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Sample records for recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene

  1. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting.

  2. Adenovirus-mediated efficient gene transfer into cultured three-dimensional organoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Fang; Wu, Ningning; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; Zhang, Junhui; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Zhengjian; Yin, Liangjun; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; Liang, Houjie; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional organoids have been recently established from various tissue-specific progenitors (such as intestinal stem cells), induced pluripotent stem cells, or embryonic stem cells. These cultured self-sustaining stem cell-based organoids may become valuable systems to study the roles of tissue-specific stem cells in tissue genesis and disease development. It is thus conceivable that effective genetic manipulations in such organoids may allow us to reconstruct disease processes and/or develop novel therapeutics. Recombinant adenoviruses are one of the most commonly used viral vectors for in vitro and in vivo gene deliveries. In this study, we investigate if adenoviruses can be used to effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured "mini-gut" organoids derived from intestinal stem cells. Using adenoviral vectors that express fluorescent proteins, we demonstrate that adenoviruses can effectively deliver transgenes into the cultured 3-D "mini-gut" organoids. The transgene expression can last at least 10 days in the cultured organoids. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated noggin expression effectively support the survival and self-renewal of mini-gut organoids, while adenovirus-mediated expression of BMP4 inhibits the self-sustainability and proliferation of the organoids. Thus, our results strongly suggest that adenovirus vectors can be explored as effective gene delivery vehicles to introduce genetic manipulations in 3-D organoids.

  3. Adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene selectively kills gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xian-Run; Li, Jian-Sheng; Niu, Ying; Miao, Li

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene (CD/TK) for selective killing of gastric cancer cells. Gastric cancer cells SCG7901 and normal gastric epithelial cell lines were infected by adenoviruses Ad-survivin/GFP and Ad-survivin/CD/TK. GFP expression and CD-TK were detected by fluorescence microscopy and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. After treatment of the infected cells with the pro-drugs ganciclovir (GCV) and/or 5-FC, the cell growth status was evaluated by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Cell cycle changes were detected using flow cytometry. In nude mice bearing human gastric cancer, the recombinant adenovirus vector was injected directly into the tumor followed by an intraperitoneal injection of GCV and/or 5-FC. The subsequent tumor growth was then observed. The GFP gene driven by survivin could be expressed within the gastric cancer line SCG7901, but not in normal gastric epithelial cells. RT-PCR demonstrated the presence of the CD/TK gene product in the infected SCG7901 cells, but not in the infected normal gastric epithelial cells. The infected gastric cancer SCG7901, but not the gastric cells, was highly sensitive to the pro-drugs. The CD/TK fusion gene system showed significantly greater efficiency than either of the single suicide genes in killing the target cells (P<0.01). Treatment of the infected cells with the pro-drugs resulted in increased cell percentage in G0-Gl phase and decreased percentage in S phase. In nude mice bearing SCG7901 cells, treatment with the double suicide gene system significantly inhibited tumor growth, showing much stronger effects than either of the single suicide genes (P<0.01). The adenovirus-mediated CD/TK double suicide gene driven by survivin promoter combined with GCV an 5-FC treatment could be an effective therapy against experimental gastric cancer with much greater efficacy than the single suicide gene CD/TK combined

  4. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and expression of human beta-glucuronidase gene in the liver, spleen, and central nervous system in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, T; Watabe, K; Uehara, K; Sly, W S; Vogler, C; Eto, Y

    1997-02-18

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (Sly syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase. A murine model of this disorder has been well characterized and used to study a number of forms of experimental therapies, including gene therapy. We produced recombinant adenovirus that expresses human beta-glucuronidase and administered this recombinant adenovirus to beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice intravenously. The beta-glucuronidase activities in liver and spleen were elevated to 40% and 20%, respectively, of the heterozygote enzymatic level at day 16. Expression persisted for at least 35 days. Pathological abnormalities of these tissues were also improved, and the elevated levels of urinary glycosaminoglycans were reduced in treated mice. However, the beta-glucuronidase activity in kidney and brain was not significantly increased. After administration of the recombinant adenovirus directly into the lateral ventricles of mutant mice, the beta-glucuronidase activity in crude brain homogenates increased to 30% of heterozygote activity. Histochemical demonstration of beta-glucuronidase activity in brain revealed that the enzymatic activity was mainly in ependymal cells and choroid. However, in some regions, the adenovirus-mediated gene expression was also evident in brain parenchyma associated with vessels and in the meninges. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated gene delivery might improve the central nervous system pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis in addition to correcting visceral pathology.

  5. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and expression of human β-glucuronidase gene in the liver, spleen, and central nervous system in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Toya; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Uehara, Keiko; Sly, William S.; Vogler, Carole; Eto, Yoshikatsu

    1997-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (Sly syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase. A murine model of this disorder has been well characterized and used to study a number of forms of experimental therapies, including gene therapy. We produced recombinant adenovirus that expresses human β-glucuronidase and administered this recombinant adenovirus to β-glucuronidase-deficient mice intravenously. The β-glucuronidase activities in liver and spleen were elevated to 40% and 20%, respectively, of the heterozygote enzymatic level at day 16. Expression persisted for at least 35 days. Pathological abnormalities of these tissues were also improved, and the elevated levels of urinary glycosaminoglycans were reduced in treated mice. However, the β-glucuronidase activity in kidney and brain was not significantly increased. After administration of the recombinant adenovirus directly into the lateral ventricles of mutant mice, the β-glucuronidase activity in crude brain homogenates increased to 30% of heterozygote activity. Histochemical demonstration of β-glucuronidase activity in brain revealed that the enzymatic activity was mainly in ependymal cells and choroid. However, in some regions, the adenovirus-mediated gene expression was also evident in brain parenchyma associated with vessels and in the meninges. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated gene delivery might improve the central nervous system pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis in addition to correcting visceral pathology. PMID:9037045

  6. Significant inhibition of Tembusu virus envelope and NS5 gene using an adenovirus-mediated short hairpin RNA delivery system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Feng, Qiang; Wei, Lei; Zhuo, Liling; Chen, Hao; Diao, Youxiang; Tang, Yi

    2017-10-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, which was first isolated in the tropics during the 1970s. Recently, a disease characterized by ovarian haemorrhage and neurological symptoms was observed in ducks in China, which threatens poultry production. However, there is no suitable vaccination strategy or effective antiviral drugs to combat TMUV infections. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a new anti-TMUV therapy. In this study, we report an efficient short hairpin RNA (shRNA) delivery strategy for the inhibition of TMUV production using an adenovirus vector system. Using specifically designed shRNAs based on the E and NS5 protein genes of TMUV, the vector-expressed viral genes, TMUV RNA replication and infectious virus production were downregulated at different levels in Vero cells, where the shRNA (NS52) was highly effective in inhibiting TMUV. Using the human adenovirus type 5 shRNA delivery system, the recombinant adenovirus (rAd-NS52) inhibited TMUV multiplication with high efficiency. Furthermore, the significant dose-dependent inhibition of viral RNA copies induced by rAd-NS52 was found in TMUV-infected cells, which could last for at least 96h post infection. Our results indicated that the adenovirus-mediated delivery of shRNAs could play an active role in future TMUV antiviral therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated overexpression of 3β-hydroxysteroid-Δ24 reductase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiuli; Jia, Dan; Zhao, Chenguang; Wang, Weiqi; Liu, Ting; Chen, Shuchao; Quan, Xiaoping; Sun, Deliang; Gao, Bing

    2014-01-01

    3β-Hydroxysteroid-Δ24 reductase (DHCR24) is a multifunctional enzyme that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and has neuroprotective and cholesterol-synthesizing activities. DHCR24 overexpression confers neuroprotection against apoptosis caused by amyloid β deposition. The present study aimed to construct two recombinant adenoviruses driving DHCR24 expression specifically in neurons. Two SYN1 promoter DNA fragments were obtained from human (h) and rat (r). Recombinant Ad-r(h)SYN1-DHCR24 was transfected into AD-293, N2A (mouse neuroblastoma), and MIN6 (mouse pancreatic carcinoma) cells. Western blot analysis showed DHCR24 was specially expressed in 293 and N2A cells, but no specific band was found in MIN6 cells. This demonstrates that the recombinant adenoviruses successfully express DHCR24, and no expression is observed in non-neuronal cells. TUNEL assay results showed apoptosis was inhibited in adenovirus-transfected neurons. Detecting reactive oxygen species by immunofluorescence, we found that adenovirus transfection inhibits apoptosis through scavenging excess reactive oxygen species. Our findings show that the recombinant DHCR24 adenoviruses induce neuron-specific DHCR24 expression, and thereby lay the foundation for further studies on DHCR24 gene therapy for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25206847

  8. Gene therapy for colorectal cancer by adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CD147 based on loss of the IGF2 imprinting system.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuqin; He, Bangshun; Chen, Jie; Sun, Huiling; Deng, Qiwen; Wang, Feng; Ying, Houqun; Liu, Xian; Lin, Kang; Peng, Hongxin; Xie, Hongguang; Wang, Shukui

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Loss of imprinting (LOI) of the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) gene is an epigenetic abnormality phenomenon in CRC. Recently observed association of CRC with cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147) could provide a novel approach for gene therapy. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of using adenovirus‑mediated siRNA targeting CD147 based on the IGF2 LOI system for targeted gene therapy of CRC. A novel adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CD147, rAd-H19-CD147mirsh, which was driven by the IGF2 imprinting system, was constructed. The results showed that the EGFP expression was detected only in the IGF2 LOI cell lines (HT-29 and HCT-8), but that no EGFP was produced in cell lines with maintenance of imprinting (MOI) (HCT116). Moreover, rAd-H19-CD147mirsh significantly inhibited the expression of CD147, decreased cell viability and invasive ability, and increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs only in the LOI cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, mice bearing HT-29 xenografted tumors, which received intratumoral administration of the rAd-H19-CD147mirsh, showed significantly reduced tumor growth and enhanced survival. We conclude that recombinant adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CD147 based on the IGF2 LOI system inhibited the growth of the LOI cells in vitro and in vivo, which would provide a novel approach for targeted CRC gene therapy.

  9. Potential of mesenchymal stem cells by adenovirus-mediated erythropoietin gene therapy approaches for bone defect.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Ding, Jian; Jiang, Liming; Shi, Ce; Ni, Shilei; Jin, Han; Li, Daowei; Sun, Hongchen

    2014-11-01

    Regeneration of large bone defects is a common clinical problem. Recent studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as a promising alternative to traditional surgical techniques. However, it is still a key question how to enhance the osteogenic potential of MSCs for possible clinical trials. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of adenovirus-mediated erythropoietin (Ad-EPO) transfer on BMSCs, we performed extensive in vitro/in vivo assays in this study. Flow cytometry analysis and the result of MTT showed that EPO could promote BMSCs proliferation. QPCR data demonstrated that EPO increased expressions of Runx2, Sp7, and Col1 in osteoblast at various time points and also increased alkaline phosphatase activity and the calcium deposition. These results indicate that EPO can increase the differentiation of osteoblast. Importantly, in vivo assays clearly demonstrate that EPO can efficiently induce new bone formation in the bone defect model. Our results strongly suggest that EPO can affect osteoblast differentiation and play important roles in bone regeneration leading to an increase in bone formation.

  10. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a modified human proinsulin gene reverses hyperglycemia in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Short, D K; Okada, S; Yamauchi, K; Pessin, J E

    1998-11-01

    The human proinsulin cDNA was introduced into a replication-defective adenovirus and was found to confer proinsulin expression to a hepatocyte (H4-II-E) cell line upon infection. A second virus was constructed in which the dibasic prohormone convertase recognition sequence was mutated to a tetrabasic furin cleavage site. Cells infected with this virus synthesized both proinsulin and mature insulin. Gel filtration chromatography, competition of insulin binding, and activation of the insulin receptor kinase activity demonstrated that this mature insulin was functionally identical to that of authentic processed insulin. Injection of these viral constructs into the external jugular vein of mice resulted in insulin gene expression in the liver. Expression from the mutated proinsulin virus dramatically improved the glycemic state of diabetic mice. However, the effects of the viral infection were transient, being maximal at approximately 5-7 days and returning to steady-state levels by 14-21 days. These data demonstrate that somatic cell insulin gene delivery by the use of recombinant adenovirus can be used to transiently reverse the diabetic state in mice.

  11. Adenovirus-mediated interleukin-35 gene transfer suppresses allergic airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Pan, Xiuhe; Peng, Xiao; Li, Shubo; Zhou, Yanchun; Zheng, Xiaoxuan; Li, Mingcai

    2015-10-01

    Asthma is thought to result from the generation of T helper type 2 (Th2) responses, leading to bronchial inflammation. Interleukin (IL)-35 is a recently described member of IL-12 cytokine family that plays a critical role in influencing Th cell differentiation and inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of adenovirus expressing IL-35 (AdIL-35) on allergic airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in a mouse model of asthma. BALB/c mice were subjected to an established model of allergic airway disease. AdIL-35 was administered intranasally and the effect of IL-35 on Th2 responses, pulmonary inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia, and AHR were assessed. Transfer of AdIL-35 significantly reduced the severity of AHR and numbers of inflammatory cells and levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-17 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, compared with administration of a control virus. Moreover, AdIL-35 elevated the numbers of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the lungs. Histological analysis showed that AdIL-35 inhibited allergic lung tissue inflammation and mucus hypersecretion. These results demonstrate that adenovirus-mediated delivery of interleukin-35 gene can mitigate allergic airway inflammation in experimental asthma and suggest that IL-35 may offer a novel therapeutic approach to treat allergic asthma.

  12. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction inhibits telomerase activity independent of its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, M; Ogawa, T; Mizumoto, K; Ueno, H; Niiyama, H; Sato, N; Nakamura, M; Tanaka, M

    1999-08-01

    Evidence for a relationship between overexpression of wild-type p53 and telomerase activity remains controversial. We investigated whether p53 gene transduction could cause telomerase inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines, focusing on the relation of transduction to growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic cell death. The cells were infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing wild-type p53 or p21WAF1 at a multiplicity of infection of 100 or were continuously exposed to 10 microM VP-16, which is well known to induce apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction caused G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and resultant growth inhibition in MIA PaCa-2 cells; the cell number 2 days after infection was 50% of preinfection value, and 13% of the cells were dead. Moreover, the transduction resulted in complete depression of telomerase activity through down-regulation of hTERT mRNA expression. In contrast, p21WAF1 gene transduction only arrested cell growth and cell cycle at G1 phase, and VP-16 treatment inhibited cell growth with G2-M arrest and apoptosis; after treatment, the cell number was 73% of pretreatment, and 12% of the cells were dead. Neither p21WAF1 gene transduction nor VP-16 treatment caused telomerase inhibition. Similar results were obtained in two other pancreatic cancer cell lines, SUIT-2 and AsPC-1. Thus, our results demonstrate that the p53 gene transduction directly inhibits telomerase activity, independent of its effects on cell growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis.

  13. Effects of Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of the Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Gene in Experimental Radiation-Induced Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shunying; Chen Yundai; Li Libing; Chen Jinlong; Wu Bin; Zhou, Xiao; Zhi Guang; Li Qingfang; Wang Rongliang; Duan Haifeng; Guo Zikuan; Yang Yuefeng; Xiao Fengjun; Wang Hua; Wang Lisheng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Irradiation to the heart may lead to late cardiovascular complications. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether adenovirus-mediated delivery of the human hepatocyte growth factor gene could reduce post-irradiation damage of the rat heart and improve heart function. Methods and Materials: Twenty rats received single-dose irradiation of 20 Gy gamma ray locally to the heart and were randomized into two groups. Two weeks after irradiation, these two groups of rats received Ad-HGF or mock adenovirus vector intramyocardial injection, respectively. Another 10 rats served as sham-irradiated controls. At post-irradiation Day 120, myocardial perfusion was tested by myocardial contrast echocardiography with contrast agent injected intravenously. At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was assessed using the Langendorff technique with an isolated working heart model, after which heart samples were collected for histological evaluation. Results: Myocardial blood flow was significantly improved in HGF-treated animals as measured by myocardial contrast echocardiography at post-irradiation Day 120 . At post-irradiation Day 180, cardiac function was significantly improved in the HGF group compared with mock vector group, as measured by left ventricular peak systolic pressure (58.80 +- 9.01 vs. 41.94 +- 6.65 mm Hg, p < 0.05), the maximum dP/dt (5634 +- 1303 vs. 1667 +- 304 mm Hg/s, p < 0.01), and the minimum dP/dt (3477 +- 1084 vs. 1566 +- 499 mm Hg/s, p < 0.05). Picrosirius red staining analysis also revealed a significant reduction of fibrosis in the HGF group. Conclusion: Based on the study findings, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer can attenuate radiation-induced cardiac injury and can preserve cardiac function.

  14. Direct cell entry of gold/iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles in adenovirus mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Kazumasa; Mukai, Yohei; Kojima, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Mai; Kiyohara, George; Yamamoto, Takao A; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Okada, Naoki; Seino, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2009-03-01

    Gold/iron-oxide MAgnetic Nanoparticles (GoldMAN) imparts useful magnetic properties to various biomolecules. Gold nanoparticles immobilized on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles allow for the conjugation of biomolecules via an Au-S bond. Here, we present a practical application by utilizing GoldMAN and a magnetic field to induce intracellular transduction. This method has great potential for application of the adenovirus gene delivery vector (Ad), widely used for in vitro/in vivo gene transfer, to Ad-resistant cells. We demonstrated that Ad was easily immobilized on GoldMAN and the Ad/GoldMAN complex was introduced into the cell by the magnetic field, which increased gene expression over 1000 times that of Ad alone. The GoldMAN penetrated the plasma membrane directly, independent of the cell-surface virus receptors and endocytosis pathway. This mechanism will contribute to improve the gene expression efficiency of Ad. This technology is a useful tool for extending Ad tropism and enhancing transduction efficiency. GoldMAN also makes possible the effective use of various biomolecules within the cell because of its interesting cell-entry mechanism.

  15. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to hypothalamic magnocellular neurons in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Vasopressin is synthesized by magnocellular neurons in supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) hypothalamic nuclei and released by their axon terminals in the neurohypophysis (NH). With its actions as an antidiuretic hormone and vasoactive agent, vasopressin plays a pivotal role in the control of body fluids and cardiovascular homeostasis. Because of its well-defined neurobiology and functional importance, the SON/PVN-NH system is ideal to establish methods for gene transfer of genetic material into specific pathways in the mouse central nervous system. In these studies, we compared the efficiency of transferring the gene lacZ, encoding for beta-galactosidase (beta-gal), versus a gene encoding for green fluorescent protein by using replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) vectors in adult mice. Transfection with viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) plaque-forming units per coverslip of NH, PVN, and SON in dissociated, cultured cells caused efficient transfection without cytotoxicity. However, over an extended period of time, higher levels (50% to 75% of the cells) of beta-gal expression were detected in comparison with green fluorescent protein (5% to 50% of the cells). With the use of a stereotaxic approach, the pituitary glands of mice were injected with Ad (4 x 10(6) plaque-forming units). In material from these animals, we were able to visualize the expression of the beta-gal gene in the NH and in magnocellular neurons of both the PVN and SON. The results of these experiments indicate that Ad-Rous sarcoma virus promoter-beta-gal is taken up by nerve terminals at the injection site (NH) and retrogradely transported to the soma of the neurons projecting to the NH. We conclude that the application of these experimental approaches will provide powerful tools for physiological studies and potential approaches to deliver therapeutic genes to treat diseases.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to cells of the magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Haskell, R. E.; Johnson, R. F.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Davidson, B. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the optimum conditions for using replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) to transfer the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei and cells of the neurohypophysis (NH). As indicated by characterizing cell survival over 15 days in culture and in electrophysiological whole cell patch-clamp studies, viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) pfu/coverslip did not affect viability of transfected PVN and NH cultured cells from preweanling rats. At 2 x 10(7) pfu, GFP gene expression was higher (40% of GFP-positive cells) and more sustained (up to 15 days). Using a stereotaxic approach in adult rats, we were able to directly transduce the PVN, SON, and NH and visualize gene expression in coronal brain slices and in the pituitary 4 days after injection of Ad. In animals receiving NH injections of Ad, the virus was retrogradely transported to PVN and SON neurons as indicated by the appearance of GFP-positive neurons in cultures of dissociated cells from those brain nuclei and by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses of PVN and SON tissues. Adenoviral concentrations of up to 8 x 10(6) pfu injected into the NH did not affect cell viability and did not cause inflammatory responses. Adenoviral injection into the pituitary enabled the selective delivery of genes to the soma of magnocellular neurons. The experimental approaches described here provide potentially useful strategies for the treatment of disordered expression of the hormones vasopressin or oxytocin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to cells of the magnocellular hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Haskell, R. E.; Johnson, R. F.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Davidson, B. L.; Johnson, A. K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the optimum conditions for using replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) to transfer the gene for the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei and cells of the neurohypophysis (NH). As indicated by characterizing cell survival over 15 days in culture and in electrophysiological whole cell patch-clamp studies, viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) pfu/coverslip did not affect viability of transfected PVN and NH cultured cells from preweanling rats. At 2 x 10(7) pfu, GFP gene expression was higher (40% of GFP-positive cells) and more sustained (up to 15 days). Using a stereotaxic approach in adult rats, we were able to directly transduce the PVN, SON, and NH and visualize gene expression in coronal brain slices and in the pituitary 4 days after injection of Ad. In animals receiving NH injections of Ad, the virus was retrogradely transported to PVN and SON neurons as indicated by the appearance of GFP-positive neurons in cultures of dissociated cells from those brain nuclei and by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses of PVN and SON tissues. Adenoviral concentrations of up to 8 x 10(6) pfu injected into the NH did not affect cell viability and did not cause inflammatory responses. Adenoviral injection into the pituitary enabled the selective delivery of genes to the soma of magnocellular neurons. The experimental approaches described here provide potentially useful strategies for the treatment of disordered expression of the hormones vasopressin or oxytocin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  18. [The in vitro antitumor responses of murine peritoneal macrophages induced by adenovirus-mediated IL-4 and/or M-CSF gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Cao, X; Lei, H

    1996-07-01

    To observe the antitumor responses of murine peritoneal macrophages induced by adenovirus-mediated IL-4 and/or M-CSF gene transfer. The IL-4 gene and/or M-CSF gene was transfected into murine peritoneal macrophages-mediated by adenovirus and the levels of IL-4, M-CSF, TNF, IL-1 and NO in the supernatant of the macrophages and the cytotoxicity of the macrophages to tumor cells were assayed. The high levels of IL-4 and M-CSF could be detected in the supernatant of macrophages 18 hours after being infected with advenovirus expressing IL-4 or M-CSF. The cytotoxicity of the macrophages engineered to secrete IL-4 or M-CSF increased significantly, and when IL-4 gene and M-CSF gene were cotransfected into the macrophages or the macrophages were co-stimulated with LPS, the cytotoxicity increased even more significantly. The levels of TNF, IL-land NO in the supernatant of macrophages also increased. The results demonstrated that transfection of IL-4 and/or M-CSF gene into macrophages could augment their anti-tumor immunity.

  19. Efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in combination with radiation therapy in an orthotopic mouse prostate cancer model.

    PubMed

    Freytag, Svend O; Paielli, Dell; Wing, Mark; Rogulski, Ken; Brown, Steve; Kolozsvary, Andy; Seely, John; Barton, Ken; Dragovic, Alek; Kim, Jae Ho

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in an adjuvant setting with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in an experimental prostate cancer model in preparation for a Phase I clinical study in humans. For efficacy studies, i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumors were established in immune-deficient mice. Tumors were injected with the lytic, replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus containing a cytosine deaminase (CD)/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK) fusion gene. Two days later, mice were administered 1 week of 5-fluorocytosine + ganciclovir (GCV) prodrug therapy and fractionated doses of EBRT (trimodal therapy). Tumor control rate of trimodal therapy was compared to that of EBRT alone. For toxicology studies, immune-competent male mice received a single intraprostatic injection (10(10) vp) of the replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus. Two days later, mice were administered 4 weeks of 5-fluorocytosine + GCV prodrug therapy and 56 Gy EBRT to the pelvic region. The toxicity of trimodal therapy was assessed by histopathologic analysis of major organs and clinical chemistries. In both the i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumor models, trimodal therapy significantly improved primary tumor control beyond that of EBRT alone. In the DU145 model, trimodal therapy resulted in a tumor growth delay (70 days) that was more than twice that (32 days) of EBRT alone. Whereas EBRT failed to eradicate DU145 tumors, trimodal therapy resulted in 25% tumor cure. In the LNCaP C4-2 tumor model, EBRT slowed the growth of intraprostatic tumors, but resulted in no tumor cures, and 57% of the mice developed retroperitoneal lymph node metastases at 3 months. By contrast, trimodal therapy resulted in 44% tumor cure and reduced significantly the percentage (13%) of lymph node metastases relative to EBRT alone. Overall, trimodal therapy was associated

  20. Immune response and effect of adenovirus-mediated human BMP-2 gene transfer on the repair of segmental tibial bone defects in goats.

    PubMed

    Xu, X Leon; Tang, Tingting; Dai, Kerong; Zhu, Zhen'an; Guo, X Edward; Yu, Chaofeng; Lou, Jueren

    2005-10-01

    Tissue-engineered bone may be used for filling bone defects. There are, however, no reports on this technique used in large animals. We evaluated the effectiveness of, and immune response in repairing diaphyseal bone defects by gene transfer using bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). We used adenovirus-mediated human BMP-2 (Adv-hBMP-2) gene-transduced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) to repair 2.1-cm segmental tibial bone defects in goats (group I, n = 7). An Adv-ssgal-transduced BMSC group (group II, n = 5), a non-transduced BMSC group (group III, n = 5), and an untreated group (group IV, n = 2) were used as controls. Self-secreted extracellular matrix was used as cellular carrier. Radiographic and histomorphometric examination demonstrated more callus in the bone defects of group I compared to other groups. Week 24 after implantation, the defect healing rates of groups I, II, III, and IV were 6/7, 1/5, 2/5, and 0/2, respectively. The maximum compressive strength of new tissue in the bone defects of group I was higher than those of groups II and III. Temporary cellular and persistent humoral immune responses against adenovirus were detected after hBMP-2 gene transfer. We found that Adv-hBMP-2 genetransduced BMSCs had superior osteoinductivity in the repair of tibial bone defects in goats, but it could cause temporary cellular and persistent humoral immune responses against adenovirus.

  1. Hypercholesterolemia in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice and its reversal by adenovirus-mediated gene delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, S; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L; Gerard, R D; Hammer, R E; Herz, J

    1993-01-01

    We employed homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells to produce mice lacking functional LDL receptor genes. Homozygous male and female mice lacking LDL receptors (LDLR-/- mice) were viable and fertile. Total plasma cholesterol levels were twofold higher than those of wild-type litter-mates, owing to a seven- to ninefold increase in intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) and LDL without a significant change in HDL. Plasma triglyceride levels were normal. The half-lives for intravenously administered 125I-VLDL and 125I-LDL were prolonged by 30-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively, but the clearance of 125I-HDL was normal in the LDLR-/- mice. Unlike wild-type mice, LDLR-/- mice responded to moderate amounts of dietary cholesterol (0.2% cholesterol/10% coconut oil) with a major increase in the cholesterol content of IDL and LDL particles. The elevated IDL/LDL level of LDLR-/- mice was reduced to normal 4 d after the intravenous injection of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus encoding the human LDL receptor driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter. The virus restored expression of LDL receptor protein in the liver and increased the clearance of 125I-VLDL. We conclude that the LDL receptor is responsible in part for the low levels of VLDL, IDL, and LDL in wild-type mice and that adenovirus-encoded LDL receptors can acutely reverse the hypercholesterolemic effects of LDL receptor deficiency. Images PMID:8349823

  2. Silk-Elastinlike Hydrogel Improves the Safety of Adenovirus-Mediated Gene-Directed Enzyme-Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Joshua A.; Price, Robert A.; Greish, Khaled; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant Silk-Elastinlike Protein polymers (SELPs) are well-known for their highly tunable properties on both the molecular and macroscopic hydrogel level. One specific structure of these polymers, SELP-815K, has been investigated as an injectable controlled delivery system for the treatment of head and neck cancer via a gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) approach. Due to its pore size and gelation properties in vivo, SELP restricts the distribution and controls the release of therapeutic viruses for up to one month. It has been shown that SELP-mediated delivery significantly improves therapeutic outcome of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system in xenograft models of human head and neck cancer. However little is known about potential benefits of this approach with regard to toxicity in the presence of a fully intact immune system. The studies presented here were designed to assess the change in toxicity of the SELP mediated viral delivery compared to free viral injection in a non-tumor bearing immune competent mouse model. Toxicity was assessed at 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks via body weight monitoring, complete blood count (CBC), and blood chemistry. It was found that in the acute and subacute phases (weeks 1-4) there is significant toxicity in groups combining the virus and the prodrug, and matrix-mediated gene delivery with SELP demonstrates a reduction in toxicity from the 2 week time point through the 4 week time point. At the end of the subchronic phase (12 weeks), signs of toxicity had subsided in both groups. Based on these results, recombinant SELPs offer a significant reduction in toxicity of virus-mediated GDEPT treatment compared to free virus injection in the acute and subacute phases. PMID:20586469

  3. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery of interleukin-10, but not transforming growth factor β, ameliorates the induction of Graves’ hyperthyroidism in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, O; Mizutori, Y; Takamura, N; Yamasaki, H; Kita, A; Kuwahara, H; Nagayama, Y

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) are well known anti-inflammatory cytokines. We have studied the effect of adenovirus-mediated IL-10 and TGF-β gene delivery on the induction of Graves’ hyperthyroidism in our mouse model that involves repeated injections of adenovirus expressing the thyrotropin receptor A subunit (AdTSHR). We first constructed adenoviruses encoding the two cytokines (AdIL10 and AdTGFβ) and confirmed expression by in vitro infection of COS cells. Susceptible BALB/c mice were injected twice with AdTSHR alone or together with AdIL10 or AdTGFβ, and bled two weeks after the second immunization. Significantly elevated serum thyroxine levels were seen in 26% of mice immunized with AdTSHR and AdIL10 versus 61% with AdTSHR alone. Levels of thyroid stimulating antibody, but not nonstimulating antibody, were also decreased, and TSHR-specific splenocyte secretion of interferon-γ in recall assays was impaired in mice treated with AdIL10. In contrast, AdTGFβ had little effect on hyperthyroidism. Overall, our findings demonstrate that gene delivery of IL-10, but not TGF-β, suppresses the induction of Graves’ hyperthyroidism in a mouse model. However, the effect of IL-10 is less powerful than we observed previously with T helper type 2-inducers including adenovirus expressing IL-4, Shistosoma mansoni infection or α-galactosylceramide. PMID:16045729

  4. Extensive beta-glucuronidase activity in murine central nervous system after adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to brain.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, A; Stein, C; Derksen, T; Yang, G; Anderson, R D; Davidson, B L

    1998-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII), caused by beta-glucuronidase deficiency, is a classic lysosomal storage disease. In the central nervous system (CNS), there is widespread pathology with distention of vacuoles in neurons and glia. An approach to therapy for MPS VII would require extensive delivery of enzyme to the CNS and subsequent uptake by the affected cells. In this study we show that intrastriatal injection of recombinant adenovirus encoding beta-glucuronidase (Ad betagluc) to MPS VII or wild-type mice results in focal, intense beta-glucuronidase mRNA expression near the injection site. Further, histochemical staining for enzyme activity showed that beta-glucuronidase activity extended well beyond transduced cells. Activity was detected throughout the ipsilateral striatum as well as in the corpus callosum, ventricles, and bilateral neocortex. Similarly, after injection into the right lateral ventricle or cisterna magna, enzyme activity was present in the ependymal cells of the ventricles, in the subarachnoid spaces, and also in the underlying cortex (150-500 microm from ependyma). The distribution of enzyme was most extensive 21 days after gene transfer to normal mouse brain, with more than 50% of the hemisphere positive for beta-glucuronidase activity. Eighty-four days after adenovirus injection a substantial level of enzyme expression remained (>40% of hemisphere positive for beta-glucuronidase activity). Histological sections from striatum of beta-glucuronidase-deficient mice injected with Ad betagluc showed a marked reduction in the number of distended vacuoles in both neurons and glia, as compared with uninjected striatum. Importantly, correction was noted in both hemispheres. Our finding that a relatively small number of transduced cells produce enzyme that reaches a large proportion of the CNS has favorable implications in developing direct gene transfer therapies for lysosomal storage disorders.

  5. Adenovirus-mediated ING4 Gene Transfer in Osteosarcoma Suppresses Tumor Growth via Induction of Apoptosis and Inhibition of Tumor Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Xie, Yufeng; Sheng, Weihua; Miao, Jingcheng; Yang, Jicheng

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitor of growth (ING) family proteins have been defined as candidate tumor suppressors. ING4 as a novel member of ING family has potential tumor-suppressive effects via multiple pathways. However, the therapeutic effect of adenovirus-mediated ING4 (Ad-ING4) gene transfer in human osteosarcoma is still unknown. In this study, we explored the in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of Ad-ING4 in human osteosarcoma and its potential mechanism using a MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line. We demonstrated that Ad-ING4 induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis, upregulated the expression of P21, P27 and Bax, downregulated the Bcl-2 expression and activated Caspase-3 in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells. Moreover, intratumoral injections of Ad-ING4 in athymic nude mice bearing MG-63 human osteosarcoma tumors significantly suppressed osteosarcoma xenografted tumor growth, increased the expression of P21, P27 and Bax, reduced the Bcl-2 and CD34 expression and microvessel density (MVD) in tumors. This retarded MG-63 osteosarcoma growth in vitro and in vivo in an athymic nude mouse model elicited by Ad-ING4 was closely associated with the increase in the expression of cell cycle-related molecules P21 and P27, decrease in the ratio of anti- to pro-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2/Bax followed by the activation of Caspase-3 leading to apoptosis via intrinsic apoptotic pathways, and the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Thus, our results indicate that Ad-ING4 is a potential candidate for human osteosarcoma gene therapy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Gene therapy for human nasopharyngeal carcinoma by adenovirus-mediated transfer of human p53, GM-CSF, and B7-1 genes in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Su-Ping; Wang, Lan; Wang, Hua; Wu, Bin; Han, Ying; Wang, Li-Sheng; Wu, Chu-Tse

    2008-10-01

    Incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remains high in endemic regions. Prevention of tumor recurrences and metastases is a crucial approach to improve therapeutic outcome in NPC patients. In this study, we investigated the effects of the cotransfer of the tumor suppressor gene, p53, in combination with the immunostimulatory genes, GM-CSF and B7-1, on tumor regression and subsequent tumor recurrence. We constructed a recombinant adenovirus carrying human wild-type p53, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and B7-1 genes (Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1), which mediated high-level expression of these three genes in NPC CNE-1 cells. Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 infection inhibited the growth of CNE-1 cells and induced tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in vitro. In CNE-1 xenograft tumor models in huPBL-nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice, an intratumoral injection of Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 resulted in a reduced tumor burden, compared to normal saline (NS) and Ad-p53 controls. Tumors in the Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 group displayed diffuse necrosis and infiltration of human T-cells. Further, the tumor occurrence of CNE-1 cell rechallenge largely decreased after the primary tumor was intratumorally injected with Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 in the HuPBL-NOD/SCID mice model. Only 2 of 8 (25%) animals in the Ad-p53/GM-CSF/B7-1 group had developed measurable tumors, which demonstrated extensive necrosis and much more human T-cell infiltration, compared to 5 of 7 (71%) in the NS and Ad-p53 groups. Therefore, the adenovirus-mediated introduction of p53, GM-CSF, and B7-1 genes could improve local control and prevent the recurrence or metastases of NPC tumors, which suggests a potential therapeutic value in NPC treatment.

  7. Prospective Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Oncolytic Adenovirus-Mediated Cytotoxic Gene Therapy in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, Svend O.; Stricker, Hans; Lu, Mei; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Aref, Ibrahim; Pradhan, Deepak; Levin, Kenneth; Kim, Jae Ho; Peabody, James; Siddiqui, Farzan; Barton, Kenneth; Pegg, Jan; Zhang, Yingshu; Cheng, Jingfang; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bourgeois, Renee; Gupta, Nilesh; Lane, Zhaoli; Rodriguez, Ron; DeWeese, Theodore; and others

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of combining oncolytic adenovirus-mediated cytotoxic gene therapy (OAMCGT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive either OAMCGT plus IMRT (arm 1; n=21) or IMRT only (arm 2; n=23). The primary phase 2 endpoint was acute (≤90 days) toxicity. Secondary endpoints included quality of life (QOL), prostate biopsy (12-core) positivity at 2 years, freedom from biochemical/clinical failure (FFF), freedom from metastases, and survival. Results: Men in arm 1 exhibited a greater incidence of low-grade influenza-like symptoms, transaminitis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia than men in arm 2. There were no significant differences in gastrointestinal or genitourinary events or QOL between the 2 arms. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from 37 men (84%). Thirty-three percent of men in arm 1 were biopsy-positive versus 58% in arm 2, representing a 42% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm (P=.13). There was a 60% relative reduction in biopsy positivity in the investigational arm in men with <50% positive biopsy cores at baseline (P=.07). To date, 1 patient in each arm exhibited biochemical failure (arm 1, 4.8%; arm 2, 4.3%). No patient developed hormone-refractory or metastatic disease, and none has died from prostate cancer. Conclusions: Combining OAMCGT with IMRT does not exacerbate the most common side effects of prostate radiation therapy and suggests a clinically meaningful reduction in positive biopsy results at 2 years in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

  8. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into normal rabbit arteries results in prolonged vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, K D; Dunn, P F; Owens, J W; Schulick, A H; Virmani, R; Sukhova, G; Libby, P; Dichek, D A

    1995-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are capable of high efficiency in vivo arterial gene transfer, and are currently in use as therapeutic agents in animal models of vascular disease. However, despite substantial data on the ability of viruses to cause vascular inflammation and proliferation, and the presence in current adenovirus vectors of viral open reading frames that are translated in vivo, no study has examined the effect of adenovirus vectors alone on the arterial phenotype. In a rabbit model of gene transfer into a normal artery, we examined potential vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal proliferation resulting from exposure to replication-defective adenovirus. Exposure of normal arteries to adenovirus vectors resulted in: (a) pronounced infiltration of T cells throughout the artery wall; (b) upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in arterial smooth muscle cells; (c) neointimal hyperplasia. These findings were present both 10 and 30 d after gene transfer, with no evidence of a decline in severity over time. Adenovirus vectors have pleiotropic effects on the arterial wall and cause significant pathology. Interpretation of experimental protocols that use adenovirus vectors to address either biological or therapeutic issues should take these observations into account. These observations should also prompt the design of more inert gene transfer vectors. Images PMID:8675667

  9. Adenovirus-Mediated Human Paraoxonase 1 Gene Transfer to Provide Protection Against the Toxicity of the Organophosphorus Pesticide Toxicant Diazoxon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    tested whether PON1 gene transfer using adenovirus provides protection against the toxicity of the OP diazoxon. Using an adenovirus construct...expressed PON1 at 600-3480 U ml(-1) on day 5 post-treatment, which is 8-50 fold above endogenous. Six mice expressing hPON1 survived 2LD(50) doses of diazoxon

  10. Aminoclay as a highly effective cationic vehicle for enhancing adenovirus-mediated gene transfer through nanobiohybrid complex formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Jin; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Lim, Soo-Jeong

    2017-02-01

    Electrostatic complexation of adenovirus (Ad) with cationic lipids or polymers has been shown to be an effective means for overcoming the limitations of adenoviral vectors and enhancing gene-transfer efficacy. However, such complexation causes cytotoxicity, limiting the use of this strategy. The present study explored the potential of 3-aminopropyl functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (aminoclay) as a cationic vehicle for improving Ad-mediated gene transfer without inducing cytotoxicity. Aminoclay complexation produced a dose-dependent increase in Ad-mediated transgene expression in both Ad infection-sensitive and -refractory cells, thereby greatly lowering the Ad dose required for transgene expression. Unlike the case for cationic lipids (Lipofectamine) or polymers (Polybrene), the enhancement effect of aminoclay was not accompanied by significant cytotoxicity regardless of cell lines and it was not observed for nonviral plasmid vectors. Physical characterization studies revealed that nanobiohybrid complexes formed between aminoclay and Ad particles through electrostatic interactions, creating aggregates of Ad particles whose surface was shielded with aminoclay nanosheet oligomers. It appears that aminoclay complexation changes the surface charge of Ad particles from a negative to a highly positive value and thus increases Ad binding to cellular membranes, thereby providing an additional cellular entry mechanism, namely caveolae-dependent endocytosis. Aminoclay-Ad nanobiohybrids may serve as a next-generation efficient, versatile and biocompatible gene-delivery carrier. Electrostatic complexation of adenovirus with cationic materials has been shown to be an effective means for enhancing gene-transfer efficacy in vitro. However, such complexation causes cytotoxicity, limiting the use of this strategy. The present study explored the potential of a synthesized organoclay 3-aminopropyl functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (aminoclay) as a cationic vehicle for

  11. Potential of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy for use in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Daisuke; Shiraha, Hidenori; Kato, Hironari; Nagahara, Teruya; Iwamuro, Masaya; Kataoka, Junro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Watanabe, Masami; Takaki, Akinobu; Nouso, Kazuhiro; Nasu, Yasutomo; Yagi, Takahito; Kumon, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2014-05-01

    The reduced expression in immortalized cells REIC/the dickkopf 3 (Dkk-3) gene, tumor suppressor gene, is downregulated in various malignant tumors. In a prostate cancer study, an adenovirus vector carrying the REIC/Dkk-3 gene (Ad-REIC) induces apoptosis. In the current study, we examined the effects of REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy in pancreatic cancer. REIC/Dkk-3 expression was assessed by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry in the pancreatic cancer cell lines (ASPC1, MIAPaCa2, Panc1, BxPC3, SUIT-2, KLM1, and T3M4) and pancreatic cancer tissues. The Ad-REIC agent was used to investigate the apoptotic effect in vitro and antitumor effects in vivo. We also assessed the therapeutic effects of Ad-REIC therapy with gemcitabine. The REIC/Dkk-3 expression was lost in the pancreatic cancer cell lines and decreased in pancreatic cancer tissues. Ad-REIC induced apoptosis and inhibited cell growth in the ASPC1 and MIAPaCa2 lines in vitro, and Ad-REIC inhibited tumor growth in the mouse xenograft model using ASPC1 cells. The antitumor effect was further enhanced in combination with gemcitabine. This synergistic effect may be caused by the suppression of autophagy via the enhancement of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Ad-REIC induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer cell lines. REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic tool for pancreatic cancer. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Inhibition of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis by systemic and subconjunctival adenovirus-mediated transfer of the viral IL-10 gene

    PubMed Central

    De Kozak, Y; Thillaye-Goldenberg, B; Naud, M -C; Viana Da Costa, A; Auriault, C; Verwaerde, C

    2002-01-01

    Pathological ocular manifestations result from a dysregulation in the balance between proinflammatory type 1 cytokines and regulatory type 2 cytokines. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine with potent immunosuppressive effects. We have examined the efficiency of viral IL-10 adenovirus (Ad-vIL-10)-mediated gene transfer on experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) induced in mice and rats by purified retinal autoantigens, respectively, interphotoreceptor binding protein (IRBP) and S-antigen (S-Ag). B10-A mice that received a single unilateral injection of Ad-vIL-10 in the retro-orbital sinus venosus performed 1 day before immunization with IRBP in the footpads showed high levels of circulating vIL-10 in their sera and a significant reduction in pathological ocular manifestations. Lower levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 were found in cellular supernatants from IRBP-stimulated splenic cells in these treated mice. The local effect on ocular disease of vIL-10 was neutralized completely by injection of a monoclonal anti-vIL-10 antibody, demonstrating the specificity of the treatment. To determine whether the transfer of the vIL-10 gene within the periocular tissues of the eye could prevent acute EAU, a subconjunctival injection of Ad-vIL-10 was performed in Lewis rats simultaneously with S-antigen in the footpads. This injection determined in situ vIL-10 expression with very low circulating vIL-10 and led to a significant reduction of EAU without affecting the systemic immune response. The present results suggest that Ad-mediated gene transfer resulting in systemic and local expression of vIL-10 provide a promising approach for the treatment of uveitis. PMID:12390308

  13. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Haixi; Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu; Li, Lili; Ren, Guosheng; Xu, Yongzhu; Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Tingxiu

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  14. Augmentation of lung liquid clearance via adenovirus-mediated transfer of a Na,K-ATPase beta1 subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Factor, P; Saldias, F; Ridge, K; Dumasius, V; Zabner, J; Jaffe, H A; Blanco, G; Barnard, M; Mercer, R; Perrin, R; Sznajder, J I

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that alveolar Na,K-ATPases play an important role in active Na+ transport and lung edema clearance. We reasoned that overexpression of Na,K-ATPase subunit genes could increase Na,K-ATPase function in lung epithelial cells and edema clearance in rat lungs. To test this hypothesis we produced replication deficient human type 5 adenoviruses containing cDNAs for the rat alpha1 and beta1 Na,K-ATPase subunits (adMRCMValpha1 and adMRCMVbeta1, respectively). As compared to controls, adMRCMVbeta1 increased beta1 subunit expression and Na,K-ATPase function by 2. 5-fold in alveolar type 2 epithelial cells and rat airway epithelial cell monolayers. No change in Na,K-ATPase function was noted after infection with adMRCMValpha1. Rat lungs infected with adMRCMVbeta1, but not adMRCMValpha1, had increased beta1 protein levels and lung liquid clearance 7 d after tracheal instillation. Alveolar epithelial permeability to Na+ and mannitol was mildly increased in animals infected with adMRCMVbeta1 and a similar Escherichia coli lacZ-expressing virus. Our data shows, for the first time, that transfer of the beta1 Na,K-ATPase subunit gene augments Na,K-ATPase function in epithelial cells and liquid clearance in rat lungs. Conceivably, overexpression of Na,K-ATPases could be used as a strategy to augment lung liquid clearance in patients with pulmonary edema. PMID:9769335

  15. Anti-prostate cancer effects of CTL cell induction in vitro by recombinant adenovirus mediated PSMA/4-1BBL dendritic cells: an immunotherapy study.

    PubMed

    Sui, C-G; Wu, D; Meng, F-D; Yang, M-H; Jiang, Y-H

    2015-06-29

    This study aimed to examine anti-prostate cancer immune response induced by dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with PSMA/4-1BBL recombinant adenoviruses in vitro. Ad-PSMA, Ad-4-1BBL, and Ad-GFP were transfected into DCs derived from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. Ad-PSMA/4-1BBL-DC, Ad-PSMA-DC, Ad-4-1BBL-DC, Ad-GFP-DC, and normal-DC, PSMA and 4-1BBL protein levels in DCs were detected by western blot. IL-12, IFN-γ and IL-10 were measured by ELISA. Mixed lymphocyte reaction and the cytotoxicity of each group targeted to LNCap, Du145, and 22RV prostate cancer cells were determined by CCK-8 assay. PSMA and 4-1BBL protein could express on DC successfully, the IL-12 supernatant content (134.29 ± 2.22 pg) was higher than others (P < 0.05). The ability to stimulate autologous T lymphocyte proliferation in the co-transfection group was higher than others (P < 0.05). When the DCs were co-cultured with CTLs, the PSMA/4-1BBL-DC-CTL group showed the highest content of IFN-γ (1176.10 ± 14.37pg/5 x 10(6) cells), but the lowest IL-10 content (75.14 ± 2.01 pg/5 x 10(6) cells) (P < 0.05), and the strongest anti-tumor effect when the effector to target ratio was 40:1, along with a higher killing ratio of LNCap cells than others (P < 0.05). Overall, Mature DCs transfected with Ad-PSMA/4- 1BBL not only showed high secretion of IL-12, but also induced CTLs to stimulate and enhance the killing effect of PSMA specific effector cells to PSMA positively expressing prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the DCs infected with two kinds of tumor-associated antigens would induce more effective tumor-specific CTL induction.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of endostatin in vivo results in high level of transgene expression and inhibition of tumor growth and metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Bernhard V.; Martinet, Olivier; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Mandeli, John; Woo, Savio L. C.

    2000-04-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis has been shown to be an effective strategy in cancer therapy in mice. However, its widespread application has been hampered by difficulties in the large-scale production of the antiangiogenic proteins. This limitation may be resolved by in vivo delivery and expression of the antiangiogenic genes. We have constructed a recombinant adenovirus that expresses murine endostatin that is biologically active both in vitro, as determined in endothelial cell proliferation assays, and in vivo, by suppression of angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor 165. Persistent high serum levels of endostatin (605-1740 ng/ml; mean, 936 ng/ml) were achieved after systemic administration of the vector to nude mice, which resulted in significant reduction of the growth rates and the volumes of JC breast carcinoma and Lewis lung carcinoma (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). In addition, the endostatin vector treatment completely prevented the formation of pulmonary micrometastases in Lewis lung carcinoma (P = 0.0001). Immunohistochemical staining of the tumors demonstrated a decreased number of blood vessels in the treatment group versus the controls. In conclusion, the present study clearly demonstrates the potential of vector-mediated antiangiogenic gene therapy as a component in cancer therapy.

  17. Adenovirus-mediated tissue factor pathway inhibitor gene transfer induces apoptosis by blocking the phosphorylation of JAK-2/STAT-3 pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Yejing; Chi, Jinyu; Hu, Jing; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yin, Xinhua

    2012-10-01

    In our previous study, we have demonstrated that tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) gene could induce vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis. This study was conducted to investigate whether the overexpression of the TFPI gene can induce VSMC apoptosis by inhibiting JAK-2/STAT-3 pathway phosphorylation and thereby inhibiting the expression of such downstream targets as the apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cell cycle protein cyclin D1. The effect of TFPI on the expression of survivin, a central molecule in cell survival, was also investigated. Rat VSMCs were infected with recombinant adenovirus containing either the TFPI (Ad-TFPI) or LacZ (Ad-LacZ) gene or DMEM in vitro. TFPI expression was detected by ELISA. TUNEL staining and electron microscope were carried out to determine the apoptosis of VSMCs. The expression levels of JAK-2, p-JAK-2, STAT-3, p-STAT-3, cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and survivin were examined by western blot analysis. TFPI protein was detected in the TFPI group after gene transfer and the peak expression was at the 3rd day. At the 3rd, 5th and 7th days after gene transfer, the apoptotic rates by TUNEL assay in the TFPI group were 10.91 ± 1.66%, 13.46 ± 1.28% and 17.04 ± 1.95%, respectively, whereas those in the LacZ group were 3.28 ± 0.89%, 4.01 ± 0.72% and 4.89 ± 1.17%, respectively. We observed cell contraction, slight mitochondrial swelling, nuclear pyknosis and apoptotic body formation in TFPI-treated VSMCs using electron microscopy. JAK-2, p-JAK-2, STAT-3, p-STAT-3, cyclin D1 and Bcl-2, which are all involved in the JAK-2/STAT-3 pathway, were detected in the VSMCs on the 3rd, 5th and 7th days after gene transfer, which is consistent with previously demonstrated time points when VSMCs apoptosis occurred. The expression levels of p-JAK-2, p-STAT-3, cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 were significantly decreased over time in the TFPI group (each P<0.05) but not in the Ad-LacZ and DMEM groups. However, this attenuation of expression was not observed for JAK-2

  18. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase into hamsters increases hepatic enzyme activity and reduces plasma total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Spady, D K; Cuthbert, J A; Willard, M N; Meidell, R S

    1995-01-01

    Clinical interventions that accelerate conversion of cholesterol to bile acids reduce circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. The initial and rate-limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase. To examine the effects of transient primary overexpression of this enzyme on sterol metabolism and lipoprotein transport, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus in which a cDNA encoding rat 7 alpha-hydroxylase is expressed from the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (AdCMV7 alpha). Syrian hamsters administered AdCMV7 alpha intravenously accumulated transgene-specific mRNA in the liver and demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in hepatic microsomal 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity. The increased conversion of cholesterol to bile acids resulted in a compensatory increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. In addition, overexpression of 7 alpha-hydroxylase reduced the rate of LDL cholesterol entry into the plasma space and, in animals maintained on a Western-type diet, restored hepatic LDL receptor expression. As a consequence, plasma LDL concentrations fell by approximately 60% in animals maintained on control diet and by approximately 75% in animals consuming a Western-type diet. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were reduced to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate that transient upregulation of bile acid synthesis by direct transfer of a 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene favorably alters circulating lipoprotein profiles and suggest one potential molecular target for genetic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. Images PMID:7635963

  19. Towards Fibroid Gene Therapy: Adenovirus-Mediated Delivery of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Thymidine Kinase Gene/Ganciclovir Shrinks Uterine Leiomyoma in the Eker Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Memy; Zhang, Dong; Salama, Salama; Hamada, Farid; Arafa, Hossam; Fouad, Hala; Walker, Cheryl; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims The objective of this study was to assess in vivo gene therapy of uterine leiomyomas in the Eker rat model using adenovirus (Ad)-mediated delivery of herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase gene (HSV1TK) followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment. Methods We randomized 27 female Eker rats with MRI-confirmed uterine leiomyomas to a single treatment with direct intra-tumor injection of Ad-HSV1TK/GCV, Ad-LacZ/GCV, or medium alone. Samples were collected from tumors, other body organs, and blood at 10, 20, and 30 days after treatment to assess the safety and efficacy of the treatment. Results Ad-HSV1TK/GCV treatment significantly decreased uterine fibroid volume by 75 ± 16, 58.7 ± 6.3, and 67.5 ± 27.5%, of the pretreatment volume at days 10, 20, and 30, respectively. Ad-HSV1TK/GCV increased caspase-3 activity, Bax expression, and TUNEL apoptosis marker, and it decreased cyclin D1, PCNA, Bcl2, and PARP protein expressions. Ad transfection induced local CD4+ and CD8+ infiltration and serum anti-Ad antibodies. Additionally, Ad transfection was tumor-localized and safe to non-target tissues. Conclusion These studies demonstrate a marked efficiency and high safety for the Ad-HSV1TK/GCV therapeutic approach in the context of Eker rat uterine leiomyomas and provide essential preclinical data for the development of Ad-HSV1TK/GCV gene therapy for uterine fibroids. PMID:19325244

  20. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-09-14

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  1. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-09-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  2. A super gene expression system enhances the anti-glioma effects of adenovirus-mediated REIC/Dkk-3 gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Tetsuo; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Shimazu, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ishida, Joji; Otani, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Toshihiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Watanabe, Masami; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Date, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression in immortalized cells/Dickkopf-3 (REIC/Dkk-3) is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic gene in many human cancers. Recently, an adenovirus REIC vector with the super gene expression system (Ad-SGE-REIC) was developed to increase REIC/Dkk-3 expression and enhance therapeutic effects compared with the conventional adenoviral vector (Ad-CAG-REIC). In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of Ad-SGE-REIC on malignant glioma. In U87ΔEGFR and GL261 glioma cells, western blotting confirmed that robust upregulation of REIC/Dkk-3 expression occurred in Ad-SGE-REIC-transduced cells, most notably after transduction at a multiplicity of infection of 10. Cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-SGE-REIC resulted in a time-dependent and significant reduction in the number of malignant glioma cells attaching to the bottom of culture wells. Xenograft and syngeneic mouse intracranial glioma models treated with Ad-SGE-REIC had significantly longer survival than those treated with the control vector Ad-LacZ or with Ad-CAG-REIC. This study demonstrated the anti-glioma effect of Ad-SGE-REIC, which may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma. PMID:27625116

  3. Adenoviral mediated interferon-alpha 2b gene therapy suppresses the pro-angiogenic effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Adam, Liana; Black, Peter C; Kassouf, Wassim; Eve, Beryl; McConkey, David; Munsell, Mark F; Benedict, William F; Dinney, Colin P N

    2007-05-01

    Intravesical adenovirus mediated interferon-alpha gene transfer has a potent therapeutic effect against superficial human bladder carcinoma xenografts growing in the bladder of athymic nude mice. We determined whether the inhibition of angiogenesis might contribute to the antitumor effect. We treated several human urothelial carcinoma cells with adenovirus mediated interferon-alpha 2b and monitored its effects on the production of angiogenic factors using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical analysis and a gel shift based transcription factor array. To assess the role of adenovirus mediated interferon 2b in angiogenic activity we used in vitro invasion assays and evaluated the anti-angiogenic effects of adenovirus mediated interferon gene therapy in an orthotopic murine model of human superficial bladder cancer. In adenovirus mediated interferon-alpha infected 253J B-V cells vascular endothelial growth factor was decreased and anti-angiogenic interferon-gamma inducible protein 10 was up-regulated. In contrast, the addition of as much as 100,000 IU recombinant interferon had no apparent effect on vascular endothelial growth factor production. Conditioned medium derived from adenovirus mediated interferon 2b infected 253J B-V cells greatly decreased the invasive potential of human endothelial cells and down-regulated their matrix metalloproteinase 2 expression compared to controls. Furthermore, adenovirus mediated interferon 2b blocked pro-angiogenic nuclear signals, such as the transcription factors activating protein-1 and 2, stimulating protein-1, nuclear factor kappaB and c-myb. In vivo experiments revealed significant vascular endothelial growth factor down-regulation and decreased tumor vessel density in the adenovirus mediated interferon 2b treated group compared to controls. Treatment with adenovirus mediated interferon 2b increases the angiostatic activity of the bladder cancer microenvironment

  4. Efficient adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into primary T cells and thymocytes in a new coxsackie/adenovirus receptor transgenic model

    PubMed Central

    Hurez, Vincent; Dzialo-Hatton, Robin; Oliver, James; Matthews, R James; Weaver, Casey T

    2002-01-01

    Background Gene transfer studies in primary T cells have suffered from the limitations of conventional viral transduction or transfection techniques. Replication-defective adenoviral vectors are an attractive alternative for gene delivery. However, naive lymphocytes are not readily susceptible to infection with adenoviruses due to insufficient expression of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor. Results To render T cells susceptible to adenoviral gene transfer, we have developed three new murine transgenic lines in which expression of the human coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (hCAR) with a truncated cytoplasmic domain (hCARΔcyt) is limited to thymocytes and lymphocytes under direction of a human CD2 mini-gene. hCARΔcyt.CD2 transgenic mice were crossed with DO11.10 T cell receptor transgenic mice (DO11.hCARΔcyt) to allow developmental studies in a defined, clonal T cell population. Expression of hCARΔcyt enabled adenoviral transduction of resting primary CD4+ T cells, differentiated effector T cells and thymocytes from DO11.hCARΔcyt with high efficiency. Expression of hCARΔcyt transgene did not perturb T cell development in these mice and adenoviral transduction of DO11.hCARΔcyt T cells did not alter their activation status, functional responses or differentiative potential. Adoptive transfer of the transduced T cells into normal recipients did not modify their physiologic localization. Conclusion The DO11.hCARΔcyt transgenic model thus allows efficient gene transfer in primary T cell populations and will be valuable for novel studies of T cell activation and differentiation. PMID:12019030

  5. Periluminal expression of a secreted transforming growth factor-β type II receptor inhibits in-stent neointima formation following adenovirus-mediated stent-based intracoronary gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Clare E; Ranjzad, Parisa; Williams, Paul D; Kakar, Salik J; Driessen, Anita; Tijsma, Edze; Fernandes, Brian; Heagerty, Anthony M; Kingston, Paul A

    2014-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) has been shown unequivocally to enhance neointima formation in carotid and ileo-femoral arteries. In our previous studies, however, TGF-β1 expression in coronary arteries actually reduced neointima formation without affecting luminal loss postangioplasty, while expression of a TGF-β1 antagonist (RIIs) in balloon-injured coronary arteries reduced luminal loss without affecting neointima formation. These observed effects may be a consequence of the mode of coronary artery gene transfer employed, but they may also represent differences in the modes of healing of coronary, carotid, and ileo-femoral arteries after endoluminal injury. To help clarify whether a gene therapy strategy to antagonize TGF-β might have application within the coronary vasculature, we have investigated the effect of high-level periluminal expression of RIIs using stent-based adenovirus-mediated intracoronary gene transfer. Porcine coronary arteries were randomized to receive a custom-made CoverStent preloaded with saline only, or with 1×10(9) infectious units of adenovirus expressing RIIs or β-galactosidase (lacZ). Vessels were analyzed 28 days poststenting, at which time angiographic in-stent diameter was significantly greater in RIIs-treated arteries, and in-stent luminal loss significantly reduced. Computerized morphometric minimum in-stent lumen area was ~300% greater in RIIs-exposed vessels than in lacZ or saline-only groups. This was because of significantly reduced neointima formation in the RIIs group. RIIs had no demonstrable effect on cellular proliferation or apoptosis, but greater normalized neointimal/medial collagen content was observed in RIIs-exposed arteries. These data highlight the qualitatively similar effect of TGF-β antagonism on neointima formation in injured coronary and noncoronary arteries, and suggest that since cellular proliferation is unaffected, TGF-β1 antagonism might prevent in-stent restenosis without the delayed

  6. Down-regulation of collagen synthesis and matrix metalloproteinase expression in myofibroblasts from Dupuytren nodule using adenovirus-mediated relaxin gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Young-Mi; Choi, Yun-Rak; Yun, Chae-Ok; Park, Jin-Oh; Suk, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Hak-Sun; Park, Moon-Soo; Lee, Byung-Ho; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Moon, Seong-Hwan

    2014-04-01

    Dupuytren's disease is a fibroproliferative connective tissue disorder characterized by contracture of the palmer fascia of the hand. Relaxin (RLN) is a multifunctional factor which contributes to the remodeling of the pelvic ligament by inhibiting fibrosis and inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the RLN gene on the inhibition of fibrosis in myofibroblastic cells. Myofibroblast cells with adenovirus LacZ (Ad-LacZ) as a marker gene or adenovirus relaxin (Ad-RLN) as therapeutic gene showed transgene expressions in beta-galactosidase assay and Western blot analysis. Myofibroblastic cells with Ad-RLN demonstrated a 22% and 48% reduction in collagen I and III mRNA expressions respectively, a 50% decrease in MMP-1, 70% decrease in MMP-2, 80% decrease in MMP-9, and a 15% reduction in MMP-13 protein expression compared with cultures with viral control and saline control. In addition, myofibroblastic cells with Ad-RLN showed a 40% decrease in TIMP 1 and a 15% increase in TIMP 3 protein expression at 48 h compared to cultures with viral control and saline control. Also, myofibroblastic cell with Ad-RLN demonstrated a 74% inhibition of fibronectin and a 52% decrease in total collagen synthesis at 48 h compared with cultures with viral control and saline control. In conclusion, the RLN gene render antifibrogenic effect on myofibroblastic cells from Dupuytren's nodule via direct inhibition of collagen synthesis not through collagenolytic pathway such as MMP-1, -13, TIMP 1, and 3. Therefore relaxin can be an alternative therapeutic strategy in initial stage of Dupuytren's disease by its antifibrogenic effect. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cell-specific induction of sensitivity to ganciclovir in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Minemura, K; Takeda, T; Minemura, K; Nagasawa, T; Zhang, R; Leopardi, R; DeGroot, L J

    2000-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene transfer followed by ganciclovir administration is a common strategy for experimental cancer therapy. To evaluate the feasibility of using the human calcitonin promoter to target medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), we developed adenovirus vectors containing Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene under the control of the CALC-I promoter (AdCTlacZ), or the human cytomegalovirus promoter (AdCMVlacZ). Beta-galactosidase activity driven by the CALC-I promoter was higher than by the CMV promoter in rat MTC cells after infection with adenovirus vectors. AdCTlacZ induced an equal or lower expression level of beta-galactosidase in TT (human MTC), T98G, Cos1, HepG2, and HeLa cells compared with AdCMVlacZ. To inhibit the growth of MTC cells, we developed two adenovirus vectors, AdCMVtk carrying HSVtk driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter and AdDCTtk containing a human CALC-I minigene under the control of the CALC-I promoter. HSVtk is fused to a portion of calcitonin coded in exon 4 to direct cell-specific regulation of splicing. All cell lines infected with AdCMVtk were rendered sensitive to ganciclovir, whereas T98G and Cos1 cells infected with AdDCTtk were not affected. Cell killing was also observed in HeLa, HepG2, rat MTC and TT cells infected with AdDCTtk.

  8. Adenovirus-mediated GDF-5 promotes the extracellular matrix expression in degenerative nucleus pulposus cells*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xu-wei; Liu, Kang; Chen, Zhu; Zhao, Ming; Han, Xiao-wei; Bai, Yi-guang; Feng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector-carrying human growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) gene, investigate the biological effects of adenovirus-mediated GDF-5 (Ad-GDF-5) on extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in human degenerative disc nucleus pulposus (NP) cells, and explore a candidate gene therapy method for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Methods: Human NP cells of a degenerative disc were isolated, cultured, and infected with Ad-GDF-5 using the AdEasy-1 adenovirus vector system. On Days 3, 7, 14, and 21, the contents of the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and hydroxyproline (Hyp), synthesis of proteoglycan and collagen II, gene expression of collagen II and aggrecan, and NP cell proliferation were assessed. Results: The adenovirus was an effective vehicle for gene delivery with prolonged expression of GDF-5. Biochemical analysis revealed increased sGAG and Hyp contents in human NP cells infected by Ad-GDF-5 whereas there was no conspicuous change in basal medium (BM) or Ad-green fluorescent protein (GFP) groups. Only cells in the Ad-GDF-5 group promoted the production of ECM, as demonstrated by the secretion of proteoglycan and up-regulation of collagen II and aggrecan at both protein and mRNA levels. The NP cell proliferation was significantly promoted. Conclusions: The data suggest that Ad-GDF-5 gene therapy is a potential treatment for IDD, which restores the functions of degenerative intervertebral disc through enhancing the ECM production of human NP cells. PMID:26739524

  9. Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy with sitimagene ceradenovec followed by intravenous ganciclovir for patients with operable high-grade glioma (ASPECT): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Manfred; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Martin, John; Warnke, Peter; Menei, Philippe; Eckland, David; Kinley, Judith; Kay, Richard; Ram, Zvi

    2013-08-01

    Besides the use of temozolomide and radiotherapy for patients with favourable methylation status, little progress has been made in the treatment of adult glioblastoma. Local control of the disease by complete removal increases time to progression and survival. We assessed the efficacy and safety of a locally applied adenovirus-mediated gene therapy with a prodrug converting enzyme (herpes-simplex-virus thymidine kinase; sitimagene ceradenovec) followed by intravenous ganciclovir in patients with newly diagnosed resectable glioblastoma. For this international, open-label, randomised, parallel group multicentre phase 3 clinical trial, we recruited patients from 38 sites in Europe. Patients were eligible if they were aged 18-70 years, had newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme amenable to complete resection, and had a Karnofsky score of 70 or more at screening. We used a computer-generated randomisation sequence to allocate patients in a one-to-one ratio (with block sizes of four) to receive either surgical resection of the tumour and intraoperative perilesional injection of sitimagene ceradenovec (1 × 10(12) viral particles) followed by ganciclovir (postoperatively, 5 mg/kg intravenously twice a day) in addition to standard care or resection and standard care alone. Temozolomide, not being standard in all participating countries at the time of the study, was allowed at the discretion of the treating physician. The primary endpoint was a composite of time to death or re-intervention, adjusted for temozolamide use, assessed by intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis. This trial is registered with EudraCT, number 2004-000464-28. Between Nov 3, 2005, and April 16, 2007, 250 patients were recruited and randomly allocated: 124 to the experimental group and 126 to the standard care group, of whom 119 and 117 patients, respectively, were included in the ITT analyses. Median time to death or re-intervention was longer in the experimental group (308 days, 95% CI

  10. Construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus carrying a mouse TIGIT-GFP gene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J M; Cui, J L; He, W T; Yu, D W; Gao, Y; Wang, L; Chen, Z K; Zhou, H M

    2015-12-29

    Recombinant adenovirus vector systems have been used extensively in protein research and gene therapy. However, the construction and characterization of recombinant adenovirus is a tedious and time-consuming process. TIGIT is a recently discovered immunosuppressive molecule that plays an important role in maintaining immunological balance. The construction of recombinant adenovirus mediating TIGIT expression must be simplified to facilitate its use in the study of TIGIT. In this study, the TIGIT gene was combined with green fluorescent protein (GFP); the TIGIT-GFP gene was inserted into a gateway plasmid to construct a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus. HEK 293A cells were infected with the adenovirus, which was then purified and subjected to virus titering. TIGIT-GFP adenovirus was characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and its expression in mouse liver was detected by infection through caudal vein injection. The results showed the successful construction of the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus (5 x 10(10) PFU/mL). Co-expression of TIGIT and GFP was identified in 293A and liver cells; synthesis and positioning of TIGIT-GFP was viewed under a fluorescence microscope. TIGIT-GFP was highly expressed on liver cells 1 day (25.53%) after infection and faded 3 days (11.36%) after injection. In conclusion, the fusion of TIGIT with GFP allows easy, rapid, and uncomplicated detection of TIGIT translation. The construction of a TIGIT-GFP adenovirus, mediating TIGIT expression in vitro and in vivo, lays the foundation for further research into TIGIT function and gene therapy. Moreover, the TIGIT-GFP adenovirus is a helpful tool for studying other proteins (which could replace the TIGIT gene).

  11. Adenovirus-mediated truncated Bid overexpression induced by the Cre/LoxP system promotes the cell apoptosis of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Qifang; Yang, Ru; Lu, Weixian; Zhu, Weipei; Zhou, Jundong; Zheng, Cui; Zhou, Dongmei; Yu, Ling; Wu, Jinchang

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are a small subset of cancer cells that contribute to cancer progression, metastasis, chemoresistance and recurrence. CD133-positive (CD133+) ovarian cancer cells have been identified as ovarian cancer stem cells. Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is an innovative therapeutic method for cancer treatment. In the present study, we aimed to develop a new gene therapy to specifically eliminate CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells by targeting CD133. We used the Cre/LoxP system to augment the selective expression of the truncated Bid (tBid) gene as suicide gene therapy in CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells. The adenovirus (Ad)-CD133-Cre expressing Cre recombinase under the control of the CD133 promoter and Ad-CMV-LoxP-Neo-LoxP-tBid expressing tBid under the control of the CMV promoter were successfully constructed using the Cre/LoxP switching system. The co-infection of Ad-CMV-LoxP-Neo-LoxP-tBid and Ad-CD133-Cre selectively induced tBid overexpression, which inhibited cell growth and triggered the cell apoptosis of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells. The Cre/LoxP system-mediated tBid overexpression activated the pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and augmented the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin in CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells. Furthermore, in xenograft experiments, co-infection with the two recombinant adenoviruses markedly suppressed tumor growth in vivo and promoted cell apoptosis in tumor tissues. Taken together, the present study provides evidence that the adenovirus-mediated tBid overexpression induced by the Cre/LoxP system can effectively eliminate CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells, representing a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  12. Effects of adenovirus-mediated expression of p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A in cell lines derived from t(2;5) anaplastic large cell lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Turturro, Franceso; Arnold, Marilyn D; Frist, Audrey Y; Seth, Prem

    2002-06-01

    We investigated the response of SUDHL-1 and L428 cells, derived from t(2;5)-anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and Hodgkin's disease (HD), respectively, to recombinant adenoviruses expressing cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p27Kip1 (Adp27), p21Waf1 (Adp21) and p16INK4A (Adp16). Cell cycle analysis of SUDHL-1 cells after 24 h of infection with 200 multiplicity of infection (MOI) of Adp27, Adp21, and Adp16, showed very high levels of cell debris in the subG1 area. The magnitude of cell debris-events was Adp27/Adp21 > Adp16. Cell cycle analysis of L428 cells revealed absence of cell debris and increased G2 phase in all the groups of cells tested as compared to the controls (mock and AdNull). A minimal increase in G1 phase was also evident in cells infected with Adp27 (52%) compared to uninfected cells (43%), AdNull (45%) and to cells infected with Adp21 (37%) and Adp16 (31%). The presence of significant levels of Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) on the cell surface of L428 cells excluded the cell membrane-barrier as responsible for the differences in cell observed in response to the recombinant adenovirus-mediated CDKIs expression as compared to SUDHL-1. We also showed that the recombinant adenovirus-mediated cytotoxicity measured as apoptosis was MOI- and vector-dependent in SUDHL-1 cells at lower MOI (100). In conclusion, the therapeutic effect induced by recombinant adenoviruses expressing p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A is cell-dependent in cells derived from selected lymphoid malignancies. Biochemical cellular differences more than cell surface barriers seem to be responsible for differences in response to recombinant adenovirus-mediated expression of cytotoxic genes. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of recombinant adenoviruses expressing p27Kip1, p21Waf1 and p16INK4A may be further explored as a tool for gene therapy of t(2;5)-derived ALCL.

  13. Adenovirus-mediated tumor-specific combined gene therapy using Herpes simplex virus thymidine/ganciclovir system and murine interleukin-12 induces effective antitumor activity against medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masanori; Straus, Francis H; Messina, Marinella; Robinson, Bruce G; Takeda, Teiji; Hashizume, Kiyoshi; DeGroot, Leslie J

    2004-01-01

    The present treatment of advanced and metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is unsatisfactory. Tissue-specific cancer gene therapy is a novel alternative approach. We developed a recombinant adenovirus expressing Herpes simplex type 1 thymidine kinase (HSVtk) driven by a modified CALC-I promoter TCP (AdTCPtk). Infection with this virus showed efficient cytotoxic effect on MTC cell lines (rMTC and TT cells) after treatment with ganciclovir (GCV) in vitro. In a syngenic WAG/Rij rat model, the combination of AdTCPtk/GCV treatment with administration of murine interleukin-12 (mIL-12) expressing adenovirus under control of TCP (AdTCPmIL-12) resulted in effective growth suppression of tumor at the treated site and also at a distant untreated site, in comparison to treatment with AdTCPtk/GCV or AdTCPmIL-12 alone. Moreover, intravenous injection of AdTCPtk, or AdTCPtk+AdTCPmIL-12, followed by administration of GCV, did not cause evident toxicity after administration of GCV. These results indicate that this combined system can provide an effective therapy for metastatic MTC with minimal toxicity.

  14. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 gene transfer in combination with bronchial arterial infusion for treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, one year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong-song; Liu, Yuan; Zou, Qing; He, Qing; La, Zi; Yang, Lin; Hu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we have examined the safety and efficacy of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) injection in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the combination with the therapy of bronchial arterial infusion (BAI). Methods: A total of 58 patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled in a non-randomized, two-armed clinical trial. Of which, 19 received a combination treatment of BAI and rAd-p53 (the combo group), while the remaining 39 were treated with only BAI (the control group). Patients were followed up for 12 months, with safety and local response evaluated by the National Cancer Institute’s Common Toxicity Criteria and response evaluation criteria in solid tumor (RECIST), respectively. Time to progression (TTP) and survival rates were also analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In the combo group, 19 patients received a total of 49 injections of rAd-p53 and 46 times of BAI, respectively, while 39 patients in the control group received a total of 113 times of BAI. The combination treatment was found to have less adverse events such as anorexia, nausea and emesis, pain, and leucopenia (P<0.05) but more arthralgia, fever, influenza-like symptom, and myalgia (P<0.05), compared with the control group. The overall response rates (complete response (CR)+partial response (PR)) were 47.3% and 38.4% for the combo group and the control group, respectively (P>0.05). Patients in the combo group had a longer TTP than those in the control group (a median 7.75 vs 5.5 months, P=0.018). However, the combination treatment did not lead to better survival, with survival rates at 3, 6, and 12 months in the combo group being 94.74%, 89.47%, and 52.63%, respectively, compared with 92.31%, 69.23%, and 38.83% in the control group (P=0.224). Conclusion: Our results show that the combination of rAd-p53 and BAI was well tolerated in patients with NSCLC and may have improved the quality of life and delayed

  15. E1A RNA transcripts amplify adenovirus-mediated tumor reduction.

    PubMed

    Dion, L D; Goldsmith, K T; Strong, T V; Bilbao, G; Curiel, D T; Garver, R I

    1996-11-01

    Previous work by this group has established that E1-defective, recombinant adenoviruses can be replication-enabled by the codelivery of a plasmid encoding the deleted E1 functions, a strategy now designated conditional replication-enablement system for adenovirus (CRESA). In the studies reported here, the original replication-enabling plasmid was replaced by two separate plasmids that encoded the necessary E1A and E1B functions, respectively. An RNA transcript encoding the requisite E1A functions was shown to substitute functionally for the E1A plasmid without significant loss of new adenovirus production in in vitro experiments. No replication competent adenovirus was detectable in the cells treated with the plasmids, or the RNA and plasmid combinations. Subcutaneous human tumor nodules containing a fraction of cells cotransduced with the replication-enabling RNA + DNA and an adenovirus containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) expression cassette were reduced to a greater extent than control nodules containing the same fraction of cells cotransduced with the virus and an irrelevant plasmid. These experiments show that an E1-defective adenovirus can be conditionally replication-enabled by an RNA transcript encoding the required E1 functions, and that the replication-enablement is sufficient to produce an augmentation of an adenovirus-mediated therapeutic effect in vivo.

  16. Caveolin-1 inhibits epidermal growth factor-stimulated lamellipod extension and cell migration in metastatic mammary adenocarcinoma cells (MTLn3). Transformation suppressor effects of adenovirus-mediated gene delivery of caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Razani, B; Altschuler, Y; Bouzahzah, B; Mostov, K E; Pestell, R G; Lisanti, M P

    2000-07-07

    Caveolin-1 is a principal component of caveolae membranes that may function as a transformation suppressor. For example, the human caveolin-1 gene is localized to a suspected tumor suppressor locus (D7S522; 7q31.1) that is deleted in human cancers, including mammary carcinomas. However, little is known about the role of caveolins in regulating cell movement, a critical parameter in determining metastatic potential. Here, we examine the role of caveolin-1 in cell movement. For this purpose, we employed an established cellular model, MTLn3, a metastatic rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. In this system, epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation induces rapid lamellipod extension and cell migration. Interestingly, we find that MTLn3 cells fail to express detectable levels of endogenous caveolin-1. To restore caveolin-1 expression in MTLn3 cells efficiently, we employed an inducible adenoviral gene delivery system to achieve tightly controlled expression of caveolin-1. We show here that caveolin-1 expression in MTLn3 cells inhibits EGF-stimulated lamellipod extension and cell migration and blocks their anchorage-independent growth. Under these conditions, EGF-induced activation of the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade is also blunted. Our results suggest that caveolin-1 expression in motile MTLn3 cells induces a non-motile phenotype.

  17. Human, viral or mutant human IL-10 expressed after local adenovirus-mediated gene transfer are equally effective in ameliorating disease pathology in a rabbit knee model of antigen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keravala, Annahita; Lechman, Eric R; Nash, Joan; Mi, Zhibao; Robbins, Paul D

    2006-01-01

    IL-10 is a Th2 cytokine important for inhibiting cell-mediated immunity while promoting humoral responses. Human IL-10 (hIL-10) has anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive as well as immunostimulatory characteristics, whereas viral IL-10 (vIL-10), a homologue of hIL-10 encoded by Epstein Barr virus (EBV), lacks several immunostimulatory functions. The immunostimulatory characteristic of hIL-10 has been attributed to a single amino acid, isoleucine at position 87, which in vIL-10 is alanine. A mutant hIL-10 in which isoleucine has been substituted (mut.hIL-10) is biologically active with only immunosuppressive, but not immunostimulatory, functions, making it a potentially superior therapeutic for inflammatory diseases. To compare the efficacy of mut.hIL-10 with hIL-10 and vIL-10 in blocking the progression of rheumatoid arthritis, we used replication defective adenoviral vectors to deliver intra-articularly the gene encoding hIL-10, vIL-10 or mut.hIL-10 to antigen-induced arthritic (AIA) knee joints in rabbits. Intra-articular expression of hIL-10, vIL-10, and mut.hIL-10 resulted in significant improvement of the pathology in the treated joints to similar levels. These observed changes included a significant reduction in intra-articular leukocytosis and the degree of synovitis, as well as normalization of cartilage matrix metabolism. Our results suggest that hIL-10, vIL-10, and mut.hIL-10 are all equally therapeutic in the rabbit AIA model for treating disease pathology.

  18. Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Therapy Against Viral Biothreat Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-12

    disease has led to modify adenoviruses as vectors for vaccine development against other viral agents. Human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAd5) is the most...to contain the spread of viruses to the general population . Most licensed vaccines are made either by chemically inactivated whnle viruses or by...be catastrophic for viral biothreat agents that often cause the most lethal infections in humans . Therefore, new approaches are needed for the

  19. Adenovirus-mediated interleukin (IL)-24 immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Rajagopal; Ioannides, Constantine G; Roth, Jack A; Chada, Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family. IL-24, also known as melanoma differentiation associated gene 7 (mda-7), is a unique cytokine in that it has cytokine properties and functions as a novel tumor suppressor gene. Studies by us and other investigators using viral and non-viral vectors have demonstrated IL-24 overexpression in human cancer cells inhibited tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo. A majority of these studies using immunodeficient animal models have focused on demonstrating the direct anticancer properties of IL-24. Very few studies have focused on studying the immunotherapeutic properties of IL-24 despite it being reported to function as a Th1 cytokine. A phase I clinical trial using an adenovirus vector expressing IL-24 (Ad-IL24/INGN241) reported Ad-IL24 treatment of cancer patients resulted in changes in cytokines and T cells. However, well-designed and detailed preclinical studies to support the clinical findings are warranted. Demonstrating immune modulation by IL-24 will provide a rationale for developing IL-24-based immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer treatment.In the present chapter, we provide experimental details for conducting IL-24-based immunotherapy studies. As it is not possible for the authors to cover all of the information the authors recommend reading other immunology-based literature and procedures for a better understanding of conducting preclinical studies.

  20. Nonreplicating vaccinia vector efficiently expresses recombinant genes.

    PubMed

    Sutter, G; Moss, B

    1992-11-15

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), a highly attenuated vaccinia virus strain that has been safety tested in humans, was evaluated for use as an expression vector. MVA has multiple genomic deletions and is severely host cell restricted: it grows well in avian cells but is unable to multiply in human and most other mammalian cells tested. Nevertheless, we found that replication of viral DNA appeared normal and that both early and late viral proteins were synthesized in human cells. Proteolytic processing of viral structural proteins was inhibited, however, and only immature virus particles were detected by electron microscopy. We constructed an insertion plasmid with the Escherichia coli lacZ gene under the control of the vaccinia virus late promoter P11, flanked by sequences of MVA DNA, to allow homologous recombination at the site of a naturally occurring 3500-base-pair deletion within the MVA genome. MVA recombinants were isolated and propagated in permissive avian cells and shown to express the enzyme beta-galactosidase upon infection of nonpermissive human cells. The amount of enzyme made was similar to that produced by a recombinant of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve, which also had the lacZ gene under control of the P11 promoter, but multiplied to high titers. Since recombinant gene expression is unimpaired in nonpermissive human cells, MVA may serve as a highly efficient and exceptionally safe vector.

  1. Targeted suppression of Has2 mRNA in mouse cumulus cell-oocyte complexes by adenovirus-mediated short-hairpin RNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Koji; Su, You-Qiang; Eppig, John J.

    2008-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an effective tool for studying gene function in oocytes, but no studies have targeted somatic cells of primary cultured cumulus cell-oocyte complexes (COCs). This is probably due to difficulty in introducing RNAi-inducing molecules, such as a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) gene, into COCs by commonly used transfection reagents. We therefore tested whether a developmental process of intact COCs could be suppressed by adenovirus-mediated shRNA expression. Has2, encoding hyaluronan synthase 2, was selected as the target transcript, because the process of cumulus expansion depends upon expression of Has2 mRNA and this process is easily evaluated in vitro. Intact COCs were infected with replication-incompetent adenoviruses containing an expression sequence of shRNA targeting either Has2 (Has2 shRNA) or a control transcript not expressed in cumulus cells, and the effects on epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated cumulus expansion were determined. Has2 shRNA expression suppressed Has2 mRNA levels in COCs by more than 70%, without affecting expression levels of Ptgs2, Ptx3, Tnfaip6 mRNAs, which are also required for cumulus expansion, or other transcripts not related to expansion. Interestingly, levels of Areg and Ereg mRNAs were decreased in COCs expressing Has2 shRNA when compared with those in controls, while Btc mRNA levels remained unaffected. Furthermore, the degree of cumulus expansion by Has2 shRNA-expressing COCs was significantly less than that of controls. Thus adenovirus-mediated introduction of shRNA produces specific gene silencing and a phenotype in intact COCs, providing proof of principle that this method will be a helpful tool for understanding mechanisms of COC development. PMID:18951380

  2. Somatic recombination, gene amplification and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramel, C; Cederberg, H; Magnusson, J; Vogel, E; Natarajan, A T; Mullender, L H; Nivard, J M; Parry, J M; Leyson, A; Comendador, M A; Sierra, L M; Ferreiro, J A; Consuegra, S

    1996-06-12

    The principle objective of this research programme, to analyse chemical induction of somatic recombination and related endpoints, i.e., mobilization of transposing elements and gene amplification, has been approached by means of several assay systems. These have included Drosophila, Saccharomyces and mammalian cell cultures. 6.1. Screening assays for mitotic recombination. A large number of chemicals have been investigated in the three Drosophila assay systems employed--the multiple wing hair/flare wing spot system developed by Graf et al., 1984, the white-ivory system developed by Green et al., 1986 and the white/white+ eye spot assay developed by Vogel (Vogel and Nivard, 1993). Particularly the screening of 181 chemicals, covering a wide array of chemical classes, by the last mentioned assay has shown that measurement of somatic recombination in Drosophila constitutes a sensitive and efficient short-term test which shows a remarkably good correlation with the agent score of 83 short-term tests analysed by ICPEMC (Mendelsohn et al., 1992; Table 2) as well as the assay performance in international collaborative programmes measuring carcinogen/non-carcinogens (de Serres and Ashby, 1981; Ashby et al., 1985, 1988). Also the wing spot assay has gained wide international recognition as a similarly sensitive test. These two assay systems in Drosophila measure both intrachromosomal events and interchromosomal recombination. The white-ivory system on the other hand is based on the loss of a tandem duplication in the white locus, the mechanism of which is less known, but probably involves intrachromosomal recombination. The difference in the mechanism between this assay and the former two was indicated by the lack of response to methotrexate in the white-ivory assay, while this compound was strongly recombinogenic in both the wing spot and white/white+ assays. The use of different strains of Drosophila with the white/white+ assay demonstrated the importance of the

  3. Novel recombinant papillomavirus genomes expressing selectable genes

    PubMed Central

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Porter, Samuel; McKinney, Caleb; Stepp, Wesley H.; McBride, Alison A.

    2016-01-01

    Papillomaviruses infect and replicate in keratinocytes, but viral proteins are initially expressed at low levels and there is no effective and quantitative method to determine the efficiency of infection on a cell-to-cell basis. Here we describe human papillomavirus (HPV) genomes that express marker proteins (antibiotic resistance genes and Green Fluorescent Protein), and can be used to elucidate early stages in HPV infection of primary keratinocytes. To generate these recombinant genomes, the late region of the oncogenic HPV18 genome was replaced by CpG free marker genes. Insertion of these exogenous genes did not affect early replication, and had only minimal effects on early viral transcription. When introduced into primary keratinocytes, the recombinant marker genomes gave rise to drug-resistant keratinocyte colonies and cell lines, which maintained the extrachromosomal recombinant genome long-term. Furthermore, the HPV18 “marker” genomes could be packaged into viral particles (quasivirions) and used to infect primary human keratinocytes in culture. This resulted in the outgrowth of drug-resistant keratinocyte colonies containing replicating HPV18 genomes. In summary, we describe HPV18 marker genomes that can be used to quantitatively investigate many aspects of the viral life cycle. PMID:27892937

  4. Adaptation despite gene flow? Low recombination helps.

    PubMed

    Marques, David A

    2017-09-01

    About 15,000 years earlier, the Northern half of Europe and North America was buried under a few kilometres of ice. Since then, many organisms have colonized and rapidly adapted to the new, vacant habitats. Some, like the threespine stickleback fish, have done so more successfully than others: from the sea, stickleback have adapted to a multitude of lake and stream habitats with a vast array of complex phenotypes and life histories. Previous studies showed that most of these "ecotypes" differ in multiple divergently selected genes throughout the genome. But how are well-adapted ecotypes of one habitat protected from maladaptive gene flow from ecotypes of another, adjacent habitat? According to a From the Cover meta-analysis in this issue of Molecular Ecology (Samuk et al., 2017), low recombination rate regions in the genome offer such protection. While inversions have often been highlighted as an efficient way to maintain linkage disequilibrium among sets of adaptive variants in the face of gene flow, Samuk et al. (2017) show that variation in recombination rate across the genome may perform a similar role in threespine stickleback. With this study, theoretical predictions for the importance of low recombination regions in adaptation are for the first time tested with a highly replicated population genomic data set. The findings from this study have implications for the adaptability of species, speciation and the evolution of genome architecture. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Long-term gene transfer to mouse fetuses with recombinant adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M; Jerebtsova, M; Batshaw, M L; Newman, K; Ye, X

    2000-12-01

    We have developed a micro-injection technique to deliver recombinant adenovirus and AAV to mouse fetuses at day 15 after conception. Several routes of delivery, including injections to the amniotic fluid, the front limb, the placenta, the liver, and the retro-orbital venus plexus, were tested using an E1-deleted recombinant adenovirus (Ad.CBlacZ) or a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV.CMVlacZ) carrying a beta-galactosidase (lacZ) gene. Injection of Ad.CBlacZ into the amniotic cavity led to transgene expression in the skin and in the digestive tract of the fetuses. Injection of Ad.CBlacZ in the front limb resulted in LacZ expression in all major muscle groups around the injection site and at low levels in the liver. The other three routes of delivery, ie intra-placental, intra-hepatic and retro-orbital injections of Ad.CBlacZ, all led to lacZ expression predominantly in the liver. Further studies revealed a maximal tolerant dose (defined as the highest viral dose with < or =20% mortality in the injected fetuses) of 1 x 10(9) particles per fetus for intra- hepatic injections, 3 x 10(9) particles per fetus for intra-placental injection, 1 x 1010 particles per fetus for retro-orbital and intra-amniotic injections, and 2 x 10(10) particle per fetus for intra-muscular injection. The adenovirus-mediated lacZ expression in liver and muscle persisted for at least 6 weeks. Intra-muscular injection of AAV.CMVlacZ also resulted in lacZ expression in the muscle up to 3 months after birth with no indication of cellular immune response at the injection site. Taken together, our results demonstrated that prolonged transgene expression can be achieved by in utero gene transfer using either adenoviral or AAV vectors. The distribution of virus-mediated gene transfer appeared to determined mostly by the route of viral administration.

  6. Recombinant fungal entomopathogen RNAi target insect gene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiongbo; Wu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology is considered as an alternative for control of pests. However, RNAi has not been used in field conditions yet, since delivering exogenous ds/siRNA to target pests is very difficult. The laboratory methods of introducing the ds/siRNA into insects through feeding, micro feeding / dripping and injecting cannot be used in fields. Transgenic crop is perhaps the most effective application of RNAi for pest control, but it needs long-time basic researches in order to reduce the cost and evaluate the safety. Therefore, transgenic microbe is maybe a better choice. Entomopathogenic fungi generally invade the host insects through cuticle like chemical insecticides contact insect to control sucking sap pests. Isaria fumosorosea is a common fungal entomopathogen in whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. We constructed a recombinant strain of I. fumosorosea expressing specific dsRNA of whitefly's TLR7 gene. It could silence the TLR7 gene and improve the virulence against whitefly. Transgenic fungal entomopathogen has shown great potential to attain the application of RNAi technology for pests control in fields. In the future, the research interests should be focused on the selection of susceptible target pests and their vital genes, and optimizing the methods for screening genes and recombinants as well.

  7. Adenovirus mediated BIMS transfer induces growth supression and apoptosis in Raji lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya Ning; Li, Qiang

    2014-09-01

    To transfer pro-apoptotic BIM directly into tumor cells bypass the complicated biological processes of BIM activation so as to reverse the chemoresistance of cancer cells. BIMS was specifically amplified from HL-60 cells by RT-PCR, confirmed to be correct by sequencing and cloned into shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV carrying a green fluorescence protein gene to generate a recombinant plasmid pAdTrack-CMV-BIMS. This plasmid and adenovirus backbone plasmid pAdEasy-1 were linearized and electroporated into E.coli BJ5183 host bacteria to mediate homologous recombination. The positive clone was identified by restrict endonuclease digestion. The recombinant pAdEasy-CMV-BIMS was transferred into HEK293 cells for packaging and amplification. The successful construction of recombinant human BIMS adenovirus (Ad-BIMS) was demonstrated by Western blot. To test whether Ad-BIMS has the capability of inducing apoptosis of tumor cells, Ad-BIMS was used to infect GC resistant Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells. After infected for 2-5 days, BIMS expression in Raji cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. The significant growth retardation and apoptosis of Raji cells were also observed by MTT and flow cytometry. These results indicated that BIMS might be a potential candidate of gene therapy for chemoresistant tumor cells. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibitory effect of recombinant adenovirus carrying immunocaspase-3 on hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohua; Fan, Rui; Zou, Xue; Gao, Lin; Jin, Haifeng; Du, Rui; Xia, Lin; Fan, Daiming . E-mail: fandaim@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-06-29

    Previously, Srinivasula devised a contiguous molecule (C-cp-3 or immunocaspase-3) containing the small and large subunits similar to that in the active form of caspas-3 and found C-cp-3 had similar cleavage activity to the active form of caspase-3. To search for a new clinical application of C-cp-3 to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, recombinant adenoviruses carrying the C-cp-3 and a-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter (Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3) were constructed through a bacterial homologous recombinant system. The efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer and the inhibitory effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on the proliferation of hepatocarcinoma cells were determined by X-gal stain and MTT assay, respectively. The tumorigenicity of hepatocarcinoma cells transfected by Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 and the antitumor effect of Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 on transplanted tumor in nude mice were detected in vivo. The results suggested that Ad-rAFP-C-cp-3 can inhibit specifically proliferation of AFP-producing human hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and adenovirus-mediated C-cp-3 transfer could be used as a new method to treat human hepatocarcinoma.

  9. HSV Recombinant Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manservigi, Roberto; Argnani, Rafaela; Marconi, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The very deep knowledge acquired on the genetics and molecular biology of herpes simplex virus (HSV), has allowed the development of potential replication-competent and replication-defective vectors for several applications in human healthcare. These include delivery and expression of human genes to cells of the nervous systems, selective destruction of cancer cells, prophylaxis against infection with HSV or other infectious diseases, and targeted infection to specific tissues or organs. Replication-defective recombinant vectors are non-toxic gene transfer tools that preserve most of the neurotropic features of wild type HSV-1, particularly the ability to express genes after having established latent infections, and are thus proficient candidates for therapeutic gene transfer settings in neurons. A replication-defective HSV vector for the treatment of pain has recently entered in phase 1 clinical trial. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are becoming a suitable and powerful tool to eradicate brain tumours due to their ability to replicate and spread only within the tumour mass, and have reached phase II/III clinical trials in some cases. The progress in understanding the host immune response induced by the vector is also improving the use of HSV as a vaccine vector against both HSV infection and other pathogens. This review briefly summarizes the obstacle encountered in the delivery of HSV vectors and examines the various strategies developed or proposed to overcome such challenges. PMID:20835362

  10. Evolution of meiotic recombination genes in maize and teosinte.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Gaganpreet K; Warzecha, Tomasz; Pawlowski, Wojciech P

    2017-01-25

    Meiotic recombination is a major source of genetic variation in eukaryotes. The role of recombination in evolution is recognized but little is known about how evolutionary forces affect the recombination pathway itself. Although the recombination pathway is fundamentally conserved across different species, genetic variation in recombination components and outcomes has been observed. Theoretical predictions and empirical studies suggest that changes in the recombination pathway are likely to provide adaptive abilities to populations experiencing directional or strong selection pressures, such as those occurring during species domestication. We hypothesized that adaptive changes in recombination may be associated with adaptive evolution patterns of genes involved in meiotic recombination. To examine how maize evolution and domestication affected meiotic recombination genes, we studied patterns of sequence polymorphism and divergence in eleven genes controlling key steps in the meiotic recombination pathway in a diverse set of maize inbred lines and several accessions of teosinte, the wild ancestor of maize. We discovered that, even though the recombination genes generally exhibited high sequence conservation expected in a pathway controlling a key cellular process, they showed substantial levels and diverse patterns of sequence polymorphism. Among others, we found differences in sequence polymorphism patterns between tropical and temperate maize germplasms. Several recombination genes displayed patterns of polymorphism indicative of adaptive evolution. Despite their ancient origin and overall sequence conservation, meiotic recombination genes can exhibit extensive and complex patterns of molecular evolution. Changes in these genes could affect the functioning of the recombination pathway, and may have contributed to the successful domestication of maize and its expansion to new cultivation areas.

  11. Recombinant Brucella abortus gene expressing immunogenic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, J.E.; Tabatabai, L.B.

    1991-06-11

    This patent describes a synthetic recombinant DNA molecule containing a DNA sequence. It comprises a gene of Brucella abortus encoding an immunogenic protein having a molecular weight of approximately 31,000 daltons as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, the protein having an isoelectric point around 4.9, and containing a twenty-five amino acid sequence from its amino terminal end consisting of Gln-Ala-Pro-Thr-Phe-Phe-Arg-Ile-Gly-Thr-Gly-Gly-Thr-Ala-Gly-Thr-Tyr-Tyr-Pro-Ile-Gly-Gly-Leu-Ile-Ala, wherein Gln, Ala, Pro, Thr, Phe, Arg, Ile, Gly, Tyr, and Leu, respectively, represent glutamine, alanine, proline, threonine, phenylalanine, arginine, isolecuine, glycine, tyrosine, and leucine.

  12. Adenovirus-Mediated p202 Gene Transfer in Breast Cancer Gene Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    degradation through proteasome -mediated pathway (21, 34). It is possible that IFIXcal binding may affect the protein stability of HDM2. To test this...14 HDM2 is the major negative regulator of p53 through ubiquitination- proteasome pathway (7, 35, 56). We show IFIXcl destabilizes HDM2 (Fig. 3A). It...functions as a tumor suppressor by negatively regulating HDM2. They also suggest that IFIXotl mediates a novel crosstalk between IFN signaling pathway

  13. Thixotropic solutions enhance viral-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Michael P; Luner, Paul; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Philip H; Keshavjee, Shaf; Zabner, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelia is inefficient in part because its receptor is absent on the apical surface of the airways. Targeting adenovirus to other receptors, increasing the viral concentration, and even prolonging the incubation time with adenovirus vectors can partially overcome the lack of receptors and facilitate gene transfer. Unfortunately, mucociliary clearance would prevent prolonged incubation time in vivo. Thixotropic solutions (TS) are gels that upon a vigorous shearing force reversibly become liquid. We hypothesized that formulating recombinant adenoviruses in TS would decrease virus clearance and thus enhance gene transfer to the airway epithelia. We found that clearance of virus-sized fluorescent beads by human airway epithelia in vitro and by monkey trachea in vivo were markedly decreased when the beads were formulated in TS compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Adenovirus formulated in TS significantly increased adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of a reporter gene in human airway epithelia in vitro and in murine airway epithelia in vivo. Furthermore, an adenovirus encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene (AdCFTR) formulated in TS was more efficient in correcting the chloride transport defect in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia than AdCFTR formulated in PBS. These data indicate a novel strategy to augment the efficiency of gene transfer to the airways that may be applicable to a number of different gene transfer vectors and could be of value in gene transfer to cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia in vivo.

  14. [Enzymatic regulatory processes in gene recombination].

    PubMed

    Kovarskiĭ, V A; Profir, A V

    1988-01-01

    Recombination bistability in the system of genetic regulation in pro- and eucaryots is analysed on the basis of sigmoid kinetics of regulatory enzymes. It is shown that under an increase of either exogenic factors (temperature) or endogenic factors (concentration of molecules, which activate the enzymes) of crucial values, bistability solutions for recombination frequencies are possible. Histeresic character of the dependence of this value on the external parameters is pointed out. The role of fluctuation processes in distortion of the memory effects is discussed. On the basis of monostable solutions molecular account for the empiric Plau law is given for U-shaped dependence of recombination frequency on temperature.

  15. Disappearance of body fat in normal rats induced by adenovirus-mediated leptin gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoxun; Koyama, Kazunori; Yuan, Xue; Lee, Young; Zhou, Yan-Ting; O’Doherty, Robert; Newgard, Christopher B.; Unger, Roger H.

    1996-01-01

    Sustained hyperleptinemia of 8 ng/ml was induced for 28 days in normal Wistar rats by infusing a recombinant adenovirus containing the rat leptin cDNA (AdCMV-leptin). Hyperleptinemic rats exhibited a 30–50% reduction in food intake and gained only 22 g over the experimental period versus 115–132 g in control animals that received saline infusions or a recombinant virus containing the β-galactosidase gene (AdCMV-βGal). Body fat was absent in hyperleptinemic rats, whereas control rats pair-fed to the hyperleptinemic rats retained ≈50% body fat. Further, plasma triglycerides and insulin levels were significantly lower in hyperleptinemic versus pair-fed controls, while fatty acid and glucose levels were similar in the two groups, suggestive of enhanced insulin sensitivity in the hyperleptinemic animals. Thus, despite equivalent reductions in food intake and weight gain in hyperleptinemic and pair-fed animals, identifiable fat tissue was completely ablated only in the former group, raising the possibility of a specific lipoatrophic activity for leptin. PMID:8962134

  16. Major psychological factors affecting acceptance of gene-recombination technology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the validity of a causal model that was made to predict the acceptance of gene-recombination technology. A structural equation model was used as a causal model. First of all, based on preceding studies, the factors of perceived risk, perceived benefit, and trust were set up as important psychological factors determining acceptance of gene-recombination technology in the structural equation model. An additional factor, "sense of bioethics," which I consider to be important for acceptance of biotechnology, was added to the model. Based on previous studies, trust was set up to have an indirect influence on the acceptance of gene-recombination technology through perceived risk and perceived benefit in the model. Participants were 231 undergraduate students in Japan who answered a questionnaire with a 5-point bipolar scale. The results indicated that the proposed model fits the data well, and showed that acceptance of gene-recombination technology is explained largely by four factors, that is, perceived risk, perceived benefit, trust, and sense of bioethics, whether the technology is applied to plants, animals, or human beings. However, the relative importance of the four factors was found to vary depending on whether the gene-recombination technology was applied to plants, animals, or human beings. Specifically, the factor of sense of bioethics is the most important factor in acceptance of plant gene-recombination technology and animal gene-recombination technology, and the factors of trust and perceived risk are the most important factors in acceptance of human being gene-recombination technology.

  17. Adenovirus-Mediated CCR7 and BTLA Overexpression Enhances Immune Tolerance and Migration in Immature Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Haiming; Zhu, Jinhong; Miao, Hongcheng; Gong, Zhenyu; Jiang, Xiaochen; Feng, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Our previous report revealed that immature dendritic cells (imDCs) with adenovirus-mediated CCR7 overexpression acquired an enhanced migratory ability but also exhibited the lower immune tolerance observed in more mature cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether BTLA overexpression was sufficient to preserve immune tolerance in imDCs with exogenous CCR7 overexpression. Scanning electron microscopy and surface antigens analysis revealed that BTLA overexpression suppressed DC maturation, an effect further potentiated in CCR7 and BTLA cooverexpressing cells. Correspondingly, in vitro chemotaxis assays and mixed lymphocyte reactions demonstrated increased migratory potential and immune tolerance in CCR7 and BTLA coexpressing cells. Furthermore, CCR7 and BTLA cooverexpressed imDCs suppressed IFN-γ and IL-17 expression and promoted IL-4 and TGF-beta expression of lymphocyte, indicating an increase of T helper 2 (Th2) regulatory T cell (Treg). Thus, these data indicate that CCR7 and BTLA cooverexpression imparts an intermediate immune phenotype in imDCs when compared to that in CCR7- or BTLA-expressing counterparts that show a more immunocompetent or immunotolerant phenotype, respectively. All these results indicated that adenovirus-mediated CCR7 and BTLA overexpression could enhance immune tolerance and migration of imDCs. Our study provides a basis for further studies on imDCs in immune tolerance, with the goal of developing effective cellular immunotherapies for transplant recipients. PMID:28393074

  18. Recombination events that activate, diversify, and delete immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Leder, P; Max, E E; Seidman, J G; Kwan, S P; Scharff, M; Nau, M; Norman, B

    1981-01-01

    Immunoglobulin kappa light-chain diversity arises, in large part, from an array of germ-line V-region genes that undergo somatic recombination with one of four active J-region segments. The diversity provided by this combinational system is increased by a recombination mechanism that allows variation of crossover points so as to generate additional diversity at a critical region of the light chain. The elaborate mechanism for generating diversity is accompanied not only by considerable waste, in terms of unused V and J regions in a given cell, but also by a range of aberrant recombinants that fail to produce active immunoglobulin genes.

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Gene Delivery by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Hideki; Limn, Chang Kwang; Yap, Chan Choo; Onishi, Masayoshi; Nozaki, Masami; Nishimune, Yoshitake; Okahashi, Nobuo; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Rie; Mochizuki, Rika; Moriishi, Kohji; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2003-01-01

    Although recombinant baculovirus vectors can be an efficient tool for gene transfer into mammalian cells in vitro, gene transduction in vivo has been hampered by the inactivation of baculoviruses by serum complement. Recombinant baculoviruses possessing excess envelope protein gp64 or other viral envelope proteins on the virion surface deliver foreign genes into a variety of mammalian cell lines more efficiently than the unmodified baculovirus. In this study, we examined the efficiency of gene transfer both in vitro and in vivo by recombinant baculoviruses possessing envelope proteins derived from either vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVG) or rabies virus. These recombinant viruses efficiently transferred reporter genes into neural cell lines, primary rat neural cells, and primary mouse osteal cells in vitro. The VSVG-modified baculovirus exhibited greater resistance to inactivation by animal sera than the unmodified baculovirus. A synthetic inhibitor of the complement activation pathway circumvented the serum inactivation of the unmodified baculovirus. Furthermore, the VSVG-modified baculovirus could transduce a reporter gene into the cerebral cortex and testis of mice by direct inoculation in vivo. These results suggest the possible use of the recombinant baculovirus vectors in combination with the administration of complement inhibitors for in vivo gene therapy. PMID:12941888

  20. Quasispecies theory for horizontal gene transfer and recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Enrique; Park, Jeong-Man; Deem, Michael W.

    2008-12-01

    We introduce a generalization of the parallel, or Crow-Kimura, and Eigen models of molecular evolution to represent the exchange of genetic information between individuals in a population. We study the effect of different schemes of genetic recombination on the steady-state mean fitness and distribution of individuals in the population, through an analytic field theoretic mapping. We investigate both horizontal gene transfer from a population and recombination between pairs of individuals. Somewhat surprisingly, these nonlinear generalizations of quasispecies theory to modern biology are analytically solvable. For two-parent recombination, we find two selected phases, one of which is spectrally rigid. We present exact analytical formulas for the equilibrium mean fitness of the population, in terms of a maximum principle, which are generally applicable to any permutation invariant replication rate function. For smooth fitness landscapes, we show that when positive epistatic interactions are present, recombination or horizontal gene transfer introduces a mild load against selection. Conversely, if the fitness landscape exhibits negative epistasis, horizontal gene transfer or recombination introduces an advantage by enhancing selection towards the fittest genotypes. These results prove that the mutational deterministic hypothesis holds for quasispecies models. For the discontinuous single sharp peak fitness landscape, we show that horizontal gene transfer has no effect on the fitness, while recombination decreases the fitness, for both the parallel and the Eigen models. We present numerical and analytical results as well as phase diagrams for the different cases.

  1. Recombination in the hemagglutinin gene of the 1918 "Spanish flu".

    PubMed

    Gibbs, M J; Armstrong, J S; Gibbs, A J

    2001-09-07

    When gene sequences from the influenza virus that caused the 1918 pandemic were first compared with those of related viruses, they yielded few clues about its origins and virulence. Our reanalysis indicates that the hemagglutinin gene, a key virulence determinant, originated by recombination. The "globular domain" of the 1918 hemagglutinin protein was encoded by a part of a gene derived from a swine-lineage influenza, whereas the "stalk" was encoded by parts derived from a human-lineage influenza. Phylogenetic analyses showed that this recombination, which probably changed the virulence of the virus, occurred at the start of, or immediately before, the pandemic and thus may have triggered it.

  2. Genetic recombination is targeted towards gene promoter regions in dogs.

    PubMed

    Auton, Adam; Rui Li, Ying; Kidd, Jeffrey; Oliveira, Kyle; Nadel, Julie; Holloway, J Kim; Hayward, Jessica J; Cohen, Paula E; Greally, John M; Wang, Jun; Bustamante, Carlos D; Boyko, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the H3K4 trimethylase, PRDM9, as the gene responsible for recombination hotspot localization has provided considerable insight into the mechanisms by which recombination is initiated in mammals. However, uniquely amongst mammals, canids appear to lack a functional version of PRDM9 and may therefore provide a model for understanding recombination that occurs in the absence of PRDM9, and thus how PRDM9 functions to shape the recombination landscape. We have constructed a fine-scale genetic map from patterns of linkage disequilibrium assessed using high-throughput sequence data from 51 free-ranging dogs, Canis lupus familiaris. While broad-scale properties of recombination appear similar to other mammalian species, our fine-scale estimates indicate that canine highly elevated recombination rates are observed in the vicinity of CpG rich regions including gene promoter regions, but show little association with H3K4 trimethylation marks identified in spermatocytes. By comparison to genomic data from the Andean fox, Lycalopex culpaeus, we show that biased gene conversion is a plausible mechanism by which the high CpG content of the dog genome could have occurred.

  3. Genetic Recombination Is Targeted towards Gene Promoter Regions in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Auton, Adam; Rui Li, Ying; Kidd, Jeffrey; Oliveira, Kyle; Nadel, Julie; Holloway, J. Kim; Hayward, Jessica J.; Cohen, Paula E.; Greally, John M.; Wang, Jun; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Boyko, Adam R.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the H3K4 trimethylase, PRDM9, as the gene responsible for recombination hotspot localization has provided considerable insight into the mechanisms by which recombination is initiated in mammals. However, uniquely amongst mammals, canids appear to lack a functional version of PRDM9 and may therefore provide a model for understanding recombination that occurs in the absence of PRDM9, and thus how PRDM9 functions to shape the recombination landscape. We have constructed a fine-scale genetic map from patterns of linkage disequilibrium assessed using high-throughput sequence data from 51 free-ranging dogs, Canis lupus familiaris. While broad-scale properties of recombination appear similar to other mammalian species, our fine-scale estimates indicate that canine highly elevated recombination rates are observed in the vicinity of CpG rich regions including gene promoter regions, but show little association with H3K4 trimethylation marks identified in spermatocytes. By comparison to genomic data from the Andean fox, Lycalopex culpaeus, we show that biased gene conversion is a plausible mechanism by which the high CpG content of the dog genome could have occurred. PMID:24348265

  4. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyuha; Reinhard, Carsten; Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Underwood, Charles J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Yelina, Nataliya E; Griffin, Catherine; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  5. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  6. Expression of recombination-activating genes and T cell receptor gene recombination in the human T cell leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hong-yun; Ma, Li; Meng, Min-jie; Yao, Xin-sheng; Lin, Ying; Wu, Zhen-qiang; He, Xiao-wei; Wang, Ju-fang; Wang, Xiao-ning

    2007-03-05

    Recent studies have suggested that mature T cells can change their specificity through reexpression of recombination-activating genes (RAG) and RAG-mediated V(D)J recombination. This process is named receptor revision and has been observed in mature peripheral T cells from transgenic mice and human donors. However, whether thebreceptor revision in mature T cells is a random or orientated process remains poorly understood. Here we used the Jurkathuman T cell line, which represents a mature stage of T cell development, as a model to investigate the regulation of Tcell receptor (TCR) gene recombination. TCR Dbeta-Jbeta signal joint T cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) were determined by nested and seminested PCR. Double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) in the TCRVbeta chain locus were detected by ligation-mediated-PCR. Further analysis of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size of the TCRVbeta chain was examined by the TCR GeneScan technique. RAG1, RAG2, and three crucial components of the nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) pathway were readily detected in Jurkat. Characteristics of junctional diversity of Dbeta2-Jbeta2 signal joints and ds RSS breaks associated with the Dbeta2 5' and Dbeta 2 3' sites were detected in DNA from Jurkat cells. CDR3 size and the gene sequences of the TCRVbeta chain did not change during cell proliferation. RAG1 and RAG2 and ongoing TCR gene recombination are coexpressed in Jurkat cells, but the ongoing recombination process may not play a role in modification of the TCR repertoire.However, the results suggest that Jurkat could be used as a model for studying the regulation of RAGs and V(D)J recombination and as a "special" model of the coexistence of TCR gene rearrangements and "negative" receptor revision.

  7. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  8. Adenovirus-mediated inhibition of SPARC attenuates liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Camino, Alejandra M; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Maccio, Daniela; Prada, Federico; Salvatierra, Edgardo; Rizzo, Miguel; Alaniz, Laura; Aquino, Jorge B; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L; Silva, Marcelo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2008-09-01

    The interaction between fibrogenic cells and extracellular matrix plays a role in liver fibrosis, yet the mechanisms are largely unknown. Secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a matricellular glycoprotein that is expressed by hepatic stellate cells and is overexpressed in fibrotic livers. We investigated the in vivo role of SPARC in experimentally induced liver fibrosis in rats. A recombinant adenovirus carrying antisense SPARC was constructed (AdasSPARC). Advanced liver fibrosis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by prolonged intraperitoneal administration of thioacetamide. Animals received injections of AdasSPARC or Ad beta gal (control adenovirus) via the tail vein and directly into the liver 1 week after the first dose. The pathological changes in liver tissues and indices of fibrosis were assessed at eight weeks. Expression of SPARC, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and alpha-smooth muscle actin were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry. Hepatic SPARC expression significantly increased during the development of liver fibrosis. AdasSPARC markedly attenuated the development of hepatic fibrosis in rats treated with thiocetamide, as assessed by decreased collagen deposition, lower hepatic content of hydroxyproline and less advanced morphometric stage of fibrosis. AdasSPARC treatment reduced inflammatory activity (Knodell score) and suppressed transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cell to the myofibroblasts like phenotype in vivo. Furthermore, in vitro inhibition of SPARC on hepatic stellate cells decreases the production of TGF-beta. This is the first study to demonstrate that knockdown of hepatic SPARC expression ameliorates thioacetamide-induced liver fibrosis in rats with chronic liver injury. SPARC is a potential target for gene therapy in liver fibrosis. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Cancer genes: rare recombinants instead of activated oncogenes (a review).

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1987-01-01

    The 20 known transforming (onc) genes of retroviruses are defined by sequences that are transduced from cellular genes termed protooncogenes or cellular oncogenes. Based on these sequences, viral onc genes have been postulated to be transduced cellular cancer genes, and proto-onc genes have been postulated to be latent cancer genes that can be activated from within the cell to cause virus-negative tumors. The hypothesis is popular because it promises direct access to cellular cancer genes. However, the existence of latent cancer genes presents a paradox, since such genes are clearly undesirable. The hypothesis predicts that viral onc genes and proto-onc genes are isogenic; that expression of proto-onc genes induces tumors; that activated proto-onc genes transform diploid cells upon transfection, like viral onc genes; and that diploid tumors exist. As yet, none of these predictions is confirmed. Instead: Structural comparisons between viral onc genes, essential retroviral genes, and proto-onc genes show that all viral onc genes are indeed new genes, rather than transduced cellular cancer genes. They are recombinants put together from truncated viral and truncated proto-onc genes. Proto-onc genes are frequently expressed in normal cells. To date, not one activated proto-onc gene has been isolated that transforms diploid cells. Above all, no diploid tumors with activated proto-onc genes have been found. Moreover, the probability of spontaneous transformation in vivo is at least 10(9) times lower than predicted from the mechanisms thought to activate proto-onc genes. Therefore, the hypothesis that proto-onc genes are latent cellular oncogenes appears to be an overinterpretation of sequence homology to structural and functional homology with viral onc genes. Here it is proposed that only rare truncations and illegitimate recombinations that alter the germ-line configuration of cellular genes generate viral and possibly cellular cancer genes. The clonal chromosome

  10. Recombinant levels of Escherichia coli K-12 mutants deficient in various replication, recombination, or repair genes.

    PubMed Central

    Zieg, J; Maples, V F; Kushner, S R

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains containing mutations in lexA, rep, uvrA, uvrD, uvrE, lig, polA, dam, or xthA were constructed and tested for conjugation and transduction proficiencies and ability to form Lac+ recombinants in an assay system utilizing a nontandem duplication of two partially deleted lactose operons (lacMS286phi80dIIlacBK1). lexA and rep mutants were as deficient (20% of wild type) as recB and recC strains in their ability to produce Lac+ progeny. All the other strains exhibited increased frequencies of Lac+ recombinant formation, compared with wild type, ranging from 2- to 13-fold. Some strains showed markedly increased conjugation proficiency (dam uvrD) compared to wild type, while others appeared deficient (polA107). Some differences in transduction proficiency were also observed. Analysis of the Lac+ recombinants formed by the various mutants indicated that they were identical to the recombinants formed by a wild-type strain. The results indicate that genetic recombination in E. coli is a highly regulated process involving multiple gene products. PMID:350859

  11. Recombination and Gene Flux Caused by Gene Conversion and Crossing over in Inversion Heterokaryotypes

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, A.; Betran, E.; Barbadilla, A.; Ruiz, A.

    1997-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the effects of inversions on recombination and gene flux between arrangements caused by gene conversion and crossing over was carried out. Two different mathematical models of recombination were used: the Poisson model (without interference) and the Counting model (with interference). The main results are as follows. (1) Recombination and gene flux are highly site-dependent both inside and outside the inverted regions. (2) Crossing over overwhelms gene conversion as a cause of gene flux in large inversions, while conversion becomes relatively significant in short inversions and in regions around the breakpoints. (3) Under the Counting model the recombination rate between two markers depends strongly on the position of the markers along the inverted segment. Two equally spaced markers in the central part of the inverted segment have less recombination than if they are in a more extreme position. (4) Inversions affect recombination rates in the uninverted regions of the chromosome. Recombination increases in the distal segment and decreases in the proximal segment. These results provide an explanation for a number of observations reported in the literature. Because inversions are ubiquitous in the evolutionary history of many Drosophila species, the effects of inversions on recombination are expected to influence DNA variation patterns. PMID:9178017

  12. Horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis

    PubMed Central

    McNeilly, Celia L.; McMillan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) is a human pathogen that colonizes the skin or throat, and causes a range of diseases from relatively benign pharyngitis to potentially fatal invasive diseases. While not as virulent as the close relative Streptococcus pyogenes the two share a number of virulence factors and are known to coexist in a human host. Both pre- and post-genomic studies have revealed that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination occurs between these two organisms and plays a major role in shaping the population structure of SDSE. This review summarizes our current knowledge of HGT and recombination in the evolution of SDSE. PMID:25566202

  13. Selection of recombinant antibodies from antibody gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Hust, Michael; Dübel, Stefan; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    After the sequencing of the human genome is completed, the research focus shifts toward the analysis of gene products. The human genome encodes more than 30,000 genes. Owing to alternative mRNA splicing and posttranslational modifications, for example, glycosylation, phoshorylation, and so on, the number of different proteins of human proteome is supposed to easily exceed 90,000. Antibodies are key detection reagents for the "postgenomic" analysis of these proteins. Any systematic investigation of the human proteome requires high throughput methods for antibody generation. In vitro selection systems utilizing recombinant antibody repertoires offer this capability and capacity. The most commonly used contemporary in vitro selection system is antibody phage display, which has already yielded thousands of useful antibodies for therapy, research, and diagnostics. Herein, methods are described for the selection of recombinant antibody fragments from naive antibody gene libraries.

  14. Genetically Engineered Poxviruses for Recombinant Gene Expression, Vaccination, and Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Bernard

    1996-10-01

    Vaccinia virus, no longer required for immunization against smallpox, now serves as a unique vector for expressing genes within the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. As a research tool, recombinant vaccinia viruses are used to synthesize and analyze the structure--function relationships of proteins, determine the targets of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and investigate the types of immune response needed for protection against specific infectious diseases and cancer. The vaccine potential of recombinant vaccinia virus has been realized in the form of an effective oral wild-life rabies vaccine, although no product for humans has been licensed. A genetically altered vaccinia virus that is unable to replicate in mammalian cells and produces diminished cytopathic effects retains the capacity for high-level gene expression and immunogenicity while promising exceptional safety for laboratory workers and potential vaccine recipients.

  15. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation.

  16. Gene targeting in maize by somatic ectopic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ayar, Ayhan; Wehrkamp-Richter, Sophie; Laffaire, Jean-Baptiste; Le Goff, Samuel; Levy, Julien; Chaignon, Sandrine; Salmi, Hajer; Lepicard, Alexandra; Sallaud, Christophe; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I; Paul, Wyatt

    2013-04-01

    Low transformation efficiency and high background of non-targeted events are major constraints to gene targeting in plants. We demonstrate here applicability in maize of a system that reduces the constraint from transformation efficiency. The system requires regenerable transformants in which all of the following elements are stably integrated in the genome: (i) donor DNA with the gene of interest adjacent to sequence for repair of a defective selectable marker, (ii) sequence encoding a rare-cutting endonuclease such as I-SceI, (iii) a target locus (TL) comprising the defective selectable marker and I-SceI cleavage site. Typically, this requires additional markers for the integration of the donor and target sequences, which may be assembled through cross-pollination of separate transformants. Inducible expression of I-SceI then cleaves the TL and facilitates homologous recombination, which is assayed by selection for the repaired marker. We used bar and gfp markers to identify assembled transformants, a dexamethasone-inducible I-SceI::GR protein, and selection for recombination events that restored an intact nptII. Applying this strategy to callus permitted the selection of recombination into the TL at a frequency of 0.085% per extracted immature embryo (29% of recombinants). Our results also indicate that excision of the donor locus (DL) through the use of flanking I-SceI cleavage sites may be unnecessary, and a source of unwanted repair events at the DL. The system allows production, from each assembled transformant, of many cells that subsequently can be treated to induce gene targeting. This may facilitate gene targeting in plant species for which transformation efficiencies are otherwise limiting.

  17. New Genes Originated via Multiple Recombinational Pathways in the β-Globin Gene Family of Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Federico G.; Opazo, Juan C.; Storz, Jay F.

    2008-01-01

    Species differences in the size or membership composition of multigene families can be attributed to lineage-specific additions of new genes via duplication, losses of genes via deletion or inactivation, and the creation of chimeric genes via domain shuffling or gene fusion. In principle, it should be possible to infer the recombinational pathways responsible for each of these different types of genomic change by conducting detailed comparative analyses of genomic sequence data. Here, we report an attempt to unravel the complex evolutionary history of the β-globin gene family in a taxonomically diverse set of rodent species. The main objectives were: 1) to characterize the genomic structure of the β-globin gene cluster of rodents; 2) to assign orthologous and paralogous relationships among duplicate copies of β-like globin genes; and 3) to infer the specific recombinational pathways responsible for gene duplications, gene deletions, and the creation of chimeric fusion genes. Results of our comparative genomic analyses revealed that variation in gene family size among rodent species is mainly attributable to the differential gain and loss of later expressed β-globin genes via unequal crossing-over. However, two distinct recombinational mechanisms were implicated in the creation of chimeric fusion genes. In muroid rodents, a chimeric γ/ε fusion gene was created by unequal crossing-over between the embryonic ε- and γ-globin genes. Interestingly, this γ/ε fusion gene was generated in the same fashion as the “anti-Lepore” 5′-δ-(β/δ)-β-3′ duplication mutant in humans (the reciprocal exchange product of the pathological hemoglobin Lepore deletion mutant). By contrast, in the house mouse, Mus musculus, a chimeric β/δ fusion pseudogene was created by a β-globin → δ-globin gene conversion event. Although the γ/ε and β/δ fusion genes share a similar chimeric gene structure, they originated via completely different recombinational pathways. PMID

  18. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  19. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  20. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  1. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  2. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  3. The effect of mucolytic agents on gene transfer across a CF sputum barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stern, M; Caplen, N J; Browning, J E; Griesenbach, U; Sorgi, F; Huang, L; Gruenert, D C; Marriot, C; Crystal, R G; Geddes, D M; Alton, E W

    1998-01-01

    Trials of gene transfer for cystic fibrosis (CF) are currently underway. However, direct application to the airways may be impeded by the presence of airway secretions. We have therefore assessed the effect of CF sputum on the expression of the reporter gene beta-galactosidase complexed with the cationic liposome DC-Chol/DOPE in a number of cell lines in vitro. Transfection was markedly inhibited in the presence of sputum; the effect was concentration dependent and was only partially ameliorated by removal of sputum with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) washing before gene transfer. However, treatment of the sputum-covered cells with recombinant human DNase (rhDNase, 50 micrograms/ml) but not with N-acetylcysteine, Nacystelyn, lysine (all 20 mM) or recombinant alginase (0.5 U/ml) significantly (P < 0.005) improved gene transfer. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer efficiency in the presence of sputum was similarly inhibited, and again, treatment with rhDNase before transfection significantly improved gene transfer (P < 0.005). Transfection of Cos 7 cells in the presence of exogenous genomic DNA alone demonstrated similar inhibition to that observed with sputum and was also ameliorated by pre-treatment of DNA-covered cells with rhDNase. In a separate series of experiments performed in the absence of added sputum or genomic DNA, increasing concentrations of rhDNase resulted in a concentration-related decline in transfection efficiency. However, even at the highest concentration (500 micrograms/ml of rhDNase), transfection efficiency remained more than 50% of control. Thus, pre-treatment of CF airways with rhDNase may be appropriate before liposome or adenovirus-mediated gene therapy.

  4. Adenovirus-mediated shRNA interference against HSV-1 replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Liu, Xinjing; Wang, Qingzhi; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Ting; Han, Zhiqiang; Xu, Yuming

    2016-12-01

    The UL29 and UL28 proteins encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are critical for its replication and packaging, respectively. Research has demonstrated that synthesized siRNA molecules targeting the UL29 gene are able to suppress HSV-2 replication and the UL28-null HSV-1 gene cannot form infectious viruses in vitro. Silencing the UL28 and UL29 genes by RNAi might lead to the development of novel antiviral agents for the treatment of HSV-1 infections. Two kinds of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the UL29 and UL28 genes were chemically synthesized and then delivered into cells by a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Adv5) vector. (-) shRNAs targeting none of the genome of HSV-1 were used as the control. Vero cells were inoculated with Ad-UL28shRNA or Ad-UL29shRNA at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100 and challenged 24 h later with HSV-1 at an MOI of 0.01 to inhibit HSV-1 replication, as measured by the level of the corresponding RNA and proteins. In addition, the amount of progeny virus was assessed at daily intervals. The antiviral effects of Ad-shRNAs at ongoing HSV-1 infection were explored at 12 h after inoculation of the HSV-1. The results showed that the shRNAs delivered by Adv5 significantly suppressed HSV-1 replication in vitro, as determined by the levels of viral RNA transcription, viral protein synthesis, and viral production. The Ad-UL28shRNA and Ad-UL29shRNA suppressed the replication of HSV-1, respectively, compared with the control group (P < 0.001). When Ad-UL28shRNA and Ad-UL29shRNA were combined, a synergistic effect was observed. The antiviral effects could sustain for at least 4 days after the HSV-1 infection (P < 0.001). Furthermore, antiviral effects were achieved 12 h prior to inoculation of Adv5-shRNAs (P < 0.001). Our data demonstrated comparable antiviral activities against herpes simplex virus by shRNAs targeting either UL29 or UL28 sites in vitro and the effectiveness of using the Adv5

  5. Potent antitumor activity of double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus-mediated ST13 for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, De Bin; Zhong, Su Yang; Yang, Min; Wang, Yi Gang; Qian, Qi Jun; Zheng, Shu; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2009-04-01

    Following targeted gene virotherapy, the suppression of tumorigenicity 13 (ST13) gene was inserted into the double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus SG500 to ensure more safety and potent antitumor activity against colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo. We generated the ST13-expressing oncolytic adenovirus SG500-ST13, with which colorectal carcinoma cell lines SW620 and HCT116, and the lung fibroblast cell line WI38, were infected. Crystal violet staining was carried out to detect the cytopathic effect in cells, and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method was used to assay cell viability. The effect of apoptosis induced by SG500-ST13 was confirmed by Hoechst staining and the TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling method. To further identify the antitumor effects of SG500-ST13 on HCT116 xenografts in Balb/c nude mice, the induction of cell death was assessed by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Immunohistochemical study was also carried out.

  6. Recombinant Carcinoembryonic Antigen as a Reporter Gene for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kenanova, Vania; Barat, Bhaswati; Olafsen, Tove; Chatziioannou, Arion; Herschman, Harvey R.; Braun, Jonathan; Wu, Anna M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Reporter genes can provide a way of non-invasively assessing gene activity in vivo. However, current reporter gene strategies may be limited by the immunogenicity of foreign reporter proteins, endogenous expression or unwanted biological activity. We have developed a reporter gene based on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a human protein with limited normal tissue expression. Methods To construct a CEA reporter gene for PET, a CEA minigene (N-A3) was fused to the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human FcγRIIb receptor. The NA3-FcγRIIb recombinant gene, driven by a CMV promoter, was transfected in Jurkat (human T cell leukemia) cells. Expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and microPET imaging. Results Flow cytometry identified Jurkat clones stably expressing NA3-FcγRIIb at low, medium, and high levels. High and medium NA3-FcγRIIb expression could also be detected by Western blot. Reporter gene positive and negative Jurkat cells were used to establish xenografts in athymic mice. IHC showed staining of the tumor with high reporter gene expression; medium and low N-A3 expression was not detected. MicroPET imaging, using an anti-CEA 124I-labeled scFv-Fc antibody fragment, demonstrated that only high N-A3 expression could be detected. Specific accumulation of activity was visualized at the N-A3 positive tumor as early as 4h. MicroPET image quantitation showed tumor activity of 1.8(±0.2), 15.2(±1.3) and 4.6(±1.2) %ID/g at 4h, 20h and 48h, respectively. Biodistribution at 48h, demonstrated tumor uptake of 4.8(±0.8) %ID/g. Conclusion The CEA N-A3 minigene has the potential to be used as a reporter gene for imaging cells in vivo. PMID:18719907

  7. Selection of recombinant antibodies from antibody gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dübel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are indispensable detection reagents for research and diagnostics and represent the biggest class of biological therapeutics on the market. In vitro antibody selection systems offer many advantages over animal-based technologies because the whole selection process is independent of the in vivo immune response. In the last two decades antibody phage display has evolved to the most robust and widely used method and has already yielded thousands of antibodies. The selection of binders by phage display is also referred to as "panning" and based on the specific molecular interaction of antibody phage with an immobilized antigen thus allowing the enrichment and isolation of antigen-specific monoclonal binders from very large antibody gene libraries. Here, we give detailed protocols for the selection of recombinant antibody fragments from antibody gene libraries in microtiter plates.

  8. Characterization of recombinant bacteriophages containing mosquito ribosomal RNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.

    1988-01-01

    A family of nine recombinant bacteriophages containing rRNA genes from cultured cells of the mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has been isolated by screening two different genomic DNA libraries - Charon 30 and EMBL 3 using {sup 32}P-labeled 18S and 28S rRNA as probes. These nine recombinant bacteriophages were characterized by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and S1 nuclease analysis. The 18S rRNA coding region contains an evolutionarily conserved EcoRI site near the 3{prime}-end, and measures 1800 bp. The 28S rRNA genes were divided into {alpha} and {beta} coding regions measuring 1750 bp and 2000 bp, respectively. The gap between these two regions measures about 340 bp. No insertion sequences were found in the rRNA coding regions. The entire rDNA repeat unit had a minimum length of 15.6 kb, including a nontranscribed spacer region. The non-transcribed spacer region of cloned A. albopictus rDNA contained a common series of seven PvuI sites within a 1250 bp region upstream of the 18S rRNA coding region, and a proportion of this region also showed heterogeneity both in the length and in the restriction sites.

  9. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick

    2011-07-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ER{alpha} as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  10. Construction of gene-targeting vectors by recombineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Song-Choon; Wang, Wei; Liu, Pentao

    2009-01-01

    Recombineering is a technology that utilizes the efficient homologous recombination functions encoded by gamma phage to manipulate DNA in Escherichia coli. Construction of knockout vectors has been greatly facilitated by recombineering as it allows one to choose any genomic region to manipulate. We describe here an efficient recombineering-based protocol for making mouse conditional knockout targeting vectors.

  11. Release of active and depot GDF-5 after adenovirus-mediated overexpression stimulates rabbit and human intervertebral disc cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haili; Kroeber, Markus; Hanke, Michael; Ries, Rainer; Schmid, Carsten; Poller, Wolfgang; Richter, Wiltrud

    2004-02-01

    To develop new therapeutic options for the treatment of disc degeneration we tested the possibility of overexpression of active growth and differentiation factor (GDF) 5 and of transforming growth factor (TGF) beta(1) by adenoviral gene transfer and characterized its effect on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis of cultured rabbit and human intervertebral disc cells. Recombinant adenovirus encoding for GDF-5 or TGF-beta(1) was developed and transgene expression characterized by RT-PCR, western blot and ELISA. Growth and matrix synthesis of transduced cells was measured by [(3)H]thymidine or [(35)S]sulfate incorporation. Disc cells expressed the receptors BMPR1A, BMPR1B, and BMPR2, which are relevant for GDF-5 action. Adenovirus efficiently transferred the GDF-5 gene or the TGF-beta(1) gene to rabbit and human intervertebral disc cells. About 50 ng GDF-5 protein/10(6 )cells per 24 h or 7 ng TGF-beta(1) protein/10(6 )cells per 24 h was produced. According to western blotting, two GDF-5 forms, with molecular weights consistent with the activated GDF-5 dimer and the proform, were secreted over the 3 weeks following gene transfer. Overexpressed GDF-5 and TGF-beta(1) were bioactive and promoted growth of rabbit disc cells in monolayer culture. Our results suggest that ex vivo gene delivery of GDF-5 and TGF-beta(1) is an attractive approach for the release of mature and pre-GDF-5 in surrounding tissue. This leads us to hope that it will prove possible to improve the treatment of degenerative disc disease by means of ex vivo gene transfer of single or multiple growth factors.

  12. Five low energy phosphorene allotropes constructed through gene segments recombination

    PubMed Central

    He, Chaoyu; Zhang, ChunXiao; Tang, Chao; Ouyang, Tao; Li, Jin; Zhong, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Based on the crystal structures of the previously proposed low energy η-P and θ-P, five new phosphorene allotropes were predicted through gene segments recombination method. These five new phosphorene allotropes are confirmed dynamically stable and energetically more favorable than their parents (η-P and θ-P). Especially, the XX-XX type G1-P is confirmed energetically more favorable than most of all the previously proposed phosphorene allotropes, including black phosphorene and blue phosphorene, which is highly expected to be synthesized in future experiment through vapor deposition or epitaxial growth method like blue β-P. The calculated results also show that such a new promising phosphorene allotrope G1-P is a potential candidate for application in nano-electronics according to its middle band gap of about 1.491 eV from DFT-HSE06 calculation. PMID:28447623

  13. Clinical gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Mueller, C; Flotte, T R

    2008-06-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors possess a number of properties that may make them suitable for clinical gene therapy, including being based upon a virus for which there is no known pathology and a natural propensity to persist in human cells. Wild-type adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are now known to be very diverse and ubiquitous in humans and nonhuman primates, which adds to the degree of confidence one may place in the natural history of AAV, namely that it has never been associated with any human tumors or other acute pathology, other than sporadic reports of having been isolated from spontaneously aborted fetuses. On the basis of this understanding of AAV biology and a wide range of preclinical studies in mice, rabbits, dogs and nonhuman primates, a growing number of clinical trials have been undertaken with this class of vectors. Altogether, over 40 clinical trials have now been approved. Although all previous trials were undertaken using AAV serotype 2 vectors, at least two current trials utilize AAV2 vector genomes cross-packaged or pseudotyped into AAV1 capsids, which appear to mediate more efficient gene delivery to muscle. The explosion of capsid isolates available for use as vectors to over 120 has now provided the potential to broaden the application of AAV-based gene therapy to other cell types.

  14. RNA Structures Facilitate Recombination-Mediated Gene Swapping in HIV-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P.; Weeks, Kevin M.; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny. PMID:20881047

  15. RNA structures facilitate recombination-mediated gene swapping in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Martin, Darren P; Weeks, Kevin M; Negroni, Matteo

    2010-12-01

    Many viruses, including retroviruses, undergo frequent recombination, a process which can increase their rate of adaptive evolution. In the case of HIV, recombination has been responsible for the generation of numerous intersubtype recombinant variants with epidemiological importance in the AIDS pandemic. Although it is known that fragments of genetic material do not combine randomly during the generation of recombinant viruses, the mechanisms that lead to preferential recombination at specific sites are not fully understood. Here we reanalyze recent independent data defining (i) the structure of a complete HIV-1 RNA genome and (ii) favorable sites for recombination. We show that in the absence of selection acting on recombinant genomes, regions harboring RNA structures in the NL4-3 model strain are strongly predictive of recombination breakpoints in the HIV-1 env genes of primary isolates. In addition, we found that breakpoints within recombinant HIV-1 genomes sampled from human populations, which have been acted upon extensively by natural selection, also colocalize with RNA structures. Critically, junctions between genes are enriched in structured RNA elements and are also preferred sites for generating functional recombinant forms. These data suggest that RNA structure-mediated recombination allows the virus to exchange intact genes rather than arbitrary subgene fragments, which is likely to increase the overall viability and replication success of the recombinant HIV progeny.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of recombination restriction in the envelope gene of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Galetto, Roman; Hamoudi, Meriem; Archer, John; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Martin, Darren P; Robertson, David L; Negroni, Matteo

    2009-05-01

    The ability of pathogens to escape the host's immune response is crucial for the establishment of persistent infections and can influence virulence. Recombination has been observed to contribute to this process by generating novel genetic variants. Although distinctive recombination patterns have been described in many viral pathogens, little is known about the influence of biases in the recombination process itself relative to selective forces acting on newly formed recombinants. Understanding these influences is important for determining how recombination contributes to pathogen genome and proteome evolution. Most previous research on recombination-driven protein evolution has focused on relatively simple proteins, usually in the context of directed evolution experiments. Here, we study recombination in the envelope gene of HIV-1 between primary isolates belonging to subtypes that recombine naturally in the HIV/AIDS pandemic. By characterizing the early steps in the generation of recombinants, we provide novel insights into the evolutionary forces that shape recombination patterns within viral populations. Specifically, we show that the combined effects of mechanistic processes that determine the locations of recombination breakpoints across the HIV-1 envelope gene, and purifying selection acting against dysfunctional recombinants, can explain almost the entire distribution of breakpoints found within this gene in nature. These constraints account for the surprising paucity of recombination breakpoints found in infected individuals within this highly variable gene. Thus, the apparent randomness of HIV evolution via recombination may in fact be relatively more predictable than anticipated. In addition, the dominance of purifying selection in localized areas of the HIV genome defines regions where functional constraints on recombinants appear particularly strong, pointing to vulnerable aspects of HIV biology.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Recombination Restriction in the Envelope Gene of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Galetto, Roman; Hamoudi, Meriem; Archer, John; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Martin, Darren P.; Robertson, David L.; Negroni, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    The ability of pathogens to escape the host's immune response is crucial for the establishment of persistent infections and can influence virulence. Recombination has been observed to contribute to this process by generating novel genetic variants. Although distinctive recombination patterns have been described in many viral pathogens, little is known about the influence of biases in the recombination process itself relative to selective forces acting on newly formed recombinants. Understanding these influences is important for determining how recombination contributes to pathogen genome and proteome evolution. Most previous research on recombination-driven protein evolution has focused on relatively simple proteins, usually in the context of directed evolution experiments. Here, we study recombination in the envelope gene of HIV-1 between primary isolates belonging to subtypes that recombine naturally in the HIV/AIDS pandemic. By characterizing the early steps in the generation of recombinants, we provide novel insights into the evolutionary forces that shape recombination patterns within viral populations. Specifically, we show that the combined effects of mechanistic processes that determine the locations of recombination breakpoints across the HIV-1 envelope gene, and purifying selection acting against dysfunctional recombinants, can explain almost the entire distribution of breakpoints found within this gene in nature. These constraints account for the surprising paucity of recombination breakpoints found in infected individuals within this highly variable gene. Thus, the apparent randomness of HIV evolution via recombination may in fact be relatively more predictable than anticipated. In addition, the dominance of purifying selection in localized areas of the HIV genome defines regions where functional constraints on recombinants appear particularly strong, pointing to vulnerable aspects of HIV biology. PMID:19424420

  18. Genetic recombination as a major cause of mutagenesis in the human globin gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Borg, Joseph; Georgitsi, Marianthi; Aleporou-Marinou, Vassiliki; Kollia, Panagoula; Patrinos, George P

    2009-12-01

    Homologous recombination is a frequent phenomenon in multigene families and as such it occurs several times in both the alpha- and beta-like globin gene families. In numerous occasions, genetic recombination has been previously implicated as a major mechanism that drives mutagenesis in the human globin gene clusters, either in the form of unequal crossover or gene conversion. Unequal crossover results in the increase or decrease of the human globin gene copies, accompanied in the majority of cases with minor phenotypic consequences, while gene conversion contributes either to maintaining sequence homogeneity or generating sequence diversity. The role of genetic recombination, particularly gene conversion in the evolution of the human globin gene families has been discussed elsewhere. Here, we summarize our current knowledge and review existing experimental evidence outlining the role of genetic recombination in the mutagenic process in the human globin gene families.

  19. Creating new genes by plasmid recombination in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Ana; Galic, Tatjana; Mariet, Jean-François; Matic, Ivan; Radman, Miroslav; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2005-11-01

    Gene shuffling is a way of creating proteins with interesting new characteristics, starting from diverged sequences. We tested an alternative to gene shuffling based on plasmid recombination and found that Bacillus subtilis efficiently recombines sequences with 4% divergence, and Escherichia coli mutS is more appropriate for sequences with 22% divergence.

  20. Creating New Genes by Plasmid Recombination in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Ana; Galic, Tatjana; Mariet, Jean-François; Matic, Ivan; Radman, Miroslav; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2005-01-01

    Gene shuffling is a way of creating proteins with interesting new characteristics, starting from diverged sequences. We tested an alternative to gene shuffling based on plasmid recombination and found that Bacillus subtilis efficiently recombines sequences with 4% divergence, and Escherichia coli mutS is more appropriate for sequences with 22% divergence. PMID:16269814

  1. Cold shock induction of recombinant Arctic environmental genes.

    PubMed

    Bjerga, Gro Elin Kjæreng; Williamson, Adele Kim

    2015-08-19

    Heterologous expression of psychrophilic enzymes in E. coli is particularly challenging due to their intrinsic instability. The low stability is regarded as a consequence of adaptation that allow them to function at low temperatures. Recombinant production presents a significant barrier to their exploitation for commercial applications in industry. As part of an enzyme discovery project we have investigated the utility of a cold-shock inducible promoter for low-temperature expression of five diverse genes derived from the metagenomes of marine Arctic sediments. After evaluation of their production, we further optimized for soluble production by building a vector suite from which the environmental genes could be expressed as fusions with solubility tags. We found that the low-temperature optimized system produced high expression levels for all putatively cold-active proteins, as well as reducing host toxicity for several candidates. As a proof of concept, activity assays with one of the candidates, a putative chitinase, showed that functional protein was obtained using the low-temperature optimized vector suite. We conclude that a cold-shock inducible system is advantageous for the heterologous expression of psychrophilic proteins, and may also be useful for expression of toxic mesophilic and thermophilic proteins where properties of the proteins are deleterious to the host cell growth.

  2. Evolution by selection, recombination, and gene duplication in MHC class I genes of two Rhacophoridae species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparison of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes across vertebrate species can reveal molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of adaptive immunity-related proteins. As the first terrestrial tetrapods, amphibians deserve special attention because of their exposure to probably increased spectrum of microorganisms compared with ancestral aquatic fishes. Knowledge regarding the evolutionary patterns and mechanisms associated with amphibian MHC genes remains limited. The goal of the present study was to isolate MHC class I genes from two Rhacophoridae species (Rhacophorus omeimontis and Polypedates megacephalus) and examine their evolution. Results We identified 27 MHC class I alleles spanning the region from exon 2 to 4 in 38 tree frogs. The available evidence suggests that these 27 sequences all belong to classical MHC class I (MHC Ia) genes. Although several anuran species only display one MHC class Ia locus, at least two or three loci were observed in P. megacephalus and R. omeimontis, indicating that the number of MHC class Ia loci varies among anuran species. Recombination events, which mainly involve the entire exons, played an important role in shaping the genetic diversity of the 27 MHC class Ia alleles. In addition, signals of positive selection were found in Rhacophoridae MHC class Ia genes. Amino acid sites strongly suggested by program to be under positive selection basically accorded with the putative antigen binding sites deduced from crystal structure of human HLA. Phylogenetic relationships among MHC class I alleles revealed the presence of trans-species polymorphisms. Conclusions In the two Rhacophoridae species (1) there are two or three MHC class Ia loci; (2) recombination mainly occurs between the entire exons of MHC class Ia genes; (3) balancing selection, gene duplication and recombination all contribute to the diversity of MHC class Ia genes. These findings broaden our knowledge on the evolution of amphibian MHC systems

  3. Duplication of chicken defensin7 gene generated by gene conversion and homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Ok; Bornelöv, Susanne; Andersson, Leif; Lamont, Susan J; Chen, Junfeng; Womack, James E

    2016-11-29

    Defensins constitute an evolutionary conserved family of cationic antimicrobial peptides that play a key role in host innate immune responses to infection. Defensin genes generally reside in complex genomic regions that are prone to structural variation, and defensin genes exhibit extensive copy number variation in humans and in other species. Copy number variation of defensin genes was examined in inbred lines of Leghorn and Fayoumi chickens, and a duplication of defensin7 was discovered in the Fayoumi breed. Analysis of junction sequences confirmed the occurrence of a simple tandem duplication of defensin7 with sequence identity at the junction, suggesting nonallelic homologous recombination between defensin7 and defensin6 The duplication event generated two chimeric promoters that are best explained by gene conversion followed by homologous recombination. Expression of defensin7 was not elevated in animals with two genes despite both genes being transcribed in the tissues examined. Computational prediction of promoter regions revealed the presence of several putative transcription factor binding sites generated by the duplication event. These data provide insight into the evolution and possible function of large gene families and specifically, the defensins.

  4. Duplication of chicken defensin7 gene generated by gene conversion and homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Ok; Bornelöv, Susanne; Andersson, Leif; Lamont, Susan J.; Chen, Junfeng; Womack, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Defensins constitute an evolutionary conserved family of cationic antimicrobial peptides that play a key role in host innate immune responses to infection. Defensin genes generally reside in complex genomic regions that are prone to structural variation, and defensin genes exhibit extensive copy number variation in humans and in other species. Copy number variation of defensin genes was examined in inbred lines of Leghorn and Fayoumi chickens, and a duplication of defensin7 was discovered in the Fayoumi breed. Analysis of junction sequences confirmed the occurrence of a simple tandem duplication of defensin7 with sequence identity at the junction, suggesting nonallelic homologous recombination between defensin7 and defensin6. The duplication event generated two chimeric promoters that are best explained by gene conversion followed by homologous recombination. Expression of defensin7 was not elevated in animals with two genes despite both genes being transcribed in the tissues examined. Computational prediction of promoter regions revealed the presence of several putative transcription factor binding sites generated by the duplication event. These data provide insight into the evolution and possible function of large gene families and specifically, the defensins. PMID:27849592

  5. The haemagglutinin gene, but not the neuraminidase gene, of 'Spanish flu' was a recombinant.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, M J; Armstrong, J S; Gibbs, A J

    2001-01-01

    Published analyses of the sequences of three genes from the 1918 Spanish influenza virus have cast doubt on the theory that it came from birds immediately before the pandemic. They showed that the virus was of the H1N1 subtype lineage but more closely related to mammal-infecting strains than any known bird-infecting strain. They provided no evidence that the virus originated by gene reassortment nor that the virus was the direct ancestor of the two lineages of H1N1 viruses currently found in mammals; one that mostly infects human beings, the other pigs. The unusual virulence of the virus and why it produced a pandemic have remained unsolved. We have reanalysed the sequences of the three 1918 genes and found conflicting patterns of relatedness in all three. Various tests showed that the patterns in its haemagglutinin (HA) gene were produced by true recombination between two different parental HA H1 subtype genes, but that the conflicting patterns in its neuraminidase and non-structural-nuclear export proteins genes resulted from selection. The recombination event that produced the 1918 HA gene probably coincided with the start of the pandemic, and may have triggered it. PMID:11779383

  6. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates.

    PubMed

    Spring-Pearson, Senanu M; Stone, Joshua K; Doyle, Adina; Allender, Christopher J; Okinaka, Richard T; Mayo, Mark; Broomall, Stacey M; Hill, Jessica M; Karavis, Mark A; Hubbard, Kyle S; Insalaco, Joseph M; McNew, Lauren A; Rosenzweig, C Nicole; Gibbons, Henry S; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul; Tuanyok, Apichai

    2015-01-01

    The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspots for recombination driven primarily by site-specific recombination associated with tRNAs. However, recombination rates in other portions of the genome are also high, a feature we expected to disrupt gene order. We analyzed the pangenome of 37 isolates of B. pseudomallei and demonstrate that the pangenome is 'open', with approximately 136 new genes identified with each new genome sequenced, and that the global core genome consists of 4568±16 homologs. Genes associated with metabolism were statistically overrepresented in the core genome, and genes associated with mobile elements, disease, and motility were primarily associated with accessory portions of the pangenome. The frequency distribution of genes present in between 1 and 37 of the genomes analyzed matches well with a model of genome evolution in which 96% of the genome has very low recombination rates but 4% of the genome recombines readily. Using homologous genes among pairs of genomes, we found that gene order was highly conserved among strains, despite the high recombination rates previously observed. High rates of gene transfer and recombination are incompatible with retaining gene order unless these processes are either highly localized to specific sites within the genome, or are characterized by symmetrical gene gain and loss. Our results demonstrate that both processes occur: localized recombination introduces many new genes at relatively few sites, and recombination throughout the genome generates the novel multi-locus sequence types previously observed while preserving gene order.

  7. E. coli recA gene improves gene targeted homologous recombination in Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    PubMed

    Ishag, Hassan Z A; Xiong, Qiyan; Liu, Maojun; Feng, Zhixin; Shao, Guoqing

    2017-05-01

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis is an opportunistic pathogen of pigs. Recently, it has been shown to transform cell cultures, increasing the attention of the researchers. Studies on the pathogenesis require specific genetic tool that is not yet available for the pathogen. To address this limitation, we constructed two suicide plasmids pGEMT-tetM/LR and pGEMT-recA-tetM/LR having a tetracycline resistance marker flanked by two hemolysin gene arms. The latter plasmid encodes an E. coli recA, a gene involved in DNA recombination, repair and maintenance of DNA. Using inactivation of the hemolysin gene, which results in a detectable and measurable phenotype, we found that each plasmid can disrupt the hemolysin gene of M. hyorhinis through a double cross-over homologous recombination. However, inclusion of the E. coli recA gene in the construct resulted in 9-fold increase in the frequency of hemolysin gene mutants among the screened tetracycline resistance colonies. The resultant hemolysin mutant strain lacks the ability to lyse mouse bed blood cells (RBC) when tested in vitro (p<0.001). The host-plasmid system described in this study, has applications for the genetic manipulation of this pathogen and potentially other mycoplasmas.

  8. Amelioration of radiation-induced skin injury by adenovirus-mediated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) overexpression in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective Radiation-induced skin injury remains a serious concern for radiation therapy. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, has been reported to have potential antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties. However, the role of HO-1 in radiation-induced skin damage remains unclear. This study aims to elucidate the effects of HO-1 on radiation-induced skin injury in rats. Methods A control adenovirus (Ad-EGFP) and a recombinant adenovirus (Ad-HO1-EGFP) were constructed. Rats were irradiated to the buttock skin with a single dose of 45 Gy followed by a subcutaneous injection of PBS, 5 × 109 genomic copies of Ad-EGFP or Ad-HO1-EGFP (n = 8). After treatment, the skin MDA concentration, SOD activity and apoptosis were measured. The expression of antioxidant and pro-apoptotic genes was determined by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. Skin reactions were measured at regular intervals using the semi-quantitative skin injury score. Results Subcutaneous injection of Ad-HO1-EGFP infected both epidermal and dermal cells and could spread to the surrounding regions. Radiation exposure upregulated the transcription of the antioxidant enzyme genes, including SOD-1, GPx2 and endogenous HO-1. HO-1 overexpression decreased lipid peroxidation and inhibited the induction of ROS scavenging proteins. Moreover, HO-1 exerted an anti-apoptotic effect by suppressing FAS and FASL expression. Subcutaneous injection of Ad-HO1-EGFP demonstrated significant improvement in radiation-induced skin injury. Conclusions The present study provides evidences for the protective role of HO-1 in alleviating radiation-induced skin damage in rats, which is helpful for the development of therapy for radiation-induced skin injury. PMID:22247972

  9. Adenovirus-mediated tBid overexpression results in therapeutic effects on p53-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ji; Chen, George G; Chun, Suk-Ying; Yun, Jing-Ping; Chak, Ernest C W; Ho, Rocky L K; Lai, Paul B S

    2006-10-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with a very high mortality. Because the success of the conventional therapies is limited, gene therapy may represent an alternative for HCC management. Our earlier study has shown that Bid plays a role in the development of HCC. The aim of our study is to evaluate the possibility of using truncated Bid (tBid) as a novel therapy for HCC treatment. Two HCC cell lines, Hep3B and PLC/PRF/5, were used in the experiment. Hep3B was a p53-resistant while PLC/PRF/5 a p53-sensitive. A recombinant adenovirus-Ad/AFPtBid, which contained a tBid gene driven by an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter, was constructed. Both Hep3B and PLC/PRF/5 cells infected with Ad/AFPtBid showed a significant decrease in cell viability. The decrease in cell viability by Ad/AFPtBid resulted from apoptosis of HCC cells, evident by enhanced activity of caspases and increased release of cytochrome c. In vivo experiment was performed by the intratumor injection of Ad/AFPtBid in nude mice inoculated with Hep3B. Ad/AFPtBid injection significantly inhibited tumor growth, and tumor tissues showed a marked increase in TUNEL-positive cells. Our experiment also demonstrated that Ad/AFPtBid only targeted AFP-producing cells but not those non-AFP producing cells. In conclusion, these results indicate that the introduction of Ad/AFPtBid can not only significantly but specifically kill HCC cells that produce AFP. The cell death induced by Ad/AFPtBid in HCC cells is via an apoptotic pathway that can be independent of p53 status.

  10. Frequency and character of alternative somatic recombination fates of paralogous genes during T-DNA integration.

    PubMed

    Jelesko, John G; Carter, Kristy; Kinoshita, Yuki; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2005-09-01

    A synthetic RBCSB gene cluster was transformed into Arabidopsis in order to simultaneously evaluate the frequency and character of somatic illegitimate recombination, homologous recombination, and targeted gene replacement events associated with T-DNA-mediated transformation. The most frequent type of recombination event observed was illegitimate integration of the T-DNA without activation of the silent DeltaRBCS1B: LUC transgene. Sixteen luc(+) (firefly luciferase positive) T1 plants were isolated. Six of these were due to illegitimate recombination events resulting in a gene trapping effect. Nine resulted from homologous recombination between paralogous RBCSB sequences associated with T-DNA integration. The frequency of somatic homologous recombination associated with T-DNA integration was almost 200 times higher than previously reported rates of meiotic homologous recombination with the same genes. The distribution of (somatic homologous) recombination resolution sites generally fits a fractional interval length model. However, a small region adjacent to an indel showed a significant over-representation of resolution sites, suggesting that DNA mismatch recognition may also play an important role in the positioning of somatic resolution sites. The frequency of somatic resolution within exon-2 was significantly different from that previously observed during meiotic recombination.

  11. Homologous recombination drives both sequence diversity and gene content variation in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying; Ma, Jennifer H; Warren, Keisha; Tsang, Raymond S W; Low, Donald E; Jamieson, Frances B; Alexander, David C; Hao, Weilong

    2013-01-01

    The study of genetic and phenotypic variation is fundamental for understanding the dynamics of bacterial genome evolution and untangling the evolution and epidemiology of bacterial pathogens. Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is among the most intriguing bacterial pathogens in genomic studies due to its dynamic population structure and complex forms of pathogenicity. Extensive genomic variation within identical clonal complexes (CCs) in Nm has been recently reported and suggested to be the result of homologous recombination, but the extent to which recombination contributes to genomic variation within identical CCs has remained unclear. In this study, we sequenced two Nm strains of identical serogroup (C) and multi-locus sequence type (ST60), and conducted a systematic analysis with an additional 34 Nm genomes. Our results revealed that all gene content variation between the two ST60 genomes was introduced by homologous recombination at the conserved flanking genes, and 94.25% or more of sequence divergence was caused by homologous recombination. Recombination was found in genes associated with virulence factors, antigenic outer membrane proteins, and vaccine targets, suggesting an important role of homologous recombination in rapidly altering the pathogenicity and antigenicity of Nm. Recombination was also evident in genes of the restriction and modification systems, which may undermine barriers to DNA exchange. In conclusion, homologous recombination can drive both gene content variation and sequence divergence in Nm. These findings shed new light on the understanding of the rapid pathoadaptive evolution of Nm and other recombinogenic bacterial pathogens.

  12. Recombinant HT.sub.m4 gene, protein and assays

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Bing; Adra, Chaker N.; Lelias, Jean-Michel

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein and a recombinant HT.sub.m4 protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy.

  13. Gene Evolutionary Trajectories and GC Patterns Driven by Recombination in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Anitha; Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Kwicklis, Madeline; Engstrom, Kayla; Garcia, Nathan; Oviedo, Oliver J.; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Gonzales, Michael D.; He, Yan; Wang, Minghui; Sun, Qi; Pillardy, Jaroslaw; Kianian, Shahryar F.; Pawlowski, Wojciech P.; Chen, Changbin; Mudge, Joann

    2016-01-01

    Recombination occurring during meiosis is critical for creating genetic variation and plays an essential role in plant evolution. In addition to creating novel gene combinations, recombination can affect genome structure through altering GC patterns. In maize (Zea mays) and other grasses, another intriguing GC pattern exists. Maize genes show a bimodal GC content distribution that has been attributed to nucleotide bias in the third, or wobble, position of the codon. Recombination may be an underlying driving force given that recombination sites are often associated with high GC content. Here we explore the relationship between recombination and genomic GC patterns by comparing GC gene content at each of the three codon positions (GC1, GC2, and GC3, collectively termed GCx) to instances of a variable GC-rich motif that underlies double strand break (DSB) hotspots and to meiocyte-specific gene expression. Surprisingly, GCx bimodality in maize cannot be fully explained by the codon wobble hypothesis. High GCx genes show a strong overlap with the DSB hotspot motif, possibly providing a mechanism for the high evolutionary rates seen in these genes. On the other hand, genes that are turned on in meiosis (early prophase I) are biased against both high GCx genes and genes with the DSB hotspot motif, possibly allowing important meiotic genes to avoid DSBs. Our data suggests a strong link between the GC-rich motif underlying DSB hotspots and high GCx genes. PMID:27713757

  14. Ectopic mitotic recombination in Drosophila probed with bacterial beta-galactosidase gene-based reporter transgenes.

    PubMed Central

    Bärtsch, S; Dücker, K; Würgler, F E; Sengstag, C

    1997-01-01

    Plasmids were constructed to investigate homologous mitotic recombination in Drosophila cells. Heteroalleles containing truncated but overlapping segments of the bacterial beta-galactosidase gene (lacZ) were positioned either on separate plasmids or as direct repeats on the same chromosome. Recombination reconstituted a functional lacZgene leading to expression of LacZ+activity detectable by histochemical staining. High extrachromosomal recombination (ECR) frequencies between unlinked heteroalleles were observed upon transient co-transfection into Drosophila melanogaster Schneider line 2 (S2) cells. Stably transfected cells containing the lacZ heteroalleles linked on a chromosome exhibited intrachromosomal recombination (ICR) frequencies two orders of magnitude lower than ECR frequencies. Recombination was inducible by exposing the cells to ethyl methanesulphonate or mitomycin C. Recombination products were characterized by multiplex PCR analysis and unequal sister chromatid recombination was found as the predominant mechanism reconstituting the lacZ gene. To investigate recombination in vivo imaginal disc cells from transgenic larvae carrying the reporter gene on the X chromosome were isolated and stained for LacZ+ activity. The presence of a few LacZ+ clones indicated that mitotic recombination events occurred at frequencies two orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding event in cultured cells and late during larval development. PMID:9380517

  15. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-derived recombinant vectors for gene transfer and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Peggy; Fraefel, Cornel; Epstein, Alberto L

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153-kilobase pair (kbp) double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes the approach most commonly used to prepare recombinant HSV-1 vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria.

  16. [Construction and expression of recombinant adeno-associated virus vector containing HSV1-TK gene].

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhi-xiang; Tan, Qian; Liu, Shuang-zhen; Liu, Dan; Li, Zhong-qing; Peng, Jian-qiang

    2008-03-01

    To construct the recombinant adeno-associated virus(rAAV) vector plasmid pSNAV2.0-TK containing HSV1-TK gene, to produce recombinant adeno-associated virus rAAV2/HSV1-TK, and to detect the integration and expression of HSV1-TK gene in lens epithelial cells transfected by rAAV2/HSV1-TK, and to provide foundation for gene therapy of posterior capsular opacification. The recombinant vector plasmid constructed by gene recombinant technology was analyzed by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. The cell strain BHK-21/TK was screened by G418 after the plasmid was transfected into BHK-21 cells,with the helper virus HSV1-rc/UL2 to produce the recombinant virus rAAV2/HSV1-TK. The purity of rAAV2/HSV1-TK was detected by SDS-PAGE and HPLC, and the titre of rAAV2/HSV1-TK was observed by dot blot hybridization. The HSV1-TK gene in lens epithelial cells transfected by rAAV2/HSV-TK was investigated by PCR and RT-PCR. The recombinant plasmid proved successful by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. The recombinant virus rAAV2/HSV1-TK was produced successfully and its titre was 1 x 10(12) v.g./mL by dot blot hybridization. The HSV1-TK gene was integrated and expressed in lens epithelial cells. The recombinant adeno-associated virus vector plasmid containing HSV1-TK gene is successfully constructed, and high titre recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV2/HSV1-TK) is obtained. The HSV1-TK gene in lens epithelial cells is expressed after being transfected by rAAV2/HSV1-TK.

  17. Construction of recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with bglS gene insertion into PEP4 locus by homologous recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Qi-he; Fu, Ming-liang; Wang, Jin-ling; Zhang, Hong-bo; He, Guo-qing

    2008-01-01

    The bglS gene encoding endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and sequenced in this study. The bglS expression cassette, including PGK1 promoter, bglS gene fused to the signal sequence of the yeast mating pheromone α-factor (MFα1S), and ADH1 terminator with G418-resistance as the selected marker, was constructed. Then one of the PEP4 allele of Saccharomyces cerevisiae WZ65 strain was replaced by bglS expression cassette using chromosomal integration of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated homologous recombination, and the bglS gene was expressed simultaneously. The recombinant strain S. cerevisiae (SC-βG) was preliminarily screened by the clearing hydrolysis zone formed after the barley β-glucan was hydrolyzed in the plate and no proteinase A (PrA) activity was measured in fermenting liquor. The results of PCR analysis of genome DNA showed that one of the PEP4 allele had been replaced and bglS gene had been inserted into the locus of PEP4 gene in recombinant strains. Different endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase assay methods showed that the recombinant strain SC-βG had high endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase expression level with the maximum of 69.3 U/(h·ml) after 60 h of incubation. Meanwhile, the Congo Red method was suitable for the determination of endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase activity during the actual brewing process. The current research implies that the constructed yeast strain could be utilized to improve the industrial brewing property of beer. PMID:18600782

  18. Accurate assessment of intragenic recombination frequency within the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene.

    PubMed

    Abbs, S; Roberts, R G; Mathew, C G; Bentley, D R; Bobrow, M

    1990-08-01

    Polymorphic loci that lie at the two extremities of the Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) gene have been used to estimate intragenic recombination rates. Multipoint linkage analysis of the CEPH panel of families suggests a total intragenic recombination frequency of nearly 0.12 (confidence intervals 0.041-0.226) over the genomic length of approximately 2 Mb.

  19. Gene evolutionary trajectories and GC patterns driven by recombination in Zea mays

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recombination occurring during meiosis is critical for creating genetic variation and plays an essential role in plant evolution. In addition to creating novel gene combinations, recombination can affect genome structure through altering GC patterns. In maize (Zea mays) and other grasses, another in...

  20. Generation of Recombinant Capripoxvirus Vectors for Vaccines and Gene Knockout Function Studies.

    PubMed

    Boshra, Hani; Cao, Jingxin; Babiuk, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate capripoxvirus through gene knockouts and gene insertions has become an increasingly valuable research tool in elucidating the function of individual genes of capripoxvirus, as well as in the development of capripoxvirus-based recombinant vaccines. The homologous recombination technique is used to generate capripoxvirus knockout viruses (KO), and is based on the targeting a particular viral gene of interest. This technique can also be used to insert a gene of interest. A protocol for the generation of a viral gene knockout is described. This technique involves the use of a plasmid which encodes the flanking sequences of the regions where the homologous recombination will occur, and will result in the insertion of an EGFP reporter gene for visualization of recombinant virus, as well as the E. coli gpt gene as a positive selection marker. If an additional gene is to be incorporated, this can be achieved by inserting a gene of interest for expression under a poxvirus promoter into the plasmid between the flanking regions for insertion. This chapter describes a protocol for generating such recombinant capripoxviruses.

  1. Construction of a gene library from Azospirillum brasilense and characterization of a recombinant containing the nif structural genes.

    PubMed

    Schrank, I S; Zaha, A; de Araújo, E F; Santos, D S

    1987-01-01

    1. We have constructed a gene library, from Azospirillum brasilense using the vector EMBL4. 2. A recombinant containing the nif structural genes from A. brasilense was isolated and characterized. This recombinant contains a DNA insert of about 15 kilobases (kb) which gives rise to five fragments after cleavage with EcoRI. Only one of the DNA fragments (6.5 kb) hybridized to the nifHDK genes of Klebsiella pneumoniae. 3. The organization of the nif genes in this DNA fragment was determined using different DNA segments containing the nifH, nifK or nifD genes of K. pneumoniae as probes.

  2. Recombination sequences in plant mitochondrial genomes: diversity and homologies to known mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, D B; Palmer, J D

    1984-01-01

    Several plant mitochondrial genomes contain repeated sequences that are postulated to be sites of homologous intragenomic recombination (1-3). In this report, we have used filter hybridizations to investigate sequence relationships between the cloned mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) recombination repeats from turnip, spinach and maize and total mtDNA isolated from thirteen species of angiosperms. We find that strong sequence homologies exist between the spinach and turnip recombination repeats and essentially all other mitochondrial genomes tested, whereas a major maize recombination repeat does not hybridize to any other mtDNA. The sequences homologous to the turnip repeat do not appear to function in recombination in any other genome, whereas the spinach repeat hybridizes to reiterated sequences within the mitochondrial genomes of wheat and two species of pokeweed that do appear to be sites of recombination. Thus, although intragenomic recombination is a widespread phenomenon in plant mitochondria, it appears that different sequences either serve as substrates for this function in different species, or else surround a relatively short common recombination site which does not cross-hybridize under our experimental conditions. Identified gene sequences from maize mtDNA were used in heterologous hybridizations to show that the repeated sequences implicated in recombination in turnip and spinach/pokeweed/wheat mitochondria include, or are closely linked to genes for subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase and 26S rRNA, respectively. Together with previous studies indicating that the 18S rRNA gene in wheat mtDNA is contained within a recombination repeat (3), these results imply an unexpectedly frequent association between recombination repeats and plant mitochondrial genes. Images PMID:6473104

  3. Gene flow and selection interact to promote adaptive divergence in regions of low recombination.

    PubMed

    Samuk, Kieran; Owens, Gregory L; Delmore, Kira E; Miller, Sara E; Rennison, Diana J; Schluter, Dolph

    2017-09-01

    Adaptation to new environments often occurs in the face of gene flow. Under these conditions, gene flow and recombination can impede adaptation by breaking down linkage disequilibrium between locally adapted alleles. Theory predicts that this decay can be halted or slowed if adaptive alleles are tightly linked in regions of low recombination, potentially favouring divergence and adaptive evolution in these regions over others. Here, we compiled a global genomic data set of over 1,300 individual threespine stickleback from 52 populations and compared the tendency for adaptive alleles to occur in regions of low recombination between populations that diverged with or without gene flow. In support of theory, we found that putatively adaptive alleles (FST and dXY outliers) tend to occur more often in regions of low recombination in populations where divergent selection and gene flow have jointly occurred. This result remained significant when we employed different genomic window sizes, controlled for the effects of mutation rate and gene density, controlled for overall genetic differentiation, varied the genetic map used to estimate recombination and used a continuous (rather than discrete) measure of geographic distance as proxy for gene flow/shared ancestry. We argue that our study provides the first statistical evidence that the interaction of gene flow and selection biases divergence toward regions of low recombination. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Recombination rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with both erm(B) and mef(A) genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Young; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2010-08-01

    Erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates containing both erm(B) and mef(A) genes have a higher rate of multidrug resistance (MDR). We investigated the relationships between the presence of erythromycin resistance determinants and the recombination rate. We determined the mutation and recombination frequencies of 46 S. pneumoniae isolates, which included 19 with both erm(B) and mef(A), nine with only erm(B), six with only mef(A), and 11 erythromycin-susceptible isolates. Mutation frequency values were estimated as the number of rifampin-resistant colonies as a proportion of total viable count. Genotypes and serotypes of isolates with the hyper-recombination phenotype were determined. Twelve S. pneumoniae isolates were hypermutable and four isolates were determined to have hyper-recombination frequency. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with both erm(B) and mef(A) genes did not show a high mutation frequency. In contrast, all isolates with a hyper-recombination phenotype contained both erm(B) and mef(A) genes. In addition, the recombination rate of isolates with both erm(B) and mef(A) genes was statistically higher than the rate of other isolates. The dual presence of erm(B) and mef(A) genes in some pneumococcal isolates may be associated with high recombination frequency. This may be one of the reasons for the frequent emergence of MDR in certain pneumococcal isolates.

  5. Reciprocal and Nonreciprocal Recombination at the Glucocerebrosidase Gene Region: Implications for Complexity in Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tayebi, Nahid; Stubblefield, Barbara K.; Park, Joseph K.; Orvisky, Eduard; Walker, Jamie M.; LaMarca, Mary E.; Sidransky, Ellen

    2003-01-01

    Gaucher disease results from an autosomal recessive deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. The glucocerebrosidase gene is located in a gene-rich region of 1q21 that contains six genes and two pseudogenes within 75 kb. The presence of contiguous, highly homologous pseudogenes for both glucocerebrosidase and metaxin at the locus increases the likelihood of DNA rearrangements in this region. These recombinations can complicate genotyping in patients with Gaucher disease and contribute to the difficulty in interpreting genotype-phenotype correlations in this disorder. In the present study, DNA samples from 240 patients with Gaucher disease were examined using several complementary approaches to identify and characterize recombinant alleles, including direct sequencing, long-template polymerase chain reaction, polymorphic microsatellite repeats, and Southern blots. Among the 480 alleles studied, 59 recombinant alleles were identified, including 34 gene conversions, 18 fusions, and 7 downstream duplications. Twenty-two percent of the patients evaluated had at least one recombinant allele. Twenty-six recombinant alleles were found among 310 alleles from patients with type 1 disease, 18 among 74 alleles from patients with type 2 disease, and 15 among 96 alleles from patients with type 3 disease. Several patients carried two recombinations or mutations on the same allele. Generally, alleles resulting from nonreciprocal recombination (gene conversion) could be distinguished from those arising by reciprocal recombination (crossover and exchange), and the length of the converted sequence was determined. Homozygosity for a recombinant allele was associated with early lethality. Ten different sites of crossover and a shared pentamer motif sequence (CACCA) that could be a hotspot for recombination were identified. These findings contribute to a better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships in Gaucher disease and may provide insights into the mechanisms

  6. Reciprocal and nonreciprocal recombination at the glucocerebrosidase gene region: implications for complexity in Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Tayebi, Nahid; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Park, Joseph K; Orvisky, Eduard; Walker, Jamie M; LaMarca, Mary E; Sidransky, Ellen

    2003-03-01

    Gaucher disease results from an autosomal recessive deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. The glucocerebrosidase gene is located in a gene-rich region of 1q21 that contains six genes and two pseudogenes within 75 kb. The presence of contiguous, highly homologous pseudogenes for both glucocerebrosidase and metaxin at the locus increases the likelihood of DNA rearrangements in this region. These recombinations can complicate genotyping in patients with Gaucher disease and contribute to the difficulty in interpreting genotype-phenotype correlations in this disorder. In the present study, DNA samples from 240 patients with Gaucher disease were examined using several complementary approaches to identify and characterize recombinant alleles, including direct sequencing, long-template polymerase chain reaction, polymorphic microsatellite repeats, and Southern blots. Among the 480 alleles studied, 59 recombinant alleles were identified, including 34 gene conversions, 18 fusions, and 7 downstream duplications. Twenty-two percent of the patients evaluated had at least one recombinant allele. Twenty-six recombinant alleles were found among 310 alleles from patients with type 1 disease, 18 among 74 alleles from patients with type 2 disease, and 15 among 96 alleles from patients with type 3 disease. Several patients carried two recombinations or mutations on the same allele. Generally, alleles resulting from nonreciprocal recombination (gene conversion) could be distinguished from those arising by reciprocal recombination (crossover and exchange), and the length of the converted sequence was determined. Homozygosity for a recombinant allele was associated with early lethality. Ten different sites of crossover and a shared pentamer motif sequence (CACCA) that could be a hotspot for recombination were identified. These findings contribute to a better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships in Gaucher disease and may provide insights into the mechanisms

  7. [Construction of recombinant adenovirus vector of calcitonin gene-related peptide gene and transfection to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-hui; Han, Jie; Shao, Lei; Wang, Li-hong; Song, Jun-xian; Wei, Zhong-hai; Zheng, Liang-rong

    2010-05-01

    To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) by AdEasy system and to validate its expression in myocardial cells. The full-length of CGRP gene cDNA was acquired by RT-PCR and cloned into pShuttle-CMV. After linearization with Pme I, the recombinant plasmid (pShuttle-CMV-CGRP) was transformed into E.coli BJ5183 by electroporation to construct the recombinant adenovirus plasmid AdEasy-pShuttle-CGRP. The recombinant adenovirus plasmids were transformed into E.coli XL10-Gold cells to be amplified. Then the recombinant plasmid was digested with Pac I and transfected to 293 cells to package recombinant adenovirus particles. PCR technique was used to detect target gene. The recombinant adenovirus particles were purified by CsC1 density gradient. The purified recombinant adenovirus was transfected to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes,and the recombinant adenovirus production was observed by fluorescent microscope. Expression of CGRP in hearts 7 days after intravenous delivery of adenoviral vectors AV-CGRP was determined by radioimmunoassay. The RT-PCR products confirmed a full-length cDNA of CGRP gene in PUC(57) by sequencing. The corresponding double endonuclease and PCR analysis certified the successful cloning of the gene into the pShuttle-CMV. The recombinant adenovirus plasmid AdEasy-pShuttle-CGRP was digested by Pac I endonuclease to form the typical DNA segments, whose length was about 3 kb and 30 kb. PCR analysis and fluorescent microscope observation confirmed that the CGRP gene was inserted into the adenovirus vector with very strong power of transfection. The recombinant adenovirus particles infected neonatal rat cardiomyocytes successfully. Radioimmunoassay showed that delivery of AV-CGRP significantly increased the expression of CGRP in mice hearts. The recombinant adenovirus vector of CGRP gene has been constructed,and it can infect neonatal rat cardiomyocytes successfully. Somatic delivery of CGRP gene can significantly

  8. New insights into the evolutionary origins of the recombination-activating gene proteins and V(D)J recombination.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Lina Marcela; Schatz, David G

    2017-06-01

    The adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates relies on V(D)J recombination as one of the main processes to generate the diverse array of receptors necessary for the recognition of a wide range of pathogens. The DNA cleavage reaction necessary for the assembly of the antigen receptor genes from an array of potential gene segments is mediated by the recombination-activating gene proteins RAG1 and RAG2. The RAG proteins have been proposed to originate from a transposable element (TE) as they share mechanistic and structural similarities with several families of transposases and are themselves capable of mediating transposition. A number of RAG-like proteins and TEs with sequence similarity to RAG1 and RAG2 have been identified, but only recently has their function begun to be characterized, revealing mechanistic links to the vertebrate RAGs. Of particular significance is the discovery of ProtoRAG, a transposon superfamily found in the genome of the basal chordate amphioxus. ProtoRAG has many of the sequence and mechanistic features predicted for the ancestral RAG transposon and is likely to be an evolutionary relative of RAG1 and RAG2. In addition, early observations suggesting that RAG1 is able to mediate V(D)J recombination in the absence of RAG2 have been confirmed, implying independent evolutionary origins for the two RAG genes. Here, recent progress in identifying and characterizing RAG-like proteins and the TEs that encode them is summarized and a refined model for the evolution of V(D)J recombination and the RAG proteins is presented. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Recombinant HT{sub m4} gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, B.; Adra, C.N.; Lelias, J.M.

    1996-09-03

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein and a recombinant HT{sub m4} protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy. 2 figs.

  10. [The phenomenon of gene linkage and recombination in the paternity test].

    PubMed

    Cheng, D L; Yan, P H; Liu, Y; Chen, J

    1999-02-01

    The phenomenon of gene linkage and recombination may nearly be overlooked in paternity test of one single child, but it is likely encountered in paternity test of twin or more. In a case of paternity test, the results of 17 items including eight DNA loci were analyzed and the phenomenon of gene linkage and recombination was discussed in detail. This phenomenon should be brought into necessary attention in the paternity test.

  11. Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene therapy for rat malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A J; Vogels, R; Someren, G V; Esandi, M C; Noteboom, J L; Avezaat, C J; Vecht, C; Bekkum, D W; Valerio, D; Bout, A; Hoogerbrugge, P M

    1996-01-20

    Transfer of a herpes simplex virus-derived thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene into brain tumor cells and subsequent ganciclovir (GCV) treatment has been shown by others to be an effective treatment in rats with intracerebrally inoculated 9L gliosarcomas. Mechanism of action and reproducibility are, however, still a matter of debate. We have used the same model to test the therapeutic effects of both retrovirus- and adenovirus-mediated transfer of the HSV-tk gene followed by GCV treatment. Survival time of rats with intracerebral 9L tumors was significantly prolonged after a single administration of adenovirus carrying a HSV-tk gene as compared to controls. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer also resulted in significantly prolonged survival time when recombinant retrovirus-producing cells were transplanted. Direct injection of the recombinant retrovirus, HSV-tk-expressing cells, virus-producing cells without GCV administration and recombinant retrovirus-lacZ or interleukin-2 (IL-2)-producing cells did not result in tumor cell kill. In the present study, no significant difference in survival of 9L brain tumor carrying rats was found after treatment with adenovirus as compared to retrovirus-mediated HSV-tk-mediated gene transfer and subsequent GCV treatment.

  12. Improved genetic stability of recombinant yellow fever 17D virus expressing a lentiviral Gag gene fragment.

    PubMed

    de Santana, Marlon G Veloso; Neves, Patrícia C C; dos Santos, Juliana Ribeiro; Lima, Noemia S; dos Santos, Alexandre A C; Watkins, David I; Galler, Ricardo; Bonaldo, Myrna C

    2014-03-01

    We have previously designed a method to construct viable recombinant Yellow Fever (YF) 17D viruses expressing heterologous polypeptides including part of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Gag protein. However, the expressed region, encompassing amino acid residues from 45 to 269, was genetically unstable. In this study, we improved the genetic stability of this recombinant YF 17D virus by introducing mutations in the IRES element localized at the 5' end of the SIV gag gene. The new stable recombinant virus elicited adaptive immune responses similar to those induced by the original recombinant virus. It is, therefore, possible to increase recombinant stability by removing functional motifs from the insert that may have deleterious effects on recombinant YF viral fitness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Phenotypic differentiation of Streptococcus pyogenes populations is induced by recombination-driven gene-specific sweeps

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yun-Juan; Shapiro, B. Jesse; Lee, Shaun W.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Castellino, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic recombination plays an important role in driving adaptive evolution and population differentiation in bacteria. However, controversy exists as to the effects of recombination on population diversity and differentiation, i.e., recombination is frequent enough to sweep through the population at selected gene loci (gene-specific sweeps), or the recombination rate is low without interfering genome-wide selective sweeps. Observations supporting either view are sparse. Pathogenic bacteria causing infectious diseases are promising candidates to provide observations of recombination. However, phenotype-associated differentiations are usually vague among them due to diverse disease manifestations. Here we report a population genomic study of the group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS), a human pathogen with highly recombining genomes. By employing a genome-wide association study on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we demonstrate a phenotypic differentiation of GAS, represented by separate clustering of two sublineages associated with niche-specific infections, i.e., skin infection and pharyngitis-induced acute rheumatic fever. By quantifying SNPs associated with the differentiation in a statistical and phylogenetic context, we propose that the phenotype-associated differentiation arose through recombination-driven gene-specific sweeps, rather than genome-wide sweeps. Our work provides a novel paradigm of phenotype-associated differentiation induced by gene-specific sweeps in a human pathogen and has implications for understanding of driving forces of bacterial evolution. PMID:27821851

  14. Global gene expression in recombinant and non-recombinant yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in three different metabolic states.

    PubMed

    Díaz, H; Andrews, B A; Hayes, A; Castrillo, J; Oliver, S G; Asenjo, J A

    2009-01-01

    Global gene expression of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one recombinant (P+), accumulating large amounts of an intracellular protein Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and one non-recombinant (P-) which does not contain the recombinant plasmid, were compared in batch culture during diauxic growth when cells were growing exponentially on glucose, when they were growing exponentially on ethanol, and in the early stationary phase when glycerol was being utilized. When comparing the gene expression for P- (and P+) during growth on ethanol to that on glucose (Eth/Gluc), overexpression is related to an increase in consumption of glycerol, activation of the TCA cycle, degradation of glycogen and metabolism of ethanol. Furthermore, 97.6% of genes (80 genes) involved in the central metabolic pathway are overexpressed. This is similar to that observed by DeRisi et al. [DeRisi, J.L., Iyer, V.R. & Brown, P.O. 1997. Exploring the metabolic and genetic control of gene expression on a genomic scale. Science 278:680-686.] but very different from was observed for Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA), where the specific growth rate is lowered to ca. 40%, the fluxes in the TCA cycle are reduced to ca. 40% (to 30% in P+), glycolysis is reduced to virtually 0 and protein synthesis to ca. 50% (to 40% in P+). Clearly it is not possible to correlate in a simple or direct way, quantitative mRNA expression levels with cell function which is shown by the Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA). When comparing the two strains in the 3 growth stages, 4 genes were found to be under or overexpressed in all cases. The products of all of these genes are expressed at the plasma membrane or cell wall of the yeast. While comparing the strains (P+/P-) when growing on glucose, ethanol and in the early stationary phase, many of the genes of the central metabolic pathways are underexpressed in P+, which is similar to the behaviour of the metabolic fluxes of both strains (MFA). Comparing the gene expression for P- (and

  15. [Prokaryotic expression and activity identification of gene recombinant protein of brain-derivedneurotrophic factor precursor].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Liang, Xiaomin; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2014-08-19

    To generate the gene recombinant protein of brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor (proBDNF) in prokaryotic cells and investigate its biological activity. Rat-derived cDNA of proBDNF with point mutation was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into plasmid pET-28a for expression in E. coli BL21. Western blot was used to identify the product and DAPI performed to test its effect on apoptosis of PC12 cells. PCR product of recombinant gene was successfully expressed in E. coli. And the product agreed with the target protein in molecular weight and showed reactivity with its specific antibody. Apoptosis of PC12 cells was induced by a certain concentration of recombinant proBDNF. The prokaryotic expression vector has been successfully constructed for recombinant gene of proBDNF. And the product has biological toxicity and it may induce the apoptosis of PC12 cells.

  16. Ubiquitination Events That Regulate Recombination of Immunoglobulin Loci Gene Segments

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jaime; Rothschild, Gerson; Basu, Uttiya

    2014-01-01

    Programed DNA mutagenesis events in the immunoglobulin (Ig) loci of developing B cells utilize the common and conserved mechanism of protein ubiquitination for subsequent proteasomal degradation to generate the required antigen-receptor diversity. Recombinase proteins RAG1 and RAG2, necessary for V(D)J recombination, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase, an essential mutator protein for catalyzing class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, are regulated by various ubiquitination events that affect protein stability and activity. Programed DNA breaks in the Ig loci can be identified by various components of DNA repair pathways, also regulated by protein ubiquitination. Errors in the ubiquitination pathways for any of the DNA double-strand break repair proteins can lead to inefficient recombination and repair events, resulting in a compromised adaptive immune system or development of cancer. PMID:24653725

  17. The effects of mismatch repair and RAD1 genes on interchromosomal crossover recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Ainsley; Fabbri, Rebecca M; Reeves, Jason W; Crouse, Gray F

    2006-06-01

    We have previously shown that recombination between 400-bp substrates containing only 4-bp differences, when present in an inverted repeat orientation, is suppressed by >20-fold in wild-type strains of S. cerevisiae. Among the genes involved in this suppression were three genes involved in mismatch repair--MSH2, MSH3, and MSH6--and one in nucleotide excision repair, RAD1. We now report the involvement of these genes in interchromosomal recombination occurring via crossovers using these same short substrates. In these experiments, recombination was stimulated by a double-strand break generated by the HO endonuclease and can occur between completely identical (homologous) substrates or between nonidentical (homeologous) substrates. In addition, a unique feature of this system is that recombining DNA strands can be given a choice of either type of substrate. We find that interchromosomal crossover recombination with these short substrates is severely inhibited in the absence of MSH2, MSH3, or RAD1 and is relatively insensitive to the presence of mismatches. We propose that crossover recombination with these short substrates requires the products of MSH2, MSH3, and RAD1 and that these proteins have functions in recombination in addition to the removal of terminal nonhomology. We further propose that the observed insensitivity to homeology is a result of the difference in recombinational mechanism and/or the timing of the observed recombination events. These results are in contrast with those obtained using longer substrates and may be particularly relevant to recombination events between the abundant short repeated sequences that characterize the genomes of higher eukaryotes.

  18. Engineered Zinc Finger Nuclease–Mediated Homologous Recombination of the Human Rhodopsin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, David L.; Cashman, Siobhan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Novel zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) were designed to target the human rhodopsin gene and induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment. Methods. Three-finger zinc finger nucleases were designed based on previously published guidelines. To assay for ZFN specificity, the authors generated human embryonic retinoblast cell lines stably expressing a Pro23His rhodopsin, the most common mutation associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in North America. They report quantification of these rhodopsin-specific ZFNs to induce a targeted double-strand break in the human genome, demonstrate their ability to induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment, and report the quantification of the frequency of ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. Results. Compared with endogenous homologous recombination, the authors observed a 12-fold increase in homologous recombination and an absolute frequency of ZFN-directed homologous recombination as high as 17% in the human rhodopsin gene. Conclusions. ZFNs are chimeric proteins with significant potential for the treatment of inherited diseases. In this study, the authors report the design of novel ZFNs targeting the human rhodopsin gene. These ZFNs may be useful for the treatment of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common causes of inherited blindness in the developed world. Herein, they also report on several aspects of donor fragment design and in vitro conditions that facilitate ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. PMID:20671268

  19. The Arabidopsis DNA mismatch repair gene PMS1 restricts somatic recombination between homeologous sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Dion, Eric; Richard, Gabriel; Domingue, Olivier; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François J

    2009-04-01

    The eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system contributes to maintaining the fidelity of genetic information by correcting replication errors and preventing illegitimate recombination events. This study aimed to examine the function(s) of the Arabidopsis thaliana PMS1 gene (AtPMS1), one of three homologs of the bacterial MutL gene in plants. Two independent mutant alleles (Atpms1-1 and Atpms1-2) were obtained and one of these (Atpms1-1) was studied in detail. The mutant exhibited a reduction in seed set and a bias against the transmission of the mutant allele. Somatic recombination, both homologous and homeologous, was examined using a set of reporter constructs. Homologous recombination remained unchanged in the mutant while homeologous recombination was between 1.7- and 4.8-fold higher than in the wild type. This increase in homeologous recombination frequency was not correlated with the degree of sequence divergence. In RNAi lines, a range of increases in homeologous recombination were observed with two lines showing a 3.3-fold and a 3.6-fold increase. These results indicate that the AtPMS1 gene contributes to an antirecombination activity aimed at restricting recombination between diverged sequences.

  20. Engineered zinc finger nuclease-mediated homologous recombination of the human rhodopsin gene.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, David L; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-12-01

    Novel zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) were designed to target the human rhodopsin gene and induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment. Three-finger zinc finger nucleases were designed based on previously published guidelines. To assay for ZFN specificity, the authors generated human embryonic retinoblast cell lines stably expressing a Pro23His rhodopsin, the most common mutation associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in North America. They report quantification of these rhodopsin-specific ZFNs to induce a targeted double-strand break in the human genome, demonstrate their ability to induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment, and report the quantification of the frequency of ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. Compared with endogenous homologous recombination, the authors observed a 12-fold increase in homologous recombination and an absolute frequency of ZFN-directed homologous recombination as high as 17% in the human rhodopsin gene. ZFNs are chimeric proteins with significant potential for the treatment of inherited diseases. In this study, the authors report the design of novel ZFNs targeting the human rhodopsin gene. These ZFNs may be useful for the treatment of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common causes of inherited blindness in the developed world. Herein, they also report on several aspects of donor fragment design and in vitro conditions that facilitate ZFN-mediated homologous recombination.

  1. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas S.; Lisby, Michael; Salanti, Ali; Fordyce, Sarah L.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Carter, Richard; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Theander, Thor G.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome-wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens. PMID:24253306

  2. Segregation of yeast polymorphic STA genes in meiotic recombinants and analysis of glucoamylase production.

    PubMed

    Balogh, I; Maráz, A

    1996-12-01

    Hybrid yeast strains were constructed using haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains to get haploid meiotic recombinants having more than one copy of STA1, STA2, and STA3 genes. STA genes were localized on the chromosomes by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Working gene dosage effects were found among STA genes in liquid starch medium, indicating low levels of glucose repression. Growth of strains, however, was not influenced by their STA copy number.

  3. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Komatsubara, Akira T.; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002–0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer. PMID:26290434

  4. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-20

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

  5. Impact of karyotype organization on interlocus recombination between T cell receptor genes in Equidae.

    PubMed

    Drbalova, Jitka; Musilova, Petra; Kubickova, Svatava; Sebestova, Hana; Vahala, Jiri; Rubes, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) genes (TRA, TRB, TRD and TRG) reside in 3 different chromosomal regions. During the maturation of T lymphocytes, the TCR genes are rearranged by site-specific recombination, a process that also predisposes T cells to aberrant rearrangements. Illegitimate recombination between the TCR genes occurs at a low level in healthy individuals, but this frequency may correlate with the risk of lymphoma. The aim of this work was to investigate interlocus recombination in equids. Illegitimate rearrangements were studied in peripheral blood lymphocytes by FISH with painting and BAC probes and by sequencing of PCR products, and the frequencies of recombination were assessed in horses and 4 other equids. The presence of several trans-rearrangement products between the TRA and TRG genes was verified by PCR in all investigated equids. Frequencies of trans-rearrangements in horses are higher than in humans, and colocalization of the TCR genes on the same chromosome increases the incidence of trans-rearrangements between them. The orientation of the TCR genes does not impact interlocus recombination itself but does affect the viability of cells carrying its products and consequently the number of trans-rearrangements observed in lymphocytes.

  6. Recombination and Population Mosaic of a Multifunctional Viral Gene, Adeno-Associated Virus cap

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Myers, Richard; Danos, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a dominant force in evolution and results in genetic mosaics. To detect evidence of recombination events and assess the biological significance of genetic mosaics, genome sequences for various viral populations of reasonably large size are now available in the GenBank. We studied a multi-functional viral gene, the adeno-associated virus (AAV) cap gene, which codes for three capsid proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3. VP1-3 share a common C-terminal domain corresponding to VP3, which forms the viral core structure, while the VP1 unique N-terminal part contains an enzymatic domain with phospholipase A2 activity. Our recombinant detection program (RecI) revealed five novel recombination events, four of which have their cross-over points in the N-terminal, VP1 and VP2 unique region. Comparison of phylogenetic trees for different cap gene regions confirmed discordant phylogenies for the recombinant sequences. Furthermore, differences in the phylogenetic tree structures for the VP1 unique (VP1u) region and the rest of cap highlighted the mosaic nature of cap gene in the AAV population: two dominant forms of VP1u sequences were identified and these forms are linked to diverse sequences in the rest of cap gene. This observation together with the finding of frequent recombination in the VP1 and 2 unique regions suggests that this region is a recombination hot spot. Recombination events in this region preserve protein blocks of distinctive functions and contribute to convergence in VP1u and divergence of the rest of cap. Additionally the possible biological significance of two dominant VP1u forms is inferred. PMID:18286191

  7. Recombinant AAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina: gene therapy perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rolling, F

    2004-10-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases such as retinal macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa constitute a broad group of diseases that all share one critical feature, the progressive apoptotic loss of cells in the retina. There is currently no effective treatment available by which the course of these disorders can be modified, and visual dysfunction often progresses to total blindness. Gene therapy represents an attractive approach to treating retinal degeneration because the eye is easily accessible and allows local application of therapeutic vectors with reduced risk of systemic effects. Furthermore, transgene expression within the retina and effects of treatments may be monitored by a variety of noninvasive examinations. An increasing number of strategies for molecular treatment of retinal disease rely on recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) as a therapeutic gene delivery vector. Before rAAV-mediated gene therapy for retinal degeneration becomes a reality, there are a number of important requirements that include: (1) evaluation of different rAAV serotypes, (2) screening of vectors in large animals in order to ensure that they mediate safe and long-term gene expression, (3) appropriate regulation of therapeutic gene expression, (4) evaluation of vectors carrying a therapeutic gene in relevant animal models, (5) identification of suitable patients, and finally (6) manufacture of clinical grade vector. All these steps towards gene therapy are still being explored. Outcomes of these studies will be discussed in the order in which they occur, from vector studies to preclinical assessment of the therapeutic potential of rAAV in animal models of retinal degeneration.

  8. A protocol for construction of gene targeting vectors and generation of homologous recombinant embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bouabe, Hicham; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The completion of human and mouse genome sequencing has confronted us with huge amount of data sequences that certainly need decades and many generations of scientists to be reasonably interpreted and assigned to physiological functions, and subsequently fruitfully translated into medical application. A means to assess the function of genes provides gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that enables to introduce site-specific modifications in the mouse genome, and analyze their physiological consequences. Gene targeting enables almost any type of genetic modifications of interest, ranging from gene insertion (e.g., insertion of human-specific genes or reporter genes), gene disruption, point mutations, and short- and long-range deletions, inversions. Site-specific modification into the genome of ESCs can be reached by homologous recombination using targeting vectors. Here, we describe a protocol to generate targeting constructs and homologous recombinant ESCs.

  9. Chromosomal integration of recombinant alpha-amylase and glucoamylase genes in saccharomyces cerevisiae for starch conversion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recombinant constructs of barley '-amylase and Lentinula edodes glucoamylase genes were integrated into the chromosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The insertion was confirmed by PCR amplification of the gene sequence in the chromosomes. The expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE of the enzymes puri...

  10. Chromosomal Loop Domains Direct the Recombination of Antigen Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiazhi; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Lijuan; Frock, Richard L.; Du, Zhou; Meyers, Robin M.; Meng, Fei-long; Schatz, David G.; Alt, Frederick W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY RAG initiates antibody V(D)J recombination in developing lymphocytes by generating “on-target” DNA breaks at matched pairs of bona fide recombination signal sequences (RSSs). We employ bait RAG-generated breaks in endogenous or ectopically-inserted RSS pairs to identify huge numbers of RAG “off-target” breaks. Such breaks occur at the simple CAC motif that defines the RSS cleavage-site and are largely confined within convergent CTCF-binding element (CBE)-flanked loop domains containing bait RSS pairs. Marked orientation-dependence of RAG off-target activity within loops spanning up to 2 megabases implies involvement of linear tracking. In this regard, major RAG off-targets in chromosomal translocations occur as convergent RSS pairs at enhancers within a loop. Finally, deletion of a CBE-based IgH locus element disrupts V(D)J recombination domains and, correspondingly, alters RAG on- and off-target distributions within IgH. Our findings reveal how RAG activity is developmentally focused and implicate mechanisms by which chromatin domains harness biological processes within them. PMID:26593423

  11. Chromosomal Loop Domains Direct the Recombination of Antigen Receptor Genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiazhi; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Lijuan; Frock, Richard L; Du, Zhou; Meyers, Robin M; Meng, Fei-long; Schatz, David G; Alt, Frederick W

    2015-11-05

    RAG initiates antibody V(D)J recombination in developing lymphocytes by generating "on-target" DNA breaks at matched pairs of bona fide recombination signal sequences (RSSs). We employ bait RAG-generated breaks in endogenous or ectopically inserted RSS pairs to identify huge numbers of RAG "off-target" breaks. Such breaks occur at the simple CAC motif that defines the RSS cleavage site and are largely confined within convergent CTCF-binding element (CBE)-flanked loop domains containing bait RSS pairs. Marked orientation dependence of RAG off-target activity within loops spanning up to 2 megabases implies involvement of linear tracking. In this regard, major RAG off-targets in chromosomal translocations occur as convergent RSS pairs at enhancers within a loop. Finally, deletion of a CBE-based IgH locus element disrupts V(D)J recombination domains and, correspondingly, alters RAG on- and off-target distributions within IgH. Our findings reveal how RAG activity is developmentally focused and implicate mechanisms by which chromatin domains harness biological processes within them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. METHODS Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. RESULTS The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. CONCLUSION We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia. PMID:27672590

  13. Extensive Recombination Due to Heteroduplexes Generates Large Amounts of Artificial Gene Fragments during PCR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Song, Hongshuo; Liu, Donglai; Zuo, Tao; Lu, Fengmin; Zhuang, Hui; Gao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Artificial recombinants can be generated during PCR when more than two genetically distinct templates coexist in a single PCR reaction. These recombinant amplicons can lead to the false interpretation of genetic diversity and incorrect identification of biological phenotypes that do not exist in vivo. We investigated how recombination between 2 or 35 genetically distinct HIV-1 genomes was affected by different PCR conditions using the parallel allele-specific sequencing (PASS) assay and the next generation sequencing method. In a standard PCR condition, about 40% of amplicons in a PCR reaction were recombinants. The high recombination frequency could be significantly reduced if the number of amplicons in a PCR reaction was below a threshold of 1013–1014 using low thermal cycles, fewer input templates, and longer extension time. Heteroduplexes (each DNA strand from a distinct template) were present at a large proportion in the PCR products when more thermal cycles, more templates, and shorter extension time were used. Importantly, the majority of recombinants were identified in heteroduplexes, indicating that the recombinants were mainly generated through heteroduplexes. Since prematurely terminated extension fragments can form heteroduplexes by annealing to different templates during PCR amplification, recombination has a better chance to occur with samples containing different genomes when the number of amplicons accumulate over the threshold. New technologies are warranted to accurately characterize complex quasispecies gene populations. PMID:25211143

  14. A Genome-Wide Identification of Genes Undergoing Recombination and Positive Selection in Neisseria

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuan; Yin, Zhiqiu; Ren, Hongguang; Zhou, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is particular interest in the molecular mechanisms of adaptive evolution in bacteria. Neisseria is a genus of gram negative bacteria, and there has recently been considerable focus on its two human pathogenic species N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae. Until now, no genome-wide studies have attempted to scan for the genes related to adaptive evolution. For this reason, we selected 18 Neisseria genomes (14 N. meningitidis, 3 N. gonorrhoeae and 1 commensal N. lactamics) to conduct a comparative genome analysis to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the roles of natural selection and homologous recombination throughout the history of adaptive evolution. Among the 1012 core orthologous genes, we identified 635 genes with recombination signals and 10 genes that showed significant evidence of positive selection. Further functional analyses revealed that no functional bias was found in the recombined genes. Positively selected genes are prone to DNA processing and iron uptake, which are essential for the fundamental life cycle. Overall, the results indicate that both recombination and positive selection play crucial roles in the adaptive evolution of Neisseria genomes. The positively selected genes and the corresponding amino acid sites provide us with valuable targets for further research into the detailed mechanisms of adaptive evolution in Neisseria. PMID:25180194

  15. A better experimental method to detect the sensitivity of cancer cells to anticancer drugs after adenovirus-mediated introduction of two kinds of p53 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Li, WeiYing; Lai, BaiTang; Yang, XueHui; Zhang, ChunYan; Li, JinZhao; Zhu, YunZhong

    2015-09-01

    p53 plays an important role in drug responses by regulating cell cycle progression and inducing programmed cell death. The C-terminal of p53 self-regulates the protein negatively; however, whether it affects the sensitivity of cancer cells to anticancer drugs is unclear. In this study, two experimental methods were used to compare the sensitivity to anticancer drugs of human lung 801D cancer cells transfected with adenovirus bearing either full-length p53 or the deleted-C-terminal p53 in vivo. Adenovirus-mediated deliveries of full-length or deleted-C-terminal p53 were performed after development of tumors (the first method) or by infection into cells before xenotransplantation (the second method). The results showed that infection with the deleted-C-terminal p53 increased 801D cell sensitivity to anticancer drugs in the second, but not in the first method, as indicated by greater tumor-inhibition rates. In addition, compared with the first method, the second method resulted in viruses with more uniformly infected cells and the infection rates between groups were similar. This yielded smaller within-group variations and greater uniformity among transplanted tumors. The second method could circumvent the difficulties associated with intratumoral injection.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated expression of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 targeting hepatic stellate cell attenuates liver fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Yang, Quanjun; Huang, Jinlu; Gan, Run; Guo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response characterized with the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). And hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the principal cell source of ECM. NR4A2 (Nurr1) is a member of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A family and acts as transcription factor. It participates in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver reduced significantly compared with normal liver and NR4A2 knockout in HSCs promoted ECM production. In the present study we explored the role of NR4A2 on liver fibrosis. Studies in cultured HSCs demonstrated that NR4A2 over-expression suppressed the activation of HSCs, such as ECM production and invasion ability. Moreover cell cycle was arrested, cell apoptosis was promoted and cell signaling pathway was influenced. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of NR4A2 in rats ameliorated significantly dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) induced liver fibrosis. The In vivo experiments produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. Taken together these results demonstrate NR4A2 enhancement attenuates liver fibrosis via suppressing the activation of HSCs and NR4A2 may be an ideal target for anti-fibrotic therapy. PMID:27646469

  17. Lovastatin enhances adenovirus-mediated TRAIL induced apoptosis by depleting cholesterol of lipid rafts and affecting CAR and death receptor expression of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youhong; Chen, Lin; Gong, Zhicheng; Shen, Liangfang; Kao, Chinghai; Hock, Janet M; Sun, Lunquan; Li, Xiong

    2015-02-20

    Oncolytic adenovirus and apoptosis inducer TRAIL are promising cancer therapies. Their antitumor efficacy, when used as single agents, is limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have low infection activity, and cancer cells develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we explored combining prostate-restricted replication competent adenovirus-mediated TRAIL (PRRA-TRAIL) with lovastatin, a commonly used cholesterol-lowering drug, as a potential therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Lovastatin significantly enhanced the efficacy of PRRA-TRAIL by promoting the in vivo tumor suppression, and the in vitro cell killing and apoptosis induction, via integration of multiple molecular mechanisms. Lovastatin enhanced PRRA replication and virus-delivered transgene expression by increasing the expression levels of CAR and integrins, which are critical for adenovirus 5 binding and internalization. Lovastatin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing death receptor DR4 expression. These multiple effects of lovastatin on CAR, integrins and DR4 expression were closely associated with cholesterol-depletion in lipid rafts. These studies, for the first time, show correlations between cholesterol/lipid rafts, oncolytic adenovirus infection efficiency and the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL at the cellular level. This work enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that support use of lovastatin, in combination with PRRA-TRAIL, as a candidate strategy to treat human refractory prostate cancer in the future.

  18. Lovastatin enhances adenovirus-mediated TRAIL induced apoptosis by depleting cholesterol of lipid rafts and affecting CAR and death receptor expression of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhicheng; Shen, Liangfang; Kao, Chinghai; Hock, Janet M.; Sun, Lunquan; Li, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus and apoptosis inducer TRAIL are promising cancer therapies. Their antitumor efficacy, when used as single agents, is limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have low infection activity, and cancer cells develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we explored combining prostate-restricted replication competent adenovirus-mediated TRAIL (PRRA-TRAIL) with lovastatin, a commonly used cholesterol-lowering drug, as a potential therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Lovastatin significantly enhanced the efficacy of PRRA-TRAIL by promoting the in vivo tumor suppression, and the in vitro cell killing and apoptosis induction, via integration of multiple molecular mechanisms. Lovastatin enhanced PRRA replication and virus-delivered transgene expression by increasing the expression levels of CAR and integrins, which are critical for adenovirus 5 binding and internalization. Lovastatin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing death receptor DR4 expression. These multiple effects of lovastatin on CAR, integrins and DR4 expression were closely associated with cholesterol-depletion in lipid rafts. These studies, for the first time, show correlations between cholesterol/lipid rafts, oncolytic adenovirus infection efficiency and the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL at the cellular level. This work enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that support use of lovastatin, in combination with PRRA-TRAIL, as a candidate strategy to treat human refractory prostate cancer in the future. PMID:25605010

  19. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-11-02

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species.

  20. Homologous recombination between single-stranded DNA and chromosomal genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, J R; Moore, P D

    1987-01-01

    Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains was examined by using the URA3 and TRP1 genes cloned into M13 vectors in the absence of sequences capable of promoting autonomous replication. These constructs transform S. cerevisiae cells to prototrophy by homologous recombination with the resident mutant gene. Single-stranded DNA was found to transform S. cerevisiae cells at efficiencies greater than that of double-stranded DNA. No conversion of single-stranded transforming DNA into duplex forms could be detected during the transformation process, and we conclude that single-stranded DNA may participate directly in recombination with chromosomal sequences. Transformation with single-stranded DNA gave rise to both gene conversion and reciprocal exchange events. Cotransformation with competing heterologous single-stranded DNA specifically inhibited transformation by single-stranded DNA, suggesting that one of the components in the transformation-recombination process has a preferential affinity for single-stranded DNA. Images PMID:3302673

  1. Molluscan mobile elements similar to the vertebrate recombination-activating genes

    PubMed Central

    Panchin, Yuri; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2009-01-01

    Animal genomes contain ~20,000 genes. Additionally millions of genes for antigen receptors are generated in cells of the immune system from the sets of separate gene segments by a mechanism known as the V(D)J somatic recombination. The components of the V(D)J recombination system, Recombination-Activating Gene proteins (RAG1 and RAG2) and recombination signal sequence (RSS), are thought to have “entered” the vertebrate genome as a hypothetical “RAG transposon”. Recently discovered mobile elements have terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) similar to RSS and may encode proteins with a different degree of similarity to RAG1. We describe a novel N-RAG-TP transposon identified from the sea slug Aplysia californica that encodes a protein similar to the N-terminal part of RAG1 in vertebrates. This refines the “RAG transposon” hypothesis and allows us to propose a scenario for V(D)J recombination machinery evolution from a relic transposon related to the existing mobile elements N-RAG-TP, Chapaev and Transib. PMID:18313399

  2. High-level transgene expression by homologous recombination-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Mélanie; Girod, Pierre-Alain; Calabrese, David; Kostyrko, Kaja; Wicht, Marianne; Yerly, Florence; Mazza, Christian; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Martinet, Danielle; Mermod, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Gene transfer and expression in eukaryotes is often limited by a number of stably maintained gene copies and by epigenetic silencing effects. Silencing may be limited by the use of epigenetic regulatory sequences such as matrix attachment regions (MAR). Here, we show that successive transfections of MAR-containing vectors allow a synergistic increase of transgene expression. This finding is partly explained by an increased entry into the cell nuclei and genomic integration of the DNA, an effect that requires both the MAR element and iterative transfections. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis often showed single integration events, indicating that DNAs introduced in successive transfections could recombine. High expression was also linked to the cell division cycle, so that nuclear transport of the DNA occurs when homologous recombination is most active. Use of cells deficient in either non-homologous end-joining or homologous recombination suggested that efficient integration and expression may require homologous recombination-based genomic integration of MAR-containing plasmids and the lack of epigenetic silencing events associated with tandem gene copies. We conclude that MAR elements may promote homologous recombination, and that cells and vectors can be engineered to take advantage of this property to mediate highly efficient gene transfer and expression. PMID:21652640

  3. Embryonic stem cell gene targeting using bacteriophage lambda vectors generated by phage-plasmid recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, T; Rancourt, D E

    1998-01-01

    Targeted mutagenesis is an extremely useful experimental approach in molecular medicine, allowing the generation of specialized animals that are mutant for any gene of interest. Currently the rate determining step in any gene targeting experiment is construction of the targeting vector (TV). In order to streamline gene targeting methods and avoid problems encountered with plasmid TVs, we describe the direct application of lambda phage in targeted mutagenesis. The recombination-proficient phage vector lambda2TK permits generation of TVs by conventional restriction-ligation or recombination-mediated methods. The resulting lambdaTV DNA can then be cleaved with restriction endonucleases to release the bacteriophage arms and can subsequently be electroporated directly into ES cells to yield gene targets. We demonstrate that in vivo phage-plasmid recombination can be used to introduce neo and lacZ - neo mutations into precise positions within a lambda2TK subclone via double crossover recombination. We describe two methods for eliminating single crossover recombinants, spi selection and size restriction, both of which result in phage TVs bearing double crossover insertions. Thus TVs can be easily and quickly generated in bacteriophage without plasmid subcloning and with little genomic sequence or restriction site information. PMID:9461458

  4. Recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogous genes in X-ray sensitive and resistant CHO cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubnitchaya-Labudová, O.; Portele, A.; Vaçata, V.; Lubec, G.; Rink, H.; Höfer, M.

    1997-10-01

    The XRCC1 gene (X-ray repair cross complementing) complements the DNA repair deficiency of the radiation sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant cell line EM9 but the mechanism of the correction is not elucidated yet. XRCC1 shows substantial homology to the RAG2 gene (recombination activating gene) and we therefore tried to answer question, whether structural similarities (sequence of a putative recombination activating domain, aa 332-362 for XRCC1 and aa 286-316 in RAG2) would reflect similar functions of the homologous, putative recombination activating domain. PCR experiments revealed that no sequence homologous to the structural part of human XRCC1 was present in cDNA of CHO. Differential display demonstrated two putative recombination activating domains in the parental CHO line AA8 and one in the radiosensitive mutant EM9. Southern blot experiments showed the presence of several genes with partial homology to human XRCC1. Recombination studies consisted of expressing amplified target domains within chimeric proteins in recA - bacteria and subsequent detection of recombination events by sequencing the recombinant plasmids. Recombination experiments demonstrated recombination activating activity of all putative recombination activating domains amplified from AA8 and EM9 genomes as reflected by deletions within the insert of the recombinant plasmids. The recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogues could explain a mechanism responsible for the correction of the DNA repair defect in EM9.

  5. Mapping the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy gene is complicated by chromsome 4q35 recombination events.

    PubMed

    Weiffenbach, B; Dubois, J; Storvick, D; Tawil, R; Jacobsen, S J; Gilbert, J; Wijmenga, C; Mendell, J R; Winokur, S; Altherr, M R

    1993-06-01

    A gene responsible for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) has been linked to polymorphisms on chromosome 4q35. Multipoint linkage analyses have placed this gene distal to all reported genetic markers on the chromosome. By using as a probe a clone isolated from a cosmid containing sequences related to a homeobox domain, de novo DNA rearrangements were reported in sporadic and familial cases of FSHD. Linkage analysis of an EcoRI polymorphism detected by this clone in twenty-four multigenerational FSHD families revealed recombinants between this marker and the disease with a recombination fraction of 0.05. Two families with apparent germline mosaicism were also identified.

  6. [Recombination and fusion expression of porcine defensin gene PBD-I in E. coli].

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Wei, Hong

    2003-03-01

    The porcine defensin gene PBD-I was amplified by RT-PCR, then the gene was inserted into expression vector PinPoint(TM) Xa-3. Recombinant plasmid named as ppd-1 was transformed into E.Coli JM109, which could effectively produce fusion protein induced with IPTG. The positive clone of PBD-I gene expressed 17kDa fusion protein by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Expression of PBD-I gene didn't increase distinctly along with time. The expression of PBD-I gene lays a foundation in research on antimicrobial activities and its mechanism of the defensin.

  7. Evolution and Recombination of Genes Encoding HIV-1 Drug Resistance and Tropism during Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Binshan; Kitchen, Christina; Weiser, Barbara; Mayers, Douglas; Foley, Brian; Kemal, Kimdar; Anastos, Kathryn; Suchard, Marc; Parker, Monica; Brunner, Cheryl; Burger, Harold

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of residual plasma virus during antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a high priority to improve understanding of HIV-1 pathogenesis and therapy. To understand the evolution of HIV-1 pol and env genes in viremic patients under selective pressure of ART, we performed longitudinal analyses of plasma-derived pol and env sequences from single HIV-1 genomes. We tested the hypotheses that drug resistance in pol was unrelated to changes in coreceptor usage (tropism), and that recombination played a role in evolution of viral strains. Recombinants were identified by using Bayesian and other computational methods. High-level genotypic resistance was seen in ~70% of X4 and R5 strains during ART. There was no significant association between resistance and tropism. Each patient displayed at least one recombinant encompassing env and representing a change in predicted tropism. These data suggest that, in addition to mutation, recombination can play a significant role in shaping HIV-1 evolution. PMID:20451945

  8. [The construction of attenuated Tiantan recombinant vaccinia virus vector with IFN-gamma receptor gene deletion].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Liu, Ying; Duan, Dan-li; Li, Hai-shan; Liu, Yong; Hong, Kun-Xue; Zhu, Jia-hong; Shao, Yi-ming

    2004-03-01

    B8R gene encodes a secreted protein with homology to IFN-gamma receptor, which neutralizes the antiviral and immunological regulation activities of IFN-gamma. To improve the safety of vaccinia virus vector, an attenuated recombinant vaccinia virus with the B8R gene deletion from Tiantan vaccine strain (VTT) was constructed. The transfer vectors were generated by joining B8R left flank, B8R right flank, vv promoter, LacZ, multicloning site and pBRSK fragments. The recombinant viruses VTTdeltaB8RLacZ (VTT with B8R deletion and LacZ insertion) were constructed by homologous recombination. The B8R deletion mutants were confirmed by dot blot with B8R gene probe and PCR amplification. The replication ability of VTTdeltaB8RLacZ strain in vitro was similar to that of the VTT. The skin lesions formed by VTTdeltaB8RLacZ (10(6) pfu) were significantly smaller and healed faster than those formed by VTT when injected intradermally to the rabbits,and no visible ulceration occurred. Meanwhile LacZ in VTKgpedeltaB8RLacZ was expressed stably. The attenuated vector with B8R gene deletion improves the safety of recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine B8R locus may be used as a new site for insertion of foreign genes in vaccinia virus vector.

  9. Gene doctoring: a method for recombineering in laboratory and pathogenic Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Homologous recombination mediated by the λ-Red genes is a common method for making chromosomal modifications in Escherichia coli. Several protocols have been developed that differ in the mechanisms by which DNA, carrying regions homologous to the chromosome, are delivered into the cell. A common technique is to electroporate linear DNA fragments into cells. Alternatively, DNA fragments are generated in vivo by digestion of a donor plasmid with a nuclease that does not cleave the host genome. In both cases the λ-Red gene products recombine homologous regions carried on the linear DNA fragments with the chromosome. We have successfully used both techniques to generate chromosomal mutations in E. coli K-12 strains. However, we have had limited success with these λ-Red based recombination techniques in pathogenic E. coli strains, which has led us to develop an enhanced protocol for recombineering in such strains. Results Our goal was to develop a high-throughput recombineering system, primarily for the coupling of genes to epitope tags, which could also be used for deletion of genes in both pathogenic and K-12 E. coli strains. To that end we have designed a series of donor plasmids for use with the λ-Red recombination system, which when cleaved in vivo by the I-SceI meganuclease generate a discrete linear DNA fragment, allowing for C-terminal tagging of chromosomal genes with a 6 × His, 3 × FLAG, 4 × ProteinA or GFP tag or for the deletion of chromosomal regions. We have enhanced existing protocols and technologies by inclusion of a cassette conferring kanamycin resistance and, crucially, by including the sacB gene on the donor plasmid, so that all but true recombinants are counter-selected on kanamycin and sucrose containing media, thus eliminating the need for extensive screening. This method has the added advantage of limiting the exposure of cells to the potential damaging effects of the λ-Red system, which can lead to unwanted secondary

  10. Trypanosome Surface Antigen Genes: Analysis Using Recombinant DNA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-15

    glycoprotein ( VSG ) genes. umerous syringe passaged and cyclically transmitted, frequently expressed VATs have been isolated, monoclonal antibodies prepared...to their VSGs , and he expressed VSG genes have been cloned. We have shown that many diverse tocks express VSG epitopes related to the early IsTst...epitopes. The VSG ene organization in the genome and sequence organization has been haracterized. We have confirmed sequence homology at the 3’ terminus

  11. PCR-mediated recombination of the amplification products of the Hibiscus tiliaceus cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linghui; Tang, Tian; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2007-03-31

    PCR-mediated recombination describes the process of in vitro chimera formation from related template sequences present in a single PCR amplification. The high levels of genetic redundancy in eukaryotic genomes should make recombination artifacts occur readily. However, few evolutionary biologists adequately consider this phenomenon when studying gene lineages. The cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GapC), which encodes a NADP-dependent nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the cytosol, is a classical low-copy nuclear gene marker and is commonly used in molecular evolutionary studies. Here, we report on the occurrence of PCR-mediated recombination in the GapC gene family of Hibiscus tiliaceus. The study suggests that recombinant areas appear to be correlated with DNA template secondary structures. Our observations highlight that recombination artifacts should be considered when studying specific and allelic phylogenies. The authors suggest that nested PCR be used to suppress PCR-mediated recombination.

  12. Suicide gene therapy using adenovirus vector for human oral squamous carcinoma cell line in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Hayashi, Yasushi; Kagami, Hideaki; Fukui, Takafumi; Fukuhara, Hirokazu; Tohnai, Iwai; Ueda, Minoru; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yoshida, Jun

    2005-06-01

    Recently, suicide gene therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene followed by ganciclovir (GCV) administration was evaluated for the treatment of cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of suicide gene therapy using the replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus vector for human oral squamous carcinoma cell lines. To evaluate transduction efficiency, each cell line was transduced in vitro with an adenovirus vector containing the beta-galactosidase gene. By 24 hours after transduction, nearly 100% of the cells were transduced at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 10, and from 30 to 10% at an MOI of 1. Next, each cell line was transduced with an adenovirus vector containing the HSVtk gene, and a subsequent administration of GCV for the assessment of suicide gene therapy. A subsequent administration of GCV resulted in complete tumor cell death. In addition, we conducted a morphological analysis of that cell death using video-enhanced contrast differential interference contrast microscopy, and we observed that it included both apoptosis and necrosis after HSVtk gene and GCV treatment. These results suggest that adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy induced remarkable cytotoxicity with a bystander effect in human oral squamous cell carcinoma thus suggesting an effective treatment strategy for that tumor.

  13. [Construction and identification of recombinant avian adeno-associated virus expressing GFP reporter gene].

    PubMed

    Wang, An-ping; Sun, Huai-chang; Wang, Jian-ye; Wang, Yong-juan; Yuan, Wei-feng

    2007-07-01

    To generate recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (rAAAV) for gene transfer studies in avian cells, the recombinant plasmid containing the whole genome of AAAV was digested with restriction enzymes to remove the Rep and Cap genes, resulting in AAAV transfer vector pAITR. GFP-expressing cassette was amplified by PCR and inserted into the AAAV transfer vector. The Rep-Cap gene of AAAV amplified by high fidelity PCR was subcloned into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3, resulting in an AAAV helper vector pcDNA-ARC. The Rep and Cap genes amplified by high fidelity PCR were subcloned separately into the co-expression vector pVITRO2-mcs, resulting in another AAAV helper vector pVITRO2-ARC. Using calcium phosphate precipitation method, rAAAV-GFP was generated by co-transfecting AAV-293 cells with a cocktail of pAITR-GFP, pcDNA-ARC or pVITRO2-ARC, and adenovirus helper vector pHelper. The three structural proteins VP1, VP2 and VP3 of correct molecular masses were detected by SDS-PAGE and the GFP reporter gene was detected by PCR in purified rAAAV-GFP virions. Chicken embryonic fibroblast (CEF) cells and CEL cell line were transduced with the recombinant virus, the GFP-positive cells were easily observed under fluorescent microscope, expression of which lasted for at least two weeks. These data demonstrate that an efficient helper virus-free packaging system has been established for generating recombinant AAAV particles for gene transfer studies in avian cells and for development of recombinant vaccines against avian diseases.

  14. [Heterologous genes expression on Escherichia coli chromosome lac operon using Red recombination].

    PubMed

    Li, Shanhu; Shi, Qingguo; Huang, Cuifen; Zhou, Jianguang

    2008-04-01

    To achieve efficient and stable expression of heterologous exogenetic protein or antigen in E. coli chromosome, the luciferase report gene was knocked in lacZ site of chromosome lac operon by using Red recombination system and selection-counterselection kan/sacB technology. The quantitative analysis of exogenous gene expression indicated that the target gene could be efficiently expressed at lacZ site of lac operon. The results confirmed the efficient screening and stable expression of heterologous protein or antigen on chromosome by using the recombinant engineering technique. This study demonstrated that the chromosome could be used as a vector for heterologous protein or antigen and the stable expression of exogenous gene on E. coli chromosome had no side effect on the bacterial growth and propagation.

  15. Homologous recombination within the capsid gene of porcine circovirus type 2 subgroup viruses via natural co-infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several studies had reported homologous recombination between porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-group 1 (Gp1) and -group 2 (Gp2) viruses. Interestingly, the recombination events described thus far mapped either within the Rep gene sequences or the sequences flanking the Rep gene region. Previously, ...

  16. Problem-Solving Test: Conditional Gene Targeting Using the Cre/loxP Recombination System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: gene targeting, knock-out mutation, bacteriophage, complementary base-pairing, homologous recombination, deletion, transgenic organisms, promoter, polyadenylation element, transgene, DNA replication, RNA polymerase, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, restriction endonuclease, polymerase chain…

  17. Evolution and homologous recombination of the hemagglutinin-esterase gene sequences from porcine torovirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of the present study was to gain new insights into the evolution, homologous recombination and selection pressures imposed on the porcine torovirus (PToV), by examining changes in the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene. The most recent common ancestor of PToV was estimated to have emerge...

  18. Problem-Solving Test: Conditional Gene Targeting Using the Cre/loxP Recombination System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: gene targeting, knock-out mutation, bacteriophage, complementary base-pairing, homologous recombination, deletion, transgenic organisms, promoter, polyadenylation element, transgene, DNA replication, RNA polymerase, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, restriction endonuclease, polymerase chain…

  19. Gene conversion associated with site-specific recombination in yeast plasmid pSR1.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, H; Araki, H; Oshima, Y

    1988-01-01

    A circular DNA plasmid, pSR1, isolated from Zygosaccharomyces rouxii has a pair of inverted repeats consisting of completely homologous 959-base pair (bp) sequences. Intramolecular recombination occurs frequently at the inverted repeats in cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as in Z. rouxii, and is catalyzed by a protein encoded by the R gene of its own genome. The recombination is, however, independent of the RAD52 gene of the host genome. A site for initiation of the intramolecular recombination in the S. cerevisiae host was delimited into, at most, a 58-bp region in the inverted repeats by using mutant plasmids created by linker insertion. The 58-bp region contains a pair with 14-bp dyad symmetry separated by a 3-bp spacer sequence. The recombination initiated at this site was accompanied by a high frequency of gene conversion (3 to 50% of the plasmid clones examined). Heterogeneity created by the linker insertion or by a deletion (at most 153 bp so far tested) at any place on the inverted repeats was converted to a homologous combination by the gene conversion, even in the rad52-1 mutant host. A mechanism implying branch migration coupled with DNA replication is discussed. Images PMID:3280974

  20. Recombinant Hendra viruses expressing a reporter gene retain pathogenicity in ferrets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hendra virus (HeV) is an Australian bat-borne zoonotic paramyxovirus that repeatedly spills-over to horses causing fatal disease. Human cases have all been associated with close contact with infected horses. Methods A full-length antigenome clone of HeV was assembled, a reporter gene (GFP or luciferase) inserted between the P and M genes and transfected to 293T cells to generate infectious reporter gene-encoding recombinant viruses. These viruses were then assessed in vitro for expression of the reporter genes. The GFP expressing recombinant HeV was used to challenge ferrets to assess the virulence and tissue distribution by monitoring GFP expression in infected cells. Results Three recombinant HeV constructs were successfully cloned and rescued; a wild-type virus, a GFP-expressing virus and a firefly luciferase-expressing virus. In vitro characterisation demonstrated expression of the reporter genes, with levels proportional to the initial inoculum levels. Challenge of ferrets with the GFP virus demonstrated maintenance of the fatal phenotype with disease progressing to death consistent with that observed previously with the parental wild-type isolate of HeV. GFP expression could be observed in infected tissues collected from animals at euthanasia. Conclusions Here, we report on the first successful rescue of recombinant HeV, including wild-type virus and viruses expressing two different reporter genes encoded as an additional gene cassette inserted between the P and M genes. We further demonstrate that the GFP virus retained the ability to cause fatal disease in a well-characterized ferret model of henipavirus infection despite the genome being an extra 1290 nucleotides in length. PMID:23521919

  1. Recombinant Hendra viruses expressing a reporter gene retain pathogenicity in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Glenn A; Virtue, Elena R; Smith, Ina; Todd, Shawn; Arkinstall, Rachel; Frazer, Leah; Monaghan, Paul; Smith, Greg A; Broder, Christopher C; Middleton, Deborah; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2013-03-25

    Hendra virus (HeV) is an Australian bat-borne zoonotic paramyxovirus that repeatedly spills-over to horses causing fatal disease. Human cases have all been associated with close contact with infected horses. A full-length antigenome clone of HeV was assembled, a reporter gene (GFP or luciferase) inserted between the P and M genes and transfected to 293T cells to generate infectious reporter gene-encoding recombinant viruses. These viruses were then assessed in vitro for expression of the reporter genes. The GFP expressing recombinant HeV was used to challenge ferrets to assess the virulence and tissue distribution by monitoring GFP expression in infected cells. Three recombinant HeV constructs were successfully cloned and rescued; a wild-type virus, a GFP-expressing virus and a firefly luciferase-expressing virus. In vitro characterisation demonstrated expression of the reporter genes, with levels proportional to the initial inoculum levels. Challenge of ferrets with the GFP virus demonstrated maintenance of the fatal phenotype with disease progressing to death consistent with that observed previously with the parental wild-type isolate of HeV. GFP expression could be observed in infected tissues collected from animals at euthanasia. Here, we report on the first successful rescue of recombinant HeV, including wild-type virus and viruses expressing two different reporter genes encoded as an additional gene cassette inserted between the P and M genes. We further demonstrate that the GFP virus retained the ability to cause fatal disease in a well-characterized ferret model of henipavirus infection despite the genome being an extra 1290 nucleotides in length.

  2. Properties of Mitotic and Meiotic Recombination in the Tandemly-Repeated CUP1 Gene Cluster in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Dominska, Margaret; Petrova, Aleksandra; Bagshaw, Halle; Kokoska, Robert J; Petes, Thomas D

    2017-06-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the genes encoding the metallothionein protein Cup1 are located in a tandem array on chromosome VIII. Using a diploid strain that is heterozygous for an insertion of a selectable marker (URA3) within this tandem array, and heterozygous for markers flanking the array, we measured interhomolog recombination and intra/sister chromatid exchange in the CUP1 locus. The rate of intra/sister chromatid recombination exceeded the rate of interhomolog recombination by >10-fold. Loss of the Rad51 and Rad52 proteins, required for most interhomolog recombination, led to a relatively small reduction of recombination in the CUP1 array. Although interhomolog mitotic recombination in the CUP1 locus is elevated relative to the average genomic region, we found that interhomolog meiotic recombination in the array is reduced compared to most regions. Lastly, we showed that high levels of copper (previously shown to elevate CUP1 transcription) lead to a substantial elevation in rate of both interhomolog and intra/sister chromatid recombination in the CUP1 array; recombination events that delete the URA3 insertion from the CUP1 array occur at a rate of >10(-3)/division in unselected cells. This rate is almost three orders of magnitude higher than observed for mitotic recombination events involving single-copy genes. In summary, our study shows that some of the basic properties of recombination differ considerably between single-copy and tandemly-repeated genes. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of human hotspot intersected genes highlights the roles of meiotic recombination in evolution and disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Hu, Zhibin; Zhou, Zuomin; Guo, Xuejiang; Sha, Jiahao

    2013-01-31

    Meiotic recombination events are not randomly located, but rather cluster at hotspot regions. Recently, the fine-scale mapping of genome-wide human recombination hotspots was performed. Here, we systematically analyzed the evolutionary and disease-associated features of hotspots that overlapped with protein-coding genes. In this study, we defined hotspot intersected genes as HI genes. We found that HI genes were prone to be located in the extracellular part and were functionally enriched in cell-to-cell communication. Tissue-specific genes and secreted protein encoding genes were overrepresented in HI genes, while housekeeping genes were underrepresented. Compared to slowly evolving housekeeping genes and random genes with lower recombination rates, HI genes evolved faster. The fact that brain and blood specific genes were overrepresented in HI genes indicates that they may be involved in the evolution of human intelligence and the immune system. We also found that genes related to disease were enriched in HI genes, especially genes with disease-associated chromosomal rearrangements. Hotspot sequence motifs were overrepresented in common sequences of HI genes and genes with disease-associated chromosomal rearrangements. We further listed repeat elements that were enriched both in hotspots and genes with disease-associated chromosomal rearrangements. HI genes are evolving and may be involved in the generation of key features of human during evolution. Disease-associated genes may be by-products of meiotic recombination. In addition, hotspot sequence motifs and repeat elements showed the connection between meiotic recombination and genes with disease-associated chromosomal rearrangements at the sequence level. Our study will enable us to better understand the evolutionary and biological significance of human meiotic recombination.

  4. UV irradiation induces homologous recombination genes in the model archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1

    PubMed Central

    McCready, Shirley; Müller, Jochen A; Boubriak, Ivan; Berquist, Brian R; Ng, Wooi Loon; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2005-01-01

    Background A variety of strategies for survival of UV irradiation are used by cells, ranging from repair of UV-damaged DNA, cell cycle arrest, tolerance of unrepaired UV photoproducts, and shielding from UV light. Some of these responses involve UV-inducible genes, including the SOS response in bacteria and an array of genes in eukaryotes. To address the mechanisms used in the third branch of life, we have studied the model archaeon, Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1, which tolerates high levels of solar radiation in its natural hypersaline environment. Results Cells were irradiated with 30–70 J/m2 UV-C and an immunoassay showed that the resulting DNA damage was largely repaired within 3 hours in the dark. Under such conditions, transcriptional profiling showed the most strongly up-regulated gene was radA1, the archaeal homolog of rad51/recA, which was induced 7-fold. Additional genes involved in homologous recombination, such as arj1 (recJ-like exonuclease), dbp (eukaryote-like DNA binding protein of the superfamily I DNA and RNA helicases), and rfa3 (replication protein A complex), as well as nrdJ, encoding for cobalamin-dependent ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA metabolism, were also significantly induced in one or more of our experimental conditions. Neither prokaryotic nor eukaryotic excision repair gene homologs were induced and there was no evidence of an SOS-like response. Conclusion These results show that homologous recombination plays an important role in the cellular response of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 to UV damage. Homologous recombination may permit rescue of stalled replication forks, and/or facilitate recombinational repair. In either case, this provides a mechanism for the observed high-frequency recombination among natural populations of halophilic archaea. PMID:16176594

  5. The low-recombining pericentromeric region of barley restricts gene diversity and evolution but not gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Katie; Bayer, Micha; Cook, Nicola; Dreißig, Steven; Dhillon, Taniya; Russell, Joanne; Hedley, Pete E; Morris, Jenny; Ramsay, Luke; Colas, Isabelle; Waugh, Robbie; Steffenson, Brian; Milne, Iain; Stephen, Gordon; Marshall, David; Flavell, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The low-recombining pericentromeric region of the barley genome contains roughly a quarter of the genes of the species, embedded in low-recombining DNA that is rich in repeats and repressive chromatin signatures. We have investigated the effects of pericentromeric region residency upon the expression, diversity and evolution of these genes. We observe no significant difference in average transcript level or developmental RNA specificity between the barley pericentromeric region and the rest of the genome. In contrast, all of the evolutionary parameters studied here show evidence of compromised gene evolution in this region. First, genes within the pericentromeric region of wild barley show reduced diversity and significantly weakened purifying selection compared with the rest of the genome. Second, gene duplicates (ohnolog pairs) derived from the cereal whole-genome duplication event ca. 60MYa have been completely eliminated from the barley pericentromeric region. Third, local gene duplication in the pericentromeric region is reduced by 29% relative to the rest of the genome. Thus, the pericentromeric region of barley is a permissive environment for gene expression but has restricted gene evolution in a sizeable fraction of barley's genes. PMID:24947331

  6. A modified recombineering protocol for the genetic manipulation of gene clusters in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Alcazar-Fuoli, Laura; Cairns, Timothy; Lopez, Jordi F; Zonja, Bozo; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Bowyer, Paul; Bignell, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analyses of fungal genome structure have revealed the presence of physically-linked groups of genes, termed gene clusters, where collective functionality of encoded gene products serves a common biosynthetic purpose. In multiple fungal pathogens of humans and plants gene clusters have been shown to encode pathways for biosynthesis of secondary metabolites including metabolites required for pathogenicity. In the major mould pathogen of humans Aspergillus fumigatus, multiple clusters of co-ordinately upregulated genes were identified as having heightened transcript abundances, relative to laboratory cultured equivalents, during the early stages of murine infection. The aim of this study was to develop and optimise a methodology for manipulation of gene cluster architecture, thereby providing the means to assess their relevance to fungal pathogenicity. To this end we adapted a recombineering methodology which exploits lambda phage-mediated recombination of DNA in bacteria, for the generation of gene cluster deletion cassettes. By exploiting a pre-existing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of A. fumigatus genomic clones we were able to implement single or multiple intra-cluster gene replacement events at both subtelomeric and telomere distal chromosomal locations, in both wild type and highly recombinogenic A. fumigatus isolates. We then applied the methodology to address the boundaries of a gene cluster producing a nematocidal secondary metabolite, pseurotin A, and to address the role of this secondary metabolite in insect and mammalian responses to A. fumigatus challenge.

  7. A Modified Recombineering Protocol for the Genetic Manipulation of Gene Clusters in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Alcazar-Fuoli, Laura; Cairns, Timothy; Lopez, Jordi F.; Zonja, Bozo; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Bowyer, Paul; Bignell, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Genomic analyses of fungal genome structure have revealed the presence of physically-linked groups of genes, termed gene clusters, where collective functionality of encoded gene products serves a common biosynthetic purpose. In multiple fungal pathogens of humans and plants gene clusters have been shown to encode pathways for biosynthesis of secondary metabolites including metabolites required for pathogenicity. In the major mould pathogen of humans Aspergillus fumigatus, multiple clusters of co-ordinately upregulated genes were identified as having heightened transcript abundances, relative to laboratory cultured equivalents, during the early stages of murine infection. The aim of this study was to develop and optimise a methodology for manipulation of gene cluster architecture, thereby providing the means to assess their relevance to fungal pathogenicity. To this end we adapted a recombineering methodology which exploits lambda phage-mediated recombination of DNA in bacteria, for the generation of gene cluster deletion cassettes. By exploiting a pre-existing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of A. fumigatus genomic clones we were able to implement single or multiple intra-cluster gene replacement events at both subtelomeric and telomere distal chromosomal locations, in both wild type and highly recombinogenic A. fumigatus isolates. We then applied the methodology to address the boundaries of a gene cluster producing a nematocidal secondary metabolite, pseurotin A, and to address the role of this secondary metabolite in insect and mammalian responses to A. fumigatus challenge. PMID:25372385

  8. Gene expression analysis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with recombinant bromelain.

    PubMed

    Fouz, Nour; Amid, Azura; Hashim, Yumi Zuhanis Has-Yun

    2014-08-01

    The contributing molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis of breast cancer need to be better characterized. The principle of our study was to better understand the genetic mechanism of oncogenesis for human breast cancer and to discover new possible tumor markers for use in clinical practice. We used complimentary DNA (cDNA) microarrays to compare gene expression profiles of treated Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) with recombinant bromelain and untreated MCF-7. SpringGene analysis was carried out of differential expression followed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), to understand the underlying consequence in developing disease and disorders. We identified 1,102 known genes differentially expressed to a significant degree (p<0.001) changed between the treatment. Within this gene set, 20 genes were significantly changed between treated cells and the control cells with cutoff fold change of more than 1.5. These genes are RNA-binding motif, single-stranded interacting protein 1 (RBMS1), ribosomal protein L29 (RPL29), glutathione S-transferase mu 2 (GSTM2), C15orf32, Akt3, B cell translocation gene 1 (BTG1), C6orf62, C7orf60, kinesin-associated protein 3 (KIFAP3), FBXO11, AT-rich interactive domain 4A (ARID4A), COPS2, TBPL1|SLC2A12, TMEM59, SNORD46, glioma tumor suppressor candidate region gene 2 (GLTSCR2), and LRRFIP. Our observation on gene expression indicated that recombinant bromelain produces a unique signature affecting different pathways, specific for each congener. The microarray results give a molecular mechanistic insight and functional effects, following recombinant bromelain treatment. The extent of changes in genes is related to and involved significantly in gap junction signaling, amyloid processing, cell cycle regulation by BTG family proteins, and breast cancer regulation by stathmin1 that play major roles.

  9. Generating gene knockout rats by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Chang; Huang, Guanyi; Ashton, Charles; Li, Ping; Ying, Qi-Long

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a detailed protocol for generating gene knockout rats by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. This protocol comprises the following procedures: derivation and expansion of rat ES cells, construction of gene-targeting vectors, generation of gene-targeted rat ES cells and, finally, production of gene-targeted rats. The major differences between this protocol and the classical mouse gene-targeting protocol include ES cell culture methods, drug selection scheme, colony picking and screening strategies. This ES cell–based gene-targeting technique allows sophisticated genetic modifications to be performed in the rat, as many laboratories have been doing in the mouse for the past two decades. Recently we used this protocol to generate Tp53 (also known as p53) gene knockout rats. The entire process requires ~1 year to complete, from derivation of ES cells to generation of knockout rats. PMID:21637202

  10. Recombination analysis and structure prediction show correlation between breakpoint clusters and RNA hairpins in the pol gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 unique recombinant forms.

    PubMed

    Galli, Andrea; Lai, Alessia; Corvasce, Stefano; Saladini, Francesco; Riva, Chiara; Dehò, Lorenzo; Caramma, Ilaria; Franzetti, Marco; Romano, Laura; Galli, Massimo; Zazzi, Maurizio; Balotta, Claudia

    2008-12-01

    Recombination is recognized as a primary force in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolution, increasing viral diversity through reshuffling of genomic portions. The strand-switching activity of reverse transcriptase is required to complete HIV-1 replication and can occur randomly throughout the genome, leading to viral recombination. Some recombination hotspots have been identified and found to correlate with RNA structure or sequence features. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of recombination hotspots in the pol gene of HIV-1 and to assess their correlation with the underlying RNA structure. Analysis of the recombination pattern and breakpoint distribution in a group of unique recombinant forms (URFs) detected two recombination hotspots in the pol region. Two stable and conserved hairpins were consistently predicted corresponding to the identified hotspots using six different RNA-folding algorithms on the URF parental strains. These findings suggest that such hairpins may play a role in the higher recombination rates detected at these positions.

  11. Recombination-activating gene 1 and 2 (RAG1 and RAG2) in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianlei; Tan, Xungang; Zhang, Pei-Jun; Zhang, Yuqing; Xu, Peng

    2014-12-01

    During the development of B and T lymphocytes, Ig and TCR variable region genes are assembled from germline V, D, and J gene segments by a site-specific recombination reaction known as V(D)J recombination. The process of somatic V(D)J recombination, mediated by the recombination-activating gene (RAG) products, is the most significant characteristic of adaptive immunity in jawed vertebrates. Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) RAG1 and RAG2 were isolated by Genome Walker and RT-PCR, and their expression patterns were analysed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization on sections. RAG1 spans over 7.0 kb, containing 4 exons and 3 introns, and the full-length ORF is 3207 bp, encoding a peptide of 1068 amino acids. The first exon lies in the 5'-UTR, which is an alternative exon. RAG2 full-length ORF is 1062 bp, encodes a peptide of 533 amino acids, and lacks introns in the coding region. In 6-month old flounders, the expression of RAG1 and RAG2 was essentially restricted to the pronephros (head kidney) and mesonephros (truck kidney). Additionally, both of them were mainly expressed in the thymus. These results revealed that the thymus and kidney most likely serve as the primary lymphoid tissues in the flounder.

  12. Effective restoration of dystrophin-associated proteins in vivo by adenovirus-mediated transfer of truncated dystrophin cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, K; Miyagoe, Y; Yamamoto, K; Nabeshima, Y; Dickson, G; Takeda, S

    1998-03-27

    A series of truncated dystrophin cDNAs (3.1-4.2 kbp) containing only three, three, two or one rod repeats with hinge 1 and 4 (named deltaDysAX2, AX11, AH3, M3, respectively) or no rod repeat retaining either hinge 1 or 4 (named deltaDysH1, H4, respectively) were constructed. These cDNAs were introduced into skeletal muscle of adult mdx mice using the adenovirus vector with a strong CAG promoter. deltaDysAX2, AX11, AH3 and deltaDysM3 expressed themselves successfully and recovered dystrophin-associated proteins effectively. Especially 3.7 kbp cDNA for deltaDysM3 offers the possibility of an approach utilizing newly developed virus vectors, such as an adeno-associated virus vector, toward gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  13. Isolation of the gene encoding the Hin recombinational enhancer binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R C; Ball, C A; Pfeffer, D; Simon, M I

    1988-01-01

    In vitro DNA inversion mediated by the protein Hin requires the presence of a recombinational enhancer sequence located in cis relative to the recombination sites and a protein, Fis, which binds to the enhancer. We have cloned and determined the primary sequence of the gene encoding Fis. The deduced amino acid sequence of Fis indicates that the protein is 98 amino acids long and contains a potential helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif at its carboxyl terminus. The gene encoding Fis maps at 72 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome. The construction of mutant strains of E. coli that lack a functional fis gene demonstrates that Fis is not essential for cell growth under laboratory conditions but is required for high rates of Hin-mediated site-specific inversion in vivo. PMID:2835774

  14. Isolation of novel human and mouse genes of the recA/RAD51 recombination-repair gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, R; Dunn, A M; Simpson, P J; Tambini, C E; Thacker, J

    1998-01-01

    Genes from the recA/RAD51 family play essential roles in homologous recombination in all organisms. Using sequence homologies from eukaryotic members of this family we have identified fragments of two additional mammalian genes with homology to RAD51. Cloning the full-length cDNAs for both human and mouse genes showed that the sequences are highly conserved, and that the predicted proteins have characteristic features of this gene family. One of the novel genes (R51H2) occurs in two forms in human cDNA, differing extensively at the 3' end, probably due to an unusual form of alternative splicing. The new genes (R51H2 and R51H3) were mapped to human chromosomes 14q23-24 and 17q1.2, respectively. Expression studies showed that R51H2 is expressed at lower levels than R51H3 , but that expression of both genes occurs at elevated levels in the testis compared with other tissues. The combination of gene structure conservation and the transcript expression patterns suggests that these new members of the recA/RAD51 family may also function in homologous recombination-repair pathways. PMID:9512535

  15. Recombination between diverged clusters of the tomato Cf-9 plant disease resistance gene family

    PubMed Central

    Parniske, Martin; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

    1999-01-01

    The tomato Cf-4 and Cf-9 genes are the founder members of a large gene family of homologues of Cladosporium fulvum resistance gene Cf-9 (Hcr9 genes), several of which confer resistance against C. fulvum through recognition of different pathogen-encoded avirulence determinants. Three loci of tandemly repeated Hcr9 genes—Southern Cross (SC), Milky Way (MW), and Northern Lights (NL)—are located on the short arm of tomato chromosome 1. Comparisons between 2 SC-Hcr9s, 11 from MW, and 5 from NL implicated sequence exchange between gene family members in their evolution. The extent to which novel variants can be generated by recombination depends on the degree of sequence polymorphism available within the gene family. Here we show that physical separation of Hcr9 genes can be associated with elevated sequence divergence. Two diverged subclasses of Hcr9s could be defined. These are physically separated from each other, with members of one class exclusively residing at Northern Lights. One exceptional Hcr9 at Northern Lights carried sequence features specific for Hcr9s at other loci, suggesting a recent transfer of this gene by an interlocus recombination event. As members of diverged subclasses are brought into physical vicinity within a tandem repeat, a larger spectrum of sequence variants can potentially be generated by subsequent interhomologue sequence exchange. PMID:10318973

  16. Dynamics and modeling of temperature-regulated gene product expression in recombinant yeast fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C; Yang, S T

    1996-06-20

    The dynamic response of temperature-regulated gene expression in the recombinant yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain XK1-C2 carrying plasmid pSXR125, to temperature changes during fed-batch and continuous (chemostat) cultures was studied. The production of the gene product, beta-galactosidase, in the yeast cell is sensitive to the growth temperature. Gene expression of this product was fully turned on or off by temperature shifts between 24 and 30 degrees C. However, the response for gene turn-on and turn-off in this recombinant yeast was slow, requiring from several hours to over 10 h to fully appear. The continuous reactor took 30-60 h after the temperature shift to reach a new steady state. A dynamic process model was developed to simulate the reactor and cell responses to temperature shift. A first-order model was used to account for the effect of dilution rate on the change of protein concentration in the chemostat. It was found that cell response in gene expression to temperature shift followed first-order plus dead-time dynamics. Also, the response time for gene expression to temperature shift varied with specific growth rate or dilution rate of the continuous reactor. In general, the response was slower at a higher dilution rate and for gene turn-on than for gene turn-off.

  17. IMGT/GeneInfo: enhancing V(D)J recombination database accessibility.

    PubMed

    Baum, Thierry-Pascal; Pasqual, Nicolas; Thuderoz, Florence; Hierle, Vivien; Chaume, Denys; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Jouvin-Marche, Evelyne; Marche, Patrice-Noël; Demongeot, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    IMGT/GeneInfo is a user-friendly online information system that provides information on data resulting from the complex mechanisms of immunoglobulin (IG) and T cell receptor (TR) V(D)J recombinations. For the first time, it is possible to visualize all the rearrangement parameters on a single page. IMGT/GeneInfo is part of the international ImMunoGeneTics information system (IMGT), a high-quality integrated knowledge resource specializing in IG, TR, major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and related proteins of the immune system of human and other vertebrate species. The IMGT/GeneInfo system was developed by the TIMC and ICH laboratories (with the collaboration of LIGM), and is the first example of an external system being incorporated into IMGT. In this paper, we report the first part of this work. IMGT/GeneInfo_TR deals with the human and mouse TRA/TRD and TRB loci of the TR. Data handling and visualization are complementary to the current data and tools in IMGT, and will subsequently allow the modelling of V(D)J gene use, and thus, to predict non-standard recombination profiles which may eventually be found in conditions such as leukaemias or lymphomas. Access to IMGT/GeneInfo is free and can be found at http://imgt.cines.fr/GeneInfo.

  18. Baculovirus expression of the glycoprotein gene of Lassa virus and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Hummel, K B; Martin, M L; Auperin, D D

    1992-09-01

    A recombinant baculovirus was constructed that expresses the glycoprotein gene of Lassa virus (Josiah strain) under the transcriptional control of the polyhedrin promoter. The expressed protein (B-LSGPC) comigrated with the authentic viral glycoprotein as observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), was reactive with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in Western blots, and was glycosylated. Although the recombinant protein was not processed into the mature glycoproteins, G1 and G2, it demonstrated reactivity with all known epitopes as measured by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA), and it was immunogenic, eliciting antisera in rabbits that recognized whole virus in IFAs. Regarding future applications to diagnostic assays, the recombinant glycoprotein proved to be an effective substitute for Lassa virus-infected mammalian cells in IFAs and it was able to distinguish sera from several human cases of Lassa fever, against a panel of known negative sera of African origin, in an enzyme immunoassay (EIA).

  19. Adenovirus-mediated Wnt5a expression inhibits the telogen-to-anagen transition of hair follicles in mice.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yi-Zhan; Wang, Rui-Min; Yang, Ke; Guo, Hai-Ying; Deng, Fang; Li, Yu-Hong; Ye, Ji-Xing; He, Long; Lian, Xiao-Hua; Yang, Tian

    2013-01-01

    The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays an important role in hair cycle induction. Wnt5a is a non-canonical Wnt family member that generally antagonizes canonical Wnt signaling in other systems. In hair follicles, Wnt5a and canonical Wnt are both expressed in cells in the telogen stage. Wnt5a has been shown to be critical for controlling hair cell fate. However, the role that Wnt5a plays in the transition from the telogen to anagen stage is unknown. In this study, using whole-mount in situ hybridization, we show that Wnt5a is produced by several other cell types, excluding dermal papilla cells, throughout the hair cycle. For example, Wnt5a is expressed in bulge and secondary hair germ cells in the telogen stage. Our studies focused on the depilated 8-week-old mouse as a synchronized model of hair growth. Interestingly, overexpression of adenovirus Wnt5a in the dorsal skin of mice led to the elongation of the telogen stage and inhibition of the initiation of the anagen stage. However, following an extended period of time, four pelage hair types grew from hairless skin that was induced by Wnt5a, and the structure of these new hair shafts was normal. Using microarray analysis and quantitative arrays, we showed that the expression of β-catenin and some target genes of canonical Wnt signaling decreased after Wnt5a treatment. These data demonstrate that Wnt5a may inhibit the telogen stage to maintain a quiescent state of the hair follicle.

  20. Crossovers are associated with mutation and biased gene conversion at recombination hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Arbeithuber, Barbara; Betancourt, Andrea J.; Ebner, Thomas; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis is a potentially important source of germline mutations, as sites of meiotic recombination experience recurrent double-strand breaks (DSBs). However, evidence for a local mutagenic effect of recombination from population sequence data has been equivocal, likely because mutation is only one of several forces shaping sequence variation. By sequencing large numbers of single crossover molecules obtained from human sperm for two recombination hotspots, we find direct evidence that recombination is mutagenic: Crossovers carry more de novo mutations than nonrecombinant DNA molecules analyzed for the same donors and hotspots. The observed mutations were primarily CG to TA transitions, with a higher frequency of transitions at CpG than non-CpGs sites. This enrichment of mutations at CpG sites at hotspots could predominate in methylated regions involving frequent single-stranded DNA processing as part of DSB repair. In addition, our data set provides evidence that GC alleles are preferentially transmitted during crossing over, opposing mutation, and shows that GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) predominates over mutation in the sequence evolution of hotspots. These findings are consistent with the idea that gBGC could be an adaptation to counteract the mutational load of recombination. PMID:25646453

  1. Expression of a Bacillus phytase C gene in Pichia pastoris and properties of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Olazarán, Martha; Rodríguez-Blanco, Lilí; Carreon-Treviño, J Gerardo; Gallegos-López, Juan A; Viader-Salvadó, José M

    2010-08-01

    The cloning and expression of a native gene encoding a Bacillus subtilis phytase using Pichia pastoris as the host is described. In addition, the influence of N-glycosylation on the biochemical properties of the B. subtilis phytase, the influence of pH on the thermostability of the recombinant and native B. subtilis phytases, and the resistance of both phytases to shrimp digestive enzymes and porcine trypsin are also described. After 48 h of methanol induction in shake flasks, a selected recombinant strain produced and secreted 0.82 U/ml (71 mg/liter) recombinant phytase. This phytase was N-glycosylated, had a molecular mass of 39 kDa after N-deglycosylation, exhibited activity within a pH range of 2.5 to 9 and at temperatures of 25 to 70 degrees C, had high residual activity (85% +/- 2%) after 10 min of heat treatment at 80 degrees C and pH 5.5 in the presence of 5 mM CaCl(2), and was resistant to shrimp digestive enzymes and porcine trypsin. Although the recombinant Bacillus phytase had pH and temperature activity profiles that were similar to those of the corresponding nonglycosylated native phytase, the thermal stabilities of the recombinant and native phytases were different, although both were calcium concentration and pH dependent.

  2. Waste recombinant DNA: effectiveness of thermo-treatment to manage potential gene pollution.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaohua; Li, Mengnan; Zheng, Guanghong; Le, Yiquan; Wang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Heating at 100 degrees C for 5-10 min is a common method for treating wastewater containing recombinant DNA in many bio-laboratories in China. In this experiment, plasmid pET-28b was used to investigate decay efficiency of waste recombinant DNA during thermo-treatment. The results showed that the decay half-life of the plasmid was 2.7-4.0 min during the thermo-treatment, and even heating for 30 min the plasmids still retained some transforming activity. Low pH promoted the decay of recombinant DNA, but NaCl, bovine serum albumin and EDTA, which existed in the most wastewater from bio-laboratories, protected DNA from degradation. Thus, the decay half-life of plasmid DNA may be longer than 2.7-4.0 min practically. These results suggest that the effectiveness of heating at 100 degrees C for treating waste recombinant DNA is low and a gene pollution risk remains when those thermo-treated recombinant DNAs are discharged into the environment. Therefore other simple and effective methods should be developed.

  3. Germline and somatic mutations in homologous recombination genes predict platinum response and survival in ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Kathryn P; Walsh, Tom; Harrell, Maria I; Lee, Ming K; Pennil, Christopher C; Rendi, Mara H; Thornton, Anne; Norquist, Barbara M; Casadei, Silvia; Nord, Alexander S; Agnew, Kathy J; Pritchard, Colin C; Scroggins, Sheena; Garcia, Rochelle L; King, Mary-Claire; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2014-02-01

    Hallmarks of germline BRCA1/2-associated ovarian carcinomas include chemosensitivity and improved survival. The therapeutic impact of somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination DNA repair genes is uncertain. Using targeted capture and massively parallel genomic sequencing, we assessed 390 ovarian carcinomas for germline and somatic loss-of-function mutations in 30 genes, including BRCA1, BRCA2, and 11 other genes in the homologous recombination pathway. Thirty-one percent of ovarian carcinomas had a deleterious germline (24%) and/or somatic (9%) mutation in one or more of the 13 homologous recombination genes: BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, BARD1, BRIP1, CHEK1, CHEK2, FAM175A, MRE11A, NBN, PALB2, RAD51C, and RAD51D. Nonserous ovarian carcinomas had similar rates of homologous recombination mutations to serous carcinomas (28% vs. 31%, P = 0.6), including clear cell, endometrioid, and carcinosarcoma. The presence of germline and somatic homologous recombination mutations was highly predictive of primary platinum sensitivity (P = 0.0002) and improved overall survival (P = 0.0006), with a median overall survival of 66 months in germline homologous recombination mutation carriers, 59 months in cases with a somatic homologous recombination mutation, and 41 months for cases without a homologous recombination mutation. Germline or somatic mutations in homologous recombination genes are present in almost one third of ovarian carcinomas, including both serous and nonserous histologies. Somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination genes have a similar positive impact on overall survival and platinum responsiveness as germline BRCA1/2 mutations. The similar rate of homologous recombination mutations in nonserous carcinomas supports their inclusion in PARP inhibitor clinical trials. ©2013 AACR.

  4. Genetic diversity and recombination analysis in the coat protein gene of Banana bract mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, V; Selvarajan, R

    2014-06-01

    Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae, is the causal agent of the bract mosaic disease (BBrMD) that causes serious yield losses in banana and plantain in India and the Philippines. In this study, global genetic diversity and molecular evolution of BBrMV based on the capsid protein (CP) gene were investigated. Multiple alignments of CP gene of 49 BBrMV isolates showed nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) identity of 79-100 and 80-100 %, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that except two Indians isolates (TN14 and TN16), all isolates clustered together. Eleven recombination events were detected using Recombination Detection Program. Codon-based maximum-likelihood methods revealed that most of the codons in the CP gene were under negative or neutral selection except for codons 28, 43, and 92 which were under positive selection. Gene flow between BBrMV populations of banana and cardamom was relatively frequent but not between two different populations of banana infecting isolates identified in this study. This is the first report on genetic diversity, and evolution of BBrMV isolates based on recombination and phylogenetic analysis in India.

  5. Transient and stable gene expression in mammalian cells transduced with a recombinant baculovirus vector

    PubMed Central

    Condreay, J. Patrick; Witherspoon, Sam M.; Clay, William C.; Kost, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses can serve as gene-transfer vehicles for transient expression of recombinant proteins in a wide range of mammalian cell types. Furthermore, by inclusion of a dominant selectable marker in the viral vector, cell lines can be derived that stably express recombinant genes. A virus was constructed containing two expression cassettes controlled by constitutive mammalian promoters: the cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter/enhancer directing expression of green fluorescent protein and the simian virus 40 (SV40) early promoter controlling neomycin phosphotransferase II. Using this virus, efficient gene delivery and expression was observed and measured in numerous cell types of human, primate, and rodent origin. In addition to commonly used transformed cell lines such as HeLa, CHO, Cos-7, and 293, this list includes primary human keratinocytes and bone marrow fibroblasts. In all cases, addition of butyrate or trichostatin A (a selective histone deacetylase inhibitor) to transduced cells markedly enhanced the levels of reporter protein expression observed. When transduced cells are put under selection with the antibiotic G418, cell lines can be obtained at high frequency that stably maintain the expression cassettes of the vector DNA and exhibit stable, high-level expression of the reporter gene. Stably transduced derivatives have been selected from a substantial number of different cell types, suggesting that stable lines can be derived from any cell type that exhibits transient expression. PMID:9874783

  6. A system for assaying homologous recombination at the endogenous human thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, M.B.; Little, J.B. ); Potter, H. ); Yandell, D.W. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1991-08-01

    A system for assaying human interchromosomal recombination in vitro was developed, using a cell line containing two different mutant thymidine kinase genes (TK) on chromosomes 17. Heteroalleles were generated in the TK{sup +/+} parent B-lymphoblast cell line WIL-2 by repeated exposure to the alkylating nitrogen mustard ICR-191, which preferentially causes +1 or {minus}1 frameshifts. Resulting TK{sup {minus}/{minus}} mutants were selected in medium containing the toxic thymidine analog trifluorothymidine. In two lines, heterozygous frameshifts were located in exons 4 and 7 of the TK gene separated by {approx}8 kilobases. These lines undergo spontaneous reversion to TK{sup +} at a frequency of < 10{sup {minus}7}, and revertants can be selected in cytidine/hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine medium. The nature and location of these heteroallelic mutations make large deletions, rearrangements, nondisjunction, and reduplication unlikely mechanisms for reversion to TK{sup +}. The mode of reversion to TK{sup +} was specifically assessed by DNA sequencing, use of single-strand conformation polymorphisms, and analysis of various restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) linked to the TK gene on chromosome 17. The data suggest that a proportion of revertants has undergone recombination and gene conversion at the TK locus, with concomitant loss of frameshifts and allele loss at linked RFLPs. Models are presented for the origin of two recombinants.

  7. Gene Targeting Using Homologous Recombination in Embryonic Stem Cells: The Future for Behavior Genetics?

    PubMed Central

    Gerlai, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior. PMID:27148349

  8. Gene Targeting Using Homologous Recombination in Embryonic Stem Cells: The Future for Behavior Genetics?

    PubMed

    Gerlai, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior.

  9. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 transfer radiosensitizes H1299 cells to subclinical-dose carbon-ion irradiation through the restoration of p53 function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Hong; Duan, Xin; Hao, Jifang; Xie, Yi; Zhou, Qingming; Wang, Yanling; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Tao

    2009-02-01

    To determine whether adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 transfer after radiotherapy could radiosensitize non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to subclinical-dose carbon-ion beam (C-beam), H1299 cells were exposed to a C-beam or gamma-ray and then infected with 5 MOI of AdCMV-p53 or GFP (C-beam or gamma-ray with p53 or GFP). Cell cycle was detected by flow cytometric analysis. The apoptosis was examined by a fluorescent microscope with DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation was monitored by the TUNEL assay. P53 mRNA was detected by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The expression of p53, MDM(2), and p21 was monitored by Western blot. Survival fractions were determined by colony-forming assay. The percentages of G(1)-phase cells in C-beam with p53 increased by 8.2%-16.0%, 5.2%-7.0%, and 5.8%-18.9%, respectively, compared with C-beam only, gamma-ray with p53, or p53 only. The accumulation of G(2)-phase cells in C-beam with p53 increased by 5.7%-8.9% and 8.8%-14.8%, compared with those in gamma-ray with p53 or p53 only, respectively. The percentage of apoptosis for C-beam with p53 increased by 7.4%-19.1%, 5.8%-11.7%, and 5.2 %-19.2%, respectively, compared with C-beam only, gamma-ray with p53, or p53 only. The level of p53 mRNA in C-beam with p53 was significantly higher than that in p53 only. The expression level of p53 and p21 in C-beam with p53 was significantly higher than that in both C-beam with GFP and p53 only. The survival fractions for C-beam with p53 were significantly less than those for the other groups (p < 0.05). The data suggested that AdCMV-p53 transfer could more efficiently radiosensitize H1299 cells to subclinical-dose C-beam irradiation through the restoration of p53 function.

  10. Structure of REC2, a recombinational repair gene of Ustilago maydis, and its function in homologous recombination between plasmid and chromosomal sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, B P; Ferguson, D O; Holloman, W K

    1994-01-01

    Mutation in the REC2 gene of Ustilago maydis leads to defects in DNA repair, recombination, and meiosis. Analysis of the primary sequence of the Rec2 protein reveals a region with significant homology to bacterial RecA protein and to the yeast recombination proteins Dmc1, Rad51, and Rad57. This homologous region in the U. maydis Rec2 protein was found to be functionally sensitive to mutation, lending support to the hypothesis that Rec2 has a functional RecA-like domain essential for activity in recombination and repair. Homologous recombination between plasmid and chromosomal DNA sequences is reduced substantially in the rec2 mutant following transformation. The frequency can be restored to a level approaching, but not exceeding, that observed in the wild-type strain if transformation is performed with cells containing multiple copies of REC2. Images PMID:8065360

  11. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT+/− cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT+/− rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species. PMID:26522387

  12. Extended gene expression by medium exchange and repeated transient transfection for recombinant protein production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Laura; Gutiérrez-Granados, Sonia; Berrow, Nicholas Simon; Segura, Maria Mercedes; Gòdia, Francesc

    2015-05-01

    Production of recombinant products in mammalian cell cultures can be achieved by stable gene expression (SGE) or transient gene expression (TGE). The former is based on the integration of a plasmid DNA into the host cell genome allowing continuous gene expression. The latter is based on episomal plasmid DNA expression. Conventional TGE is limited to a short production period of usually about 96 h, therefore limiting productivity. A novel gene expression approach termed extended gene expression (EGE) is explored in this study. The aim of EGE is to prolong the production period by the combination of medium exchange and repeated transfection of cell cultures with plasmid DNA to improve overall protein production. The benefit of this methodology was evaluated for the production of three model recombinant products: intracellular GFP, secreted GFP, and a Gag-GFP virus-like particles (VLPs). Productions were carried out in HEK 293 cell suspension cultures grown in animal-derived component free media using polyethylenimine (PEI) as transfection reagent. Transfections were repeated throughout the production process using different plasmid DNA concentrations, intervals of time, and culture feeding conditions in order to identify the best approach to achieve sustained high-level gene expression. Using this novel EGE strategy, the production period was prolonged between 192 and 240 h with a 4-12-fold increase in production levels, depending on the product type considered. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Effects of human tissue kallikrein gene transfer on the migration of vascular smooth muscule cells].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-zhen; Xie, Liang-di; Zhu, Peng-li; Xu, Chang-sheng

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the effects of adenovirus-mediated human tissue kallikrein (Ad-hKLK1) gene transfer on platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-induced migration of vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (VSMC(SHR)). A bicistronic recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-hKLK1) carrying the target hKLK1 gene and the reporter gene EGFP was constructed. VSMCs isolated from the thoracic aorta of male SHR were passaged, and the quiescent VSMC(SHR) in passages 3-6 seeded in 6-well plates were treated with Ad-hKLK1 and control virus. Human PDGF-BB or icatibant Hoe140, a BK B2 antagonistat, was used as the chemoattractant and placed in the bottom chamber of the Boyden chamber. The mRNA expressions of bradykinin B1 receptor and B2 receptor were detected by RT-PCR in VSMC(SHR). hKLK1 gene transfer significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced migration of VSMC(SHR), with the peak inhibition rate of 34.6% (P<0.001). PDGF-BB significantly increased the mRNA expression of B2 receptor but not B1 receptor in VSMC(SHR). hKLK1 gene transfer can inhibit the migration of VSMC(SHR) induced by PDGF-BB, and the inhibitory effects may be not mediated by bradykinin B2 receptor.

  14. Repetitive Element-Mediated Recombination as a Mechanism for New Gene Origination in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Ding, Yun; Zhou, Qi; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Zhao, Ruoping; Brunet, Frédéric; Peng, Lixin; Long, Manyuan; Wang, Wen

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies of repetitive elements (REs) have implicated a mechanistic role in generating new chimerical genes. Such examples are consistent with the classic model for exon shuffling, which relies on non-homologous recombination. However, recent data for chromosomal aberrations in model organisms suggest that ectopic homology-dependent recombination may also be important. Lack of a dataset comprising experimentally verified young duplicates has hampered an effective examination of these models as well as an investigation of sequence features that mediate the rearrangements. Here we use ∼7,000 cDNA probes (∼112,000 primary images) to screen eight species within the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup and identify 17 duplicates that were generated through ectopic recombination within the last 12 mys. Most of these are functional and have evolved divergent expression patterns and novel chimeric structures. Examination of their flanking sequences revealed an excess of repetitive sequences, with the majority belonging to the transposable element DNAREP1 family, associated with the new genes. Our dataset strongly suggests an important role for REs in the generation of chimeric genes within these species. PMID:18208328

  15. The expression of a recombinant cry1Ac gene with subtilisin-like protease CDEP2 gene in acrystalliferous Bacillus thuringiensis by Red/ET homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Xia, Liqiu; Zeng, Zhi; Ding, Xuezhi; Huang, Fan

    2009-10-01

    A novel cDNA encoding the subtilisin-like serine protease gene CDEP2 was isolated from Beauveria bassiana by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It contained an 1137 bp ORF that predicted a protein of 379 amino acids with M = 38863 Da and pI = 8.21. In an attempt to improve insecticidal activity, the CDEP2 gene and the cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis were co-fused into the vector pHT315 as pHAc-CDEP2 plasmid by Red/ET homologous recombination. The co-fusion gene was attempted under the control of the native cry1Ac promoter. Plasmid pHAc-CDEP2 was electro-transformed into the B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki Cry(-)B. Analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting, the transformant Cry(-)B-pHAc-CDEP2 strain produced a 130 kDa Cry1Ac protein and 39 kDa CDEP2 protein. The 50% lethal concentration values (LC(50)) of Cry(-)B-pHAc-CDEP2 strain (8.5 microl/ml) to Helicoverpa armigera third instars larvae was clearly higher than the Cry(-)B-pHAc strain (16.7 microl/ml) at 72 h.

  16. Plasmid transfer by conjugation as a possible route of horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Xylella fastidiosa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important component of evolution and adaptation of bacterial species. Xylella fastidiosa has the ability to incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome by homologous recombination at relatively high rates. This genetic recombination is believed to play a role in adaptati...

  17. Inactivation of aprE Gene in Bacillus subtilis 168 by Homologus Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Mohammed; Soleymani, Safoura; Sadeghi, Hamid Mir Mohammad; Soleimani, Narjes; Moazen, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the most important producers of high quality industrial enzymes is the Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis (B. Subtilis). One major limitation that hinders the wide application of B. subtilis is the secretion of high levels of extracellular proteases which degrade the secreted foreign proteins. In this study, homologus recombination technique was used to knock out its protease gene, aprE. Methods The internal segment of the pro-sequence of aprE gene of B. subtilis 168 with a length of 80 bps and its complementary sequence were synthesized and ligated into pUB110 at EcoR1 and XbaI restriction sites. Competent cells of B. subtilis 168 were prepared and transformed by electroporation using Bio Rad gene pulser as explained in the methods section. Transformants carrying the recombinant plasmid were selected for resistance to neomycin. The success of homologous recombination was checked by PCR amplification of the neomycin gene which was part of the vector and did not exist in the genome of B. subtilis 168. The protease activity was measured using the Protease Fluorescent Detection Kit based on the proteolytic hydrolysis of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)–labeled casein-substrate. Results The results demonstrated that aprE gene would not be able to produce further active subtilisin E. The reduction of protease activity also confirmed the efficacy of the induced mutation in this gene. Conclusion It will therefore be a major challenge for future research to identify and modulate quality control systems of B. subtilis which limit the production of high quality protease- sensitive products such as lipase. PMID:25215183

  18. The Drosophila Meiotic Recombination Gene Mei-9 Encodes a Homologue of the Yeast Excision Repair Protein Rad1

    PubMed Central

    Sekelsky, J. J.; McKim, K. S.; Chin, G. M.; Hawley, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Meiotic recombination and DNA repair are mediated by overlapping sets of genes. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes required to repair DNA double-strand breaks are also required for meiotic recombination. In contrast, mutations in genes required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) have no detectable effects on meiotic recombination in S. cerevisiae. The Drosophila melanogaster mei-9 gene is unique among known recombination genes in that it is required for both meiotic recombination and NER. We have analyzed the mei-9 gene at the molecular level and found that it encodes a homologue of the S. cerevisiae excision repair protein Rad1, the probable homologue of mammalian XPF/ERCC4. Hence, the predominant process of meiotic recombination in Drosophila proceeds through a pathway that is at least partially distinct from that of S. cerevisiae, in that it requires an NER protein. The biochemical properties of the Rad1 protein allow us to explain the observation that mei-9 mutants suppress reciprocal exchange without suppressing the frequency of gene conversion. PMID:8647398

  19. Intensive Pharmacological Immunosuppression Allows for Repetitive Liver Gene Transfer With Recombinant Adenovirus in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector–mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell–mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector. PMID:20087317

  20. Intensive pharmacological immunosuppression allows for repetitive liver gene transfer with recombinant adenovirus in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Fontanellas, Antonio; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Mauleón, Itsaso; Dubrot, Juan; Mancheño, Uxua; Collantes, María; Sampedro, Ana; Unzu, Carmen; Alfaro, Carlos; Palazón, Asis; Smerdou, Cristian; Benito, Alberto; Prieto, Jesús; Peñuelas, Iván; Melero, Ignacio

    2010-04-01

    Repeated administration of gene therapies is hampered by host immunity toward vectors and transgenes. Attempts to circumvent antivector immunity include pharmacological immunosuppression or alternating different vectors and vector serotypes with the same transgene. Our studies show that B-cell depletion with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody and concomitant T-cell inhibition with clinically available drugs permits repeated liver gene transfer to a limited number of nonhuman primates with recombinant adenovirus. Adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene was visualized in vivo with a semiquantitative transgene-specific positron emission tomography (PET) technique, liver immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot for the reporter transgene in needle biopsies. Neutralizing antibody and T cell-mediated responses toward the viral capsids were sequentially monitored and found to be repressed by the drug combinations tested. Repeated liver transfer of the HSV1-tk reporter gene with the same recombinant adenoviral vector was achieved in macaques undergoing a clinically feasible immunosuppressive treatment that ablated humoral and cellular immune responses. This strategy allows measurable gene retransfer to the liver as late as 15 months following the first adenoviral exposure in a macaque, which has undergone a total of four treatments with the same adenoviral vector.

  1. Gene cloning, recombinant expression, purification and characterization of l-methionine decarboxylase from Streptomyces sp. 590.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaya; Okada, Akane; Yamamoto, Kumiko; Okugochi, Tomomi; Kusaka, Chika; Kudou, Daizou; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Junko; Hirose, Yuu; Okajima, Toshihide; Tamura, Takashi; Soda, Kenji; Inagaki, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    l-Methionine decarboxylase (MetDC) from Streptomyces sp. 590 depends on pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and catalyzes the non-oxidative decarboxylation of l-methionine to produce 3-methylthiopropylamine and carbon dioxide. MetDC gene (mdc) was determined to consist of 1,674 bp encoding 557 amino acids, and the amino acid sequence is similar to that of l-histidine decarboxylases and l-valine decarboxylases from Streptomyces sp. strains. The mdc gene was cloned and recombinant MetDC was heterologously expressed by Escherichia coli. The purification of recombinant MetDC was carried out by DEAE-Toyopearl and Ni-NTA agarose column chromatography. The recombinant enzyme was homodimeric with a molecular mass of 61,000 Da and showed optimal activity between 45 to 55 °C and at pH 6.6, and the stability below 30 °C and between pH 4.6 to 7.0. l-Methionine and l-norleucine were good substrates for MetDC. The Michaelis constants for l-methionine and l-norleucine were 30 and 73 mM, respectively. The recombinant MetDC (0.50 U/ml) severely inhibited growth of human tumour cells A431 (epidermoid ovarian carcinoma cell line) and MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer cell line), however showed relatively low cytotoxicity for human normal cell NHDF-Neo (dermal fibroblast cell line from neonatal foreskin). This study revealed the properties of the gene and the protein sequence of MetDC for the first time. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Replicative age induces mitotic recombination in the ribosomal RNA gene cluster of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Derek L; Leverich, Christina K; Henderson, Kiersten A; Gottschling, Daniel E

    2011-03-01

    Somatic mutations contribute to the development of age-associated disease. In earlier work, we found that, at high frequency, aging Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid cells produce daughters without mitochondrial DNA, leading to loss of respiration competence and increased loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the nuclear genome. Here we used the recently developed Mother Enrichment Program to ask whether aging cells that maintain the ability to produce respiration-competent daughters also experience increased genomic instability. We discovered that this population exhibits a distinct genomic instability phenotype that primarily affects the repeated ribosomal RNA gene array (rDNA array). As diploid cells passed their median replicative life span, recombination rates between rDNA arrays on homologous chromosomes progressively increased, resulting in mutational events that generated LOH at >300 contiguous open reading frames on the right arm of chromosome XII. We show that, while these recombination events were dependent on the replication fork block protein Fob1, the aging process that underlies this phenotype is Fob1-independent. Furthermore, we provide evidence that this aging process is not driven by mechanisms that modulate rDNA recombination in young cells, including loss of cohesion within the rDNA array or loss of Sir2 function. Instead, we suggest that the age-associated increase in rDNA recombination is a response to increasing DNA replication stress generated in aging cells.

  3. Cellulosic Ethanol Production by Recombinant Cellulolytic Bacteria Harbouring pdc and adh II Genes of Zymomonas mobilis

    PubMed Central

    Piriya, P. Sobana; Vasan, P. Thirumalai; Padma, V. S.; Vidhyadevi, U.; Archana, K.; Vennison, S. John

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol fermenting genes such as pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adh II) were cloned from Zymomonas mobilis and transformed into three different cellulolytic bacteria, namely Enterobacter cloacae JV, Proteus mirabilis JV and Erwinia chrysanthemi and their cellulosic ethanol production capability was studied. Recombinant E. cloacae JV was found to produce 4.5% and 3.5% (v/v) ethanol, respectively, when CMC and 4% NaOH pretreated bagasse were used as substrates, whereas recombinant P. mirabilis and E. chrysanthemi with the same substrates could only produce 4%, 3.5%, 1%, and 1.5 % of ethanol, respectively. The recombinant E. cloacae strain produced twofold higher percentage of ethanol than the wild type. The recombinant E. cloacae strain could be improved further by increasing its ethanol tolerance capability through media optimization and also by combining multigene cellulase expression for enhancing ethanol production from various types of lignocellulosic biomass so that it can be used for industrial level ethanol production. PMID:22919503

  4. Establishing targeted carp TLR22 gene disruption via homologous recombination using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Vemulawada; Patra, Swagat Kumar; Panda, Rudra Prasanna; Rasal, Kiran Dashrath; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Barman, Hirak Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in gene editing techniques have not been exploited in farmed fishes. We established a gene targeting technique, using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in Labeo rohita, a farmed carp (known as rohu). We demonstrated that donor DNA was integrated via homologous recombination (HR) at the site of targeted double-stranded nicks created by CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease. This resulted in the successful disruption of rohu Toll-like receptor 22 (TLR22) gene, involved in innate immunity and exclusively present in teleost fishes and amphibians. The null mutant, thus, generated lacked TLR22 mRNA expression. Altogether, this is the first evidence that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a highly efficient tool for targeted gene disruption via HR in teleosts for generating model large-bodied farmed fishes.

  5. Relic of ancient recombinations in gibbon ABO blood group genes deciphered through phylogenetic network analysis.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Takashi; Noda, Reiko; Takenaka, Osamu; Saitou, Naruya

    2009-06-01

    The primate ABO blood group gene encodes a glycosyl transferase (either A or B type), and is known to have large coalescence times among the allelic lineages in human. We determined nucleotide sequences of ca. 2.2kb of this gene for 23 individuals of three gibbon species (agile gibbon, white-handed gibbon, and siamang), and observed a total of 24 haplotypes. We found relics of five ancient intragenic recombinations, occurred during ca. 2-7 million years ago, through a phylogenetic network analysis. The coalescence time between A and B alleles estimate precede the divergence (ca. 8MYA) of siamang and common gibbon lineages. This establishes the coexistence of divergent allelic lineages of the ABO blood group gene for a long period in the ancestral gibbon species, and strengthens the non-neutral evolution for this gene.

  6. Subcloning plus insertion (SPI)--a novel recombineering method for the rapid construction of gene targeting vectors.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Thimma R; Kelsall, Emma J; Fevat, Léna M S; Munson, Sarah E; Cowley, Shaun M

    2015-01-08

    Gene targeting refers to the precise modification of a genetic locus using homologous recombination. The generation of novel cell lines and transgenic mouse models using this method necessitates the construction of a 'targeting' vector, which contains homologous DNA sequences to the target gene, and has for many years been a limiting step in the process. Vector construction can be performed in vivo in Escherichia coli cells using homologous recombination mediated by phage recombinases using a technique termed recombineering. Recombineering is the preferred technique to subclone the long homology sequences (>4 kb) and various targeting elements including selection markers that are required to mediate efficient allelic exchange between a targeting vector and its cognate genomic locus. Typical recombineering protocols follow an iterative scheme of step-wise integration of the targeting elements and require intermediate purification and transformation steps. Here, we present a novel recombineering methodology of vector assembly using a multiplex approach. Plasmid gap repair is performed by the simultaneous capture of genomic sequence from mouse Bacterial Artificial Chromosome libraries and the insertion of dual bacterial and mammalian selection markers. This subcloning plus insertion method is highly efficient and yields a majority of correct recombinants. We present data for the construction of different types of conditional gene knockout, or knock-in, vectors and BAC reporter vectors that have been constructed using this method. SPI vector construction greatly extends the repertoire of the recombineering toolbox and provides a simple, rapid and cost-effective method of constructing these highly complex vectors.

  7. Role of the ruvB gene in homologous and homeologous recombination in Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Salazar, J M; Romero, D

    2000-02-08

    The Rhizobium etli ruvA and ruvB genes were cloned through a PCR-based approach, using degenerate primers matching conserved sectors in the amino acid sequences of RuvB from eight bacterial species. Comparative analysis of the predicted polypeptides for RuvA and RuvB of R. etli showed highly conserved blocks with the corresponding homologs in other bacteria; RuvB depicts characteristic motifs for DNA helicases (ATP-binding and DEXH-box motifs). An R. etli ruvB::loxP Sp mutant was constructed by interposon mutagenesis. This mutant was highly sensitive to DNA-damaging agents, such as methyl methanesulfonate and nitrofurantoin, implying a deficiency in DNA repair. Homologous and homeologous conjugational recombination was reduced almost tenfold in the ruvB::loxP Sp mutant; a recombination defect was also observed in assays employing recombination between small plasmids, albeit at a smaller magnitude. Although the ruvA and ruvB genes are contiguous in R. etli, complementation studies suggest that they are expressed independently.

  8. Identification of New Genes Required for Meiotic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ajimura, M.; Leem, S. H.; Ogawa, H.

    1993-01-01

    Mutants defective in meiotic recombination were isolated from a disomic haploid strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by examining recombination within the leu2 and his4 heteroalleles located on chromosome III. The mutants were classified into two new complementation groups (MRE2 and MRE11) and eight previously identified groups, which include SPO11, HOP1, REC114, MRE4/MEK1 and genes in the RAD52 epistasis group. All of the mutants, in which the mutations in the new complementation groups are homozygous and diploid, can undergo premeiotic DNA synthesis and produce spores. The spores are, however, not viable. The mre2 and mre11 mutants produce viable spores in a spo13 background, in which meiosis I is bypassed, suggesting that these mutants are blocked at an early step in meiotic recombination. The mre2 mutant does not exhibit any unusual phenotype during mitosis and it is, thus, considered to have a mutation in a meiosis-specific gene. By contrast, the mre11 mutant is sensitive to damage to DNA by methyl methanesulfonate and exhibits a hyperrecombination phenotype in mitosis. Among six alleles of HOP1 that were isolated, an unusual pattern of intragenic complementation was observed. PMID:8417989

  9. A gene responsible for prolyl-hydroxylation of moss-produced recombinant human erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Juliana; Altmann, Friedrich; Graf, Manuela; Stadlmann, Johannes; Reski, Ralf; Decker, Eva L.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant production of pharmaceutical proteins is crucial, not only for personalized medicine. While most biopharmaceuticals are currently produced in mammalian cell culture, plant-made pharmaceuticals gain momentum. Post-translational modifications in plants are similar to those in humans, however, existing differences may affect quality, safety and efficacy of the products. A frequent modification in higher eukaryotes is prolyl-4-hydroxylase (P4H)-catalysed prolyl-hydroxylation. P4H sequence recognition sites on target proteins differ between humans and plants leading to non-human posttranslational modifications of recombinant human proteins produced in plants. The resulting hydroxyprolines display the anchor for plant-specific O-glycosylation, which bears immunogenic potential for patients. Here we describe the identification of a plant gene responsible for non-human prolyl-hydroxylation of human erythropoietin (hEPO) recombinantly produced in plant (moss) bioreactors. Targeted ablation of this gene abolished undesired prolyl-hydroxylation of hEPO and thus paves the way for plant-made pharmaceuticals humanized via glyco-engineering in moss bioreactors. PMID:24145658

  10. A gene responsible for prolyl-hydroxylation of moss-produced recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Juliana; Altmann, Friedrich; Graf, Manuela; Stadlmann, Johannes; Reski, Ralf; Decker, Eva L

    2013-10-22

    Recombinant production of pharmaceutical proteins is crucial, not only for personalized medicine. While most biopharmaceuticals are currently produced in mammalian cell culture, plant-made pharmaceuticals gain momentum. Post-translational modifications in plants are similar to those in humans, however, existing differences may affect quality, safety and efficacy of the products. A frequent modification in higher eukaryotes is prolyl-4-hydroxylase (P4H)-catalysed prolyl-hydroxylation. P4H sequence recognition sites on target proteins differ between humans and plants leading to non-human posttranslational modifications of recombinant human proteins produced in plants. The resulting hydroxyprolines display the anchor for plant-specific O-glycosylation, which bears immunogenic potential for patients. Here we describe the identification of a plant gene responsible for non-human prolyl-hydroxylation of human erythropoietin (hEPO) recombinantly produced in plant (moss) bioreactors. Targeted ablation of this gene abolished undesired prolyl-hydroxylation of hEPO and thus paves the way for plant-made pharmaceuticals humanized via glyco-engineering in moss bioreactors.

  11. Specific CEA-producing colorectal carcinoma cell killing with recombinant adenoviral vector containing cytosine deaminase gene

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li-Zong; Wu, Wen-Xi; Xu, De-Hua; Zheng, Zhong-Cheng; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Ding, Qiang; Hua, Yi-Bing; Yao, Kun

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To kill CEA positive colorectal carcinoma cells specifically using the E coli cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene, a new replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector was constructed in which CD gene was controlled under CEA promoter and its in vitro cytotoxic effects were evaluated. METHODS: Shuttle plasmid containing CD gene and regulatory sequence of the CEA gene was constructed and recombined with the right arm of adenovirus genome DNA in 293 cell strain. Dot blotting and PCR were used to identify positive plaques. The purification of adenovirus was performed with ultra-concentration in CsCl step gradients and the titration was measured with plaque formation assay. Cytotoxic effects were assayed with MTT method, The fifty percent inhibition concentration (IC50) of 5-FC was calculated using a curve-fitting parameter. The human colorectal carcinoma cell line, which was CEA-producing, and the CEA-nonproducing Hela cell line were applied in cytological tests. An established recombinant adenovirus vector AdCMVCD, in which the CD gene was controlled under CMV promoter, was used as virus control. Quantitative results were expressed as the mean ± SD of the mean. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. RESULTS: The desired recombinant adenovirus vector was named AdCEACD. The results of dot blotting and PCR showed that the recombinant adenovirus contained CEA promoter and CD gene. Virus titer was about 5.0 × 1014 pfu/L-1 after purification. The CEA-producing Lovo cells were sensitive to 5-FC and had the same cytotoxic effect after infection with AdCEACD and AdCMVCD (The IC50 values of 5-FC in parent Lovo cells, Lovo cells infected with 100 M.O.I AdCEACD and Lovo cells infected with 10 M.O.I AdCMVCD were > 15000, 216.5 ± 38.1 and 128.8 ± 25.4 μmol•L⁻¹, P < 0.001, respectively), and the cytotoxicity of 5-FC increased accordingly when the M.O.I of adenoviruses were enhanced (The value of IC50 of 5-FC was reduced to 27.9 ± 4.2 μmol•L-1

  12. Site-specific gene integration in rice genome mediated by the FLP-FRT recombination system.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Soumen; Srivastava, Vibha

    2011-08-01

    Plant transformation based on random integration of foreign DNA often generates complex integration structures. Precision in the integration process is necessary to ensure the formation of full-length, single-copy integration. Site-specific recombination systems are versatile tools for precise genomic manipulations such as DNA excision, inversion or integration. The yeast FLP-FRT recombination system has been widely used for DNA excision in higher plants. Here, we report the use of FLP-FRT system for efficient targeting of foreign gene into the engineered genomic site in rice. The transgene vector containing a pair of directly oriented FRT sites was introduced by particle bombardment into the cells containing the target locus. FLP activity generated by the co-bombarded FLP gene efficiently separated the transgene construct from the vector-backbone and integrated the backbone-free construct into the target site. Strong FLP activity, derived from the enhanced FLP protein, FLPe, was important for the successful site-specific integration (SSI). The majority of the transgenic events contained a precise integration and expressed the transgene. Interestingly, each transgenic event lacked the co-bombarded FLPe gene, suggesting reversion of the integration structure in the presence of the constitutive FLPe expression. Progeny of the precise transgenic lines inherited the stable SSI locus and expressed the transgene. This work demonstrates the application of FLP-FRT system for site-specific gene integration in plants using rice as a model.

  13. Two recombination-dependent DNA replication pathways of bacteriophage T4, and their roles in mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, Gisela; Gewin, John; Luder, Andreas; Colowick, Nancy; Vo, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Two major pathways of recombination-dependent DNA replication, “join-copy” and “join-cut-copy,” can be distinguished in phage T4: join-copy requires only early and middle genes, but two late proteins, endonuclease VII and terminase, are uniquely important in the join-cut-copy pathway. In wild-type T4, timing of these pathways is integrated with the developmental program and related to transcription and packaging of DNA. In primase mutants, which are defective in origin-dependent lagging-strand DNA synthesis, the late pathway can bypass the lack of primers for lagging-strand DNA synthesis. The exquisitely regulated synthesis of endo VII, and of two proteins from its gene, explains the delay of recombination-dependent DNA replication in primase (as well as topoisomerase) mutants, and the temperature-dependence of the delay. Other proteins (e.g., the single-stranded DNA binding protein and the products of genes 46 and 47) are important in all recombination pathways, but they interact differently with other proteins in different pathways. These homologous recombination pathways contribute to evolution because they facilitate acquisition of any foreign DNA with limited sequence homology during horizontal gene transfer, without requiring transposition or site-specific recombination functions. Partial heteroduplex repair can generate what appears to be multiple mutations from a single recombinational intermediate. The resulting sequence divergence generates barriers to formation of viable recombinants. The multiple sequence changes can also lead to erroneous estimates in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:11459968

  14. Enhanced production of ε-caprolactone by coexpression of bacterial hemoglobin gene in recombinant Escherichia coli expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-12-28

    Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in a microbial system expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) can be influenced by not only the efficient regeneration of NADPH but also a sufficient supply of oxygen. In this study, the bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria (vhb) was introduced into the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing CHMO to investigate the effects of an oxygen-carrying protein on microbial BV oxidation of cyclohexanone. Coexpression of Vhb allowed the recombinant E. coli strain to produce a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 15.7 g/l in a fed-batch BV oxidation of cyclohexanone, which corresponded to a 43% improvement compared with the control strain expressing CHMO only under the same conditions.

  15. Evidence showing duplication and recombination of cel genes in tandem from hyperthermophilic Thermotoga sp.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Keun; Kang, Tae Ho; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Hoon; Yun, Han Dae

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess the gene duplication and diversification of tandem cellulase genes in thermophilic bacteria. The tandem cellulase genes cel5C and cel5D were cloned from Thermotoga maritima MSB8, and a survey of the thermophilic bacterial genome for tandem cel genes from the databases was carried out. A clone having 2.3 kb fragment from T. maritima MSB8 showed cellulase activity, which had two open reading frames in tandem (cel5C and cel5D). The cel5C gene has 954 bp, which encodes a protein of 317 amino acid residues with a signal peptide of 23 amino acids, and the other gene cel5D consisting of 990 bp encoding a protein of 329 amino acid residues. These two proteins have similarity with the enzymes of glycosyl hydrolase family 5. From the enzyme assay, it was observed that Cel5C was extracellular and Cel5D was intracellular cellulase. Phylogenetic and homology matrix analyses of DNA and protein sequences revealed that family 12 cellulase enzymes Cel12A and Cel12B displayed higher homology (>50 %), but Cel5C and Cel5D enzymes belong to family 5 displayed lower homology (<30 %). In addition, repeated and mirror sequences in tandem genes are supposed to show the existence of gene duplication and recombination.

  16. Induction of Ty Recombination in Yeast by Cdna and Transcription: Role of the Rad1 and Rad52 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nevo-Caspi, Y.; Kupiec, M.

    1996-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae ectopic recombination has been shown to occur at high frequencies for artificially created repeats, but at relatively low frequencies for a natural family of repeated sequences, the Ty family. Little is known about the mechanism(s) that prevent recombination between repeated sequences. We have previously shown that nonreciprocal recombination (gene conversion) of a genetically marked Ty can be induced either by the presence of high levels of Ty cDNA or by transcription of the marked Ty from a GAL1 promoter. These two kinds of induction act in a synergistic manner. To further characterize these two kinds of Ty recombination, we have investigated the role played by the RAD52 and RAD1 genes. We have found that the RAD52 and RAD1 gene products are essential to carry out transcription-induced Ty conversion whereas cDNA-mediated conversion can take place in their absence. PMID:8913740

  17. Cre Recombinase Gene Transfer In Vitro and Detection of loxP-Dependent Recombination.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Marth, Jamey D

    2007-07-01

    INTRODUCTIONAltering the genome of intact cells and organisms by site-specific DNA recombination has become an important gene-transfer methodology. The inclusion of exogenous recombinase target sequences within transferred DNA segments allows subsequent modifications to previously altered genomic structure that increase the utility of gene transfer and enhance experimental design. In this protocol, correctly targeted mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell clones bearing the F[tkneo] allele (containing several loxP sites) are subjected to in vitro Cre gene transfer to generate ES cell subclones bearing either Type 1 (Δ) or Type 2 (F) alleles. Type 2 ES cells are used to generate chimeric mice that are then crossed to germ-line Cre-expressing mice, such as ZP3-Cre transgenic mates. The additional time needed to breed the mice (~2-3 mo) is typically less troublesome than the cost and effort of maintaining multiple clone-derived lines of mice.

  18. Recombinant adeno-associated virus targets passenger gene expression to cones in primate retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Katherine; Hendrickson, Anita E.; Connor, Thomas B., Jr.; Mauck, Matthew C.; Kinsella, James J.; Hauswirth, William W.; Neitz, Jay; Neitz, Maureen

    2007-05-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is a promising vector for gene therapy of photoreceptor-based diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that rAAV serotypes 2 and 5 can transduce both rod and cone photoreceptors in rodents and dogs, and it can target rods, but not cones in primates. Here we report that using a human cone-specific enhancer and promoter to regulate expression of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene in an rAAV-5 vector successfully targeted expression of the reporter gene to primate cones, and the time course of GFP expression was able to be monitored in a living animal using the RetCam II digital imaging system.

  19. [A comparative study on characterizations of genetic recombination hotspots in PPARG gene between Kirgiz and Uyghur ethnic groups in Xinjiang].

    PubMed

    Zohra, Rozi; Song, M S; Iliham, Nizam; Dolikun, Mamatyusupu

    2016-08-16

    To investigate the characterizations of genetic recombination hotspots and linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in peroxisome proliferative activated receptor gamma (PPARG) gene in Kirgiz and Uyghur ethnic groups. Blood samples were collected from 100 Kirgiz (50 healthy controls and 50 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus) residents in Halajun County, Artux City, Kizilsu Kirgiz Autonomous Prefecture, Xinjiang in August 2013, and 50 healthy Uyghur residents in Hotan Prefecture of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region in May 2012.Thirty-one tagSNPs in PPARG gene were genotyped using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) method.The recombination hotspots and LD patterns within the PPARG gene were estimated by analyzing the SNP genotying data using the Hotspot Fisher program and Haploview software, respectively. Eighteen tagSNPs (rs1151999, rs1175540, rs1875796, rs1899951, rs2292101, rs2921190, rs2938397, rs2959272, rs2959273, rs2972162, rs3856806, rs4135247, rs4135275, rs709151, rs4135354, rs6805419, rs17036700 and rs4135304) were same with relatively higher recombination rates between the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and healthy controls of Kirgiz ethnic group, and healthy controls of Uyghur ethnic group.Five haplotype blocks with LD coefficient D' value of 1, indicating no genetic recombination occurred within the region, were observed in the healthy controls of Kirgiz ethnic groups, whereas five haplotype blocks with LD coefficient D' value less than 1 were observed in the Kirgiz patients with T2DM, indicating historical recombination events occurred within the region.Four haplotype blocks with LD coefficient D' value of 1 were observed in the Uyghur healthy controls, indicating no genetic recombination occurred within the region.There were significantly different recombination hotspot profiles between the Kirgiz, Uyghur, Utah residents with Northern and Western European ancestry (CEU), Yoruban in

  20. Targeted Recombination Demonstrates that the Spike Gene of Transmissible Gastroenteritis Coronavirus Is a Determinant of Its Enteric Tropism and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Carlos M.; Izeta, Ander; Sánchez-Morgado, Jose M.; Alonso, Sara; Sola, Isabel; Balasch, Mónica; Plana-Durán, Juan; Enjuanes, Luis

    1999-01-01

    Targeted recombination within the S (spike) gene of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) was promoted by passage of helper respiratory virus isolates in cells transfected with a TGEV-derived defective minigenome carrying the S gene from an enteric isolate. The minigenome was efficiently replicated in trans and packaged by the helper virus, leading to the formation of true recombinant and pseudorecombinant viruses containing the S proteins of both enteric and respiratory TGEV strains in their envelopes. The recombinants acquired an enteric tropism, and their analysis showed that they were generated by homologous recombination that implied a double crossover in the S gene resulting in replacement of most of the respiratory, attenuated strain S gene (nucleotides 96 to 3700) by the S gene of the enteric, virulent isolate. The recombinant virus was virulent and rapidly evolved in swine testis cells by the introduction of point mutations and in-phase codon deletions in a domain of the S gene (nucleotides 217 to 665) previously implicated in the tropism of TGEV. The helper virus, with an original respiratory tropism, was also found in the enteric tract, probably because pseudorecombinant viruses carrying the spike proteins from the respiratory strain and the enteric virus in their envelopes were formed. These results demonstrated that a change in the tropism and virulence of TGEV can be engineered by sequence changes in the S gene. PMID:10438851

  1. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-02-17

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear-plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems.

  2. Gene transfer in the liver using recombinant adeno-associated virus

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Seemin Seher; Li, Jia; Godwin, Jonathan; Gao, Guangping; Zhong, Li

    2013-01-01

    Liver-directed gene transfer and gene therapy are rapidly gaining attention primarily because the liver is centrally involved in a variety of metabolic functions that are affected in various inherited disorders. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is a popular gene delivery vehicle for gene therapy and intravenous delivery of some rAAV serotypes results in very efficient transduction of the liver. rAAV-mediated and liver-directed gene transfer can help in creating somatic transgenic animals or disease models and studying the function of various genes and miRNAs. The liver is the target tissue for gene therapy of many inborn metabolic diseases and may also be exploited as a “bio-factory” for the production of coagulation factors, insulin and growth hormones and other non-hepatic proteins. Hence efficient delivery of transgenes and small RNAs to the liver by rAAV vectors has been of long-standing interest to research scientists and clinicians alike. PMID:23686826

  3. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear–plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. PMID:26893456

  4. Generation and characterization of NV gene-knockout recombinant viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hong

    2011-11-03

    A recombinant viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (rVHSV-deltaNV-EGFP) containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene instead of the NV gene was produced using the reverse-genetics method. For use as a positive control, another recombinant virus (rVHSV-wild) was also generated, which had an identical nucleotide sequence to the wild-type VHSV genome except for a few artificially replaced nucleotides. The rVHSVs were rescued using a system controlled by T7 RNA polymerase supplied by a retroviral vector. Generation of rVHSV-deltaNV-EGFP and rVHSV-wild was confirmed by sequencing of RT-PCR products, and rescue of infectious rVHSVs was confirmed by observation of plaque formation. Replication efficiency of rVHSV-wild was distinctly lower than that of wild-type VHSV, suggesting that the artificially replaced nucleotides, especially when immediately preceding the G or NV gene start codons, might affect the replication of the virus. Replication of rVHSV-deltaNV-EGFP was slightly lower than that of rVHSV-wild when epithelioma papulosum cyprini cells were infected with multiplicity of infection (MOI) 1.0, but much lower when cells were infected with MOI 0.00001. These results suggest that the NV gene plays an important role in VHSV replication through interactions with host-cell responses, and the lower replication ability of rVHSV-wild compared to wild-type VHSV might be caused by replaced nucleotides just before the NV gene open reading frame (ORF) rather than the G gene ORF. In olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus, rVHSV-wild produced slower-progressing mortalities than wild-type VHSV, whereas rVHSV-deltaNV-EGFP pathogenesis was highly attenuated. These results suggest that the NV protein of VHSV may play an important role not only in viral replication but also in viral pathogenesis.

  5. Homologous Recombination Mediates Functional Recovery of Dysferlin Deficiency following AAV5 Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Grose, William E.; Clark, K. Reed; Griffin, Danielle; Malik, Vinod; Shontz, Kimberly M.; Montgomery, Chrystal L.; Lewis, Sarah; Brown, Robert H.; Janssen, Paul M. L.; Mendell, Jerry R.; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R.

    2012-01-01

    The dysferlinopathies comprise a group of untreatable muscle disorders including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, Miyoshi myopathy, distal anterior compartment syndrome, and rigid spine syndrome. As with other forms of muscular dystrophy, adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer is a particularly auspicious treatment strategy, however the size of the DYSF cDNA (6.5 kb) negates packaging into traditional AAV serotypes known to express well in muscle (i.e. rAAV1, 2, 6, 8, 9). Potential advantages of a full cDNA versus a mini-gene include: maintaining structural-functional protein domains, evading protein misfolding, and avoiding novel epitopes that could be immunogenic. AAV5 has demonstrated unique plasticity with regards to packaging capacity and recombination of virions containing homologous regions of cDNA inserts has been implicated in the generation of full-length transcripts. Herein we show for the first time in vivo that homologous recombination following AAV5.DYSF gene transfer leads to the production of full length transcript and protein. Moreover, gene transfer of full-length dysferlin protein in dysferlin deficient mice resulted in expression levels sufficient to correct functional deficits in the diaphragm and importantly in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Intravascular regional gene transfer through the femoral artery produced high levels of transduction and enabled targeting of specific muscle groups affected by the dysferlinopathies setting the stage for potential translation to clinical trials. We provide proof of principle that AAV5 mediated delivery of dysferlin is a highly promising strategy for treatment of dysferlinopathies and has far-reaching implications for the therapeutic delivery of other large genes. PMID:22720081

  6. Recombination of Virulence Genes in Divergent Acidovorax avenae Strains That Infect a Common Host.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Quan; Wang, Jie; Bertels, Frederic; Giordano, Paul R; Chilvers, Martin I; Huntley, Regan B; Vargas, Joseph M; Sundin, George W; Jacobs, Janette L; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2017-10-01

    Bacterial etiolation and decline (BED), caused by Acidovorax avenae, is an emerging disease of creeping bentgrass on golf courses in the United States. We performed the first comprehensive analysis of A. avenae on a nationwide collection of turfgrass- and maize-pathogenic A. avenae. Surprisingly, our results reveal that the turfgrass-pathogenic A. avenae in North America are not only highly divergent but also belong to two distinct phylogroups. Both phylogroups specifically infect turfgrass but are more closely related to maize pathogens than to each other. This suggests that, although the disease is only recently reported, it has likely been infecting turfgrass for a long time. To identify a genetic basis for the host specificity, we searched for genes closely related among turfgrass strains but distantly related to their homologs from maize strains. We found a cluster of 11 such genes generated by three ancient recombination events within the type III secretion system (T3SS) pathogenicity island. Ever since the recombination, the cluster has been conserved by strong purifying selection, hinting at its selective importance. Together our analyses suggest that BED is an ancient disease that may owe its host specificity to a highly conserved cluster of 11 T3SS genes.

  7. Fate of maize intrinsic and recombinant genes in calves fed genetically modified maize Bt11.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Emdadull H; Mikami, Osamu; Murata, Hideo; Sultana, Parvin; Shimada, Nobuaki; Yoshioka, Miyako; Guruge, Keerthi S; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Miyazaki, Shigeru; Yamanaka, Noriko; Nakajima, Yasuyuki

    2004-02-01

    The presence of maize intrinsic and recombinant cry1Ab genes in the gastrointestinal (GI) contents, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and visceral organs of calves fed genetically modified Bt11 maize was examined by PCR in a subchronic 90-day performance study. Samples were collected from six Japanese Black/Holstein calves fed Bt11 maize and from six calves fed non-Bt maize. Fragments of maize zein (Ze1), invertase, chloroplast, and cry1Ab were detected inconsistently in the rumen fluid and rectal contents 5 and 18 h after feeding. The chloroplast DNA fragments of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and tRNA were detected inconsistently in the PBMC, the visceral organs, and the longissimus muscle, while the cry1Ab gene was never detected in PBMC or in the visceral organs. These results suggest that feed-derived maize DNA was mostly degraded in the GI tract but that fragmented DNA was detectable in the GI contents as a possible source of transfer to calf tissues. These results also suggest that the recombinant cry1Ab genes were not transferred to the PBMC and tissues of calves fed Bt11 maize.

  8. Diversity and Recombination of Dispersed Ribosomal DNA and Protein Coding Genes in Microsporidia

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  9. Diversity and recombination of dispersed ribosomal DNA and protein coding genes in microsporidia.

    PubMed

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  10. The structure of HIV-1 genomic RNA in the gp120 gene determines a recombination hot spot in vivo.

    PubMed

    Galetto, Román; Moumen, Abdeladim; Giacomoni, Véronique; Véron, Michel; Charneau, Pierre; Negroni, Matteo

    2004-08-27

    By frequently rearranging large regions of the genome, genetic recombination is a major determinant in the plasticity of the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) population. In retroviruses, recombination mostly occurs by template switching during reverse transcription. The generation of retroviral vectors provides a means to study this process after a single cycle of infection of cells in culture. Using HIV-1-derived vectors, we present here the first characterization and estimate of the strength of a recombination hot spot in HIV-1 in vivo. In the hot spot region, located within the C2 portion of the gp120 envelope gene, the rate of recombination is up to ten times higher than in the surrounding regions. The hot region corresponds to a previously identified RNA hairpin structure. Although recombination breakpoints in vivo cluster in the top portion of the hairpin, the bias for template switching in this same region appears less marked in a cell-free system. By modulating the stability of this hairpin we were able to affect the local recombination rate both in vitro and in infected cells, indicating that the local folding of the genomic RNA is a major parameter in the recombination process. This characterization of reverse transcription products generated after a single cycle of infection provides insights in the understanding of the mechanism of recombination in vivo and suggests that specific regions of the genome might be prompted to yield different rates of evolution due to the presence of circumscribed recombination hot spots.

  11. Gene Catchr—Gene Cloning And Tagging for Caenorhabditis elegans using yeast Homologous Recombination: a novel approach for the analysis of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Sassi, Holly E.; Renihan, Stephanie; Spence, Andrew M.; Cooperstock, Ramona L.

    2005-01-01

    Expression patterns of gene products provide important insights into gene function. Reporter constructs are frequently used to analyze gene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans, but the sequence context of a given gene is inevitably altered in such constructs. As a result, these transgenes may lack regulatory elements required for proper gene expression. We developed Gene Catchr, a novel method of generating reporter constructs that exploits yeast homologous recombination (YHR) to subclone and tag worm genes while preserving their local sequence context. YHR facilitates the cloning of large genomic regions, allowing the isolation of regulatory sequences in promoters, introns, untranslated regions and flanking DNA. The endogenous regulatory context of a given gene is thus preserved, producing expression patterns that are as accurate as possible. Gene Catchr is flexible: any tag can be inserted at any position without introducing extra sequence. Each step is simple and can be adapted to process multiple genes in parallel. We show that expression patterns derived from Gene Catchr transgenes are consistent with previous reports and also describe novel expression data. Mutant rescue assays demonstrate that Gene Catchr-generated transgenes are functional. Our results validate the use of Gene Catchr as a valuable tool to study spatiotemporal gene expression. PMID:16254074

  12. Ethanol production by recombinant Escherichia coli carrying genes from Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Lawford, H.G.; Rousseau, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Efficient utilization of lignocellulosic feedstocks offers an opportunity to reduce the cost of producing fuel ethanol. The fermentation performance characteristics of recombinant Escherichia coli ATCC 11303 carrying the {open_quotes}PET plasmid{close_quotes} (pLO1297) with the lac operon controlling the expression of pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase 11 (adhB) genes cloned from Zymomonas mobilis CP4 were assessed in batch and continuous processes with sugar mixtures designed to mimic process streams from lignocellulosic hydrolysis systems.

  13. Specialized Genetic Recombination Systems in Bacteria: Their Involvement in Gene Expression and Evolution,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    I AA-M98 873 WALTER EED ARMY INST OF RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC F/ 6 6 /13 I SPECIALIZED GENETIC RECOMBINATION SYSTEMS IN BACTERIA? THI R IM--ETC(U) 1980 D...YEO EOT5 EIDCV7E Bacteria: Their Involvement in Gene Expression _______________ and Evolution. 6 . PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(.)G S...undifferentiated organisms that reproduce by asexual fission, a process characterized by the doubling of the cellular 81 2 09 11) 6 136 contents followed by

  14. Cloning of the repertoire of individual Plasmodium falciparum var genes using transformation associated recombination (TAR).

    PubMed

    Gaida, Annette; Becker, Marion M; Schmid, Christoph D; Bühlmann, Tobias; Louis, Edward J; Beck, Hans-Peter

    2011-03-07

    One of the major virulence factors of the malaria causing parasite is the Plasmodium falciparum encoded erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). It is translocated to It the membrane of infected erythrocytes and expressed from approximately 60 var genes in a mutually exclusive manner. Switching of var genes allows the parasite to alter functional and antigenic properties of infected erythrocytes, to escape the immune defense and to establish chronic infections. We have developed an efficient method for isolating VAR genes from telomeric and other genome locations by adapting transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning, which can then be analyzed and sequenced. For this purpose, three plasmids each containing a homologous sequence representing the upstream regions of the group A, B, and C var genes and a sequence homologous to the conserved acidic terminal segment (ATS) of var genes were generated. Co-transfection with P. falciparum strain ITG2F6 genomic DNA in yeast cells yielded 200 TAR clones. The relative frequencies of clones from each group were not biased. Clones were screened by PCR, as well as Southern blotting, which revealed clones missed by PCR due to sequence mismatches with the primers. Selected clones were transformed into E. coli and further analyzed by RFLP and end sequencing. Physical analysis of 36 clones revealed 27 distinct types potentially representing 50% of the var gene repertoire. Three clones were selected for sequencing and assembled into single var gene containing contigs. This study demonstrates that it is possible to rapidly obtain the repertoire of var genes from P. falciparum within a single set of cloning experiments. This technique can be applied to individual isolates which will provide a detailed picture of the diversity of var genes in the field. This is a powerful tool to overcome the obstacles with cloning and assembly of multi-gene families by simultaneously cloning each member.

  15. Recombination events near the immunoglobulin Cmu gene join variable and constant region genes, switch heavy-chain expression, or inactivate the locus.

    PubMed

    Cory, S; Webb, E; Gough, J; Adams, J M

    1981-04-28

    Immunoglobulin heavy-chain expression is initiated by recombination between a variable region (VH) gene and one of several joining region (JH) genes located near the mu constant region (Cmu) gene, and the active VH gene can subsequently switch to another CH gene. That the general mechanism for CH switching involves recombination between sites within the JH-Cmu intervening sequence and the 5' flanking region of another CH gene is supported here by Southern blot hybridization analysis of eight IgG- and IgA-secreting plasmacytomas. An alternative model requiring successive VH linkage to similar JH clusters near each CH gene is shown to be very unlikely since the mouse genome appears to contain only one complement of the JH locus and no JH gene was detectable within large cloned sequences flanking germline C gamma 3 and C gamma 1 genes. Thus, VH-JH joining and CH switching are mediated by separate regions of "the joining-switch" or J-S element. In each plasmacytoma examined, the J-S element had undergone recombination within both the JH locus and the switch region and was shown to be linked to the functional CH gene in an IgG3, and IgG1, and three IgA secretors. Both JH joining and CH switching occurred by deletion of DNA. Switch recombination occurred at more than one site within the J-S element in different lines, even for recombination with the same CH gene. Significantly, although heavy-chain expression is restricted to one allele ("allelic exclusion"), all rearranged in each plasmacytoma. Some rearrangements were aberrant, involving, for example, deletion of all JH genes from the allele. Hence, an error-prone recombination machinery may account for allelic exclusion in many plasmacytomas.

  16. Transient gene expression: recombinant protein production with suspension-adapted HEK293-EBNA cells.

    PubMed

    Meissner, P; Pick, H; Kulangara, A; Chatellard, P; Friedrich, K; Wurm, F M

    2001-10-20

    Transient gene expression (TGE) in mammalian cells at the reactor scale is becoming increasingly important for the rapid production of recombinant proteins. We improved a process for transient calcium phosphate-based transfection of HEK293-EBNA cells in a 1-3 L bioreactor volume. Cells were adapted to suspension culture using a commercially available medium (BioWhittaker, Walkersville, MD). Process parameters were optimized using a plasmid reporter vector encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP/CLONTECH, Palo Alto, CA, USA). Using GFP as a marker-protein, we observed by microscopic examination transfection efficiencies between 70-100%. Three different recombinant proteins were synthesized within a timeframe of 7 days from time of transfection to harvest. The first, a human recombinant IgG(1)-type antibody, was secreted into the supernatant of the cell culture and achieved a final concentration of >20 mg/L. An E. coli-derived DNA-binding protein remained intracellular, as expected, but accumulated to such a concentration that the lysate of cells, taken up into the entire culture volume, gave a concentration of 18 mg/L. The third protein, a transmembrane receptor, was expressed at 3-6 x 10(6) molecules/cell.

  17. Overproduction and partial purification of the Norrie disease gene product, norrin, from a recombinant baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Shastry, Barkur S; Trese, Michael T

    2003-12-05

    Abnormal vascularization of the peripheral retina and retinal detachment are common clinical characteristics of Norrie disease (ND), familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, Coats' disease, and retinopathy of prematurity. Although little is known about the molecular basis of these diseases, studies have shown that all of these diseases are associated with mutations in the ND gene. In spite of this, little is known about norrin, its molecular mechanism of action, and its functional relationship with the development of abnormal retinal vasculature. To obtain a large quantity of norrin for structural and functional studies, we have overproduced it in insect cells. For this purpose, a cDNA fragment (869 bp) was isolated from a human retinal cDNA library by amplification and was cloned into an expression vector. The purified plasmid was co-transfected with wild-type linearized Bac-N-Blue DNA into S. frugiperda Sf21 insect cells. The recombinant virus plaques were purified and clones were selected based on the level of recombinant protein expressed in Sf21 cells infected with a purified recombinant virus. From these, a high-titer stock was generated and subsequently used to prepare a fused protein on a large scale. The protein was partially purified by the process of immobilized metal affinity chromatography and the use of ion exchange chromatography

  18. Recombinant AAV-directed gene therapy for type I glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, JY; Mansfield, BC

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type Ia and Ib are disorders of impaired glucose homeostasis affecting the liver and kidney. GSD-Ib also affects neutrophils. Current dietary therapies cannot prevent long-term complications. In animal studies, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene therapy can correct or minimize multiple aspects of the disorders, offering hope for human gene therapy. Areas covered A summary of recent progress in rAAV-mediated gene therapy for GSD-I; strategies to improve rAAV-mediated gene delivery, transduction efficiency and immune avoidance; and vector refinements that improve expression. Expert opinion rAAV-mediated gene delivery to the liver can restore glucose homeostasis in preclinical models of GSD-I, but some long-term complications of the liver and kidney remain. Gene therapy for GSD-Ib is less advanced than for GSD-Ia and only transient correction of myeloid dysfunction has been achieved. A question remains whether a single rAAV vector can meet the expression efficiency and tropism required to treat all aspects of GSD-I, or if a multi-prong approach is needed. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of rAAV vectors in the context of strategies to achieve efficient transduction of the liver, kidney, and hematopoietic stem cells is required for treating GSD-I. PMID:21504389

  19. Somatotropic gene response to recombinant growth hormone treatment in buffalo leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Castigliego, Lorenzo; Li, Xiao-Ning; Armani, Andrea; Razzano, Maria; Mazzi, Marco; Rosati, Remo; Gianfaldoni, Daniela; Guidi, Alessandra

    2011-12-01

    The use of recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH) to increase milk yield in cows is banned in some countries. In others, where it is authorised, it has triggered harsh debates on labelling of dairy products. If many studies have been performed on bovines, there is a lack of information on buffaloes, which are sometimes treated with rbGH and re-present an important economical resource for dairy products in some countries. Analytical methods with legal value for surveillance of rbGH treatments do not yet exist. Research on gene expression biomarkers is one of the most promising approaches to this purpose. For this reason, we treated five buffaloes for 10 weeks with a sustained-release formulation of rbGH and analysed the response of 20 somatotropic axis genes in leucocytes by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Overall changes in gene expression levels were of low magnitude and sometimes affected by the 'time' factor. Only the IGFBP-1 gene showed a significant under-expression (about two-fold; p <0.001) in treated animals. Taken together, these results give evidence that expression analysis of the somatotropic axis genes in leucocytes is little helpful for discrimination of rbGH-treated buffaloes, but do not exclude that another array of genes could provide useful patterns of variation.

  20. Fitness of Streptococcus pneumoniae fluoroquinolone-resistant strains with topoisomerase IV recombinant genes.

    PubMed

    Balsalobre, Luz; de la Campa, Adela G

    2008-03-01

    The low prevalence of ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cp r) Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates carrying recombinant topoisomerase IV genes could be attributed to a fitness cost imposed by the horizontal transfer, which often implies the acquisition of larger-than-normal parE-parC intergenic regions. A study of the transcription of these genes and of the fitness cost for 24 isogenic Cp r strains was performed. Six first-level transformants were obtained either with PCR products containing the parC quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of S. pneumoniae Cp r mutants with point mutations or with a PCR product that includes parE-QRDR-ant-parC-QRDR from a Cp r Streptococcus mitis isolate. The latter yielded two strains, T6 and T11, carrying parC-QRDR and parE-QRDR-ant-parC-QRDR, respectively. These first-level transformants were used as recipients in further transformations with the gyrA-QRDR PCR products to obtain 18 second-level transformants. In addition, strain Tr7 (which contains the GyrA E85K change) was used. Reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed that parE and parC were cotranscribed in R6, T6, and T11; and a single promoter located upstream of parE was identified in R6 by primer extension. The fitness of the transformants was estimated by pairwise competition with R6 in both one-cycle and two-cycle experiments. In the one-cycle experiments, most strains carrying the GyrA E85K change showed a fitness cost; the exception was recombinant T14. In the two-cycle experiments, a fitness cost was observed in most first-level transformants carrying the ParC changes S79F, S79Y, and D83Y and the GyrA E85K change; the exceptions were recombinants T6 and T11. The results suggest that there is no impediment due to a fitness cost for the spread of recombinant Cp r S. pneumoniae isolates, since some recombinants (T6, T11, and T14) exhibited an ability to compensate for the cost.

  1. Cancer-associated genes can affect somatic intrachromosomal recombination early in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Antony M; Morley, Alexander A; Tilley, Wayne D; Sykes, Pamela J

    2004-06-04

    The pKZ1 recombination mutagenesis model has provided a sensitive assay where we study somatic intrachromosomal recombination (SICR) as a mutation end-point. SICR is associated with non-homologous end-joining repair of double-strand breaks and can result in chromosomal inversions and deletions, both of which are common chromosomal aberrations identified in cancers. It has been difficult to study the effect of cancer-associated genes on chromosomal changes prior to tumour formation in vivo because of a lack of appropriate test systems. We hypothesised that cancer-associated genes play a role in formation of chromosomal aberrations and that the pKZ1 model would provide a system in which such a role could be studied in the initial steps of carcinogenesis. Transgenic tumour model mice were bred to pKZ1 mice to produce double transgenic animals. SICR inversion events were scored in mouse tissues at an early time, prior to evident tumour formation, and compared with endogenous pKZ1 SICR levels. Over-expression of the c-myc proto-oncogene resulted in a significant 2.1-fold increase in SICR in spleen. Loss of Msh2 and expression of the SV40 T antigen resulted in a significantly reduced SICR frequency (0.3 of the endogenous frequency in pKZ1 mice) in spleen and prostate respectively. Therefore SICR was affected in the case of all three cancer-associated genes studied. We hypothesise that the increase and decrease in SICR in the presence of cancer-associated genes results from incorrect repairing of double-strand breaks. The data presented here suggest that the pKZ1 model may provide a powerful tool for studying the effect of cancer-associated genes on chromosomal changes in the early stages of carcinogenesis.

  2. Immune deficiency enhances expression of recombinant human antibody in mice after nonviral in vivo gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Kohji; Toda, Mikako; Takekoshi, Masataka; Maeda, Fumiko; Muramatsu, Tatsuo; Murai, Atsushi

    2005-10-01

    A cDNA encoding human antibody against hepatitis B virus was expressed in normal and severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mice to clarify whether or not host immune status affects circulating levels of the recombinant human antibody (RhAb) after nonviral in vivo gene transfer. For transferring genes, either electroporation (EP) or hydrodynamics-based transfection (HD) was employed. The former was applied to the leg muscle to express the gene, while the latter primarily targeted foreign gene expression in the liver. The expressed RhAb was secreted into the blood circulation, and its existence was assayed by ELISA. Prior to the investigation of host immune status, suitable forms of plasmid expression vectors and types of electrodes were determined in normal mice. Results showed that the vector encoding both the light and heavy chains driven by the CMV promoter had the highest plasma RhAb concentrations, and a pair of pincette-type electrodes conferred the best performance. In both EP and HD, the SCID state showed an increased and prolonged RhAb production in the blood circulation due probably to suppressed recognition of RhAb as a foreign protein to the host animal. The difference in gene transfer methods demonstrated a characteristic pattern: an early and sharp rise followed by a relatively rapid decrease in HD, in contrast to a gradual rise followed by a plateau level maintained in EP. As a result, with the same amount of gene transferred, the plasma RhAb concentrations for the first 7 or 8 weeks were higher in HD than EP, while the reverse was true for the latter period. Multiple gene transfer contributed to maintaining and prolonging high RhAb concentrations in plasma by both methods with similar characteristic patterns accompanying the respective gene transfer method. These results suggest the importance of host immunological potency for maintaining plasma RhAb concentrations if these gene transfer technologies are used for clinical and therapeutic purposes.

  3. RecET direct cloning and Redαβ recombineering of biosynthetic gene clusters, large operons or single genes for heterologous expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Li, Zhen; Jia, Ruonan; Hou, Yu; Yin, Jia; Bian, Xiaoying; Li, Aiying; Müller, Rolf; Stewart, A Francis; Fu, Jun; Zhang, Youming

    2016-07-01

    Full-length RecE and RecT from Rac prophage mediate highly efficient linear-linear homologous recombination that can be used to clone large DNA regions directly from genomic DNA into expression vectors, bypassing library construction and screening. Homologous recombination mediated by Redαβ from lambda phage has been widely used for recombinant DNA engineering. Here we present a protocol for direct cloning and engineering of biosynthetic gene clusters, large operons or single genes from genomic DNA using one Escherichia coli host that harbors both RecET and Redαβ systems. The pipeline uses standardized cassettes for horizontal gene transfer options, as well as vectors with different replication origins configured to minimize recombineering background through the use of selectively replicating templates or CcdB counterselection. These optimized reagents and protocols facilitate fast acquisition of transgenes from genomic DNA preparations, which are ready for heterologous expression within 1 week.

  4. Highly diverse TCRα chain repertoire of pre-immune CD8+ T cells reveals new insights in gene recombination

    PubMed Central

    Genolet, Raphael; Stevenson, Brian J; Farinelli, Laurent; Østerås, Magne; Luescher, Immanuel F

    2012-01-01

    Although the T-cell receptor αδ (TCRαδ) locus harbours large libraries of variable (TRAV) and junctional (TRAJ) gene segments, according to previous studies the TCRα chain repertoire is of limited diversity due to restrictions imposed by sequential coordinate TRAV-TRAJ recombinations. By sequencing tens of millions of TCRα chain transcripts from naive mouse CD8+ T cells, we observed a hugely diverse repertoire, comprising nearly all possible TRAV-TRAJ combinations. Our findings are not compatible with sequential coordinate gene recombination, but rather with a model in which contraction and DNA looping in the TCRαδ locus provide equal access to TRAV and TRAJ gene segments, similarly to that demonstrated for IgH gene recombination. Generation of the observed highly diverse TCRα chain repertoire necessitates deletion of failed attempts by thymic-positive selection and is essential for the formation of highly diverse TCRαβ repertoires, capable of providing good protective immunity. PMID:22373576

  5. BTK gene targeting by homologous recombination using a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus hybrid vector.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Ishimura, M; Ochiai, M; Takada, H; Kusuhara, K; Nakatsu, Y; Tsuzuki, T; Mitani, K; Hara, T

    2016-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is one of the most common humoral immunodeficiencies, which is caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. To examine the possibility of using gene therapy for XLA, we constructed a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus BTK targeting vector (HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector) composed of a genomic sequence containing BTK exons 6-19 and a green fluorescence protein-hygromycin cassette driven by a cytomegalovirus promoter. We first used NALM-6, a human male pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, as a recipient to measure the efficiency of gene targeting by homologous recombination. We identified 10 clones with the homologous recombination of the BTK gene among 107 hygromycin-resistant stable clones isolated from two independent experiments. We next used cord blood CD34⁺ cells as the recipient cells for the gene targeting. We isolated colonies grown in medium containing cytokines and hygromycin. We found that the targeting of the BTK gene occurred in four of the 755 hygromycin-resistant colonies. Importantly, the gene targeting was also observed in CD19⁺ lymphoid progenitor cells that were differentiated from the homologous recombinant CD34⁺ cells during growth in selection media. Our study shows the potential for the BTK gene therapy using the HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector via homologous recombination in hematopoietic stem cells.

  6. Evidence of Localized Prophage-Host Recombination in the lytA Gene, Encoding the Major Pneumococcal Autolysin ▿

    PubMed Central

    Morales, María; García, Pedro; de la Campa, Adela G.; Liñares, Josefina; Ardanuy, Carmen; García, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    According to a highly polymorphic region in the lytA gene, encoding the major autolysin of Streptococcus pneumoniae, two different families of alleles can be differentiated by PCR and restriction digestion. Here, we provide evidence that this polymorphic region arose from recombination events with homologous genes of pneumococcal temperate phages. PMID:20304992

  7. [Construction of a recombined adenovirus vector carrying pri-miR-21 gene and research on it's target gene TLR4].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Xu, Guang-xian; Jia, Wei; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Yi-lin; Zhao, Zhi-jun; Wei, Jun

    2012-02-01

    To construct the recombined adenovirus vector carrying pri-miR-21 gene, which can express mature miR-21 efficiently, and to study the interaction of miR- 21 with its target gene TLR4. Using healthy mouse's gDNA as template, the primary miR-21 coding sequence was amplified by PCR and cloned into a shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV. Constructed plasmid was sequenced and linearized for homologous recombination with pAdEasy-1 vector in BJ5183 bacteria. The recombined adenovirus vector carrying pri-miR-21 gene was used to challenge HeLa cell. The candidate target gene of miR-21 was determined by miRNA analysis databases. The expression level of TLR4 protein was detected by western blotting. Through the PCR, restriction enzyme digestion, DNA sequencing and expression of GFP, recombinant adenoviral vector pri-miR-21 gene was constructed successfully. Bioinformatic analysis suggested a few possible binding sites between miR-21 and TLR4. Results showed that miR-21 down-regulated TLR4 at protein levels. The recombinant adenoviral vector containing pri- miR-21 was successfully constructed. miR-21 gene interfered with the expression of TLR4 target gene.

  8. Recombination of the GFP gene to the BFP gene using a man-made site-selective DNA cutter.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshihito; Mori, Satoshi; Chen, Wen; Sumaoka, Jun; Komiyama, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    By using the recently developed man-made DNA cutter [a combination of Ce(IV)/EDTA and two DNA additives], green fluorescent protein (GFP) was converted to closely related blue fluorescent protein (BFP). The phosphodiester linkages at T196-A200 in the sense strand of GFP were hydrolyzed by the cutter, and the A1-T196 fragment in the product was selectively connected with the downstream fragment (C197-A720) of BFP by T4 DNA ligase. This recombination changed three codons in the GFP gene (TGC at 196-198, TAT at 199-201, and ACC at 502-504) to TCT, CAT, and ATC in BFP, and accordingly three amino acids in GFP (Cys65, Tyr66, and Thr167) were altered to Ser65, His66, and Ile167. The recombinant gene was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and emitted blue fluorescence, confirming the absence of undesired side reactions (mutation, deletion, insertion, depurination, etc.) in the DNA manipulation.

  9. The switching gene swi6 affects recombination and gene expression in the mating-type region of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Lorentz, A; Heim, L; Schmidt, H

    1992-06-01

    The products of 11 switching (swi) genes are required for efficient mating-type (MT) switching in homothallic (h90) strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The MT region of h90 comprises three cassette genes: the expression site mat1:1 and two silent loci, mat2:2 and mat3:3. Besides reducing MT switching, the swi6 mutation leads to deletions in the MT region caused by intrachromosomal cross-overs between two paired cassettes. These deletions only arise if DNA double-strand breaks are present at mat1:1, which initiate MT switching. Furthermore, swi6 allows meiotic recombination in the K region, a region of 16 kb between mat2:2 and mat3:3; in wild-type strains no recombination occurs in K. swi6 also allows the simultaneous expression of two different cassettes in the same haploid cell. Thus swi6 may have an influence on the general chromatin structure in the MT region.

  10. Construction of the first shuttle vectors for gene cloning and homologous recombination in Mycoplasma agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini; Marenda, Marc; Rosengarten, Renate; Jechlinger, Wolfgang; Citti, Christine

    2005-12-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae is a worldwide ruminant pathogen that causes significant economic losses by inflicting contagious agalactia in sheep and goats. The development of efficient control strategies requires a better understanding of the mycoplasma factors that promote successful infection. However, lack of genetic tools has been a major impediment in studying the pathogenic mechanisms of M. agalactiae. This study describes the identification and cloning of the M. agalactiae origin of replication (oriC) in order to construct the first shuttle vectors for targeted gene disruption, gene complementation and expression studies. Additionally, this report provides the first evidence of the occurrence of homologous recombination and the functionality of heterologous tetM determinant in this pathogen.

  11. Homologous recombination-mediated gene targeting in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Johzuka-Hisatomi, Yasuyo; Ishida, Sakiko; Iida, Shigeru; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    The liverwort Marchantia polymorpha is an emerging model organism on account of its ideal characteristics for molecular genetics in addition to occupying a crucial position in the evolution of land plants. Here we describe a method for gene targeting by applying a positive/negative selection system for reduction of non-homologous random integration to an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system using M. polymorpha sporelings. The targeting efficiency was evaluated by knocking out the NOP1 gene, which impaired air-chamber formation. Homologous recombination was observed in about 2% of the thalli that passed the positive/negative selection. With the advantage of utilizing the haploid gametophytic generation, this strategy should facilitate further molecular genetic analysis of M. polymorpha, in which many of the mechanisms found in land plants are conserved, yet in a less complex form.

  12. Homologous recombination-mediated gene targeting in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L.

    PubMed Central

    Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Johzuka-Hisatomi, Yasuyo; Ishida, Sakiko; Iida, Shigeru; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    The liverwort Marchantia polymorpha is an emerging model organism on account of its ideal characteristics for molecular genetics in addition to occupying a crucial position in the evolution of land plants. Here we describe a method for gene targeting by applying a positive/negative selection system for reduction of non-homologous random integration to an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system using M. polymorpha sporelings. The targeting efficiency was evaluated by knocking out the NOP1 gene, which impaired air-chamber formation. Homologous recombination was observed in about 2% of the thalli that passed the positive/negative selection. With the advantage of utilizing the haploid gametophytic generation, this strategy should facilitate further molecular genetic analysis of M. polymorpha, in which many of the mechanisms found in land plants are conserved, yet in a less complex form. PMID:23524944

  13. The joint effects of background selection and genetic recombination on local gene genealogies.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kai; Charlesworth, Brian

    2011-09-01

    Background selection, the effects of the continual removal of deleterious mutations by natural selection on variability at linked sites, is potentially a major determinant of DNA sequence variability. However, the joint effects of background selection and genetic recombination on the shape of the neutral gene genealogy have proved hard to study analytically. The only existing formula concerns the mean coalescent time for a pair of alleles, making it difficult to assess the importance of background selection from genome-wide data on sequence polymorphism. Here we develop a structured coalescent model of background selection with recombination and implement it in a computer program that efficiently generates neutral gene genealogies for an arbitrary sample size. We check the validity of the structured coalescent model against forward-in-time simulations and show that it accurately captures the effects of background selection. The model produces more accurate predictions of the mean coalescent time than the existing formula and supports the conclusion that the effect of background selection is greater in the interior of a deleterious region than at its boundaries. The level of linkage disequilibrium between sites is elevated by background selection, to an extent that is well summarized by a change in effective population size. The structured coalescent model is readily extendable to more realistic situations and should prove useful for analyzing genome-wide polymorphism data.

  14. Characterization of an endogenous gene expressed in Aedes aegypti using an orally infectious recombinant Sindbis virus

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L.L.; Bartholomay, L.C.; Olson, K.E.; Lowenberger, C.; Vizioli, J.; Higgs, S.; Beaty, B.J.; Christensen, B.M.

    2001-01-01

    Sindbis virus expression vectors have been used successfully to express and silence genes of interest in vivo in several mosquito species, including Aedes aegypti, Ae. albopictus, Ae. triseriatus,Culex pipiens, Armigeres subalbatus and Anopheles gambiae. Here we describe the expression of an endogenous gene, defensin, in Ae. aegypti using the orally infectious Sindbis virus, MRE/3′2J expression vector. We optimized conditions to infect mosquito larvae per os using C6/36 Ae. albopictus cells infected with the recombinant virus to maximize virus infection and expression of defensin. Infection with the parental Sindbis virus (MRE/3′2J) did not induce defensin expression. Mosquito larvae infected by ingestion of recombinant Sindbis virus-infected C6/36 cells expressed defensin when they emerged as adults. Defensin expression was observed by western analysis or indirect fluorescent assay in all developmental stages of mosquitoes infected with MRE/3′2J virus that contained the defensin insert. The multiplicity of infection of C6/36 cells and the quantity of infected cells consumed by larvae played an important role in defensin expression. Parental viruses, missing the defensin insert, and/or other defective interfering virus may have contributed to these observations. PMID:15455070

  15. The recombination dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus inferred from spA gene.

    PubMed

    Santos-Júnior, Célio D; Veríssimo, António; Costa, Joana

    2016-07-11

    Given the role of spA as a pivotal virulence factor decisive for Staphylococcus aureus ability to escape from innate and adaptive immune responses, one can consider it as an object subject to adaptive evolution and that variations in spA may uncover pathogenicity variations. The population genetic structure was deduced from the extracellular domains of SpA gene sequence (domains A-E and the X-region) and compared to the MLST-analysis of 41 genetically diverse methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) S. aureus strains. Incongruence between tree topologies was noticeable and in the inferred spA tree most MSSA isolates were clustered in a distinct group. Conversely, the distribution of strains according to their spA-type was not always congruent with the tree inferred from the complete spA gene foreseeing that spA is a mosaic gene composed of different segments exhibiting different evolutionary histories. Evidences of a network-like organization were identified through several conflicting phylogenetic signals and indeed several intragenic recombination events (within subdomains of the gene) were detected within and between CC's of MRSA strains. The alignment of SpA sequences enabled the clustering of several isoforms as a result of non-randomly distributed amino acid variations, located in two clusters of polymorphic sites in domains D to B and Xr (a). Nevertheless, evidences of cluster specific structural arrangements were detected reflecting alterations on specific residues with potential impact on S. aureus pathogenicity. The detection of positive selection operating on spA combined with frequent non-synonymous mutations, domain duplication and frequent intragenic recombination events represent important mechanisms acting in the evolutionary adaptive mechanism promoting spA genetic plasticity. These findings argue that crucial allelic forms correlated with pathogenicity can be identified by sequences analysis enabling the design of more

  16. Phase I Trial of Adenovirus-Mediated IL-12 Gene Transduction in Patients with Recurrent Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Following Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    radiation therapy who are presently not on hormonal therapy. An important part of the screening process is a needle biopsy of the prostate to confirm the...has been amended (see below) to also include patients who had their locally advanced prostate cancer treated with hormonal ablative therapy...the lack of effective therapies for men who have failed definitive radiotherapy or who have locally advanced cancer despite hormone ablative therapy

  17. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-09-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment.

  18. Loss of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor expression in human colorectal cancer: A potential impact on the efficacy of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Han, Yong; Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-Ju; Wang, Shi-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Fan-Long; He, Xiang-Lei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Mou, Xiao-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is considered a tumor suppressor and critical factor for the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that employ the adenovirus. However, data on CAR expression levels in colorectal cancer are conflicting and its clinical relevance remains to be elucidated. Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays containing 251 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue samples from Chinese Han patients to assess the expression levels of CAR. Compared with healthy mucosa, decreased CAR expression (40.6% vs. 95.6%; P<0.001) was observed in colorectal cancer samples. The CAR immunopositivity in tumor tissues was not significantly associated with gender, age, tumor size, differentiation, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis or distant metastasis in patients with colon cancer. However, expression of CAR is present in 83.3% of the tumor tissues from patient with colorectal liver metastasis, which was significantly higher than those without liver metastasis (39.6%; P=0.042). At the plasma membrane, CAR was observed in 29.5% normal mucosa samples, which was significantly higher than in colorectal cancer samples (4.0%; P<0.001). In addition, the survival analysis demonstrated that the expression level of CAR has no association with the prognosis of colorectal cancer. CAR expression was observed to be downregulated in colorectal cancer, and it exerts complex effects during colorectal carcinogenesis, potentially depending on the stage of the cancer development and progression. High CAR expression may promote liver metastasis. With regard to oncolytic therapy, CAR expression analysis should be performed prior to adenoviral oncolytic treatment to stratify Chinese Han patients for treatment. PMID:27485384

  19. The effects of recombination, mutation and selection on the evolution of the Rp1 resistance genes in grasses.

    PubMed

    Jouet, Agathe; McMullan, Mark; van Oosterhout, Cock

    2015-06-01

    Plant immune genes, or resistance genes, are involved in a co-evolutionary arms race with a diverse range of pathogens. In agronomically important grasses, such R genes have been extensively studied because of their role in pathogen resistance and in the breeding of resistant cultivars. In this study, we evaluate the importance of recombination, mutation and selection on the evolution of the R gene complex Rp1 of Sorghum, Triticum, Brachypodium, Oryza and Zea. Analyses show that recombination is widespread, and we detected 73 independent instances of sequence exchange, involving on average 1567 of 4692 nucleotides analysed (33.4%). We were able to date 24 interspecific recombination events and found that four occurred postspeciation, which suggests that genetic introgression took place between different grass species. Other interspecific events seemed to have been maintained over long evolutionary time, suggesting the presence of balancing selection. Significant positive selection (i.e. a relative excess of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN /dS >1)) was detected in 17-95 codons (0.42-2.02%). Recombination was significantly associated with areas with high levels of polymorphism but not with an elevated dN /dS ratio. Finally, phylogenetic analyses show that recombination results in a general overestimation of the divergence time (mean = 14.3%) and an alteration of the gene tree topology if the tree is not calibrated. Given that the statistical power to detect recombination is determined by the level of polymorphism of the amplicon as well as the number of sequences analysed, it is likely that many studies have underestimated the importance of recombination relative to the mutation rate. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Initiation of V(D)J recombination by Dbeta-associated recombination signal sequences: a critical control point in TCRbeta gene assembly.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Don-Marc; Benoukraf, Touati; Jaeger, Sébastien; Ferrier, Pierre; Payet-Bornet, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) beta gene assembly by V(D)J recombination proceeds via successive Dbeta-to-Jbeta and Vbeta-to-DJbeta rearrangements. This two-step process is enforced by a constraint, termed beyond (B)12/23, which prohibits direct Vbeta-to-Jbeta rearrangements. However the B12/23 restriction does not explain the order of TCRbeta assembly for which the regulation remains an unresolved issue. The initiation of V(D)J recombination consists of the introduction of single-strand DNA nicks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) containing a 12 base-pairs spacer. An RSS containing a 23 base-pairs spacer is then captured to form a 12/23 RSSs synapse leading to coupled DNA cleavage. Herein, we probed RSS nicks at the TCRbeta locus and found that nicks were only detectable at Dbeta-associated RSSs. This pattern implies that Dbeta 12RSS and, unexpectedly, Dbeta 23RSS initiate V(D)J recombination and capture their respective Vbeta or Jbeta RSS partner. Using both in vitro and in vivo assays, we further demonstrate that the Dbeta1 23RSS impedes cleavage at the adjacent Dbeta1 12RSS and consequently Vbeta-to-Dbeta1 rearrangement first requires the Dbeta1 23RSS excision. Altogether, our results provide the molecular explanation to the B12/23 constraint and also uncover a 'Dbeta1 23RSS-mediated' restriction operating beyond chromatin accessibility, which directs Dbeta1 ordered rearrangements.

  1. Signs of Neutralization in a Redundant Gene Involved in Homologous Recombination in Wolbachia Endosymbionts

    PubMed Central

    Badawi, Myriam; Giraud, Isabelle; Vavre, Fabrice; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Genomic reduction in bacterial endosymbionts occurs through large genomic deletions and long-term accumulation of mutations. The latter process involves successive steps including gene neutralization, pseudogenization, and gradual erosion until complete loss. Although many examples of pseudogenes at various levels of degradation have been reported, neutralization cases are scarce because of the transient nature of the process. Gene neutralization may occur due to relaxation of selection in nonessential genes, for example, those involved in redundant functions. Here, we report an example of gene neutralization in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway of Wolbachia, a bacterial endosymbiont of arthropods and nematodes. The HR pathway is often depleted in endosymbiont genomes, but it is apparently intact in some Wolbachia strains. Analysis of 12 major HR genes showed that they have been globally under strong purifying selection during the evolution of Wolbachia strains hosted by arthropods, supporting the evolutionary importance of the HR pathway for these Wolbachia genomes. However, we detected signs of recent neutralization of the ruvA gene in a subset of Wolbachia strains, which might be related to an ancestral, clade-specific amino acid change that impaired DNA-binding activity. Strikingly, RuvA is part of the RuvAB complex involved in branch migration, whose function overlaps with the RecG helicase. Although ruvA is experiencing neutralization, recG is under strong purifying selection. Thus, our high phylogenetic resolution suggests that we identified a rare example of targeted neutralization of a gene involved in a redundant function in an endosymbiont genome. PMID:25230723

  2. Signs of neutralization in a redundant gene involved in homologous recombination in Wolbachia endosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Myriam; Giraud, Isabelle; Vavre, Fabrice; Grève, Pierre; Cordaux, Richard

    2014-09-17

    Genomic reduction in bacterial endosymbionts occurs through large genomic deletions and long-term accumulation of mutations. The latter process involves successive steps including gene neutralization, pseudogenization, and gradual erosion until complete loss. Although many examples of pseudogenes at various levels of degradation have been reported, neutralization cases are scarce because of the transient nature of the process. Gene neutralization may occur due to relaxation of selection in nonessential genes, for example, those involved in redundant functions. Here, we report an example of gene neutralization in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway of Wolbachia, a bacterial endosymbiont of arthropods and nematodes. The HR pathway is often depleted in endosymbiont genomes, but it is apparently intact in some Wolbachia strains. Analysis of 12 major HR genes showed that they have been globally under strong purifying selection during the evolution of Wolbachia strains hosted by arthropods, supporting the evolutionary importance of the HR pathway for these Wolbachia genomes. However, we detected signs of recent neutralization of the ruvA gene in a subset of Wolbachia strains, which might be related to an ancestral, clade-specific amino acid change that impaired DNA-binding activity. Strikingly, RuvA is part of the RuvAB complex involved in branch migration, whose function overlaps with the RecG helicase. Although ruvA is experiencing neutralization, recG is under strong purifying selection. Thus, our high phylogenetic resolution suggests that we identified a rare example of targeted neutralization of a gene involved in a redundant function in an endosymbiont genome.

  3. Identifying the risk of producing aneuploids using meiotic recombination genes as biomarkers: A copy number variation approach

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Raviraj V.; Lingaiah, Kusuma; Veerappa, Avinash M.; Ramachandra, Nallur B.

    2017-01-01

    Background & objectives: Aneuploids are the most common chromosomal abnormality in liveborns and are usually the result of non-disjunction (NDJ) in meiosis. Copy number variations (CNVs) are large structural variations affecting the human genome. CNVs influence critical genes involved in causing NDJ by altering their copy number which affects the clinical outcome. In this study influence of CNVs on critical meiotic recombination was examined using new computational technologies to assess their role in causing aneuploidy. Methods: This investigation was based on the analysis of 12 random normal populations consisting of 1714 individuals for aneuploid causing genes under CNV effect. To examine the effect of CNVs on genes causing aneuploidy, meiotic recombination genes were analyzed using EnrichR, WebGestalt and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results: Forty three NDJ genes were found under CNV burden; IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) and KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis of CNV in meiotic recombination genes revealed a significant role of breast cancer gene 1, amyloid protein precursor, mitogen-activated protein kinase and nerve growth factor as key molecular players involved in causing aneuploidy. Interaction between these genes with other CNV-overlapping genes involved in cell cycle, recombination and meiosis might lead to increased incidences of aneuploidy. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of this study implied that the effect of CNVs on normal genome contributed in amplifying the occurrences of chromosomal aneuploidies. The normal individuals consisting of variations in the susceptible genes causing aneuploids in the population remain undetected until the disorder genes express in the succeeding generations. PMID:28574013

  4. A conditional mouse model for measuring the frequency of homologous recombination events in vivo in the absence of essential genes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam D; Claybon, Alison B; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2011-09-01

    The ability to detect and repair DNA damage is crucial to the prevention of various diseases. Loss of function of genes involved in these processes is known to result in significant developmental defects and/or predisposition to cancer. One such DNA repair mechanism, homologous recombination, has the capacity to repair a wide variety of lesions. Knockout mouse models of genes thought to be involved in DNA repair processes are frequently lethal, making in vivo studies very difficult, if not impossible. Therefore, we set out to develop an in vivo conditional mouse model system to facilitate investigations into the involvement of essential genes in homologous recombination. To test our model, we measured the frequency of spontaneous homologous recombination using the pink-eyed unstable mouse model, in which we conditionally excised either Blm or full-length Brca1 (breast cancer 1, early onset). These two genes are hypothesized to have opposing roles in homologous recombination. In summary, our in vivo data supports in vitro studies suggesting that BLM suppresses homologous recombination, while full-length BRCA1 promotes this process.

  5. Protection against Friend retrovirus-induced leukemia by recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the gag gene.

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, M; Nishio, J; Chesebro, B

    1992-01-01

    High sequence variability in the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus has provoked interest in nonenvelope antigens as potential immunogens against retrovirus infection. However, the role of core protein antigens encoded by the gag gene in protective immunity against retroviruses is unclear. By using recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) gag gene, we could prime CD4+ T-helper cells and protectively immunize susceptible strains of mice against Friend retrovirus infection. Recovery from leukemic splenomegaly developed more slowly after immunization with vaccinia virus-F-MuLV gag than with vaccinia virus-F-MuLV env; however, genetic nonresponders to the envelope protein could be partially protected with Gag vaccines. Class switching of F-MuLV-neutralizing antibodies from immunoglobulin M to immunoglobulin G after challenge with Friend virus complex was facilitated in mice immunized with the Gag antigen. Sequential deletion of the gag gene revealed that the major protective epitope was located on the N-terminal hydrophobic protein p15. Images PMID:1534853

  6. Evidence for increased recombination near the human insulin gene: implication for disease association studies.

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, A; Elbein, S C; Permutt, M A

    1986-01-01

    Haplotypes for four new restriction site polymorphisms (detected by Rsa I, Taq I, HincII, and Sac I) and a previously identified DNA length polymorphism (5' FP), all at the insulin locus, have been studied in U.S. Blacks, African Blacks, Caucasians, and Pima Indians. Black populations are polymorphic for all five markers, whereas the other groups are polymorphic for Rsa I, Taq I, and 5' FP only. The data suggest that approximately equal to 1 in 550 base pairs is variant in this region. The polymorphisms, even though located within 20 kilobases, display low levels of nonrandom association. Population genetic analysis suggests that recombination within this 20-kilobase segment occurs 24 times more frequently than expected if crossing-over occurred uniformly throughout the human genome. These findings suggest that population associations between DNA polymorphisms and disease susceptibility genes near the insulin gene or structural mutations in the insulin gene will be weak. Thus, population studies would probably require large sample sizes to detect associations. However, the low levels of nonrandom association increase the information content of the locus for linkage studies, which is the best alternative for discovering disease susceptibility genes. PMID:3006026

  7. Recombineering-based dissection of flanking and paralogous Hox gene functions in mouse reproductive tracts

    PubMed Central

    Raines, Anna M.; Adam, Mike; Magella, Bliss; Meyer, Sara E.; Grimes, H. Leighton; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Potter, S. Steven

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes are key regulators of development. In mammals, the study of these genes is greatly confounded by their large number, overlapping functions and interspersed shared enhancers. Here, we describe the use of a novel recombineering strategy to introduce simultaneous frameshift mutations into the flanking Hoxa9, Hoxa10 and Hoxa11 genes, as well as their paralogs on the HoxD cluster. The resulting Hoxa9,10,11 mutant mice displayed dramatic synergistic homeotic transformations of the reproductive tracts, with the uterus anteriorized towards oviduct and the vas deferens anteriorized towards epididymis. The Hoxa9,10,11 mutant mice also provided a genetic setting that allowed the discovery of Hoxd9,10,11 redundant reproductive tract patterning function. Both shared and distinct Hox functions were defined. Hoxd9,10,11 play a crucial role in the regulation of uterine immune function. Non-coding non-polyadenylated RNAs were among the key Hox targets, with dramatic downregulation in mutants. We observed Hox cross-regulation of transcription and splicing. In addition, we observed a surprising anti-dogmatic apparent posteriorization of the uterine epithelium. In caudal regions of the uterus, the normal simple columnar epithelium flanking the lumen was replaced by a pseudostratified transitional epithelium, normally found near the more posterior cervix. These results identify novel molecular functions of Hox genes in the development of the male and female reproductive tracts. PMID:23760953

  8. Over-expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in mesenchymal stem cells transfected with recombinant lentivirus BDNF gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Zhu, J; Zhang, K; Liu, T; Zhang, Z

    2016-12-30

    This study was aimed at investigating the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified with recombinant lentivirus bearing BDNF gene. Lentivirus vectors bearing BDNF gene were constructed. MSCs were isolated from rats and cultured. The lentiviral vectors containing BDNF gene were transfected into the MSCs, and BDNF gene and protein expressions were monitored with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). RT-PCR and Western blot were used to measure gene and protein expressions, respectibvely in MSCs, MSCs-EGFP and MSCs-EGFP-BDNF groups. Green fluorescence assay confirmed successful transfection of BDNF gene recombinant lentivirus into MSCs. RT-PCR and Western blot revealed that BDNF gene and protein expressions in the MSCs-EGFP-BDNF group were significantly higher than that in MSCs group and MSCs-EGFP group. There were no statistically significant differences in gene expression between MSCs and MSCs-EGFP groups. MSCs can over-express BDNF when transfected with recombinant lentivirus bearing BDNF gene.

  9. 1,3-Propanediol production by new recombinant Escherichia coli containing genes from pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Przystałowska, Hanna; Zeyland, Joanna; Szymanowska-Powałowska, Daria; Szalata, Marlena; Słomski, Ryszard; Lipiński, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    1,3-Propanediol (1,3-PDO) is an organic compound, which is a valuable intermediate product, widely used as a monomer for synthesizing biodegradable polymers, increasing their strength; as well as an ingredient of textile, cosmetic and medical products. 1,3-PDO is mostly synthesized chemically. Global companies have developed technologies for 1,3-PDO synthesis from petroleum products such as acrolein and ethylene oxide. A potentially viable alternative is offered by biotechnological processes using microorganisms capable of synthesizing 1,3-PDO from renewable substrates (waste glycerol, a by-product of biofuel production, or glucose). In the present study, genes from Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae were introduced into Escherichia coli bacteria to enable the synthesis of 1,3-PDO from waste glycerol. These strains belong to the best 1,3-PDO producers, but they are pathogenic, which restricts their application in industrial processes. The present study involved the construction of two gene expression constructs, containing a total of six heterologous glycerol catabolism pathway genes from C. freundii ATCC 8090 and K. pneumoniae ATCC 700721. Heterologous genes encoding glycerol dehydratase (dhaBCE) and the glycerol dehydratase reactivation factor (dhaF, dhaG) from C. freundii and gene encoding 1,3-PDO oxidoreductase (dhaT) from K. pneumoniae were expressed in E. coli under the control of the T7lac promoter. An RT-PCR analysis and overexpression confirmed that 1,3-PDO synthesis pathway genes were expressed on the RNA and protein levels. In batch fermentation, recombinant E. coli bacteria used 32.6gl(-1) of glycerol to produce 10.6 gl(-1) of 1,3-PDO, attaining the efficiency of 0.4 (mol₁,₃-PDO molglycerol(-1)). The recombinant E. coli created is capable of metabolizing glycerol to produce 1,3-PDO, and the efficiency achieved provides a significant research potential of the bacterium. In the face of shortage of fossil fuel supplies and climate warming

  10. Arabidopsis RAD51C gene is important for homologous recombination in meiosis and mitosis.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kiyomi; Osakabe, Keishi; Nakayama, Shigeki; Endo, Masaki; Tagiri, Akemi; Todoriki, Setsuko; Ichikawa, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2005-10-01

    Rad51 is a homolog of the bacterial RecA recombinase, and a key factor in homologous recombination in eukaryotes. Rad51 paralogs have been identified from yeast to vertebrates. Rad51 paralogs are thought to play an important role in the assembly or stabilization of Rad51 that promotes homologous pairing and strand exchange reactions. We previously characterized two RAD51 paralogous genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) named AtRAD51C and AtXRCC3, which are homologs of human RAD51C and XRCC3, respectively, and described the interaction of their products in a yeast two-hybrid system. Recent studies showed the involvement of AtXrcc3 in DNA repair and functional role in meiosis. To determine the role of RAD51C in meiotic and mitotic recombination in higher plants, we characterized a T-DNA insertion mutant of AtRAD51C. Although the atrad51C mutant grew normally during vegetative developmental stage, the mutant produced aborted siliques, and their anthers did not contain mature pollen grains. Crossing of the mutant with wild-type plants showed defective male and female gametogeneses as evidenced by lack of seed production. Furthermore, meiosis was severely disturbed in the mutant. The atrad51C mutant also showed increased sensitivity to gamma-irradiation and cisplatin, which are known to induce double-strand DNA breaks. The efficiency of homologous recombination in somatic cells in the mutant was markedly reduced relative to that in wild-type plants.

  11. New Insights into the Organization, Recombination, Expression and Functional Mechanism of Low Molecular Weight Glutenin Subunit Genes in Bread Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huajie; Sun, Jiazhu; Zhang, Zhongjuan; Qin, Huanju; Li, Bin; Hao, Shanting; Li, Zhensheng; Wang, Daowen; Zhang, Aimin; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2010-01-01

    The bread-making quality of wheat is strongly influenced by multiple low molecular weight glutenin subunit (LMW-GS) proteins expressed in the seeds. However, the organization, recombination and expression of LMW-GS genes and their functional mechanism in bread-making are not well understood. Here we report a systematic molecular analysis of LMW-GS genes located at the orthologous Glu-3 loci (Glu-A3, B3 and D3) of bread wheat using complementary approaches (genome wide characterization of gene members, expression profiling, proteomic analysis). Fourteen unique LMW-GS genes were identified for Xiaoyan 54 (with superior bread-making quality). Molecular mapping and recombination analyses revealed that the three Glu-3 loci of Xiaoyan 54 harbored dissimilar numbers of LMW-GS genes and covered different genetic distances. The number of expressed LMW-GS in the seeds was higher in Xiaoyan 54 than in Jing 411 (with relatively poor bread-making quality). This correlated with the finding of higher numbers of active LMW-GS genes at the A3 and D3 loci in Xiaoyan 54. Association analysis using recombinant inbred lines suggested that positive interactions, conferred by genetic combinations of the Glu-3 locus alleles with more numerous active LMW-GS genes, were generally important for the recombinant progenies to attain high Zeleny sedimentation value (ZSV), an important indicator of bread-making quality. A higher number of active LMW-GS genes tended to lead to a more elevated ZSV, although this tendency was influenced by genetic background. This work provides substantial new insights into the genomic organization and expression of LMW-GS genes, and molecular genetic evidence suggesting that these genes contribute quantitatively to bread-making quality in hexaploid wheat. Our analysis also indicates that selection for high numbers of active LMW-GS genes can be used for improvement of bread-making quality in wheat breeding. PMID:20975830

  12. Absence of interference in association with gene conversion in Sordaria fimicola, and presence of interference in association with ordinary recombination.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Y

    1978-07-01

    From the analysis of large samples of gene conversion asci in the g locus of Sordaria fimicola, it was found that neither the conversion event itself nor conversion-associated recombination of flanking markers cause either chiasma or chromatid interference with crossing over in a neighboring interval. The presence of more than one kind of crossover event, one causing interference the other not, is considered. The existence of two kinds of gene loci, one of single-cistron composition and the other of multiple-cistron composition, is discussed in relation to reciprocal recombination within a locus.

  13. Absence of Interference in Association with Gene Conversion in SORDARIA FIMICOLA, and Presence of Interference in Association with Ordinary Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kitani, Y.

    1978-01-01

    From the analysis of large samples of gene conversion asci in the g locus of Sordaria fimicola, it was found that neither the conversion event itself nor conversion-associated recombination of flanking markers cause either chiasma or chromatid interference with crossing over in a neighboring interval. The presence of more than one kind of crossover event, one causing interference the other not, is considered. The existence of two kinds of gene loci, one of single-cistron composition and the other of multiple-cistron composition, is discussed in relation to reciprocal recombination within a locus. PMID:17176535

  14. Two DNA repair and recombination genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, are induced during meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K. ); Schild, D. )

    1989-07-01

    The DNA repair and recombination genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, were transcriptionally induced approximately 10- to 15-fold in sporulating MATa/{alpha} cells. Congenic MATa/a cells, which did not sporulate, did not show similar increases. Assays of {beta}-galactosidase activity in strains harboring either a RAD52- or RAD54-lacZ gene fusion indicated that this induction occurred at a time concomitant with a commitment to meiotic recombination, as measured by prototroph formation from his1 heteroalleles.

  15. Direct estimation of the recombination frequency between the RB1 gene and two closely linked microsatellites using sperm typing.

    PubMed

    Girardet, A; Lien, S; Leeflang, E P; Beaufrère, L; Tuffery, S; Munier, F; Arnheim, N; Claustres, M; Pellestor, F

    1999-01-01

    In this study, single sperm typing has been used for high-resolution recombination analysis between the retinoblastoma gene and two closely linked extragenic microsatellites (D13S284 and D13S1307). The analysis of 1198 single sperm from three donors allowed the determination of recombination fractions between RB1.20 and D13S284 and RB1.20 and D13S1307 of 0.022 and 0.033, respectively. These results show that RB1 gene and the two microsatellites are closely linked, which validates their potential use in indirect genetic diagnosis of retinoblastoma.

  16. Design and Characterization of Novel Recombinant Listeriolysin O–Protamine Fusion Proteins for Enhanced Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of gene delivery for effective gene therapy, it is essential that the vector carries functional components that can promote overcoming barriers in various steps leading to the transport of DNA from extracellular to ultimately nuclear compartment. In this study, we designed genetically engineered fusion proteins as a platform to incorporate multiple functionalities in one chimeric protein. Prototypes of such a chimera tested here contain two domains: one that binds to DNA; the other that can facilitate endosomal escape of DNA. The fusion proteins are composed of listeriolysin O (LLO), the endosomolytic pore-forming protein from Listeria monocytogenes, and a 22 amino acid sequence of the DNA-condensing polypeptide protamine (PN), singly or as a pair: LLO-PN and LLO-PNPN. We demonstrate dramatic enhancement of the gene delivery efficiency of protamine-condensed DNA upon incorporation of a small amount of LLO-PN fusion protein and further improvement with LLO-PNPN in vitro using cultured cells. Additionally, the association of anionic liposomes with cationic LLO-PNPN/protamine/DNA complexes, yielding a net negative surface charge, resulted in better in vitro transfection efficiency in the presence of serum. An initial, small set of data in mice indicated that the observed enhancement in gene expression could also be applicable to in vivo gene delivery. This study suggests that incorporation of a recombinant fusion protein with multiple functional components, such as LLO–protamine fusion protein, in a nonviral vector is a promising strategy for various nonviral gene delivery systems. PMID:25521817

  17. Safety of adenovirus-mediated transfer of the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator cDNA to the lungs of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Wilmott, R W; Amin, R S; Perez, C R; Wert, S E; Keller, G; Boivin, G P; Hirsch, R; De Inocencio, J; Lu, P; Reising, S F; Yei, S; Whitsett, J A; Trapnell, B C

    1996-02-10

    To define the toxicity of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) gene therapy with a replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus (Av1Cf2) in a nonhuman primate model, 10(10) plaque forming units (pfu) were instilled directly through a bronchoscope into the right lung of 5 macaques, and a lower dose of 4 x 10(6) pfu was administered to the right lung of 1 macaque. One sham-treated control received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The macaques were evaluated sequentially by clinical examination, vital signs, weight, hematology, blood chemistry, chest radiography, pulse oximetry, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) at baseline and 3-28 days post-treatment. After the period of observation, macaques were sacrificed for autopsy and histological examination. The macaques tolerated the experimental therapy clinically with no changes in body temperature, oxygen saturation, heart rate, body weight, or blood pressure. However, 1 macaque with visible evidence of aspiration at the time of initial bronchoscopy developed tachypnea with right lower lobe (RLL) pneumonia on chest radiograph and by histology. There were no changes in Hgb, Wbc, BUN, plasma electrolytes, bilirubin, or hepatic transaminases. In the macaques that received 10(10) pfu, there was a progressive increase in the number of CD8+ lymphocytes in BAL that was maximal at 28 days. Histological examination of the treated lungs of the high-dose macaques at 3 days showed marked peribronchial and perivascular cuffing by inflammatory cells and alveolar accumulation of neutrophils and macrophages. The alveolitis appeared to be resolving at 28 days, although the perivascular and peribronchial aggregates of mononuclear cells were still present. In the high-dose macaques, BAL interleukin-8 (IL-8) was increased at all time points (256-388 pg/ml versus 1-84 pg/ml at baseline and in control), whereas IL-1 beta was increased only at days 21 and 28 (341-852 pg/ml versus 30-92 pg/ml at baseline and in control

  18. Alleles of the homologous recombination gene, RAD59, identify multiple responses to disrupted DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liddell, Lauren C; Manthey, Glenn M; Owens, Shannon N; Fu, Becky X H; Bailis, Adam M

    2013-10-14

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad59 is required for multiple homologous recombination mechanisms and viability in DNA replication-defective rad27 mutant cells. Recently, four rad59 missense alleles were found to have distinct effects on homologous recombination that are consistent with separation-of-function mutations. The rad59-K166A allele alters an amino acid in a conserved α-helical domain, and, like the rad59 null allele diminishes association of Rad52 with double-strand breaks. The rad59-K174A and rad59-F180A alleles alter amino acids in the same domain and have genetically similar effects on homologous recombination. The rad59-Y92A allele alters a conserved amino acid in a separate domain, has genetically distinct effects on homologous recombination, and does not diminish association of Rad52 with double-strand breaks. In this study, rad59 mutant strains were crossed with a rad27 null mutant to examine the effects of the rad59 alleles on the link between viability, growth and the stimulation of homologous recombination in replication-defective cells. Like the rad59 null allele, rad59-K166A was synthetically lethal in combination with rad27. The rad59-K174A and rad59-F180A alleles were not synthetically lethal in combination with rad27, had effects on growth that coincided with decreased ectopic gene conversion, but did not affect mutation, unequal sister-chromatid recombination, or loss of heterozygosity. The rad59-Y92A allele was not synthetically lethal when combined with rad27, stimulated ectopic gene conversion and heteroallelic recombination independently from rad27, and was mutually epistatic with srs2. Unlike rad27, the stimulatory effect of rad59-Y92A on homologous recombination was not accompanied by effects on growth rate, cell cycle distribution, mutation, unequal sister-chromatid recombination, or loss of heterozygosity. The synthetic lethality conferred by rad59 null and rad59-K166A alleles correlates with their inhibitory effect on association

  19. Enhanced production of acetoin and butanediol in recombinant Enterobacter aerogenes carrying Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene.

    PubMed

    Geckil, Hikmet; Barak, Ze'ev; Chipman, David M; Erenler, Sebnem O; Webster, Dale A; Stark, Benjamin C

    2004-10-01

    Microbial production of butanediol and acetoin has received increasing interest because of their diverse potential practical uses. Although both products are fermentative in nature, their optimal production requires a low level of oxygen. In this study, the use of a recombinant oxygen uptake system on production of these metabolites was investigated. Enterobacter aerogenes was transformed with a pUC8-based plasmid carrying the gene (vgb) encoding Vitreoscilla (bacterial)hemoglobin (VHb). The presence of vgb and production of VHb by this strain resulted in an increase in viability from 72 to 96 h in culture, but no overall increase in cell mass. Accumulation of the fermentation products acetoin and butanediol were enhanced (up to 83%) by the presence of vgb/VHb. This vgb/VHb related effect appears to be due to an increase of flux through the acetoin/butanediol pathway, but not at the expense of acid production.

  20. Biological Activity of Recombinant Bovine Interferon τ Produced by a Silkworm-Baculovirus Gene Expression System

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Hitomi; TSUNAZAKI, Makoto; HAMANO, Takashi; TAKAHASHI, Masashi; OKUDA, Kiyoshi; INUMARU, Shigeki; OKANO, Akira; GESHI, Masaya; HIRAKO, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bovine interferon (bIFN) τ plays a crucial role in maternal-fetal recognition and was expressed using a Bombyx mori (Bm) nuclear polyhedrosis virus (silkworm baculovirus) gene expression system. The biological effects of Bm-recombinant bIFNτ (rbIFNτ) on prostaglandin (PG) F2α synthesis were investigated in cultured bovine endometrial epithelial cells with oxytocin (OT, 100 nM) and on the in vitro development of bovine embryos. Bm-rbIFNτ and OT were shown to suppress PGF2α production in a dose-dependent manner. When in vitro produced morula stage embryos were cultured for 72 hr in modified CR1aa medium supplemented with or without rbIFNτ, Bm-rbIFNτ (10 ng/ml) significantly promoted development to the expanded blastocyst stage. In conclusion, Bm-rbIFNτ was suggested to have the same bioactivity as native IFNτ. PMID:24212505

  1. Application of lambda Red recombination system to Vibrio cholerae genetics: simple methods for inactivation and modification of chromosomal genes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shouji; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Morita, Masatomo; Arakawa, Eiji; Watanabe, Haruo

    2009-06-01

    The lambda Red-based recombination system is very useful for genetic manipulation of some Gram-negative bacteria. Here we report simple procedures for the inactivation and modification of genes of interest on Vibrio cholerae chromosome using this recombination technique. For this purpose, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment carrying an antibiotic resistance cassette flanked by regions homologous to the target locus was electroporated into recipient V. cholerae strains expressing a highly proficient lambda Red recombination system. Two PCR procedures were tested to generate an amplification product carrying an antibiotic resistance cassette flanked by short (50 or 100 nt) or long (1000 nt) homologous extensions, which allowed successful disruption of four chromosomal loci (ctxB, toxT, lacZ, and recA). Our results suggest that 100-nt homology between the PCR product and the target gene is sufficient to stimulate the lambda Red-dependent recombination. To increase recombination efficiency, however, the PCR procedure should be used to generate a product with 1000-nt homologous extensions. Furthermore, we applied this gene replacement method to create lacZ reporter fusion to the target gene. Transcriptional fusion to the V. cholerae ctxA gene was constructed using a PCR product that contains the 100-nt homologous extension to ctxA on each side of the lacZ::cat cassette, and was shown to respond appropriately to a null mutation in the regulatory gene, toxT. Use of the techniques presented here should prompt rapid and efficient mutagenesis/modification of V. cholerae chromosomal genes.

  2. Recombinant capripoxvirus expressing the hemagglutinin protein gene of rinderpest virus: protection of cattle against rinderpest and lumpy skin disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Romero, C H; Barrett, T; Chamberlain, R W; Kitching, R P; Fleming, M; Black, D N

    1994-10-01

    A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of the hemagglutinin (H) protein gene of the RBOK vaccine strain of rinderpest virus, under the control of the vaccinia late promoter p11, was inserted by homologous recombination into the thymidine kinase gene of the KS-1 strain of capripoxvirus. The recombinant virus produced authentic H protein as judged by its electrophoretic mobility, transport to the cell surface of infected lamb testis cells, and reactivity with monoclonal antibodies specific for the H protein of rinderpest virus. The recombinant virus induced significant levels of rinderpest virus neutralizing antibodies in vaccinated cattle and protected them from clinical rinderpest after challenge with a lethal dose of a highly virulent heterologous strain of the virus. Protection was achieved using vaccine doses lower than those used with a similar recombinant expressing the fusion protein gene of rinderpest. The parental KS-1 virus is widely used as a vaccine against capripox viruses and so the rinderpest recombinant acts as a dual vaccine to protect cattle against both rinderpest and lumpy skin disease.

  3. Genetic engineering and heterologous expression of the disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster via Red/ET recombineering.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qiang; Herrmann, Jennifer; Hu, Shengbiao; Raju, Ritesh; Bian, Xiaoying; Zhang, Youming; Müller, Rolf

    2016-02-15

    Disorazol, a macrocyclic polykitide produced by the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce12 and it is reported to have potential cytotoxic activity towards several cancer cell lines, including multi-drug resistant cells. The disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster (dis) from Sorangium cellulosum (So ce12) was identified by transposon mutagenesis and cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The 58-kb dis core gene cluster was reconstituted from BACs via Red/ET recombineering and expressed in Myxococcus xanthus DK1622. For the first time ever, a myxobacterial trans-AT polyketide synthase has been expressed heterologously in this study. Expression in M. xanthus allowed us to optimize the yield of several biosynthetic products using promoter engineering. The insertion of an artificial synthetic promoter upstream of the disD gene encoding a discrete acyl transferase (AT), together with an oxidoreductase (Or), resulted in 7-fold increase in disorazol production. The successful reconstitution and expression of the genetic sequences encoding for these promising cytotoxic compounds will allow combinatorial biosynthesis to generate novel disorazol derivatives for further bioactivity evaluation.

  4. Gene transfer to the nonhuman primate retina with recombinant feline immunodeficiency virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Lotery, Andrew J; Derksen, Todd A; Russell, Stephen R; Mullins, Robert F; Sauter, Sybille; Affatigato, Louisa M; Stone, Edwin M; Davidson, Beverly L

    2002-04-10

    We hypothesize that recombinant feline immunodeficiency viral (rFIV) vectors may be useful for gene transfer to the nonhuman primate retina. We performed vitrectomies and subretinal injections in the right eyes of 11 cynomolgus monkeys. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped rFIV that expressed the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene was injected into eight eyes. Sham vehicle or lactose buffer injections were also performed in two of these eight study eyes. rFIV pseudotyped with an amphotropic envelope was used in two eyes, and in one animal injections of lactose buffer only were given. After surgery the animals were clinically evaluated by retinal photography and electroretinography. beta-Galactosidase expression was evaluated, at a final end point, in histological sections. We found photoreceptor and Müller cells to have the greatest transgene expression. Focal inflammatory responses localized to the injection site were seen histologically in all eyes. No difference in transduction efficiency was seen between injections near the macula and more peripheral injections. Visual function as assessed by electroretinography was not significantly affected by vector or vehicle injections. We conclude that rFIV vectors administered beneath the retina can transduce a variety of retinal cells in the nonhuman primate retina. rFIV vectors have therapeutic potential and could be exploited to develop gene therapy for the human eye.

  5. Isolation of the functional human excision repair gene ERCC5 by intercosmid recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Mudgett, J.S.; MacInnes, M.A. )

    1990-12-01

    The complete human nucleotide exicision repair gene ERCC5 was isolated as a functional gene on overlapping cosmids. ERCC5 corrects the excision repair deficiency of Chinese hamster ovary cell line UV135, of complementation group 5. Cosmids that contained human sequences were obtained from a UV-resistant cell line derived from UV135 cells transformed with human genomic DNA. Individually, none of the cosmids complemented the UV135 repair defect; cosmid groups were formed to represent putative human genomic regions, and specific pairs of cosmids that effectively transformed UV135 cells to UV resistance were identified. Analysis of transformants derived from the active cosmid pairs showed that the functional 32-kbp ERCC5 gene was reconstructed by homologous intercosmid recombination. The cloned human sequences exhibited 100% concordance with the locus designated genetically as ERCC5 located on human chromosome 13q. Cosmid-transformed UV135 host cells repaired cytotoxic damage to levels about 70% of normal and repaired UV-irradiated shuttle vector DNA to levels about 82% of normal.

  6. Intrinsic biocontainment: Multiplex genome safeguards combine transcriptional and recombinational control of essential yeast genes

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yizhi; Agmon, Neta; Choi, Woo Jin; Ubide, Alba; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Caravelli, Katrina; Hao, Haiping; Bader, Joel S.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2015-01-01

    Biocontainment may be required in a wide variety of situations such as work with pathogens, field release applications of engineered organisms, and protection of intellectual properties. Here, we describe the control of growth of the brewer’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using both transcriptional and recombinational “safeguard” control of essential gene function. Practical biocontainment strategies dependent on the presence of small molecules require them to be active at very low concentrations, rendering them inexpensive and difficult to detect. Histone genes were controlled by an inducible promoter and controlled by 30 nM estradiol. The stability of the engineered genes was separately regulated by the expression of a site-specific recombinase. The combined frequency of generating viable derivatives when both systems were active was below detection (<10−10), consistent with their orthogonal nature and the individual escape frequencies of <10−6. Evaluation of escaper mutants suggests strategies for reducing their emergence. Transcript profiling and growth test suggest high fitness of safeguarded strains, an important characteristic for wide acceptance. PMID:25624482

  7. Structure, Gene Flow, and Recombination among Geographic Populations of a Russula virescens Ally from Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zefen; Mi, Fei; Liu, Chunli; Tang, Xiaozhao; Long, Yunxian; He, Xiaoxia; Wang, Pengfei; Xu, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms that are morphologically indistinguishable from Russula virescens (Schaeff.) Fr. are among the most popular wild edible mushrooms in Yunnan province, southwestern China. However, almost nothing is known about their biology. This study investigated the diversity and population genetics of a R. virescens ally from Yunnan. A total of 210 samples were collected from 13 geographical locations throughout the main distribution range in Yunnan. The patterns of genetic variation within and among these geographic populations were analyzed using sequences from three nuclear and two mitochondrial DNA fragments. Analysis of the ITS sequences revealed that samples from Yunnan showed 3–6% sequence difference from R. virescens samples from North America and Europe and formed a distinct clade. Our multilocus population genetic analyses suggested frequent gene flow among geographic populations of the R. virescens ally in Yunnan. Interestingly, the nuclear and mitochondrial genes exhibited different levels of gene flow and recombination. We discuss the implications of our results for understanding speciation, reproduction and conservation of this important biological resource. PMID:24069176

  8. Senataxin plays an essential role with DNA damage response proteins in meiotic recombination and gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Becherel, Olivier J; Yeo, Abrey J; Stellati, Alissa; Heng, Evelyn Y H; Luff, John; Suraweera, Amila M; Woods, Rick; Fleming, Jean; Carrie, Dianne; McKinney, Kristine; Xu, Xiaoling; Deng, Chuxia; Lavin, Martin F

    2013-04-01

    Senataxin, mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2), plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity by coordination of transcription, DNA replication, and the DNA damage response. We demonstrate that senataxin is essential for spermatogenesis and that it functions at two stages in meiosis during crossing-over in homologous recombination and in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Disruption of the Setx gene caused persistence of DNA double-strand breaks, a defect in disassembly of Rad51 filaments, accumulation of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops), and ultimately a failure of crossing-over. Senataxin localised to the XY body in a Brca1-dependent manner, and in its absence there was incomplete localisation of DNA damage response proteins to the XY chromosomes and ATR was retained on the axial elements of these chromosomes, failing to diffuse out into chromatin. Furthermore persistence of RNA polymerase II activity, altered ubH2A distribution, and abnormal XY-linked gene expression in Setx⁻/⁻ revealed an essential role for senataxin in MSCI. These data support key roles for senataxin in coordinating meiotic crossing-over with transcription and in gene silencing to protect the integrity of the genome.

  9. Expression of a foreign gene by recombinant canine distemper virus recovered from cloned DNAs.

    PubMed

    Parks, Christopher L; Wang, Hai-Ping; Kovacs, Gerald R; Vasilakis, Nikos; Kowalski, Jacek; Nowak, Rebecca M; Lerch, Robert A; Walpita, Pramila; Sidhu, Mohinderjit S; Udem, Stephen A

    2002-02-26

    A canine distemper virus (CDV) genomic cDNA clone and expression plasmids required to establish a CDV rescue system were generated from a laboratory-adapted strain of the Onderstepoort vaccine virus. In addition, a CDV minireplicon was prepared and used in transient expression studies performed to identify optimal virus rescue conditions. Results from the transient expression experiments indicated that minireplicon-encoded reporter gene activity was increased when transfected cell cultures were maintained at 32 rather than 37 degrees C, and when the cellular stress response was induced by heat shock. Applying these findings to rescue of recombinant CDV (rCDV) resulted in efficient recovery of virus after transfected HEp2 or A549 cells were co-cultured with Vero cell monolayers. Nucleotide sequence determination and analysis of restriction site polymorphisms confirmed that rescued virus was rCDV. A rCDV strain also was engineered that contained the luciferase gene inserted between the P and M genes; this virus directed high levels of luciferase expression in infected cells.

  10. Genetic engineering and heterologous expression of the disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster via Red/ET recombineering

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qiang; Herrmann, Jennifer; Hu, Shengbiao; Raju, Ritesh; Bian, Xiaoying; Zhang, Youming; Müller, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Disorazol, a macrocyclic polykitide produced by the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce12 and it is reported to have potential cytotoxic activity towards several cancer cell lines, including multi-drug resistant cells. The disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster (dis) from Sorangium cellulosum (So ce12) was identified by transposon mutagenesis and cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The 58-kb dis core gene cluster was reconstituted from BACs via Red/ET recombineering and expressed in Myxococcus xanthus DK1622. For the first time ever, a myxobacterial trans-AT polyketide synthase has been expressed heterologously in this study. Expression in M. xanthus allowed us to optimize the yield of several biosynthetic products using promoter engineering. The insertion of an artificial synthetic promoter upstream of the disD gene encoding a discrete acyl transferase (AT), together with an oxidoreductase (Or), resulted in 7-fold increase in disorazol production. The successful reconstitution and expression of the genetic sequences encoding for these promising cytotoxic compounds will allow combinatorial biosynthesis to generate novel disorazol derivatives for further bioactivity evaluation. PMID:26875499

  11. Intrinsic biocontainment: multiplex genome safeguards combine transcriptional and recombinational control of essential yeast genes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yizhi; Agmon, Neta; Choi, Woo Jin; Ubide, Alba; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Caravelli, Katrina; Hao, Haiping; Bader, Joel S; Boeke, Jef D

    2015-02-10

    Biocontainment may be required in a wide variety of situations such as work with pathogens, field release applications of engineered organisms, and protection of intellectual properties. Here, we describe the control of growth of the brewer's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using both transcriptional and recombinational "safeguard" control of essential gene function. Practical biocontainment strategies dependent on the presence of small molecules require them to be active at very low concentrations, rendering them inexpensive and difficult to detect. Histone genes were controlled by an inducible promoter and controlled by 30 nM estradiol. The stability of the engineered genes was separately regulated by the expression of a site-specific recombinase. The combined frequency of generating viable derivatives when both systems were active was below detection (<10(-10)), consistent with their orthogonal nature and the individual escape frequencies of <10(-6). Evaluation of escaper mutants suggests strategies for reducing their emergence. Transcript profiling and growth test suggest high fitness of safeguarded strains, an important characteristic for wide acceptance.

  12. Paclitaxel is necessary for improved survival in epithelial ovarian cancers with homologous recombination gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Stephanie; Li, Jiaqi; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Wubbenhorst, Bradley; Maxwell, Kara N.; Fishbein, Lauren; McLane, Michael W.; Benedetto, Chiara; Canuto, Emilie Marion; Mitra, Nandita; Zhang, Lin; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Tanyi, Janos L.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the impact of somatic mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes on the chemotherapeutic response and survival of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We performed targeted massively parallel sequencing of tumor DNA from 158 patients with EOC. We associated adjuvant chemotherapy and clinical outcome with mutations in selected genes, focusing on those encoding HR proteins. RESULTS HR mutations were found in 47 (30%) tumors. We did not detect an overall survival (OS) difference in advanced stage patients whose tumors had HR mutations compared to those without (median OS of 49.6 months (95% CI 29.9-57.7) vs. 43.3 months (95% CI 31.9-75.47), p = 0.87). However, when stratified by chemotherapy regimen, patients whose tumors had TP53 and HR mutations demonstrated a marked survival advantage when treated with platinum and paclitaxel vs. platinum +/− cyclophosphamide (median OS of 90 months (95% CI 50-NA) vs. 29.5 months (95% CI 17.7-50.5), p = 0.0005). CONCLUSIONS Previous studies demonstrating a survival advantage for EOC patients with somatic HR mutations have been conducted with almost universal use of both platinum and paclitaxel. Our study is the first to our knowledge to compare cohorts with somatic HR gene mutations treated with and without paclitaxel containing platinum regimens. The survival benefit attributed to the platinum sensitivity of HR deficient ovarian cancers may depend upon the combined use of paclitaxel. PMID:27191893

  13. Extensive recombination events and horizontal gene transfer shaped the Legionella pneumophila genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen of environmental protozoa. When humans inhale contaminated aerosols this bacterium may cause a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease. Despite the abundance of dozens of Legionella species in aquatic reservoirs, the vast majority of human disease is caused by a single serogroup (Sg) of a single species, namely L. pneumophila Sg1. To get further insights into genome dynamics and evolution of Sg1 strains, we sequenced strains Lorraine and HL 0604 1035 (Sg1) and compared them to the available sequences of Sg1 strains Paris, Lens, Corby and Philadelphia, resulting in a comprehensive multigenome analysis. Results We show that L. pneumophila Sg1 has a highly conserved and syntenic core genome that comprises the many eukaryotic like proteins and a conserved repertoire of over 200 Dot/Icm type IV secreted substrates. However, recombination events and horizontal gene transfer are frequent. In particular the analyses of the distribution of nucleotide polymorphisms suggests that large chromosomal fragments of over 200 kbs are exchanged between L. pneumophila strains and contribute to the genome dynamics in the natural population. The many secretion systems present might be implicated in exchange of these fragments by conjugal transfer. Plasmids also play a role in genome diversification and are exchanged among strains and circulate between different Legionella species. Conclusion Horizontal gene transfer among bacteria and from eukaryotes to L. pneumophila as well as recombination between strains allows different clones to evolve into predominant disease clones and others to replace them subsequently within relatively short periods of time. PMID:22044686

  14. A complete approach for recombinant protein expression training: From gene cloning to assessment of protein functionality*.

    PubMed

    Novo, M Teresa Marques; Soares-Costa, Andrea; de Souza, Antonia Q L; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Molina, Gustavo C; Palacios, Carlos A; Kull, Claudia R; Monteiro, Izabel F; Baldan-Pineda, Paulo H; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2005-01-01

    A practical course was given to undergraduate biology students enrolled in the elective course "Introduction to Genetic Engineering" at the Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar), São Paulo, Brazil. The goal of the course was to teach current molecular biology tools applied to a real research situation that could be reported by the students themselves. The purpose was to produce a plant recombinant protein and demonstrate a heretofore unreported biological activity. Cystatins, natural inhibitors of cysteine proteases, were proposed for these studies. Initially, the students searched for plant cystatin cDNA sequences in the NCBI databases and selected the Oryzacystatin I gene (ocI) from rice, Oriza sativa, as the target gene for this study. Total RNA was extracted from rice-germinating seeds and primers containing restriction sites for NdeI and EcoRI were designed based on the ocI cDNA sequence and then used to amplify the open reading frame (ORF). RT-PCR amplification provided a band of the expected size for ocI ORF (309 bp). The PCR product was cut with NdeI and EcoRI restriction enzymes and cloned directly in the pET28a expression vector digested with the same enzymes. A pET28-ocI recombinant clone was selected, checked by sequencing, and used to transform Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) expression strain. After induction of the bacteria with isopropylthiogalactoside and cellular disruption, the His-tagged OCI protein, present mainly in the soluble fraction, was purified by affinity chromatography in a nickel column. The purified protein was successfully used to inhibit fungal growth (Trichoderma reesei). The results were discussed extensively and the students contributed to the writing of this article, of which they are co-authors.

  15. Withania coagulans tryptophan decarboxylase gene cloning, heterologous expression, and catalytic characteristics of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Jadaun, Jyoti Singh; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Narnoliya, Lokesh Kumar; Tripathi, Sandhya; Sangwan, Rajender Singh

    2017-01-01

    Tryptophan decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.28) catalyzes pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent decarboxylation of tryptophan to produce tryptamine for recruitment in a myriad of biosynthetic pathways of metabolites possessing indolyl moiety. A recent report of certain indolyl metabolites in Withania species calls for a possible predominant functional role of tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) in the genome of Withania species to facilitate production of the indolyl progenitor molecule, tryptamine. Therefore, with this metabolic prospection, we have identified and cloned a full-length cDNA sequence of TDC from aerial tissues of Withania coagulans. The functional WcTDC gene comprises of 1506 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 502 amino acid protein with calculated molecular mass and pI value of 56.38 kDa and 8.35, respectively. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was affinity-purified to homogeneity to discern its kinetics of catalysis. The enzyme (WcTDC) exhibited much higher Km value for tryptophan than for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and was dedicated to catalyze decarboxylation of only tryptophan or, to a limited extent, of its analogue (like 5-hydroxy tryptophan). The observed optimal catalytic functionality of the enzyme on the slightly basic side of the pH scale and at slightly higher temperatures reflected adaptability of the plant to hot and arid regions, the predominant natural habitat of the herb. This pertains to be the first report on cloning and characterization of heterologously expressed recombinant enzyme from W. coagulans and forms a starting point to further understanding of withanamide biosynthesis.

  16. Recombinant Human Adenovirus: Targeting to the Human Transferrin Receptor Improves Gene Transfer to Brain Microcapillary Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Haibin; Anderson, Brian; Mao, Qinwen; Davidson, Beverly L.

    2000-01-01

    Some inborn errors of metabolism due to deficiencies of soluble lysosomal enzymes cause global neurodegenerative disease. Representative examples include the infantile and late infantile forms of the ceroid lipofuscinoses (CLN1 or CLN2 deficiency, respectively) and mucopolysaccharidoses type VII (MPS VII), a deficiency of β-glucuronidase. Treatment of the central nervous system component of these disorders will require widespread protein or enzyme replacement, either through dissemination of the protein or through dissemination of a gene encoding it. We hypothesize that transduction of brain microcapillary endothelium (BME) with recombinant viral vectors, with secretion of enzyme product basolaterally, could allow for widespread enzyme dissemination. To achieve this, viruses should be modified to target the BME. This requires (i) identification of a BME-resident target receptor, (ii) identification of motifs targeted to that molecule, (iii) the construction of modified viruses to allow for binding to the target receptor, and (iv) demonstrated transduction of receptor-expressing cells. In proof of principal experiments, we chose the human transferrin receptor (hTfR), a molecule found at high density on human BME. A nonamer phage display library was panned for motifs which could bind hTfR. Forty-three clones were sequenced, most of which contained an AKxxK/R, KxKxPK/R, or KxK motif. Ten peptides representative of the three motifs were cloned into the HI loop of adenovirus type 5 fiber. All motifs tested retained their ability to trimerize and bind transferrin receptor, and seven allowed for recombinant adenovirus production. Importantly, the fiber-modified viruses facilitated increased gene transfer (2- to 34-fold) to hTfR expressing cell lines and human brain microcapillary endothelia expressing high levels of endogenous receptor. Our data indicate that adenoviruses can be modified in the HI loop for expanded tropism to the hTfR. PMID:11070036

  17. Production of lentiviral vectors by transient expression of minimal packaging genes from recombinant adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Kuate, Seraphin; Stefanou, Daniela; Hoffmann, Dennis; Wildner, Oliver; Uberla, Klaus

    2004-11-01

    The potential of lentiviral vectors for clinical gene therapy has not yet been evaluated. One of the reasons is the cytotoxicity of lentiviral packaging genes which makes the generation of stable producer cell lines difficult. Therefore, a novel packaging system for lentiviral vectors based on transient expression of packaging genes by recombinant adenoviruses was developed. Adenoviral vectors expressing VSV-G, codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol, and codon-optimized SIV gag-pol under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter (adenoviral lenti-pack vectors) were constructed and the production levels of this vector system were evaluated. The generated adenoviral lenti-pack vectors could be grown to high titers when transgene expression was suppressed and no evidence for instabilities was obtained. Cells stably transfected with a SIV-based vector construct were converted into lentiviral vector producer cells by infection with the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors. Lentiviral vector titers obtained were as high as vector titers obtained by transient cotransfection experiments. A protocol was developed that allowed preparation of lentiviral vector stocks with undetectable levels of contaminating adenoviral lenti-pack vectors. The adenoviral lenti-pack vectors described should provide a convenient alternative approach to inducible packaging cell lines for large-scale lentiviral vector production. Transient expression of cytotoxic lentiviral packaging genes by the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors circumvents loss of titers during prolonged culture of packaging cell lines. The design of the adenoviral lenti-pack vectors should reduce the risk of transfer of packaging genes to target cells and at the same time provide flexibility with respect to the lentiviral vector constructs that can be packaged.

  18. Genetic variations in the homologous recombination repair pathway genes modify risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haishi; Liu, Yanhong; Zhou, Keke; Zhou, Chengcheng; Zhou, Renke; Cheng, Chunxia; Wei, Qingyi; Lu, Daru; Zhou, Liangfu

    2016-01-01

    Accumulative epidemiological evidence suggests that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair pathway play an important role in glioma susceptibility. However, the effects of such SNPs on glioma risk remain unclear. We used a used a candidate pathway-based approach to elucidate the relationship between glioma risk and 12 putative functional SNPs in genes involved in the HR pathway. Genotyping was conducted on 771 histologically-confirmed glioma patients and 752 cancer-free controls from the Chinese Han population. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated both for each SNP individually and for grouped analyses, examining the effects of the numbers of adverse alleles on glioma risk, and evaluated their potential gene-gene interactions using the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR). In the single-locus analysis, two variants, the NBS1 rs1805794 (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.15-1.76, P = 0.001), and RAD54L rs1048771 (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.17-2.22, P = 0.002) were significantly associated with glioma risk. When we examined the joint effects of the risk-conferring alleles of these three SNPs, we found a significant trend indicating that the risk increases as the number of adverse alleles increase (P = 0.005). Moreover, the MDR analysis suggested a significant three-locus interaction model involving NBS1 rs1805794, MRE11 rs10831234, and ATM rs227062. These results suggested that these variants of the genes involved in the HR pathway may contribute to glioma susceptibility.

  19. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Busch, Clara Jana-Lui; Vogt, Alexander; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-07-13

    Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymena and localizes to the macronucleus where it induces precise recombination at two loxP sequences in direct orientation in the Tetrahymena macronuclear chromosome. This Cre/loxP recombination can be used to remove a loxP-flanked drug-resistance marker from an N-terminal tagging construct after it is integrated into the macronucleus. The system established in this study allows us to express an N-terminal epitope tagged gene from its own endogenous promoter in Tetrahymena.

  20. Field safety assessment of recombination in transgenic grapevines expressing the coat protein gene of Grapevine fanleaf virus.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Emmanuelle; Komar, Véronique; Fuchs, Marc

    2004-04-01

    One of the major environmental safety issues over transgenic crops containing virus-derived genes relates to the outcome of recombination events between viral transgene transcripts and RNAs from indigenous virus populations. We addressed this issue by assessing the emergence of viable Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) recombinants in transgenic grapevines expressing the GFLV coat protein (CP) gene. Test plants consisted of nontransgenic scions grafted onto transgenic and nontransgenic rootstocks that were exposed over 3 years to nematode-mediated GFLV infection in two distinct vineyard sites. The CP gene of challenging GFLV isolates was amplified from scions by IC-RT-PCR, and characterized by RFLP and nucleotide sequencing using strain F13 as reference since it provided the CP transgene. Analysis of EcoRI and StyI RFLP banding patterns from 347 challenging GFLV isolates and sequence data from 85 variants revealed no characteristics similar to strain F13 and no difference in the molecular variability among isolates from 190 transgenic and 157 nontransgenic plants, or from plants within (253 individuals) or outside (94 individuals) of the two sites. Interestingly, five GFLV recombinants were identified in three nontransgenic plants located outside of the two field settings. This survey indicates that transgenic grapevines did not assist the emergence of viable GFLV recombinants to detectable levels nor did they affect the molecular diversity of indigenous GFLV populations during the trial period. This is the first report on safety assessment of recombination with a transgenic crop expressing a CP gene under field conditions of heavy disease pressure but low, if any, selection pressure against recombinant viruses.

  1. Fat grafting as a vehicle for the delivery of recombinant adenoassociated viral vectors to achieve gene modification of muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Katherine H; During, Matthew J; Muravlev, Alexander; Wang, Chuansong; Kocak, Ergun

    2013-06-01

    The combination of gene therapy and plastic surgery may have the potential to improve the specificity that is needed to achieve clinically applicable treatment regimens. Our goal was to develop a method for gene modification that would yield sustainable production of gene products but would be less time consuming than existing protocols. An adenoassociated virus was used to deliver gene products to pectoralis muscle flaps. Gene modification was accomplished via either direct injection or novel fat grafting techniques. The production of gene product was observable by both in vivo imaging and immunohistochemical staining. Gene products were not detected in tissues that were not in contact with the fat grafts that were incubated with the viral vector, indicating that the transduction stayed local to the flap. Using novel recombinant adenoassociated virus vectors, we have developed a method for gene delivery that is highly efficient and applicable to muscle flaps.

  2. An intramolecular recombination mechanism for the formation of the rRNA gene palindrome of Tetrahymena thermophila

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, D.K.; Yasuda, L.E.; Yao, Meng-Chao

    1995-12-01

    This report discusses the formation of rRNA gene palindrome in Tetrahymena thermophila and the involvement of intramolecular recombination. This, along with the authors` previous study, is the first to define a molecular pathway of palindrome formation. 48 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Alu-mediated nonallelic homologous and nonhomologous recombination in the BMPR2 gene in heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Masaharu; Aimi, Yuki; Yanagisawa, Ryoji; Ono, Masae; Oka, Akira; Fukuda, Keiichi; Yoshino, Hideaki; Satoh, Toru; Gamou, Shinobu

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to undertake thorough genetic analysis of the bone morphogenetic protein type 2 receptor (BMPR2) gene in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. We conducted a systematic analysis for larger gene rearrangements together with conventional mutation analysis in 152 pulmonary arterial hypertension patients including 43 patients diagnosed as having idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and 10 diagnosed as having familial pulmonary arterial hypertension. Analysis of the BMPR2 gene revealed each of the four kinds of nonsense and frameshift mutations, one missense mutation, one splice-site mutation, and two types of exonic deletion. For cases in which exons 1-3 were deleted, the 5' and 3' break points were located in the AluY repeat sequences in the 5' side of the adjacent NOP58 gene and in the AluY repeat sequences in intron 3, suggesting an AluY-mediated nonallelic homologous recombination as the mechanism responsible for the deletion. For the case in which exon 10 was deleted, nonhomologous recombination took place between the AluSx site in intron 9 and a unique sequence in intron 10. Exonic deletions of BMPR2 account for at least part of BMPR2 mutations associated with heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension in Japan, as previously reported in other populations. One of our cases was mediated via Alu-mediated nonallelic homologous recombination and another was mediated via nonhomologous recombination.

  4. Molecular mapping of four blast resistance genes using recombinant inbred lines of 93-11 and nipponbare

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Molecular mapping of new blast resistance genes is important for developing resistant rice cultivars using marker-assisted selection. In this study, 259 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) were developed from a cross between Nipponbare and 93-11, and were used to construct a 1165.8-cM linkage map with 1...

  5. Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor delta gene in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kanavaros, P; Farcet, J P; Gaulard, P; Haioun, C; Divine, M; Le Couedic, J P; Lefranc, M P; Reyes, F

    1991-01-01

    Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta-chain gene were studied in 37 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) and related to their clinical presentation and the expression of the alpha beta or gamma delta heterodimers as determined by immunostaining of frozen tissue samples. There were 22 cases of alpha beta, 5 cases of gamma delta, and 10 cases of silent TCR expressing neither the alpha beta nor gamma delta TCR. 5 different probes were used to examine the delta locus. The 22 cases of alpha beta PTCL displayed biallelic and monoallelic deletions; a monoallelic V delta 1 J delta 1 rearrangement was observed in 1 case and a monoallelic germ line configuration in 7 cases. The 5 cases of gamma delta PTCL displayed biallelic rearrangements: the productive rearrangements could be ascribed to V delta 1J delta 1 joining in 3 cases and VJ delta 1 joining in 2 cases according to the combined pattern of DNA hybridization with the appropriate probes and of cell reactivity with the TCR delta-1, delta TCS-1, and anti-V delta 2 monoclonal antibodies. In the VJ delta 1 joining, the rearranged V segments were located between V delta 1 and V delta 2. Interestingly, in the third group of 10 cases of silent PTCL, 5 cases were found to have a TCR gene configuration identical to that in the TCR alpha beta PTCL, as demonstrated by biallelic delta gene deletion. These 5 cases were CD3 positive. The 5 remaining cases showed a monoallelic delta gene rearrangement with a monoallelic germ line configuration in 4 and a monoallelic deletion in 1. Four of these cases were CD3 negative, which was consistent with an immature genotype the TCR commitent of which could not be ascertained. Finally, TCR gamma delta PTCL consisted of a distinct clinical morphological and molecular entity whereas TCR alpha beta and silent PTCL had a similar presentation. Images PMID:1991851

  6. Analysis of Two Lysozyme Genes and Antimicrobial Functions of Their Recombinant Proteins in Asian Seabass

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Gui Hong; Bai, Zhi Yi; Xia, Jun Hong; Liu, Feng; Liu, Peng; Yue, Gen Hua

    2013-01-01

    Lysozymes are important proteins of the innate immune system for the defense against bacterial infection. We cloned and analyzed chicken-type (c-type) and goose-type (g-type) lysozymes from Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer). The deduced amino acid sequence of the c-type lysozyme contained 144 residues and possessed typical structure residues, conserved catalytic residues (Glu50 and Asp67) and a “GSTDYGIFQINS” motif. The deduced g-type lysozyme contained 187 residues and possessed a goose egg white lysozyme (GEWL) domain containing three conserved catalytic residues (Glu71, Asp84, Asp95) essential for catalytic activity. Real time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that the two lysozyme genes were constitutively expressed in all the examined tissues. The c-type lysozyme was most abundant in liver, while the g-type lysozyme was predominantly expressed in intestine and weakly expressed in muscle. The c-type and g-type transcripts were up-regulated in the kidney, spleen and liver in response to a challenge with Vibrio harveyi. The up-regulation of the c-type lysozyme was much stronger than that of the g-type lysozyme in kidney and spleen. The recombinant proteins of the c-type and g-type lysozymes showed lytic activities against the bacterial pathogens Vibrio harveyi and Photobacterium damselae in a dosage-dependent manner. We identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the two lysozyme genes. There were significant associations of these polymorphisms with resistance to the big belly disease. These results suggest that the c- and g-type genes play an important role in resistance to bacterial pathogens in fish. The SNP markers in the two genes associated with the resistance to bacterial pathogens may facilitate the selection of Asian seabass resistant to bacterial diseases. PMID:24244553

  7. PCR-Independent Method of Transformation-Associated Recombination Reveals the Cosmomycin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in an Ocean Streptomycete.

    PubMed

    Larson, Charles B; Crüsemann, Max; Moore, Bradley S

    2017-04-28

    The transformation-associated recombination cloning methodology facilitates the genomic capture and heterologous expression of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). We have streamlined this procedure by introduction of synthetic DNA gene blocks for the efficient capture of BGCs. We show the successful capture and expression of the aromatic polyketide antitumor agent cosmomycin from streptomycete bacteria and the discovery of new cosmomycin analogues by mass spectral molecular networking.

  8. Initiation of V(D)J Recombination by Dβ-Associated Recombination Signal Sequences: A Critical Control Point in TCRβ Gene Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Don-Marc; Benoukraf, Touati; Jaeger, Sébastien; Ferrier, Pierre; Payet-Bornet, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) β gene assembly by V(D)J recombination proceeds via successive Dβ-to-Jβ and Vβ-to-DJβ rearrangements. This two-step process is enforced by a constraint, termed beyond (B)12/23, which prohibits direct Vβ-to-Jβ rearrangements. However the B12/23 restriction does not explain the order of TCRβ assembly for which the regulation remains an unresolved issue. The initiation of V(D)J recombination consists of the introduction of single-strand DNA nicks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) containing a 12 base-pairs spacer. An RSS containing a 23 base-pairs spacer is then captured to form a 12/23 RSSs synapse leading to coupled DNA cleavage. Herein, we probed RSS nicks at the TCRβ locus and found that nicks were only detectable at Dβ-associated RSSs. This pattern implies that Dβ 12RSS and, unexpectedly, Dβ 23RSS initiate V(D)J recombination and capture their respective Vβ or Jβ RSS partner. Using both in vitro and in vivo assays, we further demonstrate that the Dβ1 23RSS impedes cleavage at the adjacent Dβ1 12RSS and consequently Vβ-to-Dβ1 rearrangement first requires the Dβ1 23RSS excision. Altogether, our results provide the molecular explanation to the B12/23 constraint and also uncover a ‘Dβ1 23RSS-mediated’ restriction operating beyond chromatin accessibility, which directs Dβ1 ordered rearrangements. PMID:19238214

  9. In vitro dynamics of HIV-1 BF intersubtype recombinants genomic regions involved in the regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Carobene, Mauricio G; Rodrígues, Christian Rodríguez; De Candia, Cristian A; Turk, Gabriela; Salomón, Horacio

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 intersubtype recombination is a very common phenomenon that has been shown to frequently affect different viral genomic regions. Vpr and Tat are viral proteins known to interact with viral promoter (LTR) during the replication cycle. This interaction is mainly involved in the regulation of viral gene expression, so, any structural changes in the LTR and/or these regulatory proteins may have an important impact on viral replication and spread. It has been reported that these genetic structures underwent recombination in BF variants widely spread in South America. To gain more insight of the consequences of the BF intersubtype recombination phenomenon on these different but functionally related genomic regions we designed and performed and in vitro study that allowed the detection and recovery of intersubtype recombinants sequences and its subsequent analysis. Our results indicate that recombination affects differentially these regions, showing evidence of a time-space relationship between the changes observed in the viral promoter and the ones observed in the Vpr/Tat coding region. This supports the idea of intersubtype recombination as a mechanism that promotes biological adaptation and compensates fitness variations. PMID:19607724

  10. Overexpression of Recombinant Human Teriparatide, rhPTH (1–34) in Escherichia coli : An Innovative Gene Fusion Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Nahid; Amini Bayat, Zahra; Sagharidouz, Sepideh; Vaez, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Parathyroid hormone is an 84-amino acid peptide secreted by the parathyroid glands. Its physiological role is maintenance of normal serum calcium level and bone remodeling. Biological activity of this hormone is related to N-terminal 1–34 amino acids. The recombinant form of hormone (1–34) has been approved for treatment of osteoporosis from 2002. In this study, a novel fusion partner has been developed for preparation of high yield recombinant 1–34 amino acids of hPTH. Methods: Novel nucleotide cassette designed encoding a chimeric fusion protein comprising of a fusion partner consisting of a His-tag in N-terminal, 53 amino acids belong to Escherichia coli (E. coli) β-galactosidase (LacZ) gene, a linker sequence for increasing of expression and protection of target peptide structure from fusion tag effect, an Enteropeptidase cleavage site, rhPTH (1–34) gene fragment. Optimized fusion gene was synthesized and ligated into pET-28a vector under control of T7 promoter, and then transformed in E. coli (DH5α) cells. Positive clones containing this gene were double digested with NcoI and-BamHI and also approved by sequencing. Gene overexpression was observed in SDS-PAGE after induction with 0.2 mM IPTG. Confirmation of gene expression was performed by western blotting using anti-His-tag antibody conjugated with peroxidase. Results: By this fusion gene design approach, we achieved a high level expression of the rhPTH, where it represented at least 43.7% of the total protein as determined by SDS-PAGE and confirmed by western blotting. Conclusion: In addition to high level expression of the designed gene in this work, specific amino acid sequence of bacterial β-galactosidase was selected as major part of carrier tag for protection of this hormone as important step of recombinant rhPTH with relevant isoelectronic point (pI). This innovation resulted in recombinant production of hPTH very well and the gene construct could be applied as a pattern for

  11. Genealogy-Based Methods for Inference of Historical Recombination and Gene Flow and Their Application in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Paul A.; Song, Yun S.; Brem, Rachel B.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic exchange between isolated populations, or introgression between species, serves as a key source of novel genetic material on which natural selection can act. While detecting historical gene flow from DNA sequence data is of much interest, many existing methods can be limited by requirements for deep population genomic sampling. In this paper, we develop a scalable genealogy-based method to detect candidate signatures of gene flow into a given population when the source of the alleles is unknown. Our method does not require sequenced samples from the source population, provided that the alleles have not reached fixation in the sampled recipient population. The method utilizes recent advances in algorithms for the efficient reconstruction of ancestral recombination graphs, which encode genealogical histories of DNA sequence data at each site, and is capable of detecting the signatures of gene flow whose footprints are of length up to single genes. Further, we employ a theoretical framework based on coalescent theory to test for statistical significance of certain recombination patterns consistent with gene flow from divergent sources. Implementing these methods for application to whole-genome sequences of environmental yeast isolates, we illustrate the power of our approach to highlight loci with unusual recombination histories. By developing innovative theory and methods to analyze signatures of gene flow from population sequence data, our work establishes a foundation for the continued study of introgression and its evolutionary relevance. PMID:23226196

  12. Genealogy-based methods for inference of historical recombination and gene flow and their application in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Paul A; Song, Yun S; Brem, Rachel B

    2012-01-01

    Genetic exchange between isolated populations, or introgression between species, serves as a key source of novel genetic material on which natural selection can act. While detecting historical gene flow from DNA sequence data is of much interest, many existing methods can be limited by requirements for deep population genomic sampling. In this paper, we develop a scalable genealogy-based method to detect candidate signatures of gene flow into a given population when the source of the alleles is unknown. Our method does not require sequenced samples from the source population, provided that the alleles have not reached fixation in the sampled recipient population. The method utilizes recent advances in algorithms for the efficient reconstruction of ancestral recombination graphs, which encode genealogical histories of DNA sequence data at each site, and is capable of detecting the signatures of gene flow whose footprints are of length up to single genes. Further, we employ a theoretical framework based on coalescent theory to test for statistical significance of certain recombination patterns consistent with gene flow from divergent sources. Implementing these methods for application to whole-genome sequences of environmental yeast isolates, we illustrate the power of our approach to highlight loci with unusual recombination histories. By developing innovative theory and methods to analyze signatures of gene flow from population sequence data, our work establishes a foundation for the continued study of introgression and its evolutionary relevance.

  13. MHC-restricted antigen presentation and recognition: constraints on gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines in humans.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Neto, E

    1999-02-01

    The target of any immunization is to activate and expand lymphocyte clones with the desired recognition specificity and the necessary effector functions. In gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines, the immunogen is a single protein or a small assembly of epitopes from antigenic proteins. Since most immune responses against protein and peptide antigens are T-cell dependent, the molecular target of such vaccines is to generate at least 50-100 complexes between MHC molecule and the antigenic peptide per antigen-presenting cell, sensitizing a T cell population of appropriate clonal size and effector characteristics. Thus, the immunobiology of antigen recognition by T cells must be taken into account when designing new generation peptide- or gene-based vaccines. Since T cell recognition is MHC-restricted, and given the wide polymorphism of the different MHC molecules, distinct epitopes may be recognized by different individuals in the population. Therefore, the issue of whether immunization will be effective in inducing a protective immune response, covering the entire target population, becomes an important question. Many pathogens have evolved molecular mechanisms to escape recognition by the immune system by variation of antigenic protein sequences. In this short review, we will discuss the several concepts related to selection of amino acid sequences to be included in DNA and peptide vaccines.

  14. Protection and synergism by recombinant fowl pox vaccines expressing multiple genes from Marek's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lucy E; Witter, R L; Reddy, S M; Wu, P; Yanagida, N; Yoshida, S

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant fowl poxviruses (rFPVs) were constructed to express genes from serotype 1 Marek's disease virus (MDV) coding for glycoproteins B, E, I, H, and UL32 (gB1, gE, gI, gH, and UL32). An additional rFPV was constructed to contain four MDV genes (gB1, gE, gI, and UL32). These rFPVs were evaluated for their ability to protect maternal antibody-positive chickens against challenge with highly virulent MDV isolates. The protection induced by a single rFPV/gB1 (42%) confirmed our previous finding. The protection induced by rFPV/gI (43%), rFPV/gB1UL32 (46%), rFPV/gB1gEgI (72%), and rFPV/gB1gEgIUL32 (70%) contributed to additional knowledge on MDV genes involved in protective immunity. In contrast, the rFPV containing gE, gH, or UL32 did not induce significant protection compared with turkey herpesvirus (HVT). Levels of protection by rFPV/gB1 and rFPV/gl were comparable with that of HVT. Only gB1 and gI conferred synergism in rFPV containing these two genes. Protection by both rFPV/gB1gEgI (72%) and rFPV/gB1gEgIUL32(70%) against Marek's disease was significantly enhanced compared with a single gB1 or gI gene (40%). This protective synergism between gB1 and gI in rFPVs may be the basis for better protection when bivalent vaccines between serotypes 2 and 3 were used. When rFPV/gB1gIgEUL32 + HVT were used as vaccine against Md5 challenge, the protection was significantly enhanced (94%). This synergism between rFPV/gB1gIgEUL32 and HVT indicates additional genes yet to be discovered in HVT may be responsible for the enhancement.

  15. A Bat-Derived Putative Cross-Family Recombinant Coronavirus with a Reovirus Gene

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Ji, Wei; Jia, Hao; Zhou, Yongming; Wen, Honghua; Zhao, Honglan; Liu, Huaxing; Li, Hong; Wang, Qihui; Wu, Ying; Wang, Liang; Liu, Di; Liu, Guang; Yu, Hongjie; Holmes, Edward C.; Lu, Lin; Gao, George F.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2002 and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012 has generated enormous interest in the biodiversity, genomics and cross-species transmission potential of coronaviruses, especially those from bats, the second most speciose order of mammals. Herein, we identified a novel coronavirus, provisionally designated Rousettus bat coronavirus GCCDC1 (Ro-BatCoV GCCDC1), in the rectal swab samples of Rousettus leschenaulti bats by using pan-coronavirus RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing. Although the virus is similar to Rousettus bat coronavirus HKU9 (Ro-BatCoV HKU9) in genome characteristics, it is sufficiently distinct to be classified as a new species according to the criteria defined by the International Committee of Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). More striking was that Ro-BatCoV GCCDC1 contained a unique gene integrated into the 3’-end of the genome that has no homologs in any known coronavirus, but which sequence and phylogeny analyses indicated most likely originated from the p10 gene of a bat orthoreovirus. Subgenomic mRNA and cellular-level observations demonstrated that the p10 gene is functional and induces the formation of cell syncytia. Therefore, here we report a putative heterologous inter-family recombination event between a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus and a double-stranded segmented RNA virus, providing insights into the fundamental mechanisms of viral evolution. PMID:27676249

  16. Knockout targeting of the Drosophila nap1 gene and examination of DNA repair tracts in the recombination products.

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Susanne; Barnickel, Thorsten; Marhold, Joachim; Lyko, Frank; Mechler, Bernard M; Lankenau, Dirk-Henner

    2003-01-01

    We used ends-in gene targeting to generate knockout mutations of the nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1) gene in Drosophila melanogaster. Three independent targeted null-knockout mutations were produced. No wild-type NAP1 protein could be detected in protein extracts. Homozygous Nap1(KO) knockout flies were either embryonic lethal or poorly viable adult escapers. Three additional targeted recombination products were viable. To gain insight into the underlying molecular processes we examined conversion tracts in the recombination products. In nearly all cases the I-SceI endonuclease site of the donor vector was replaced by the wild-type Nap1 sequence. This indicated exonuclease processing at the site of the double-strand break (DSB), followed by replicative repair at donor-target junctions. The targeting products are best interpreted either by the classical DSB repair model or by the break-induced recombination (BIR) model. Synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA), which is another important recombinational repair pathway in the germline, does not explain ends-in targeting products. We conclude that this example of gene targeting at the Nap1 locus provides added support for the efficiency of this method and its usefulness in targeting any arbitrary locus in the Drosophila genome. PMID:12618400

  17. The role of germline promoters and I exons in cytokine-induced gene-specific class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, Wesley A; Shi, Jian; Holden, Victoria; Fontaine, Clinton; Collins, John T

    2011-01-01

    Germline transcription precedes class switch recombination (CSR). The promoter regions and I exons of these germline transcripts include binding sites for activation- and cytokine-induced transcription factors, and the promoter regions/I exons are essential for CSR. Therefore, it is a strong hypothesis that the promoter/I exons regions are responsible for much of cytokine-regulated, gene-specific CSR. We tested this hypothesis by swapping the germline promoter and I exons for the murine γ1 and γ2a H chain genes in a transgene of the entire H chain C-region locus. We found that the promoter/I exon for γ1 germline transcripts can direct robust IL-4-induced recombination to the γ2a gene. In contrast, the promoter/I exon for the γ2a germline transcripts works poorly in the context of the γ1 H chain gene, resulting in expression of γ1 H chains that is <1% the wild-type level. Nevertheless, the small amount of recombination to the chimeric γ1 gene is induced by IFN-γ. These results suggest that cytokine regulation of CSR, but not the magnitude of CSR, is regulated by the promoter/I exons.

  18. Recombination event at the Friedreich`s ataxia (FRDA) locus in a large French-Canadian family positions the FRDA gene centromeric to the X11 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, A.; Mercier, J.; Poirier, J.

    1994-09-01

    The FRDA gene is closely linked to loci D9S15 (MCT112) and D9S5 (DR47/26P) on chromosome 9q in a region of reduced recombination. We studied three related Quebec families using 11 polymorphic markers spanning {approximately} 1.5 megabases on 9q. They are arranged 9qtel-9qcen as shown. All are multiallelic microsatellites, except for MCT/MspI, DR47 and 26P. We find that two obligate heterozygote siblings: No. 196 (mother of 5 affected children) and No. 179 (father of 1 affected son) gave different FRDA chromosomes to their affected offspring. Both chromosomes originate from their unaffected mother No. 197. A recombination took place so that she transmitted No. 179, on the 2-8-6-1-3-2-2-2-2-3-7 haplotype the mutant FRDA gene. It occurred after FD1/X11 and extends as far as FR5. Lack of informativity at the MLS1 and FR2 loci precludes the detection of a second, unlikely recombination event within the region. This rare recombination places the FRDA gene centromeric to the X11 gene.

  19. The Epstein-Barr virus EBNA-2 gene in oral hairy leukoplakia: strain variation, genetic recombination, and transcriptional expression.

    PubMed Central

    Walling, D M; Perkins, A G; Webster-Cyriaque, J; Resnick, L; Raab-Traub, N

    1994-01-01

    Oral hairy leukoplakia (HLP) lesions frequently contain defective Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomes with deletions in the EBNA-2 gene that abundantly replicate and persist within the lesion. To characterize these viral strains and recombinant variants, the EBNA-2 gene in EBV DNA from several different HLP biopsy specimens was analyzed. Amplification of EBNA-2 coding sequences by PCR demonstrated the presence in HLP of intact EBNA-2 genes as well as a variety of internally deleted variants of both EBNA-2A and EBNA-2B. Some of the deletion variants evolved within the HLP lesion from intact EBNA-2 genes, while other variants appeared to be transmissible strains that directly infected the lesion. Intrastrain recombination within the HLP lesion also generated variation within the EBNA-2 polyproline region. Cloning and sequencing of HLP cDNA demonstrated transcription from the internally deleted EBNA-2 open reading frame, indicating that these variant genes are expressed in HLP. Comparative analysis of the HLP EBNA-2 sequences confirmed previous findings of EBV coinfection with multiple types and strains. Sequence variation of these wild-type genes demonstrated that EBNA-2A sequences distinguish at least two separate strains and a variety of substrains of EBV type 1. Two of the HLP EBNA-2A sequences contained amino acid changes in a cytotoxic T-cell epitope within an otherwise highly conserved region of the gene. These data indicate that EBV coinfection, strain variation, and recombination within the EBNA-2 gene are common features of HLP and suggest that the expression of internally deleted EBNA-2 variants could contribute to EBV pathogenesis in permissive infection. Images PMID:7966582

  20. The BCL11A transcription factor directly activates RAG gene expression and V(D)J recombination.

    PubMed

    Lee, Baeck-seung; Dekker, Joseph D; Lee, Bum-kyu; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Sleckman, Barry P; Shaffer, Arthur L; Ippolito, Gregory C; Tucker, Philip W

    2013-05-01

    Recombination-activating gene 1 protein (RAG1) and RAG2 are critical enzymes for initiating variable-diversity-joining (VDJ) segment recombination, an essential process for antigen receptor expression and lymphocyte development. The transcription factor BCL11A is required for B cell development, but its molecular function(s) in B cell fate specification and commitment is unknown. We show here that the major B cell isoform, BCL11A-XL, binds the RAG1 promoter and Erag enhancer to activate RAG1 and RAG2 transcription in pre-B cells. We employed BCL11A overexpression with recombination substrates in a cultured pre-B cell line as well as Cre recombinase-mediated Bcl11a(lox/lox) deletion in explanted murine pre-B cells to demonstrate direct consequences of BCL11A/RAG modulation on V(D)J recombination. We conclude that BCL11A is a critical component of a transcriptional network that regulates B cell fate by controlling V(D)J recombination.

  1. FSHbeta gene mutation in a female with delayed puberty and hypogonadism: response to recombinant human FSH.

    PubMed

    Kottler, M L; Richard, N; Chabre, O; Alain, S; Young, J

    2009-01-01

    We report a woman with primary amenorrhoea and infertility associated with an isolated deficiency of pituitary FSH that does not respond to GnRH administration. Serum inhibin B was undetectable and antimullerian hormone (AMH) was within the normal range. Ultra sound examination revealed a small uterus and small ovaries with few small follicles. We identified an homozygous 1-bp (G) deletion at codon 79 in FSHbeta gene suggesting a complete loss of function. The patient underwent studies of ovarian responsiveness to recombinant human FSH according to the following protocol: 150UI/d for five days following by 75 UI/d for 10 days. Estradiol plasma level started to increase from day 5 associated to a sharp increase of inhibine B and a decrease of LH. During the same time, we observed an excessive development of multiple follicles resulting in an arrest of the treatment to avoid hyperstimulation. The present study confirm that follicles up to 5 mm in diameter had developed in the absence of FSH and that FSH is required for the growth of follicles beyond the two-layer granulose stage.

  2. DMP-1-mediated Ghr gene recombination compromises skeletal development and impairs skeletal response to intermittent PTH

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongbo; Kennedy, Oran D.; Cardoso, Luis; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Partridge, Nicola C.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Yakar, Shoshana

    2016-01-01

    Bone minerals are acquired during growth and are key determinants of adult skeletal health. During puberty, the serum levels of growth hormone (GH) and its downstream effector IGF-1 increase and play critical roles in bone acquisition. The goal of the current study was to determine how bone cells integrate signals from the GH/IGF-1 to enhance skeletal mineralization and strength during pubertal growth. Osteocytes, the most abundant bone cells, were shown to orchestrate bone modeling during growth. We used dentin matrix protein (Dmp)-1-mediated Ghr knockout (DMP-GHRKO) mice to address the role of the GH/IGF axis in osteocytes. We found that DMP-GHRKO did not affect linear growth but compromised overall bone accrual. DMP-GHRKO mice exhibited reduced serum inorganic phosphate and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and decreased bone formation indices and were associated with an impaired response to intermittent PTH treatment. Using an osteocyte-like cell line along with in vivo studies, we found that PTH sensitized the response of bone to GH by increasing Janus kinase-2 and IGF-1R protein levels. We concluded that endogenously secreted PTH and GHR signaling in bone are necessary to establish radial bone growth and optimize mineral acquisition during growth.—Liu, Z., Kennedy, O. D., Cardoso, L., Basta-Pljakic, J., Partridge, N. C., Schaffler, M. B., Rosen, C. J., Yakar, S. DMP-1-mediated Ghr gene recombination compromises skeletal development and impairs skeletal response to intermittent PTH. PMID:26481310

  3. Immunotherapy for Lewis lung carcinoma utilizing dendritic cells infected with CK19 gene recombinant adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Q.F.; ZHAO, X.N.; PENG, C.L.; HAO, Y.T.; ZHAO, Y.P.; JIANG, N.; XUE, H.; GUO, J.Z.; YUN, C.H.; CONG, B.; ZHAO, X.G.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) as 'professional' antigen-presenting cells (APCs) initiate and regulate immune responses to various antigens. DC-based vaccines have become a promising modality in cancer immunotherapy. Cytokeratin 19 (CK19) protein is expressed at high levels in lung cancer and many other tumor cells, suggesting CK19 as a potential tumor-specific target for cancer immune therapy. We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CK19 gene (rAd-CK19). DCs transfected with rAd-CK19 were used to vaccinate C57BL/6 mice bearing xenografts derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. The transfected DCs gave rise to potent CK19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) capable of lysing LLC cells. Mice immunized with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited significantly attenuated tumor growth (including tumor volume and weight) when compared to the tumor growth of mice immunized with rAd-c DCs or DCs during the 24-day observation period (P<0.05). The results revealed that the mice vaccinated with the rAd-CK19-DCs exhibited a potent protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity to LLC cells in the subcutaneous model along with an inhibitive effect on tumor growth compared to the mice vaccinated with the rAd-c DCs or DCs alone. The present study proposes a meaningful mode of action utilizing rAd-CK19 DCs in lung cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26323510

  4. [Melanin properties studies of the recombinant of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes containing tyrosinase gene].

    PubMed

    Cai, X

    2001-12-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes is a notably killing maggots bacterium, which was isolated from natural dead maggots. Tyrosinase gene of P. maltophilia AT18 has been introduced into P. pseudoalcaligenes, and enabled it the ability of producing melanin steadily. Antiradiation effect of the melanin is quite strong. The melanin of the recombinant is nonfixiform material. It's solubility is very little in many sorts of organic or inorganic solvent. It's solubility is big in alkaline solution, but little in neutral or weak acid solution. It is deposited when pH < 4. It is oxidized by H2O2 or NaC10. It is also reduced by Ag+ or H2S. It has free radical and it can absorbs free radical generated by ultra-violent ray. It can absorbs ray of all sorts of wave length. The absorption rate of ultra-violet ray is the biggest in all sorts of wave length. It can effectively protects protein, DNA and other biomacromolecule matter against the damages by ultra-violet ray.

  5. Targeting gene expression to cones with human cone opsin promoters in recombinant AAV.

    PubMed

    Komáromy, A M; Alexander, J J; Cooper, A E; Chiodo, V A; Glushakova, L G; Acland, G M; Hauswirth, W W; Aguirre, G D

    2008-07-01

    Specific cone-directed therapy is of high priority in the treatment of human hereditary retinal diseases. However, not much information exists about the specific targeting of photoreceptor subclasses. Three versions of the human red cone opsin promoter (PR0.5, 3LCR-PR0.5 and PR2.1), and the human blue cone opsin promoter HB569, were evaluated for their specificity and robustness in targeting green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene expression to subclasses of cones in the canine retina when used in recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors of serotype 5. The vectors were administered by subretinal injection. The promoter PR2.1 led to most effective and specific expression of GFP in the long- and medium-wavelength-absorbing cones (L/M cones) of normal and diseased retinas. The PR0.5 promoter was not effective. Adding three copies of the 35-bp LCR in front of PR0.5 lead to weak GFP expression in L/M cones. The HB569 promoter was not specific, and GFP was expressed in a few L/M cones, some rods and the retinal pigment epithelium. These results suggest that L/M cones, the predominant class of cone photoreceptors in the retinas of dogs and most mammalian species can be successfully targeted using the human red cone opsin promoter.

  6. Precision control of recombinant gene transcription for CHO cell synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam J; James, David C

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of mammalian cell factories for biopharmaceutical production will be genetically engineered to possess both generic and product-specific manufacturing capabilities that may not exist naturally. Introduction of entirely new combinations of synthetic functions (e.g. novel metabolic or stress-response pathways), and retro-engineering of existing functional cell modules will drive disruptive change in cellular manufacturing performance. However, before we can apply the core concepts underpinning synthetic biology (design, build, test) to CHO cell engineering we must first develop practical and robust enabling technologies. Fundamentally, we will require the ability to precisely control the relative stoichiometry of numerous functional components we simultaneously introduce into the host cell factory. In this review we discuss how this can be achieved by design of engineered promoters that enable concerted control of recombinant gene transcription. We describe the specific mechanisms of transcriptional regulation that affect promoter function during bioproduction processes, and detail the highly-specific promoter design criteria that are required in the context of CHO cell engineering. The relative applicability of diverse promoter development strategies are discussed, including re-engineering of natural sequences, design of synthetic transcription factor-based systems, and construction of synthetic promoters. This review highlights the potential of promoter engineering to achieve precision transcriptional control for CHO cell synthetic biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Tissue-engineered human bioartificial muscles expressing a foreign recombinant protein for gene therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Forman, D. E.; Hennessey, J.; Sullivan, K.; Zielinski, B. A.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1999-01-01

    Murine skeletal muscle cells transduced with foreign genes and tissue engineered in vitro into bioartificial muscles (BAMs) are capable of long-term delivery of soluble growth factors when implanted into syngeneic mice (Vandenburgh et al., 1996b). With the goal of developing a therapeutic cell-based protein delivery system for humans, similar genetic tissue-engineering techniques were designed for human skeletal muscle stem cells. Stem cell myoblasts were isolated, cloned, and expanded in vitro from biopsied healthy adult (mean age, 42 +/- 2 years), and elderly congestive heart failure patient (mean age, 76 +/- 1 years) skeletal muscle. Total cell yield varied widely between biopsies (50 to 672 per 100 mg of tissue, N = 10), but was not significantly different between the two patient groups. Percent myoblasts per biopsy (73 +/- 6%), number of myoblast doublings prior to senescence in vitro (37 +/- 2), and myoblast doubling time (27 +/- 1 hr) were also not significantly different between the two patient groups. Fusion kinetics of the myoblasts were similar for the two groups after 20-22 doublings (74 +/- 2% myoblast fusion) when the biopsy samples had been expanded to 1 to 2 billion muscle cells, a number acceptable for human gene therapy use. The myoblasts from the two groups could be equally transduced ex vivo with replication-deficient retroviral expression vectors to secrete 0.5 to 2 microg of a foreign protein (recombinant human growth hormone, rhGH)/10(6) cells/day, and tissue engineered into human BAMs containing parallel arrays of differentiated, postmitotic myofibers. This work suggests that autologous human skeletal myoblasts from a potential patient population can be isolated, genetically modified to secrete foreign proteins, and tissue engineered into implantable living protein secretory devices for therapeutic use.

  8. Correlation between gene expression and mutator phenotype predicts homologous recombination deficiency and outcome in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianping; Wu, Di; Li, Chuanxing; Zhou, Meng; Hao, Dapeng

    2014-11-01

    New strategies are needed to predict response to platinum-based chemotherapy and outcome of ovarian cancers. We hypothesized that the mutator phenotype in the cancer genome represents the overuse of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which might be a sign of homologous recombination (HR) deficiency and can be captured by gene expression. Multidimensional data of ovarian cancer patients and breast cancer patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database were used for the development and validation of a potential clinical information-independent score that correlates with HR deficiency and predicts outcome. Correlation of the score with platinum response, outcome, and BRCA mutations was assessed. The score correlated with increased genomic mutation rate in both ovarian cancer and breast cancer cases that harbored a substantial subset of HR-deficient samples. Significantly improved outcomes were observed in the high-scoring group versus the low-scoring group in the TCGA dataset and in three large gene expression microarray datasets. A strong correlation was found between the score and the likelihood of achieving complete response to chemotherapy. The score was also found to be highly robust to noises in genomic mutations. Sixty-four patients harboring BRCA mutations were successfully divided into two groups based on scores, with the high-scoring group showing significantly improved outcomes compared with wild-type cases and the low-scoring group showing no significance in all the same analyses. The score was significantly correlated with the response to platinum therapy and outcome. Evaluation of the score as a prognostic tool in ovarian cancer patients is warranted. We develop a diagnostic signature for the HR-deficiency based on a novel hypothesis. HR-deficiency score is significantly correlated to platinum therapy and outcomes. HRDS was validated by its association with OS, PFS, DFS and CR in validation datasets. Evaluation of the score as a prognostic tool in

  9. Tissue-engineered human bioartificial muscles expressing a foreign recombinant protein for gene therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Forman, D. E.; Hennessey, J.; Sullivan, K.; Zielinski, B. A.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1999-01-01

    Murine skeletal muscle cells transduced with foreign genes and tissue engineered in vitro into bioartificial muscles (BAMs) are capable of long-term delivery of soluble growth factors when implanted into syngeneic mice (Vandenburgh et al., 1996b). With the goal of developing a therapeutic cell-based protein delivery system for humans, similar genetic tissue-engineering techniques were designed for human skeletal muscle stem cells. Stem cell myoblasts were isolated, cloned, and expanded in vitro from biopsied healthy adult (mean age, 42 +/- 2 years), and elderly congestive heart failure patient (mean age, 76 +/- 1 years) skeletal muscle. Total cell yield varied widely between biopsies (50 to 672 per 100 mg of tissue, N = 10), but was not significantly different between the two patient groups. Percent myoblasts per biopsy (73 +/- 6%), number of myoblast doublings prior to senescence in vitro (37 +/- 2), and myoblast doubling time (27 +/- 1 hr) were also not significantly different between the two patient groups. Fusion kinetics of the myoblasts were similar for the two groups after 20-22 doublings (74 +/- 2% myoblast fusion) when the biopsy samples had been expanded to 1 to 2 billion muscle cells, a number acceptable for human gene therapy use. The myoblasts from the two groups could be equally transduced ex vivo with replication-deficient retroviral expression vectors to secrete 0.5 to 2 microg of a foreign protein (recombinant human growth hormone, rhGH)/10(6) cells/day, and tissue engineered into human BAMs containing parallel arrays of differentiated, postmitotic myofibers. This work suggests that autologous human skeletal myoblasts from a potential patient population can be isolated, genetically modified to secrete foreign proteins, and tissue engineered into implantable living protein secretory devices for therapeutic use.

  10. A novel reporter gene assay for recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yushuai; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Lei; Li, Xiang; Shi, Xinchang; Qin, Xi; Rao, Chunming; Wang, Junzhi

    2014-11-01

    Accurate determination of in vitro biological activity of therapeutic erythropoietin is essential in quality control of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) pharmaceutical products. However, most of currently-used methods leave much to be desired so that a simpler, quicker and more accurate method is urgently needed. The bioassay described here utilizes a sub clone of UT-7/epo cell line stably transfected with luciferase gene under the control of sis inducible element and interferon γ-activated sequence element promoter. Active erythropoietin could induce the expression of luciferase by signaling through the erythropoietin receptor and the dose-response curve showed good linearity, yielding a coefficient of determination of 0.99 or higher. The optimized assay was simpler with the operation completed within 24h and more sensitive with EC50 being 0.077IU/mL. The accuracy estimates ranged from 81.7% to 102.4%, and both intra-assay and inter-assay precision was below 15.0%. The robustness of the assay was demonstrated by no effect of passage levels of the cells on the performance of the assay (p values: 0.772 for sample 1 and 0.943 for sample 2). Besides, Bland-Altman analysis showed a high consistency of the new assay with in vivo reticulocyte assay in results. These results suggested that the new reporter gene assay can be a viable supplement to the traditional reticulocyte assay and employed in potency determination of rHuEPO pharmaceutical products. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Retrovirus transduction: Generation of infectious retroviruses expressing dominant and selectable genes is associated with in vivo recombination and deletion events

    SciTech Connect

    Joyner, A.L.; Bernstein, A.

    1983-12-01

    The authors describe the generation of infectious retroviruses containing foreign genes by an in vivo recombination-deletion mechanism. Cotransfection into mouse cells of chimeric plasmids carrying a murine retrovirus 5' long terminal repeat and either the thymidine kinase (tk) gene of herpes virus or the dominant selectable bacterial gene for neomycin resistance (neo), along with a clone of Moloney murine leukemia virus, results in the generation of infectious thymidine kinase or neomycine-resistant viruses. Expression of the selectable marker in these viruses can be regulated by the homologous transcriptional promoter of the gene, by the promoter contained within the Friend spleen focus-forming virus long terminal repeat, or by the simian virus 40 early region promoter. In all cases, the rescued viruses appeared to arise by recombination in vivo with Moloney murine leukemia virus sequences, resulting in the acquisition of the Moloney 3' long terminal repeat and variable amounts of the 3' adjacent Moloney genome. In two of the thymidine kinase constructs where tk was inserted 200 base pairs downstream from the long terminal repeat, the rescued viruses acquired a large part of the murine leukemia virus genome, including the region involved in packaging genomic RNA into virions. The generation of infectious neomycin-resistant virus is associated with deletions of simian virus 40 splicing and polyadenylation sequences. These results demonstrate that nonhomologous recombination and deletion events can take place in animal cells, resulting in the acquisition or removal of cis-acting sequences required for, or inhibitory to, retrovirus infectivity.

  12. Treatment of leptomeningeal metastases in a rat model using a recombinant adenovirus containing the HSV-tk gene.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A J; Esandi, M D; van Someren, G; Noteboom, J L; Avezaat, C J; Vecht, C; Smitt, P A; van Bekkum, D W; Valerio, D; Hoogerbrugge, P M; Bout, A

    1996-10-01

    The authors constructed recombinant adenoviral vectors to investigate their potential for gene therapy treatment of leptomeningeal metastases. Several human cell lines that were derived from tumors occurring as leptomeningeal metastases and that were infected in vitro with major late promoter recombinant adenovirus containing the luciferase (luc) gene (IG.Ad.MLP.luc) showed high levels of expression. When these human tumor cell lines were infected in vitro with recombinant adenovirus harboring the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene (IG.Ad.MLP.TK), they were highly sensitive to the killing effects of ganciclovir (GCV). Transduction efficiency of leptomeningeal tumor cells in vivo was assessed by injecting 9-L rat brain tumor cells into the cerebrospinal fluid of Fischer rats via the cisterna magna. After 3 days, recombinant adenovirus containing the lacZ reporter gene (IG.Ad.MLP.lacZ) was injected via the same route. Six days after tumor cell injection, expression of the reporter gene was observed in tumor cells along the total neural axis. Subsequently, rats with leptomeningeal metastases were treated 3 days after tumor cell injection with HSV-tk. Beginning on the next day, GCV was injected intraperitoneally for 10 days. The rats that developed neurological symptoms were killed immediately. The symptom-free latency of every rat was determined. The rats treated with HSV-tk and subsequent GCV had significantly longer (p < 0.01) symptom-free latency than all control groups. This study demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of this therapeutic approach in a rat model. Clinically, it should be used in the palliative treatment of patients with leptomeningeal metastases.

  13. Construction and characterization of the recombinant Moloney murine leukemia viruses bearing the mouse Fv-4 env gene.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, M; Yoshikura, H

    1990-01-01

    A nucleotide sequence of the mouse Fv-4 env gene was completed. Structural comparison revealed a close relationship of Fv-4 to the ecotropic Cas-Br-E murine leukemia virus isolated from a wild mouse in southern California. Various portions of the env gene of Moloney murine leukemia virus were replaced by the corresponding Fv-4 env sequence to construct recombinant murine leukemia virus clones. Infectivity of these recombinants was checked by the S+L- cell focus induction assay and the XC cell syncytium formation assay. Recombinants bearing the following Fv-4 env sequence retained ecotropic infectivity; the AccI-BamHI and BamHI-BalI regions coding for the N- and C-terminal halves of Fv-4 gp70SU, respectively; and the BalI-NcoI region encoding the cleavage site between gp70SU and p15(E)TM of the Fv-4 env. However, when the Fv-4 sequence was substituted for the p15(E)TM-coding NcoI-EcoRV region or the AccI-EcoRV region covering almost the entire env gene, infectivity was undetectable in our assays. The recombinant clone containing the Fv-4 AccI-EcoRV region, i.e., almost the entire Fv-4 env sequence, was introduced with pSV2neo into NIH 3T3 cells, and a G418r cell line named NIH(Fv4)-2 was isolated. The NIH(Fv4)-2 cell released viral particles that contained reverse transcriptase, Fv-4 env molecules as well as the other viral proteins, and viral genomic RNA. However, proviral DNA synthesis was not detected upon inoculation of this virus in NIH 3T3 cells. The loss of infectivity of the recombinant virus bearing the Fv-4 AccI-EcoRV region appeared to be caused by failure in an early step of replication. Images PMID:2304138

  14. A recombination hotspot leads to sequence variability within a novel gene (AK005651) and contributes to type 1 diabetes susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Iris K.L.; Mackin, Leanne; Wang, Nancy; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Elso, Colleen M.; Ashton, Michelle P.; Quirk, Fiona; Phipson, Belinda; Bahlo, Melanie; Speed, Terence P.; Smyth, Gordon K.; Morahan, Grant; Brodnicki, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    More than 25 loci have been linked to type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, but identification of the underlying genes remains challenging. We describe here the positional cloning of a T1D susceptibility locus, Idd11, located on mouse chromosome 4. Sequence analysis of a series of congenic NOD mouse strains over a critical 6.9-kb interval in these mice and in 25 inbred strains identified several haplotypes, including a unique NOD haplotype, associated with varying levels of T1D susceptibility. Haplotype diversity within this interval between congenic NOD mouse strains was due to a recombination hotspot that generated four crossover breakpoints, including one with a complex conversion tract. The Idd11 haplotype and recombination hotspot are located within a predicted gene of unknown function, which exhibits decreased expression in relevant tissues of NOD mice. Notably, it was the recombination hotspot that aided our mapping of Idd11 and confirms that recombination hotspots can create genetic variation affecting a common polygenic disease. This finding has implications for human genetic association studies, which may be affected by the approximately 33,000 estimated hotspots in the genome. PMID:21051460

  15. A Recombinant Rabies Virus Encoding Two Copies of the Glycoprotein Gene Confers Protection in Dogs against a Virulent Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhaojin; Chen, Jing; Ai, Jun; Dun, Can; Fu, Zhen F.; Niu, Xuefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G) is the principal antigen responsible for the induction of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) and is the major modality of protective immunity in animals. A recombinant RABV HEP-Flury strain was generated by reverse genetics to encode two copies of the G-gene (referred to as HEP-dG). The biological properties of HEP-dG were compared to those of the parental virus (HEP-Flury strain). The HEP-dG recombinant virus grew 100 times more efficiently in BHK-21 cell than the parental virus, yet the virulence of the dG recombinant virus in suckling mice was lower than the parental virus. The HEP-dG virus can improve the expression of G-gene mRNA and the G protein and produce more offspring viruses in cells. The amount of G protein revealed a positive relationship with immunogenicity in mice and dogs. The inactivated HEP-dG recombinant virus induced higher levels of VNA and conferred better protection against virulent RABV in mice and dogs than the inactivated parental virus and a commercial vaccine. The protective antibody persisted for at least 12 months. These data demonstrate that the HEP-dG is stable, induces a strong VNA response and confers protective immunity more effectively than the RABV HEP-Flury strain. HEP-dG could be a potential candidate in the development of novel inactivated rabies vaccines PMID:24498294

  16. The MRE4 gene encodes a novel protein kinase homologue required for meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Leem, S H; Ogawa, H

    1992-01-01

    The MRE4 gene was cloned by complementation of the defects of meiotic recombination and haploidization in an mre4-1 mutant. Disruption of MRE4 resulted in reduced meiotic recombination and spore inviability. The mre4 spore lethality can be suppressed by spo13, a mutation that causes cells to bypass the reductional division. Analysis of meiotic DNA extracted from the mre4 mutant cells revealed that double-strand breaks occurred at the two sites of the HIS4-LEU2 recombination hot spot, but at a frequency of about 10-20% of the wild type. Northern blot analysis indicated that the MRE4 gene produces four transcripts of 1.63, 3.2, 4.0 and 6.2 kb. All of these transcripts are absent from mitotic cells and are meiotically induced. The DNA sequence of the MRE4 open reading frame predicts a 497-amino acids protein with a molecular mass of 56.8 kDa. The Mre4 protein contains highly conserved amino acid sequences found specifically in serine-threonine protein kinases. These results suggest that protein phosphorylation is required directly or indirectly for meiotic recombination. Images PMID:1741279

  17. Identification, Characterization and Down-Regulation of Cysteine Protease Genes in Tobacco for Use in Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Duwadi, Kishor; Chen, Ling; Menassa, Rima; Dhaubhadel, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Plants are an attractive host system for pharmaceutical protein production. Many therapeutic proteins have been produced and scaled up in plants at a low cost compared to the conventional microbial and animal-based systems. The main technical challenge during this process is to produce sufficient levels of recombinant proteins in plants. Low yield is generally caused by proteolytic degradation during expression and downstream processing of recombinant proteins. The yield of human therapeutic interleukin (IL)-10 produced in transgenic tobacco leaves was found to be below the critical level, and may be due to degradation by tobacco proteases. Here, we identified a total of 60 putative cysteine protease genes (CysP) in tobacco. Based on their predicted expression in leaf tissue, 10 candidate CysPs (CysP1-CysP10) were selected for further characterization. The effect of CysP gene silencing on IL-10 accumulation was examined in tobacco. It was found that the recombinant protein yield in tobacco could be increased by silencing CysP6. Transient expression of CysP6 silencing construct also showed an increase in IL-10 accumulation in comparison to the control. Moreover, CysP6 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting that ER may be the site of IL-10 degradation. Overall results suggest that CysP6 is important in determining the yield of recombinant IL-10 in tobacco leaves. PMID:26148064

  18. Biased Gene Conversion in Rhizobium etli Is Caused by Preferential Double-Strand Breaks on One of the Recombining Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez-Cuna, Fares Osam; Castellanos, Mildred

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gene conversion, the nonreciprocal transfer of information during homologous recombination, is the main process that maintains identity between members of multigene families. Gene conversion in the nitrogenase (nifH) multigene family of Rhizobium etli was analyzed by using a two-plasmid system, where each plasmid carried a copy of nifH. One of the nifH copies was modified, creating restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) spaced along the gene. Once the modified plasmid was introduced into R. etli, selection was done for cointegration with a resident plasmid lacking the RFLPs. Most of the cointegrate molecules harbor gene conversion events, biased toward a gain of RFLPs. This bias may be explained under the double-strand break repair model by proposing that the nifH gene lacking the RFLPs suffers a DNA double-strand break, so the incoming plasmid functions as a template for repairing the homolog on the resident plasmid. To support this proposal, we cloned an SceI site into the nifH homolog that had the RFLPs used for scoring gene conversion. In vivo expression of the meganuclease I-SceI allowed the generation of a double-strand break on this homolog. Upon introduction of this modified plasmid into an R. etli strain lacking I-SceI, biased gene conversion still favored the retention of markers on the incoming plasmid. In contrast, when the recipient strain ectopically expressed I-SceI, a dramatic reversal in gene conversion bias was seen, favoring the preservation of resident sequences. These results show that biased gene conversion is caused by preferential double-strand breaks on one of the recombining homologs. IMPORTANCE In this work, we analyzed gene conversion by using a system that entails horizontal gene transfer followed by homologous recombination in the recipient cell. Most gene conversion events are biased toward the acquisition of the incoming sequences, ranging in size from 120 bp to 800 bp. This bias is due to preferential cutting of

  19. Recombinational cloning of the antibiotic biosynthetic gene clusters in linear plasmid SCP1 of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ran; Xia, Haiyang; Xu, Qingyu; Dang, Fujun; Qin, Zhongjun

    2013-08-01

    The model organism Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) harbors a 356-kb linear plasmid, SCP1. We report here development of a recombinational cloning method for deleting large segment from one telomere of SCP1 followed by replacing with the telomere of pSLA2 and sequentially inserting with the overlapping cosmids in vivo. The procedure depends on homologous recombination coupled with cleavage at telomere termini by telomere terminal protein. Using this procedure, we cloned the 81-kb avermectin and the 76-kb spinosad biosynthetic gene clusters into SCP1. Heterologous expression of avermectin production in S. coelicolor was detected. These results demonstrate the utility of SCP1 for cloning large DNA segments such as antibiotic biosynthetic gene clusters. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  1. Construction of recombinant Escherichia coli strains for secretory expression of artificial genes for human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovskaya, L.E.; Ruzin, A.V.; Shingarova, L.N.; Korobko, V.G.

    1995-11-01

    A number of recombinant plasmids for expression of artificial genes encoding human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were constructed. A hybrid gene was obtained that contains a sequence encoding the leader peptide and a tandem of two IgG-binding domains of protein A from Staphylococcus aureus coupled, through an enteropepdidase linker, to a synthetic gmcsf gene. The construction enables Escherichia coli to carry out biosynthesis of the hybrid protein and its subsequent transport into the periplasmic space of bacteria. Another hybrid gene, combining sequences for the signal peptide of the E. coli outer membrane protein OmpA and GM-CSF, was obtained using polymerase chain reaction. The localization of the mature protein produced by the hybrid gene was found to depend on the strength of the promoter used. 39 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Specific targeted gene repair using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides at an endogenous locus in mammalian cells uses homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Jennifer; Fernandez, Serena; Helleday, Thomas; Bryant, Helen E

    2009-12-03

    The feasibility of introducing point mutations in vivo using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssON) has been demonstrated but the efficiency and mechanism remain elusive and potential side effects have not been fully evaluated. Understanding the mechanism behind this potential therapy may help its development. Here, we demonstrate the specific repair of an endogenous non-functional hprt gene by a ssON in mammalian cells, and show that the frequency of such an event is enhanced when cells are in S-phase of the cell cycle. A potential barrier in using ssONs as gene therapy could be non-targeted mutations or gene rearrangements triggered by the ssON. Both the non-specific mutation frequencies and the frequency of gene rearrangements were largely unaffected by ssONs. Furthermore, we find that the introduction of a mutation causing the loss of a functional endogenous hprt gene by a ssON occurred at a similarly low but statistically significant frequency in wild type cells and in cells deficient in single strand break repair, nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair. However, this mutation was not induced in XRCC3 mutant cells deficient in homologous recombination. Thus, our data suggest ssON-mediated targeted gene repair is more efficient in S-phase and involves homologous recombination.

  3. Short-term efficiency and safety of gene delivery into canine kidneys.

    PubMed

    Chetboul, V; Klonjkowski, B; Lefebvre, H P; Desvaux, D; Laroute, V; Rosenberg, D; Maurey, C; Crespeau, F; Adam, M; Adnot, S; Eloit, M; Pouchelon, J L

    2001-03-01

    Gene delivery of biologically active molecules to the kidney may have potential therapeutic applications in renal and cardiovascular diseases. Recombinant adenovirus is one of the most efficient vectors for in vivo gene delivery. However, in vivo toxicity at the site of administration has to be evaluated for the successful use of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. The aim of this study was to document precisely the short-term safety of different routes of intra-renal adenoviral administration and to compare their transduction efficiency. Dog puppies were injected with an adenoviral vector expressing the beta-galactosidase reporter gene in both kidneys via three different routes, i.e. intra-renal-ureteral route (IU) and intra-renal-arterial route with (IAC) or without (IA) clamping of the renal vein. Toxicity of viral administration was assayed on day 4 at both physiological and histological levels. Renal samples were monitored for the presence of nuclear beta-galactosidase-expressing cells. All renal physiological parameters (glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, and electrolyte excretion fractions) remained stable whatever the route of viral administration. No histological lesion was detected in any of the haematoxylin-eosin-stained kidney sections, and there was no evidence of ischaemia-reperfusion injury in the kidneys subjected to venous clamping. Efficient transgene expression was obtained in dog kidneys following IAC and IU injection of adenoviral vectors. Gene transfer via the IAC route induced gene expression predominantly in the cortical interstitial cells. Retrograde IU adenoviral injection resulted in reduced transduction efficiency compared with the IAC route, with transgene expression occurring mainly in the distal tubular and pyelic epithelial cells. The two major findings of this study were (i) the absence of acute histological and functional renal alteration following intra-arterial and intra-ureteral injections of adenoviral

  4. New single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in homologous recombination repair genes detected by microarray analysis in Polish breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Romanowicz, Hanna; Strapagiel, Dominik; Słomka, Marcin; Sobalska-Kwapis, Marta; Kępka, Ewa; Siewierska-Górska, Anna; Zadrożny, Marek; Bieńkiewicz, Jan; Smolarz, Beata

    2016-11-30

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of malignancy and mortality in women worldwide. This study aimed at localising homologous recombination repair (HR) genes and their chromosomal loci and correlating their nucleotide variants with susceptibility to breast cancer. In this study, authors analysed the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in homologous recombination repair genes and the incidence of breast cancer in the population of Polish women. Blood samples from 94 breast cancer patients were analysed as test group. Individuals were recruited into the study at the Department of Oncological Surgery and Breast Diseases of the Institute of the Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital in Lodz, Poland. Healthy controls (n = 500) were obtained from the Biobank Laboratory, Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz. Then, DNA of breast cancer patients was compared with one of the disease-free women. The test was supported by microarray analysis. Statistically significant correlations were identified between breast cancer and 3 not described previously SNPs of homologous recombination repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2: rs59004709, rs4986852 and rs1799950. Further studies on larger groups are warranted to support the hypothesis of correlation between the abovementioned genetic variants and breast cancer risk.

  5. Replication inhibition by nucleoside analogues of a recombinant Autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus harboring the herpes thymidine kinase gene driven by the IE-1(0) promoter: a new way to select recombinant baculoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Godeau, F; Saucier, C; Kourilsky, P

    1992-01-01

    The expression of the thymidine-thymidylate kinase (HSV1-TK), (ATP: thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.21) of herpes simplex virus type 1 endows the host cell with a conditional lethal phenotype which depends on the presence of nucleoside analogues metabolized by this enzyme into toxic inhibitors of DNA replication. To generate a recombinant baculovirus that could be selected against by nucleoside analogs, the HSV1-tk coding sequence was placed under the control of the Autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) immediate early promoterm IE-1(0), and this construction was introduced via homologous recombination into the polyhedrin locus of AcMNPV. Two recombinant baculoviruses harboring this gene construct at the polyhedrin locus were isolated and tested for their ability to replicate in the presence of various concentrations of the nucleoside analog 9-(1,3-Dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl)guanine (Ganciclovir). Neither Sf9 lepidopteran cell viability nor replication of wild type or beta-Galactosidase-expressing recombinant AcMNPVs were affected by concentrations of Ganciclovir up to 100 microM. In contrast, replication of the recombinant AcMNPV virus harboring the HSV1-tk gene was inhibited by Ganciclovir in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was detectable at 2 microM and complete at 100 microM. This property was exploited in model isolations aimed at purifying new recombinant viruses having lost this counter-selectable gene marker as a result of homologous recombination at the polyhedrin locus after cotransfection of the viral DNA with a replacement vector. After being propagated in the presence of Ganciclovir, the progeny of such co-transfections contained over 85% recombinant viruses, demonstrating that counter-selection of parental HSV1-tk-containing viruses by Ganciclovir constitutes a novel approach for recombinant baculovirus isolation. Images PMID:1335569

  6. Recombinant fowlpox viruses coexpressing chicken type I IFN and Newcastle disease virus HN and F genes: influence of IFN on protective efficacy and humoral responses of chickens following in ovo or post-hatch administration of recombinant viruses.

    PubMed

    Karaca, K; Sharma, J M; Winslow, B J; Junker, D E; Reddy, S; Cochran, M; McMillen, J

    1998-10-01

    We have constructed recombinant (r) fowl pox viruses (FPVs) coexpressing chicken type I interferon (IFN) and/or hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) proteins of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). We administered rFPVs and FPV into embryonated chicken eggs at 17 days of embryonation or in chickens after hatch. Administration of FPV or rFPVs did not influence hatchability and survival of hatched chicks. In ovo or after hatch vaccination of chickens with the recombinant viruses resulted in protection against challenge with virulent FPV and NDV. Chickens vaccinated with FPV or FPV-NDV recombinant had significantly lower body weight 2 weeks following vaccination. This loss in body weight was not detected in chickens receiving FPV-IFN and FPV-NDV-IFN recombinants. Chickens vaccinated with FPV coexpressing IFN and NDV genes produced less antibodies against NDV in comparison with chickens vaccinated with FPV expressing NDV genes.

  7. Do genetic recombination and gene density shape the pattern of DNA elimination in rice long terminal repeat retrotransposons?

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhixi; Rizzon, Carene; Du, Jianchang; Zhu, Liucun; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Jackson, Scott A; Gaut, Brandon S; Ma, Jianxin

    2009-12-01

    In flowering plants, the accumulation of small deletions through unequal homologous recombination (UR) and illegitimate recombination (IR) is proposed to be the major process counteracting genome expansion, which is caused primarily by the periodic amplification of long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs). However, the full suite of evolutionary forces that govern the gain or loss of transposable elements (TEs) and their distribution within a genome remains unclear. Here, we investigated the distribution and structural variation of LTR-RTs in relation to the rates of local genetic recombination (GR) and gene densities in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome. Our data revealed a positive correlation between GR rates and gene densities and negative correlations between LTR-RT densities and both GR and gene densities. The data also indicate a tendency for LTR-RT elements and fragments to be shorter in regions with higher GR rates; the size reduction of LTR-RTs appears to be achieved primarily through solo LTR formation by UR. Comparison of indica and japonica rice revealed patterns and frequencies of LTR-RT gain and loss within different evolutionary timeframes. Different LTR-RT families exhibited variable distribution patterns and structural changes, but overall LTR-RT compositions and genes were organized according to the GR gradients of the genome. Further investigation of non-LTR-RTs and DNA transposons revealed a negative correlation between gene densities and the abundance of DNA transposons and a weak correlation between GR rates and the abundance of long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs)/short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs). Together, these observations suggest that GR and gene density play important roles in shaping the dynamic structure of the rice genome.

  8. Properties of a herpes simplex virus multiple immediate-early gene-deleted recombinant as a vaccine vector

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Brockman, Mark A.; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Mathews, Lydia; Lucas, William T.; Murphy, Cynthia G.; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.; Deluca, Neal A.; Knipe, David M. . E-mail: david_knipe@hms.harvard.edu

    2007-01-20

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) recombinants induce durable immune responses in rhesus macaques and mice and have induced partial protection in rhesus macaques against mucosal challenge with virulent simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). In this study, we evaluated the properties of a new generation HSV vaccine vector, an HSV-1 multiple immediate-early (IE) gene deletion mutant virus, d106, which contains deletions in the ICP4, ICP27, ICP22, and ICP47 genes. Because several of the HSV IE genes have been implicated in immune evasion, inactivation of the genes encoding these proteins was expected to result in enhanced immunogenicity. The d106 virus expresses few HSV gene products and shows minimal cytopathic effect in cultured cells. When d106 was inoculated into mice, viral DNA accumulated at high levels in draining lymph nodes, consistent with an ability to transduce dendritic cells and activate their maturation and movement to lymph nodes. A d106 recombinant expressing Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase induced durable {beta}-gal-specific IgG and CD8{sup +} T cell responses in naive and HSV-immune mice. Finally, d106-based recombinants have been constructed that express simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) gag, env, or a rev-tat-nef fusion protein for several days in cultured cells. Thus, d106 shows many of the properties desirable in a vaccine vector: limited expression of HSV gene products and cytopathogenicity, high level expression of transgenes, ability to induce durable immune responses, and an ability to transduce dendritic cells and induce their maturation and migration to lymph nodes.

  9. Construction of PR39 recombinant AAV under control of the HRE promoter and the effect of recombinant AAV on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    SUN, LIJUN; HAO, YUEWEN; NIE, XIAOWEI; ZHANG, XUEXIN; YANG, GUANGXIAO; WANG, QUANYING

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the PR39 recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) controlled by the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease. The minimal HRE was artificially synthesized and the AAV vector controlled by HRE was introduced with NT4-TAT-His-PR39 to investigate the expression of AAV-PR39 in hypoxic vascular endothelial cells (VEC) of human umbilical vein (CRL-1730 cell line) and the angiogenesis-promoting effect in pigs with acute myocardial infraction (AMI). The minimal HRE/CMV was designed and artificially synthesized using the PCR method and cloned with the T vector cloning method. The pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV plasmid was constructed. Using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, HEK-293 cells were co-transfected with three plasmids to produce the recombinant virus. An equal volume of pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyAAAV and enterovirus (EV, blank virus) was transfected into CRL-1730 cell lines, respectively. The immunohistochemical method was used to assay the expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cell lines and the expression of PR39 under hypoxia. Eighteen AMI miniature pigs were randomized into the experimental group (HRE-AAV-PR39 group), control group 1 (physical saline group) and control group 2 (EV group). The area of ischemia was assessed with conventional MRI and myocardium perfusion MRI. Pigs were sacrificed at preset time-points to obtain samples of ischemic myocardium. Morphological and pathological data were collected. According to data in the literature and databases, the minimal HRE was designed and synthesized with the PCR method. A large number of HREs were connected to modified pSSHGAAV (pSSV9int-/XbaI) vector followed by insertion of the NT4-6His-PR39 gene segment and, thus, the recombinant plasmid pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV was successfully constructed. The expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cells under the regulation of HRE was assayed using the

  10. Construction of PR39 recombinant AAV under control of the HRE promoter and the effect of recombinant AAV on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Hao, Yuewen; Nie, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xuexin; Yang, Guangxiao; Wang, Quanying

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the PR39 recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) controlled by the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) on gene therapy of ischemic heart disease. The minimal HRE was artificially synthesized and the AAV vector controlled by HRE was introduced with NT4-TAT-His-PR39 to investigate the expression of AAV-PR39 in hypoxic vascular endothelial cells (VEC) of human umbilical vein (CRL-1730 cell line) and the angiogenesis-promoting effect in pigs with acute myocardial infraction (AMI). The minimal HRE/CMV was designed and artificially synthesized using the PCR method and cloned with the T vector cloning method. The pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV plasmid was constructed. Using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, HEK-293 cells were co-transfected with three plasmids to produce the recombinant virus. An equal volume of pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyAAAV and enterovirus (EV, blank virus) was transfected into CRL-1730 cell lines, respectively. The immunohistochemical method was used to assay the expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cell lines and the expression of PR39 under hypoxia. Eighteen AMI miniature pigs were randomized into the experimental group (HRE-AAV-PR39 group), control group 1 (physical saline group) and control group 2 (EV group). The area of ischemia was assessed with conventional MRI and myocardium perfusion MRI. Pigs were sacrificed at preset time-points to obtain samples of ischemic myocardium. Morphological and pathological data were collected. According to data in the literature and databases, the minimal HRE was designed and synthesized with the PCR method. A large number of HREs were connected to modified pSSHGAAV (pSSV9int-/XbaI) vector followed by insertion of the NT4-6His-PR39 gene segment and, thus, the recombinant plasmid pSS-HRE-CMV-NT4-6His-PR39-PolyA-AAV was successfully constructed. The expression of 6xHis in CRL-1730 cells under the regulation of HRE was assayed using the

  11. Identifying genetic loci and spleen gene coexpression networks underlying immunophenotypes in BXD recombinant inbred mice

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Rachel M.; Naswa, Sudhir; Rogers, Gary L.; Kania, Stephen A.; Das, Suchita; Chesler, Elissa J.; Saxton, Arnold M.; Langston, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The immune system plays a pivotal role in the susceptibility to and progression of a variety of diseases. Due to a strong genetic basis, heritable differences in immune function may contribute to differential disease susceptibility between individuals. Genetic reference populations, such as the BXD (C57BL/6J × DBA/2J) panel of recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains, provide unique models through which to integrate baseline phenotypes in healthy individuals with heritable risk for disease because of the ability to combine data collected from these populations across both multiple studies and time. We performed basic immunophenotyping (e.g., percentage of circulating B and T lymphocytes and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subpopulations) in peripheral blood of healthy mice from 41 BXD RI strains to define the immunophenotypic variation in this strain panel and to characterize the genetic architecture that underlies these traits. Significant QTL models that explained the majority (50–77%) of phenotypic variance were derived for each trait and for the T:B cell and CD4+:CD8+ ratios. Combining QTL mapping with spleen gene expression data uncovered two quantitative trait transcripts, Ptprk and Acp1, as candidates for heritable differences in the relative abundance of helper and cytotoxic T cells. These data will be valuable in extracting genetic correlates of the immune system in the BXD panel. In addition, they will be a useful resource for prospective, phenotype-driven model selection to test hypotheses about differential disease or environmental susceptibility between individuals with baseline differences in the composition of the immune system. PMID:20179155

  12. Polymorphism, recombination and alternative unscrambling in the DNA polymerase alpha gene of the ciliate Stylonychia lemnae (Alveolata; class Spirotrichea).

    PubMed Central

    Ardell, David H; Lozupone, Catherine A; Landweber, Laura F

    2003-01-01

    DNA polymerase alpha is the most highly scrambled gene known in stichotrichous ciliates. In its hereditary micronuclear form, it is broken into >40 pieces on two loci at least 3 kb apart. Scrambled genes must be reassembled through developmental DNA rearrangements to yield functioning macronuclear genes, but the mechanism and accuracy of this process are unknown. We describe the first analysis of DNA polymorphism in the macronuclear version of any scrambled gene. Six functional haplotypes obtained from five Eurasian strains of Stylonychia lemnae were highly polymorphic compared to Drosophila genes. Another incompletely unscrambled haplotype was interrupted by frameshift and nonsense mutations but contained more silent mutations than expected by allelic inactivation. In our sample, nucleotide diversity and recombination signals were unexpectedly high within a region encompassing the boundary of the two micronuclear loci. From this and other evidence we infer that both members of a long repeat at the ends of the loci provide alternative substrates for unscrambling in this region. Incongruent genealogies and recombination patterns were also consistent with separation of the two loci by a large genetic distance. Our results suggest that ciliate developmental DNA rearrangements may be more probabilistic and error prone than previously appreciated and constitute a potential source of macronuclear variation. From this perspective we introduce the nonsense-suppression hypothesis for the evolution of ciliate altered genetic codes. We also introduce methods and software to calculate the likelihood of hemizygosity in ciliate haplotype samples and to correct for multiple comparisons in sliding-window analyses of Tajima's D. PMID:14704164

  13. Expression of Talaromyces thermophilus lipase gene in Trichoderma reesei by homologous recombination at the cbh1 locus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Xia, Liming

    2017-03-01

    CBH1 (cellobiohydrolase) comprises the majority of secreted proteins by Trichoderma reesei. For expression of Talaromyces thermophilus lipase gene in T. reesei, a self-designed CBH1 promoter was applied to drive the lipase gene expression cassette which was bracketed by flanking sequences of cbh1 gene for homologous recombination. Protoplast and Agrobacterium-mediated plasmid transformations were performed and compared, resultantly, transformation mediated by Agrobacterium was overall proved to be more efficient. Stable integration of lipase gene into chromosomal DNA of T. reesei transformants was verified by PCR. After shaking flask fermentation, lipase activity of transformant reached 375 IU mL(-1), whereas no cellobiohydrolase activity was detected. SDS-PAGE analysis further showed an obvious protein band about 39 kDa and no CBH1 band in fermentation broth, implying lipase gene was successfully extracellularly expressed in T. reesei via homologous recombination at cbh1 locus. This study herein would benefit genetic engineering of filamentous fungi and industrial application of thermo-alkaline lipase like in paper making and detergents addition.

  14. Integration of a transfected gene into the genome of Babesia bovis occurs by legitimate homologous recombination mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Carlos E; Johnson, Wendell C; Herndon, David R; Laughery, Jacob M; Davis, William C

    2015-08-01

    This study examines the patterns of gene integration of gfp-bsd upon stable transfection into the T3Bo strain of Babesia bovis using a plasmid designed to integrate homologous sequences of the parasite's two identical ef-1α A and B genes. While the transfected BboTf-149-6 cell line displayed two distinct patterns of gene integration, clonal lines derived from this strain by cell sorting contained only single gfp-bsd insertions. Whole genome sequencing of two selected clonal lines, E9 and C6, indicated two distinct patterns of gfp-bsd insertion occurring by legitimate homologous recombination mechanisms: one into the expected ef-1α orf B, and another into the ef-1α B promoter. The data suggest that expression of the ef-1α orf B is not required for development of B. bovis in cultured erythrocyte stages. Use of legitimate homologous recombination mechanisms in transfected B. bovis supports the future use of transfection methods for developing efficient gene function assignment experiments using gene knockout techniques. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Gene flow, recombination, and positive selection in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: mechanisms underlying the diversity of the widespread opportunistic pathogen.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong; Yin, Zhiqiu; Li, Beiping; Jin, Yuan; Ren, Hongguang; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Wei; Liang, Long; Yue, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a global multidrug-resistant human opportunistic pathogen in clinical environments. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is also ubiquitous in aqueous environments, soil, and plants. Various molecular typing methods have revealed that S. maltophilia exhibits high levels of phenotypic and genotypic diversity. However, information regarding the genomic diversity within S. maltophilia and the corresponding genetic mechanisms resulting in said diversity remain scarce. The genome sequences of 17 S. maltophilia strains were selected to investigate the mechanisms contributing to genetic diversity at the genome level. The core and large pan-genomes of the species were first estimated, resulting in a large, open pan-genome. A species phylogeny was also reconstructed based on 344 orthologous genes with one copy per genome, and the contribution of four evolutionary mechanisms to the species genome diversity was quantified: 15%-35% of the genes showed evidence for recombination, 0%-25% of the genes in one genome were likely gained, 0%-44% of the genes in some genomes were likely lost, and less than 0.3% of the genes in a genome were under positive selection pressures. We observed that, among the four main mechanisms, homologous recombination plays a key role in maintaining diversity in S. maltophilia. In this study, we provide an overview of evolution in S. maltophilia to provide a better understanding of its evolutionary dynamics and its relationship with genome diversity.

  16. Requirement of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein C for BRCA Gene Expression and Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Anantha, Rachel W.; Cai, Hong; Simhadri, Srilatha; Ule, Jernej; König, Julian; Xia, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNP C) is a core component of 40S ribonucleoprotein particles that bind pre-mRNAs and influence their processing, stability and export. Breast cancer tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 form a complex and play key roles in homologous recombination (HR), DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and cell cycle regulation following DNA damage. Methods PALB2 nucleoprotein complexes were isolated using tandem affinity purification from nuclease-solubilized nuclear fraction. Immunofluorescence was used for localization studies of proteins. siRNA-mediated gene silencing and flow cytometry were used for studying DNA repair efficiency and cell cycle distribution/checkpoints. The effect of hnRNP C on mRNA abundance was assayed using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Results and Significance We identified hnRNP C as a component of a nucleoprotein complex containing breast cancer suppressor proteins PALB2, BRCA2 and BRCA1. Notably, other components of the 40S ribonucleoprotein particle were not present in the complex. hnRNP C was found to undergo significant changes of sub-nuclear localization after ionizing radiation (IR) and to partially localize to DNA damage sites. Depletion of hnRNP C substantially altered the normal balance of repair mechanisms following DSB induction, reducing HR usage in particular, and impaired S phase progression after IR. Moreover, loss of hnRNP C strongly reduced the abundance of key HR proteins BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51 and BRIP1, which can be attributed, at least in part, to the downregulation of their mRNAs due to aberrant splicing. Our results establish hnRNP C as a key regulator of BRCA gene expression and HR-based DNA repair. They also suggest the existence of an RNA regulatory program at sites of DNA damage, which involves a unique function of hnRNP C that is independent of the 40S ribonucleoprotein particles and most other hnRNP proteins. PMID:23585894

  17. Balancing selection and recombination as evolutionary forces caused population genetic variations in golden pheasant MHC class I genes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qian-Qian; He, Ke; Sun, Dan-Dan; Ma, Mei-Ying; Ge, Yun-Fa; Fang, Sheng-Guo; Wan, Qiu-Hong

    2016-02-18

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are vital partners in the acquired immune processes of vertebrates. MHC diversity may be directly associated with population resistance to infectious pathogens. Here, we screened for polymorphisms in exons 2 and 3 of the IA1 and IA2 genes in 12 golden pheasant populations across the Chinese mainland to characterize their genetic variation levels, to understand the effects of historical positive selection and recombination in shaping class I diversity, and to investigate the genetic structure of wild golden pheasant populations. Among 339 individual pheasants, we identified 14 IA1 alleles in exon 2 (IA1-E2), 11 IA1-E3 alleles, 27 IA2-E2 alleles, and 28 IA2-E3 alleles. The non-synonymous substitution rate was significantly greater than the synonymous substitution rate at sequences in the IA2 gene encoding putative peptide-binding sites but not in the IA1 gene; we also found more positively selected sites in IA2 than in IA1. Frequent recombination events resulted in at least 9 recombinant IA2 alleles, in accordance with the intermingling pattern of the phylogenetic tree. Although some IA alleles are widely shared among studied populations, large variation occurs in the number of IA alleles across these populations. Allele frequency analysis across 2 IA loci showed low levels of genetic differentiation among populations on small geographic scales; however, significant genetic differentiation was observed between pheasants from the northern and southern regions of the Yangtze River. Both STRUCTURE analysis and F-statistic (F ST ) value comparison classified those populations into 2 major groups: the northern region of the Yangtze River (NYR) and the southern region of the Yangtze River (SYR). More extensive polymorphisms in IA2 than IA1 indicate that IA2 has undergone much stronger positive-selection pressure during evolution. Moreover, the recombination events detected between the genes and the intermingled phylogenetic

  18. Induction of direct repeat recombination by psoralen-DNA adducts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: defects in DNA repair increase gene copy number variation.

    PubMed

    Saffran, Wilma A; Ahmed, Anam; Binyaminov, Olga; Gonzalez, Cynthia; Gupta, Amita; Fajardo, Manuel A; Kishun, Devindra; Nandram, Ashana; Reyes, Kenneth; Scalercio, Karina; Senior, Charles W

    2014-09-01

    Psoralen photoreaction produces covalent monoadducts and interstrand crosslinks in DNA. The interstrand DNA crosslinks are complex double strand lesions that require the involvement of multiple pathways for repair. Homologous recombination, which can carry out error-free repair, is a major pathway for crosslink repair; however, some recombination pathways can also produce DNA rearrangements. Psoralen photoreaction-induced recombination in yeast was measured using direct repeat substrates that can detect gene conversions, a form of conservative recombination, as well as deletions and triplications, which generate gene copy number changes. In repair-proficient cells the major products of recombination were gene conversions, along with substantial fractions of deletions. Deficiencies in DNA repair pathways increased non-conservative recombination products. Homologous recombination-deficient rad51, rad54, and rad57 strains had low levels of crosslink-induced recombination, and most products were deletions produced by single strand annealing. Nucleotide excision repair-deficient rad1 and rad2 yeast had increased levels of triplications, and rad1 cells had lower crosslink-induced recombination. Deficiencies in post-replication repair increased crosslink-induced recombination and gene copy number changes. Loss of REV3 function, in the error-prone branch, and of RAD5 and UBC13, in the error-free branch, produced moderate increases in deletions and triplications; rad18 cells, deficient in both post-replication repair sub-pathways, exhibited hyperrecombination, with primarily non-conservative products. Proper functioning of all the DNA repair pathways tested was required to maintain genomic stability and avoid gene copy number variation in response to interstrand crosslinks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular cloning, recombinant gene expression, and antifungal activity of cystatin from taro (Colocasia esculenta cv. Kaosiung no. 1).

    PubMed

    Yang, A H; Yeh, K W

    2005-06-01

    A cDNA clone, designated CeCPI, encoding a novel phytocystatin was isolated from taro corms (Colocasia esculenta) using both degenerated primers/RT-PCR amplification and 5'-/3'-RACE extension. The full-length cDNA gene is 1,008 bp in size, encodes 206 amino acid residues, with a deduced molecular weight of 29 kDa. It contains a conserved reactive site motif Gln-Val-Val-Ser-Gly of cysteine protease inhibitors, and another consensus ARFAV sequence for phytocystatin. Sequence analysis revealed that CeCPI is phylogenetically closely related to Eudicots rather than to Monocots, despite taro belonging to Monocot. Recombinant GST-CeCPI fusion protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and its inhibitory activity against papain was identified on gelatin/SDS-PAGE. These results confirmed that recombinant CeCPI protein exhibited strong cysteine protease inhibitory activity. Investigation of its antifungal activity clearly revealed a toxic effect on the mycelium growth of phytopathogenic fungi, such as Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. etc., at a concentration of 80 microg recombinant CeCPI/ ml. Moreover, mycelium growth was completely inhibited and the sclerotia lysed at a concentration of 150-200 microg/ml. Further studies have demonstrated that recombinant CeCPI is capable of acting against the endogenous cysteine proteinase in the fungal mycelium.

  20. Restoration of adrenal steroidogenesis by adenovirus-mediated transfer of human cytochromeP450 21-hydroxylase into the adrenal gland of21-hydroxylase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Tajima, T; Okada, T; Ma, X M; Ramsey, W; Bornstein, S; Aguilera, G

    1999-11-01

    21-Hydroxylase deficiency, a potentially fatal disease due to deletions or mutations of the cytochrome P450 21-hydroxylase gene (CYP21), causes congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with low or absent glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid production. The feasibility of gene therapy for CAH was studied using 21OH-deficient mice (21OH-) and a replication-deficient adenovirus containing the genomic sequence of human CYP21 (hAdCYP21). Intra-adrenal injection of hAdCYP21 in 21OH- mice induced hCYP21 mRNA with the highest expression from 2 to 7 days before a gradual decline. 21OH activity measured in adrenal tissue increased from undetectable to levels found in wild-type mice 2 to 7 days after AdhCYP21 injection. Adrenal morphology of 21OH- mice showed lack of zonation, and hypertrophy and hyperplasia of adrenocortical mitochondria with few tubulovesicular christae. These morphological abnormalities were markedly improved 7 days after hAdCYP21 gene therapy. Plasma corticosterone increased from undetectable levels to values similar in wild-type mice by 7 and 14 days, declining over the next 40 days. This is the first demonstration that a single intra-adrenal injection of an adenoviral vector encoding CYP21 can compensate for the biochemical, endocrine and histological alterations in 21OH-deficient mice, and shows that gene therapy could be a feasible option for treatment of CAH.

  1. Immunogenic response to a recombinant pseudorabies virus carrying bp26 gene of Brucella melitensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan; Wu, Chang-Xian; Zheng, Ke; Xu, Xian-Jin; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Chuang-Fu; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2015-06-01

    Brucellae are facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens of a zoonotic disease called brucellosis. Live attenuated vaccines are utilized for prophylaxis of brucellosis; however, they retain residual virulence to human and/or animals, as well as interfere with diagnosis. In this study, recombinant virus PRV ΔTK/ΔgE/bp26 was screened and purified. One-step growth curve assay showed that the titer of recombinant virus was comparable to the parent strain. Mice experiments showed the recombinant virus elicited high titer of humoral antibodies against Brucella detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and against PRV by serum neutralization test. The recombinant virus induced high level of Brucella-specific lymphocyte proliferation response and production of interferon gamma. Collectively, these data suggest that the bivalent virus was capable of inducing both humoral and cellular immunity, and had the potential to be a vaccine candidate to prevent Brucella and/or pseudorabies virus infections.

  2. Subretinal delivery of recombinant AAV serotype 8 vector in dogs results in gene transfer to neurons in the brain.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Knut; Colle, Marie-Anne; Dubreil, Laurence; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack Yves; Provost, Nathalie; Nivard, Delphine; Cherel, Yan; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2008-05-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are among the most efficient gene delivery vehicles for gene transfer to the retina. This study evaluates the behavior of the rAAV8 serotype vector with regard to intraocular delivery in rats and dogs. Subretinal delivery of an AAV2/8.gfp vector results in efficient gene transfer in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the photoreceptors and, surprisingly, in the cells of the inner nuclear layer as well as in ganglion cells. Most importantly, in dogs, gene transfer also occurred distal to the injection site in neurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus of the brain. Because green fluorescent protein (GFP) was detected along the visual pathway within the brain, we analyzed total DNA extracted from various brain slices using PCR. Vector sequences were detected in many parts of the brain, but chiefly in the contralateral hemisphere.

  3. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors mediate efficient gene transduction in cultured neonatal and adult microglia.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei; Kang, John; Sopher, Bryce; Gillespie, James; Aloi, Macarena S; Odom, Guy L; Hopkins, Stephanie; Case, Amanda; Wang, David B; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Garden, Gwenn A

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are a specialized population of myeloid cells that mediate CNS innate immune responses. Efforts to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate microglia behaviors have been hampered by the lack of effective tools for manipulating gene expression. Cultured microglia are refractory to most chemical and electrical transfection methods, yielding little or no gene delivery and causing toxicity and/or inflammatory activation. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAVs) vectors are non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA vectors commonly used to transduce many primary cell types and tissues. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing rAAV serotype 2 (rAAV2) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia. rAAV2 yields high transduction and causes minimal toxicity or inflammatory response in both neonatal and adult microglia. To demonstrate that rAAV transduction can induce functional protein expression, we used rAAV2 expressing Cre recombinase to successfully excise a LoxP-flanked miR155 gene in cultured microglia. We further evaluated rAAV serotypes 5, 6, 8, and 9, and observed that all efficiently transduced cultured microglia to varying degrees of success and caused little or no alteration in inflammatory gene expression. These results provide strong encouragement for the application of rAAV-mediated gene expression in microglia for mechanistic and therapeutic purposes. Neonatal microglia are functionally distinct from adult microglia, although the majority of in vitro studies utilize rodent neonatal microglia cultures because of difficulties of culturing adult cells. In addition, cultured microglia are refractory to most methods for modifying gene expression. Here, we developed a novel protocol for culturing adult microglia and evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia.

  4. The impact of intragenic recombination on phylogenetic reconstruction at the sectional level in Eucalyptus when using a single copy nuclear gene (cinnamoyl CoA reductase).

    PubMed

    Poke, Fiona S; Martin, Darren P; Steane, Dorothy A; Vaillancourt, René E; Reid, James B

    2006-04-01

    Low copy number nuclear genes have been found to be useful for phylogenetic reconstruction at different taxonomic levels. This study investigated the utility of a single copy gene, cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR), for resolving phylogenetic relationships at the sectional level within Eucalyptus. The monophyly of sections Exsertaria and Latoangulatae was explored, using section Maidenaria as an outgroup, and the impact of intragenic recombination on phylogenetic reconstruction examined. Phylogenetic analysis did not resolve monophyletic groups. Latoangulatae and Maidenaria were polyphyletic or paraphyletic. Exsertaria species formed a clade but included a single Latoangulatae species (E. major). Recombination analysis identified two intragenic recombination events that involved species from different sections, which have probably been facilitated by inter-sectional hybridisation. One of the events most likely occurred prior to speciation, with several Latoangulatae species having the recombinant allele. The other event may have occurred after speciation, since only one of two E. globulus samples possessed the recombinant allele. This is the first detailed report of intragenic recombination in both CCR and Eucalyptus, and between species of different sections of a plant genus. The occurrence of intragenic recombination may explain the anomalous positions of some species within the phylogenetic tree, and indicates that phylogenetic analysis of Eucalyptus using nuclear genes will be problematic unless recombination is taken into account.

  5. Putative recombination events and evolutionary history of five economically important viruses of fruit trees based on coat protein-encoding gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Boulila, Moncef

    2010-06-01

    To enhance the knowledge of recombination as an evolutionary process, 267 accessions retrieved from GenBank were investigated, all belonging to five economically important viruses infecting fruit crops (Plum pox, Apple chlorotic leaf spot, Apple mosaic, Prune dwarf, and Prunus necrotic ringspot viruses). Putative recombinational events were detected in the coat protein (CP)-encoding gene using RECCO and RDP version 3.31beta algorithms. Based on RECCO results, all five viruses were shown to contain potential recombination signals in the CP gene. Reconstructed trees with modified topologies were proposed. Furthermore, RECCO performed better than the RDP package in detecting recombination events and exhibiting their evolution rate along the sequences of the five viruses. RDP, however, provided the possible major and minor parents of the recombinants. Thus, the two methods should be considered complementary.

  6. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. Results In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymena and localizes to the macronucleus where it induces precise recombination at two loxP sequences in direct orientation in the Tetrahymena macronuclear chromosome. This Cre/loxP recombination can be used to remove a loxP-flanked drug-resistance marker from an N-terminal tagging construct after it is integrated into the macronucleus. Conclusions The system established in this study allows us to express an N-terminal epitope tagged gene from its own endogenous promoter in Tetrahymena. PMID:20626890

  7. Alteration of a recombinant protein N-glycan structure in silkworms by partial suppression of N-acetylglucosaminidase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tatsuya; Kikuta, Kotaro; Kanematsu, Ayumi; Kondo, Sachiko; Yagi, Hirokazu; Kato, Koichi; Park, Enoch Y

    2017-09-01

    To synthesize complex type N-glycans in silkworms, shRNAs against the fused lobe from Bombyx mori (BmFDL), which codes N-acetylglucosaminidase (GlcNAcase) in the Golgi, was expressed by recombinant B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) in silkworm larvae. Expression was under the control of the actin promoter of B. mori or the U6-2 and i.e.-2 promoters from Orgyia pseudotsugata multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (OpMNPV). The reduction of specific GlcNAcase activity was observed in Bm5 cells and silkworm larvae using the U6-2 promoter. In silkworm larvae, the partial suppression of BmFDL gene expression was observed. When shRNA against BmFDL was expressed under the control of U6-2 promoter, the Man3GlcNAc(Fuc)GlcNAc structure appeared in a main N-glycans of recombinant human IgG. These results suggested that the control of BmFDL expression by its shRNA in silkworms caused the modification of its N-glycan synthetic pathway, which may lead to the alteration of N-glycans in the expressed recombinant proteins. Suppression of BmFDL gene expression by shRNA is not sufficient to synthesize complex N-glycans in silkworm larvae but can modify the N-glycan synthetic pathway.

  8. Adenovirus-Mediated Somatic Genome Editing of Pten by CRISPR/Cas9 in Mouse Liver in Spite of Cas9-Specific Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Mou, Haiwei; Li, Shaoyong; Li, Yingxiang; Hough, Soren; Tran, Karen; Li, Jia; Yin, Hao; Anderson, Daniel G; Sontheimer, Erik J; Weng, Zhiping; Gao, Guangping; Xue, Wen

    2015-07-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 derived from the bacterial adaptive immunity pathway is a powerful tool for genome editing, but the safety profiles of in vivo delivered Cas9 (including host immune responses to the bacterial Cas9 protein) have not been comprehensively investigated in model organisms. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a prevalent human liver disease characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver. In this study, we used adenovirus (Ad) vector to deliver a Streptococcus pyogenes-derived Cas9 system (SpCas9) targeting Pten, a gene involved in NASH and a negative regulator of the PI3K-AKT pathway, in mouse liver. We found that the Ad vector mediated efficient Pten gene editing even in the presence of typical Ad vector-associated immunotoxicity in the liver. Four months after vector infusion, mice receiving the Pten gene-editing Ad vector showed massive hepatomegaly and features of NASH, consistent with the phenotypes following Cre-loxP-induced Pten deficiency in mouse liver. We also detected induction of humoral immunity against SpCas9 and the potential presence of an SpCas9-specific cellular immune response. Our findings provide a strategy to model human liver diseases in mice and highlight the importance considering Cas9-specific immune responses in future translational studies involving in vivo delivery of CRISPR/Cas9.

  9. Chloroplast-targeted expression of recombinant crystal-protein gene in cotton: an unconventional combat with resistant pests.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Sarfraz; Mohamed, Bahaeldeen Babiker; Shehzad, Kamran; Jamal, Adil; Shahid, Muhammad Naveed; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Husnain, Tayyab

    2013-07-10

    Plants transformed with single Bt gene are liable to develop insect resistance and this has already been reported in a number of studies carried out around the world where Bt cotton was cultivated on commercial scale. Later, it was envisaged to transform plants with more than one Bt genes in order to combat with resistant larvae. This approach seems valid as various Bt genes possess different binding domains which could delay the likely hazards of insect resistance against a particular Bt toxin. But it is difficult under field conditions to develop homozygous plants expressing all Bt genes equally after many generations without undergoing recombination effects. A number of researches claiming to transform plants from three to seven transgenes in a single plant were reported during the last decade but none has yet applied for patent of homozygous transgenic lines. A better strategy might be to use hybrid-Bt gene(s) modified for improved lectin-binding domains to boost Bt receptor sites in insect midgut. These recombinant-Bt gene(s) would express different lectin domains in a single polypeptide and it is relatively easy to develop homozygous transgenic lines under field conditions. Enhanced chloroplast-localized expression of hybrid-Bt gene would leave no room for insects to develop resistance. We devised and successfully applied this strategy in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and data up to T3 generation showed that our transgenic cotton plants were displaying enhanced chloroplast-targeted Cry1Ac-RB expression. Laboratory and field bioassays gave promising results against American bollworm (Heliothis armigera), pink bollworm (Pictinophora scutigera) and fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) that otherwise, were reported to have evolved resistance against Cry1Ac toxin. Elevated levels of hybrid-Bt toxin were confirmed by ELISA of chloroplast-enriched protein samples extracted from leaves of transgenic cotton lines. While, localization of recombinant Cry1Ac-RB protein in

  10. The Arabidopsis thaliana PARTING DANCERS Gene Encoding a Novel Protein Is Required for Normal Meiotic Homologous RecombinationD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wijeratne, Asela J.; Chen, Changbin; Zhang, Wei; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Ma, Hong

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies of meiotic recombination in the budding yeast and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana indicate that meiotic crossovers (COs) occur through two genetic pathways: the interference-sensitive pathway and the interference-insensitive pathway. However, few genes have been identified in either pathway. Here, we describe the identification of the PARTING DANCERS (PTD) gene, as a gene with an elevated expression level in meiocytes. Analysis of two independently generated transferred DNA insertional lines in PTD showed that the mutants had reduced fertility. Further cytological analysis of male meiosis in the ptd mutants revealed defects in meiosis, including reduced formation of chiasmata, the cytological appearance of COs. The residual chiasmata in the mutants were distributed randomly, indicating that the ptd mutants are defective for CO formation in the interference-sensitive pathway. In addition, transmission electron microscopic analysis of the mutants detected no obvious abnormality of synaptonemal complexes and apparently normal late recombination nodules at the pachytene stage, suggesting that the mutant's defects in bivalent formation were postsynaptic. Comparison to other genes with limited sequence similarity raises the possibility that PTD may present a previously unknown function conserved in divergent eukaryotic organisms. PMID:16394097

  11. Genes encoding homologous antigens in taeniid cestode parasites: Implications for development of recombinant vaccines produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gauci, Charles; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant vaccine antigens are being evaluated for their ability to protect livestock animals against cysticercosis and related parasitic infections. Practical use of some of these vaccines is expected to reduce parasite transmission, leading to a reduction in the incidence of neurocysticercosis and hydatid disease in humans. We recently showed that an antigen (TSOL16), expressed in Escherichia coli, confers high levels of protection against Taenia solium cysticercosis in pigs, which provides a strategy for control of T. solium parasite transmission. Here, we discuss the characteristics of this antigen that may affect the utility of TSOL16 and related antigens for development as recombinant vaccines. We also report that genes encoding antigens closely related to TSOL16 from T. solium also occur in other related species of parasites. These highly homologous antigens have the potential to be used as vaccines and may provide protection against related species of Taenia that cause infection in other hosts.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of VP1 gene sequences of waterfowl parvoviruses from the Mainland of China revealed genetic diversity and recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao; Cheng, Xiao-Xia; Chen, Shao-Ying; Lin, Feng-Qiang; Chen, Shi-Long; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Jin-Xiang; Huang, Mei-Qing; Zheng, Min

    2016-03-01

    To determine the origin and evolution of goose parvovirus (GPV) and Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) in the Mainland of China, phylogenetic and recombination analyses in the present study were performed on 32 complete VP1 gene sequences from China and other countries. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene, GPV strains studied here from Mainland China (PRC) could be divided into three genotypes, namely PRC-I, PRC-II and PRC-III. Genotype PRC-I is indigenous to Mainland China. Only one GPV strain from Northeast China was of Genotype PRC-II and was thought to be imported from Europe. Genotype PRC-III, which was the most isolated genotype during 1999-2012, is related to GPVs in Taiwan and has been the predominant pathogen responsible for recent Derzy's disease outbreaks in Mainland China. Current vaccine strains used in Mainland China belong to Genotype PRC-I that is evolutionary distant from Genotypes PRC-II and PRC-III. In comparison, MDPV strains herein from Mainland China are clustered in a single group which is closely related to Taiwanese MDPV strains, and the full-length sequences of the VP1 gene of China MDPVs are phylogenetic closely related to the VP1 sequence of a Hungarian MDPV strain. Moreover, We also found that homologous recombination within VP1 gene plays a role in generating genetic diversity in GPV evolution. The GPV GDFSh from Guangdong Province appears to be the evolutionary product of a recombination event between parental GPV strains GD and B, while the major parent B proved to be a reference strain for virulent European GPVs. Our findings provide valuable information on waterfowl parvoviral evolution in Mainland China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhalation of Nebulized Perfluorochemical Enhances Recombinant Adenovirus and Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Gene Expression in Lung Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Travis; Bonneau, Laura; Howard, Alan; Blanchard, James; Borda, Juan; Weiner, Daniel J.; Wang, Lili; Gao, Guang Ping; Kolls, Jay K.; Bohm, Rudolf; Liggitt, Denny

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Use of perfluorochemical liquids during intratracheal vector administration enhances recombinant adenovirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated lung epithelial gene expression. We hypothesized that inhalation of nebulized perfluorochemical vapor would also enhance epithelial gene expression after subsequent intratracheal vector administration. Freely breathing adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed for selected times to nebulized perflubron or sterile saline in a sealed Plexiglas chamber. Recombinant adenoviral vector was administered by transtracheal puncture at selected times afterward and mice were killed 3 days after vector administration to assess transgene expression. Mice tolerated the nebulized perflubron without obvious ill effects. Vector administration 6 hr after nebulized perflubron exposure resulted in an average 540% increase in gene expression in airway and alveolar epithelium, compared with that with vector alone or saline plus vector control (p<0.05). However, vector administration 1 hr, 1 day, or 3 days after perflubron exposure was not different from either nebulized saline with vector or vector alone and a 60-min exposure to nebulized perflubron is required. In parallel pilot studies in macaques, inhalation of nebulized perflubron enhanced recombinant AAV2/5 vector expression throughout the lung. Serial chest radiographs, bronchoalveolar lavages, and results of complete blood counts and serum biochemistries demonstrated no obvious adverse effects of nebulized perflubron. Further, one macaque receiving nebulized perflubron only was monitored for 1 year with no obvious adverse effects of exposure. These results demonstrate that inhalation of nebulized perflubron, a simple, clinically more feasible technique than intratracheal administration of liquid perflubron, safely enhances lung gene expression. PMID:22568624

  14. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in INS1E cells: effects on cell metabolism and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Rubí, Blanca; Antinozzi, Peter A; Herrero, Laura; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Asins, Guillermina; Serra, Dolors; Wollheim, Claes B; Maechler, Pierre; Hegardt, Fausto G

    2002-05-15

    Lipid metabolism in the beta-cell is critical for the regulation of insulin secretion. Pancreatic beta-cells chronically exposed to fatty acids show higher carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) protein levels, higher palmitate oxidation rates and an altered insulin response to glucose. We examined the effect of increasing CPT I levels on insulin secretion in cultured beta-cells. We prepared a recombinant adenovirus containing the cDNA for the rat liver isoform of CPT I. The overexpression of CPT I in INS1E cells caused a more than a 5-fold increase in the levels of CPT I protein (detected by Western blotting), a 6-fold increase in the CPT activity, and an increase in fatty acid oxidation at 2.5 mM glucose (1.7-fold) and 15 mM glucose (3.1-fold). Insulin secretion was stimulated in control cells by 15 mM glucose or 30 mM KCl. INS1E cells overexpressing CPT I showed lower insulin secretion on stimulation with 15 mM glucose (-40%; P<0.05). This decrease depended on CPT I activity, since the presence of etomoxir, a specific inhibitor of CPT I, in the preincubation medium normalized the CPT I activity, the fatty-acid oxidation rate and the insulin secretion in response to glucose. Exogenous palmitate (0.25 mM) rescued glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in CPT I-overexpressing cells, indicating that the mechanism of impaired GSIS was through the depletion of a critical lipid. Depolarizing the cells with KCl or intermediary glucose concentrations (7.5 mM) elicited similar insulin secretion in control cells and cells overexpressing CPT I. Glucose-induced ATP increase, glucose metabolism and the triacylglycerol content remained unchanged. These results provide further evidence that CPT I activity regulates insulin secretion in the beta-cell. They also indicate that up-regulation of CPT I contributes to the loss of response to high glucose in beta-cells exposed to fatty acids.

  15. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in INS1E cells: effects on cell metabolism and insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Rubí, Blanca; Antinozzi, Peter A; Herrero, Laura; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Asins, Guillermina; Serra, Dolors; Wollheim, Claes B; Maechler, Pierre; Hegardt, Fausto G

    2002-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in the beta-cell is critical for the regulation of insulin secretion. Pancreatic beta-cells chronically exposed to fatty acids show higher carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) protein levels, higher palmitate oxidation rates and an altered insulin response to glucose. We examined the effect of increasing CPT I levels on insulin secretion in cultured beta-cells. We prepared a recombinant adenovirus containing the cDNA for the rat liver isoform of CPT I. The overexpression of CPT I in INS1E cells caused a more than a 5-fold increase in the levels of CPT I protein (detected by Western blotting), a 6-fold increase in the CPT activity, and an increase in fatty acid oxidation at 2.5 mM glucose (1.7-fold) and 15 mM glucose (3.1-fold). Insulin secretion was stimulated in control cells by 15 mM glucose or 30 mM KCl. INS1E cells overexpressing CPT I showed lower insulin secretion on stimulation with 15 mM glucose (-40%; P<0.05). This decrease depended on CPT I activity, since the presence of etomoxir, a specific inhibitor of CPT I, in the preincubation medium normalized the CPT I activity, the fatty-acid oxidation rate and the insulin secretion in response to glucose. Exogenous palmitate (0.25 mM) rescued glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in CPT I-overexpressing cells, indicating that the mechanism of impaired GSIS was through the depletion of a critical lipid. Depolarizing the cells with KCl or intermediary glucose concentrations (7.5 mM) elicited similar insulin secretion in control cells and cells overexpressing CPT I. Glucose-induced ATP increase, glucose metabolism and the triacylglycerol content remained unchanged. These results provide further evidence that CPT I activity regulates insulin secretion in the beta-cell. They also indicate that up-regulation of CPT I contributes to the loss of response to high glucose in beta-cells exposed to fatty acids. PMID:11988095

  16. Change of gene structure and function by non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombination, and transposition of DNA.

    PubMed

    Goettel, Wolfgang; Messing, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal interval exemplifies the evolution of gene regulation and allelic diversity in general. It also illustrates the evolutionary pace of changes in plants, where many of the above mechanisms are of somatic origin. In contrast to animals, somatic alterations can easily be transmitted through meiosis because the germline in plants is contiguous to somatic tissue, permitting the recovery of such chromosomal rearrangements. The analyzed region contains the P1-wr allele, a variant of the genetically well-defined p1 gene, which encodes a Myb-like transcriptional activator in maize. The P1-wr allele consists of eleven nearly perfect P1-wr 12-kb repeats that are arranged in a tandem head-to-tail array. Although a technical challenge to sequence such a structure by shotgun sequencing, we overcame this problem by subcloning each repeat and ordering them based on nucleotide variations. These polymorphisms were also critical for recombination and expression analysis in presence and absence of the trans-acting epigenetic factor Ufo1. Interestingly, chimeras of the p1 and p2 genes, p2/p1 and p1/p2, are framing the P1-wr cluster. Reconstruction of sequence amplification steps at the p locus showed the evolution from a single Myb-homolog to the multi-gene P1-wr cluster. It also demonstrates how non-homologous end-joining can create novel gene fusions. Comparisons to orthologous regions in sorghum and rice also indicate a greater instability of the maize genome, probably due to diploidization

  17. Adenovirus-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression regulated by hypoxia response element protects brain from injury of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qindong; Zhang, Pengbo; Zhang, Junfeng; Chen, Xinlin; Lu, Haixia; Tian, Yumei; Parker, T L; Liu, Yong

    2009-11-20

    Some gene expression may be regulated by hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) that is bound by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) which is up-regulated during cerebral ischemia. To explore ischemia/hypoxia-controlled expression and the neuroprotective effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) after ischemic brain injury, an adenoviral vector using five copies of hypoxia response element (HRE) in the vascular endothelial growth factor gene to regulate the expression of BDNF gene (Ad5HRE:BDNF) was constructed, and its efficacy was verified for driving BDNF expression in cultured Hela cells under hypoxic condition by ELISA. We found that the concentration of BDNF in the Ad5HRE:BDNF-transfected culture media was 28-fold greater in a hypoxic condition than under normoxia. To examine the effect of Ad5HRE:BDNF on ischemic brain injury in vivo, Ad5HRE:BDNF was injected into right caudate putamen of adult mice 7 days prior to 60 min transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). It was found that exogenous BDNF expression was increased in the Ad5HRE-BDNF-treated group and infarct volume of the Ad5HRE:BDNF-treated group at 3 days after MCAO was significantly smaller than that of vehicle- or AdNull-treated groups. Moreover, Ad5HRE:BDNF injection resulted in significantly improved sensorimotor scores 7 days after MCAO and induced a reduction in the number of Fluoro-Jade B-positive neurons and TUNEL-positive cells, compared with vehicle- or AdNull-injection. Our findings suggest that BDNF expression could be regulated in hypoxia/ischemia condition with five copies of HRE and ameliorates ischemic brain injury in a mouse focal cerebral ischemia model.

  18. Subolesin/akirin orthologs from Ornithodoros spp. soft ticks: cloning, RNAi gene silencing and protective effect of the recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Román, Raúl; Díaz-Martín, Verónica; Oleaga, Ana; Siles-Lucas, Mar; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo

    2012-04-30

    Subolesin/akirin is a well characterized protective antigen highly conserved across vector species and thus potentially useful for the development of a broad-spectrum vaccine for the control of arthropod infestations including hard ticks, mosquitoes, sand flies and the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. Soft ticks could be also targeted by this vaccine if proved that the soft tick subolesin orthologs are conserved and induce protective immune responses too. However, to date no soft tick subolesin orthologs have been fully characterized nor tested as recombinant antigens in vaccination trials. The objectives of the present work were to clone and characterize the subolesin orthologs from two important vector species of soft ticks as Ornithodoros erraticus and O. moubata, to evaluate the effect of subolesin gene silencing by RNAi, and to test the protective value of the recombinant antigens in vaccination trials. The obtained results demonstrate that both soft tick subolesins are highly conserved showing more than 69% and 74% identity with those of hard ticks in their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. Additionally, we demonstrate that both soft ticks possess fully operative RNAi machinery, and that subolesin gene silencing by dsRNA injection inhibits oviposition indicating the involvement of subolesin in tick reproduction. Finally, vaccination with the recombinant soft tick subolesins induced a partial protective effect resulting in the reduction of the oviposition rate. These preliminary results encourage further studies on the use of recombinant subolesins as vaccines for the control of soft tick infestations, either alone or in combination with other specific molecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhanced anti-tumor activity by the combination of a conditionally replicating adenovirus mediated interleukin-24 and dacarbazine against melanoma cells via induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guan; Liu, Yan-Qun; Wei, Zhi-Ping; Pei, Dong-Sheng; Mao, Li-Jun; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2010-08-28

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most lethal and aggressive human malignancies. It is notoriously resistant to all of the current therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy. Suppressed apoptosis and extraordinary invasiveness are the distinctive features that contribute to the malignancy of melanoma. Dacarbazine (DTIC) has been considered as the gold standard for melanoma treatment with a response rate of 15-20%. Unfortunately, the resistance to this chemotherapeutic agent occurs frequently. ZD55-IL-24 is a selective conditionally replicating adenovirus that can mediate the expression of interleukin-24 (IL-24) gene, which has a strong anti-tumor effect. In this study, we hypothesized that a combination of ZD55-IL-24-mediated gene virotherapy and chemotherapy using DTIC would produce an increased cytotoxicity against human melanoma cells in comparison with these agents alone. Our results showed that the combination of ZD55-IL-24 and DTIC significantly enhanced the anti-tumor activity by more effectively inducing apoptosis in melanoma cells than either agent used alone without any overlapping toxicity against normal cells. This additive or synergistic effect of ZD55-IL-24 in combination with DTIC in killing human malignant melanoma cells implies a promising novel approach for melanoma therapy.

  20. Yeast MPH1 gene functions in an error-free DNA damage bypass pathway that requires genes from Homologous recombination, but not from postreplicative repair.

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, K Anke; Rudolph, Christian; Ulrich, Helle D; Kramer, Wilfried

    2004-01-01

    The MPH1 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a member of the DEAH family of proteins, had been identified by virtue of the spontaneous mutator phenotype of respective deletion mutants. Genetic analysis suggested that MPH1 functions in a previously uncharacterized DNA repair pathway that protects the cells from damage-induced mutations. We have now analyzed genetic interactions of mph1 with a variety of mutants from different repair systems with respect to spontaneous mutation rates and sensitivities to different DNA-damaging agents. The dependence of the mph1 mutator phenotype on REV3 and REV1 and the synergy with mutations in base and nucleotide excision repair suggest an involvement of MPH1 in error-free bypass of lesions. However, although we observed an unexpected partial suppression of the mph1 mutator phenotype by rad5, genetic interactions with other mutations in postreplicative repair imply that MPH1 does not belong to this pathway. Instead, mutations from the homologous recombination pathway were found to be epistatic to mph1 with respect to both spontaneous mutation rates and damage sensitivities. Determination of spontaneous mitotic recombination rates demonstrated that mph1 mutants are not deficient in homologous recombination. On the contrary, in an sgs1 background we found a pronounced hyperrecombination phenotype. Thus, we propose that MPH1 is involved in a branch of homologous recombination that is specifically dedicated to error-free bypass. PMID:15126389

  1. Origin of the CMS gene locus in rapeseed cybrid mitochondria: active and inactive recombination produces the complex CMS gene region in the mitochondrial genomes of Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Masao; Kikuchi, Rie; Imamura, Jun; Handa, Hirokazu

    2010-01-01

    CMS (cytoplasmic male sterile) rapeseed is produced by asymmetrical somatic cell fusion between the Brassica napus cv. Westar and the Raphanus sativus Kosena CMS line (Kosena radish). The CMS rapeseed contains a CMS gene, orf125, which is derived from Kosena radish. Our sequence analyses revealed that the orf125 region in CMS rapeseed originated from recombination between the orf125/orfB region and the nad1C/ccmFN1 region by way of a 63 bp repeat. A precise sequence comparison among the related sequences in CMS rapeseed, Kosena radish and normal rapeseed showed that the orf125 region in CMS rapeseed consisted of the Kosena orf125/orfB region and the rapeseed nad1C/ccmFN1 region, even though Kosena radish had both the orf125/orfB region and the nad1C/ccmFN1 region in its mitochondrial genome. We also identified three tandem repeat sequences in the regions surrounding orf125, including a 63 bp repeat, which were involved in several recombination events. Interestingly, differences in the recombination activity for each repeat sequence were observed, even though these sequences were located adjacent to each other in the mitochondrial genome. We report results indicating that recombination events within the mitochondrial genomes are regulated at the level of specific repeat sequences depending on the cellular environment.

  2. Immunological ignorance allows long-term gene expression after perinatal recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer to murine airways.

    PubMed

    Carlon, Marianne S; Vidović, Dragana; Dooley, James; da Cunha, Marina Mori; Maris, Michael; Lampi, Youlia; Toelen, Jaan; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle; Deprest, Jan; Verbeken, Erik; Liston, Adrian; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2014-06-01

    Gene therapy of the lung has the potential to treat life-threatening diseases such as cystic fibrosis and α(1)-antitrypsin or surfactant deficiencies. A major hurdle for successful gene therapy is the development of an immune response against the transgene and/or viral vector. We hypothesized that by targeting the airways in the perinatal period, induction of an immune response against the vector particle could be prevented because of immaturity of the immune system, in turn allowing repeated gene transfer later in adult life to ensure long-term gene expression. Therefore, we readministered recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotype 5 (rAAV2/5) to mouse airways 3 and 6 months after initial perinatal gene transfer. Our findings demonstrate that perinatal rAAV2/5-mediated gene transfer to the airways avoids a strong immune response. This immunological ignorance allows the readministration of an autologous vector later in adult life, resulting in efficient and stable gene transfer up to 7 months, without evidence of a decrease in transgene expression. Together, these data provide a basis to further explore perinatal gene therapy for pulmonary conditions with adequate gene expression up to 7 months.

  3. Genomic polymorphism, recombination, and linkage disequilibrium in human major histocompatibility complex-encoded antigen-processing genes

    SciTech Connect

    van Endert, P.M.; Lopez, M.T.; Patel, S.D.; McDevitt, H.O. ); Monaco, J.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Recently, two subunits of a large cytosolic protease and two putative peptide transporter proteins were found to be encoded by genes within the class II region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). These genes have been suggested to be involved in the processing of antigenic proteins for presentation by MHC class I molecules. Because of the high degree of polymorphism in MHC genes, and previous evidence for both functional and polypeptide sequence polymorphism in the proteins encoded by the antigen-processing genes, we tested DNA from 27 consanguineous human cell lines for genomic polymorphism by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. These studies demonstrate a strong linkage disequilibrium between TAP1 and LMP2 RFLPs. Moreover, RFLPs, as well as a polymorphic stop codon in the telomeric TAP2 gene, appear to be in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DR alleles and RFLPs in the HLA-DO gene. A high rate of recombination, however, seems to occur in the center of the complex, between the TAP1 and TAP2 genes.

  4. Vaccinia Virus Recombinants: Expression of VSV Genes and Protective Immunization of Mice and Cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackett, M.; Yilma, T.; Rose, J. K.; Moss, B.

    1985-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes a contagious disease of horses, cattle, and pigs. When DNA copies of messenger RNA's for the G or N proteins of VSV were linked to a vaccinia virus promoter and inserted into the vaccinia genome, the recombinants retained infectivity and synthesized VSV polypeptides. After intradermal vaccination with live recombinant virus expressing the G protein, mice produced VSV-neutralizing antibodies and were protected against lethal encephalitis upon intravenous challenge with VSV. In cattle, the degree of protection against intradermalingually injected VSV was correlated with the level of neutralizing antibody produced following vaccination.

  5. Development of novel recombinant biomimetic chimeric MPG-based peptide as nanocarriers for gene delivery: Imitation of a real cargo.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Asia; Nikkhah, Maryam; Sadeghian, Faranak; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2016-10-01

    In last decades great efforts have been devoted to the study of development of recombinant peptide based vectors that consist of biological motifs with potential applications in gene therapy. Recombinant Biomimetic Chimeric Vectors (rBCVs) are biopolymeric nanocarriers that are designed to mimic viral features to overcome the cellular obstacles in gene transferring pathway into cell nucleus. In this research, we designed and genetically engineered three novel rBCVs with similar sequences that differed in motifs arrangement and motif abundance: MPG-2H1, 2TMPG-2H1 and 2RMPG-2H1. The MPG as a famous amphipathic cell penetrating peptide is the main segment of these constructs which was studied for the first time in association with truncated histone H1 DNA condensing motif. Through the performance of several physicochemical and biological assays, the rBCVs were remarkably examined regarding transfection efficiency. The main objective of this study is focused on the importance of motif design in transfection efficiency of rBCVs on one hand, and the assessment of correlation between structural features and functionality of motifs on the other hand. The results revealed that all three kinds of rBCVs/pDNA nanoparticles with average sizes of 200nm could overwhelm the cellular obstacles associated with gene transfer, and lead to efficient gene delivery. Furthermore, no significant toxicity was perceived and efficient endosome disruptive activity was obtained. It is noteworthy to say among three mentioned constructs 2RMPG-2H1 showed the highest transfection efficiency. Overall the peptide based vectors hold great promise as a nontoxic and effective gene carrier in vitro and in vivo, besides the rational design possibility as the most vital advantages over the other non-viral gene delivery vectors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of hepatocarcinoma and tumor metastasis to liver by gene therapy with recombinant CBD-HepII polypeptide of fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Huang, Bo; Yuan, Ye; Gong, Wei; Xiao, Han; Li, Dong; Yu, Zhi-Rui; Wu, Feng-Hua; Zhang, Gui-Mei; Feng, Zuo-Hua

    2007-07-01

    Unlike the intact fibronectin (FN) molecule, some proteolytic or recombinant fragments of FN possess inhibitory activities on tumor, providing potential strategies in tumor therapeutics. Using the hydrodynamics-based gene delivery technique, we demonstrated that the treatment by in vivo expression of a recombinant CBD-HepII polypeptide of FN, designated as CH50, strongly inhibited the tumor growth, tumor invasion and angiogenesis. Such inhibitory effects of CH50 on tumor were partly ascribed to its influence on the activities of MMP-9 and alphavbeta3 integrin. The in vivo expressed CH50 decreased both the production and the activity of MMP-9 in tumor tissues. CH50 also down-regulated alphavbeta3 expression in tumor cells and endothelial cells in vitro. The decreased activity of alphavbeta3 integrin was proved by its reduced binding ability to fibrinogen and the down-regulation of cdc2 expression. The gene therapy with CH50 not only prolonged the survival of mice bearing hepatocarcinoma in the liver, but also suppressed the growth and invasive ability of tumor in spleen and its metastasis to liver. Taken together, these findings suggest a prospective utility of CH50 in the gene therapy of liver cancer.

  7. A concept of eliminating nonhomologous recombination for scalable and safe AAV vector generation for human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Biao; Moore, Andrea R; Dai, Jihong; Roberts, Sean; Chu, Kirk; Kapranov, Philipp; Moss, Bernard; Xiao, Weidong

    2013-07-01

    Scalable and efficient production of high-quality recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for gene therapy remains a challenge despite recent clinical successes. We developed a new strategy for scalable and efficient rAAV production by sequestering the AAV helper genes and the rAAV vector DNA in two different subcellular compartments, made possible by using cytoplasmic vaccinia virus as a carrier for the AAV helper genes. For the first time, the contamination of replication-competent AAV particles (rcAAV) can be completely eliminated in theory by avoiding ubiquitous nonhomologous recombination. Vector DNA can be integrated into the host genomes or delivered by a nuclear targeting vector such as adenovirus. In suspension HeLa cells, the achieved vector yield per cell is similar to that from traditional triple-plasmid transfection method. The rcAAV contamination was undetectable at the limit of our assay. Furthermore, this new concept can be used not only for production of rAAV, but also for other DNA vectors.

  8. [An experimental research on the combination treatment of sFLK-1 gene therapy combined with gamma knife].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Wang, Zheng-rong; Li, Hao; Wei, Yu-quan; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Bin

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate whether the sustained expression by adenovirus-mediated gene (sFLK-1) transfer can enhance the treatment efficacy of gamma knife radiosurgery. The mouse sFLK-1 gene was cloned to construct the recombinant adenovirus. The gliomata growing in BALB/c female nude mice with an initial mean volume of (109.3 +/- 20.5) mm3 were treated with gamma knife alone (13 Gy on day 12), sFLK-1 adenovirus alone (1 x 10(9) plaque-forming units, PFU was given to two mouse tail vein by injections, 7 and 14 days), gamma knife associated with sFLK-1 adenovirus or control adenovirus (1 x 10(9) PFU was given to two mouse tail vein by injections, 13 and 17 days). After the completion of therapy, the tumor size was recorded. The microvessel density (MVD) and tumor apoptosis were evaluated by immunohistochemical means. As comparing with three other control groups, the combination treatment group with sFLK-1 gene therapy and gamma knife not only significantly reduced tumor volume and prolonged the life span of tumor burden mice as well. In addition, the average tumor weights were lower in sFLK-1 combined with gamma knife group than in any other control group. Immunohistochemical analysis of glioma demonstrated a decreased MVD and a high apoptosis cell rate in sFLK-1 combined with gamma knif group. The antitumor effect of gamma knife can be potentiated by sFLK-1 gene therapy. Thus the combination of sFLK-1 gene therapy and gamma knife results an additive effect of antitumor. The observation may provide an important strategy for treatment cancer metastasis.

  9. Registration of a rice gene mapping population of Lemont X Jasmine 85 recombinant inbred lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A mapping population developed from a cross of rice (Oryza sativa L.) tropical japonica cultivar ‘Lemont’ and indica cultivar ‘Jasmine 85’ was developed to facilitate genetic studies for important agronomic traits. The indica- and japonica-based rice recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population ...

  10. Meiotic homoeologous recombination-based alien gene introgression in the genomics era of wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat (Triticum spp.) has a narrow genetic basis due to its allopolyploid origin. However, wheat has numerous wild relatives usable for expanding genetic variability of its genome through meiotic homoeologous recombination. Traditionally, laborious cytological analyses have been employed to detect h...

  11. Mapping of the css (chloroplast splicing suppressor) gene(s) to a recombinationally suppressed region of chromosome III in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liming; Lee, Jaesung; Herrin, David L

    2012-07-01

    In previous work, three suppressors of defective group I introns (7151, 71N1, 7120) were isolated from a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that had a splicing-deficient chloroplast large subunit (LSU) rRNA intron. Genetic analysis indicated that the 7151 and 71N1 suppressor mutations each involved single nuclear loci, and that the 7151 mutation was dominant. Here we present genetic evidence that the 7120 suppressor also involves a single nuclear locus and that the mutation is dominant in vegetative diploids. Moreover, we have employed crosses with the S1D2 strain and molecular markers to map the 7120 and 71N1 suppressors. Based on an analysis of 800 progeny from 7120 × S1D2, the 7120 suppressor is located in a region of ~400 kb on chromosome III that is devoid of recombination. The ~400-kb region contains at least 72 genes, about one-third of which (i.e., 22) are predicted to be organelle targeted. Similar analysis of 71N1 × S1D2 using 400 progeny also pointed to the recombination-deficient region of chromosome III, raising the possibility that these mutations could affect the same gene. These efforts lay the foundation for identifying the css (chloroplast splicing suppressor) gene(s), which promotes splicing of multiple chloroplast group I introns.

  12. Definition of minimal domains of interaction within the recombination-activating genes 1 and 2 recombinase complex.

    PubMed

    Aidinis, V; Dias, D C; Gomez, C A; Bhattacharyya, D; Spanopoulou, E; Santagata, S

    2000-06-01

    During V(D)J recombination, recognition and cleavage of the recombination signal sequences (RSSs) requires the coordinated action of the recombination-activating genes 1 and 2 (RAG1/RAG2) recombinase complex. In this report, we use deletion mapping and site-directed mutagenesis to determine the minimal domains critical for interaction between RAG1 and RAG2. We define the active core of RAG2 required for RSS cleavage as aa 1-371 and demonstrate that the C-terminal 57 aa of this core provide a dominant surface for RAG1 interaction. This region corresponds to the last of six predicted kelch repeat motifs that have been proposed by sequence analysis to fold RAG2 into a six-bladed beta-propeller structure. Residue W317 within this sixth repeat is shown to be critical for mediating contact with RAG1 and concurrently for stabilizing binding and directing cleavage of the RSS. We also show that zinc finger B (aa 727-750) of RAG1 provides a dominant interaction domain for recruiting RAG2. In all, the data support a model of RAG2 as a multimodular protein that utilizes one of its six faces for establishing productive contacts with RAG1.

  13. Alleles of the yeast Pms1 mismatch-repair gene that differentially affect recombination- and replication-related processes.

    PubMed Central

    Welz-Voegele, Caroline; Stone, Jana E; Tran, Phuoc T; Kearney, Hutton M; Liskay, R Michael; Petes, Thomas D; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Mismatch-repair (MMR) systems promote eukaryotic genome stability by removing errors introduced during DNA replication and by inhibiting recombination between nonidentical sequences (spellchecker and antirecombination activities, respectively). Following a common mismatch-recognition step effected by MutS-homologous Msh proteins, homologs of the bacterial MutL ATPase (predominantly the Mlh1p-Pms1p heterodimer in yeast) couple mismatch recognition to the appropriate downstream processing steps. To examine whether the processing steps in the spellchecker and antirecombination pathways might differ, we mutagenized the yeast PMS1 gene and screened for mitotic separation-of-function alleles. Two alleles affecting only the antirecombination function of Pms1p were identified, one of which changed an amino acid within the highly conserved ATPase domain. To more specifically address the role of ATP binding/hydrolysis in MMR-related processes, we examined mutations known to compromise the ATPase activity of Pms1p or Mlh1p with respect to the mitotic spellchecker and antirecombination activities and with respect to the repair of mismatches present in meiotic recombination intermediates. The results of these analyses confirm a differential requirement for the Pms1p ATPase activity in replication vs. recombination processes, while demonstrating that the Mlh1p ATPase activity is important for all examined MMR-related functions. PMID:12454061

  14. Adenovirus-mediated Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells reduces airway inflammation in ovalbumin and cockroach-induced asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soojin; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hyunil; Moon, Junghee; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3 is a master regulator of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cell (Treg) function and is also a suppressor of SKP2 and HER2/ErbB2. There are an increasing number of reports describing the functions of Foxp3 in cell types other than Tregs. In this context, we evaluated the functions of Foxp3 in ovalbumin- and cockroach-induced asthma models. Foxp3-EGFP-expressing adenovirus or EGFP control adenovirus was administered intratracheally (i.t.), followed by challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) or cockroach extract to induce asthma. Th2 cytokine and immune cell profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well as serum IgE levels, were analyzed. Histological analyses were also conducted to demonstrate the effects of Foxp3 expression on airway remodeling, goblet cell hyperplasia and inflammatory responses in the lung. Adenoviral Foxp3 was expressed only in lung epithelial cells, and not in CD4+ or CD8+ cells. BALF from Foxp3 gene-delivered mice showed significantly reduced numbers of total immune cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in response to cockroach allergen or OVA. In addition, Foxp3 expression in the lung reduced the levels of Th2 cytokines and IgE in BALF and serum, respectively. Moreover, histopathological analysis also showed that Foxp3 expression substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airways, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle cell hypertrophy. Furthermore, when Tregs were depleted by diphtheria toxin in Foxp3DTR mice, the anti-asthmatic functions of Foxp3 were not altered in OVA-challenged asthma models. In this study, our results suggest that Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells, and not in Tregs, inhibited OVA- and cockroach extract-induced asthma. PMID:27633092

  15. Adenovirus-mediated Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells reduces airway inflammation in ovalbumin and cockroach-induced asthma model.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Shin, Dasom; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hyunil; Moon, Junghee; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-09-16

    Foxp3 is a master regulator of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg) function and is also a suppressor of SKP2 and HER2/ErbB2. There are an increasing number of reports describing the functions of Foxp3 in cell types other than Tregs. In this context, we evaluated the functions of Foxp3 in ovalbumin- and cockroach-induced asthma models. Foxp3-EGFP-expressing adenovirus or EGFP control adenovirus was administered intratracheally (i.t.), followed by challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) or cockroach extract to induce asthma. Th2 cytokine and immune cell profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well as serum IgE levels, were analyzed. Histological analyses were also conducted to demonstrate the effects of Foxp3 expression on airway remodeling, goblet cell hyperplasia and inflammatory responses in the lung. Adenoviral Foxp3 was expressed only in lung epithelial cells, and not in CD4(+) or CD8(+) cells. BALF from Foxp3 gene-delivered mice showed significantly reduced numbers of total immune cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in response to cockroach allergen or OVA. In addition, Foxp3 expression in the lung reduced the levels of Th2 cytokines and IgE in BALF and serum, respectively. Moreover, histopathological analysis also showed that Foxp3 expression substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airways, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle cell hypertrophy. Furthermore, when Tregs were depleted by diphtheria toxin in Foxp3(DTR) mice, the anti-asthmatic functions of Foxp3 were not altered in OVA-challenged asthma models. In this study, our results suggest that Foxp3 expression in lung epithelial cells, and not in Tregs, inhibited OVA- and cockroach extract-induced asthma.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting TNF-α and overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 promotes early osteoblast differentiation on a cell model of Ti particle-induced inflammatory response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, H H; Yu, C C; Sun, S X; Ma, X J; Yang, X C; Sun, K N; Jin, Q H

    2013-10-01

    Wear particles are phagocytosed by macrophages and other inflammatory cells, resulting in cellular activation and release of proinflammatory factors, which cause periprosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening, the most common causes of total joint arthroplasty failure. During this pathological process, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays an important role in wear-particle-induced osteolysis. In this study, recombination adenovirus (Ad) vectors carrying both target genes [TNF-α small interfering RNA (TNF-α-siRNA) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2)] were synthesized and transfected into RAW264.7 macrophages and pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, respectively. The target gene BMP-2, expressed on pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and silenced by the TNF-α gene on cells, was treated with titanium (Ti) particles that were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. We showed that recombinant adenovirus (Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2) can induce osteoblast differentiation when treated with conditioned medium (CM) containing RAW264.7 macrophages challenged with a combination of Ti particles and Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2 (Ti-ad CM) assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity. The receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand was downregulated in pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells treated with Ti-ad CM in comparison with conditioned medium of RAW264.7 macrophages challenged with Ti particles (Ti CM). We suggest that Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2 induced osteoblast differentiation and inhibited osteoclastogenesis on a cell model of a Ti particle-induced inflammatory response, which may provide a novel approach for the treatment of periprosthetic osteolysis.

  17. A tomato mutant that shows stunting, wilting, progressive necrosis and constitutive expression of defence genes contains a recombinant Hcr9 gene encoding an autoactive protein.

    PubMed

    Barker, Claire L; Talbot, Stephen J; Jones, Jonathan D G; Jones, David A

    2006-05-01

    The tomato Cf-9 gene confers resistance to races of the leaf mould fungus Cladosporium fulvum that carry the Avr9 avirulence gene. Cf-9 resides at a locus containing five paralogous genes and was isolated by transposon tagging using a modified maize Dissociation (Ds) element. The tagging experiment generated an allelic series of Ds-induced mutations of Cf-9, most of which were wild type in appearance. However, one mutant, designated M205, showed stunted growth, wilting, progressive leaf chlorosis and necrosis and constitutive expression of defence genes. The phenotype of M205 was caused by a semidominant, Avr9-independent mutation that co-segregated with a Ds element insertion at the Cf-9 locus. Molecular genetic analysis indicated that the Cf-9 locus of M205 had undergone recombination, generating a chimeric gene, designated Hcr9-M205, that comprised an in-frame fusion between the 5' coding region of the Cf-9 paralogue, Hcr9-9A, and the 3' coding region of Cf-9. The presence of a possible excision footprint adjacent to the junction between Hcr9-9A and Cf-9, and a Ds insertion at the homologous position in the downstream paralogue Hcr9-9D, is consistent with recombination between Hcr9-9A and Cf-9 promoted by transposition of Ds from Cf-9 into Hcr9-9D. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of Hcr9-M205 in Nicotiana tabacum caused chlorosis and the accumulation of defence gene transcripts, indicating that the protein encoded by this novel Hcr9 gene is autoactive.

  18. Rice hemoglobins. Gene cloning, analysis, and O2-binding kinetics of a recombinant protein synthesized in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Peter, R; Hargrove, M S; Sarath, G; Moran, J F; Lohrman, J; Olson, J S; Klucas, R V

    1997-01-01

    Although nonsymbiotic hemoglobins (Hbs) are found in different tissues of dicots and monocots, very little is known about hb genes in monocots and the function of Hbs in nonsymbiotic tissues. We report the cloning and analysis of two rice (Oryza sativa L.) hb genes, hb1 and hb2, that code for plant Hbs. Rice hb1 and hb2 genes contain four exons and three introns, as with all of the known plant hb genes. At least three copies of the hb gene were detected in rice DNA, and analysis of gene expression shows that hb1 and hb2 are expressed in leaves but only hb1 is expressed in roots. A cDNA for rice Hb1 was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant Hb (rHb1) shows an unusuall