Science.gov

Sample records for recombinant anti-mesothelin immunotoxin

  1. Methylation-associated partial down-regulation of mesothelin causes resistance to anti-mesothelin immunotoxins in a pancreatic cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Hollevoet, Kevin; Mason-Osann, Emily; Müller, Fabian; Pastan, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Anti-mesothelin Pseudomonas exotoxin A-based recombinant immunotoxins (RITs) present a potential treatment modality for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). To study mechanisms of resistance, the sensitive PDAC cell line KLM-1 was intermittently exposed to the anti-mesothelin SS1-LR-GGS RIT. Surviving cells were resistant to various anti-mesothelin RITs (IC50s >1 μg/ml), including the novel de-immunized RG7787. These resistant KLM-1-R cells were equally sensitive to the anti-CD71 HB21(Fv)-PE40 RIT as KLM-1, indicating resistance was specific to anti-mesothelin RITs. Mesothelin gene expression was partially down-regulated in KLM-1-R, resulting in 5-fold lower surface protein levels and decreased cellular uptake of RG7787 compared to KLM-1. Bisulfite sequencing analysis found that the mesothelin promoter region was significantly more methylated in KLM-1-R (59 ± 3.6%) compared to KLM-1 (41 ± 4.8%), indicating hypermethylation as a mechanism of mesothelin downregulation. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine restored original mesothelin surface expression to more than half in KLM-1-R and increased sensitivity to RG7787 (IC50 = 722.4 ± 232.6 ng/ml), although cells remained significantly less sensitive compared to parental KLM-1 cells (IC50 = 4.41 ± 0.38 ng/ml). Mesothelin cDNA introduction in KLM-1-R led to 5-fold higher surface protein levels and significantly higher RG7887 uptake compared to KLM-1. As a result, the original sensitivity to RG7787 was fully restored (IC50 = 4.49 ± 1.11 ng/ml). A significantly higher RG7787 uptake was thus required to reach the original cytotoxicity in resistant cells, hinting that intracellular RIT trafficking is also a limiting factor. RNA deep sequencing analysis of KLM-1 and KLM-1-R cells supported our experimental findings; compared to KLM-1, resistant cells displayed differential expression of genes linked to intracellular transport and an expression pattern that matched a more general hypermethylation status

  2. 77 FR 8263 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Anti-mesothelin Targeted Immunotoxins...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... one major B-cell epitope due to the alteration of an amino acid. The immunotoxin may include... lacks at least one major B-cell epitope due to the alteration an amino acid. Ultimately, the PE used...

  3. 77 FR 5036 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancers AGENCY: National... Antibodies Specific for Mesothelin'' [HHS Ref. E-079-2008/0- US-01], PCT Application PCT/US2009/038228 entitled ``Human Monoclonal Antibody Against Mesothelin'' , Australian patent application AU...

  4. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages in an experimental glioma model with a recombinant immunotoxin to folate receptor beta.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku; Tanaka, Masashi; Tsuneyoshi, Yasuhiro; Xu, Baohui; Michie, Sara A; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Hirano, Hirofumi; Arita, Kazunori; Matsuyama, Takami

    2009-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in glioblastomas and a high degree of macrophage infiltration is associated with a poor prognosis for glioblastoma patients. However, it is unclear whether TAMs in glioblastomas promote tumor growth. In this study, we found that folate receptor beta (FR beta) was expressed on macrophages in human glioblastomas and a rat C6 glioma implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. To target FR beta-expressing TAMs, we produced a recombinant immunotoxin consisting of immunoglobulin heavy and light chain Fv portions of an anti-mouse FR beta monoclonal antibody and Pseudomonas exotoxin A. Injection of the immunotoxin into C6 glioma xenografts in nude mice significantly depleted TAMs and reduced tumor growth. The immunotoxin targeting FR beta-expressing macrophages will provide a therapeutic tool for human glioblastomas.

  5. In vitro and in vivo effects of a recombinant anti-PSMA immunotoxin in combination with docetaxel against prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Marta; Schultze-Seemann, Susanne; Bogatyreva, Lioudmila; Hauschke, Dieter; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Wolf, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel (DOC) is used for the first-line treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CPRC). However, the therapeutic effects are limited, only about one half of patients respond to the therapy and severe side effects possibly lead to discontinuation of treatment. Therefore, actual research is focused on the development of new DOC-based combination treatments. In this study we investigated the antitumor effects of a recombinant immunotoxin targeting the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in combination with DOC in vitro and in vivo. The immunotoxin consists of an anti-PSMA single chain antibody fragment (scFv) as binding and a truncated form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exotoxin A (PE40) as toxin domain. The immunotoxin induced apoptosis and specifically reduced the viability of androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent C4-2 prostate cancer cells. A synergistic cytotoxic activity was observed in combination with DOC with IC50 values in the low picomolar or even femtomolar range. Moreover, combination treatment resulted in an enhanced antitumor activity in a C4-2 SCID mouse xenograft model. This highlights the immunotoxin as a promising therapeutic agent for a future DOC-based combination therapy of CPRC. PMID:26968813

  6. A bivalent recombinant immunotoxin with high potency against tumors with EGFR and EGFRvIII expression.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jie; Liu, Yuanyi; Gao, Shuying; Lin, Stephen; Gu, Xinbin; Pomper, Martin G; Wang, Paul C; Shan, Liang

    2015-01-01

    EGFR and EGFRvIII are overexpressed in various types of cancer, serving as optimal targets for cancer therapy. Capitalizing on the high specificity of humanized antibody 806 (mAb806) to the EGFR and EGFRvIII overexpressed in cancer, we designed and generated a bivalent recombinant immunotoxin (RIT, DT390-BiscFv806) by fusing the mAb806-derived bivalent single-chain variable fragment with a diphtheria toxin fragment, DT390. In vitro, DT390-BiscFv806 efficiently internalized into the cells and exhibited high cytotoxicity against the U87 glioblastoma cells and the EGFRvIII-transfected U87 (U87-EGFRvIII) cells with a half maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) of 1.47 nM and 2.26 × 10(-4) nM, respectively. Notably, DT390-BiscFv806 was 4 orders of magnitude more potent against the U87-EGFRvIII cells than against the parent U87 cells. The cytotoxicity against a group of 6 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were further analyzed, showing an IC50 ranging from 0.24 nM to 156 nM, depending on the expression level of EGFR/EGFRvIII. In animals, the U87-EGFRvIII tumor xenografts grew extremely faster than the parental U87, and systemic administration of DT390-BiscFv806 significantly inhibited the growth of established U87-EGFRvIII and U87 tumor xenografts, showing a growth inhibition rate of 76.3% (59.82-96.2%) and 59.4% (31.5-76.0%), respectively. In pathology, the RIT-treated tumors exhibited a low mitotic activity and a large number of degenerative tumor cells, compared with the control tumors. The results indicate that DT390-BiscFv806 is promising for treatment of various types of cancer, especially for those with high EGFR expression or with EGFR and EGFRvIII co-expression.

  7. Dual B- and T-cell de-immunization of recombinant immunotoxin targeting mesothelin with high cytotoxic activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Ronit; Onda, Masanori; Park, Dong; Addissie, Selamawit; Xiang, Laiman; Zhang, Jingli; Hassan, Raffit; Pastan, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant immunotoxins (RITs) are genetically engineered proteins being developed to treat cancer. They are composed of an Fv that targets a cancer antigen and a portion of a protein toxin. Their clinical success is limited by their immunogenicity. Our goal is to produce a new RIT that targets mesothelin and is non-immunogenic by combining mutations that decrease B- and T-cell epitopes. Starting with an immunotoxin that has B-cell epitopes suppressed, we added mutations step-wise that suppress T-cell epitopes. The final protein (LMB-T14) has greatly reduced antigenicity as assessed by binding to human anti-sera and a greatly decreased ability to activate helper T-cells evaluated in a T-cell activation assay. It is very cytotoxic to mesothelioma cells from patients, and to cancer cell lines. LMB-T14 produces complete remissions of a mesothelin expressing cancer (A431/H9) xenograft. The approach used here can be used to de-immunize other therapeutic foreign proteins. PMID:27167198

  8. Selective killing of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytically infected cells with a recombinant immunotoxin targeting the viral gpK8.1A envelope glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Deboeeta; Chandran, Bala

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) is etiologically associated with three neoplastic syndromes: Kaposi sarcoma and the uncommon HIV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman disease. The incidence of the latter B-cell pathology has been increasing in spite of antiretroviral therapy; its association with lytic virus replication has prompted interest in therapeutic strategies aimed at this phase of the virus life cycle. We designed and expressed a recombinant immunotoxin (2014-PE38) targeting the gpK8.1A viral glycoprotein expressed on the surface of the virion and infected cells. We show that this immunotoxin selectively kills KSHV-infected cells in dose-dependent fashion, resulting in major reductions of infectious virus release. The immunotoxin and ganciclovir, an inhibitor of viral DNA replication, showed marked reciprocal potentiation of antiviral activities. These results suggest that the immunotoxin, alone or in combination, may represent a new approach to treat diseases associated with KSHV lytic replication. PMID:22377676

  9. In vitro and in vivo studies of antitumor effects of the recombinant immunotoxin MSH-PE38KDEL on melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hui, Q; Ma, J; Song, J; Liu, Z; Ren, H; Jiang, W; Wang, Y; Xu, Y; Guo, D; Zhang, X; Lu, S

    2014-01-01

    MSH-PE38KDEL is a chimeric molecule composed of MSH, and fused to a truncated mutant form of Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE38KDEL). Our study aims to evaluate the specific cytotoxicity of recombinant immunotoxin MSH-PE38KDEL on melanoma cells A875 and B16 in vitro, as well as its inhibition of metastatic melanoma in vivo. MSH-PE38KDEL was expressed in Escherichia coli, and greater than 90% purity was obtained. The purified MSH-PE38KDEL was found to be selectively cytotoxic to MSH receptor-positive melanoma cells in vitro. The specific cytotoxicity of recombinant MSH-PE38KDEL to A875 and B16 was over 85% by cell viability assay; however, MSH-PE38KDEL had no cytotoxicity to the human 2BS cells. The anti-tumor activity of MSH-PE38KDEL was evaluated in mice with induced melanoma through intra-tumor or intravenous administration. The results showed that 90% melanoma growths were inhibited, and 40% of the tumors were disappeared completely. Histopathology results showed MSH-PE38KDEL can effectively inhibit intrahepatic metastasis. In conclusion, MSH-PE38KDEL had cytotoxic effects on MSH receptor-positive melanoma cells, and causes significant tumor growth inhibition. These results support a possible new approach for the treatment of melanoma.

  10. Target-specific cytotoxic activity of recombinant immunotoxin scFv(MUC1)-ETA on breast carcinoma cells and primary breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravibhushan; Samant, Urmila; Hyland, Stephen; Chaudhari, Pradip R; Wels, Winfried S; Bandyopadhyay, Dilip

    2007-02-01

    MUC1 is a mucin family protein, overexpressed in more than 90% of breast cancers in an underglycosylated form, exposing the core peptides of the extracellular domain that act as a potential target for antibody-mediated therapy. We have developed an anti-MUC1 scFv antibody from a phage library of mice immunized with synthetic peptide MUC1-variable number of tandem repeats. MUC1 binding phages were affinity selected through biopanning using a biotin-streptavidin pull-down method. The selected phage clones showed target-specific binding to MUC1-expressing cells. Fusion of truncated Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (ETA) to a high binder, phage-derived scFv clone and bacterial expression and purification of recombinant scFv(MUC1)-ETA immunotoxin were done with good yield and purity. In vitro target-specific cytotoxic activity and target-specific binding of immunotoxin were shown on MUC1-expressing cells and primary breast tumor samples. A truncated ETA fusion protein expressed from the same vector but lacking scFv did not show cytotoxic effects, confirming target specificity. Our results suggest that the scFv(MUC1)-ETA immunotoxin has therapeutic potential and deserves further development and characterization for MUC1-specific breast cancers treatment.

  11. Non-invasive tumor detection in small animals using novel functional Pluronic nanomicelles conjugated with anti-mesothelin antibody.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Yong, Ken-Tye; Law, Wing-Chueng; Roy, Indrajit; Hu, Rui; Wu, Fang; Zhao, Weiwei; Huang, Kun; Erogbogbo, Folarin; Bergey, Earl J; Prasad, Paras N

    2011-04-01

    In this study QDs were encapsulated in carboxylated PluronicF127 (F127COOH) triblock polymeric micelles and conjugated with anti-mesothelin antibody for the purpose of alleviating potential toxicity, enhancing the stability and improving targeting efficiency of CdTe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in tumors. The amphiphilic triblock polymer of F127COOH contains hydrophilic carboxylated poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and hydrophobic poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) units. After encapsulating QDs into carboxylated F127 (F127COOH-QD) micelles, the particles were conjugated with anti-mesothelin antibodies to allow targeting of cancerous areas. The size of the monodispersed spherical QD-containing micelles was determined to be ∼120 nm by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was estimated to be 4.7 × 10(-7) M. In an in vitro study, the anti-methoselin antibody conjugated F127COOH (Me-F127COOH-QD) nanomicelles showed negligible cytotoxicity to pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1). Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the Me-F127COOH-QD nanomicelles were taken up more efficiently by Panc-1 cells, due to antibody mediated targeting. An in vivo imaging study showed that Me-F127COOH-QD nanomicelles accumulated at the pancreatic tumor site 15 min after intravenous injection. In addition, the low in vivo toxicity of the nanomicellar formulation was evaluated by pathological assays. These results suggest that anti-mesothein antibody conjugated carboxylated F127 nanomicelles may serve as a promising nanoscale platform for early human pancreatic cancer detection and targeted drug delivery.

  12. Comparison of growth inhibition of a human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line by free monoclonal antibodies and their corresponding antibody-recombinant ricin A chain immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Ettenson, D; Sheldon, K; Marks, A; Houston, L L; Baumal, R

    1988-01-01

    Four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) (8C, IgG2a; M2A, IgG2a; M2D, IgG2b; 10B, IgG1) directed against the human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line HEY were compared for their ability in the free form and as immunotoxins made with recombinant ricin A chain (rRA) to inhibit the growth of HEY cells. For in vitro studies cultured HEY cells were assayed for protein synthesis and plated in agarose to form colonies, and for in vivo studies they were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into BALB/c nu/nu (nude) mice at a challenge dose (3 X 10(5) cells) which produced carcinomatosis with ascites, leading to death 30 days following injection. In the free form, mAB 8C was the most potent in inhibiting colony formation in the complement (C)-mediated and ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytoxicity) assays in vitro. This mAb was also the only one capable of prolonging survival of mice, both in tumor cell neutralization, and tumor growth inhibition experiments. The four mAb-rRA immunotoxins were effective in inhibiting protein synthesis in vitro in the presence of 10(-7) M monensin. However, in vivo, only 8C-rRA and M2A-rRA were capable of prolonging survival of mice in tumor growth inhibition experiments. Our results suggest that mAb 8C might be useful in the free form and as an 8C-rRA immunotoxin for i.p. immunotherapy of ovarian cancer.

  13. Design, characterization and anti-tumour cytotoxicity of a panel of recombinant, mammalian ribonuclease-based immunotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Deonarain, M. P.; Epenetos, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (BSRNase) is an unusual member of the ribonuclease superfamily, because of its remarkable anti-tumour and immunosuppressive properties. We describe here the construction, expression, purification and characterization of a panel of six immunotoxins based upon this enzyme and show that we can increase its anti-tumour activity by over 2 x 10(4)-fold. This is achieved by improving tumour cell targeting using a single-chain Fv (scFv) directed against the oncofetal antigen placental alkaline phosphatase. As well as the simple scFv-BSRNase fusion protein, we have constructed five other derivatives with additional peptides designed to improve folding and intracellular trafficking and delivery. We find that the molecule most cytotoxic to antigen (PLAP)-positive cells in vitro is one that contains a C-terminal 'KDEL' endoplasmic reticulum retention signal and a peptide sequence derived from diphtheria toxin. All these molecules are produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli) as insoluble inclusion bodies and require extensive in vitro processing to recover antigen binding and ribonuclease activity. Despite incomplete ribonuclease activity and quaternary assembly, these molecules are promising reagents for specific chemotherapy of cancer and are potentially less harmful and immunogenic than current immunotoxins. Images Figure 2 PMID:9484808

  14. Development and investigation of recombinant immunotoxin protein 4D5scFv-mCherry-PE(40).

    PubMed

    Shilova, O N; Souslova, E A; Pilunov, A M; Deyev, S M; Petrov, R V

    2016-11-01

    Development of agents for theranostics implies combining the targeting module, the effector module, and the detection module within the same complex or recombinant protein. We have constructed, isolated, and characterized the 4D5scFv-mCherry-PE(40) protein, which exhibits fluorescent properties and specifically binds to cancer cells expressing the HER2 receptor and reduces their viability. The ability of the obtained targeted antitumor agent 4D5scFv-mCherry-PE(40) to selectively stain the HER2-positive cells and its highly selective cytotoxicity against these cells make the obtained targeted recombinant protein 4D5scFv-mCherry-PE(40) a promising theranostic agent for the diagnostics and therapy of HER2-positive human tumors.

  15. Targeting of locus ceruleus noradrenergic neurons expressing human interleukin-2 receptor α-subunit in transgenic mice by a recombinant immunotoxin anti-Tac(Fv)-PE38: a study for exploring noradrenergic influence upon anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Keiichi; Sugimoto, Naoya; Suzuki, Saya; Sawada, Keisuke; Das, Gopal; Uchida, Katsuya; Fuse, Toshimitsu; Ohara, Shinji; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2011-04-20

    The noradrenergic (NA) neurons in the locus ceruleus (LC) were ablated with a high degree of selectivity by immunotoxin-mediated neuronal targeting. Transgenic mice were used in which the human interleukin-2 receptor-α subunit (hIL-2Rα; Tac) is expressed under the promoter of dopamine β-hydroxylase. The recombinant immunotoxin, which is composed of the Fv fragment of an anti-hIL-2Rα monoclonal antibody fused to a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin [anti-Tac(Fv)-PE38], was injected bilaterally into the LC of the mouse. As a result, the LC-NA neurons disappeared almost completely, and tissue noradrenaline was depleted in brain regions that receive NA inputs from the LC. The decrement of tissue noradrenaline content was more profound compared with that in mice treated with N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4), a neurotoxin capable of ablating axons originating from the LC-NA neurons. Mice treated with either the immunotoxin or DSP-4 presented increased anxiety-like behaviors; in contrast, only the immunotoxin-treated mice, and not the DSP-4-treated mice, showed increased depression-like behavior. The immunotoxin-mediated neuronal targeting may provide a means for further unraveling the links between the LC and pathological manifestations of neurological disorders.

  16. Advances in Anticancer Immunotoxin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alewine, Christine; Hassan, Raffit

    2015-01-01

    Immunotoxins are a novel class of antibody-conjugated therapeutics currently in clinical development for a variety of malignancies. They consist of an antibody-based targeting domain fused to a bacterial toxin payload for cell killing. Immunotoxins kill cells by inhibiting protein synthesis, a unique mechanism of action that is toxic to both dividing and nondividing cells. Recent advances in the design and administration of immunotoxins are overcoming historical challenges in the field, leading to renewed interest in these therapeutics. PMID:25561510

  17. Glypican-3 Targeting Immunotoxins for the Treatment of Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Bryan D.; Ho, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of primary liver cancer, yet no effective therapeutics exist. This review provides an overview of the recent development of recombinant immunotoxins for the treatment of glypican-3 (GPC3) expressing HCC. GPC3 is a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is overexpressed in HCC, but is absent from normal adult human tissues. Treatment of HCC with anti-GPC3 immunotoxins represents a new therapeutic option. Using phage display and hybridoma technologies, three high affinity antibodies (HN3, HS20 and YP7) have been generated against GPC3. Two of these antibodies (HN3 and HS20) have demonstrated the ability to inhibit Wnt/Yap signaling, leading to a reduction in liver cancer cell proliferation. By combining the HN3 antibody capable of inhibiting Wnt/Yap signaling with the protein synthesis inhibitory domain of the Pseudomonas exotoxin, a recombinant immunotoxin that exhibits a dual inhibitory mechanism was generated. This immunotoxin was found to be highly effective in the treatment of human HCCs in mouse xenograft models. Engineering of the toxin fragment to reduce the level of immunogenicity is currently being explored. The development of immunotoxins provides opportunities for novel liver cancer therapies. PMID:27669301

  18. In vitro and in vivo targeting imaging of pancreatic cancer using a Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoprobe modified with anti-mesothelin antibody

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Le, Wenjun; Mei, Tianxiao; Wang, Tiegong; Chen, Luguang; Lei, Yi; Cui, Shaobin; Chen, Bingdi; Cui, Zheng; Shao, Chengwei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly malignant disease with a 5-year survival rate <5% mainly due to lack of early diagnosis and effective therapy. In an effort to improve the early diagnostic rate of pancreatic cancer, a nanoprobe Fe3O4@SiO2 modified with anti-mesothelin antibody (A-MFS) was prepared to target cells and tumor tissues highly expressing mesothelin in vitro (human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990) and in vivo (subcutaneously transplanted tumors) studies. The A-MFS probe was successfully prepared and was spherical and uniform with a hydrodynamic diameter between 110 and 130 nm. Cell Counting Kit-8 testing indicated that A-MFS was nontoxic in vitro and in vivo studies. The in vitro study showed that the A-MFS probe specifically targeted SW1990 cells with high mesothelin expression. The in vivo study was conducted in Siemens 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging. The average T2-weighted signal values of the xenografts were 966.533±31.56 before injecting A-MFS and 691.133±56.84 before injecting saline solution. After injection of 0.1 mL A-MFS via nude mouse caudal vein for 2.5 hours, the average T2-weighted signal of the xenograft decreased by 342.533±42.6. The signal value decreased by −61.233±33.9 and −58.7±19.4 after injection of the saline and Fe3O4@SiO2. The decrease of tumor signal by A-MFS was much more significant than that by saline and Fe3O4@SiO2 (P<0.05). The results demonstrated the high stability and nontoxicity of A-MFS, which effectively targeted pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. A-MFS is a promising agent for diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27274243

  19. Immune Depletion to Enhance Immunotoxin Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced mesothelioma who have not benefited from previous chemotherapy will receive pentostatin and cyclophosphamide to prevent an anti-immunotoxin immune response prior to and in conjunction with SS1P immunotoxin therapy.

  20. Scintigraphic monitoring of immunotoxins using radionuclides and heterobifunctional chelators

    SciTech Connect

    Reardan, D.; Bernhard, S.

    1991-10-22

    This patent describes a method for in vivo radioimmunodetection of cytotoxic immunotoxin. It comprises administering internally to a mammal a radio-labeled immunotoxin, wherein a heterobifunctional chelating agent provides a chemical bridge between a radiolabel and a cytotoxic component bound to the antigen-binding component of the immunotoxin, and detecting externally the distribution of the immunotoxin in the mammal.

  1. Alkylating agents and immunotoxins exert synergistic cytotoxic activity against ovarian cancer cells. Mechanism of action.

    PubMed Central

    Lidor, Y J; O'Briant, K C; Xu, F J; Hamilton, T C; Ozols, R F; Bast, R C

    1993-01-01

    Alkylating agents can be administered in high dosage to patients with ovarian cancer using autologous bone marrow support, but drug-resistant tumor cells can still persist. Immunotoxins provide reagents that might eliminate drug resistant cells. In the present study, concurrent treatment with alkylators and immunotoxins proved superior to treatment with each agent alone. Toxin immunoconjugates prepared from different monoclonal antibodies and recombinant ricin A chain (rRTA) inhibited clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cell lines in limiting dilution assays. When alkylating agents and toxin conjugates were used in combination, the addition of the immunotoxins to cisplatin, or to cisplatin and thiotepa, produced synergistic cytotoxic activity against the OVCA 432 and OVCAR III cell lines. Studies performed to clarify the mechanism of action showed that cisplatin and thiotepa had no influence on internalization and binding of the 317G5-rRTA immunotoxin. Intracellular uptake of [195m]Pt-cisplatin was not affected by the immunoconjugate and thiotepa. The combination of the 317G5-rRTA and thiotepa, as well as 317G5-rRTA alone, increased [195m]Pt cisplatin-DNA adduct levels. The immunotoxin alone and in combination with the alkylators decreased intracellular glutathione levels and reduced glutathione-S-transferase activity. Repair of DNA damage induced by the combination of alkylators and 317G5-rRTA was significantly reduced when compared to repair after damage with alkylators alone. These findings suggest that immunotoxins affect levels and activity of enzymes required for the prevention and repair of alkylator damage. Images PMID:8227359

  2. Humanized CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins exhibit promising anti-T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia potential

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuan; Li, Jialu; Zhu, Xuejun; Tang, Xiaowen; Bao, Yangyi; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Yuhui; Tian, Fang; Liu, Xiaomei; Yang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Background Nanobodies, named as VHHs (variable domain of heavy chain of HCAb [heavy-chain antibodies]), are derived from heavy-chain-only antibodies that circulate in sera of camelids. Their exceptional physicochemical properties, possibility of humanization, and unique antigen recognition properties make them excellent candidates for targeted delivery of biologically active components, including immunotoxins. In our previous efforts, we have successfully generated the monovalent and bivalent CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins, which can effectively trigger the apoptosis of CD7-positive malignant cells. To pursue the possibility of translating those immunotoxins into clinics, we humanized the nanobody sequences (designated as dhuVHH6) as well as further truncated the Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE)-derived PE38 toxin to produce a more protease-resistant form, which is named as PE-LR, by deleting majority of PE domain II. Methods and results Three new types of immunotoxins, dhuVHH6-PE38, dVHH6-PE-LR, and dhuVHH6-PE-LR, were successfully constructed. These recombinant immunotoxins were expressed in Escherichia coli and showed that nanobody immunotoxins have the benefits of easy soluble expression in a prokaryotic expression system. Flow cytometry results revealed that all immunotoxins still maintained the ability to bind specifically to CD7-positive T lymphocyte strains without binding to CD7-negative control cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that these proteins can be endocytosed into the cytoplasm after binding with CD7-positive cells and that this phenomenon was not observed in CD7-negative cells. WST-8 experiments showed that all immunotoxins retained the highly effective and specific growth inhibition activity in CD7-positive cell lines and primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Further in vivo animal model experiments showed that humanized dhuVHH6-PE38 immunotoxin can tolerate higher doses and extend the survival of NOD-Prkdcem26Il

  3. Immunotoxin Therapies for the Treatment of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Dependent Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Nathan; FitzGerald, David

    2016-01-01

    Many epithelial cancers rely on enhanced expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to drive proliferation and survival pathways. Development of therapeutics to target EGFR signaling has been of high importance, and multiple examples have been approved for human use. However, many of the current small molecule or antibody-based therapeutics are of limited effectiveness due to the inevitable development of resistance and toxicity to normal tissues. Recombinant immunotoxins are therapeutic molecules consisting of an antibody or receptor ligand joined to a protein cytotoxin, combining the specific targeting of a cancer-expressed receptor with the potent cell killing of cytotoxic enzymes. Over the decades, many bacterial- or plant-based immunotoxins have been developed with the goal of targeting the broad range of cancers reliant upon EGFR overexpression. Many examples demonstrate excellent anti-cancer properties in preclinical development, and several EGFR-targeted immunotoxins have progressed to human trials. This review summarizes much of the past and current work in the development of immunotoxins for targeting EGFR-driven cancers. PMID:27153091

  4. Enhancement of immunotoxin activity using chemical and biological reagents.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M.

    1997-01-01

    One of the major discoveries of effective therapeutics is the use of targeted treatment, such as antibody-directed toxins, i.e. immunotoxins; however, this medicine delivery strategy is still at a developmental stage. A number of problems need to be resolved; one is their inefficacy when applied in vivo. Research has stimulated interest in this area through the use of chemical reagents and other moieties to increase the activity of immunotoxins. In this article, reagents that can potentiate the cytotoxicity of immunotoxins are reviewed and the mechanisms that increase activity of immunotoxins are discussed. Lysosomotropic amines, especially ammonium chloride and chloroquine, may raise the pH value of the lysosome in which the conjugates enter. Carboxylic ionophores, e.g. monensin, can influence Golgi vacuolation, which may facilitate the routing of conjugates, augmenting activity. Calcium channel antagonists may increase immunotoxin killing through morphological or other mechanisms that are not yet well understood. Viral particles and surface structure can enhance the cytotoxicity of conjugates, probably through the mechanism of disrupting endosomes. In addition, cytokines, beta-adrenergic blockers, immunosuppressive agents (cyclosporin A) and some antibiotics (daunorubicin) can be used to increase the effect of immunotoxins. PMID:9155057

  5. Induction and increase of HLA-DR antigen expression by immune interferon on ML-3 cell line enhances the anti-HLA-DR immunotoxin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Chiron, M; Jaffrezou, J P; Carayon, P; Bordier, C; Roubinet, F; Xavier, C; Brandely, M; Laurent, G

    1990-01-01

    In order to evaluate the impact of induction and increase target antigen expression on immunotoxin potency, we measured the potentiating effect of recombinant immune interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma) on the cytotoxicity of an anti HLA-DR ricin A-chain immunotoxin (2G5 RTA-IT) on the myeloid cell line ML-3. After 48 h of incubation with rIFN-gamma (500 U/ml) the percentage of 2G5-positive cells increased from 40% to 79%, and the 2G5 mean density was enhanced by 10-fold (11,000 versus 110,000 molecules/cell). Concurrently, rIFN-gamma pretreatment induced a dramatic improvement of 2G5 RTA-IT dose-effect cytotoxicity, as well as immunotoxin cytotoxicity kinetics. When 2G5 RTA-IT was used at the optimal dose of 10(-8)M (the maximum dose which avoided non-specific ricin A-chain cytotoxicity), the immunotoxin-induced cell kill increased with the percentage of DR-positive ML-3 cells according to a similar linear-logarithmic function of rIFN-gamma concentration. Moreover, in the same range of rIFN-gamma concentrations, the killing values and the percentage of DR-positive ML-3 cells were similar if not identical. These findings imply that the enhancement of 2G5 RTA-IT cytotoxicity by rIFN-gamma is mainly related to the rIFN-gamma 2G5 antigen induction on HLA-DR negative cells when immunotoxin was used at 10(-8) M. Furthermore, 2G5 RTA-IT dose-effect cytotoxicity on DR-expressing ML-3 cells, when used at lower concentrations, was also increased by rIFN-gamma in a dose-dependent manner. This result suggests that for immunotoxin concentrations close to the limiting membrane saturation dose (10(-10)M), rIFN-gamma may not solely act by inducing HLA-DR expression on DR-negative ML-3 subpopulation but also by increasing individual cellular DR density on DR expressing ML-3 cells. Finally, our study showed that immunotoxin potency on malignant cell populations which display an heterogeneous antigen expression, could be greatly improved by the use of rIFN-gamma. PMID:2122930

  6. Single-chain antibody-based immunotoxins targeting Her2/neu: design optimization and impact of affinity on antitumor efficacy and off-target toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Marks, James D; Huang, Qian; Rudnick, Stephen I; Xiong, Chiyi; Hittelman, Walter N; Wen, Xiaoxia; Marks, John W; Cheung, Lawrence H; Boland, Kim; Li, Chun; Adams, Gregory P; Rosenblum, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant immunotoxins, consisting of single-chain variable fragments (scFv) genetically fused to polypeptide toxins, represent potentially effective candidates for cancer therapeutics. We evaluated the affinity of various anti-Her2/neu scFv fused to recombinant gelonin (rGel) and its effect on antitumor efficacy and off-target toxicity. A series of rGel-based immunotoxins were created from the human anti-Her2/neu scFv C6.5 and various affinity mutants (designated ML3-9, MH3-B1, and B1D3) with affinities ranging from 10(-8) to 10(-11) mol/L. Against Her2/neu-overexpressing tumor cells, immunotoxins with increasing affinity displayed improved internalization and enhanced autophagic cytotoxicity. Targeting indices were highest for the highest affinity B1D3/rGel construct. However, the addition of free Her2/neu extracellular domain (ECD) significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of B1D3/rGel because of immune complex formation. In contrast, ECD addition had little impact on the lower affinity constructs in vitro. In vivo studies against established BT474 M1 xenografts showed growth suppression by all immunotoxins. Surprisingly, therapy with the B1D3-rGel induced significant liver toxicity because of immune complex formation with shed Her2/neu antigen in circulation. The MH3-B1/rGel construct with intermediate affinity showed effective tumor growth inhibition without inducing hepatotoxicity or complex formation. These findings show that while high-affinity constructs can be potent antitumor agents, they may also be associated with mistargeting through the facile formation of complexes with soluble antigen leading to significant off-target toxicity. Constructs composed of intermediate-affinity antibodies are also potent agents that are more resistant to immune complex formation. Therefore, affinity is an exceptionally important consideration when evaluating the design and efficacy of targeted therapeutics.

  7. Towards Engineering Novel PE-Based Immunotoxins by Targeting Them to the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Marta; Gorzkiewicz, Michal; Grzesik, Joanna; Walczak-Drzewiecka, Aurelia; Salkowska, Anna; Rodakowska, Ewelina; Steczkiewicz, Kamil; Rychlewski, Leszek; Dastych, Jaroslaw; Ginalski, Krzysztof

    2016-11-10

    Exotoxin A (PE) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase, which can permanently inhibit translation in the attacked cells. Consequently, this toxin is frequently used in immunotoxins for targeted cancer therapies. In this study, we propose a novel modification to PE by incorporating the NLS sequence at its C-terminus, to make it a selective agent against fast-proliferating cancer cells, as a nucleus-accumulated toxin should be separated from its natural substrate (eEF2) in slowly dividing cells. Here, we report the cytotoxic activity and selected biochemical properties of newly designed PE mutein using two cellular models: A549 and HepG2. We also present a newly developed protocol for efficient purification of recombinant PE and its muteins with very high purity and activity. We found that furin cleavage is not critical for the activity of PE in the analyzed cell lines. Surprisingly, we observed increased toxicity of the toxin accumulated in the nucleus. This might be explained by unexpected nuclease activity of PE and its potential ability to cleave chromosomal DNA, which seems to be a putative alternative intoxication mechanism. Further experimental investigations should address this newly detected activity to identify catalytic residues and elucidate the molecular mechanism responsible for this action.

  8. Towards Engineering Novel PE-Based Immunotoxins by Targeting Them to the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Borowiec, Marta; Gorzkiewicz, Michal; Grzesik, Joanna; Walczak-Drzewiecka, Aurelia; Salkowska, Anna; Rodakowska, Ewelina; Steczkiewicz, Kamil; Rychlewski, Leszek; Dastych, Jaroslaw; Ginalski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Exotoxin A (PE) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase, which can permanently inhibit translation in the attacked cells. Consequently, this toxin is frequently used in immunotoxins for targeted cancer therapies. In this study, we propose a novel modification to PE by incorporating the NLS sequence at its C-terminus, to make it a selective agent against fast-proliferating cancer cells, as a nucleus-accumulated toxin should be separated from its natural substrate (eEF2) in slowly dividing cells. Here, we report the cytotoxic activity and selected biochemical properties of newly designed PE mutein using two cellular models: A549 and HepG2. We also present a newly developed protocol for efficient purification of recombinant PE and its muteins with very high purity and activity. We found that furin cleavage is not critical for the activity of PE in the analyzed cell lines. Surprisingly, we observed increased toxicity of the toxin accumulated in the nucleus. This might be explained by unexpected nuclease activity of PE and its potential ability to cleave chromosomal DNA, which seems to be a putative alternative intoxication mechanism. Further experimental investigations should address this newly detected activity to identify catalytic residues and elucidate the molecular mechanism responsible for this action. PMID:27834892

  9. Experimental treatment of human Hodgkin's disease with ricin A-chain immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Gottstein, C; Winkler, U; Amlot, P; Pileri, S; Diehl, V; Thorpe, P

    1994-05-01

    In the present paper we describe the evaluation of ricin A-chain immunotoxins for clinical application in Hodgkin's disease. The immunotoxins were constructed by chemically linking deglycosylated ricin-A to monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) recognising lymphocyte activation markers CD25, CD30, or IRac, which are expressed by Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg (H-RS) cells. The cytotoxic effects of the immunotoxins were investigated in vitro against L540Cy Hodgkin cells and in vivo against Hodgkin's tumors in nude mice and disseminated Hodgkin's tumors in SCID mice. MoAbs were evaluated for crossreactivity with normal human tissues and staining of sections from Hodgkin's disease tissue. Of 32 MoAbs, eight showed little crossreactivity with vital human organs and produced highly active immunotoxins. The most effective immunotoxin, RFT5 gamma l.dgA (CD25), inhibits the growth of H-RS cells at concentrations of 7 x 10(-12) M. RFT5 gamma l.dgA destroys about 60% of solid Hodgkin's tumors of 0.5 cm diameter in nude mice and induces complete remissions in 95% of SCID mice with disseminated Hodgkin's tumors when administered one day after tumor challenge. This immunotoxin binds to all H-RS cells in more than 90% of patients with Hodgkin's disease. Patients with refractory Hodgkin's disease are currently being treated in a phase-I/II clinical trial.

  10. The novel multispecies Fc-specific Pseudomonas exotoxin A fusion protein α-Fc-ETA' enables screening of antibodies for immunotoxin development.

    PubMed

    Klausz, Katja; Kellner, Christian; Derer, Stefanie; Valerius, Thomas; Staudinger, Matthias; Burger, Renate; Gramatzki, Martin; Peipp, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Immunoconjugates that deliver cytotoxic payloads to cancer cells represent a promising class of therapeutic agents which are intensively investigated in various clinical applications. Prerequisites for the generation of effective immunoconjugates are antibodies which efficiently deliver the respective cytotoxic payload. To facilitate the selection of human or mouse antibodies that display favorable characteristics as immunotoxins, we developed a novel Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA)-based screening protein. The α-Fc-ETA' consists of a multispecies-specific Fc-binding domain antibody genetically fused to a truncated ETA version (ETA'). α-Fc-ETA' non-covalently bound to human and mouse antibodies but did not form immune complexes with bovine immunoglobulins. In combination with antibodies harboring human or mouse Fc domains α-Fc-ETA' inhibited proliferation of antigen-expressing tumor cells. The cytotoxic effects were strictly antibody dependent and were observed with low α-Fc-ETA' concentrations. Mouse antibodies directed against CD7 and CD317/HM1.24 that previously had been used for the generation of functional recombinant immunotoxins, also showed activity in combination with α-Fc-ETA' by inhibiting growth of antigen-positive myeloma and leukemia cell lines. In contrast, α-kappa-ETA', a similarly designed human kappa light chain-specific fusion protein, was only specifically active in combination with antibodies containing a human kappa light chain. Thus, the novel α-Fc-ETA' fusion protein is broadly applicable in screening antibodies and Fc-containing antibody derivatives from different species to select for candidates with favorable characteristics for immunotoxin development.

  11. Different sensitivity of CD30+ cell lines to Ber-H2/saporin-S6 immunotoxin.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Bolognesi, A; Olivieri, F; Polito, L; Stirpe, F

    1998-01-01

    The in vitro sensitivity of cells to a Ber-H2(anti-CD30)/saporin-S6 immunotoxin has been investigated. The CD30+ cell lines, K562, L428 and L540, were used to study cell binding, uptake and degradation of the immunotoxin. K562 cells were less sensitive than L428 and L540 cells to the immunotoxin by approximately one order of magnitude. The difference in cytotoxicity correlated with the intracellular accumulation and with the ratio of degraded over total internalized Ber-H2/saporin-S6, regardless of the immunotoxin binding to the cells. After 6 h incubation, the less sensitive K562 cells (i) accumulated only one third and one tenth of the immunotoxin accumulated by the more sensitive L428 and L540 cells, respectively, and (ii) degraded two thirds of the internalized protein versus one third degraded by either L428 or L540 cells. Ammonium chloride and chloroquine reduced the cytotoxicity of the immunotoxin towards K562 but not to L540 cells. This effect correlated with the increment of immunotoxin catabolism by K562 cells in the presence of chloroquine. In conclusion, uptake alone of an immunotoxin by target cells is not sufficient to assure its efficacy which might also depend on intracellular routing. Only a cytotoxicity test may be really predictive.

  12. Noradrenergic lesioning with an anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picklo, M. J.; Wiley, R. G.; Lappi, D. A.; Robertson, D.

    1994-01-01

    Sympathectomy has been achieved by a variety of methods but each has its limitations. These include lack of tissue specificity, incomplete lesioning, and the age range of susceptibility to the lesioning. To circumvent these drawbacks, an immunotoxin was constructed using a monoclonal antibody against the noradrenergic specific enzyme dopamine beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) coupled via a disulfide bond to saporin, a ribosomal inactivating protein. Three days after intravenous injection of the anti-D beta H immunotoxin (50 micrograms) into adult Sprague-Dawley rats, 66% of neurons in the superior cervical ganglia were chromatolytic. Superior cervical ganglia neurons were poisoned in 1 day old and 1 week old (86% of neurons) neonatal rats following subcutaneous injection of 3.75 and 15 micrograms, respectively. The anti-D beta H immunotoxin will be a useful tool in the study of the peripheral noradrenergic system in adult and neonatal animals.

  13. Immunotoxin targeting glypican-3 regresses liver cancer via dual inhibition of Wnt signalling and protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Tang, Zhewei; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Feng, Mingqian; Qian, Min; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Ho, Mitchell

    2015-03-11

    Glypican-3 is a cell surface glycoprotein that associates with Wnt in liver cancer. We develop two antibodies targeting glypican-3, HN3 and YP7. The first antibody recognizes a functional epitope and inhibits Wnt signalling, whereas the second antibody recognizes a C-terminal epitope but does not inhibit Wnt signalling. Both are fused to a fragment of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE38) to create immunotoxins. Interestingly, the immunotoxin based on HN3 (HN3-PE38) has superior antitumor activity as compared with YP7 (YP7-PE38) both in vitro and in vivo. Intravenous administration of HN3-PE38 alone, or in combination with chemotherapy, induces regression of Hep3B and HepG2 liver tumour xenografts in mice. This study establishes glypican-3 as a promising candidate for immunotoxin-based liver cancer therapy. Our results demonstrate immunotoxin-induced tumour regression via dual mechanisms: inactivation of cancer signalling via the antibody and inhibition of protein synthesis via the toxin.

  14. Evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for the development of breast cancer immunotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorn, M.J.; Ring, D.; Frankel, A.

    1985-03-01

    Eighty-five antibodies recognizing breast cancer-selective antigens were conjugated to ricin toxin A-chain using a disulfide linkage. The cytotoxicities of the resulting immunotoxins were determined on breast cancer cells and normal human fibroblasts. Twenty-four antibodies formed immunotoxins that were toxic to at least one breast cancer cell line at concentrations of 10 nM or less but were nontoxic to human fibroblast lines used as negative controls. Some of the breast tumor-selective immunotoxins were as toxic as a conjugate between monoclonal anti-transferrin receptor and ricin toxin A-chain (50% inhibition of cellular protein synthesis at approximately 0.1 nM). Another set of four immunotoxins were indiscriminately toxic to human breast tumor cell lines, two human fibroblast cell lines, and a human lymphoblastoid line. Several of the antibodies the toxin conjugates of which specifically killed breast cancer cell lines may be useful in cancer therapy, since they show a wide range of binding to individual breast tumors and cell lines and a limited range of binding to normal tissue types.

  15. Phage display-based generation of novel internalizing antibody fragments for immunotoxin-based treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fitting, Jenny; Blume, Tobias; ten Haaf, Andre; Blau, Wolfgang; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Tur, Mehmet Kemal; Barth, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The current standard treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is chemotherapy based on cytarabine and daunorubicine (7 + 3), but it discriminates poorly between malignant and benign cells. Dose-limiting off‑target effects and intrinsic drug resistance result in the inefficient eradication of leukemic blast cells and their survival beyond remission. This minimal residual disease is the major cause of relapse and is responsible for a 5-year survival rate of only 24%. More specific and efficient approaches are therefore required to eradicate malignant cells while leaving healthy cells unaffected. In this study, we generated scFv antibodies that bind specifically to the surface of AML blast cells and AML bone marrow biopsy specimens. We isolated the antibodies by phage display, using subtractive whole-cell panning with AML M2‑derived Kasumi‑1 cells. By selecting for internalizing scFv antibody fragments, we focused on potentially novel agents for intracellular drug delivery and tumor modulation. Two independent methods showed that 4 binders were internalized by Kasumi-1 cells. Furthermore, we observed the AML‑selective inhibition of cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis by a recombinant immunotoxin comprising one scFv fused to a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA'). This method may therefore be useful for the selection of novel disease-specific internalizing antibody fragments, providing a novel immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of AML patients. PMID:25760770

  16. Novel CD7-specific nanobody-based immunotoxins potently enhanced apoptosis of CD7-positive malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jinle; Li, Jialu; Zhu, Xuejun; Yu, Yuan; Chen, Dan; Yuan, Lei; Gu, Zhenyang; Zhang, Xingding; Qi, Lin; Gong, Zhishu; Jiang, Pengjun; Yu, Juhua; Meng, Huimin; An, Gangli

    2016-01-01

    Various CD7-targeting immunotoxins have been tested for its potential in treating CD7+ malignant patients but none of those immunotoxins was approved clinically because of lacking enough efficacy and safety. Here we successfully constructed the monovalent and bivalent CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins PG001 and PG002, both conjugated with a truncated derivative of Pseudomonas exotoxin A respectively. The prokaryotic system expressed immunotoxins not only maintained their binding specificity for CD7-positive cells with a Kd of 16.74 nM and 3.6 nM for PG001 and PG002 respectively, but also efficiently promoted antigen-restricted apoptosis of the CD7-positive leukemia cell lines Jurkat and CEM, and primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells with an in vitro cytotoxic activity (EC50) in the range of 23-30 pM for PG002. In NOD/SCID mice transplanted with CEM cells, PG001 and PG002 prevented engraftment of the cells and markedly prolonged mouse survival. Owing to the efficient antigen-restricted anti-leukemic activity of PG002, this CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxin exhibited a superior anti-CD7 positive malignancies activity than previously reported immunotoxins, and may represent a promising therapeutic strategy in treating CD7-positive leukemia and lymphoma, which still remain a significant clinical challenge. PMID:27083001

  17. [New perspectives in oncology: is selective destruction of tumor cells with immunotoxins in Hodgkin's disease an additional therapeutic alternative?].

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Gottstein, C; Winkler, U; Schön, G; Amlot, P; Thorpe, P; Diehl, V

    1992-10-15

    In the present paper, the authors describe the production and testing of immunotoxins for clinical application in Hodgkin's disease. The immunotoxins were constructed by chemical coupling of deglycolysated ricin-A to monoclonal antibodies against antigens on Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg cells (CD25, CD30, IRac). The cytotoxic effect of the immunotoxins was investigated in vitro against Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg cells (H-RS) and in vivo against solid Hodgkin's tumors in nude mice and disseminated Hodgkin's tumors in SCID mice. Cross-reactivity with normal tissue and the staining behaviour observed in sections of Hodgkin's tissue of various subtypes proved important parameters for the assessment of clinical applicability. Of more than 30 evaluated MoAb's, eight immunotoxins were produced, of which six showed both, cytotoxic effects of considerable potency against Hodgkin's tumor cells and low cross-reactivity with vital human organs. The most effective immunotoxin, RFT5 gamma 1.dgA, (CD25) inhibits the growth of H-RS cells at concentrations of 7 pMol and destroys about 60% of solid Hodgkin's tumors of 0.5 cm in diameter in nude mice. This immunotoxin binds to virtually all tumor cells in more than 90% of patients with Hodgkin's disease. Sufficient quantities of RFT5 gamma 1.dgA were produced for the treatment of patients with refractory Hodgkin's disease. These patients are currently being treated in a phase I clinical trial.

  18. Prospects of bacterial and plant protein-based immunotoxins for treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Weidle, Ulrich H; Tiefenthaler, Georg; Schiller, Christian; Weiss, Elisabeth H; Georges, Guy; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial- and plant-derived immunotoxins have documented potential for treatment of cancer. We discuss Anthrax toxin, ribosome inactivating-toxins, such as saporin and ricin, and ADP-ribosylating toxins such as Diphtheria toxin and Pseudomonas exotoxin, with focus on the latter, which has been most thoroughly investigated. Regarding their potential as anticancer agents, critical issues such as immunogenicity and toxicity are outlined. We describe different generations of immunotoxins, the pathways for the delivery of the cytotoxic 'warheads', molecular parameters modulating efficacy, and combination therapy with other anticancer agents. Finally, we discuss deimmunization strategies based on the removal of B- and T-cell epitopes from the cytotoxic component, and highlight promising clinical proof-of-concept studies.

  19. Anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin-induced sympathectomy in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picklo, M. J.; Wiley, R. G.; Lonce, S.; Lappi, D. A.; Robertson, D.

    1995-01-01

    Anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin (DHIT) is an antibody-targeted noradrenergic lesioning tool comprised of a monoclonal antibody against the noradrenergic enzyme, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, conjugated to saporin, a ribosome-inactivating protein. Noradrenergic-neuron specificity and completeness and functionality of sympathectomy were assessed. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 28.5, 85.7, 142 or 285 micrograms/kg DHIT i.v. Three days after injection, a 6% to 73% decrease in the neurons was found in the superior cervical ganglia of the animals. No loss of sensory, nodose and dorsal root ganglia, neurons was observed at the highest dose of DHIT. In contrast, the immunotoxin, 192-saporin (142 micrograms/kg), lesioned all three ganglia. To assess the sympathectomy, 2 wk after treatment (285 micrograms/kg), rats were anesthetized with urethane (1 g/kg) and cannulated in the femoral artery and vein. DHIT-treated animals' basal systolic blood pressure and heart rate were significantly lower than controls. Basal plasma norepinephrine levels were 41% lower in DHIT-treated animals than controls. Tyramine-stimulated release of norepinephrine in DHIT-treated rats was 27% of controls. Plasma epinephrine levels of DHIT animals were not reduced. DHIT-treated animals exhibited a 2-fold hypersensitivity to the alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. We conclude that DHIT selectively delivered saporin to noradrenergic neurons resulting in destruction of these neurons. Anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin administration produces a rapid, irreversible sympathectomy.

  20. High in Vitro Anti-Tumor Efficacy of Dimeric Rituximab/Saporin-S6 Immunotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea; Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 mAb Rituximab has revolutionized lymphoma therapy, in spite of a number of unresponsive or relapsing patients. Immunotoxins, consisting of toxins coupled to antibodies, are being investigated for their potential ability to augment Rituximab efficacy. Here, we compare the anti-tumor effect of high- and low-molecular-weight Rituximab/saporin-S6 immunotoxins, named HMW-IT and LMW-IT, respectively. Saporin-S6 is a potent and stable plant enzyme belonging to ribosome-inactivating proteins that causes protein synthesis arrest and consequent cell death. Saporin-S6 was conjugated to Rituximab through an artificial disulfide bond. The inhibitory activity of HMW-IT and LMW-IT was evaluated on cell-free protein synthesis and in two CD20+ lymphoma cell lines, Raji and D430B. Two different conjugates were separated on the basis of their molecular weight and further characterized. Both HMW-IT (dimeric) and LMW-IT (monomeric) maintained a high level of enzymatic activity in a cell-free system. HMW-IT, thanks to a higher toxin payload and more efficient antigen capping, showed stronger in vitro anti-tumor efficacy than LMW-IT against lymphoma cells. Dimeric HMW-IT can be used for lymphoma therapy at least for ex vivo treatments. The possibility of using HMW-IT augments the yield in immunotoxin preparation and allows the targeting of antigens with low internalization rates. PMID:27338475

  1. Successful treatment of disseminated human Hodgkin's disease in SCID mice with deglycosylated ricin A-chain immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Winkler, U; Gottstein, C; Schön, G; Kapp, U; Wolf, J; Hansmann, M L; Bohlen, H; Thorpe, P; Diehl, V; Engert, A

    1994-01-15

    To evaluate the effects of deglycosylated ricin A-chain (dgA) immunotoxins against disseminated Hodgkin's lymphoma, we used RFT5.dgA (CD25) and IRac.dgA (70 kD) to treat L540Cy Hodgkin cells in severely immunodeficient SCID mice. In this model, more than 90% of the animals developed multiple lymphomas in various organs such as the lymph nodes, liver, bone marrow, and extranodal sites that killed untreated animals after a mean survival time (MST) of 36.3 days. A single intraperitoneal injection of 8 micrograms of either immunotoxin rendered 95% (RFT5.dgA) and 93% (IRac.dgA), respectively, of mice tumor-free when applied 1 day after tumor challenge. The MST of the RFT5.dgA-treated group was extended by more than 80 days (P < .00001). SCID mice treated 12 days after tumor challenge had lower remission rates (46%), suggesting that the antitumor effect of the immunotoxins depends on the number of tumor cells present. We conclude that ricin A-chain immunotoxins have potent antitumor effects against disseminated Hodgkin's tumors in SCID mice and that this model is ideally suited for the evaluation of different immunotoxin treatment modalities.

  2. Complete suppression of in vivo growth of human leukemia cells by specific immunotoxins: nude mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, H.; Seon, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    In this study, immunotoxins containing monoclonal anti-human T-cell leukemia antibodies are shown to be capable of completely suppressing the tumor growth of human T-cell leukemia cells in vivo without any overt undersirable toxicity. These immunotoxins were prepared by conjugating ricin A chain (RA) with our monoclonal antibodies, SN1 and SN2, directed specifically to the human T-cell leukemia cell surface antigens TALLA and GP37, respectively. The authors have shown that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for human T-cell leukemia cells and do not react with various normal cells including normal T and B cells, thymocytes, and bone marrow cells. Ascitic and solid human T-cell leukemia cell tumors were generated in nude mice. The ascitic tumor was generated by transplanting Ichikawa cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell) i.p. into nude mice, whereas the solid tumor was generated by transplanting s.c. MOLT-4 cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell line) and x-irradiated human fibrosarcoma cells into x-irradiated nude mice. To investigate the efficacy of specific immunotoxins in suppression the in vivo growth of the ascitic tumor, they divided 40 nude mice that were injected with Ichikawa cells into four groups. None of the mice in group 4 that were treated with SN1-RA and SN2-RA showed any signs of a tumor or undesirable toxic effects for the 20 weeks that they were followed after the transplantation. Treatment with SN1-RA plus SN2-RA completely suppressed solid tumor growth in 4 of 10 nude mice carrying solid tumors and partially suppressed the tumor growth in the remaining 6 nude mice. These results strongly suggest that SN1-RA and SN2-RA may be useful for clinical treatment.

  3. Inhibition of antibody response to Pseudomonas exotoxin and an immunotoxin containing Pseudomonas exotoxin by 15-deoxyspergualin in mice.

    PubMed

    Pai, L H; FitzGerald, D J; Tepper, M; Schacter, B; Spitalny, G; Pastan, I

    1990-12-15

    Immunotoxins are potent cell-killing agents that may be useful in the treatment of cancer. The early production of neutralizing antibodies to immunotoxins is one of the major limiting factors for their use in humans. 15-Deoxyspergualin (DSG), a derivative of spergualin, which is a metabolite of Bacillus laterosporus, has been found to have immunosuppressive activity in rodents, dogs, and primates. We examined the suppressive activity of DSG on the antibody response to Pseudomonas exotoxin in mice by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Male BDF1 mice were immunized with a single dose of a nontoxic mutant of Pseudomonas exotoxin (40 micrograms) and then treated with i.p. injections of DSF at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 3 days. Although antibodies to Pseudomonas exotoxin were observed within 7 days in the control group, there was complete suppression of antibody production in the DSG-treated group. Immunosuppression has also been observed in animals immunized with multiple doses (10 mg x 7 d) of Pseudomonas exotoxin and treated with DSG at a dose of 5 mg/kg for 21 days. Similar immunosuppression was observed in mice given multiple doses of the immunotoxin, anti-Tac-LysPE40. We conclude that the immunosuppressive activity of DSG may be useful in increasing the duration of immunotoxin treatment.

  4. A new design immunotoxin for killing high-grade glioma U87 cells: from in vitro to in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luqiu, Zhou; Yiquan, Ke; Gengqiang, Ling; Yijing, Liu; Xiaodan, Jiang; Yingqian, Cai

    2012-01-01

    A new wave of engineered antibodies, leading to increased effectiveness of functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity or complement-dependent cytotoxicity, is being evaluated in clinical settings. Several, such as immunotoxins, are expected to receive approval for usage soon. In this study, using a cognate heavy framework region (HFR2), two complementarity-determining regions (CDRs, i.e., LCDR1 and HCDR3) were fused to the first 388 amino acid residues of diphtheria toxin (DT388) to establish the immunotoxin IT-87. It was found that the mimetics of LCDR1-HFR2-HCDR3 retained the antigen recognition of their parent antibody. The immunotoxin IT-87 could especially kill the U87 MG glioblastoma cell line, the targets of the parent antibody, in vitro; however, the IT-87 could not kill Rajicells. In SCID mice bearing both U87 and Raji cells, the IT-87 directly targeted the U87-induced tumors (via tumor-specific surface markers) and inhibited the growth of the cells in vivo over a 20-day daily IT-87 treatment period. It is believed that the design of this particular immunotoxin could be the basis for even more promising molecules to be used in the treatment of human cancers.

  5. In vivo therapy of a murine B cell tumor (BCL1) using antibody-ricin A chain immunotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Krolick, K.A.; Uhr, J.W.; Slavin, S.; Vitetta, E.S.

    1982-06-01

    Prolonged remissions were induced in mice bearing advanced BCL1 tumors by the combined approach of nonspecific cytoreductive therapy and administration of a tumor-reactive immunotoxin. Thus, the vast majority of the tumor cells (approximately 95%) were first killed by nonspecific cytoreductive therapy using total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and splenectomy. The residual tumor cells were then eliminated by intravenous administration of an anti-delta immunotoxin. In three of four experiments, all animals treated in the above fashion appeared tumor free 12-16 wk later. In one experiment, blood cells from the mice in remission were transferred to normal BALB/c recipients, and the latter animals have not developed detectable tumor for the 6 mo of observation. Because 1-10 adoptively transferred BCL1 cells will cause tumor in normal BALB/c mice by 12 wk, the inability to transfer tumor to recipients might indicate that the donor animals were tumor free. In the remainder of the animals treated with the tumor-reactive immunotoxin there was a substantial remission in all animals, but the disease eventually reappeared. In contrast, all mice treated with the control immunotoxin or antibody alone relapsed significantly earlier (3-4 wk after splenectomy).

  6. High throughput cytotoxicity screening of anti-HER2 immunotoxins conjugated with antibody fragments from phage-displayed synthetic antibody libraries

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shin-Chen; Chen, Hong-Sen; Lin, Hung-Wei; Chao, Wei-Ting; Chen, Yao-Sheng; Fu, Chi-Yu; Yu, Chung-Ming; Huang, Kai-Fa; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Immunotoxins are an important class of antibody-based therapeutics. The potency of the immunotoxins depends on the antibody fragments as the guiding modules targeting designated molecules on cell surfaces. Phage-displayed synthetic antibody scFv libraries provide abundant antibody fragment candidates as targeting modules for the immunoconjugates, but the discovery of optimally functional immunoconjugates is limited by the scFv-payload conjugation procedure. In this work, cytotoxicity screening of non-covalently assembled immunotoxins was developed in high throughput format to discover highly functional synthetic antibody fragments for delivering toxin payloads. The principles governing the efficiency of the antibodies as targeting modules have been elucidated from large volume of cytotoxicity data: (a) epitope and paratope of the antibody-based targeting module are major determinants for the potency of the immunotoxins; (b) immunotoxins with bivalent antibody-based targeting modules are generally superior in cytotoxic potency to those with corresponding monovalent targeting module; and (c) the potency of the immunotoxins is positively correlated with the densities of the cell surface antigen. These findings suggest that screening against the target cells with a large pool of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries without the limitations of natural antibody responses can lead to optimal potency and minimal off-target toxicity of the immunoconjugates. PMID:27550798

  7. 76 FR 63317 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, lung cancer, mesothelioma, and stomach... cancers, including mesothelioma, lung cancer, stomach/gastric cancer, ovarian cancer and pancreatic...

  8. Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Biology is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of mesothelin-expressing cancers.

  9. A CSPG4-specific immunotoxin kills rhabdomyosarcoma cells and binds to primary tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Brehm, Hannes; Niesen, Judith; Mladenov, Radoslav; Stein, Christoph; Pardo, Alessa; Fey, Georg; Helfrich, Wijnand; Fischer, Rainer; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Barth, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) remains challenging, with metastatic and alveolar RMS offering a particularly poor prognosis. Therefore, the identification and evaluation of novel antigens, which are suitable targets for immunotherapy, is one attractive possibility to improve the treatment of this disease. Here we show that chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) is expressed on RMS cell lines and RMS patient material. We evaluated the immunotoxin (IT) αMCSP-ETA', which specifically recognizes CSPG4 on the RMS cell lines RD, FL-OH1, TE-671 and Rh30. It is internalized rapidly, induces apoptosis and thus kills RMS cells selectively. We also demonstrate the specific binding of this IT to RMS primary tumor material from three different patients.

  10. Immunotoxins and Anticancer Drug Conjugate Assemblies: The Role of the Linkage between Components

    PubMed Central

    Dosio, Franco; Brusa, Paola; Cattel, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Immunotoxins and antibody-drug conjugates are protein-based drugs combining a target-specific binding domain with a cytotoxic domain. Such compounds are potentially therapeutic against diseases including cancer, and several clinical trials have shown encouraging results. Although the targeted elimination of malignant cells is an elegant concept, there are numerous practical challenges that limit conjugates’ therapeutic use, including inefficient cellular uptake, low cytotoxicity, and off-target effects. During the preparation of immunoconjugates by chemical synthesis, the choice of the hinge component joining the two building blocks is of paramount importance: the conjugate must remain stable in vivo but must afford efficient release of the toxic moiety when the target is reached. Vast efforts have been made, and the present article reviews strategies employed in developing immunoconjugates, focusing on the evolution of chemical linkers. PMID:22069744

  11. Enhanced Eradication of Lymphoma by Tumor-Specific Cytotoxic T-Cells Secreting an Engineered Tumor-Specific Immunotoxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    50U/ml) or CD3/CD28 antibodies (1mg/ml) or cultured unstimulated. In an ATP proliferation assay after three days culture, both parental and...unction o f m onoclonal an tibodies b y coupling toxic moieties to the targeting portion of the antibody . These “warheads” have included...radionucleotides and toxins (immunotoxins: IT). The antibody binds to the cell surface and the toxin is internalized into the cytosol, where it inhibits critical

  12. Cytotoxic effect of the immunotoxin constructed of the ribosome-inactivating protein curcin and the monoclonal antibody against Her2 receptor on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Quintero, Lidia Patricia; Contis Montes de Oca, Arturo; Romero Rojas, Andrés; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Martínez-Ayala, Alma Leticia

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of the curcin on cancer cells allows to consider this protein as the toxic component of an immunotoxin directed to Her2, which is associated with cancer. Reductive amination was proposed to conjugate curcin and an anti-Her2; the binding was tested using Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western blot, and immunocytochemistry. The in vitro cytotoxicity of curcin and the immunotoxin was assessed on breast cancer cell lines SK-BR-3 (Her2(+)) and MDA-MB-231 (Her2(-)). IC50 values for curcin were 15.5 ± 8.3 and 18.6 ± 2.4 μg/mL, respectively, statistically equivalent (p < 0.05). While to the immunotoxin was 2.2 ± 0.08 for SK-BR-3 and 147.6 ± 2.5 μg/mL for MDA-MB-231. These values showed that the immunotoxin was seven times more toxic to the SK-BR-3 than curcin and eight times less toxic to the MDA-MB-231. The immunotoxin composed of curcin and an antibody against Her2 and constructed by reductive amination could be a therapeutic candidate against Her2(+) cancer.

  13. Validation of a mutant of the pore-forming toxin sticholysin-I for the construction of proteinase-activated immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pentón, David; Pérez-Barzaga, Victor; Díaz, Iscel; Reytor, Mey L; Campos, Javier; Fando, Rafael; Calvo, Loany; Cilli, Eduardo M; Morera, Vivian; Castellanos-Serra, Lila R; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, María E; Alvarez, Carlos; Pons, Tirso; Tejuca, Mayra

    2011-06-01

    The use of pore-forming toxins from sea anemones (actinoporins) in the construction of immunotoxins (ITs) against tumour cells is an alternative for cancer therapy. However, the main disadvantage of actinoporin-based ITs obtained so far has been the poor cellular specificity associated with the toxin's ability to bind and exert its activity in almost any cell membrane. Our final goal is the construction of tumour proteinase-activated ITs using a cysteine mutant at the membrane binding region of sticholysin-I (StI), a cytolysin isolated from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. The mutant and the ligand moiety would be linked by proteinase-sensitive peptides through the StI cysteine residue blocking the toxin binding region and hence the IT non-specific killing activity. To accomplish this objective the first step was to obtain the mutant StI W111C, and to evaluate the impact of mutating tryptophan 111 by cysteine on the toxin pore-forming capacity. After proteolysis of the cleavage sequence, a short peptide would remain attached to the toxin. The next step was to evaluate whether this mutant is able to form pores even with a residual peptide linked to cysteine 111. In this work we demonstrated that (i) StI W111C shows pore-forming capacity in a nanomolar range, although it is 8-fold less active than the wild-type recombinant StI, corroborating the previously reported importance of residue 111 for the binding of StI to membranes, and (ii) the mutant is able to form pores even with a residual seven-residue peptide linked to cysteine 111. In addition, it was demonstrated that binding of a large molecule to cysteine 111 renders an inactive toxin that is no longer able to bind to the membrane. These results validate the mutant StI W111C for its use in the construction of tumour proteinase-activated ITs.

  14. Novel Chemokine-Based Immunotoxins for Potent and Selective Targeting of Cytomegalovirus Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Katja; Jeppesen, Mads G.; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel; Krzywkowski, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Immunotoxins as antiviral therapeutics are largely unexplored but have promising prospective due to their high selectivity potential and their unparalleled efficiency. One recent example targeted the virus-encoded G protein-coupled receptor US28 as a strategy for specific and efficient treatment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. US28 is expressed on virus-infected cells and scavenge chemokines by rapid internalization. The chemokine-based fusion-toxin protein (FTP) consisted of a variant (F49A) of CX3CL1 specifically targeting US28 linked to the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE). Here, we systematically seek to improve F49A-FTP by modifications in its three structural domains; we generated variants with (1) altered chemokine sequence (K14A, F49L, and F49E), (2) shortened and elongated linker region, and (3) modified toxin domain. Only F49L-FTP displayed higher selectivity in its binding to US28 versus CX3CR1, the endogenous receptor for CX3CL1, but this was not matched by a more selective killing of US28-expressing cells. A longer linker and different toxin variants decreased US28 affinity and selective killing. Thereby, F49A-FTP represents the best candidate for HCMV treatment. Many viruses encode internalizing receptors suggesting that not only HCMV but also, for instance, Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus may be targeted by FTPs. PMID:28251165

  15. Facilitation of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by a T cell-specific immunotoxin containing daunomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, S.S.; Inazawa, M.; Sinha, N.; Sawada, S.; Vergidis, R.; Diener, E.

    1987-12-01

    Daunomycin coupled via an acid-sensitive spacer to monoclonal Thy-1.2-specific antibody was used to purge T lymphocytes from a 1:1 mixture of murine C57BL/6J bone marrow and spleen cells prior to engraftment in fully allogeneic, irradiated BALB/c recipients. Treatment of bone marrow with the immunotoxin at a concentration used for purging had no effect on the viability of committed hematopoietic progenitor or multipotent stem cells. All of the recipients of purged bone marrow were at least 80% chimeric for donor peripheral blood cells and none developed graft-versus-host disease. Out of 50 chimeras, 49 were still alive more than 200 days posttransplantation. The chimeras were shown to be tolerant to donor tissue as tested by mixed lymphocyte reactivity, cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and skin grafting. The same tests revealed full immunocompetence of chimeras to third-party alloantigens. In vivo IgM and IgG antibody responses to sheep red blood cells were similar in magnitude in allogeneically and syngeneically reconstituted mice.

  16. Novel Chemokine-Based Immunotoxins for Potent and Selective Targeting of Cytomegalovirus Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Spiess, Katja; Jeppesen, Mads G; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel; Krzywkowski, Karen; Kledal, Thomas N; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2017-01-01

    Immunotoxins as antiviral therapeutics are largely unexplored but have promising prospective due to their high selectivity potential and their unparalleled efficiency. One recent example targeted the virus-encoded G protein-coupled receptor US28 as a strategy for specific and efficient treatment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. US28 is expressed on virus-infected cells and scavenge chemokines by rapid internalization. The chemokine-based fusion-toxin protein (FTP) consisted of a variant (F49A) of CX3CL1 specifically targeting US28 linked to the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE). Here, we systematically seek to improve F49A-FTP by modifications in its three structural domains; we generated variants with (1) altered chemokine sequence (K14A, F49L, and F49E), (2) shortened and elongated linker region, and (3) modified toxin domain. Only F49L-FTP displayed higher selectivity in its binding to US28 versus CX3CR1, the endogenous receptor for CX3CL1, but this was not matched by a more selective killing of US28-expressing cells. A longer linker and different toxin variants decreased US28 affinity and selective killing. Thereby, F49A-FTP represents the best candidate for HCMV treatment. Many viruses encode internalizing receptors suggesting that not only HCMV but also, for instance, Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus may be targeted by FTPs.

  17. A guide to taming a toxin: recombinant immunotoxins constructed from Pseudomonas exotoxin A for the treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weldon, John E.; Pastan, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Summary Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE) is a highly toxic protein secreted by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The modular structure and corresponding mechanism of action of PE make it amenable to extensive modifications that can redirect its potent cytotoxicity from disease to a therapeutic function. In combination with a variety of artificial targeting elements, such as receptor ligands and antibody fragments, PE becomes a selective agent for the elimination of specific cell populations. This review summarizes our current understanding of PE, its intoxication pathway, and ongoing efforts to convert this toxin into a treatment for cancer. PMID:21585657

  18. Anti-melanoma activity of the 9.2.27PE immunotoxin in dacarbazine resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Risberg, Karianne; Fodstad, Oystein; Andersson, Yvonne

    2010-04-01

    We have earlier shown that the 9.2.27 Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE) immunotoxin (IT) efficiently kills melanoma cells through inhibition of protein synthesis followed by some morphologic and biochemical features of apoptosis, a different cell killing mechanism than the one caused by Dacarbazine (DTIC), a chemotherapeutic drug used to treat malignant melanoma. To examine whether induced DTIC resistance also is a determining factor for the effectiveness of 9.2.27PE IT, we developed a DTIC resistant subline, FEMX-200DR, from the DTIC sensitive cell line FEMX. The cell variants were treated with 9.2.27PE, an IT binding to the high molecular weight-melanoma associated antigen (HMW-MAA) expressed on most malignant melanoma cells. The IT was equally effective in killing the FEMX-200DR and the FEMX cells, and the cell death was primarily caused by inhibition of protein synthesis. The DNA repair enzyme and apoptotic marker PARP, a substrate of caspase-3, was inactivated, although we observed only a minor activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8, intracellular proteases involved in apoptosis. In addition to being DTIC resistant, the FEMX-200DR cells were also more resistant to apoptosis than the parent cells as a 3 times higher concentration of the apoptotic inducer Staurosporine was needed to obtain IC50. Furthermore, in early passage malignant melanoma cell lines established from lymph node metastases, the 9.2.27PE caused a time-dependent and dose-dependent decrease in cell viability independent of their DTIC sensitivity. These findings show that the 9.2.27PE IT efficiently can cause cell death in malignant melanoma cells independent of their level of resistance to apoptosis and DTIC.

  19. Eradication of tumor colonization and invasion by a B cell-specific immunotoxin in a murine model for human primary intraocular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuqing; Mahesh, Sankaranarayana P; Shen, De Fen; Liu, Baoying; Siu, Willie O; Hwang, Frank S; Wang, Qing-Chen; Chan, Chi-Chao; Pastan, Ira; Nussenblatt, Robert B

    2006-11-01

    Human primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL) is predominantly a B cell-originated malignant disease with no appropriate animal models and effective therapies available. This study aimed to establish a mouse model to closely mimic human B-cell PIOL and to test the therapeutic potential of a recently developed immunotoxin targeting human B-cell lymphomas. Human B-cell lymphoma cells were intravitreally injected into severe combined immunodeficient mice. The resemblance of this tumor model to human PIOL was examined by fundoscopy, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and evaluated for molecular markers. The therapeutic effectiveness of immunotoxin HA22 was tested by injecting the drug intravitreally. Results showed that the murine model resembles human PIOL closely. Pathologic examination revealed that the tumor cells initially colonized on the retinal surface, followed by infiltrating through the retinal layers, expanding preferentially in the subretinal space, and eventually penetrating through the retinal pigment epithelium into the choroid. Several putative molecular markers for human PIOL were expressed in vivo in this model. Tumor metastasis into the central nervous system was also observed. A single intravitreal injection of immunotoxin HA22 after the establishment of the PIOL resulted in complete regression of the tumor. This is the first report of a murine model that closely mimics human B-cell PIOL. This model may be a valuable tool in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of human PIOL and for the evaluation of new therapeutic approaches. The results of B cell-specific immunotoxin therapy may have clinical implications in treating human PIOL.

  20. Immunotoxins Constructed with Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins and their Enhancers: A Lethal Cocktail with Tumor Specific Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Gilabert-Oriol, Roger; Weng, Alexander; von Mallinckrodt, Benedicta; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik; Thakur, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    The term ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) is used to denominate proteins mostly of plant origin, which have N-glycosidase enzymatic activity leading to a complete destruction of the ribosomal function. The discovery of the RIPs was almost a century ago, but their usage has seen transition only in the last four decades. With the advent of antibody therapy, the RIPs have been a subject of extensive research especially in targeted tumor therapies, which is the primary focus of this review. In the present work we enumerate 250 RIPs, which have been identified so far. An attempt has been made to identify all the RIPs that have been used for the construction of immunotoxins, which are conjugates or fusion proteins of an antibody or ligand with a toxin. The data from 1960 onwards is reviewed in this paper and an extensive list of more than 450 immunotoxins is reported. The clinical reach of tumor-targeted toxins has been identified and detailed in the work as well. While there is a lot of potential that RIPs embrace for targeted tumor therapies, the success in preclinical and clinical evaluations has been limited mainly because of their inability to escape the endo/lysosomal degradation. Various strategies that can increase the efficacy and lower the required dose for targeted toxins have been compiled in this article. It is plausible that with the advancements in platform technologies or improved endosomal escape the usage of tumor targeted RIPs would see the daylight of clinical success. PMID:25341935

  1. Non-genotoxic conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using a hematopoietic-cell-specific internalizing immunotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Palchaudhuri, Rahul; Saez, Borja; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Schajnovitz, Amir; Sykes, David B; Tate, Tiffany A; Czechowicz, Agnieszka; Kfoury, Youmna; Ruchika, FNU; Rossi, Derrick J; Verdine, Gregory L; Mansour, Michael K; Scadden, David T

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers curative therapy for patients with hemoglobinopathies, congenital immunodeficiencies, and other conditions, possibly including AIDS. Autologous HSCT using genetically corrected cells would avoid the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), but the genotoxicity of conditioning remains a substantial barrier to the development of this approach. Here we report an internalizing immunotoxin targeting the hematopoietic-cell-restricted CD45 receptor that effectively conditions immunocompetent mice. A single dose of the immunotoxin, CD45–saporin (SAP), enabled efficient (>90%) engraftment of donor cells and full correction of a sickle-cell anemia model. In contrast to irradiation, CD45–SAP completely avoided neutropenia and anemia, spared bone marrow and thymic niches, enabling rapid recovery of T and B cells, preserved anti-fungal immunity, and had minimal overall toxicity. This non-genotoxic conditioning method may provide an attractive alternative to current conditioning regimens for HSCT in the treatment of non-malignant blood diseases. PMID:27272386

  2. A multi-antigen vaccine in combination with an immunotoxin targeting tumor-associated fibroblast for treating murine melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jinxu; Hu, Biliang; Li, Si; Zhang, Chupei; Liu, Yarong; Wang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    A therapeutically effective cancer vaccine must generate potent antitumor immune responses and be able to overcome tolerance mechanisms mediated by the progressing tumor itself. Previous studies showed that glycoprotein 100 (gp100), tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1), and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) are promising immunogens for melanoma immunotherapy. In this study, we administered these three melanoma-associated antigens via lentiviral vectors (termed LV-3Ag) and found that this multi-antigen vaccine strategy markedly increased functional T-cell infiltration into tumors and generated protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity. We also engineered a novel immunotoxin, αFAP-PE38, capable of targeting fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-expressing fibroblasts within the tumor stroma. When combined with αFAP-PE38, LV-3Ag exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor effects on tumor growth in an established B16 melanoma model. The mechanism of action underlying this combination treatment likely modulates the immune suppressive tumor microenvironment and, consequently, activates cytotoxic CD8+ T cells capable of specifically recognizing and destroying tumor cells. Taken together, these results provide a strong rationale for combining an immunotoxin with cancer vaccines for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. PMID:27119119

  3. Production of recombinant immunotherapeutics for anticancer treatment: the role of bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Pranchevicius, Maria-Cristina S; Vieira, Thiessa R

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most important health problems because many cases are difficult to prevent. Cancer still has unknown mechanisms of pathogenesis, and its capacity to produce temporary or permanent damage, besides death, is very high. Although many anticancer therapies are available, finding a cure for cancer continues to be a difficult task. Thus, many efforts have been made to develop more effective treatments, such as immunotherapy based on a new class of tumor-specific products that are produced using recombinant DNA technology. These recombinant products are used with the main objectives of killing the tumor and stimulating immune cells to respond to the cancer cells. The principal recombinant products in anticancer therapy are immunostimulants, vaccines, antibodies, immunotoxins and fusion proteins. This review focuses on the general aspects of these genetically engineered products, their clinical performance, current advances and future prospects for this type of anticancer therapy.

  4. A novel combination immunotherapy for cancer by IL-13Rα2-targeted DNA vaccine and immunotoxin in murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hideyuki; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A; Husain, Syed R; Puri, Raj K

    2011-11-15

    Optimum efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines may require combinations that generate effective antitumor immune responses, as well as overcome immune evasion and tolerance mechanisms mediated by progressing tumor. Previous studies showed that IL-13Rα2, a unique tumor-associated Ag, is a promising target for cancer immunotherapy. A targeted cytotoxin composed of IL-13 and mutated Pseudomonas exotoxin induced specific killing of IL-13Rα2(+) tumor cells. When combined with IL-13Rα2 DNA cancer vaccine, surprisingly, it mediated synergistic antitumor effects on tumor growth and metastasis in established murine breast carcinoma and sarcoma tumor models. The mechanism of synergistic activity involved direct killing of tumor cells and cell-mediated immune responses, as well as elimination of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, consequently, regulatory T cells. These novel results provide a strong rationale for combining immunotoxins with cancer vaccines for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer.

  5. Combined use of an immunotoxin and cyclosporine to prevent both activated and quiescent peripheral blood T cells from producing type 1 human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, K D; Ramilo, O; Vitetta, E S

    1993-01-01

    Two different populations of infected T cells are present in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals: activated cells that produce virions and quiescent cells that harbor the viral genome but are unable to produce virus unless they are activated. Using an in vitro model of acute HIV infection, we have evaluated the effect of depleting activated T cells with an immunotoxin and subsequently inhibiting activation of quiescent T cells with an immunosuppressive agent. CD25 (Tac, p55), the alpha chain of the interleukin 2 receptor, is expressed on activated, but not quiescent, T cells. An anti-CD25-ricin A chain immunotoxin eliminated activated, CD25+ HIV-infected cells and, thereby, inhibited viral production by these cells. Subsequent addition of cyclosporine to the residual CD25- cells prevented their activation and thereby suppressed their ability to produce virus and to propagate the infection to uninfected T cells. Images PMID:8434001

  6. Purification and characterization of a novel type i ribosome inactivating protein, pachyerosin, from Pachyrhizus erosus seeds, and preparation of its immunotoxin against human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Lin; Cheng, Yuan-Liu; Qiu, Yi; Shen, Cai-Hong; Yi, Bin; Peng, Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Pachyrhizus erosus seeds have a high protein content and are used in China due to their cytotoxic effect. Here we report the biological and pharmacological activity of the protein extracts from P. erosus seeds. A novel ribosome-inactivating protein, pachyerosin, from P. erosus seeds was successively purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-sepharose FF, and Sephacryl S-200. Pachyerosin showed to be a type I ribosome-inactivating protein with a molecular mass of 29 kDa and an isoelectric point of 9.19. It strongly inhibited protein synthesis of rabbit reticulocyte lysate with an IC50 of 0.37 ng/mL and showed N-glycosidase activity on rat liver ribosomes with an EC50 of 85.9 pM. The N-terminal 27 amino acids of pachyerosin revealed a 60.71% sequence identity with abrin A from the seeds of Abrus precatorius. With the aim of targeting the delivery of pachyerosin, immunotoxin was prepared by conjugating pachyerosin with anti-human AFP monoclonal antibodies SM0736. The immunotoxin pachyerosin-SM0736 efficiently inhibited the growth of the human hepatoma cell line HuH-7 with an IC50 of 0.050 ± 0.004 nM, 2360 times lower than that of pachyerosin and 430 times lower than that of the immunotoxin against human gastric cancer cell line SGC7901. These results imply that pachyerosin may be used as a new promising anticancer agent.

  7. A deimmunised form of the ribotoxin, α-sarcin, lacking CD4+ T cell epitopes and its use as an immunotoxin warhead.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tim D; Hearn, Arron R; Holgate, Robert G E; Kozub, Dorota; Fogg, Mark H; Carr, Francis J; Baker, Matthew P; Lacadena, Javier; Gehlsen, Kurt R

    2016-08-29

    Fungal ribotoxins that block protein synthesis can be useful warheads in the context of a targeted immunotoxin. α-Sarcin is a small (17 kDa) fungal ribonuclease produced by Aspergillus giganteus that functions by catalytically cleaving a single phosphodiester bond in the sarcin-ricin loop of the large ribosomal subunit, thus making the ribosome unrecognisable to elongation factors and leading to inhibition of protein synthesis. Peptide mapping using an ex vivo human T cell assay determined that α-sarcin contained two T cell epitopes; one in the N-terminal 20 amino acids and the other in the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Various mutations were tested individually within each epitope and then in combination to isolate deimmunised α-sarcin variants that had the desired properties of silencing T cell epitopes and retention of the ability to inhibit protein synthesis (equivalent to wild-type, WT α-sarcin). A deimmunised variant (D9T/Q142T) demonstrated a complete lack of T cell activation in in vitro whole protein human T cell assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from donors with diverse HLA allotypes. Generation of an immunotoxin by fusion of the D9T/Q142T variant to a single-chain Fv targeting Her2 demonstrated potent cell killing equivalent to a fusion protein comprising the WT α-sarcin. These results represent the first fungal ribotoxin to be deimmunised with the potential to construct a new generation of deimmunised immunotoxin therapeutics.

  8. Cytotoxicity of the anti-CD22 immunotoxin HA22 (CAT-8015) against paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Mussai, Francis; Campana, Dario; Bhojwani, Deepa; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Steinberg, Seth M; Wayne, Alan S; Pastan, Ira

    2010-08-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) remains the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality in paediatrics and outcome is poor for patients who have high-risk ALL or relapse. HA22 (CAT-8015) is an immunotoxin composed of an anti-CD22 variable fragment linked to a 38 kDa truncated protein derived from Pseudomonas exotoxin A. Using a bone marrow mesenchymal cell culture assay to support ALL cell viability, we investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of HA22 against ALL blasts from newly diagnosed (n = 13) and relapsed patients (n = 22). There was interpatient variability in sensitivity to HA22. Twenty-four of 35 patient samples tested were sensitive (median 50% lethal concentration 3 ng/ml, range 1-80 ng/ml). Blasts from the other 11 patients were not killed by 500 ng/ml HA22. The median 50% lethal concentration was 20 ng/ml for all patients. There was no significant difference in HA22 sensitivity between diagnosis and relapse samples but peripheral blood ALL blasts were more sensitive to HA22 than those from bone marrow (P = 0.008). Thus, HA22, at concentrations achievable in patients, is highly cytotoxic to B-lineage ALL cells. These results provide a strong rationale for clinical testing of this agent in children with drug-resistant ALL and offers the potential to reduce morbidities of treatment while improving outcome.

  9. Actinomycin D enhances killing of cancer cells by immunotoxin RG7787 through activation of the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiu Fen; Xiang, Laiman; Zhou, Qi; Carralot, Jean-Philippe; Prunotto, Marco; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Pastan, Ira

    2016-01-01

    RG7787 is a mesothelin-targeted immunotoxin designed to have low-immunogenicity, high-cytotoxic activity and fewer side effects. RG7787 kills many types of mesothelin-expressing cancer cells lines and causes tumor regressions in mice. Safety and immunogenicity of RG7787 is now being assessed in a phase I trial. To enhance the antitumor activity of RG7787, we screened for clinically used drugs that can synergize with RG7787. Actinomycin D is a potent transcription inhibitor that is used for treating several cancers. We report here that actinomycin D and RG7787 act synergistically to kill many mesothelin-positive cancer cell lines and produce major regressions of pancreatic and stomach cancer xenografts. Analyses of RNA expression show that RG7787 or actinomycin D alone and together increase levels of TNF/TNFR family members and NF-κB–regulated genes. Western blots revealed the combination changed apoptotic protein levels and enhanced cleavage of Caspases and PARP. PMID:27601652

  10. Treatment of premalignancy: prevention of lymphoma in radiation leukemia virus-inoculated mice by cyclosporin A and immunotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Yefenof, E; Abboud, G; Epszteyn, S; Vitetta, E S

    1992-01-01

    Radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced preleukemic (PL) latency is characterized by the appearance of virus-infected PL cells in the thymus. The survival of these PL cells is dependent upon autostimulation with interleukin 4 (IL-4). We have intervened prophylactically in RadLV-induced preleukemia by using cyclosporin-A (CSA), which inhibits IL-4 production, and an immunotoxin (ITx) that kills PL cells. CSA efficiently inhibited IL-4 secretion from RadLV-induced PL and leukemic cells, and its administration to PL mice caused a significant delay in their death. An ITx consisting of anti-RadLV glycoprotein-70 (gp70) antibody coupled to ricin A chain efficiently inhibited protein synthesis in virus-infected cells in vitro and, when injected into PL mice, also delayed their death. Combined treatment with CSA and ITx prevented 75% of the treated PL mice from developing lymphoma. These results show that the development of malignancy from a premalignant state can be averted by a combination of therapeutic modalities that decrease the size and growth rate of the premalignant cell population. PMID:1731346

  11. A deimmunised form of the ribotoxin, α-sarcin, lacking CD4+ T cell epitopes and its use as an immunotoxin warhead

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tim D.; Hearn, Arron R.; Holgate, Robert G.E.; Kozub, Dorota; Fogg, Mark H.; Carr, Francis J.; Baker, Matthew P.; Lacadena, Javier; Gehlsen, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal ribotoxins that block protein synthesis can be useful warheads in the context of a targeted immunotoxin. α-Sarcin is a small (17 kDa) fungal ribonuclease produced by Aspergillus giganteus that functions by catalytically cleaving a single phosphodiester bond in the sarcin–ricin loop of the large ribosomal subunit, thus making the ribosome unrecognisable to elongation factors and leading to inhibition of protein synthesis. Peptide mapping using an ex vivo human T cell assay determined that α-sarcin contained two T cell epitopes; one in the N-terminal 20 amino acids and the other in the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Various mutations were tested individually within each epitope and then in combination to isolate deimmunised α-sarcin variants that had the desired properties of silencing T cell epitopes and retention of the ability to inhibit protein synthesis (equivalent to wild-type, WT α-sarcin). A deimmunised variant (D9T/Q142T) demonstrated a complete lack of T cell activation in in vitro whole protein human T cell assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from donors with diverse HLA allotypes. Generation of an immunotoxin by fusion of the D9T/Q142T variant to a single-chain Fv targeting Her2 demonstrated potent cell killing equivalent to a fusion protein comprising the WT α-sarcin. These results represent the first fungal ribotoxin to be deimmunised with the potential to construct a new generation of deimmunised immunotoxin therapeutics. PMID:27578884

  12. Kinetics of cellular trafficking and cytotoxicity of 9.2.27-gelonin immunotoxins targeted against the high-molecular-weight melanoma-associated antigen.

    PubMed

    Chan, M C; Murphy, R M

    1999-02-01

    The high-molecular-weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA) is expressed on a large majority of melanoma tissues but not on most normal or other neoplastic tissues. Monoclonal antibody 9.2.27 binds with high affinity and specificity to the HMW-MAA, making it an attractive choice as an agent for targeting toxins or chemotherapeutic agents specifically towards melanomas. To characterize the interactions between 9.2.27 and melanoma cells more carefully, data on the kinetics of binding, internalization, and degradation of 9.2.27 by SK-MEL-2 cells were collected. Binding of 9.2.27 to SK-MEL-2 cells was rapid, and followed by slow loss of surface-bound antibody, probably because of loss of surface antigen caused by degradation and/or shedding. A small fraction (approx. 5%) of surface-bound 9.2.27 was internalized and degraded. A mathematical model describing these interactions was developed, and equilibrium and kinetic constants were fitted to the data. To evaluate the utility of 9.2.27 as a toxin-targeting agent, 9.2.27-gelonin immunotoxins were constructed and tested in protein synthesis inhibition assays. The dependence of the toxicity data for 9.2.27-gelonin on time and concentration was quantitatively related to the accumulated intracellular exposure to 9.2.27-gelonin by a relatively simple equation. This equation had been previously validated for immunotoxins targeted against the transferrin receptor, for which the trafficking kinetics are quite dissimilar from those of the HMW-MAA. The success of the approach here suggests that this method may be widely applicable for analysis of immunotoxin efficacy.

  13. Antitumor effects of ricin A chain immunotoxins prepared from intact antibodies and Fab' fragments on solid human Hodgkin's disease tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Martin, G; Pfreundschuh, M; Amlot, P; Hsu, S M; Diehl, V; Thorpe, P

    1990-05-15

    Three monoclonal antibodies which strongly bind to Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells and two corresponding Fab' fragments were linked to deglycosylated ricin A chain (dg A) to evaluate their potential as immunotoxins for the treatment of Hodgkin's disease. Two of the antibodies, Ber-H2 and HRS-3, were shown to bind to the same epitope on the CD30 antigen, whereas the third antibody, IRac, bound to a different antigen. None of the antibodies significantly cross-reacted with normal human tissues as judged by indirect immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase analyses on frozen sections from 28 normal tissues. All three antibodies formed potent and specific immunotoxins. They inhibited protein synthesis of the L540 Hodgkin's disease cell line in vitro by 50% at concentrations of 1 x 10(-11) M for IRac.dgA, 9 x 10(-11) M for HRS-3.dgA, and 2 x 10(-10) M for Ber-H2.dgA. HRS-3 Fab' and IRac Fab' immunotoxins were 7.8- and 60-fold less cytotoxic, respectively, than their intact counterparts in vitro. In vivo, a single i.v. injection of a dose of Ber-H2.dgA, HRS-3.dgA, or IRac.dgA corresponding to 40% of the LD50 induced lasting complete remissions in 38, 44, and 50%, respectively, of mice with solid s.c. L540 tumors of 60 to 80 mm3 size (0.5-cm diameter). At equivalent dosage (40% of the LD50), the HRS-3 Fab'.dgA and the IRac Fab'.dgA both induced lasting complete remissions in 25% of the mice, although the HRS-3 Fab'.dgA was significantly superior to IRac Fab'.dgA at retarding tumor growth in the remaining animals. The effectiveness of the immunotoxins depended on the size of the tumor at the time of injection, since IRac.dgA treatment induced complete remissions in 100% of mice with small tumors (10 to 20 mm3, approximately 0.3 cm in diameter) but only 13% of mice with larger tumors of 400 to 600 mm3 (approximately 1 cm in diameter). Tumors which regrew after IRac.dgA treatment mainly consisted of antigen-deficient mutants having reduced sensitivity to IRac.dgA but normal

  14. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  15. Phase I trial of EpCAM-targeting immunotoxin MOC31PE, alone and in combination with cyclosporin

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Y; Engebraaten, O; Juell, S; Aamdal, S; Brunsvig, P; Fodstad, Ø; Dueland, S

    2015-01-01

    Background: A phase I trial was performed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity of the anti-EpCAM immunotoxin (IT) MOC31PE in cancer patients. An important part of the study was to investigate whether the addition of Sandimmune (cyclosporin, CsA) suppressed the development of anti-IT antibodies. Methods: Patients with EpCAM-positive metastatic disease were eligible for treatment with intravenous MOC31PE using a modified Fibonacci dose escalation sequence. Maximum tolerated dose was first established without, then with intravenously administered CsA. Results: Sixty-three patients were treated with MOC31PE in doses ranging from 0.5 to 8 μg kg−1. Maximum tolerated dose was 8 μg kg−1 for MOC31PE alone, and 6.5 μg kg−1 when combined with CsA. The dose-limiting adverse event was reversible liver toxicity. No radiological complete or partial responses were observed, whereas stable disease was seen in 36% of the patients receiving MOC31PE only. The pharmacokinetic profile of MOC31PE was characterised by linear kinetics and with a half-life of ∼3 h. The addition of CsA delayed the generation of anti-IT antibodies. Conclusions: Intravenous infusion of MOC31PE can safely be administered to cancer patients. Immune suppression with CsA delays the development of anti-MOC31PE antibodies. The antitumour effect of MOC31PE warrants further evaluation in EpCAM-positive metastatic disease. PMID:26554649

  16. Preclinical studies with the anti-CD19-saporin immunotoxin BU12-SAPORIN for the treatment of human-B-cell tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Flavell, D. J.; Flavell, S. U.; Boehm, D. A.; Emery, L.; Noss, A.; Ling, N. R.; Richardson, P. R.; Hardie, D.; Wright, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    The immunotoxin BU12-SAPORIN was constructed by covalently coupling the single-chain ribosome-inactivating protein saporin to the anti-CD19 monoclonal antibody BU12 via a disulphide linker using the heterobifunctional reagent SPDP. The immunoreactivity and specificity of BU12-SAPORIN was identical to that of unmodified native BU12 antibody. BU12-SAPORIN was selectively cytotoxic in vitro in a dose-dependent manner for the CD19+ human common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (cALL) cell line NALM-6 but exhibited no toxicity for the CD19- T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) cell line HSB-2. The survival of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with disseminated NALM-6 leukaemia was significantly prolonged compared with sham-treated control animals by a course of therapy with BU12-SAPORIN but not with the irrelevant anti-CD7 immunotoxin HB2-SAPORIN. BU12-SAPORIN had no therapeutic effect in SCID mice with disseminated CD19- HSB-2 leukaemia. These preclinical studies have clearly demonstrated the selective cytotoxicity of BU12-SAPORIN for CD19+ target cells both in vitro and in vivo. This, taken together with the lack of expression of the CD19 molecule by any normal life-sustaining tissue and its ubiquitous and homogeneous expression by the majority of cALL and B-NHL cells, provides the rationale for undertaking a phase I trial of systemic therapy with BU12-SAPORIN. Images Figure 1 PMID:8519647

  17. The MOC31PE immunotoxin reduces cell migration and induces gene expression and cell death in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The standard treatment of ovarian cancer with chemotherapy often leads to drug resistance and relapse of the disease, and the need for development of novel therapy alternatives is obvious. The MOC31PE immunotoxin binds to the cell surface antigen EpCAM, which is expressed by the majority of epithelial cancers including ovarian carcinomas, and we studied the cytotoxic effects of MOC31PE in ovarian cancer cells. Methods Investigation of the effects of MOC31PE treatment on protein synthesis, cell viability, proliferation and gene expression of the ovarian cancer cell lines B76 and HOC7. Results MOC31PE treatment for 24 h caused a dose-dependent reduction of protein synthesis with ID50 values of less than 10 ng/ml, followed by reduced cell viability. In a gene expression array monitoring the expression of 84 key genes in cancer pathways, 13 of the genes were differentially expressed by MOC31PE treatment in comparison to untreated cells. By combining MOC31PE and the immune suppressor cyclosporin A (CsA) the MOC31PE effect on protein synthesis inhibition and cell viability increased tenfold. Cell migration was also reduced, both in the individual MOC31PE and CsA treatment, but even more when combining MOC31PE and CsA. In tumor metastasis PCR arrays, 23 of 84 genes were differentially expressed comparing CsA versus MOC31PE + CsA treatment. Increased expression of the tumor suppressor KISS1 and the nuclear receptor NR4A3 was observed, and the differential candidate gene expression was confirmed in complementary qPCR analyses. For NR4A3 this was not accompanied by increased protein expression. However, a subcellular fractionation assay revealed increased mitochondrial NR4A3 in MOC31PE treated cells, suggesting a role for this protein in MOC31PE-induced apoptotic cell death. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that MOC31PE may become a new targeted therapy for ovarian cancer and that the MOC31PE anti-cancer effect is potentiated by CsA. PMID:24528603

  18. EGFR/EGFRvIII-targeted immunotoxin therapy for the treatment of glioblastomas via convection-enhanced delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xuhui; Pastan, Ira; Bigner, Darell D.; Chandramohan, Vidyalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive malignant brain tumor among all primary brain and central nervous system tumors. The median survival time for glioblastoma patients given the current standard of care treatment (surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy) is less than 15 months. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop more efficient therapeutics to improve the poor survival rates of patients with glioblastoma. To address this need, we have developed a novel tumor-targeted immunotoxin (IT), D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL (D2C7-IT), by fusing the single chain variable fragment (scFv) from the D2C7 monoclonal antibody (mAb) with the Pseudomonas Exotoxin (PE38KDEL). D2C7-IT reacts with both the wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRwt) and EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII), two onco-proteins frequently amplified or overexpressed in glioblastomas. Surface plasmon resonance and flow cytometry analyses demonstrated a significant binding capacity of D2C7-IT to both EGFRwt and EGFRvIII proteins. In vitro cytotoxicity data showed that D2C7-IT can effectively inhibit protein synthesis and kill a variety of EGFRwt-, EGFRvIII-, and both EGFRwt- and EGFRvIII-expressing glioblastoma xenograft cells and human tumor cell lines. Furthermore, D2C7-IT exhibited a robust anti-tumor efficacy in orthotopic mouse glioma models when administered via intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery (CED). A preclinical toxicity study was therefore conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) of D2C7-IT via intracerebral CED for 72 hours in rats. Based on this successful rat toxicity study, an Investigational New Drug (IND) application (#116855) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and is now in effect for a Phase I/II D2C7-IT clinical trial (D2C7 for Adult Patients with Recurrent Malignant Glioma, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02303678). While it is still too early to draw conclusions from the trial, results thus far are

  19. Recombinant allergens

    PubMed Central

    Jutel, Marek; Solarewicz-Madejek, Katarzyna; Smolinska, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only known causative treatment of allergic diseases. Recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies arose from a strong need to both to improve safety and enhance efficacy of SIT. In addition, new vaccines can be effective in allergies including food allergy or atopic dermatitis, which poorly respond to the current treatment with allergen extracts. A number of successful clinical studies with both wild-type and hypoallergenic derivatives of recombinant allergens vaccines have been reported for the last decade. They showed high efficacy and safety profile as well as very strong modulation of T and B cell responses to specific allergens. PMID:23095874

  20. Recombinant gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Lathi, R B; Milki, A A

    2001-10-01

    Recombinant DNA technology makes it possible to produce large amounts of human gene products for pharmacologic applications, supplanting the need for human tissues. The genes for the alpha and beta subunits of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) have been characterized and cloned. Recombinant FSH (rFSH) has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of fertility disorders. In comparison with the urinary gonadotropin products, human menopausal gonadotropins (HMG), and urinary follitropins (uFSH), rFSH is more potent and better tolerated by patients. Recombinant HCG appears to be as efficacious as urinary HCG with the benefit of improved local tolerance. Recombinant LH (rLH) is likely to be recommended as a supplement to rFSH for ovulation induction in hypogonadotropic women. It may also benefit in vitro fertilization patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with rFSH combined with pituitary suppression, with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or antagonist.

  1. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  2. Depletion of cholinergic amacrine cells by a novel immunotoxin does not perturb the formation of segregated on and off cone bipolar cell projections.

    PubMed

    Gunhan, Emine; Choudary, Prabhakara V; Landerholm, Thomas E; Chalupa, Leo M

    2002-03-15

    Cone bipolar cells are the first retinal neurons that respond in a differential manner to light onset and offset. In the mature retina, the terminal arbors of On and Off cone bipolar cells terminate in different sublaminas of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) where they form synapses with the dendrites of On and Off retinal ganglion cells and with the stratified processes of cholinergic amacrine cells. Here we first show that cholinergic processes within the On and Off sublaminas of the IPL are present early in development, being evident in the rat on the day of birth, approximately 10 d before the formation of segregated cone bipolar cell axons. This temporal sequence, as well as our previous finding that the segregation of On and Off cone bipolar cell inputs occurs in the absence of retinal ganglion cells, suggested that cholinergic amacrine cells could provide a scaffold for the subsequent in-growth of bipolar cell axons. To test this hypothesis directly, a new cholinergic cell immunotoxin was constructed by conjugating saporin, the ribosome-inactivating protein toxin, to an antibody against the vesicular acetylcholine transporter. A single intraocular injection of the immunotoxin caused a rapid, complete, and selective loss of cholinergic amacrine cells from the developing rat retina. On and Off cone bipolar cells were visualized using an antibody against recoverin, the calcium-binding protein that labels the soma and processes of these interneurons. After complete depletion of cholinergic amacrine cells, cone bipolar cell axon terminals still formed their two characteristic strata within the IPL. These findings demonstrate that the presence of cholinergic amacrine cells is not required for the segregation of recoverin-positive On and Off cone bipolar cell projections.

  3. Membrane cholesterol is essential for triterpenoid saponin augmentation of a saporin-based immunotoxin directed against CD19 on human lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wendy S; Baker, Ella J; Holmes, Suzanne E; Koster, Grielof; Hunt, Alan N; Johnston, David A; Flavell, Sopsamorn U; Flavell, David J

    2017-02-21

    Triterpenoid saponins from Saponinum Album (SA) exert potent lytic effects on eukaryotic cell plasma membranes and, when used at sub-lytic concentrations, significantly augment the cytotoxicity of saporin-based immunotoxins (IT). To help elucidate the mechanism(s) behind these two phenomena we investigated the role of cholesterol to both. Human Daudi lymphoma cells were lipid deprived using a combination of three different approaches. Following treatment, the total cellular lipid content was analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and plasma membrane (PM) cholesterol content measured using the lipophilic fluorescent probe NR12S. Maximal lipid deprivation of cells resulted in a complete loss of sensitivity to lysis by SA. Similarly augmentation of the anti-CD19 immunotoxin (IT) BU12-SAPORIN by SA was lost but without a concomitant loss of intrinsic IT cytotoxicity. The lytic activity of SA was restored following incubation of lipid deprived Daudi cells with Synthecol or LDL. The augmentative effect of SA on IT cytotoxicity for Daudi cells was restored following repletion of PM cholesterol levels with LDL. NR12S fluorescence and ESI-MS analysis of cellular lipids demonstrated that restoration of SA lytic activity by Synthecol was entirely due to increased PM cholesterol levels. Restoration of cellular and PM cholesterol levels by LDL also restored the augmentative effect of SA for IT, an effect associated with repletion of PM cholesterol with minor changes in some phospholipid species. These results indicate that the lytic and IT augmentative properties of SA are cholesterol-dependent in contrast to intrinsic IT cytotoxicity that is at least partially cholesterol independent.

  4. Intrathecal administration of single-chain immunotoxin, LMB-7 [B3(Fv)-PE38], produces cures of carcinomatous meningitis in a rat model.

    PubMed Central

    Pastan, I H; Archer, G E; McLendon, R E; Friedman, H S; Fuchs, H E; Wang, Q C; Pai, L H; Herndon, J; Bigner, D D

    1995-01-01

    LMB-7 [B3(Fv)-PE38] is a single-chain immunotoxin constructed from the murine monoclonal antibody B3 and a truncated from of Pseudomonas exotoxin PE38. Antibody B3 recognizes a carbohydrate epitope found on solid tumors that frequently invade the intrathecal space and cause neoplastic meningitis. We tested the therapeutic value of intrathecally administered LMB-7 by using a model of human neoplastic meningitis in athymic rats. This model is representative of a clinical situation in that antibody B3 cross-reacts with a number of normal tissues that can be used to monitor potential systemic toxicity. Treatment was begun 3 days after A431 tumor implantation. Without treatment, the animals median survival was 10 days. Intrathecal administration of 10 micrograms of LMB-7 in 40 microliters on days 3, 5, and 7 produced 4 of 10 and 8 of 10 long-term survivors (> 170 days) in two experiments. Of the long-term survivors, 2 of 4 and 7 of 8 survivors had no microscopic evidence of tumor and were considered histologic cures. Lack of significant toxicity in the effective dose range and specificity make LMB-7 an excellent candidate for intrathecal treatment of neoplastic meningitis in humans. PMID:7708720

  5. Epitope mapping and key amino acid identification of anti-CD22 immunotoxin CAT-8015 using hybrid β-lactamase display

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, D.; Popovic, B.; Sridharan, S.; Giannotta, F.; Filée, P.; Yilmaz, N.; Minter, R.

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are a commercially successful class of drug molecules and there are now a growing number of antibodies coupled to toxic payloads, which demonstrate clinical efficacy. Determining the precise epitope of therapeutic antibodies is beneficial in understanding the structure–activity relationship of the drug, but in many cases is not done due to the structural complexity of, in particular, conformational protein epitopes. Using the immunotoxin CAT-8015 as a test case, this study demonstrates that a new methodology, hybrid β-lactamase display, can be employed to elucidate a complex epitope on CD22. Following insertion of random CD22 gene fragments into a permissive site within β-lactamase, proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were first screened for correct folding by resistance to ampicillin and then selected by phage display for affinity to CAT-8015. The optimal protein region recognised by CAT-8015 could then be used as a tool for fine epitope mapping, using alanine-scanning analysis, demonstrating that this technology is well suited to the rapid characterisation of antibody epitopes. PMID:21159620

  6. Epitope mapping and key amino acid identification of anti-CD22 immunotoxin CAT-8015 using hybrid β-lactamase display.

    PubMed

    Bannister, D; Popovic, B; Sridharan, S; Giannotta, F; Filée, P; Yilmaz, N; Minter, R

    2011-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are a commercially successful class of drug molecules and there are now a growing number of antibodies coupled to toxic payloads, which demonstrate clinical efficacy. Determining the precise epitope of therapeutic antibodies is beneficial in understanding the structure-activity relationship of the drug, but in many cases is not done due to the structural complexity of, in particular, conformational protein epitopes. Using the immunotoxin CAT-8015 as a test case, this study demonstrates that a new methodology, hybrid β-lactamase display, can be employed to elucidate a complex epitope on CD22. Following insertion of random CD22 gene fragments into a permissive site within β-lactamase, proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were first screened for correct folding by resistance to ampicillin and then selected by phage display for affinity to CAT-8015. The optimal protein region recognised by CAT-8015 could then be used as a tool for fine epitope mapping, using alanine-scanning analysis, demonstrating that this technology is well suited to the rapid characterisation of antibody epitopes.

  7. Improving baculovirus recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuguang; Chapman, David A. G.; Jones, Ian M.

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses have established themselves as a favoured technology for the high-level expression of recombinant proteins. The construction of recombinant viruses, however, is a time consuming step that restricts consideration of the technology for high throughput developments. Here we use a targeted gene knockout technology to inactivate an essential viral gene that lies adjacent to the locus used for recombination. Viral DNA prepared from the knockout fails to initiate an infection unless rescued by recombination with a baculovirus transfer vector. Modified viral DNA allows 100% recombinant virus formation, obviates the need for further virus purification and offers an efficient means of mass parallel recombinant formation. PMID:12527795

  8. Combination of the PI3K Inhibitor ZSTK474 with a PSMA-Targeted Immunotoxin Accelerates Apoptosis and Regression of Prostate Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Baiz, Daniele; Hassan, Sazzad; Choi, Young A; Flores, Anabel; Karpova, Yelena; Yancey, Dana; Pullikuth, Ashok; Sui, Guangchao; Sadelain, Michel; Debinski, Waldemar; Kulik, George

    2013-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is activated in most advanced prostate cancers, yet so far treatments with PI3K inhibitors have been at best tumorostatic in preclinical cancer models and do not show significant antitumor efficacy in clinical trials. Results from tissue culture experiments in prostate cancer cells suggest that PI3K inhibitors should be combined with other cytotoxic agents; however, the general toxicity of such combinations prevents translating these experimental data into preclinical and clinical models. We investigated the emerging concept of tumor-targeted synthetic lethality in prostate cancer cells by using the pan-PI3K inhibitor ZSTK474 and the immunotoxin J591PE, a protein chimera between the single-chain variable fragment of the monoclonal antibody J591 against the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and the truncated form of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE38QQR). The combination of ZSTK474 and J591PE increased apoptosis within 6 hours and cell death (monitored at 24–48 hours) in the PSMA-expressing cells LNCaP, C4-2, and C4-2Luc but not in control cells that do not express PSMA (PC3 and BT549 cells). Mechanistic analysis suggested that induction of apoptosis requires Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD) dephosphorylation and decreased expression of myeloid leukemia cell differentiation protein 1 (MCL-1). A single injection of ZSTK474 and J591PE into engrafted prostate cancer C4-2Luc cells led to consistent and stable reduction of luminescence within 6 days. These results suggest that the combination of a PI3K inhibitor and a PSMA-targeted protein synthesis inhibitor toxin represents a promising novel strategy for advanced prostate cancer therapy that should be further investigated. PMID:24204196

  9. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  10. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  11. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  12. Preclinical toxicity evaluation of a novel immunotoxin, D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL, administered via intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery in rats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xuhui; Chandramohan, Vidyalakshmi; Reynolds, Randall P; Norton, John N; Wetsel, William C; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Aryal, Dipendra K; McLendon, Roger E; Levin, Edward D; Petry, Neil A; Zalutsky, Michael R; Burnett, Bruce K; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; Pastan, Ira H; Bigner, Darell D

    2016-04-01

    D2C7-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL (D2C7-IT) is a novel immunotoxin that reacts with wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRwt) and mutant EGFRvIII proteins overexpressed in glioblastomas. This study assessed the toxicity of intracerebral administration of D2C7-IT to support an initial Food and Drug Administration Investigational New Drug application. After the optimization of the formulation and administration, two cohorts (an acute and chronic cohort necropsied on study days 5 and 34) of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (four groups of 5 males and 5 females) were infused with the D2C7-IT formulation at total doses of 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.4 μg (the acute cohort) and 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.35 μg (the chronic cohort) for approximately 72 h by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery using osmotic pumps. Mortality was observed in the 0.40 μg (5/10 rats) and 0.35 μg (4/10 rats) high-dose groups of each cohort. Body weight loss and abnormal behavior were only revealed in the rats treated with high doses of D2C7-IT. No dose-related effects were observed in clinical laboratory tests in either cohort. A gross pathologic examination of systemic tissues from the high-dose and control groups in both cohorts exhibited no dose-related or drug-related pathologic findings. Brain histopathology revealed the frequent occurrence of dose-related encephalomalacia, edema, and demyelination in the high-dose groups of both cohorts. In this study, the maximum tolerated dose of D2C7-IT was determined to be between 0.10 and 0.35 μg, and the no-observed-adverse-effect-level was 0.05 μg in SD rats. Both parameters were utilized to design the Phase I/II D2C7-IT clinical trial.

  13. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  14. Recombinant Baculovirus Isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3 ), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac(®) or BaculoDirect™, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Previously, many methods required a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. Fortunately, this step is no longer required for most systems currently available. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay or real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac(®) system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  15. Dissociative recombination in aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of dissociative recombination in planetary aeronomy is summarized, and two examples are discussed. The first is the role of dissociative recombination of N2(+) in the escape of nitrogen from Mars. A previous model is updated to reflect new experimental data on the electronic states of N produced in this process. Second, the intensity of the atomic oxygen green line on the nightside of Venus is modeled. Use is made of theoretical rate coefficients for production of O (1S) in dissociative recombination from different vibrational levels of O2(+).

  16. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  17. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  18. Multiphoton Assisted Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, E. S.; Jones, R. R.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    We have observed multiphoton assisted recombination in the presence of a 38.8 GHz microwave field. Stimulated emission of up to ten microwave photons results in energy transfer from continuum electrons, enabling recombination. The maximum electron energy loss is far greater than the 2Up predicted by the standard “simpleman’s” model. The data are well reproduced by both an approximate analytic expression and numerical simulations in which the combined Coulomb and radiation fields are taken into account.

  19. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  20. Atom Recombination on Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Chai

    Upon high speed re-entry of the Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO) through the earth's atmosphere, oxygen and nitrogen atoms produced in the shock wave in front of the SSO recombine on the surface of the SSO, releasing heat. To minimize the rise of surface temperature due to the reaction, surface material of the SSO should have a low recombination probability, gamma, of atoms impinging on it. To design such material, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of atom recombination. With this in mind, gamma values were measured for recombination of O, N, and H atoms in a diffusion tube reactor between 700 and 1250 K (HT), 300 and 700 K (MT), and at 194 K (LT) on silica. The rate of recombination was first order with respect to the atom concentration from LT to HT. The Arrhenius plots, gamma vs. 1/T, were very complex. All observations are explained by assuming a surface with a small fraction of active sites that irreversibly bind chemisorbed atoms. Everything happens as if the active sites were surrounded by collection zones within which all atoms striking the surface are adsorbed reversibly with an assumed sticking probability of unity. These atoms then diffuse on the surface. Some of them reach the active sites where they can recombine with the chemisorbed atoms. At LT, all atoms striking the surface reach the active sites. As a result of desorption at MT, the collection zones shrink with increasing temperature. At HT, only atoms striking active sites directly from the gas phase lead to recombination. An analytical solution of the diffusion-reaction problem obtained for a model where the active sites are distributed uniformly fits with the experimental data from LT to HT. The two novel features of this work are the identification of the active sites on silica for recombination of H on silica at HT as surface OH groups and the suggestion that another kind of active site is responsible for recombination of O and N atoms at HT as well as for H atoms at LT and MT. Although

  1. Purification and characterization of Moschatin, a novel type I ribosome-inactivating protein from the mature seeds of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), and preparation of its immunotoxin against human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Heng Chuan; Li, Feng; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Zu Chuan

    2003-10-01

    A novel ribosome-inactivating protein designated Moschatin from the mature seeds of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) has been successively purified to homogeneity, using ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM-cellulose 52 column chromatography, Blue Sepharose CL-6B Affinity column chromatography and FPLC size-exclusion column chromatography. Moschatin is a type 1 RIP with a pI of 9.4 and molecular weight of approximately 29 kD. It is a rRNA N-glycosidase and potently blocked the protein synthesis in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate with a IC50 of 0.26 nM. Using the anti-human melanoma McAb Ng76, a novel immunotoxin Moschatin-Ng76 was prepared successfully and it efficiently inhibited the growth of targeted melanoma cells M21 with a IC50 of 0.04 nM, 1500 times lower than that of free Moschatin. The results implied that Moschatin could be used as a new potential anticancer agent.

  2. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  3. The dissociative recombination of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubé, S.; Lehfaoui, L.; Rowe, B. R.; Mitchell, J. B. A.

    1998-09-01

    The dissociative recombination rate coefficient for 0953-4075/31/18/016/img2 has been measured at 300 K using a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe-mass spectrometer apparatus. A value of 0953-4075/31/18/016/img3 has been found.

  4. Introduction to dissociative recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.; Mitchell, J. Brian A.

    1989-01-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions with electrons has important consequences in many areas of physical science. Ab-initio calculations coupled with resonant scattering theory and multichannel quantum defect studies have produced detailed results illuminating the role of ion vibrational excitation, the quantum yields of the DR products, and the role of Rydberg states. The theoretical and experimental results are discussed.

  5. Recombineering linear BACs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingwen; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Recombineering is a powerful genetic engineering technique based on homologous recombination that can be used to accurately modify DNA independent of its sequence or size. One novel application of recombineering is the assembly of linear BACs in E. coli that can replicate autonomously as linear plasmids. A circular BAC is inserted with a short telomeric sequence from phage N15, which is subsequently cut and rejoined by the phage protelomerase enzyme to generate a linear BAC with terminal hairpin telomeres. Telomere-capped linear BACs are protected against exonuclease attack both in vitro and in vivo in E. coli cells and can replicate stably. Here we describe step-by-step protocols to linearize any BAC clone by recombineering, including inserting and screening for presence of the N15 telomeric sequence, linearizing BACs in vivo in E. coli, extracting linear BACs, and verifying the presence of hairpin telomere structures. Linear BACs may be useful for functional expression of genomic loci in cells, maintenance of linear viral genomes in their natural conformation, and for constructing innovative artificial chromosome structures for applications in mammalian and plant cells.

  6. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  7. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  8. The recombination epoch revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons.

  9. Cell biology of mitotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-03-02

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect to capacity of homologous recombination.

  10. Cell Biology of Mitotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect to capacity of homologous recombination. PMID:25731763

  11. Recombineering: genetic engineering in bacteria using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Lynn C; Sawitzke, James A; Li, Xintian; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2014-04-14

    The bacterial chromosome and bacterial plasmids can be engineered in vivo by homologous recombination using PCR products and synthetic oligonucleotides as substrates. This is possible because bacteriophage-encoded recombination proteins efficiently recombine sequences with homologies as short as 35 to 50 bases. Recombineering allows DNA sequences to be inserted or deleted without regard to location of restriction sites. This unit first describes preparation of electrocompetent cells expressing the recombineering functions and their transformation with dsDNA or ssDNA. It then presents support protocols that describe several two-step selection/counter-selection methods of making genetic alterations without leaving any unwanted changes in the targeted DNA, and a method for retrieving onto a plasmid a genetic marker (cloning by retrieval) from the Escherichia coli chromosome or a co-electroporated DNA fragment. Additional protocols describe methods to screen for unselected mutations, removal of the defective prophage from recombineering strains, and other useful techniques.

  12. Bacterial Recombineering: Genome Engineering via Phage-Based Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Pines, Gur; Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The ability to specifically modify bacterial genomes in a precise and efficient manner is highly desired in various fields, ranging from molecular genetics to metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Much has changed from the initial realization that phage-derived genes may be employed for such tasks to today, where recombineering enables complex genetic edits within a genome or a population. Here, we review the major developments leading to recombineering becoming the method of choice for in situ bacterial genome editing while highlighting the various applications of recombineering in pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology. We also present the current understanding of the mechanism of recombineering. Finally, we discuss in detail issues surrounding recombineering efficiency and future directions for recombineering-based genome editing.

  13. Orientation Dependence in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K.; Takahashi, N.; Fujitani, Y.; Yoshikura, H.; Kobayashi, I.

    1996-01-01

    Homologous recombination was investigated in Escherichia coli with two plasmids, each carrying the homologous region (two defective neo genes, one with an amino-end deletion and the other with a carboxyl-end deletion) in either direct or inverted orientation. Recombination efficiency was measured in recBC sbcBC and recBC sbcA strains in three ways. First, we measured the frequency of cells carrying neo(+) recombinant plasmids in stationary phase. Recombination between direct repeats was much more frequent than between inverted repeats in the recBC sbcBC strain but was equally frequent in the two substrates in the recBC sbcA strain. Second, the fluctuation test was used to exclude bias by a rate difference between the recombinant and parental plasmids and led to the same conclusion. Third, direct selection for recombinants just after transformation with or without substrate double-strand breaks yielded essentially the same results. Double-strand breaks elevated recombination in both the strains and in both substrates. These results are consistant with our previous findings that the major route of recombination in recBC sbcBC strains generates only one recombinant DNA from two DNAs and in recBC sbcA strains generates two recombinant DNAs from two DNAs. PMID:8722759

  14. Cocktails of ricin A-chain immunotoxins against different antigens on Hodgkin and Sternberg-Reed cells have superior anti-tumor effects against H-RS cells in vitro and solid Hodgkin tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Gottstein, C; Bohlen, H; Winkler, U; Schön, G; Manske, O; Schnell, R; Diehl, V; Thorpe, P

    1995-10-09

    Three ricin A-chain immunotoxins (ITs) recognizing different antigens on Hodgkin-Reed/Sternberg (H-RS) cells were evaluated for their anti-tumor effects when used in combination as "cocktails". These ITs, BB10.dgA (CD25), HRS3.dgA (CD30), and IRac.dgA (70 kDa), strongly inhibited the growth of L540Cy H-RS cells in vitro. The protein synthesis of this cell line was reduced more efficiently by the combination of 2 of these ITs than by BB10.dgA, HRS3.dgA or IRac.dgA alone. A cocktail of all 3 ITs was most effective in vitro. This was at least in part due to the non-homogeneous distribution of CD25, CD30 or IRac on the L540Cy H-RS target cells and to the fact that subpopulations deficient in one antigen nevertheless expressed appreciable levels of the other target antigens. IT cocktails were also superior as anti-tumor agents in nude mice with solid L540Cy tumors. Ninety percent of mice treated with cocktails containing 2 or 3 ITs had continuous complete remissions (CCR), as compared with only 40% of mice treated with the same dose of a single IT. Analysis of 7 L540Cy sub-lines re-established ex vivo from mice that relapsed after having achieved complete remission (CR) after therapy with a single IT showed that the surviving tumor cells were antigen-deficient variants which were resistant to the original IT, but which could be killed by ITs directed against other target antigens. Thus, IT cocktails give superior results against human H-RS cells, both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  16. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  17. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  18. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  19. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  20. Auger recombination in sodium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Andrew; Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Åberg, Daniel; Schleife, André

    2014-03-01

    Scintillators are an important tool used to detect high energy radiation - both in the interest of national security and in medicine. However, scintillator detectors currently suffer from lower energy resolutions than expected from basic counting statistics. This has been attributed to non-proportional light yield compared to incoming radiation, but the specific mechanism for this non-proportionality has not been identified. Auger recombination is a non-radiative process that could be contributing to the non-proportionality of scintillating materials. Auger recombination comes in two types - direct and phonon-assisted. We have used first-principles calculations to study Auger recombination in sodium iodide, a well characterized scintillating material. Our findings indicate that phonon-assisted Auger recombination is stronger in sodium iodide than direct Auger recombination. Computational resources provided by LLNL and NERSC. Funding provided by NA-22.

  1. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  2. Testing for recombinant erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Bollen, Mathieu; Beullens, Monique

    2008-03-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is a glycoprotein hormone that promotes the production of red blood cells. Recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) is illicitly used to improve performance in endurance sports. Doping in sports is discouraged by the screening of athletes for rhEpo. Both direct tests (indicating the presence of exogeneous Epo isoforms) and indirect tests (indicating hematological changes induced by exogenous Epo administration) can be used for Epo detection. At present, the test adopted by the World Anti Doping Agency is based on a combination of isoelectric focusing and double immunoblotting, and distinguishes between endogenous and rhEpo. However, the adopted monoclonal anti-Epo antibodies are not monospecific. Therefore, the test can occasionally lead to the false-positive detection of rhEpo (epoetin-beta) in post-exercise, protein-rich urine, or in case of contamination of the sample with microorganisms. An improved preanalytical care may counteract a lot of these problems. Adaptation of the criteria may be helpful to further refine direct Epo testing. Indirect tests have the disadvantage that they require blood instead of urine samples, but they can be applied to detect a broader range of performance improving techniques which are illicitly used in sports.

  3. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  4. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  5. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, H.; Ledjeff, K.

    1984-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive the discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  6. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Helmut; Ledjeff, Konstantin

    1985-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive he discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  7. Perovskite photovoltaics: Slow recombination unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Jacques-E.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most salient features of hybrid lead halide perovskites is the extended lifetime of their photogenerated charge carriers. This property has now been shown experimentally to originate from a slow, thermally activated recombination process.

  8. Controlled release from recombinant polymers.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-09-28

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed.

  9. Stable recombination hotspots in birds.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sonal; Leffler, Ellen M; Sannareddy, Keerthi; Turner, Isaac; Venn, Oliver; Hooper, Daniel M; Strand, Alva I; Li, Qiye; Raney, Brian; Balakrishnan, Christopher N; Griffith, Simon C; McVean, Gil; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-11-20

    The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but it appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking the gene that encodes PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species: the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, and the long-tailed finch, Poephila acuticauda. We found that both species have recombination hotspots, which are enriched near functional genomic elements. Unlike in mice and apes, most hotspots are shared between the two species, and their conservation seems to extend over tens of millions of years. These observations suggest that in the absence of PRDM9, recombination targets functional features that both enable access to the genome and constrain its evolution.

  10. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  11. Combinatorics in Recombinational Population Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, Laxmi

    The work that I will discuss is motivated by the need for understanding, and processing, the manifestations of recombination events in chromosome sequences. In this talk, we focus on two related problems. First, we explore the very general problem of reconstructability of pedigree history. How plausible is it to unravel the history of a complete unit (chromosome) of inheritance? The second problem deals with reconstructing the recombinational history of a collection of chromosomes.

  12. Recombinant protein expression in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Davis, Keith R; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant protein pharmaceuticals are now widely used in treatment of chronic diseases, and several recombinant protein subunit vaccines are approved for human and veterinary use. With growing demand for complex protein pharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, manufacturing capacity is becoming limited. There is increasing need for safe, scalable, and economical alternatives to mammalian cell culture-based manufacturing systems, which require substantial capital investment for new manufacturing facilities. Since a seminal paper reporting immunoglobulin expression in transgenic plants was published in 1989, there have been many technological advances in plant expression systems to the present time where production of proteins in leaf tissues of nonfood crops such as Nicotiana species is considered a viable alternative. In particular, transient expression systems derived from recombinant plant viral vectors offer opportunities for rapid expression screening, construct optimization, and expression scale-up. Extraction of recombinant proteins from Nicotiana leaf tissues can be achieved by collection of secreted protein fractions, or from a total protein extract after grinding the leaves with buffer. After separation from solids, the major purification challenge is contamination with elements of the photosynthetic complex, which can be solved by application of a variety of facile and proven strategies. In conclusion, the technologies required for safe, efficient, scalable manufacture of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana leaf tissues have matured to the point where several products have already been tested in phase I clinical trials and will soon be followed by a rich pipeline of recombinant vaccines, microbicides, and therapeutic proteins.

  13. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  14. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  15. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  16. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  17. Recombination Drives Vertebrate Genome Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kiwoong; Ellegren, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Selective and/or neutral processes may govern variation in DNA content and, ultimately, genome size. The observation in several organisms of a negative correlation between recombination rate and intron size could be compatible with a neutral model in which recombination is mutagenic for length changes. We used whole-genome data on small insertions and deletions within transposable elements from chicken and zebra finch to demonstrate clear links between recombination rate and a number of attributes of reduced DNA content. Recombination rate was negatively correlated with the length of introns, transposable elements, and intergenic spacer and with the rate of short insertions. Importantly, it was positively correlated with gene density, the rate of short deletions, the deletion bias, and the net change in sequence length. All these observations point at a pattern of more condensed genome structure in regions of high recombination. Based on the observed rates of small insertions and deletions and assuming that these rates are representative for the whole genome, we estimate that the genome of the most recent common ancestor of birds and lizards has lost nearly 20% of its DNA content up until the present. Expansion of transposable elements can counteract the effect of deletions in an equilibrium mutation model; however, since the activity of transposable elements has been low in the avian lineage, the deletion bias is likely to have had a significant effect on genome size evolution in dinosaurs and birds, contributing to the maintenance of a small genome. We also demonstrate that most of the observed correlations between recombination rate and genome contraction parameters are seen in the human genome, including for segregating indel polymorphisms. Our data are compatible with a neutral model in which recombination drives vertebrate genome size evolution and gives no direct support for a role of natural selection in this process. PMID:22570634

  18. DNA recombination. Recombination initiation maps of individual human genomes.

    PubMed

    Pratto, Florencia; Brick, Kevin; Khil, Pavel; Smagulova, Fatima; Petukhova, Galina V; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel

    2014-11-14

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are introduced in meiosis to initiate recombination and generate crossovers, the reciprocal exchanges of genetic material between parental chromosomes. Here, we present high-resolution maps of meiotic DSBs in individual human genomes. Comparing DSB maps between individuals shows that along with DNA binding by PRDM9, additional factors may dictate the efficiency of DSB formation. We find evidence for both GC-biased gene conversion and mutagenesis around meiotic DSB hotspots, while frequent colocalization of DSB hotspots with chromosome rearrangement breakpoints implicates the aberrant repair of meiotic DSBs in genomic disorders. Furthermore, our data indicate that DSB frequency is a major determinant of crossover rate. These maps provide new insights into the regulation of meiotic recombination and the impact of meiotic recombination on genome function.

  19. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  20. The Dissociative Recombination of OH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum chemical calculations of the cross sections and rates for the dissociative recombination of the upsilon = 0 level of the ground state of OH(+) show that recombination occurs primarily along the 2 (2)Pi diabatic route. The products are 0((1)D) and a hot H atom with 6.1 eV kinetic energy. The coupling to the resonances is very small and the indirect recombination mechanism plays only a minor role. The recommended value for the rate coefficient is (6.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp -9)x (T(e)/1300)(exp -0.48) cu.cm/s for 10 less than T(e) less than 1000 K.

  1. DNA recombination: the replication connection.

    PubMed

    Haber, J E

    1999-07-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise after exposure to ionizing radiation or enzymatic cleavage, but especially during the process of DNA replication itself. Homologous recombination plays a critical role in repair of such DSBs. There has been significant progress in our understanding of two processes that occur in DSB repair: gene conversion and recombination-dependent DNA replication. Recent evidence suggests that gene conversion and break-induced replication are related processes that both begin with the establishment of a replication fork in which both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis occur. There has also been much progress in characterization of the biochemical roles of recombination proteins that are highly conserved from yeast to humans.

  2. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  3. Variation in Recombination Rate: Adaptive or Not?

    PubMed

    Ritz, Kathryn R; Noor, Mohamed A F; Singh, Nadia D

    2017-03-27

    Rates of meiotic recombination are widely variable both within and among species. However, the functional significance of this variation remains largely unknown. Is the observed within-species variation in recombination rate adaptive? Recent work has revealed new insight into the scale and scope of population-level variation in recombination rate. These data indicate that the magnitude of within-population variation in recombination is similar among taxa. The apparent similarity of the variance in recombination rate among individuals between distantly related species suggests that the relative costs and benefits of recombination that establish the upper and lower bounds may be similar across species. Here we review the current data on intraspecific variation in recombination rate and discuss the molecular and evolutionary costs and benefits of recombination frequency. We place this variation in the context of adaptation and highlight the need for more empirical studies focused on the adaptive value of variation in recombination rate.

  4. Selenium incorporation using recombinant techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, Helen

    2010-04-01

    An overview of techniques for recombinant incorporation of selenium and subsequent purification and crystallization of the resulting labelled protein. Using selenomethionine to phase macromolecular structures is common practice in structure determination, along with the use of selenocysteine. Selenium is consequently the most commonly used heavy atom for MAD. In addition to the well established recombinant techniques for the incorporation of selenium in prokaryal expression systems, there have been recent advances in selenium labelling in eukaryal expression, which will be discussed. Tips and things to consider for the purification and crystallization of seleno-labelled proteins are also included.

  5. Recombination in Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    González-Candelas, Fernando; López-Labrador, F. Xavier; Bracho, María Alma

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a Flavivirus with a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of about 9,600 nucleotides. It is a major cause of liver disease, infecting almost 200 million people all over the world. Similarly to most RNA viruses, HCV displays very high levels of genetic diversity which have been used to differentiate six major genotypes and about 80 subtypes. Although the different genotypes and subtypes share basic biological and pathogenic features they differ in clinical outcomes, response to treatment and epidemiology. The first HCV recombinant strain, in which different genome segments derived from parentals of different genotypes, was described in St. Petersburg (Russia) in 2002. Since then, there have been only a few more than a dozen reports including descriptions of HCV recombinants at all levels: between genotypes, between subtypes of the same genotype and even between strains of the same subtype. Here, we review the literature considering the reasons underlying the difficulties for unequivocally establishing recombination in this virus along with the analytical methods necessary to do it. Finally, we analyze the potential consequences, especially in clinical practice, of HCV recombination in light of the coming new therapeutic approaches against this virus. PMID:22069526

  6. Genetic recombination and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, B; Betancourt, A J; Kaiser, V B; Gordo, I

    2009-01-01

    Reduced rates of genetic recombination are often associated with reduced genetic variability and levels of adaptation. Several different evolutionary processes, collectively known as Hill-Robertson (HR) effects, have been proposed as causes of these correlates of recombination. Here, we use DNA sequence polymorphism and divergence data from the noncrossing over dot chromosome of Drosophila to discriminate between two of the major forms of HR effects: selective sweeps and background selection. This chromosome shows reduced levels of silent variability and reduced effectiveness of selection. We show that neither model fits the data on variability. We propose that, in large genomic regions with restricted recombination, HR effects among nonsynonymous mutations undermine the effective strength of selection, so that their background selection effects are weakened. This modified model fits the data on variability and also explains why variability in very large nonrecombining genomes is not completely wiped out. We also show that HR effects of this type can produce an individual selection advantage to recombination, as well as greatly reduce the mean fitness of nonrecombining genomes and genomic regions.

  7. Dissociative Recombination of Complex Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. Brian A.

    1999-10-01

    The FALP-MS apparatus at the University of Rennes allows the measurement of rate coefficients for the recombination of molecular ions to be made (at 300K) even though several ions may be present in the afterglow. The recombination of a number of hydrocarbon ions derived from alkane ( Lehfaoui et al. J. Chem. Phys. 106, 5406, 1997.), alkene ( Rebrion-Rowe et al. J. Chem. Phys. 108, 7185, 1998.) and aromatic (Rebrion-Rowe et al. (Submitted to J. Chem. Phys.)) parent molecules has been studied. Despite the wide range of complexity of these compounds, the measured recombination rates are remarkably similar having values in the range of 4-10-7 cm^3.s-1. Plans are being laid for a new version of this apparatus that will allow pre-prepared ions to be injected into the inert buffer gas flow. This will allow reactive ions to be studied as well as halogen containing ions whose recombination rates would normally be masked by electron attachment to their parent gases in a conventional flowing afterglow apparatus. A high temperature modification to the CRESU supersonic flow apparatus (J.L. Le Garrec et al. J. Chem. Phys. 107, 54, 1997.) in our laboratory will allow electron attachment to radicals to be studied by means of the mass spectrometric detection of products, Langmuir probe measurement of the electron density in the flow and Laser Induced Fluorescent identification of the radical species. Such measurements are needed for the modeling of semiconductor processing plasmas.

  8. CRMAGE: CRISPR Optimized MAGE Recombineering

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Sommer, Morten O. A.; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2016-01-01

    A bottleneck in metabolic engineering and systems biology approaches is the lack of efficient genome engineering technologies. Here, we combine CRISPR/Cas9 and λ Red recombineering based MAGE technology (CRMAGE) to create a highly efficient and fast method for genome engineering of Escherichia coli. Using CRMAGE, the recombineering efficiency was between 96.5% and 99.7% for gene recoding of three genomic targets, compared to between 0.68% and 5.4% using traditional recombineering. For modulation of protein synthesis (small insertion/RBS substitution) the efficiency was increased from 6% to 70%. CRMAGE can be multiplexed and enables introduction of at least two mutations in a single round of recombineering with similar efficiencies. PAM-independent loci were targeted using degenerate codons, thereby making it possible to modify any site in the genome. CRMAGE is based on two plasmids that are assembled by a USER-cloning approach enabling quick and cost efficient gRNA replacement. CRMAGE furthermore utilizes CRISPR/Cas9 for efficient plasmid curing, thereby enabling multiple engineering rounds per day. To facilitate the design process, a web-based tool was developed to predict both the λ Red oligos and the gRNAs. The CRMAGE platform enables highly efficient and fast genome editing and may open up promising prospective for automation of genome-scale engineering. PMID:26797514

  9. Improving recombinant protein purification yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of adequate amounts of recombinant proteins is essential for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. It’s technologically challenging and a limiting factor for tung oil research because analytical reagents such as high qua...

  10. Meiotic Recombination: The Essence of Heredity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Neil

    2015-10-28

    The study of homologous recombination has its historical roots in meiosis. In this context, recombination occurs as a programmed event that culminates in the formation of crossovers, which are essential for accurate chromosome segregation and create new combinations of parental alleles. Thus, meiotic recombination underlies both the independent assortment of parental chromosomes and genetic linkage. This review highlights the features of meiotic recombination that distinguish it from recombinational repair in somatic cells, and how the molecular processes of meiotic recombination are embedded and interdependent with the chromosome structures that characterize meiotic prophase. A more in-depth review presents our understanding of how crossover and noncrossover pathways of meiotic recombination are differentiated and regulated. The final section of this review summarizes the studies that have defined defective recombination as a leading cause of pregnancy loss and congenital disease in humans.

  11. Super-dissociative recombination of H2+?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. B. A.; Yousif, F. B.; van der Donk, P. J. T.; Morgan, T. J.; Chibisov, M. I.

    1995-11-01

    The dissociative recombination of vibrationally excited H2+ ions to form products in high Rydberg states has been measured. Surprisingly large cross-sections are found for this channel. This seems to be an example of super-dissociative recombination.

  12. Recombinant DNA: History of the Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigue, Charles L.; Stanziale, William G.

    1979-01-01

    The hazards associated with recombinant DNA research are presented along with some social implications and the development of recombinant DNA research guidelines by the National Institutes of Health. (SA)

  13. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: origin and recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, W P; Bernasconi, F; Mutirangura, A; Ledbetter, D H; Langlois, S; Malcolm, S; Morris, M A; Schinzel, A A

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N = 27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N = 5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination are utilized. Standard methods of centromere mapping are employed to determine the level of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, most paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. PMID:8352279

  14. Extended recombinant bacterial ghost system.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, W; Witte, A; Eko, F O; Kamal, M; Jechlinger, W; Brand, E; Marchart, J; Haidinger, W; Huter, V; Felnerova, D; Stralis-Alves, N; Lechleitner, S; Melzer, H; Szostak, M P; Resch, S; Mader, H; Kuen, B; Mayr, B; Mayrhofer, P; Geretschläger, R; Haslberger, A; Hensel, A

    1999-08-20

    Controlled expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts from a variety of bacteria are used as non-living candidate vaccines. In the recombinant ghost system, foreign proteins are attached on the inside of the inner membrane as fusions with specific anchor sequences. Ghosts have a sealed periplasmic space and the export of proteins into this space vastly extends the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts to function as carriers of foreign antigens. In addition, S-layer proteins forming shell-like self assembly structures can be expressed in candidate vaccine strains prior to E-mediated lysis. Such recombinant S-layer proteins carrying foreign epitopes further extend the possibilities of ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes. As ghosts have inherent adjuvant properties, they can be used as adjuvants in combination with subunit vaccines. Subunits or other ligands can also be coupled to matrixes like dextran which are used to fill the internal lumen of ghosts. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral immunization of experimental animals with recombinant ghosts induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in this production. This fact explains the superior quality of ghosts when compared to other inactivated vaccines. The endotoxic component of the outer membrane does not limit the use of ghosts as vaccine candidates but triggers the release of several potent immunoregulatory cytokines. As carriers, there is no limitation in the size of foreign antigens that can be inserted in the membrane and the capacity of all spaces including the membranes, peri

  15. Recombination Catalysts for Hypersonic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of commercially-viable access to space will require technologies that reduce propulsion system weight and complexity, while extracting maximum energy from the products of combustion. This work is directed toward developing effective nozzle recombination catalysts for the supersonic and hypersonic aeropropulsion engines used to provide such access to space. Effective nozzle recombination will significantly reduce rk=le length (hence, propulsion system weight) and reduce fuel requirements, further decreasing the vehicle's gross lift-off weight. Two such catalysts have been identified in this work, barium and antimony compounds, by developing chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for these materials and determining the engine performance enhancement for a typical flight trajectory. Significant performance improvements are indicated, using only 2% (mole or mass) of these compounds in the combustor product gas.

  16. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies.

  17. Recombinant protein polymers in biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wookhyun

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring protein-based materials have been found that function as critical components in biomechanical response, fibers and adhesives. A relatively small but growing number of recombinant protein-based materials that mimic the desired features of their natural sources, such as collagens, elastins and silks, are considered as an alternative to conventional synthetic polymers. Advances in genetic engineering have facilitated the synthesis of repetitive protein polymers with precise control of molecular weights which are designed by using synthetic genes encoding tandem repeats of oligopeptide originating from a modular domain of natural proteins. Many repeat sequences as protein polymer building blocks adopt a well-defined secondary structure and undergo self-assembly to result in physically cross-linked networks or with chemical cross-linking so that further form three-dimensional architectures similar to natural counterparts. In this review, recombinant protein polymers currently developed will be presented that have emerged as promising class of next generation biomaterials.

  18. Recombinant vector and eukaryotic host transformed thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Sugden, W.M.

    1987-08-11

    A recombinant plasmid is described comprising: a segment from a first plasmid which is not a lymphotrophic herpes virus segment and which facilitates the replication of the recombinant plasmid in a prokaryotic host; a segment from a lymphotrophic herpes virus which is linked to the first plasmid segment such that is a capable of assisting in maintaining the recombinant plasmid as a plasmid if the recombinant plasmid is inserted into a eukaryotic host that has been transformed by the lymphotrophic herpes virus; and a foreign eukaryotic gene component linked as part of the recombinant plasmid.

  19. Novel applications of recombinant erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Edward J; Thiemermann, Christoph; Yaqoob, Magdi M

    2006-04-01

    Recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) was introduced into clinical practice after the identification of EPO as the major haemopoietic growth factor determining survival and maturation of erythroid precursors. Advances in our understanding of the novel sites of action of EPO in the vasculature, brain, heart and kidney have opened new avenues of therapeutic potential for EPO, and have led to an increased understanding of the biological roles of EPO and its mechanisms of cell protection.

  20. Selenium incorporation using recombinant techniques.

    PubMed

    Walden, Helen

    2010-04-01

    Using selenomethionine to phase macromolecular structures is common practice in structure determination, along with the use of selenocysteine. Selenium is consequently the most commonly used heavy atom for MAD. In addition to the well established recombinant techniques for the incorporation of selenium in prokaryal expression systems, there have been recent advances in selenium labelling in eukaryal expression, which will be discussed. Tips and things to consider for the purification and crystallization of seleno-labelled proteins are also included.

  1. Recombinant baculoviruses for insect control.

    PubMed

    Inceoglu, A B; Kamita, S G; Hinton, A C; Huang, Q; Severson, T F; Kang, K; Hammock, B D

    2001-10-01

    Baculoviruses are double-stranded DNA viruses which are highly selective for several insect groups. They are valuable natural control agents, but their utility in many agricultural applications has been limited by their slow speed of kill and narrow host specificity. Baculoviruses have been genetically modified to express foreign genes under powerful promoters in order to accelerate their speed of kill. In our and other laboratories, the expression of genes coding for insect juvenile hormone esterases and various peptide neurotoxins has resulted in recombinant baculoviruses with promise as biological insecticides. These viruses are efficacious in the laboratory, greenhouse and field and dramatically reduce damage caused by insect feeding. The recombinant viruses synergize and are synergized by classical pesticides such as pyrethroids. Since they are highly selective for pest insects, they can be used without disrupting biological control. Because the recombinant virus produces fewer progeny in infected larvae than the wild-type virus, they are rapidly out-competed in the ecosystem. The viruses can be used effectively with crops expressing endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis. They can be produced industrially but also by village industries, indicating that they have the potential to deliver sustainable pest control in developing countries. It remains to be seen, however, whether the current generation of recombinant baculoviruses will be competitive with the new generation of synthetic chemical pesticides. Current research clearly indicates, though, that the use of biological vectors of genes for insect control will find a place in agriculture. Baculoviruses will also prove valuable in testing the potential utility of proteins and peptides for insect control.

  2. Interchromosomal recombination in Zea mays.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, W; Timmermans, M C; Messing, J

    1998-01-01

    A new allele of the 27-kD zein locus in maize has been generated by interchromosomal recombination between chromosomes of two different inbred lines. A continuous patch of at least 11,817 bp of inbred W64A, containing the previously characterized Ra allele of the 27-kD zein gene, has been inserted into the genome of A188 by a single crossover. While both junction sequences are conserved, sequences of the two homologs between these junctions differ considerably. W64A contains the 7313-bp-long retrotransposon, Zeon-1. A188 contains a second copy of the 27-kD zein gene and a 2-kb repetitive element. Therefore, recombination results in a 7.3-kb insertion and a 14-kb deletion compared to the original S+A188 allele. If nonpairing sequences are looped out, 206 single base changes, frequently clustered, are present. The structure of this allele may explain how a recently discovered example of somatic recombination occurred in an A188/W64A hybrid. This would indicate that despite these sequence differences, pairing between these alleles could occur early during plant development. Therefore, such a somatically derived chimeric chromosome can also be heritable and give rise to new alleles. PMID:9799274

  3. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: Origin and recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A.; Mutirangura, A.; Ledbetter, D.H. ); Langlois, S. ); Morris, M.A.; Malcolm, S.

    1993-09-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N=27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N-5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, more paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. 33 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  4. Mechanistic features of recombination in HIV.

    PubMed

    Galetto, Román; Negroni, Matteo

    2005-01-01

    The importance of recombination in retroviral evolution has been acknowledged for several decades. Consequently, after the identification of HIV as the etiological agent of AIDS, it was suspected that recombination could also play a central role in the evolution of this virus. However, only recently, extensive epidemiologic studies of HIV infections worldwide have provided an estimate for the occurrence of recombination in vivo, unveiling recombination frequencies that dwarf those initially expected. Nowadays, recombination is regarded as an integral part of the infectious cycle of this retrovirus, which impacts on diagnosis and treatment of infections, especially when genetically distant viruses have been at the origin of the recombinant forms. Retroviral recombination is observed when two genetically divergent genomic RNA molecules are present in the same viral particle, and arises during the reverse transcription step. This review focuses on the mechanisms that have been proposed to account for the occurrence of recombination in retroviruses, from the strand displacement model, according to which recombination occurs during second DNA strand synthesis; to the description of the factors responsible for copy-choice recombination during first DNA strand synthesis, such as the presence of breaks, pause sites, or secondary structures in the genomic RNA. Most of these models have been supported by experimental data obtained from in vitro reconstituted systems or from cell infection studies using academic model sequences. The situation in vivo is expected to be more complex, since several factors come into play when recombination involves relatively distant isolates, as in the case of inter-subtype recombination. At present, it is clear that further studies are needed in order to evaluate whether a prevailing mechanism exists for in vivo recombination, and these studies will also be essential for understanding how the underlying mechanisms of recombination contribute

  5. Expression and purification of cysteine introduced recombinant saporin.

    PubMed

    Günhan, Emine; Swe, Mimi; Palazoglu, Mine; Voss, John C; Chalupa, Leo M

    2008-04-01

    Saporin, a ribosome inactivating protein is widely used for immunotoxin construction. Here we describe a mutation of saporin (sap)-3 DNA by introducing a cysteine residue, followed by protein expression and purification by ion exchange chromatography. The purified Cys255sap-3, sap-3 isomer and commercially purchased saporin, were tested for toxicity using assays measuring inhibition for protein synthesis. The IC(50) values showed that the toxicity of the Cys255sap-3 is equivalent to the sap-3 isomer and commercial saporin. Reactivity of Cys255sap-3 was confirmed by labeling with a thio-specific fluorescent probe as well as conjugation with a nonspecific mouse IgG. We have found that a single cysteine within saporin provides a method for antibody conjugation that ensures a uniform and reproducible modification of a saporin variant retaining high activity.

  6. Current Trends of HIV Recombination Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Katherine A.; Wong, Justin J.L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major characteristics of HIV-1 is its high genetic variability and extensive heterogeneity. This characteristic is due to its molecular traits, which in turn allows it to vary, recombine, and diversify at a high frequency. As such, it generates complex molecular forms, termed recombinants, which evade the human immune system and so survive. There is no sequence constraint to the recombination pattern as it appears to occur at inter-group (between groups M and O), as well as interand intra-subtype within group M. Rapid emergence and active global transmission of HIV-1 recombinants, known as circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and unique recombinant forms (URFs), requires urgent attention. To date, 55 CRFs have been reported around the world. The first CRF01_AE originated from Central Africa but spread widely in Asia. The most recent CRF; CRF55_01B is a recombinant form of CRF01_AE and subtype B, although its origin is yet to be publicly disclosed. HIV-1 recombination is an ongoing event and plays an indispensable role in HIV epidemics in different regions. Africa, Asia and South America are identified as recombination hot-spots. They are affected by continual emergence and cocirculation of newly emerging CRFs and URFs, which are now responsible for almost 20% of HIV-1 infections worldwide. Better understanding of recombinants is necessary to determine their biological and molecular attributes. PMID:24470968

  7. Recombinant DNA technology in apple.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Cesare; Patocchi, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes the achievements of almost 20 years of recombinant DNA technology applied to apple, grouping the research results into the sections: developing the technology, insect resistance, fungal disease resistance, self-incompatibility, herbicide resistance, fire blight resistance, fruit ripening, allergens, rooting ability, and acceptance and risk assessment. The diseases fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora, and scab, caused by Venturia inaequalis, were and still are the prime targets. Shelf life improvement and rooting ability of rootstocks are also relevant research areas. The tools to create genetically modified apples of added value to producers, consumers, and the environment are now available.

  8. Recombinant erythropoietin in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T; Marx, G; Littlewood, T; Macdougall, I

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin (RHuEPO) has revolutionised the treatment of patients with anaemia of chronic renal disease. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RHuEPO is also useful in various non-uraemic conditions including haematological and oncological disorders, prematurity, HIV infection, and perioperative therapies. Besides highlighting both the historical and functional aspects of RHuEPO, this review discusses the applications of RHuEPO in clinical practice and the potential problems of RHuEPO treatment. PMID:12897214

  9. Regulation of recombination and genomic maintenance.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2015-08-03

    Recombination is a central process to stably maintain and transmit a genome through somatic cell divisions and to new generations. Hence, recombination needs to be coordinated with other events occurring on the DNA template, such as DNA replication, transcription, and the specialized chromosomal functions at centromeres and telomeres. Moreover, regulation with respect to the cell-cycle stage is required as much as spatiotemporal coordination within the nuclear volume. These regulatory mechanisms impinge on the DNA substrate through modifications of the chromatin and directly on recombination proteins through a myriad of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and additional mechanisms. Although recombination is primarily appreciated to maintain genomic stability, the process also contributes to gross chromosomal arrangements and copy-number changes. Hence, the recombination process itself requires quality control to ensure high fidelity and avoid genomic instability. Evidently, recombination and its regulatory processes have significant impact on human disease, specifically cancer and, possibly, neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tokareva, Olena; Michalczechen-Lacerda, Valquíria A; Rech, Elíbio L; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is considered to be the toughest biopolymer on Earth due to an extraordinary combination of strength and elasticity. Moreover, silks are biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large-scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and material science applications. We review the current strategies to produce recombinant spider silks. PMID:24119078

  11. Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Tokareva, Olena; Michalczechen-Lacerda, Valquíria A; Rech, Elíbio L; Kaplan, David L

    2013-11-01

    Spider dragline silk is considered to be the toughest biopolymer on Earth due to an extraordinary combination of strength and elasticity. Moreover, silks are biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large-scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and material science applications. We review the current strategies to produce recombinant spider silks.

  12. Dissociative recombination in planetary ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Ionization in planetary atmospheres can be produced by solar photoionization, photoelectron impact ionization, and, in auroral regions, by impact of precipitating particles. This ionization is lost mainly in dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions. Although atomic ions cannot undergo DR, they can be transformed locally through ion-molecule reactions into molecular ions, or they may be transported vertically or horizontally to regions of the atmosphere where such transformations are possible. Because DR reactions tend to be very exothermic, they can be an important source of kinetically or internally excited fragments. In interplanetary thermospheres, the neutral densities decrease exponentially with altitude. Below the homopause (or turbopause), the atmosphere is assumed to be throughly mixed by convection and/or turbulence. Above the homopause, diffusion is the major transport mechanism, and each species is distributed according to its mass, with the logarithmic derivative of the density with repect to altitude given approximately by -1/H, where H = kT/mg is the scale height. In this expression, T is the neutral temperature, g is the local acceleratiion of gravity, and m is the mass of the species. Thus lighter species become relatively more abundant, and heavier species less abundant, as the altitude increases. This variation of the neutral composition can lead to changes in the ion composition; furthermore, as the neutral densities decrease, dissociative recombination becomes more important relative to ion-neutral reactions as a loss mechanism for molecular ions.

  13. Rapid purification of recombinant histones.

    PubMed

    Klinker, Henrike; Haas, Caroline; Harrer, Nadine; Becker, Peter B; Mueller-Planitz, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods to assemble nucleosomes from recombinant histones decades ago has transformed chromatin research. Nevertheless, nucleosome reconstitution remains time consuming to this day, not least because the four individual histones must be purified first. Here, we present a streamlined purification protocol of recombinant histones from bacteria. We termed this method "rapid histone purification" (RHP) as it circumvents isolation of inclusion bodies and thereby cuts out the most time-consuming step of traditional purification protocols. Instead of inclusion body isolation, whole cell extracts are prepared under strongly denaturing conditions that directly solubilize inclusion bodies. By ion exchange chromatography, the histones are purified from the extracts. The protocol has been successfully applied to all four canonical Drosophila and human histones. RHP histones and histones that were purified from isolated inclusion bodies had similar purities. The different purification strategies also did not impact the quality of octamers reconstituted from these histones. We expect that the RHP protocol can be readily applied to the purification of canonical histones from other species as well as the numerous histone variants.

  14. Theory of recombination in directed molecular evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weiqun; Hwa, Terence; Levine, Herbert; Kessler, David A.

    2003-03-01

    Recombination is a fundamental process driving the evolution of biological organisms in nature. It is also a very efficient method being used in in vitro directed evolution of molecules. Here we propose a simple model for the directed evolution of protein-binding DNA sequences subject to recombination, substitution, and competitive selection. This turns out to be a rare model of involving recombination which is analytically tractable. We characterize the dynamical and steady-state behaviors of this model and verify them numerically. We discuss the manner in which recombination drastically speeds up the evolutionary process.

  15. Human Insulin from Recombinant DNA Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Irving S.

    1983-02-01

    Human insulin produced by recombinant DNA technology is the first commercial health care product derived from this technology. Work on this product was initiated before there were federal guidelines for large-scale recombinant DNA work or commercial development of recombinant DNA products. The steps taken to facilitate acceptance of large-scale work and proof of the identity and safety of such a product are described. While basic studies in recombinant DNA technology will continue to have a profound impact on research in the life sciences, commercial applications may well be controlled by economic conditions and the availability of investment capital.

  16. Free recombination within Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Suerbaum, Sebastian; Smith, John Maynard; Bapumia, Khairun; Morelli, Giovanna; Smith, Noel H.; Kunstmann, Erdmute; Dyrek, Isabelle; Achtman, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Sequences of three gene fragments (flaA, flaB, and vacA) from Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients in Germany, Canada, and South Africa were analyzed for diversity and for linkage equilibrium by using the Homoplasy Test and compatibility matrices. Horizontal genetic exchange in H. pylori is so frequent that different loci and polymorphisms within each locus are all at linkage equilibrium. These results indicate that H. pylori is panmictic. Comparisons with sequences from Escherichia coli, Neisseria meningitidis, and Drosophila melanogaster showed that recombination in H. pylori was much more frequent than in other species. In contrast, when multiple family members infected with H. pylori were investigated, some strains were indistinguishable at all three loci. Thus, H. pylori is clonal over short time periods after natural transmission. PMID:9770535

  17. Deleterious background selection with recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, R.R.; Kaplan, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    An analytic expression for the expected nucleotide diversity is obtained for a neutral locus in a region with deleterious mutation and recombination. Our analytic results are used to predict levels of variation for the entire third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. The predictions are consistent with the low levels of variation that have been observed at loci near the centromeres of the third chromosome of D. melanogaster. However, the low levels of variation observed near the tips of this chromosome are not predicted using currently available estimates of the deleterious mutation rate and of selection coefficients. If considerably smaller selection coefficients are assumed, the low observed levels of variation at the tips of the third chromosome are consistent with the background selection model. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Dielectronic recombination of tungsten ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dong, Chenzhong; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-08-01

    Ab initio calculations of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients of Ne-, Pd- and Ag-like tungsten have been performed. Energy levels, radiative transition probabilities and autoionization rates were calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code. The contributions from different channels to the total rate coefficients are discussed. The present calculated rate coefficients are compared with other calculations where available. Excellent agreement has been found for Ne-like W while a large discrepancy was found for Pd-like W, which implies that more ab initio calculations and experimental measurements are badly needed. Further calculations demonstrated that the influence of configuration interaction is small while nonresonant radiative stabilizing (NRS) contribution to doubly excited non-autoionizing states are vital. The data obtained are expected to be useful for modeling plasmas for fusion applications, especially for the ITER community, which makes experimental verification even more essential.

  19. Recombining without Hotspots: A Comprehensive Evolutionary Portrait of Recombination in Two Closely Related Species of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Smukowski Heil, Caiti S.; Ellison, Chris; Dubin, Matthew; Noor, Mohamed A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic recombination rate varies across the genome within and between individuals, populations, and species in virtually all taxa studied. In almost every species, this variation takes the form of discrete recombination hotspots, determined in some mammals by a protein called PRDM9. Hotspots and their determinants have a profound effect on the genomic landscape, and share certain features that extend across the tree of life. Drosophila, in contrast, are anomalous in their absence of hotspots, PRDM9, and other species-specific differences in the determination of recombination. To better understand the evolution of meiosis and general patterns of recombination across diverse taxa, we present a truly comprehensive portrait of recombination across time, combining recently published cross-based contemporary recombination estimates from each of two sister species with newly obtained linkage-disequilibrium-based historic estimates of recombination from both of these species. Using Drosophila pseudoobscura and Drosophila miranda as a model system, we compare recombination rate between species at multiple scales, and we suggest that Drosophila replicate the pattern seen in human–chimpanzee in which recombination rate is conserved at broad scales. We also find evidence of a species-wide recombination modifier(s), resulting in both a present and historic genome-wide elevation of recombination rates in D. miranda, and identify broad scale effects on recombination from the presence of an inversion. Finally, we reveal an unprecedented view of the distribution of recombination in D. pseudoobscura, illustrating patterns of linked selection and where recombination is taking place. Overall, by combining these estimation approaches, we highlight key similarities and differences in recombination between Drosophila and other organisms. PMID:26430062

  20. Recombining without Hotspots: A Comprehensive Evolutionary Portrait of Recombination in Two Closely Related Species of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Smukowski Heil, Caiti S; Ellison, Chris; Dubin, Matthew; Noor, Mohamed A F

    2015-10-01

    Meiotic recombination rate varies across the genome within and between individuals, populations, and species in virtually all taxa studied. In almost every species, this variation takes the form of discrete recombination hotspots, determined in some mammals by a protein called PRDM9. Hotspots and their determinants have a profound effect on the genomic landscape, and share certain features that extend across the tree of life. Drosophila, in contrast, are anomalous in their absence of hotspots, PRDM9, and other species-specific differences in the determination of recombination. To better understand the evolution of meiosis and general patterns of recombination across diverse taxa, we present a truly comprehensive portrait of recombination across time, combining recently published cross-based contemporary recombination estimates from each of two sister species with newly obtained linkage-disequilibrium-based historic estimates of recombination from both of these species. Using Drosophila pseudoobscura and Drosophila miranda as a model system, we compare recombination rate between species at multiple scales, and we suggest that Drosophila replicate the pattern seen in human-chimpanzee in which recombination rate is conserved at broad scales. We also find evidence of a species-wide recombination modifier(s), resulting in both a present and historic genome-wide elevation of recombination rates in D. miranda, and identify broad scale effects on recombination from the presence of an inversion. Finally, we reveal an unprecedented view of the distribution of recombination in D. pseudoobscura, illustrating patterns of linked selection and where recombination is taking place. Overall, by combining these estimation approaches, we highlight key similarities and differences in recombination between Drosophila and other organisms.

  1. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael W

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  2. Recombinant Vaccinia Virus: Immunization against Multiple Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkus, Marion E.; Piccini, Antonia; Lipinskas, Bernard R.; Paoletti, Enzo

    1985-09-01

    The coding sequences for the hepatitis B virus surface antigen, the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D, and the influenza virus hemagglutinin were inserted into a single vaccinia virus genome. Rabbits inoculated intravenously or intradermally with this polyvalent vaccinia virus recombinant produced antibodies reactive to all three authentic foreign antigens. In addition, the feasibility of multiple rounds of vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus was demonstrated.

  3. Oligonucleotide recombination in gram negative bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes several key aspects of a novel form of RecA-independent homologous recombination. We found that synthetic single stranded DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced into bacteria by transformation can site-specifically recombine with bacterial chromosomes in the absence of any a...

  4. Oligo Recombination in Gram Negative Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homologous recombination is important for bacterial survival because it simultaneously provides genomic stability as well as genomic plasticity. Of the mechanistic pathways for homologous recombination, those mediated by RecA are the most thoroughly characterized and are understood to be structural...

  5. Dielectronic recombination lines of C{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Sochi, Taha Storey, Peter J.

    2013-11-15

    The present paper presents atomic data generated to investigate the recombination lines of C II in the spectra of planetary nebulae. These data include energies of bound and autoionizing states, oscillator strengths and radiative transition probabilities, autoionization probabilities, and recombination coefficients. The R-matrix method of electron scattering theory was used to describe the C{sup 2+} plus electron system.

  6. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

    1994-10-18

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

  7. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, John; Piddington, Chris S.; Kovacevich, Brian R.; Young, Kevin D.; Denome, Sylvia A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

  8. Dissociative recombination: Results from storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Mats

    2005-05-27

    The focus of this article is on the measurement of product branching ratios in the dissociative recombination of polyatomic molecular ions with electrons by means of ion storage rings. Recombination of ions of interest in astrophysics, plasma-assisted combustion, thermonuclear fusion, protein fragmentation, and atmospheric physics are reviewed and discussed.

  9. Dissociative recombination of highly symmetric polyatomic ions.

    PubMed

    Douguet, Nicolas; Orel, Ann E; Greene, Chris H; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav

    2012-01-13

    A general first-principles theory of dissociative recombination is developed for highly symmetric molecular ions and applied to H(3)O(+) and CH(3)(+), which play an important role in astrophysical, combustion, and laboratory plasma environments. The theoretical cross sections obtained for the dissociative recombination of the two ions are in good agreement with existing experimental data from storage ring experiments.

  10. Radiofrequency recombination lines from the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1971-01-01

    Observations of recombination lines form normal H II regions, extended H II regions, nonthermal sources, and the H I medium are discussed. Detection of recombination lines from elements other than hydrogen may provide a means of identifying fossil Stromgren spheres at high temperature.

  11. V(D)J recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    de Villartay, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    V(D)J recombination not only comprises the molecular mechanism that insures diversity of the immune system but also constitutes a critical checkpoint in the developmental program of B- and T-lymphocytes. The analysis of human patients with Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID) has contributed to the understanding of the biochemistry of the V(D)J recombination reaction. The molecular study V(D)J recombination settings in humans, mice and in cellular mutants has allowed to unravel the process of Non Homologous End Joining (NHEJ), one of the key pathway that insure proper repair of DNA double strand breaks (dsb), whether they occur during V(D)J recombination or secondary to other DNA injuries. Two NHEJ factors, Artemis and Cernunnos, were indeed discovered through the study of human V(D)J recombination defective human SCID patients.

  12. Identifying the Important HIV-1 Recombination Breakpoints

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Arts, Eric J.; Negroni, Matteo; Robertson, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant HIV-1 genomes contribute significantly to the diversity of variants within the HIV/AIDS pandemic. It is assumed that some of these mosaic genomes may have novel properties that have led to their prevalence, particularly in the case of the circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). In regions of the HIV-1 genome where recombination has a tendency to convey a selective advantage to the virus, we predict that the distribution of breakpoints—the identifiable boundaries that delimit the mosaic structure—will deviate from the underlying null distribution. To test this hypothesis, we generate a probabilistic model of HIV-1 copy-choice recombination and compare the predicted breakpoint distribution to the distribution from the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Across much of the HIV-1 genome, we find that the observed frequencies of inter-subtype recombination are predicted accurately by our model. This observation strongly indicates that in these regions a probabilistic model, dependent on local sequence identity, is sufficient to explain breakpoint locations. In regions where there is a significant over- (either side of the env gene) or under- (short regions within gag, pol, and most of env) representation of breakpoints, we infer natural selection to be influencing the recombination pattern. The paucity of recombination breakpoints within most of the envelope gene indicates that recombinants generated in this region are less likely to be successful. The breakpoints at a higher frequency than predicted by our model are approximately at either side of env, indicating increased selection for these recombinants as a consequence of this region, or at least part of it, having a tendency to be recombined as an entire unit. Our findings thus provide the first clear indication of the existence of a specific portion of the genome that deviates from a probabilistic null model for recombination. This suggests that, despite the wide diversity of recombinant forms seen in the viral

  13. Optimal expression condition of recombinant RAP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Hong; Bi, Hao; Liu, Zhiguo; Guo, Jianli; Qu, Shen

    2007-02-01

    In order to construct the expression recombinant of human receptor associated protein (RAP), optimize its expression condition and obtain the recombinant protein after expression with high efficiency, two prokaryotic expression vectors-pT7-PL and pET-28a(+) were used to construct the expression recombinant containing RAP cDNA, and the expression efficiency of two kinds of expression E. coli of BL21 strains was compared. The effect of different induction conditions on the expression of recombinant RAP was observed. After recombinant protein was purified with Ni(+) -nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni(+) -NTA) affinity chromatogram, its binding ability with microphage was observed. The results showed that two recombinant plasmids both obtained high expression of RAP. The expression levels of RAP in plasmid pT7-PL-RAP in BL21 (DE3, plysS) strain were significantly higher than in BL21 (DE3) strain. The expression of pT7-PL-RAP in the presence of chloramphenicol was higher than in the absence of chloramphenicol, and most of the inducible expressed RAP was soluble. The RAP which was purified by Ni(+) -NTA resin could strongly bind with the RAW264.7 cells rich in low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family receptors. It was concluded that the expression condition of recombinant RAP was optimized and functional RAP was obtained, which offered a good foundation for the further production of RAP as research tool.

  14. Implications of recombination for HIV diversity.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Bertha Cecilia; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Galetto, Roman; Negroni, Matteo

    2008-06-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) population is characterised by extensive genetic variability that results from high error and recombination rates of the reverse transcription process, and from the fast turnover of virions in HIV-infected individuals. Among the viral variants encountered at the global scale, recombinant forms are extremely abundant. Some of these recombinants (known as circulating recombinant forms) become fixed and undergo rapid expansion in the population. The reasons underlying their epidemiological success remain at present poorly understood and constitute a fascinating area for future research to improve our understanding of immune escape, pathogenicity and transmission. Recombinant viruses are generated during reverse transcription as a consequence of template switching between the two genetically different genomic RNAs present in a heterozygous virus. Recombination can thereby generate shortcuts in evolution by producing mosaic reverse transcription products of parental genomes. Therefore, in a single infectious cycle multiple mutations that are positively selected can be combined or, conversely, negatively selected mutations can be removed. Recombination is therefore involved in different aspects of HIV evolution, adaptation to its host, and escape from antiviral treatments.

  15. Electron Recombination in a Dense Hydrogen Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, M.R.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Yonehara, K.; Leonova, M.A.; Schwarz, T.A.; Chung, M.; /Unlisted /IIT, Chicago /Fermilab /MUONS Inc., Batavia /Turin Polytechnic

    2012-05-01

    A high pressure hydrogen gas filled RF cavity was subjected to an intense proton beam to study the evolution of the beam induced plasma inside the cavity. Varying beam intensities, gas pressures and electric fields were tested. Beam induced ionized electrons load the cavity, thereby decreasing the accelerating gradient. The extent and duration of this degradation has been measured. A model of the recombination between ionized electrons and ions is presented, with the intent of producing a baseline for the physics inside such a cavity used in a muon accelerator. Analysis of the data taken during the summer of 2011 shows that self recombination takes place in pure hydrogen gas. The decay of the number of electrons in the cavity once the beam is turned off indicates self recombination rather than attachment to electronegative dopants or impurities. The cross section of electron recombination grows for larger clusters of hydrogen and so at the equilibrium of electron production and recombination in the cavity, processes involving H{sub 5}{sup +} or larger clusters must be taking place. The measured recombination rates during this time match or exceed the analytic predicted values. The accelerating gradient in the cavity recovers fully in time for the next beam pulse of a muon collider. Exactly what the recombination rate is and how much the gradient degrades during the 60 ns muon collider beam pulse will be extrapolated from data taken during the spring of 2012.

  16. Homologous recombination in plants is organ specific.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Alexander; Filkowski, Jody; Hudson, Darryl; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2006-03-20

    In this paper we analysed the genome stability of various Arabidopsis thaliana plant organs using a transgenic recombination system. The system was based on two copies of non-functional GUS (lines #651 and #11) or LUC (line #15D8) reporter genes serving as a recombination substrate. Both reporter assays showed that recombination in flowers or stems were rare events. Most of the recombination sectors were found in leaves and roots, with leaves having over 2-fold greater number of the recombination events per single cell genome as compared to roots. The recombination events per single genome were 9.7-fold more frequent on the lateral half of the leaves than on the medial halves. This correlated with a 2.5-fold higher metabolic activity in the energy source (lateral) versus energy sink (medial) of leaves. Higher metabolic activity was paralleled by a higher anthocyanin production in lateral halves. The level of double strand break (DSB) occurrence was also different among plant organs; the highest level was observed in roots and the lowest in leaves. High level of DSBs strongly positively correlated with the activity of the key repair enzymes, AtKU70 and AtRAD51. The ratio of AtRAD51 to AtKU70 expression was the highest in leaves, supporting the more active involvement of homologous recombination pathway in the repair of DSBs in this organ. Western blot analysis confirmed the real time PCR expression data for AtKU70 gene.

  17. First-principles study of Frenkel pair recombination in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shi-Yao; Jin, Shuo; Li, Yu-Hao; Zhou, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-02-01

    The recombination of one Frenkel pair in tungsten has been investigated through first-principles simulation. Two different recombination types have been identified: instantaneous and thermally activated. The small recombination barriers for thermally activated recombination cases indicate that recombination can occur easily with a slightly increased temperature. For both of the two recombination types, recombination occurs through the self-interstitial atom moving towards the vacancy. The recombination process can be direct or through replacement sequences, depending on the vertical distance between the vacancy and the <1 1 1> line of self-interstitial atom pair.

  18. Intraspecific variation of recombination rate in maize

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In sexually reproducing organisms, meiotic crossovers ensure the proper segregation of chromosomes and contribute to genetic diversity by shuffling allelic combinations. Such genetic reassortment is exploited in breeding to combine favorable alleles, and in genetic research to identify genetic factors underlying traits of interest via linkage or association-based approaches. Crossover numbers and distributions along chromosomes vary between species, but little is known about their intraspecies variation. Results Here, we report on the variation of recombination rates between 22 European maize inbred lines that belong to the Dent and Flint gene pools. We genotype 23 doubled-haploid populations derived from crosses between these lines with a 50 k-SNP array and construct high-density genetic maps, showing good correspondence with the maize B73 genome sequence assembly. By aligning each genetic map to the B73 sequence, we obtain the recombination rates along chromosomes specific to each population. We identify significant differences in recombination rates at the genome-wide, chromosome, and intrachromosomal levels between populations, as well as significant variation for genome-wide recombination rates among maize lines. Crossover interference analysis using a two-pathway modeling framework reveals a negative association between recombination rate and interference strength. Conclusions To our knowledge, the present work provides the most comprehensive study on intraspecific variation of recombination rates and crossover interference strength in eukaryotes. Differences found in recombination rates will allow for selection of high or low recombining lines in crossing programs. Our methodology should pave the way for precise identification of genes controlling recombination rates in maize and other organisms. PMID:24050704

  19. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today.

  20. Spacecraft thermal energy accommodation from atomic recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carleton, Karen L.; Marinelli, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of atomic recombination probabilities important in determining energy release to reusable spacecraft thermal protection surfaces during reentry are presented. An experimental apparatus constructed to examine recombination of atomic oxygen from thermal protection and reference materials at reentry temperatures is described. The materials are examined under ultrahigh vacuum conditions to develop and maintain well characterized surface conditions that are free of contamination. When compared with stagnation point heat transfer measurements performed in arc jet facilities, these measurements indicate that a significant fraction of the excess energy available from atom recombination is removed from the surface as metastable O2.

  1. Recombination of N4(+) ions with electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Y. S.; Johnsen, R.

    1991-01-01

    Using a modified high-pressure-afterglow/mass spectrometer apparatus similar to that described by Lee and Johnsen (1989), spectroscopic observations of afterglow helium plasmas, with N2 as a minor additive, were carried out in order to verify the mechanism suggested by Bates (1991) for dissociative recombination of electrons with N4(+) ions. It was found that dissociative recombination of electrons with N4(+) ions results in the formation of N2 molecules in the C 3Pi(u) (v = 0,1) state, with the recombination rate coefficient of (2.6 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -6 cu cm/sec at 300 K.

  2. Dissociative Recombination without a Curve Crossing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations show that a curve crossing is not always needed for a high dissociative- recombination cross section. For HeH(+), in which no neutral states cross the ion potential curve, dissociative recombination is driven by the nuclear kinetic-energy operator on adiabatic potential curves. The kinetic-energy derivative operator allows for capture into repulsive curves that are outside of the classical turning points for the nuclear motion. The dominant dissociative route is the C (2)Sigma(+) state leading to H(n = 2) atoms. An analogous mechanism is proposed for the dissociative recombination of H3(+).

  3. Disease diagnosis by recombinant DNA methods

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, C.T.

    1987-06-05

    Recombinant DNA procedures have now been applied to the problem of the identification of molecular defects in man that account for heritable diseases, somatic mutations associated with neoplasia, and acquired infectious disease. Thus, recombinant DNA technology has rapidly expanded the ability to diagnose disease. Substantial advances in the simplification of procedures for diagnostic purposes have been made, and the informed physician has gained in diagnostic accuracy as a consequence of these developments. The wide application of recombinant DNA diagnostics will depend on simplicity, speed of results, and cost containment. 66 references, 7 figures.

  4. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes.

  5. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  6. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  7. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  8. Epigenetic control of meiotic recombination in plants.

    PubMed

    Yelina, Natasha; Diaz, Patrick; Lambing, Christophe; Henderson, Ian R

    2015-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is a deeply conserved process within eukaryotes that has a profound effect on patterns of natural genetic variation. During meiosis homologous chromosomes pair and undergo DNA double strand breaks generated by the Spo11 endonuclease. These breaks can be repaired as crossovers that result in reciprocal exchange between chromosomes. The frequency of recombination along chromosomes is highly variable, for example, crossovers are rarely observed in heterochromatin and the centromeric regions. Recent work in plants has shown that crossover hotspots occur in gene promoters and are associated with specific chromatin modifications, including H2A.Z. Meiotic chromosomes are also organized in loop-base arrays connected to an underlying chromosome axis, which likely interacts with chromatin to organize patterns of recombination. Therefore, epigenetic information exerts a major influence on patterns of meiotic recombination along chromosomes, genetic variation within populations and evolution of plant genomes.

  9. Chemical recombination in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakos, Robert J.; Morgan, Richard G.

    1994-01-01

    The note describes the theoretical basis of chemical recombination in an expansion tube which simulates energy, Reynolds number, and stream chemistry at near-orbital velocities. Expansion tubes can satisfy ground-based hypersonic propulsion and aerothermal testing requirements.

  10. The Kinetics of Nitrogen Atom Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, G. Ronald; Winkler, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a study of the kinetics of the recombination of nitrogen atoms in which concentration-time relations are determined directly by utilizing visual observations of emissions to make gas phase titrations of N atoms with NO. (MLH)

  11. Strategies for RNA-Guided DNA Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeleska, Angela; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico; Landweber, Laura F.

    We present a model for homologous DNA recombination events guided by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) templates, and apply this model to DNA rearrangements in some groups of ciliates, such as Stylonychia or Oxytricha. In these organisms, differentiation of a somatic macronucleus from a germline micronucleus involves extensive gene rearrangement, which can be modeled as topological braiding of the DNA, with the template-guided alignment proceeding through DNA branch migration. We show that a graph structure, which we refer to as an assembly graph, containing only 1- and 4-valent vertices can provide a physical representation of the DNA at the time of recombination. With this representation, 4-valent vertices correspond to the alignment of the recombination sites, and we model the actual recombination event as smoothing of these vertices.

  12. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Holloman, William K; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-08-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we have surveyed the genome of U. maydis to determine the composition of its homologous recombination system. Compared to baker's yeast, there are fundamental differences in the function as well as in the repertoire of dedicated components. These include the use of a BRCA2 homolog and its modifier Dss1 rather than Rad52 as a mediator of Rad51, the presence of only a single Rad51 paralog, and the absence of Dmc1 and auxiliary meiotic proteins.

  13. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Holloman, William K.; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we have surveyed the genome of Ustilago maydis to determine the composition of its homologous recombination system. Compared to baker's yeast, there are fundamental differences in the function as well as in the repertoire of dedicated components. These include the use of a BRCA2 homolog and its modifier Dss1 rather than Rad52 as a mediator of Rad51, the presence of only a single Rad51 paralog, and the absence of Dmc1 and auxiliary meiotic proteins. PMID:18502156

  14. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  15. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  16. Recombination-generation currents in degenerate semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1978-01-01

    The classical Shockley-Read-Hall theory of free carrier recombination and generation via traps is extended to degenerate semiconductors. A concise and simple expression is found which avoids completely the concept of a Fermi level, a concept which is alien to nonequilibrium situations. Assumptions made in deriving the recombination generation current are carefully delineated and are found to be basically identical to those made in the original theory applicable to nondegenerate semiconductors.

  17. Oxidative refolding of recombinant prochymosin.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, C; Tang, B; Zhang, Y; Yang, K

    1999-01-01

    The disulphide-coupled refolding of recombinant prochymosin from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies was investigated. Prochymosin solubilized from inclusion bodies is endowed with free thiol groups and disulphide bonds. This partially reduced form undergoes renaturation more efficiently than the fully reduced form, suggesting that some native structural elements existing in inclusion bodies and remaining after denaturation function as nuclei to initiate correct refolding. This assumption is supported by the finding that in the solubilized prochymosin molecule the cysteine residues located in the N-terminal domain of the protein are not incorrectly paired with the other cysteines in the C-terminal domain. Addition of GSH/GSSG into the refolding system facilitates disulphide rearrangement and thus enhances renaturation, especially for the fully reduced prochymosin. Based on the results described in this and previous papers [Tang, Zhang and Yang (1994) Biochem. J. 301, 17-20], a model to depict the refolding process of prochymosin is proposed. Briefly, the refolding process of prochymosin consists of two stages: the formation and rearrangement of disulphide bonds occurs at the first stage in a pH11 buffer, whereas the formation and adjustment of tertiary structure leading to the native conformation takes place at the second stage at pH8. The pH11 conditions help polypeptides to refold in such a way as to favour the formation of native disulphide bonds. Disulphide rearrangement, the rate-limiting step during refolding, can be achieved by thiol/disulphide exchange initiated by free thiol groups present in the prochymosin polypeptide, GSH/GSSG or protein disulphide isomerase. PMID:10229691

  18. Recombination hotspots: Models and tools for detection.

    PubMed

    Paul, Prosenjit; Nag, Debjyoti; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2016-04-01

    Recombination hotspots are the regions within the genome where the rate, and the frequency of recombination are optimum with a size varying from 1 to 2kb. The recombination event is mediated by the double-stranded break formation, guided by the combined enzymatic action of DNA topoisomerase and Spo 11 endonuclease. These regions are distributed non-uniformly throughout the human genome and cause distortions in the genetic map. Numerous lines of evidence suggest that the number of hotspots known in humans has increased manifold in recent years. A few facts about the hotspot evolutions were also put forward, indicating the differences in the hotspot position between chimpanzees and humans. In mice, recombination hot spots were found to be clustered within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. Several models, that help explain meiotic recombination has been proposed. Moreover, scientists also developed some computational tools to locate the hotspot position and estimate their recombination rate in humans is of great interest to population and medical geneticists. Here we reviewed the molecular mechanisms, models and in silico prediction techniques of hot spot residues.

  19. Dissociation of recombinant prion autocatalysis from infectivity.

    PubMed

    Noble, Geoffrey P; Supattapone, Surachai

    2015-01-01

    Within the mammalian prion field, the existence of recombinant prion protein (PrP) conformers with self-replicating (ie. autocatalytic) activity in vitro but little to no infectious activity in vivo challenges a key prediction of the protein-only hypothesis of prion replication--that autocatalytic PrP conformers should be infectious. To understand this dissociation of autocatalysis from infectivity, we recently performed a structural and functional comparison between a highly infectious and non-infectious pair of autocatalytic recombinant PrP conformers derived from the same initial prion strain. (1) We identified restricted, C-terminal structural differences between these 2 conformers and provided evidence that these relatively subtle differences prevent the non-infectious conformer from templating the conversion of native PrP(C) substrates containing a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. (1) In this article we discuss a model, consistent with these findings, in which recombinant PrP, lacking post-translational modifications and associated folding constraints, is capable of adopting a wide variety of autocatalytic conformations. Only a subset of these recombinant conformers can be adopted by post-translationally modified native PrP(C), and this subset represents the recombinant conformers with high specific infectivity. We examine this model's implications for the generation of highly infectious recombinant prions and the protein-only hypothesis of prion replication.

  20. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  1. Homologous recombination using bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cary; Fischer, Tobias; Munroe, Elizabeth

    2015-02-02

    This protocol introduces the technique of homologous recombination in bacteria to insert a linear DNA fragment into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). Homologous recombination allows the modification of large DNA molecules, in contrast with conventional restriction endonuclease-based strategies, which cleave large DNAs into numerous fragments and are unlikely to permit the precise targeting afforded by recombination-based approaches. The method uses a phage lambda-derived recombination system (using exo, beta, and gam) as well as other enzymatic activities provided by the host (Escherichia coli). In the method described here, a DNA fragment encoding enhanced cyan fluorescent protein is inserted immediately after the start codon of the gene encoding choline acetyltransferase ("ChAT"), the final enzyme in acetylcholine biosynthesis, using homologous recombination between sequences that are present both on the introduced DNA fragment and in the target BAC. The desired recombination products are identified via positive selection for resistance to kanamycin. In principle, the resulting modified BAC could be used to produce transgenic mice that express this fluorescent protein in cholinergic neurons. The approach described here could be used to insert any DNA fragment.

  2. Oligonucleotide recombination enabled site-specific mutagenesis in bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombineering refers to a strategy for engineering DNA sequences using a specialized mode of homologous recombination. This technology can be used for rapidly constructing precise changes in bacterial genome sequences in vivo. Oligo recombination is one type of recombineering that uses ssDNA olig...

  3. Construction of gene-targeting vectors by recombineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Song-Choon; Wang, Wei; Liu, Pentao

    2009-01-01

    Recombineering is a technology that utilizes the efficient homologous recombination functions encoded by gamma phage to manipulate DNA in Escherichia coli. Construction of knockout vectors has been greatly facilitated by recombineering as it allows one to choose any genomic region to manipulate. We describe here an efficient recombineering-based protocol for making mouse conditional knockout targeting vectors.

  4. Recombination hotspots and host susceptibility modulate the adaptive value of recombination during maize streak virus evolution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Maize streak virus -strain A (MSV-A; Genus Mastrevirus, Family Geminiviridae), the maize-adapted strain of MSV that causes maize streak disease throughout sub-Saharan Africa, probably arose between 100 and 200 years ago via homologous recombination between two MSV strains adapted to wild grasses. MSV recombination experiments and analyses of natural MSV recombination patterns have revealed that this recombination event entailed the exchange of the movement protein - coat protein gene cassette, bounded by the two genomic regions most prone to recombination in mastrevirus genomes; the first surrounding the virion-strand origin of replication, and the second around the interface between the coat protein gene and the short intergenic region. Therefore, aside from the likely adaptive advantages presented by a modular exchange of this cassette, these specific breakpoints may have been largely predetermined by the underlying mechanisms of mastrevirus recombination. To investigate this hypothesis, we constructed artificial, low-fitness, reciprocal chimaeric MSV genomes using alternating genomic segments from two MSV strains; a grass-adapted MSV-B, and a maize-adapted MSV-A. Between them, each pair of reciprocal chimaeric genomes represented all of the genetic material required to reconstruct - via recombination - the highly maize-adapted MSV-A genotype, MSV-MatA. We then co-infected a selection of differentially MSV-resistant maize genotypes with pairs of reciprocal chimaeras to determine the efficiency with which recombination would give rise to high-fitness progeny genomes resembling MSV-MatA. Results Recombinants resembling MSV-MatA invariably arose in all of our experiments. However, the accuracy and efficiency with which the MSV-MatA genotype was recovered across all replicates of each experiment depended on the MSV susceptibility of the maize genotypes used and the precise positions - in relation to known recombination hotspots - of the breakpoints

  5. Genetic recombination of the hepatitis C virus: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Morel, V; Fournier, C; François, C; Brochot, E; Helle, F; Duverlie, G; Castelain, S

    2011-02-01

    Genetic recombination is a well-known feature of RNA viruses that plays a significant role in their evolution. Although recombination is well documented for Flaviviridae family viruses, the first natural recombinant strain of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was identified as recently as 2002. Since then, a few other natural inter-genotypic, intra-genotypic and intra-subtype recombinant HCV strains have been described. However, the frequency of recombination may have been underestimated because not all known HCV recombinants are screened for in routine practice. Furthermore, the choice of treatment regimen and its predictive outcome remain problematic as the therapeutic strategy for HCV infection is genotype dependent. HCV recombination also raises many questions concerning its mechanisms and effects on the epidemiological and physiopathological features of the virus. This review provides an update on recombinant HCV strains, the process that gives rise to recombinants and clinical implications of recombination.

  6. Somatic recombination, gene amplification and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramel, C; Cederberg, H; Magnusson, J; Vogel, E; Natarajan, A T; Mullender, L H; Nivard, J M; Parry, J M; Leyson, A; Comendador, M A; Sierra, L M; Ferreiro, J A; Consuegra, S

    1996-06-12

    The principle objective of this research programme, to analyse chemical induction of somatic recombination and related endpoints, i.e., mobilization of transposing elements and gene amplification, has been approached by means of several assay systems. These have included Drosophila, Saccharomyces and mammalian cell cultures. 6.1. Screening assays for mitotic recombination. A large number of chemicals have been investigated in the three Drosophila assay systems employed--the multiple wing hair/flare wing spot system developed by Graf et al., 1984, the white-ivory system developed by Green et al., 1986 and the white/white+ eye spot assay developed by Vogel (Vogel and Nivard, 1993). Particularly the screening of 181 chemicals, covering a wide array of chemical classes, by the last mentioned assay has shown that measurement of somatic recombination in Drosophila constitutes a sensitive and efficient short-term test which shows a remarkably good correlation with the agent score of 83 short-term tests analysed by ICPEMC (Mendelsohn et al., 1992; Table 2) as well as the assay performance in international collaborative programmes measuring carcinogen/non-carcinogens (de Serres and Ashby, 1981; Ashby et al., 1985, 1988). Also the wing spot assay has gained wide international recognition as a similarly sensitive test. These two assay systems in Drosophila measure both intrachromosomal events and interchromosomal recombination. The white-ivory system on the other hand is based on the loss of a tandem duplication in the white locus, the mechanism of which is less known, but probably involves intrachromosomal recombination. The difference in the mechanism between this assay and the former two was indicated by the lack of response to methotrexate in the white-ivory assay, while this compound was strongly recombinogenic in both the wing spot and white/white+ assays. The use of different strains of Drosophila with the white/white+ assay demonstrated the importance of the

  7. Evolvability of an Optimal Recombination Rate.

    PubMed

    Lobkovsky, Alexander E; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-12-10

    Evolution and maintenance of genetic recombination and its relation to the mutational process is a long-standing, fundamental problem in evolutionary biology that is linked to the general problem of evolution of evolvability. We explored a stochastic model of the evolution of recombination using additive fitness and infinite allele assumptions but no assumptions on the sign or magnitude of the epistasis and the distribution of mutation effects. In this model, fluctuating negative epistasis and predominantly deleterious mutations arise naturally as a consequence of the additive fitness and a reservoir from which new alleles arrive with a fixed distribution of fitness effects. Analysis of the model revealed a nonmonotonic effect of recombination intensity on fitness, with an optimal recombination rate value which maximized fitness in steady state. The optimal recombination rate depended on the mutation rate and was evolvable, that is, subject to selection. The predictions of the model were compatible with the observations on the dependence between genome rearrangement rate and gene flux in microbial genomes.

  8. Recombination in Eukaryotic Single Stranded DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Darren P.; Biagini, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Golden, Michael; Roumagnac, Philippe; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution. PMID:21994803

  9. Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyploidization is the multiplication of the whole chromosome complement and has occurred frequently in vascular plants. Maintenance of stable polyploid state over generations requires special mechanisms to control pairing and distribution of more than two homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Since a minimal number of crossover events is essential for correct chromosome segregation, we investigated whether polyploidy has an influence on the frequency of meiotic recombination. Results Using two genetically linked transgenes providing seed-specific fluorescence, we compared a high number of progeny from diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis plants. We show that rates of meiotic recombination in reciprocal crosses of genetically identical diploid and autotetraploid Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher in tetraploids compared to diploids. Although male and female gametogenesis differ substantially in meiotic recombination frequency, both rates were equally increased in tetraploids. To investigate whether multivalent formation in autotetraploids was responsible for the increased recombination rates, we also performed corresponding experiments with allotetraploid plants showing strict bivalent pairing. We found similarly increased rates in auto- and allotetraploids, suggesting that the ploidy effect is independent of chromosome pairing configurations. Conclusions The evolutionary success of polyploid plants in nature and under domestication has been attributed to buffering of mutations and sub- and neo-functionalization of duplicated genes. Should the data described here be representative for polyploid plants, enhanced meiotic recombination, and the resulting rapid creation of genetic diversity, could have also contributed to their prevalence. PMID:21510849

  10. Graded recombination layers for multijunction photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Koleilat, Ghada I; Wang, Xihua; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-06-13

    Multijunction devices consist of a stack of semiconductor junctions having bandgaps tuned across a broad spectrum. In solar cells this concept is used to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic harvesting, while light emitters and detectors use it to achieve multicolor and spectrally tunable behavior. In series-connected current-matched multijunction devices, the recombination layers must allow the hole current from one cell to recombine, with high efficiency and low voltage loss, with the electron current from the next cell. We recently reported a tandem solar cell in which the recombination layer was implemented using a progression of n-type oxides whose doping densities and work functions serve to connect, with negligible resistive loss at solar current densities, the constituent cells. Here we present the generalized conditions for design of efficient graded recombination layer solar devices. We report the number of interlayers and the requirements on work function and doping of each interlayer, to bridge an work function difference as high as 1.6 eV. We also find solutions that minimize the doping required of the interlayers in order to minimize optical absorption due to free carriers in the graded recombination layer (GRL). We demonstrate a family of new GRL designs experimentally and highlight the benefits of the progression of dopings and work functions in the interlayers.

  11. Recombination in eukaryotic single stranded DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Darren P; Biagini, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Golden, Michael; Roumagnac, Philippe; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-09-01

    Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution.

  12. Immunological characterization of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Simionatto, Simone; Marchioro, Silvana B; Galli, Vanessa; Brum, Clarice B; Klein, Catia S; Rebelatto, Raquel; Silva, Everton F; Borsuk, Sibele; Conceição, Fabricio R; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2012-03-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the primary pathogen of enzootic pneumonia, is highly prevalent worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. Commercial vaccines are widely used in the control of this disease, however, they provide only partial protection. The aim of this study was to evaluate 34 recombinant proteins of M. hyopneumoniae expressed in Escherichia coli. Antigenic and immunogenic properties of these proteins were analyzed. For this, the proteins were tested against hyperimmune and convalescent pig sera through ELISA and Western blot. Immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was evaluated in BALB/c mice following intramuscular inoculation. Most antigens were able to induce a strong immune response and sera from inoculated mice were able to recognize native proteins by cell ELISA and Western blot. Several recombinant proteins were specifically recognized by convalescent pig sera, indicating they are expressed during infection. These data may help to develop more efficacious vaccines against M. hyopneumoniae.

  13. Transcription and Recombination: When RNA Meets DNA

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Andrés; Gaillard, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    A particularly relevant phenomenon in cell physiology and proliferation is the fact that spontaneous mitotic recombination is strongly enhanced by transcription. The most accepted view is that transcription increases the occurrence of double-strand breaks and/or single-stranded DNA gaps that are repaired by recombination. Most breaks would arise as a consequence of the impact that transcription has on replication fork progression, provoking its stalling and/or breakage. Here, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the cross talk between transcription and recombination, with emphasis on (1) the transcription–replication conflicts as the main source of recombinogenic DNA breaks, and (2) the formation of cotranscriptional R-loops as a major cause of such breaks. The new emerging questions and perspectives are discussed on the basis of the interference between transcription and replication, as well as the way RNA influences genome dynamics. PMID:25085910

  14. Dielectronic recombination of xenonlike tungsten ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schippers, S.; Bernhardt, D.; Mueller, A.; Krantz, C.; Grieser, M.; Repnow, R.; Wolf, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Hahn, M.; Novotny, O.; Savin, D. W.

    2011-01-15

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of xenonlike W{sup 20+} forming W{sup 19+} has been studied experimentally at a heavy-ion storage ring. A merged-beams method has been employed for obtaining absolute rate coefficients for electron-ion recombination in the collision-energy range 0-140 eV. The measured rate coefficient is dominated by strong DR resonances even at the lowest experimental energies. At plasma temperatures where the fractional abundance of W{sup 20+} is expected to peak in a fusion plasma, the experimentally derived plasma recombination rate coefficient is over a factor of 4 larger than the theoretically calculated rate coefficient which is currently used in fusion plasma modeling. The largest part of this discrepancy stems most probably from the neglect in the theoretical calculations of DR associated with fine-structure excitations of the W{sup 20+}([Kr]4d{sup 10} 4f{sup 8}) ion core.

  15. Genetics of meiosis and recombination in mice.

    PubMed

    Bolcun-Filas, Ewelina; Schimenti, John C

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis is one of the most critical developmental processes in sexually reproducing organisms. One round of DNA replication followed by two rounds of cell divisions results in generation of haploid gametes (sperm and eggs in mammals). Meiotic failure typically leads to infertility in mammals. In the process of meiotic recombination, maternal and paternal genomes are shuffled, creating new allelic combinations and thus genetic variety. However, in order to achieve this, meiotic cells must self-inflict DNA damage in the form of programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). Complex processes evolved to ensure proper DSB repair, and to do so in a way that favors interhomolog reciprocal recombination and crossovers. The hallmark of meiosis, a structurally conserved proteinaceous structure called the synaptonemal complex, is found only in meiotic cells. Conversely, meiotic homologous recombination is an adaptation of the mitotic DNA repair process but involving specialized proteins. In this chapter, we summarize current developments in mammalian meiosis enabled by genetically modified mice.

  16. Applications and challenges of multivalent recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Naim, Hussein Y

    2013-03-01

    The exceptional discoveries of antigen/gene delivery systems have allowed the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine candidates. The vaccine candidates employ various antigen-delivery systems, particularly recombinant viral vectors. Recombinant viral vectors are experimental vaccines similar to DNA vaccines, but they use attenuated viruses or bacterium as a carrier "vector" to introduce microbial DNA to cells of the body. They closely mimic a natural infection and therefore can efficiently stimulate the immune system. Although such recombinant vectors may face extensive preclinical testing and will possibly have to meet stringent regulatory requirements, some of these vectors (e.g. measles virus vectors) may benefit from the profound industrial and clinical experience of the parent vaccine. Most notably, novel vaccines based on live attenuated viruses combine the induction of broad, strong and persistent immune responses with acceptable safety profiles. We assess certain technologies in light of their use against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

  17. Initiation of meiotic recombination in chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takatomi; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-08-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is markedly activated during meiotic prophase to play central roles in faithful chromosome segregation and conferring genetic diversity to gametes. It is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the conserved protein Spo11, and preferentially occurs at discrete sites called hotspots. Since the functions of Spo11 are influenced by both of local chromatin at hotspots and higher-order chromosome structures, formation of meiotic DSBs is under regulation of chromatin structure. Therefore, investigating features and roles of meiotic chromatin is crucial to elucidate the in vivo mechanism of meiotic recombination initiation. Recent progress in genome-wide chromatin analyses tremendously improved our understanding on this point, but many critical questions are left unaddressed. In this review, we summarize current knowledge in the field, and also discuss the future problems that must be solved to understand the role of chromatin structure in meiotic recombination.

  18. Recent Theoretical Studies On Excitation and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Anil K.

    2000-01-01

    New advances in the theoretical treatment of atomic processes in plasmas are described. These enable not only an integrated, unified, and self-consistent treatment of important radiative and collisional processes, but also large-scale computation of atomic data with high accuracy. An extension of the R-matrix work, from excitation and photoionization to electron-ion recombination, includes a unified method that subsumes both the radiative and the di-electronic recombination processes in an ab initio manner. The extensive collisional calculations for iron and iron-peak elements under the Iron Project are also discussed.

  19. Graph Model of Coalescence with Recombinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, Laxmi

    One of the primary genetic events shaping an autosomal chromosome is recombination. This is a process that occurs during meiosis, in eukaryotes, that results in the offsprings having different combinations of (homologous) genes, or chromosomal segments, of the two parents. The presence of these recombination events in the evolutionary history of each chromosome complicates the genetic landscape of a population, and understanding the manifestations of these genetic exchanges in the chromosome sequences has been a subject of intense curiosity (see [Hud83, Gri99, HSW05] and citations therein).

  20. CosmoRec: Cosmological Recombination code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, Jens; Thomas, Rajat Mani

    2013-04-01

    CosmoRec solves the recombination problem including recombinations to highly excited states, corrections to the 2s-1s two-photon channel, HI Lyn-feedback, n>2 two-photon profile corrections, and n≥2 Raman-processes. The code can solve the radiative transfer equation of the Lyman-series photon field to obtain the required modifications to the rate equations of the resolved levels, and handles electron scattering, the effect of HeI intercombination transitions, and absorption of helium photons by hydrogen. It also allows accounting for dark matter annihilation and optionally includes detailed helium radiative transfer effects.

  1. The mismatch repair system reduces meiotic homeologous recombination and stimulates recombination-dependent chromosome loss.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, S R; Hunter, N; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    1996-01-01

    Efficient genetic recombination requires near-perfect homology between participating molecules. Sequence divergence reduces the frequency of recombination, a process that is dependent on the activity of the mismatch repair system. The effects of chromosomal divergence in diploids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one copy of chromosome III is derived from a closely related species, Saccharomyces paradoxus, have been examined. Meiotic recombination between the diverged chromosomes is decreased by 25-fold. Spore viability is reduced with an observable increase in the number of tetrads with only two or three viable spores. Asci with only two viable spores are disomic for chromosome III, consistent with meiosis I nondisjunction of the homeologs. Asci with three viable spores are highly enriched for recombinants relative to tetrads with four viable spores. In 96% of the class with three viable spores, only one spore possesses a recombinant chromosome III, suggesting that the recombination process itself contributes to meiotic death. This phenomenon is dependent on the activities of the mismatch repair genes PMS1 and MSH2. A model of mismatch-stimulated chromosome loss is proposed to account for this observation. As expected, crossing over is increased in pms1 and msh2 mutants. Furthermore, genetic exchange in pms1 msh2 double mutants is affected to a greater extent than in either mutant alone, suggesting that the two proteins act independently to inhibit homeologous recombination. All mismatch repair-deficient strains exhibited reductions in the rate of chromosome III nondisjunction. PMID:8887641

  2. Anomalous Abundances in Gaseous Nebulae From Recombination and Collisional Lines: Improved Photoionization and Recombination Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anil Kumar; Nahar, S. N.; Eissner, W. B.; Montenegro, M.

    2011-01-01

    A perplexing anomaly arises in the determination of abundances of common elements in gaseous nebulae, as derived from collisionally excited lines (CEL) as opposed to those from Recombination Lines (RCL). The "abundance discrepancy factors" can range from a factor of 2 to an order of magnitude or more. That has led to quite different interpretation of the physical structure and processes in gaseous nebulae, such as temperature fluctuations across the object, or metal-rich concentrations leading to a dual-abundnace scenario. We show that the problem may lie in inaccuracies in photoionization and recombination models neglecting low-energy resonance phenomena due to fine structure. Whereas the atomic physics of electron impact excitation of forbidden lines is well understood, and accurate collision strengths have long been available, that is not generally the case for electron-ion recombination cross sections. A major problem is the inclusion of relativisitic effects as it pertains to the existence of very low-energy fine structure resonances in photoionization cross sections. We carry out new relativistic calculations for photoionization and recombination cross sections using a recently extended version of the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes, and the unified electron-ion recombination method that subsumes both the radiative and the dielectronic recombination (RR and DR) processes in an ab initio and self-consistent manner. We find that near-thresold resonances manifest themselves within fine structure levels of the ground state of ions, enhancing low-temperature recombination rate coefficients at 1000-10,000 K. The resulting enahncement in level-specific and total recombination rate coefficients should therefore lead to reduced abundances derived from RCL, and in accordance with those from CEL. We present results for photoionization of O II into, and recombination from, O III. Theoretical cross sections are benchmarked against high-resolution measurements from synchrotron

  3. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

    2013-04-30

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  4. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian [East Lansing, MI; Kleff, Susanne [East Lansing, MI; Guettler, Michael V [Holt, MI

    2012-02-21

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  5. Recombination phenomena in high efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    The dominant recombination phenomena which limit the highest efficiency attainable in silicon solar cells under terrestrial sunlight are reviewed. The ultimate achievable efficiency is limited by the two intrinsic recombination mechanisms, the interband Auger recombination and interband Radiative recombination, both of which occur in the entire cell body but principally in the base layer. It is suggested that an optimum (26%) cell design is one with lowly doped 50 to 100 micron thick base, a perfect BSF, and zero extrinsic recombination such as the thermal mechanism at recombination centers the Shockley-Read-Hall process (SRH) in the bulk, on the surface and at the interfaces. The importance of recombination at the interfaces of a high-efficiency cell is demonstrated by the ohmic contact on the back surface whose interface recombination velocity is infinite. The importance of surface and interface recombination is demonstrated by representing the auger and radiative recombination losses by effective recombination velocities. It is demonstrated that the three highest efficiency cells may all be limited by the SRH recombination losses at recombination centers in the base layer.

  6. Evolution of the Genomic Recombination Rate in Murid Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Beth L.; Payseur, Bret A.

    2011-01-01

    Although very closely related species can differ in their fine-scale patterns of recombination hotspots, variation in the average genomic recombination rate among recently diverged taxa has rarely been surveyed. We measured recombination rates in eight species that collectively represent several temporal scales of divergence within a single rodent family, Muridae. We used a cytological approach that enables in situ visualization of crossovers at meiosis to quantify recombination rates in multiple males from each rodent group. We uncovered large differences in genomic recombination rate between rodent species, which were independent of karyotypic variation. The divergence in genomic recombination rate that we document is not proportional to DNA sequence divergence, suggesting that recombination has evolved at variable rates along the murid phylogeny. Additionally, we document significant variation in genomic recombination rate both within and between subspecies of house mice. Recombination rates estimated in F1 hybrids reveal evidence for sex-linked loci contributing to the evolution of recombination in house mice. Our results provide one of the first detailed portraits of genomic-scale recombination rate variation within a single mammalian family and demonstrate that the low recombination rates in laboratory mice and rats reflect a more general reduction in recombination rate across murid rodents. PMID:21149647

  7. Recombination and microdiversity in coastal marine cyanophages.

    PubMed

    Marston, Marcia F; Amrich, Christopher G

    2009-11-01

    Genetic exchange is an important process in bacteriophage evolution. Here, we examine the role of homologous recombination in the divergence of closely related cyanophage isolates from natural marine populations. Four core-viral genes (coliphage T4 homologues g20, g23, g43 and a putative tail fibre gene) and four viral-encoded bacterial-derived genes (psbA, psbD, cobS and phoH) were analysed for 60 cyanophage isolates belonging to five Rhode Island Myovirus (RIM) strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the 60 concatenated sequences revealed well-resolved sequence clusters corresponding to the RIM strain designations. Viral isolates within a strain shared an average nucleotide identity of 99.3-99.8%. Nevertheless, extensive microdiversity was observed within each cyanophage strain; only three of the 60 isolates shared the same nucleotide haplotype. Microdiversity was generated by point mutations, homologous recombination within a strain, and intragenic recombination between RIM strains. Intragenic recombination events between distinct RIM strains were detected most often in host-derived photosystem II psbA and psbD genes, but were also identified in some major capsid protein g23 genes. Within a strain, more variability was observed at the psbA locus than at any of the other seven loci. Although most of the microdiversity within a strain was neutral, some amino acid substitutions were identified, and thus microdiversity within strains has the potential to influence the population dynamics of viral-host interactions.

  8. Nonreplicating vaccinia vector efficiently expresses recombinant genes.

    PubMed

    Sutter, G; Moss, B

    1992-11-15

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), a highly attenuated vaccinia virus strain that has been safety tested in humans, was evaluated for use as an expression vector. MVA has multiple genomic deletions and is severely host cell restricted: it grows well in avian cells but is unable to multiply in human and most other mammalian cells tested. Nevertheless, we found that replication of viral DNA appeared normal and that both early and late viral proteins were synthesized in human cells. Proteolytic processing of viral structural proteins was inhibited, however, and only immature virus particles were detected by electron microscopy. We constructed an insertion plasmid with the Escherichia coli lacZ gene under the control of the vaccinia virus late promoter P11, flanked by sequences of MVA DNA, to allow homologous recombination at the site of a naturally occurring 3500-base-pair deletion within the MVA genome. MVA recombinants were isolated and propagated in permissive avian cells and shown to express the enzyme beta-galactosidase upon infection of nonpermissive human cells. The amount of enzyme made was similar to that produced by a recombinant of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve, which also had the lacZ gene under control of the P11 promoter, but multiplied to high titers. Since recombinant gene expression is unimpaired in nonpermissive human cells, MVA may serve as a highly efficient and exceptionally safe vector.

  9. Evidence for homologous recombination in Chikungunya Virus.

    PubMed

    Casal, Pablo E; Chouhy, Diego; Bolatti, Elisa M; Perez, Germán R; Stella, Emma J; Giri, Adriana A

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus, causes acute fever and joint pain in humans. Recently, endemic CHIKV infection outbreaks have jeopardized public health in wider geographical regions. Here, we analyze the phylogenetic associations of CHIKV and explore the potential recombination events on 152 genomic isolates deposited in GenBank database. The CHIKV genotypes [West African, Asian, East/Central/South African (ECSA)], and a clear division of ECSA clade into three sub-groups (I-II-III), were defined by Bayesian analysis; similar results were obtained using E1 gene sequences. A nucleotide identity-based approach is provided to facilitate CHIKV classification within ECSA clade. Using seven methods to detect recombination, we found a statistically significant event (p-values range: 1.14×10(-7)-4.45×10(-24)) located within the nsP3 coding region. This finding was further confirmed by phylogenetic networks (PHI Test, p=0.004) and phylogenetic tree incongruence analysis. The recombinant strain, KJ679578/India/2011 (ECSA III), derives from viruses of ECSA III and ECSA I. Our study demonstrates that recombination is an additional mechanism of genetic diversity in CHIKV that might assist in the cross-species transmission process.

  10. Gas recombination assembly for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Levy, Isaac; Charkey, Allen

    1989-01-01

    An assembly for recombining gases generated in electrochemical cells wherein a catalyst strip is enveloped within a hydrophobic, gas-porous film which, in turn, is encased between gas-porous, metallic layers. The sandwich construction of metallic layers and film is formed into a spiral with a tab for connection to the cell.

  11. Subunit Recombinant Vaccine Protects Against Monkeypox

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-27

    Subunit Recombinant Vaccine Protects against Monkeypox1 Jean-Michel Heraud,* Yvette Edghill-Smith,*† Victor Ayala,‡ Irene Kalisz,‡ Janie Parrino ...GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Heraud, JM Edghill-Smith, Y Ayala, V Kalisz, I Parrino , J Kalyanaraman, VS Manischewitz, J King

  12. Recombination-dependent concatemeric plasmid replication.

    PubMed Central

    Viret, J F; Bravo, A; Alonso, J C

    1991-01-01

    The replication of covalently closed circular supercoiled (form I) DNA in prokaryotes is generally controlled at the initiation level by a rate-limiting effector. Once initiated, replication proceeds via one of two possible modes (theta or sigma replication) which do not rely on functions involved in DNA repair and general recombination. Recently, a novel plasmid replication mode, leading to the accumulation of linear multigenome-length plasmid concatemers in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, has been described. Unlike form I DNA replication, an intermediate recombination step is most probably involved in the initiation of concatemeric plasmid DNA replication. On the basis of structural and functional studies, we infer that recombination-dependent plasmid replication shares important features with phage late replication modes and, in several aspects, parallels the synthesis of plasmid concatemers in phage-infected cells. The characterization of the concatemeric plasmid replication mode has allowed new insights into the mechanisms of DNA replication and recombination in prokaryotes. PMID:1779931

  13. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination.

  14. Mismatch repair during homologous and homeologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-03-02

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans.

  15. Electron Beam Could Probe Recombination Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.

    1983-01-01

    Electron beam probe technique estimate electron/hole capture cross sections in semiconductors with wide band gaps. Amplitude-modulated electron beam induces short-circuit current collected by ohmic contacts. Phase shift between this current and electron-beam current measured as function of frequency. Results of measurements used to ascertain recombination rates and energy levels.

  16. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for "molecular pharming" in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered - from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity.

  17. CATALYTIC RECOMBINER FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1960-07-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen recombiner is described for use with water-boiler type reactors. The catalyst used is the wellknown platinized alumina, and the novelty lies in the structural arrangement used to prevent flashback through the gas input system. The recombiner is cylindrical, the gases at the input end being deflected by a baffle plate through a first flashback shield of steel shot into an annular passage adjacent to and extending the full length of the housing. Below the baffle plate the gases flow first through an outer annular array of alumina pellets which serve as a second flashback shield, a means of distributing the flowing gases evenly and as a means of reducing radiation losses to the walls. Thereafter the gases flow inio the centrally disposed catalyst bed where recombination is effected. The steam and uncombined gases flow into a centrally disposed cylindrical passage inside the catalyst bod and thereafter out through the exit port. A high rate of recombination is effected.

  18. Recombination Modification in a Fluctuating Environment

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Brian

    1976-01-01

    This paper examines the theory of the evolution of increased recombination between two loci subjected to interactive selection in a temporally fluctuating environment. Both cyclical and stochastic environments are considered. It is shown that temporal variation in the linkage disequilibrium coefficient for the pair of selected loci, due to fluctuations in the selective values of the genotypes at these loci, can give rise to selection in favor of modifier genes increasing recombination. The equilibrium level of recombination established in a given population depends on several factors; it is highest for intermediate values of the environmental periodicity or autocorrelation, for cases when the modifier genes are themselves closely linked to the selected loci, and for high levels of environmental variation. In general, it seems that the rate of modification of recombination values by this process will be low except when the modifiers are tightly linked to the selected loci. The possible evolutionary significance of this process is discussed in relation to observations on genetic systems of plants and animals. PMID:1269919

  19. Measuring Diffusion and Recombination in Polycrystalline Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Light-beam-induced currents yield information about solar cell material. Apparatus measures short-circuit current generated when spot of concentrated light is scanned across grains and grain boundaries in material under test. Technique used to evaluate SOC samples for diffusion and recombination effects of cell processing and chemical and structural defects.

  20. Recombination of ozone via the chaperon mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mikhail V.; Schinke, Reinhard

    2006-03-01

    The recombination of ozone via the chaperon mechanism, i.e., ArO +O2→Ar+O3 and ArO2+O→Ar+O3, is studied by means of classical trajectories and a pairwise additive Ar -O3 potential energy surface. The recombination rate coefficient has a strong temperature dependence, which approximately can be described by T-n with n ≈3. It is negligible for temperatures above 700 K or so, but it becomes important for low temperatures. The calculations unambiguously affirm the conclusions of Hippler et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 6560 (1990)] and Luther et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 7, 2764 (2005)] that the chaperon mechanism makes a sizable contribution to the recombination of O3 at room temperature and below. The dependence of the chaperon recombination rate coefficient on the isotopomer, studied for two different isotope combinations, is only in rough qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The oxygen atom isotope exchange reaction involving ArO and ArO2 van der Waals complexes is also investigated; the weak binding of O or O2 to Ar has only a small effect.

  1. Recombinant MVA vaccines: dispelling the myths.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Matthew G; Carroll, Miles W

    2013-09-06

    Diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and cancer are prime targets for prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination, but have proven partially or wholly resistant to traditional approaches to vaccine design. New vaccines based on recombinant viral vectors expressing a foreign antigen are under intense development for these and other indications. One of the most advanced and most promising vectors is the attenuated, non-replicating poxvirus MVA (modified vaccinia virus Ankara), a safer derivative of the uniquely successful smallpox vaccine. Despite the ability of recombinant MVA to induce potent humoral and cellular immune responses against transgenic antigen in humans, especially when used as the latter element of a heterologous prime-boost regimen, doubts are occasionally expressed about the ultimate feasibility of this approach. In this review, five common misconceptions over recombinant MVA are discussed, and evidence is cited to show that recombinant MVA is at least sufficiently genetically stable, manufacturable, safe, and immunogenic (even in the face of prior anti-vector immunity) to warrant reasonable hope over the feasibility of large-scale deployment, should useful levels of protection against target pathogens, or therapeutic benefit for cancer, be demonstrated in efficacy trials.

  2. Recombinant CBM-fusion technology - Applications overview.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Carvalho, Vera; Domingues, Lucília; Gama, Francisco M

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are small components of several enzymes, which present an independent fold and function, and specific carbohydrate-binding activity. Their major function is to bind the enzyme to the substrate enhancing its catalytic activity, especially in the case of insoluble substrates. The immense diversity of CBMs, together with their unique properties, has long raised their attention for many biotechnological applications. Recombinant DNA technology has been used for cloning and characterizing new CBMs. In addition, it has been employed to improve the purity and availability of many CBMs, but mainly, to construct bi-functional CBM-fused proteins for specific applications. This review presents a comprehensive summary of the uses of CBMs recombinantly produced from heterologous organisms, or by the original host, along with the latest advances. Emphasis is given particularly to the applications of recombinant CBM-fusions in: (a) modification of fibers, (b) production, purification and immobilization of recombinant proteins, (c) functionalization of biomaterials and (d) development of microarrays and probes.

  3. Recombinative plasma in electron runaway discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yu.K.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Usuriaga, O.C.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Soboleva, T.K.; Tsypin, V.S.; Fonseca, A.M.M.; Ruchko, L.F.; Sanada, E.K.

    2005-07-15

    Cold recombinative plasma is the basic feature of the new regime of runaway discharges recently discovered in the Tokamak Chauffage Alfven Bresilien tokamak [R. M. O. Galvao et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1181 (2001)]. With low plasma temperature, the resistive plasma current and primary Dreicer process of runaway generation are strongly suppressed at the stationary phase of the discharge. In this case, the runaway avalanche, which has been recently recognized as a novel important mechanism for runaway electron generation in large tokamaks, such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, during disruptions, and for electric breakdown in matter, is the only mechanism responsible for toroidal current generation and can be easily observed. The measurement of plasma temperature by the usual methods is a difficult task in fully runaway discharges. In the present work, various indirect evidences for low-temperature recombinative plasma are presented. The direct observation of recombinative plasma is obtained as plasma detachment from the limiter. The model of cold recombinative plasma is also supported by measurements of plasma density and H{sub {alpha}} emission radial profiles, analysis of time variations of these parameters due to the relaxation instability, estimations of plasma resistivity from voltage spikes, and energy and particle balance calculations.

  4. Mismatch Repair during Homologous and Homeologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans. PMID:25731766

  5. Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone Criticism Grows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaard, Greta

    1995-01-01

    Discusses concerns related to the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone in the United States and other countries. Analyses the issue from the perspectives of animal rights, human health, world hunger, concerns of small and organic farmers, costs to the taxpayer, and environmental questions. A sidebar discusses Canadian review of the hormone.…

  6. Recombinant DNA: Scientific and Social Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandegrift, Vaughn

    1979-01-01

    This article is designed to inform chemical educators not engaged in this technology as to the nature and methods used in the technology, the reasons for scientific and social concern, and the attempts made to assuage concerns involving recombinant DNA research. (author/BB)

  7. Vaccine development using recombinant DNA technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines induce an immune response in the host that subsequently recognizes infectious agents and helps fight off the disease; vaccines must do this without causing the disease. This paper reviews the development of recombinant DNA technologies as a means of providing new ways for attenuating diseas...

  8. Science: The Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Susan

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the status of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) and attempts to rationalize Suburban Highway Policy. Effective communication among members of the RAC is a current problem facing the committee. A federal transportation priority spending policy is suggested during these times of money and fuel shortages. (MA)

  9. Recombinant antibodies and their use in biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Shen, Zhihong; Mernaugh, Ray

    2012-04-01

    Inexpensive, noninvasive immunoassays can be used to quickly detect disease in humans. Immunoassay sensitivity and specificity are decidedly dependent upon high-affinity, antigen-specific antibodies. Antibodies are produced biologically. As such, antibody quality and suitability for use in immunoassays cannot be readily determined or controlled by human intervention. However, the process through which high-quality antibodies can be obtained has been shortened and streamlined by use of genetic engineering and recombinant antibody techniques. Antibodies that traditionally take several months or more to produce when animals are used can now be developed in a few weeks as recombinant antibodies produced in bacteria, yeast, or other cell types. Typically most immunoassays use two or more antibodies or antibody fragments to detect antigens that are indicators of disease. However, a label-free biosensor, for example, a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) needs one antibody only. As such, the cost and time needed to design and develop an immunoassay can be substantially reduced if recombinant antibodies and biosensors are used rather than traditional antibody and assay (e.g. enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, ELISA) methods. Unlike traditional antibodies, recombinant antibodies can be genetically engineered to self-assemble on biosensor surfaces, at high density, and correctly oriented to enhance antigen-binding activity and to increase assay sensitivity, specificity, and stability. Additionally, biosensor surface chemistry and physical and electronic properties can be modified to further increase immunoassay performance above and beyond that obtained by use of traditional methods. This review describes some of the techniques investigators have used to develop highly specific and sensitive, recombinant antibody-based biosensors for detection of antigens in simple or complex biological samples.

  10. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.; Grin, Daniel

    2010-12-15

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-{alpha} line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, we compute the impact of some radiative transfer effects that were previously ignored, or for which previous treatments were incomplete. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-{alpha} line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-{alpha} line blueward of the hydrogen line is investigated with an analytic approximation. It is shown that both effects are negligible during cosmological hydrogen recombination. Second, the importance of high-lying, nonoverlapping Lyman transitions is assessed. It is shown that escape from lines above Ly{gamma} and frequency diffusion in Ly{beta} and higher lines can be neglected without loss of accuracy. Third, a formalism generalizing the Sobolev approximation is developed to account for the overlap of the high-lying Lyman lines, which is shown to lead to negligible changes to the recombination history. Finally, the possibility of a cosmological hydrogen recombination maser is investigated. It is shown that there is no such maser in the purely radiative treatment presented here.

  11. High recombination potential of subtype A HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nikolaitchik, Olga; Keele, Brandon; Gorelick, Robert; Alvord, W Gregory; Mazurov, Dmitriy; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2015-10-01

    Recombination can assort polymorphic alleles to increase diversity in the HIV-1 population. To better understand the recombination potential of subtype A HIV-1, we generated viruses containing sequences from two variants circulating in Russia and analyzed the polymerase gene (pol) of the recombinants after one round of HIV-1 replication using single-genome sequencing. We observed that recombination occurred throughout pol and could easily assort alleles containing mutations that conferred resistance to currently approved antivirals. We measured the recombination rate in various regions of pol including a G-rich region that has been previously proposed to be a recombination hot spot. Our study does not support a recombination hot spot in this G-rich region. Importantly, of the 58 proviral sequences containing crossover event(s) in pol, we found that each sequence was a unique genotype indicating that recombination is a powerful genetic mechanism in assorting the genomes of subtype A HIV-1 variants.

  12. Detecting and Analyzing Genetic Recombination Using RDP4.

    PubMed

    Martin, Darren P; Murrell, Ben; Khoosal, Arjun; Muhire, Brejnev

    2017-01-01

    Recombination between nucleotide sequences is a major process influencing the evolution of most species on Earth. The evolutionary value of recombination has been widely debated and so too has its influence on evolutionary analysis methods that assume nucleotide sequences replicate without recombining. When nucleic acids recombine, the evolution of the daughter or recombinant molecule cannot be accurately described by a single phylogeny. This simple fact can seriously undermine the accuracy of any phylogenetics-based analytical approach which assumes that the evolutionary history of a set of recombining sequences can be adequately described by a single phylogenetic tree. There are presently a large number of available methods and associated computer programs for analyzing and characterizing recombination in various classes of nucleotide sequence datasets. Here we examine the use of some of these methods to derive and test recombination hypotheses using multiple sequence alignments.

  13. Recombination in adenovirus: analysis of crossover sites in intertypic overlap recombinants.

    PubMed

    Mautner, V; Mackay, N

    1984-11-01

    Overlap recombination has been used as a means of generating intertypic recombinants with crossover sites located within a defined region of the adenovirus genome. Using terminal DNA fragments of adenovirus type 2 and type 5 that overlap within the vicinity of the hexon coding region (51.6-59.7 map units), two different crosses could be studied; in one the overlap entirely encompasses the hexon and there are homologous regions at either side of the overlap where recombination is expected, and in the other only one side of the overlap is capable of sustaining recombination. The overall distribution of crossover sites within the overlap has been determined by restriction endonuclease mapping, and analysed in terms of the extent of homology between Ad2 and Ad5 in this region as defined by the DNA sequences (R. Kinloch, N. Mackay, and V. Mautner (1984). J. Biol. Chem., 259, 6431-6436; G. Akusjärvi, P. Aleström, M. Pettersson, M. Lager, H. Jörnvall, and U. Pettersson (1984). Submitted). Crossovers are found only in regions of relatively high DNA homology, as previously shown for intertypic recombination between temperature-sensitive viruses (M. E. G. Boursnell and V. Mautner (1981). Virology 112, 198-209). The presence of a free DNA end within the heterologous zone is insufficient to overcome the barrier to recombination. In crosses where recombination is confined to a relatively small homologous zone (45.9-53.0 mu) there is no special distribution of crossovers within the interval; no "hot spot" is discernible at the free DNA end, suggesting that a free DNA end is not especially recombinogenic, nor at the junction between the homologous and heterologous zones, suggesting that branch migration up to the heterology does not always occur. A cross designed to furnish evidence for gene conversion gave rise to a "conventional" recombinant with a crossover located within a 21-nucleotide tract of homology.

  14. Identifying Recombination Hot Spots in the HIV-1 Genome

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Redmond P.; Schlub, Timothy E.; Grimm, Andrew J.; Waugh, Caryll; Ellenberg, Paula; Chopra, Abha; Mallal, Simon; Cromer, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 infection is characterized by the rapid generation of genetic diversity that facilitates viral escape from immune selection and antiretroviral therapy. Despite recombination's crucial role in viral diversity and evolution, little is known about the genomic factors that influence recombination between highly similar genomes. In this study, we use a minimally modified full-length HIV-1 genome and high-throughput sequence analysis to study recombination in gag and pol in T cells. We find that recombination is favored at a number of recombination hot spots, where recombination occurs six times more frequently than at corresponding cold spots. Interestingly, these hot spots occur near important features of the HIV-1 genome but do not occur at sites immediately around protease inhibitor or reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance mutations. We show that the recombination hot and cold spots are consistent across five blood donors and are independent of coreceptor-mediated entry. Finally, we check common experimental confounders and find that these are not driving the location of recombination hot spots. This is the first study to identify the location of recombination hot spots between two similar viral genomes with great statistical power and under conditions that closely reflect natural recombination events among HIV-1 quasispecies. IMPORTANCE The ability of HIV-1 to evade the immune system and antiretroviral therapy depends on genetic diversity within the viral quasispecies. Retroviral recombination is an important mechanism that helps to generate and maintain this genetic diversity, but little is known about how recombination rates vary within the HIV-1 genome. We measured recombination rates in gag and pol and identified recombination hot and cold spots, demonstrating that recombination is not random but depends on the underlying gene sequence. The strength and location of these recombination hot and cold spots can be used to improve models of

  15. Large-scale detection of recombination in nucleotide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Beiko, Robert G.; Ragan, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic recombination following a genetic transfer event can produce heterogeneous phylogenetic histories within sets of genes that share a common ancestral origin. Delineating recombination events will enhance our understanding in genome evolution. However, the task of detecting recombination is not trivial due to effect of more-recent evolutionary changes that can obscure such event from detection. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of a two-phase strategy for detecting recombination events on a large-scale dataset.

  16. Recombination: a frank view of exchanges and vice versa.

    PubMed

    Haber, J E

    2000-06-01

    The study of double-strand chromosome break repair by homologous and nonhomologous recombination is a growth industry. In the past year, there have been important advances both in understanding the connection between recombination and DNA replication and in linking recombination with origins of human cancer. At the same time, a combination of biochemical, genetic, molecular biological, and cytological approaches have provided a clearer vision of the specific functions of a variety of recombination proteins.

  17. An improved recombineering approach by adding RecA to lambda Red recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Sarov, Mihail; Rientjes, Jeanette; Fu, Jun; Hollak, Heike; Kranz, Harald; Xie, Wei; Stewart, A Francis; Zhang, Youming

    2006-01-01

    Recombineering is the use of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli for DNA engineering. Of several approaches, use of the lambda phage Red operon is emerging as the most reliable and flexible. The Red operon includes three components: Redalpha, a 5' to 3' exonuclease, Redbeta, an annealing protein, and Redgamma, an inhibitor of the major E. coli exonuclease and recombination complex, RecBCD. Most E. coli cloning hosts are recA deficient to eliminate recombination and therefore enhance the stability of cloned DNAs. However, loss of RecA also impairs general cellular integrity. Here we report that transient RecA co-expression enhances the total number of successful recombinations in bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), mostly because the E. coli host is more able to survive the stresses of DNA transformation procedures. We combined this practical improvement with the advantages of a temperature-sensitive version of the low copy pSC101 plasmid to develop a protocol that is convenient and more efficient than any recombineering procedure, for use of either double- or single-stranded DNA, published to date.

  18. Experimental risk assessment of recombinant Newcastle disease virus vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) used as live vaccines were assessed for: 1) the potential for recombinant NDV-vectored vaccines (rNDV) containing the Avian Influenza virus (AIV) H5 gene to recombine with low pathogenicity H5, H6 and H9 AIV strains, and originate a virus with increased vi...

  19. Characterization of recombinant tetanus toxin derivatives suitable for vaccine development.

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, D; Turcotte, C; Frankel, G; Li, Y; Dolly, O; Wilkin, G; Marriott, D; Fairweather, N; Dougan, G

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant derivatives of tetanus toxin (TeTx) were isolated and used to immunize mice. Recombinant TeTx light chain, a derivative of fragment C that had lost the ability to bind neurons, and a recombinant TeTx holotoxoid that could protect mice against TeTx challenge were identified. PMID:7622252

  20. Bayesian inference of shared recombination hotspots between humans and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Rannala, Bruce

    2014-12-01

    Recombination generates variation and facilitates evolution. Recombination (or lack thereof) also contributes to human genetic disease. Methods for mapping genes influencing complex genetic diseases via association rely on linkage disequilibrium (LD) in human populations, which is influenced by rates of recombination across the genome. Comparative population genomic analyses of recombination using related primate species can identify factors influencing rates of recombination in humans. Such studies can indicate how variable hotspots for recombination may be both among individuals (or populations) and over evolutionary timescales. Previous studies have suggested that locations of recombination hotspots are not conserved between humans and chimpanzees. We made use of the data sets from recent resequencing projects and applied a Bayesian method for identifying hotspots and estimating recombination rates. We also reanalyzed SNP data sets for regions with known hotspots in humans using samples from the human and chimpanzee. The Bayes factors (BF) of shared recombination hotspots between human and chimpanzee across regions were obtained. Based on the analysis of the aligned regions of human chromosome 21, locations where the two species show evidence of shared recombination hotspots (with high BFs) were identified. Interestingly, previous comparative studies of human and chimpanzee that focused on the known human recombination hotspots within the β-globin and HLA regions did not find overlapping of hotspots. Our results show high BFs of shared hotspots at locations within both regions, and the estimated locations of shared hotspots overlap with the locations of human recombination hotspots obtained from sperm-typing studies.

  1. Using Crossover Breakpoints in Recombinant Inbred Lines to Identify Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling the Global Recombination Frequency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombination is a crucial component of evolution and breeding, producing new genetic combinations on which selection can act. Rates of recombination vary tremendously, not only between species but also within species and for specific chromosomal segments. In this study, by examining recombination...

  2. Recombination clumping factor during cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.gov

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the role of recombinations in the intergalactic medium, and the related concept of the clumping factor, during cosmic reionization. The clumping factor is, in general, a local quantity that depends on both the local overdensity and the scale below which the baryon density field can be assumed smooth. That scale, called the filtering scale, depends on over-density and local thermal history. We present a method for building a self-consistent analytical model of inhomogeneous reionization, assuming the linear growth rate of the density fluctuation, which simultaneously accounts for these effects. We show that taking into account the local clumping factor introduces significant corrections to the total recombination rate, compared to the model with a globally uniform clumping factor.

  3. Dissipative Stern-Gerlach recombination experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Thiago R. de; Caldeira, A. O.

    2006-04-15

    The possibility of obtaining the initial pure state in a usual Stern-Gerlach experiment through the recombination of the two emerging beams is investigated. We have extended the previous work of Englert, Schwinger, and Scully [Found Phys. 18, 1045 (1988)] including the fluctuations of the magnetic field generated by a properly chosen magnet. As a result we obtained an attenuation factor to the possible revival of coherence when the beams are perfectly recombined. When the source of the magnetic field is a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) the attenuation factor can be controlled by external circuits and the spin decoherence directly measured. For the proposed SQUID with dimensions in the scale of microns the attenuation factor has been shown unimportant when compared with the interaction time of the spin with the magnet.

  4. Scaling and fractal behaviour underlying meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Waxman, D; Stoletzki, N

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate some of the mathematical properties of meiotic recombination. Working within the framework of a genetic model with n loci, where alpha alleles are possible at each locus, we find that the proportion of all possible diploid parental genotypes that can produce a particular haploid gamete is exp[-n log(alpha(2)/[2alpha-1])]. We show that this proportion connects recombination with a fractal geometry of dimension log(2alpha-1)/log(alpha). The fractal dimension of a geometric object manifests itself when it is measured at increasingly smaller length scales. Decreasing the length scale of a geometric object is found to be directly analogous, in a genetics problem, to specifying a multilocus haplotype at a larger number of loci, and it is here that the fractal dimension reveals itself.

  5. Cosmic Microwave Background Bispectrum from Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiqi; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2013-03-01

    We compute the cosmic microwave background temperature bispectrum generated by nonlinearities at recombination on all scales. We use CosmoLib2nd, a numerical Boltzmann code at second order to compute cosmic microwave background bispectra on the full sky. We consistently include all effects except gravitational lensing, which can be added to our result using standard methods. The bispectrum is peaked on squeezed triangles and agrees with the analytic approximation in the squeezed limit at the few percent level for all the scales where this is applicable. On smaller scales, we recover previous results on perturbed recombination. For cosmic-variance limited data to lmax⁡=2000, its signal-to-noise ratio is S/N=0.47, corresponding to fNLeff=-2.79, and will bias a local signal by fNLloc≃0.82.

  6. Recombination energy in double white dwarf formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandez, J. L. A.; Ivanova, N.; Lombardi, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the role of recombination energy during a common envelope event. We confirm that taking this energy into account helps to avoid the formation of the circumbinary envelope commonly found in previous studies. For the first time, we can model a complete common envelope event, with a clean compact double white dwarf binary system formed at the end. The resulting binary orbit is almost perfectly circular. In addition to considering recombination energy, we also show that between 1/4 and 1/2 of the released orbital energy is taken away by the ejected material. We apply this new method to the case of the double white dwarf system WD 1101+364, and we find that the progenitor system at the start of the common envelope event consisted of an ˜1.5 M⊙ red giant star in an ˜30 d orbit with a white dwarf companion.

  7. Recombinant organisms for production of industrial products

    PubMed Central

    Adrio, Jose-Luis

    2010-01-01

    A revolution in industrial microbiology was sparked by the discoveries of ther double-stranded structure of DNA and the development of recombinant DNA technology. Traditional industrial microbiology was merged with molecular biology to yield improved recombinant processes for the industrial production of primary and secondary metabolites, protein biopharmaceuticals and industrial enzymes. Novel genetic techniques such as metabolic engineering, combinatorial biosynthesis and molecular breeding techniques and their modifications are contributing greatly to the development of improved industrial processes. In addition, functional genomics, proteomics and metabolomics are being exploited for the discovery of novel valuable small molecules for medicine as well as enzymes for catalysis. The sequencing of industrial microbal genomes is being carried out which bodes well for future process improvement and discovery of new industrial products. PMID:21326937

  8. Recombinant organisms for production of industrial products.

    PubMed

    Adrio, Jose-Luis; Demain, Arnold L

    2010-01-01

    A revolution in industrial microbiology was sparked by the discoveries of ther double-stranded structure of DNA and the development of recombinant DNA technology. Traditional industrial microbiology was merged with molecular biology to yield improved recombinant processes for the industrial production of primary and secondary metabolites, protein biopharmaceuticals and industrial enzymes. Novel genetic techniques such as metabolic engineering, combinatorial biosynthesis and molecular breeding techniques and their modifications are contributing greatly to the development of improved industrial processes. In addition, functional genomics, proteomics and metabolomics are being exploited for the discovery of novel valuable small molecules for medicine as well as enzymes for catalysis. The sequencing of industrial microbal genomes is being carried out which bodes well for future process improvement and discovery of new industrial products.

  9. Replication and recombination factors contributing to recombination-dependent bypass of DNA lesions by template switch.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Fabio; Fumasoni, Marco; Szakal, Barnabas; Maloisel, Laurent; Branzei, Dana

    2010-11-11

    Damage tolerance mechanisms mediating damage-bypass and gap-filling are crucial for genome integrity. A major damage tolerance pathway involves recombination and is referred to as template switch. Template switch intermediates were visualized by 2D gel electrophoresis in the proximity of replication forks as X-shaped structures involving sister chromatid junctions. The homologous recombination factor Rad51 is required for the formation/stabilization of these intermediates, but its mode of action remains to be investigated. By using a combination of genetic and physical approaches, we show that the homologous recombination factors Rad55 and Rad57, but not Rad59, are required for the formation of template switch intermediates. The replication-proficient but recombination-defective rfa1-t11 mutant is normal in triggering a checkpoint response following DNA damage but is impaired in X-structure formation. The Exo1 nuclease also has stimulatory roles in this process. The checkpoint kinase, Rad53, is required for X-molecule formation and phosphorylates Rad55 robustly in response to DNA damage. Although Rad55 phosphorylation is thought to activate recombinational repair under conditions of genotoxic stress, we find that Rad55 phosphomutants do not affect the efficiency of X-molecule formation. We also examined the DNA polymerase implicated in the DNA synthesis step of template switch. Deficiencies in translesion synthesis polymerases do not affect X-molecule formation, whereas DNA polymerase δ, required also for bulk DNA synthesis, plays an important role. Our data indicate that a subset of homologous recombination factors, together with DNA polymerase δ, promote the formation of template switch intermediates that are then preferentially dissolved by the action of the Sgs1 helicase in association with the Top3 topoisomerase rather than resolved by Holliday Junction nucleases. Our results allow us to propose the choreography through which different players contribute to

  10. Radiative recombination of hot carriers in narrow-gap semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, N. V.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2012-01-15

    The mechanism of the radiative recombination of hot carriers in narrow-gap semiconductors is analyzed using the example of indium antimonide. It is shown that the CHCC Auger recombination process may lead to pronounced carrier heating at high excitation levels. The distribution functions and concentrations of hot carriers are determined. The radiative recombination rate of hot carriers and the radiation gain coefficient are calculated in terms of the Kane model. It is demonstrated that the radiative recombination of hot carriers will make a substantial contribution to the total radiative recombination rate at high carrier concentrations.

  11. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    PubMed

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research.

  12. RECOMBINATION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF Be-LIKE Si

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, I.; Boehm, S.; Schuch, R.; Loch, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    Recombination of Be-like Si{sup 10+} over the 0-43 eV electron-ion energy range is measured at the CRYRING electron cooler. In addition to radiative and dielectronic recombination, the recombination spectrum also shows strong contributions from trielectronic recombination. Below 100 meV, several very strong resonances associated with a spin-flip of the excited electron dominate the spectrum and also dominate the recombination in the photoionized plasma. The resonant plasma rate coefficients corrected for the experimental field ionization are in good agreement with calculated results by Gu and with AUTOSTRUCTURE calculations. All other calculations significantly underestimate the plasma rate coefficients at low temperatures.

  13. Molecular genetics of DNA viruses: recombinant virus technology.

    PubMed

    Neuhierl, Bernhard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant viral genomes cloned onto BAC vectors can be subjected to extensive molecular genetic analysis in the context of E. coli. Thus, the recombinant virus technology exploits the power of prokaryotic genetics to introduce all kinds of mutations into the recombinant genome. All available techniques are based on homologous recombination between a targeting vector carrying the mutated version of the gene of interest and the recombinant virus. After modification, the mutant viral genome is stably introduced into eukaryotic cells permissive for viral lytic replication. In these cells, mutant viral genomes can be packaged into infectious particles to evaluate the effect of these mutations in the context of the complete genome.

  14. A non-sister act: recombination template choice during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Humphryes, Neil; Hochwagen, Andreas

    2014-11-15

    Meiotic recombination has two key functions: the faithful assortment of chromosomes into gametes and the creation of genetic diversity. Both processes require that meiotic recombination occurs between homologous chromosomes, rather than sister chromatids. Accordingly, a host of regulatory factors are activated during meiosis to distinguish sisters from homologs, suppress recombination between sister chromatids and promote the chromatids of the homologous chromosome as the preferred recombination partners. Here, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the mechanistic basis of meiotic recombination template choice, focusing primarily on developments in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the regulation is currently best understood.

  15. Cultivating Insect Cells To Produce Recombinant Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn; Goodwin, Thomas; Prewett, Tacey; Andrews, Angela; Francis, Karen; O'Connor, Kim

    1996-01-01

    Method of producing recombinant proteins involves growth of insect cells in nutrient solution in cylindrical bioreactor rotating about cylindrical axis, oriented horizontally and infecting cells with viruses into which genes of selected type cloned. Genes in question those encoding production of desired proteins. Horizontal rotating bioreactor preferred for use in method, denoted by acronym "HARV", described in "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662).

  16. Recombinant organisms capable of fermenting cellobiose

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Lai, Xiaokuang; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; York, Sean W.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant microorganism which expresses pyruvate decarboxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase, Klebsiella phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and Klebsiella (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II, wherein said phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and said (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II are heterologous to said microorganism and wherein said microorganism is capable of utilizing both hemicellulose and cellulose, including cellobiose, in the production of ethanol.

  17. Dielectronic recombination rate in statistical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demura, A. V.; Leontyev, D. S.; Lisitsa, V. S.; Shurigyn, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    The dielectronic recombination rate of multielectron ions was calculated by means of the statistical approach. It is based on an idea of collective excitations of atomic electrons with the local plasma frequencies. These frequencies are expressed via the Thomas-Fermi model electron density distribution. The statistical approach provides fast computation of DR rates that are compared with the modern quantum mechanical calculations. The results are important for current studies of thermonuclear plasmas with the tungsten impurities.

  18. (Photoexcited charge pair escape and recombination)

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    Progress in four research areas on this project are summarized under the following topics: (1) Geminate charge pair recombination in hexane; (2) Fast current measurements resulting from excitation of charge transfer (CT) states; (3) Measurement of the dipole moment of excited states by DC conductivity; and (4) Charge separation at macroscopic interfaces between electron donor and acceptor solids. In a final section, personnel who have contributed to the project during the past budget period are described.

  19. Mechanism and Regulation of Meiotic Recombination Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Isabel; Keeney, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic recombination involves the formation and repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the conserved Spo11 protein. This review summarizes recent studies pertaining to the formation of meiotic DSBs, including the mechanism of DNA cleavage by Spo11, proteins required for break formation, and mechanisms that control the location, timing, and number of DSBs. Where appropriate, findings in different organisms are discussed to highlight evolutionary conservation or divergence. PMID:25324213

  20. Development of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Recombinant Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Simionatto, Simone; Dellagostin, Odir

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP), a disease that affects swine production worldwide. Vaccination is the most cost-effective strategy for the control and prevention of the disease. Research using genome-based approach has the potential to elucidate the biology and pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae and contribute to the development of more effective vaccines. Here, we describe the protocol for developing M. hyopneumoniae recombinant vaccines using reverse vaccinology approaches.

  1. V(D)J recombination frequency is affected by the sequence interposed between a pair of recombination signals: sequence comparison reveals a putative recombinational enhancer element.

    PubMed

    Roch, F A; Hobi, R; Berchtold, M W; Kuenzle, C C

    1997-06-15

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain intron enhancer (Emu) not only stimulates transcription but also V(D)J recombination of chromosomally integrated recombination substrates. We aimed at reproducing this effect in recombination competent cells by transient transfection of extrachromosomal substrates. These we prepared by interposing between the recombination signal sequences (RSS) of the plasmid pBlueRec various fragments, including Emu, possibly affecting V(D)J recombination. Our work shows that sequences inserted between RSS 23 and RSS 12, with distances from their proximal ends of 26 and 284 bp respectively, can markedly affect the frequency of V(D)J recombination. We report that the entire Emu, the Emu core as well as its flanking 5' and 3' matrix associated regions (5' and 3' MARs) upregulate V(D)J recombination while the downstream section of the 3' MAR of Emu does not. Also, prokaryotic sequences markedly suppress V(D)J recombination. This confirms previous results obtained with chromosomally integrated substrates, except for the finding that the full length 3' MAR of Emu stimulates V(D)J recombination in an episomal but not in a chromosomal context. The fact that other MARs do not share this activity suggests that the effect is no mediated through attachment of the recombination substrate to a nuclear matrix-associated recombination complex but through cis-activation. The presence of a 26 bp A-T-rich sequence motif in the 5' and 3' MARs of Emu and in all of the other upregulating fragments investigated, leads us to propose that the motif represents a novel recombinational enhancer element distinct from those constituting the Emu core.

  2. Recombination-dependent concatemeric viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lo Piano, Ambra; Martínez-Jiménez, María I; Zecchi, Lisa; Ayora, Silvia

    2011-09-01

    The initiation of viral double stranded (ds) DNA replication involves proteins that recruit and load the replisome at the replication origin (ori). Any block in replication fork progression or a programmed barrier may act as a factor for ori-independent remodelling and assembly of a new replisome at the stalled fork. Then replication initiation becomes dependent on recombination proteins, a process called recombination-dependent replication (RDR). RDR, which is recognized as being important for replication restart and stability in all living organisms, plays an essential role in the replication cycle of many dsDNA viruses. The SPP1 virus, which infects Bacillus subtilis cells, serves as a paradigm to understand the links between replication and recombination in circular dsDNA viruses. SPP1-encoded initiator and replisome assembly proteins control the onset of viral replication and direct the recruitment of host-encoded replisomal components at viral oriL. SPP1 uses replication fork reactivation to switch from ori-dependent θ-type (circle-to-circle) replication to σ-type RDR. Replication fork arrest leads to a double strand break that is processed by viral-encoded factors to generate a D-loop into which a new replisome is assembled, leading to σ-type viral replication. SPP1 RDR proteins are compared with similar proteins encoded by other viruses and their possible in vivo roles are discussed.

  3. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  4. Random-walk model of homologous recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Youhei; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    1995-12-01

    Interaction between two homologous (i.e., identical or nearly identical) DNA sequences leads to their homologous recombination in the cell. We present the following stochastic model to explain the dependence of the frequency of homologous recombination on the length of the homologous region. The branch point connecting the two DNAs in a reaction intermediate follows the random-walk process along the homology (N base-pairs). If the branch point reaches either of the homology ends, it bounds back to the homologous region at a probability of γ (reflection coefficient) and is destroyed at a probability of 1-γ. When γ is small, the frequency of homologous recombination is found to be proportional to N3 for smaller N and a linear function of N for larger N. The exponent of the nonlinear dependence for smaller N decreases from three as γ increases. When γ=1, only the linear dependence is left. These theoretical results can explain many experimental data in various systems. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  5. Development of Prototype Filovirus Recombinant Antigen Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Boisen, Matt L.; Oottamasathien, Darin; Jones, Abigail B.; Millett, Molly M.; Nelson, Diana S.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Oda, Shun-ichiro; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Akdag, Marjan; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohammed; Baimba, Francis; Gbakie, Michael; Safa, Sadiki; Fonnie, Richard; Kanneh, Lansana; Cross, Robert W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Kulakosky, Peter C.; Grant, Donald S.; Shaffer, Jeffery G.; Schieffelin, John S.; Wilson, Russell B.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.; Khan, S. Humarr; Pitts, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Throughout the 2014–2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, major gaps were exposed in the availability of validated rapid diagnostic platforms, protective vaccines, and effective therapeutic agents. These gaps potentiated the development of prototype rapid lateral flow immunodiagnostic (LFI) assays that are true point-of-contact platforms, for the detection of active Ebola infections in small blood samples. Methods. Recombinant Ebola and Marburg virus matrix VP40 and glycoprotein (GP) antigens were used to derive a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Antibodies were tested using a multivariate approach to identify antibody-antigen combinations suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and LFI assay development. Results. Polyclonal antibodies generated in goats were superior reagents for capture and detection of recombinant VP40 in test sample matrices. These antibodies were optimized for use in antigen-capture ELISA and LFI assay platforms. Prototype immunoglobulin M (IgM)/immunoglobulin G (IgG) ELISAs were similarly developed that specifically detect Ebola virus–specific antibodies in the serum of experimentally infected nonhuman primates and in blood samples obtained from patients with Ebola from Sierra Leone. Conclusions. The prototype recombinant Ebola LFI assays developed in these studies have sensitivities that are useful for clinical diagnosis of acute ebolavirus infections. The antigen-capture and IgM/IgG ELISAs provide additional confirmatory assay platforms for detecting VP40 and other ebolavirus-specific immunoglobulins. PMID:26232440

  6. Recombinant vaccine for canine parvovirus in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    López de Turiso, J A; Cortés, E; Martínez, C; Ruiz de Ybáñez, R; Simarro, I; Vela, C; Casal, I

    1992-01-01

    VP2 is the major component of canine parvovirus (CPV) capsids. The VP2-coding gene was engineered to be expressed by a recombinant baculovirus under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A transfer vector that contains the lacZ gene under the control of the p10 promoter was used in order to facilitate the selection of recombinants. The expressed VP2 was found to be structurally and immunologically indistinguishable from authentic VP2. The recombinant VP2 shows also the capability to self-assemble, forming viruslike particles similar in size and appearance to CPV virions. These viruslike particles have been used to immunize dogs in different doses and combinations of adjuvants, and the anti-CPV responses have been measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, monolayer protection assays, and an assay for the inhibition of hemagglutination. A dose of ca. 10 micrograms of VP2 was able to elicit a good protective response, higher than that obtained with a commercially available, inactivated vaccine. The results indicate that these viruslike particles can be used to protect dogs from CPV infection. Images PMID:1313899

  7. Formation and recombination of protonated acetonitrile clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasil, R.; Glosík, J.; Zakouril, P.

    1999-07-01

    Formation of the protonated acetonitrile cluster ions CH3CNH+.CH3CN and their subsequent dissociative recombination with electrons was studied in a high-pressure flowing afterglow using the axially movable Langmuir probe. The first step is the binary proton transfer reaction of H3O+ with CH3CN with the rate coefficient k1 = (5.9±1.9) × 10-9 cm3 s-1. Resulting CH3CNH+ ions further associate with the neutral acetonitrile molecules at pressures 3-5 Torr with the effective binary rate coefficient k2eff = (2.1±0.7) × 10-9 cm3 s-1 forming the clusters H+.(CH3CN)2. Further reaction of these clusters with CH3CN is very slow with the effective binary rate coefficient k3eff = (1.1±0.3) × 10-12 cm3 s-1. The large difference between k2eff and k3eff facilitated the study of dissociative recombination of H+.(CH3CN)2 cluster ions with electrons at thermal energy and pressure p = 4.5-7.0 Torr. The recombination rate coefficient thus obtained is (2.8±1) × 10-6 cm3 s-1.

  8. Extracellular recombinant protein production from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ye; Chen, Rachel

    2009-11-01

    Escherichia coli is the most commonly used host for recombinant protein production and metabolic engineering. Extracellular production of enzymes and proteins is advantageous as it could greatly reduce the complexity of a bioprocess and improve product quality. Extracellular production of proteins is necessary for metabolic engineering applications in which substrates are polymers such as lignocelluloses or xenobiotics since adequate uptake of these substrates is often an issue. The dogma that E. coli secretes no protein has been challenged by the recognition of both its natural ability to secrete protein in common laboratory strains and increased ability to secrete proteins in engineered cells. The very existence of this review dedicated to extracellular production is a testimony for outstanding achievements made collectively by the community in this regard. Four strategies have emerged to engineer E. coli cells to secrete recombinant proteins. In some cases, impressive secretion levels, several grams per liter, were reached. This secretion level is on par with other eukaryotic expression systems. Amid the optimism, it is important to recognize that significant challenges remain, especially when considering the success cannot be predicted a priori and involves much trials and errors. This review provides an overview of recent developments in engineering E. coli for extracellular production of recombinant proteins and an analysis of pros and cons of each strategy.

  9. Insertional mutagenesis and illegitimate recombination in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, G V; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1991-01-01

    Mycobacteria, particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and Mycobacterium avium, are major pathogens of man. Although insertional mutagenesis has been an invaluable genetic tool for analyzing the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis, it has not yet been possible to apply it to the mycobacteria. To overcome intrinsic difficulties in directly manipulating the genetics of slow-growing mycobacteria, including M. tuberculosis and bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine strains, we developed a system for random shuttle mutagenesis. A genomic library of Mycobacterium smegmatis was subjected to transposon mutagenesis with Tn5 seq1, a derivative of Tn5, in Escherichia coli and these transposon-containing recombinant plasmids were reintroduced into mycobacterial chromosomes by homologous recombination. This system has allowed us to isolate several random auxotrophic mutants of M. smegmatis. To extend this strategy to M. tuberculosis and BCG, targeted mutagenesis was performed using a cloned BCG methionine gene that was subjected to Tn5 seq1 mutagenesis in E. coli and reintroduced into the mycobacteria. Surprisingly for prokaryotes, both BCG and M. tuberculosis were found to incorporate linear DNA fragments into illegitimate sites throughout the mycobacterial genomes at a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-4) relative to the number of transformants obtained with autonomously replicating vectors. Thus the efficient illegitimate recombination of linear DNA fragments provides the basis for an insertional mutagenesis system for M. tuberculosis and BCG. Images PMID:2052623

  10. Monitoring DNA recombination initiated by HO endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Neal; Haber, James E

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) have proven to be very potent initiators of recombination in yeast and other organisms. A single, site-specific DSB initiates homologous DNA repair events such as gene conversion, break-induced replication, and single-strand annealing, as well as nonhomologous end joining, microhomology-mediated end joining, and new telomere addition. When repair is either delayed or prevented, a single DSB can trigger checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest. In budding yeast, expressing the HO endonuclease under the control of a galactose-inducible promoter has been instrumental in the study of these processes by providing us a way to synchronously induce a DSB at a unique site in vivo. We describe how the HO endonuclease has been used to study the recombination events in mating-type (MAT) switching. Southern blots provide an overview of the process by allowing one to examine the formation of the DSB, DNA degradation at the break, and formation of the product. Denaturing gels and slot blots as well as PCR have provided important tools to follow the progression of resection in wild-type and mutant cells. PCR has also been important in allowing us to follow the kinetics of certain recombination intermediates such as the initiation of repair DNA synthesis or the removal of nonhomologous Y sequences during MAT switching. Finally chromatin immunoprecipitation has been used to follow the recruitment of key proteins to the DSB and in subsequent steps in DSB repair.

  11. Dissociative recombination of molecular ions with electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented for the present state of the art of laboratory measurements of the dissociative recombination of molecular ions with electrons. Most work has focussed on obtaining rates and their temperature dependence, as these are of primary interest for model calculations of ionospheres. A comparison of data obtained using the microwave afterglow method, the flowing afterglow technique, and the merged beam technique shows that generally the agreement is quite good, but there are some serious discrepancies, especially in the case of H(3+) recombination, that need to be resolved. Results of some earlier experimental work need to be reexamined in the light of more recent developments. Such cases are pointed out and a compilation of rate coefficients that have withstood scrutiny is presented. Recent advances in experimental methods, such as the use of laser-in-duced fluorescence, make it possible to identify some neutral products of dissociative recombination. What has been done so far and what results one might expect from future work are briefly reviewed.

  12. Recombinant Origin of the Retrovirus XMRV

    PubMed Central

    Paprotka, Tobias; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A.; Cingöz, Oya; Martinez, Anthony; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Tepper, Clifford G.; Hu, Wei-Shau; Fivash, Matthew J.; Coffin, John M.; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2012-01-01

    The retrovirus XMRV (xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus) has been detected in human prostate tumors and in blood samples from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, but these findings have not been replicated. We hypothesized that an understanding of when and how XMRV first arose might help explain the discrepant results. We studied human prostate cancer cell lines CWR22Rv1 and CWR-R1, which produce XMRV virtually identical to the viruses recently found in patient samples, as well as their progenitor human prostate tumor xenograft (CWR22) that had been passaged in mice. We detected XMRV infection in the two cell lines and in the later passage xenografts, but not in the early passages. Importantly, we found that the host mice contained two proviruses, PreXMRV-1 and PreXMRV-2, which share 99.92% identity with XMRV over >3.2-kb stretches of their genomes. We conclude that XMRV was not present in the original CWR22 tumor but was generated by recombination of two proviruses during tumor passaging in mice. The probability that an identical recombinant was generated independently is negligible (~10-12); our results suggest that the association of XMRV with human disease is due to contamination of human samples with virus originating from this recombination event. PMID:21628392

  13. Production of recombinant allergens in plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A large percentage of allergenic proteins are of plant origin. Hence, plant-based expression systems are considered ideal for the recombinant production of certain allergens. First attempts to establish production of plant-derived allergens in plants focused on transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana infected with recombinant viral vectors. Accordingly, allergens from birch and mugwort pollen, as well as from apple have been expressed in plants. Production of house dust mite allergens has been achieved by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tobacco plants. Beside the use of plants as production systems, other approaches have focused on the development of edible vaccines expressing allergens or epitopes thereof, which bypasses the need of allergen purification. The potential of this approach has been convincingly demonstrated for transgenic rice seeds expressing seven dominant human T cell epitopes derived from Japanese cedar pollen allergens. Parallel to efforts in developing recombinant-based diagnostic and therapeutic reagents, different gene-silencing approaches have been used to decrease the expression of allergenic proteins in allergen sources. In this way hypoallergenic ryegrass, soybean, rice, apple, and tomato were developed. PMID:21258627

  14. Recombinant allergens for diagnosis of cockroach allergy.

    PubMed

    Arruda, L Karla; Barbosa, Michelle C R; Santos, Ana Beatriz R; Moreno, Adriana S; Chapman, Martin D; Pomés, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Molecular cloning of cockroach allergens and their expression as recombinant proteins have allowed a better understanding of the mechanisms of cockroach allergic disease. Recombinant cockroach allergens have been used for skin testing or in vitro methods to measure IgE antibody levels in serum. Early studies evaluating selected U.S. patients revealed that a cocktail of four cockroach allergens, Bla g 1, Bla g 2, Bla g 4, and Bla g 5, would identify 95 % of cockroach allergic patients. More recent studies pointed to an important role of sensitization to tropomyosin among certain populations, and suggested that a cocktail of five allergens Bla g 1 and/or Per a 1, Bla g 2, Bla g 4, Bla g 5, and Bla g 7, and/or Per a 7, would be expected to diagnose 50- 64 % of cockroach-allergic patients worldwide. Variation in IgE reactivity profiles could be in part due to IgE responses to cross-reactive homologous allergens from different origins. The availability of purified natural or recombinant cockroach allergens provides the capacity to improve diagnosis of cockroach allergy and to develop novel forms of immunotherapy for cockroach-allergic patients.

  15. Novel recombinant papillomavirus genomes expressing selectable genes

    PubMed Central

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Porter, Samuel; McKinney, Caleb; Stepp, Wesley H.; McBride, Alison A.

    2016-01-01

    Papillomaviruses infect and replicate in keratinocytes, but viral proteins are initially expressed at low levels and there is no effective and quantitative method to determine the efficiency of infection on a cell-to-cell basis. Here we describe human papillomavirus (HPV) genomes that express marker proteins (antibiotic resistance genes and Green Fluorescent Protein), and can be used to elucidate early stages in HPV infection of primary keratinocytes. To generate these recombinant genomes, the late region of the oncogenic HPV18 genome was replaced by CpG free marker genes. Insertion of these exogenous genes did not affect early replication, and had only minimal effects on early viral transcription. When introduced into primary keratinocytes, the recombinant marker genomes gave rise to drug-resistant keratinocyte colonies and cell lines, which maintained the extrachromosomal recombinant genome long-term. Furthermore, the HPV18 “marker” genomes could be packaged into viral particles (quasivirions) and used to infect primary human keratinocytes in culture. This resulted in the outgrowth of drug-resistant keratinocyte colonies containing replicating HPV18 genomes. In summary, we describe HPV18 marker genomes that can be used to quantitatively investigate many aspects of the viral life cycle. PMID:27892937

  16. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  17. Somatic homologous recombination in planta: the recombination frequency is dependent on the allelic state of recombining sequences and may be influenced by genomic position effects.

    PubMed

    Swoboda, P; Hohn, B; Gal, S

    1993-02-01

    We have previously described a non-selective method for scoring somatic recombination in the genome of whole plants. The recombination substrate consists of a defective partial dimer of Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) sequences, which can code for production of viable virus only upon homologous recombination; this leads to disease symptoms on leaves. Brassica napus plants (rapeseed) harbouring the recombination substrate as a transgene were used to examine the time in plant development at which recombination takes place. The analysis of three transgene loci revealed recombination frequencies specific for each locus. Recombination frequencies were increased if more than one transgene locus was present per genome, either in allelic (homozygosity of the transgene locus) or in non-allelic positions. In both cases, the overall recombination frequency was found to be elevated to approximately the sum of the frequencies for the individual transgene loci or slightly higher, suggesting that the respective transgene loci behave largely independently of each other. For all plants tested (single locus, two or multiple loci) maximal recombination frequencies were of the order of 10(-6) events per cell division.

  18. The roles of host factors in tombusvirus RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    RNA viruses are the champions of evolution due to high frequency mutations and genetic recombination occurring during virus replication. These genetic events are due to the error-prone nature of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp). Recently emerging models on viral RNA recombination, however, also include key roles for host and environmental factors. Accordingly, genome-wide screens and global proteomics approaches with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a model host have identified 38 host proteins affecting viral RNA recombination. Follow-up studies have identified key host proteins and cellular pathways involved in TBSV RNA recombination. In addition, environmental factors, such as salt stress, have been shown to affect TBSV recombination via influencing key host or viral factors involved in the recombination process. These advances will help build more accurate models on viral recombination, evolution, and adaptation.

  19. Interplay between modifications of chromatin and meiotic recombination hotspots.

    PubMed

    Brachet, Elsa; Sommermeyer, Vérane; Borde, Valérie

    2012-02-01

    Meiotic recombination lies at the heart of sexual reproduction. It is essential for producing viable gametes with a normal haploid genomic content and its dysfunctions can be at the source of aneuploidies, such as the Down syndrome, or many genetic disorders. Meiotic recombination also generates genetic diversity that is transmitted to progeny by shuffling maternal and paternal alleles along chromosomes. Recombination takes place at non-random chromosomal sites called 'hotspots'. Recent evidence has shown that their location is influenced by properties of chromatin. In addition, many studies in somatic cells have highlighted the need for changes in chromatin dynamics to allow the process of recombination. In this review, we discuss how changes in the chromatin landscape may influence the recombination map, and reciprocally, how recombination events may lead to epigenetic modifications at sites of recombination, which could be transmitted to progeny.

  20. Recombinant levels of Escherichia coli K-12 mutants deficient in various replication, recombination, or repair genes.

    PubMed Central

    Zieg, J; Maples, V F; Kushner, S R

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains containing mutations in lexA, rep, uvrA, uvrD, uvrE, lig, polA, dam, or xthA were constructed and tested for conjugation and transduction proficiencies and ability to form Lac+ recombinants in an assay system utilizing a nontandem duplication of two partially deleted lactose operons (lacMS286phi80dIIlacBK1). lexA and rep mutants were as deficient (20% of wild type) as recB and recC strains in their ability to produce Lac+ progeny. All the other strains exhibited increased frequencies of Lac+ recombinant formation, compared with wild type, ranging from 2- to 13-fold. Some strains showed markedly increased conjugation proficiency (dam uvrD) compared to wild type, while others appeared deficient (polA107). Some differences in transduction proficiency were also observed. Analysis of the Lac+ recombinants formed by the various mutants indicated that they were identical to the recombinants formed by a wild-type strain. The results indicate that genetic recombination in E. coli is a highly regulated process involving multiple gene products. PMID:350859

  1. Allele-dependent recombination frequency: homology requirement in meiotic recombination at the hot spot in the mouse major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, M; Sagai, T; Lindahl, K F; Toyoda, Y; Moriwaki, K; Shiroishi, T

    1995-05-20

    Meiotic recombination break joints in the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are clustered within short segments known as hot spots. We systematically investigated the requirement for sequence homology between two chromosomes for recombination activity at the hot spot next to the Lmp2 gene. The results indicated that a high rate of recombination required a high degree of similarity of overall genome structure at the hot spot. In particular, the same copy number of repetitive sequences within the hot spot was essential for a high frequency of recombination, suggesting that recombination in mouse meiosis is more sensitive to heterozygous deletion or insertion of DNA than to mismatches of single-base substitutions.

  2. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki; Gang, David R.; Sarkanen, Simo; Ford, Joshua D.

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  3. Poliovirus Polymerase Leu420 Facilitates RNA Recombination and Ribavirin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Brian J.; Peersen, Olve B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA recombination is important in the formation of picornavirus species groups and the ongoing evolution of viruses within species groups. In this study, we examined the structure and function of poliovirus polymerase, 3Dpol, as it relates to RNA recombination. Recombination occurs when nascent RNA products exchange one viral RNA template for another during RNA replication. Because recombination is a natural aspect of picornavirus replication, we hypothesized that some features of 3Dpol may exist, in part, to facilitate RNA recombination. Furthermore, we reasoned that alanine substitution mutations that disrupt 3Dpol-RNA interactions within the polymerase elongation complex might increase and/or decrease the magnitudes of recombination. We found that an L420A mutation in 3Dpol decreased the frequency of RNA recombination, whereas alanine substitutions at other sites in 3Dpol increased the frequency of recombination. The 3Dpol Leu420 side chain interacts with a ribose in the nascent RNA product 3 nucleotides from the active site of the polymerase. Notably, the L420A mutation that reduced recombination also rendered the virus more susceptible to inhibition by ribavirin, coincident with the accumulation of ribavirin-induced G→A and C→U mutations in viral RNA. We conclude that 3Dpol Leu420 is critically important for RNA recombination and that RNA recombination contributes to ribavirin resistance. IMPORTANCE Recombination contributes to the formation of picornavirus species groups and the emergence of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs). The recombinant viruses that arise in nature are occasionally more fit than either parental strain, especially when the two partners in recombination are closely related, i.e., members of characteristic species groups, such as enterovirus species groups A to H or rhinovirus species groups A to C. Our study shows that RNA recombination requires conserved features of the viral polymerase. Furthermore, a

  4. Cosmological recombination: feedback of helium photons and its effect on the recombination spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, J.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the reprocessing of high-frequency photons emitted by HeII and HeI during the epoch of cosmological recombination by HeI and HI. We demonstrate that, in comparison to computations which neglect all feedback processes, the number of cosmological recombination photons that are related to the presence of helium in the early Universe could be increased by ~40-70 per cent. Our computations imply that per helium nucleus ~3-6 additional photons could be produced. Therefore, a total of ~12-14 helium-related photons per helium atom are emitted during cosmological recombination. This is an important addition to cosmological recombination spectrum which in the future may render it slightly easier to determine the primordial abundance of helium using differential measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) energy spectrum. Also, since these photons are the only witnesses of the feedback process at high redshift, observing them in principle offers a way to check our understanding of the recombination physics. Here, most interestingly, the feedback of HeII photons on HeI leads to the appearance of several additional, rather narrow spectral features in the HeI recombination spectrum at low frequencies. Consequently, the signatures of helium-related features in the CMB spectral distortion from cosmological recombination at some given frequency can exceed the average level of ~17 per cent several times. We find that in particular the bands around ν ~ 10, ~35, ~80 and ~200GHz seem to be affected strongly. In addition, we computed the changes in the cosmological ionization history, finding that only the feedback of primary HeI photons on the dynamics of HeII -> HeI recombination has an effect, producing a change of ΔNe/Ne ~ +0.17 per cent at z ~ 2300. This result seems to be ~2-3 times smaller than the one obtained in earlier computations for this process, however, the difference will not be very important for the analysis of future CMB data.

  5. Live-Cell Imaging of Vaccinia Virus Recombination.

    PubMed

    Paszkowski, Patrick; Noyce, Ryan S; Evans, David H

    2016-08-01

    Recombination between co-infecting poxviruses provides an important mechanism for generating the genetic diversity that underpins evolution. However, poxviruses replicate in membrane-bound cytoplasmic structures known as factories or virosomes. These are enclosed structures that could impede DNA mixing between co-infecting viruses, and mixing would seem to be essential for this process. We hypothesize that virosome fusion events would be a prerequisite for recombination between co-infecting poxviruses, and this requirement could delay or limit viral recombination. We have engineered vaccinia virus (VACV) to express overlapping portions of mCherry fluorescent protein fused to a cro DNA-binding element. In cells also expressing an EGFP-cro fusion protein, this permits live tracking of virus DNA and genetic recombination using confocal microscopy. Our studies show that different types of recombination events exhibit different timing patterns, depending upon the relative locations of the recombining elements. Recombination between partly duplicated sequences is detected soon after post-replicative genes are expressed, as long as the reporter gene sequences are located in cis within an infecting genome. The same kinetics are also observed when the recombining elements are divided between VACV and transfected DNA. In contrast, recombination is delayed when the recombining sequences are located on different co-infecting viruses, and mature recombinants aren't detected until well after late gene expression is well established. The delay supports the hypothesis that factories impede inter-viral recombination, but even after factories merge there remain further constraints limiting virus DNA mixing and recombinant gene assembly. This delay could be related to the continued presence of ER-derived membranes within the fused virosomes, membranes that may once have wrapped individual factories.

  6. Live-Cell Imaging of Vaccinia Virus Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Paszkowski, Patrick; Noyce, Ryan S.; Evans, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination between co-infecting poxviruses provides an important mechanism for generating the genetic diversity that underpins evolution. However, poxviruses replicate in membrane-bound cytoplasmic structures known as factories or virosomes. These are enclosed structures that could impede DNA mixing between co-infecting viruses, and mixing would seem to be essential for this process. We hypothesize that virosome fusion events would be a prerequisite for recombination between co-infecting poxviruses, and this requirement could delay or limit viral recombination. We have engineered vaccinia virus (VACV) to express overlapping portions of mCherry fluorescent protein fused to a cro DNA-binding element. In cells also expressing an EGFP-cro fusion protein, this permits live tracking of virus DNA and genetic recombination using confocal microscopy. Our studies show that different types of recombination events exhibit different timing patterns, depending upon the relative locations of the recombining elements. Recombination between partly duplicated sequences is detected soon after post-replicative genes are expressed, as long as the reporter gene sequences are located in cis within an infecting genome. The same kinetics are also observed when the recombining elements are divided between VACV and transfected DNA. In contrast, recombination is delayed when the recombining sequences are located on different co-infecting viruses, and mature recombinants aren’t detected until well after late gene expression is well established. The delay supports the hypothesis that factories impede inter-viral recombination, but even after factories merge there remain further constraints limiting virus DNA mixing and recombinant gene assembly. This delay could be related to the continued presence of ER-derived membranes within the fused virosomes, membranes that may once have wrapped individual factories. PMID:27525721

  7. Genome-Wide Association Study of Meiotic Recombination Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Ferdouse; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Cheung, Vivian G.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is an essential step in gametogenesis, and is one that also generates genetic diversity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and molecular studies have identified genes that influence of human meiotic recombination. RNF212 is associated with total or average number of recombination events, and PRDM9 is associated with the locations of hotspots, or sequences where crossing over appears to cluster. In addition, a common inversion on chromosome 17 is strongly associated with recombination. Other genes have been identified by GWAS, but those results have not been replicated. In this study, using new datasets, we characterized additional recombination phenotypes to uncover novel candidates and further dissect the role of already known loci. We used three datasets totaling 1562 two-generation families, including 3108 parents with 4304 children. We estimated five different recombination phenotypes including two novel phenotypes (average recombination counts within recombination hotspots and outside of hotspots) using dense SNP array genotype data. We then performed gender-specific and combined-sex genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analyses. We replicated associations for several previously reported recombination genes, including RNF212 and PRDM9. By looking specifically at recombination events outside of hotspots, we showed for the first time that PRDM9 has different effects in males and females. We identified several new candidate loci, particularly for recombination events outside of hotspots. These include regions near the genes SPINK6, EVC2, ARHGAP25, and DLGAP2. This study expands our understanding of human meiotic recombination by characterizing additional features that vary across individuals, and identifying regulatory variants influencing the numbers and locations of recombination events. PMID:27733454

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study of Meiotic Recombination Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Begum, Ferdouse; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Cheung, Vivian G; Sherman, Stephanie L; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-12-07

    Meiotic recombination is an essential step in gametogenesis, and is one that also generates genetic diversity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and molecular studies have identified genes that influence of human meiotic recombination. RNF212 is associated with total or average number of recombination events, and PRDM9 is associated with the locations of hotspots, or sequences where crossing over appears to cluster. In addition, a common inversion on chromosome 17 is strongly associated with recombination. Other genes have been identified by GWAS, but those results have not been replicated. In this study, using new datasets, we characterized additional recombination phenotypes to uncover novel candidates and further dissect the role of already known loci. We used three datasets totaling 1562 two-generation families, including 3108 parents with 4304 children. We estimated five different recombination phenotypes including two novel phenotypes (average recombination counts within recombination hotspots and outside of hotspots) using dense SNP array genotype data. We then performed gender-specific and combined-sex genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analyses. We replicated associations for several previously reported recombination genes, including RNF212 and PRDM9 By looking specifically at recombination events outside of hotspots, we showed for the first time that PRDM9 has different effects in males and females. We identified several new candidate loci, particularly for recombination events outside of hotspots. These include regions near the genes SPINK6, EVC2, ARHGAP25, and DLGAP2 This study expands our understanding of human meiotic recombination by characterizing additional features that vary across individuals, and identifying regulatory variants influencing the numbers and locations of recombination events.

  9. Spatiotemporal regulation of meiotic recombination by Liaisonin

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Ito, Masaru; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction involves diversification of genetic information in successive generations. Meiotic recombination, which substantially contributes to the increase in genetic diversity, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved Spo11 protein. Spo11 requires additional partner proteins for its DNA cleavage reaction. DSBs are preferentially introduced at defined chromosomal sites called “recombination hotspots.” Recent studies have revealed that meiotically established higher-order chromosome structures, such as chromosome axes and loops, are also crucial in the control of DSB formation. Most of the DSB sites are located within chromatin loop regions, while many of the proteins involved in DSB formation reside on chromosomal axes. Hence, DSB proteins and DSB sites seem to be distantly located. To resolve this paradox, we conducted comprehensive proteomics and ChIP-chip analyses on Spo11 partners in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in combination with mutant studies. We identified two distinct DSB complexes, the “DSBC (DSB Catalytic core)“ and “SFT (Seven-Fifteen-Twenty four; Rec7-Rec15-Rec24)” subcomplexes. The DSBC subcomplex contains Spo11 and functions as the catalytic core for the DNA cleavage reaction. The SFT subcomplex is assumed to execute regulatory functions. To activate the DSBC subcomplex, the SFT subcomplex tethers hotspots to axes via its interaction with Mde2, which can interact with proteins in both DSBC and SFT subcomplexes. Thus, Mde2 is likely to bridge these two subcomplexes, forming a “tethered loop-axis complex.” It should be noted that Mde2 expression is strictly regulated by S phase checkpoint monitoring of the completion of DNA replication. From these observations, we proposed that Mde2 is a central coupler for meiotic recombination initiation to establish a tethered loop-axis complex in liaison with the S phase checkpoint. PMID:23572041

  10. Spatiotemporal regulation of meiotic recombination by Liaisonin.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Ito, Masaru; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction involves diversification of genetic information in successive generations. Meiotic recombination, which substantially contributes to the increase in genetic diversity, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved Spo11 protein. Spo11 requires additional partner proteins for its DNA cleavage reaction. DSBs are preferentially introduced at defined chromosomal sites called "recombination hotspots." Recent studies have revealed that meiotically established higher-order chromosome structures, such as chromosome axes and loops, are also crucial in the control of DSB formation. Most of the DSB sites are located within chromatin loop regions, while many of the proteins involved in DSB formation reside on chromosomal axes. Hence, DSB proteins and DSB sites seem to be distantly located. To resolve this paradox, we conducted comprehensive proteomics and ChIP-chip analyses on Spo11 partners in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in combination with mutant studies. We identified two distinct DSB complexes, the "DSBC (DSB Catalytic core)" and "SFT (Seven-Fifteen-Twenty four; Rec7-Rec15-Rec24)" subcomplexes. The DSBC subcomplex contains Spo11 and functions as the catalytic core for the DNA cleavage reaction. The SFT subcomplex is assumed to execute regulatory functions. To activate the DSBC subcomplex, the SFT subcomplex tethers hotspots to axes via its interaction with Mde2, which can interact with proteins in both DSBC and SFT subcomplexes. Thus, Mde2 is likely to bridge these two subcomplexes, forming a "tethered loop-axis complex." It should be noted that Mde2 expression is strictly regulated by S phase checkpoint monitoring of the completion of DNA replication. From these observations, we proposed that Mde2 is a central coupler for meiotic recombination initiation to establish a tethered loop-axis complex in liaison with the S phase checkpoint.

  11. An introduction to recombination and linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mcpeek, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    With a garden as his laboratory, Mendel was able to discern basic probabilistic laws of heredity. Although it first appeared as a baffling exception to one of Mendel`s principles, the phenomenon of variable linkage between characters was soon recognized to be a powerful tool in the process of chromosome mapping and location of genes of interest. In this introduction, we first describe Mendel`s work and the subsequent discovery of linkage. Next we describe the apparent cause of variable linkage, namely recombination, and we introduce linkage analysis. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Recombination Dynamics in Quantum Well Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquet, Julie Elizabeth

    Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence as a function of excitation energy density have been observed in order to study recombination dynamics in GaAs/Al(,x)Ga(,1 -x)As quantum well structures. The study of room temperature photoluminescence from the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) -grown multiple quantum well structure and photoluminescence peak energy as a function of tem- perature shows that room temperature recombination at excitation densities above the low 10('16) cm('-3) level is due to free carriers, not excitons. This is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of impurities in quantum wells; data taken at different emission wave- lengths at low temperatures shows that the impurity-related states at photon energies lower than the free exciton peaks luminesce much more slowly than the free exciton states. Results from a similar structure grown by metal -organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) are explained by saturation of traps. An unusual increase in decay rate observed tens of nanoseconds after excitation is probably due to carriers falling out of the trap states. Since this is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of MOCVD-grown quantum well structures, this unusual behavior may be realted to the MOCVD growth process. Further investigations indi- cate that the traps are not active at low temperatures; they become active at approximately 150 K. The traps are probably associated with the (hetero)interfaces rather than the bulk Al(,x)Ga(,1-x)As material. The 34 K photoluminescence spectrum of this sample revealed a peak shifted down by approximately 36 meV from the main peak. Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence results here show that this peak is not a stimulated phonon emission sideband, but rather is an due to an acceptor impurity, probably carbon. Photo- luminescence for excitation above and below the barrier bandgap shows that carriers are efficiently collected in the wells in both single and multiple

  13. Hydrogen recombiner catalyst test supporting data

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, M.D.

    1995-01-19

    This is a data package supporting the Hydrogen Recombiner Catalyst Performance and Carbon Monoxide Sorption Capacity Test Report, WHC-SD-WM-TRP-211, Rev 0. This report contains 10 appendices which consist of the following: Mass spectrometer analysis reports: HRC samples 93-001 through 93-157; Gas spectrometry analysis reports: HRC samples 93-141 through 93-658; Mass spectrometer procedure PNL-MA-299 ALO-284; Alternate analytical method for ammonia and water vapor; Sample log sheets; Job Safety analysis; Certificate of mixture analysis for feed gases; Flow controller calibration check; Westinghouse Standards Laboratory report on Bois flow calibrator; and Sorption capacity test data, tables, and graphs.

  14. Nanobodies and recombinant binders in cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Helma, Jonas; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Muyldermans, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are key reagents to investigate cellular processes. The development of recombinant antibodies and binders derived from natural protein scaffolds has expanded traditional applications, such as immunofluorescence, binding arrays, and immunoprecipitation. In addition, their small size and high stability in ectopic environments have enabled their use in all areas of cell research, including structural biology, advanced microscopy, and intracellular expression. Understanding these novel reagents as genetic modules that can be integrated into cellular pathways opens up a broad experimental spectrum to monitor and manipulate cellular processes. PMID:26056137

  15. Population inversion in a stationary recombining plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, M.

    1980-12-01

    Population inversion, which occurs in a recombining plasma when a stationary He plasma is brought into contact with a neutral gas, is examined. With hydrogen as a contact gas, noticeable inversion between low-lying levels of H as been found. The overpopulation density is of the order of 10/sup 8/ cm/sup -3/, which is much higher then that (approx. =10/sup 5/ cm/sup -3/) obtained previously with He as a contact gas. Relations between these experimental results and the conditions for population inversion are discussed with the CR model.

  16. Cooling and recombination processes in cometary plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, M. K.; Ong, R. S. B.

    1976-01-01

    The ion electron plasma in comets is examined for cooling processes which result from its interactions with the neutral coma. A cometary coma model is formulated that is composed predominantly of H2O and its decomposition products where electrons are cooled in a variety of processes at rates varying with energy. It is shown that solar plasma plus accumulated cometary ions and electrons is affected very strongly as it flows into the coma. The electrons are rapidly cooled and all but some 10% of the ions undergo charge exchange. Photodissociation of H2O is assumed where ion electron recombination is the dominant loss process.

  17. Patterns of recombination on human chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Schlumpf, K.S.; Kim, D.; Haines, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    Virtually all genetic linkage maps generated to date are gross averages across individuals, ages, and (often) sexes. In addition, although some level of positive interference has been assumed, until recently little evidence to support this in humans has been available. The major stumbling block has been the quality of the data available, since even a few genotypic errors can have drastic effects on both the map length and the number of apparent recombinants. In addition, variation in recombination by factors other than sex have pretty much been ignored. To explore recombination in more detail, we have generated a microsatellite marker map of human chromosome 22. This map includes 32 markers genotyped through 46 sibships of the Venezuelan Reference Pedigree (VRP). Extensive error checking and regenotyping was performed to remove as many genotypic errors as possible, but no genotypes were removed simply because they created unlikely events. The following 1000:1 odds map has been obtained: cen--F8VWFP1--11--S264--3-S311--4--S257--2--TOP1P2--3--S156--1--CRYB2--1--S258--2--S310--6--S193--1--S275--3--S268--1--S280--4--S304--3--S283--2--LiR1--3--IL2RB--3--S299--1--S302--1--S537--2--S270--4--PDGF--8--S274--qter. The female map (91 cM) is twice as long as the male map (46 cM) and the log-likelihood difference in the maps (22.3) is highly significant (P=0.001, df=22) and appears constant across the chromosome. Analysis of recombination with age showed no particular trends for either males or females when chromosomes were grouped into three categories (20, 20-30, 30+) by parental age at birth of child. Positive interference was found in maternally derived chromosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=30.5 (4), p<0.005), but not in paternally derived chromosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=6.24 (3), P=0.10). This contrasts to data from chromosomes 9 and 21 where positive interference was found for both sexes. More detailed analyses are in progress.

  18. Recombination in feline immunodeficiency virus genomes from naturally infected cougars.

    PubMed

    Bruen, Trevor C; Poss, Mary

    2007-08-01

    Recombination contributes significantly to diversity within virus populations and ultimately to viral evolution. Here we use a recently developed statistical test to perform exploratory analysis of recombination in fourteen feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVpco) genomes derived from a wild population of cougars. We use both the global and local Phi statistical test as an overall guide to predict where recombination may have occurred. Further analyses, including similarity plots and phylogenetic incongruence tests, confirmed that three FIVpco lineages were derived from recombinant events. Interestingly, the regions of mosaic origin were clustered in the area encoding lentiviral accessory genes and largely spared the viral structural genes. Because some of the mosaic strains are currently geographically disparate, our data indicate that the dispersal of cougars infected with these strains was preceded by recombination events. These results suggest that recombination has played an important role in the evolution of FIVpco for this wild population of cougars.

  19. Histone deacetylases 9 and 10 are required for homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Kotian, Shweta; Liyanarachchi, Sandhya; Zelent, Arthur; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2011-03-11

    We tested the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the homologous recombination process. A tissue-culture based homology-directed repair assay was used in which repair of a double-stranded break by homologous recombination results in gene conversion of an inactive GFP allele to an active GFP gene. Our rationale was that hyperacetylation caused by HDAC inhibitor treatment would increase chromatin accessibility to repair factors, thereby increasing homologous recombination. Contrary to expectation, treatment of cells with the inhibitors significantly reduced homologous recombination activity. Using RNA interference to deplete each HDAC, we found that depletion of either HDAC9 or HDAC10 specifically inhibited homologous recombination. By assaying for sensitivity of cells to the interstrand cross-linker mitomycin C, we found that treatment of cells with HDAC inhibitors or depletion of HDAC9 or HDAC10 resulted in increased sensitivity to mitomycin C. Our data reveal an unanticipated function of HDAC9 and HDAC10 in the homologous recombination process.

  20. Mismatch repair proteins: key regulators of genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Surtees, J A; Argueso, J L; Alani, E

    2004-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) systems are central to maintaining genome stability in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. MMR proteins play a fundamental role in avoiding mutations, primarily by removing misincorporation errors that occur during DNA replication. MMR proteins also act during genetic recombination in steps that include repairing mismatches in heteroduplex DNA, modulating meiotic crossover control, removing 3' non-homologous tails during double-strand break repair, and preventing recombination between divergent sequences. In this review we will, first, discuss roles for MMR proteins in repairing mismatches that occur during recombination, particularly during meiosis. We will also explore how studying this process has helped to refine models of double-strand break repair, and particularly to our understanding of gene conversion gradients. Second, we will examine the role of MMR proteins in repressing homeologous recombination, i.e. recombination between divergent sequences. We will also compare the requirements for MMR proteins in preventing homeologous recombination to the requirements for these proteins in mismatch repair.

  1. Proteins involved in meiotic recombination: a role in male infertility?

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Matthew L; Hassold, Terry J; Carrell, Douglas T

    2008-01-01

    Meiotic recombination results in the formation of crossovers, by which genetic information is exchanged between homologous chromosomes during prophase I of meiosis. Recombination is a complex process involving many proteins. Alterations in the genes involved in recombination may result in infertility. Molecular studies have improved our understanding of the roles and mechanisms of the proteins and protein complexes involved in recombination, some of which have function in mitotic cells as well as meiotic cells. Human gene sequencing studies have been performed for some of these genes and have provided further information on the phenotypes observed in some infertile individuals. However, further studies are needed to help elucidate the particular role(s) of a given protein and to increase our understanding of these protein systems. This review will focus on our current understanding of proteins involved in meiotic recombination from a genomic perspective, summarizing our current understanding of known mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms that may affect male fertility by altering meiotic recombination.

  2. Single-Stranded DNA Curtains for Studying Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Ma, C J; Steinfeld, J B; Greene, E C

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Genetic studies form the foundation of our knowledge on homologous recombination. Significant progress has also been made toward understanding the biochemical and biophysical properties of the proteins, complexes, and reaction intermediates involved in this essential DNA repair pathway. However, heterogeneous or transient recombination intermediates remain extremely difficult to assess through traditional ensemble methods, leaving an incomplete mechanistic picture of many steps that take place during homologous recombination. To help overcome some of these limitations, we have established DNA curtain methodologies as an experimental platform for studying homologous DNA recombination in real-time at the single-molecule level. Here, we present a detailed overview describing the preparation and use of single-stranded DNA curtains in applications related to the study of homologous DNA recombination with emphasis on recent work related to the study of the eukaryotic recombinase Rad51.

  3. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  4. Improvement in the visual discrimination of recombinant clones by size reduction of non-recombinant colonies.

    PubMed

    Sektas, Marian; Furmanek-Blaszk, Beata

    2013-11-01

    A flexible approach circumventing cloning problems related to incomplete vector double digest is described. DNA methyltransferase gene insertion into MCS of commonly used expression vectors facilitates identification of both: i) the correct linear fragment in agarose gels due to the dilator effect, and ii) recombinant colonies by size and opacity differences resulting from methyltransferase toxicity.

  5. Spin multiplicity and entanglement swapping in radical ion recombinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ichov, L. V.; Anishchik, S. V.

    2009-08-01

    We address the problem of relative frequencies of singlet and triplet recombinations in a multiparticle system, which consists of spin-correlated radical ion pairs. The nonlocal swapping of spin correlations due to cross-recombinations is taken into account. It is shown that this swapping does not contribute to singlet and triplet recombination frequencies in the absence of spin evolution in the correlated pairs.

  6. Effect of Energetic Ion on Spatial Distribution of Recombining Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, A.; Daibo, A.; Kitajima, S.; Kumagai, T.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tsubota, S.

    Spatial distribution of electron density is considered. By using a one-dimensional recombining plasma model, effects of transient energetic ion flux are investigated. The time response of the system against the transient flux is dominated by the recombination frequency. The magnitude of modification of the spatial distribution is determined by the ratio between the ionization due to the energetic ion and the recombination of the bulk plasma.

  7. The Many Landscapes of Recombination in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Comeron, Josep M.; Ratnappan, Ramesh; Bailin, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Recombination is a fundamental biological process with profound evolutionary implications. Theory predicts that recombination increases the effectiveness of selection in natural populations. Yet, direct tests of this prediction have been restricted to qualitative trends due to the lack of detailed characterization of recombination rate variation across genomes and within species. The use of imprecise recombination rates can also skew population genetic analyses designed to assess the presence and mode of selection across genomes. Here we report the first integrated high-resolution description of genomic and population variation in recombination, which also distinguishes between the two outcomes of meiotic recombination: crossing over (CO) and gene conversion (GC). We characterized the products of 5,860 female meioses in Drosophila melanogaster by genotyping a total of 139 million informative SNPs and mapped 106,964 recombination events at a resolution down to 2 kilobases. This approach allowed us to generate whole-genome CO and GC maps as well as a detailed description of variation in recombination among individuals of this species. We describe many levels of variation in recombination rates. At a large-scale (100 kb), CO rates exhibit extreme and highly punctuated variation along chromosomes, with hot and coldspots. We also show extensive intra-specific variation in CO landscapes that is associated with hotspots at low frequency in our sample. GC rates are more uniformly distributed across the genome than CO rates and detectable in regions with reduced or absent CO. At a local scale, recombination events are associated with numerous sequence motifs and tend to occur within transcript regions, thus suggesting that chromatin accessibility favors double-strand breaks. All these non-independent layers of variation in recombination across genomes and among individuals need to be taken into account in order to obtain relevant estimates of recombination rates, and should

  8. Radiation induction of delayed recombination in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Jun; Uematsu, Norio; Shiraishi, Satomi; Toyoshima, Megumi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Niwa, Ohtsura

    2008-08-02

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce delayed chromosome and gene mutations in the descendants of the irradiated tissue culture cells. Molecular mechanisms of such delayed mutations are yet to be elucidated, since high genomic complexity of mammalian cells makes it difficult to analyze. We now tested radiation induction of delayed recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe by monitoring the frequency of homologous recombination after X-irradiation. A reporter with 200 bp tandem repeats went through spontaneous recombination at a frequency of 1.0 x 10(-4), and the frequency increased dose-dependently to around 10 x 10(-4) at 500 Gy of X-irradiation. Although the repair of initial DNA damage was thought to be completed before the restart of cell division cycle, the elevation of the recombination frequency persisted for 8-10 cell generations after irradiation (delayed recombination). The delayed recombination suggests that descendants of the irradiated cells keep a memory of the initial DNA damage which upregulates recombination machinery for 8-10 generations even in the absence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Since radical scavengers were ineffective in inhibiting the delayed recombination, a memory by continuous production of DNA damaging agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) was excluded. Recombination was induced in trans in a reporter on chromosome III by a DNA DSB at a site on chromosome I, suggesting the untargeted nature of delayed recombination. Interestingly, Rad22 foci persisted in the X-irradiated population in parallel with the elevation of the recombination frequency. These results suggest that the epigenetic damage memory induced by DNA DSB upregulates untargeted and delayed recombination in S. pombe.

  9. Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven

    2012-07-30

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-Ds) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by defective switched isotype (IgG/IgA/IgE) production. Depending on the molecular defect in question, the Ig-CSR-D may be combined with an impairment in somatic hypermutation (SHM). Some of the mechanisms underlying Ig-CSR and SHM have been described by studying natural mutants in humans. This approach has revealed that T cell-B cell interaction (resulting in CD40-mediated signaling), intrinsic B-cell mechanisms (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced DNA damage), and complex DNA repair machineries (including uracil-N-glycosylase and mismatch repair pathways) are all involved in class-switch recombination and SHM. However, several of the mechanisms required for full antibody maturation have yet to be defined. Elucidation of the molecular defects underlying the diverse set of Ig-CSR-Ds is essential for understanding Ig diversification and has prompted better definition of the clinical spectrum of diseases and the development of increasingly accurate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  10. Mitotic recombination of chromosome 17 in astrocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    James, C.D.; Carlbom, E.; Nordenskjold, M.; Collins, V.P.; Cavenee, W.K. )

    1989-04-01

    Allelic combinations at seven loci on human chromosome 17 defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms were determined in tumor and normal tissues from 35 patients with gliomas. Loss of constitutional heterozygosity at one or more of these loci was observed in 8 of the 24 tumors displaying astrocytic differentiation and in the single primitive neuroectodermal tumor examined. The astrocytomas showing these losses included examples of each adult malignancy grade of the disease, including glioblastoma (malignancy grade IV), and seven of them demonstrated concurrent maintenance of heterozygosity for at least one chromosome 17 locus. Determination of allele dosage together with the genotypic data indicated that the tumor chromosomes 17 were derived by mitotic recombination in 7 of the 9 cases with shared homozygosity of the region 17p11.2-ptr in all cases. In contrast, tumors of oligodendrocytic, ependymal, or mixed cellular differentiation did not exhibit loss of alleles at any of the loci examined. These data suggest that the somatic attainment of homozygosity for loci on chromosome 17p is frequently associated with the oncogenesis of central nervous system tumors, particularly those showing solely astrocytic differentiation, and that mitotic recombination mapping is a useful approach towards the subregional localization of a locus whose rearrangement is involved in this disease.

  11. Magnetic field spectrum at cosmological recombination revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-06-01

    If vector type perturbations are present in the primordial plasma before recombination, the generation of magnetic fields is known to be inevitable through the Harrison mechanism. In the context of the standard cosmological perturbation theory, nonlinear couplings of first-order scalar perturbations create second-order vector perturbations, which generate magnetic fields. Here we reinvestigate the generation of magnetic fields at second-order in cosmological perturbations on the basis of our previous study, and extend it by newly taking into account the time evolution of purely second-order vector perturbations with a newly developed second-order Boltzmann code. We confirm that the amplitude of magnetic fields from the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes is consistent with the result in our previous study. However, we find, both numerically and analytically, that the magnetic fields from the purely second-order vector perturbations partially cancel out the magnetic fields from one of the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes, in the tight coupling regime in the radiation dominated era. Therefore, the amplitude of the magnetic fields on small scales, k ≳10 h Mpc-1 , is smaller than the previous estimates. The amplitude of the generated magnetic fields at cosmological recombination is about Brec=5.0 ×10-24 Gauss on k =5.0 ×10-1 h Mpc-1 . Finally, we discuss the reason for the discrepancies that exist in estimates of the amplitude of magnetic fields among other authors.

  12. Recombinant synthesis of hyaluronan by Agrobacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zichao; Chen, Rachel Ruizhen

    2007-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a sugar polymer of a repeating disaccharide, beta1-3 D-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) beta1-4 D-glucuronic acid (GlcA). It finds applications in numerous biomedical procedures such as ophthalmic surgery and osteoarthritis treatment. Until recently, the only commercial sources were extraction of rooster combs and from fermentation of pathogenic Streptococcus. In this work, we demonstrate that metabolic engineering strategies enable the recombinant synthesis of hyaluronan in a safe microorganism. Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749 is a commercial production strain for a food polymer, Curdlan. A broad host range expression vector was successfully developed to express the 3 kb HA synthase gene from Pasteurella multocida, along with a kfiD gene encoding UDP-glucose dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli K5 strain. Coexpression of these two heterologous enzymes enables Agrobacterium to produce HA. Hyaluronan was accumulated up to 0.3 g/L in shaker flask cultivation. The molecular weight of the polymer from various Agrobacterium strains is in the range of 0.7-2 MD. To our knowledge, this is the first successful recombinant hyaluronan synthesis in a Gram-negative bacterium that naturally produces a food product. The ease of genetic modifications provides future opportunities to tailor properties of polymers for specific applications.

  13. Ethanol precipitation for purification of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tscheliessnig, Anne; Satzer, Peter; Hammerschmidt, Nikolaus; Schulz, Henk; Helk, Bernhard; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-10-20

    Currently, the golden standard for the purification of recombinant humanized antibodies (rhAbs) from CHO cell culture is protein A chromatography. However, due to increasing rhAbs titers alternative methods have come into focus. A new strategy for purification of recombinant human antibodies from CHO cell culture supernatant based on cold ethanol precipitation (CEP) and CaCl2 precipitation has been developed. This method is based on the cold ethanol precipitation, the process used for purification of antibodies and other components from blood plasma. We proof the applicability of the developed process for four different antibodies resulting in similar yield and purity as a protein A chromatography based process. This process can be further improved using an anion-exchange chromatography in flowthrough mode e.g. a monolith as last step so that residual host cell protein is reduced to a minimum. Beside the ethanol based process, our data also suggest that ethanol could be replaced with methanol or isopropanol. The process is suited for continuous operation.

  14. Recombinant fungal entomopathogen RNAi target insect gene.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiongbo; Wu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology is considered as an alternative for control of pests. However, RNAi has not been used in field conditions yet, since delivering exogenous ds/siRNA to target pests is very difficult. The laboratory methods of introducing the ds/siRNA into insects through feeding, micro feeding / dripping and injecting cannot be used in fields. Transgenic crop is perhaps the most effective application of RNAi for pest control, but it needs long-time basic researches in order to reduce the cost and evaluate the safety. Therefore, transgenic microbe is maybe a better choice. Entomopathogenic fungi generally invade the host insects through cuticle like chemical insecticides contact insect to control sucking sap pests. Isaria fumosorosea is a common fungal entomopathogen in whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. We constructed a recombinant strain of I. fumosorosea expressing specific dsRNA of whitefly's TLR7 gene. It could silence the TLR7 gene and improve the virulence against whitefly. Transgenic fungal entomopathogen has shown great potential to attain the application of RNAi technology for pests control in fields. In the future, the research interests should be focused on the selection of susceptible target pests and their vital genes, and optimizing the methods for screening genes and recombinants as well.

  15. Recent advances in recombinant protein production

    PubMed Central

    Kunert, Renate; Casanova, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Designing appropriate expression vectors is one of the critical steps in the generation of stable cell lines for recombinant protein production. Conventional expression vectors are severely affected by the chromatin environment surrounding their integration site into the host genome, resulting in low expression levels and transgene silencing. In the past, a new generation of expression vectors and different strategies was developed to overcome the chromatin effects. Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are cloning vectors capable of accommodating up to 350 Kb. Thus, BACs can carry a whole eukaryotic locus with all the elements controlling the expression of a gene; therefore, BACs harbor their own chromatin environment. Expression vectors based on BACs containing open/permissive chromatin loci are not affected by the chromatin surrounding their integration site in the host cell genome. Consequently, BAC-based expression vectors containing the appropriate loci confer predictable and high levels of expression over time. These properties make BAC-based expression vectors a very attractive tool applied to the recombinant protein production field. PMID:23680894

  16. The landscape of recombination in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hinch, Anjali G.; Tandon, Arti; Patterson, Nick; Song, Yunli; Rohland, Nadin; Palmer, Cameron D.; Chen, Gary K.; Wang, Kai; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Akylbekova, Meggie; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Amos, Christopher; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cai, Qiuyin; Caporaso, Neil; Casey, Graham; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Deming, Sandra L.; Diver, W. Ryan; Divers, Jasmin; Fornage, Myriam; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Glessner, Joseph; Harris, Curtis C.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue A.; Isaacs, Williams; John, Esther M.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Keating, Brendan; Kittles, Rick A.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Larkin, Emma; Le Marchand, Loic; McNeill, Lorna H.; Millikan, Robert C.; Murphy, Adam; Musani, Solomon; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Nyante, Sarah; Papanicolaou, George J.; Press, Michael F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reiner, Alex P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Spitz, Margaret; Strom, Sara S.; Thun, Michael J.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Wang, Zhaoming; Wiencke, John K.; Witte, John S.; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Yamamura, Yuko; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Redline, Susan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Taylor, Herman A.; Price, Alkes L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chanock, Stephen J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Wilson, James G.; Reich, David; Myers, Simon R.

    2011-01-01

    Recombination, together with mutation, is the ultimate source of genetic variation in populations. We leverage the recent mixture of people of African and European ancestry in the Americas to build a genetic map measuring the probability of crossing-over at each position in the genome, based on about 2.1 million crossovers in 30,000 unrelated African Americans. At intervals of more than three megabases it is nearly identical to a map built in Europeans. At finer scales it differs significantly, and we identify about 2,500 recombination hotspots that are active in people of West African ancestry but nearly inactive in Europeans. The probability of a crossover at these hotspots is almost fully controlled by the alleles an individual carries at PRDM9 (P<10−245). We identify a 17 base pair DNA sequence motif that is enriched in these hotspots, and is an excellent match to the predicted binding target of African-enriched alleles of PRDM9. PMID:21775986

  17. Recombination activity of copper in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdeva, R.; Istratov, A. A.; Weber, E. R.

    2001-10-01

    The carrier recombination activity of copper in n-type and p-type silicon has been investigated. The minority carrier diffusion length has been found to decrease monotonically with increasing copper concentration in n Si and to exhibit a step-like behavior in p-type silicon at Cu concentrations above a certain critical level. It is suggested that the impact of copper on the minority carrier diffusion length is determined by the formation of copper precipitates. This process is retarded in perfect silicon due to the large lattice mismatch between Cu3Si and the silicon lattice and even more retarded in p Si, due to electrostatic repulsion effects between the positively charged copper precipitates and interstitial copper ions. Comparison of the impact of Cu on minority carrier diffusion length obtained with p-Si samples of different resistivity confirmed the electrostatic model. Studies of the impact of copper on minority carrier diffusion length in samples with internal gettering sites indicated that they provide heterogeneous nucleation sites for Cu precipitation at subcritical Cu concentration. Above a certain threshold of Cu concentration, the bulk recombination activity is dominated by quasihomogeneous formation of Cu precipitates, a process that is not detectably affected by the presence of oxide precipitates.

  18. The landscape of recombination in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Hinch, Anjali G; Tandon, Arti; Patterson, Nick; Song, Yunli; Rohland, Nadin; Palmer, Cameron D; Chen, Gary K; Wang, Kai; Buxbaum, Sarah G; Akylbekova, Ermeg L; Aldrich, Melinda C; Ambrosone, Christine B; Amos, Christopher; Bandera, Elisa V; Berndt, Sonja I; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cai, Qiuyin; Caporaso, Neil; Casey, Graham; Cupples, L Adrienne; Deming, Sandra L; Diver, W Ryan; Divers, Jasmin; Fornage, Myriam; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Glessner, Joseph; Harris, Curtis C; Hu, Jennifer J; Ingles, Sue A; Isaacs, William; John, Esther M; Kao, W H Linda; Keating, Brendan; Kittles, Rick A; Kolonel, Laurence N; Larkin, Emma; Le Marchand, Loic; McNeill, Lorna H; Millikan, Robert C; Murphy, Adam; Musani, Solomon; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Nyante, Sarah; Papanicolaou, George J; Press, Michael F; Psaty, Bruce M; Reiner, Alex P; Rich, Stephen S; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rotter, Jerome I; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Schwartz, Ann G; Signorello, Lisa B; Spitz, Margaret; Strom, Sara S; Thun, Michael J; Tucker, Margaret A; Wang, Zhaoming; Wiencke, John K; Witte, John S; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Yamamura, Yuko; Zanetti, Krista A; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Redline, Susan; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Henderson, Brian E; Taylor, Herman A; Price, Alkes L; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chanock, Stephen J; Haiman, Christopher A; Wilson, James G; Reich, David; Myers, Simon R

    2011-07-20

    Recombination, together with mutation, gives rise to genetic variation in populations. Here we leverage the recent mixture of people of African and European ancestry in the Americas to build a genetic map measuring the probability of crossing over at each position in the genome, based on about 2.1 million crossovers in 30,000 unrelated African Americans. At intervals of more than three megabases it is nearly identical to a map built in Europeans. At finer scales it differs significantly, and we identify about 2,500 recombination hotspots that are active in people of West African ancestry but nearly inactive in Europeans. The probability of a crossover at these hotspots is almost fully controlled by the alleles an individual carries at PRDM9 (P value < 10(-245)). We identify a 17-base-pair DNA sequence motif that is enriched in these hotspots, and is an excellent match to the predicted binding target of PRDM9 alleles common in West Africans and rare in Europeans. Sites of this motif are predicted to be risk loci for disease-causing genomic rearrangements in individuals carrying these alleles. More generally, this map provides a resource for research in human genetic variation and evolution.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide induced conversion of recombinant prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Fozia; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Ladner, Carol L; Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Ametaj, Burim N; Wishart, David S

    2014-01-01

    The conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to the β-rich infectious isoform PrPSc is considered a critical and central feature in prion pathology. Although PrPSc is the critical component of the infectious agent, as proposed in the “protein-only” prion hypothesis, cellular components have been identified as important cofactors in triggering and enhancing the conversion of PrPC to proteinase K resistant PrPSc. A number of in vitro systems using various chemical and/or physical agents such as guanidine hydrochloride, urea, SDS, high temperature, and low pH, have been developed that cause PrPC conversion, their amplification, and amyloid fibril formation often under non-physiological conditions. In our ongoing efforts to look for endogenous and exogenous chemical mediators that might initiate, influence, or result in the natural conversion of PrPC to PrPSc, we discovered that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacterial membranes interacts with recombinant prion proteins and induces conversion to an isoform richer in β sheet at near physiological conditions as long as the LPS concentration remains above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). More significant was the LPS mediated conversion that was observed even at sub-molar ratios of LPS to recombinant ShPrP (90–232). PMID:24819168

  20. Recombinant cells in the lung increase with age via de novo recombination events and clonal expansion.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Takafumi; Kay, Jennifer E; Li, Na; Engelward, Bevin P

    2017-04-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a critical DNA repair pathway, which is usually error-free, but can sometimes lead to cancer-promoting mutations. Despite the importance of HR as a driver of mutations, the spontaneous frequency of such mutations has proven difficult to study. To gain insight to location, cell type, and subsequent proliferation of mutated cells, we used the Rosa26 Direct Repeat (RaDR) mice for in situ detection and quantification of recombinant cells in the lung. We developed a method for automated enumeration of recombinant cells in lung tissue using the Metafer 4 slide-scanning platform. The mean spontaneous HR frequencies of the lung tissue in young and aged mice were 2 × 10(-6) and 30 × 10(-6) , respectively, which is consistent with our previous reports that mutated cells accumulate with age. In addition, by using the capability of Metafer 4 to mark the position of fluorescent cells, we found that recombinant cells from the aged mice formed clusters in the lung tissue, likely due to clonal expansion of a single mutant cell. The recombinant cells primarily consisted of alveolar epithelial type II or club (previously known as Clara) cells, both of which have the potential to give rise to cancer. This approach to tissue image analysis reveals the location and cell types that have undergone HR. Being able to quantify mutant cells in situ within lung tissue opens doors to studies of exposure-induced mutations and clonal expansion, giving rise to new opportunities for understanding how genetic and environmental factors cause tumorigenic mutations. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:135-145, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Selection by parasites may increase host recombination frequency.

    PubMed

    Fischer, O; Schmid-Hempel, P

    2005-06-22

    Meiotic recombination destroys successful genotypes and it is therefore thought to evolve only under a very limited set of conditions. Here, we experimentally show that recombination rates across two linkage groups of the host, the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, increase with exposure to the microsporidian parasite, Nosema whitei, particularly when parasites were allowed to coevolve with their hosts. Selection by randomly varied parasites resulted in smaller effects, while directional selection for insecticide resistance initially reduced recombination slightly. These results, at least tentatively, suggest that short-term benefits of recombination--and thus the evolution of sex--may be related to parasitism.

  2. The Effect of Recombination on the Reconstruction of Ancestral Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Miguel; Posada, David

    2010-01-01

    While a variety of methods exist to reconstruct ancestral sequences, all of them assume that a single phylogeny underlies all the positions in the alignment and therefore that recombination has not taken place. Using computer simulations we show that recombination can severely bias ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR), and quantify this effect. If recombination is ignored, the ancestral sequences recovered can be quite distinct from the grand most recent common ancestor (GMRCA) of the sample and better resemble the concatenate of partial most recent common ancestors (MRCAs) at each recombination fragment. When independent phylogenetic trees are assumed for the different recombinant segments, the estimation of the fragment MRCAs improves significantly. Importantly, we show that recombination can change the biological predictions derived from ASRs carried out with real data. Given that recombination is widespread on nuclear genes and in particular in RNA viruses and some bacteria, the reconstruction of ancestral sequences in these cases should consider the potential impact of recombination and ideally be carried out using approaches that accommodate recombination. PMID:20124027

  3. Rogue athletes and recombinant DNA technology: challenges for doping control.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Mansour, Mai M H

    2007-10-01

    The quest for athletic excellence holds no limit for some athletes, and the advances in recombinant DNA technology have handed these athletes the ultimate doping weapons: recombinant proteins and gene doping. Some detection methods are now available for several recombinant proteins that are commercially available as pharmaceuticals and being abused by dopers. However, researchers are struggling to come up with efficient detection methods in preparation for the imminent threat of gene doping, expected in the 2008 Olympics. This Forum article presents the main detection strategies for recombinant proteins and the forthcoming detection strategies for gene doping as well as the prime analytical challenges facing them.

  4. Expression and purification of recombinant nattokinase in Spodoptera frugiperda cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Xiaoli; Xiong, Shaoling; Zhang, Jing; Cai, Litao; Yang, Yanyan

    2007-10-01

    A recombinant baculovirus, rv-egfp-NK, containing a reporter gene encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), was used to express nattokinase (NK), a fibrinolytic enzyme, in Spodoptera frugiperda (SF-9) cells. The recombinant protein also included a histidine tag for purification using Ni(2+) resins. The recombinant NK, approximately 30 kDa, retained fibrinolytic activity (60 U/ml). The integration of the EGFP expression cassette in the Bac-to-Bac system is thus an effective method for the expression and purification of recombinant NK protein in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells.

  5. Absolute Emission Spectroscopy of Electronically Excited Products of Dissociative Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypkowski, M. P.; Gougousi, T.; Golde, M. F.; Johnsen, R.

    1997-10-01

    We have employed spatially-resolved optical emission spectroscopy in a flowing afterglow plasma to investigate radiations in the 200-400 nm range resulting from electron-ion dissociative recombination. Calibrated emission data combined with Langmuir probe electron-density measurements are analyzed to obtain branching ratios for electronically excited recombination products. In particular, we will report absolute yields of CO(a^3Π) resulting from recombining CO_2^+ ions, NO(B^2Π) from N_2O^+, OH(A^2Σ^+) from HCO_2^+, as well as NH(A^3Π_i), and OH(A^2Σ^+) from the recombination of N_2OH^+ ions.

  6. Using crossover breakpoints in recombinant inbred lines to identify quantitative trait loci controlling the global recombination frequency.

    PubMed

    Esch, Elisabeth; Szymaniak, Jessica M; Yates, Heather; Pawlowski, Wojciech P; Buckler, Edward S

    2007-11-01

    Recombination is a crucial component of evolution and breeding, producing new genetic combinations on which selection can act. Rates of recombination vary tremendously, not only between species but also within species and for specific chromosomal segments. In this study, by examining recombination events captured in recombinant inbred mapping populations previously created for maize, wheat, Arabidopsis, and mouse, we demonstrate that substantial variation exists for genomewide crossover rates in both outcrossed and inbred plant and animal species. We also identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control this variation. The method that we developed and employed here holds promise for elucidating factors that regulate meiotic recombination and for creation of hyperrecombinogenic lines, which can help overcome limited recombination that hampers breeding progress.

  7. Volume Recombination in Alcator C-Mod Divertor Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.

    1997-11-01

    Volume recombination has been predicted(See, for example, A. Loarte, Proc. 12th PSI Conf, J. Nucl. Mater (1996) I9, in press.) to be a significant sink for plasma ions under the detached divertor conditions achieved on many tokamaks. This volume recombination sink was observed initially in Alcator C-Mod and shown to be a major fraction of the ion loss. Signatures of recombination have now been observed on DIII-D(R.C. Isler, et al., paper submitted for publication), Asdex-UG (B. Napiontek, et al. 24th EPS Conf., Berchtesgaden, Germany, 1997, P4.007, in press.), and JET(R.D. Monk, et al. 24th EPS Conf., Berchtesgaden, Germany, 1997, P1.030, in press.). It is important primarily because the recombined atoms are not accelerated through the sheath - thus reducing divertor plate sputtering, and because most of the potential energy of recombination (13.6 eV) is released as radiation before the ion strikes the plate. The Alcator C-Mod measurements show that the recombination occurs in low Te ( ~1 eV), high ne ( ~1× 10^21 m-3) regions, and is significantly larger in detached regions. At the inboard, detached divertor plate the measured volume recombination rate is typically greater than the rate of ion collection at that plate and is about an order of magnitude higher than on the attached, outer plate. These spatially resolved measurements also show that the recombination rate is peaked near the strike point and imply that the recombination is occurring close to the plate surface. The C-Mod observations about the magnitude and spatial distribution of the recombination are consistent with the modelling of similar discharges(F. Wising et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36, p 136 (1996).). The experimental evidence for recombination is found in the deuterium emission spectra from the divertor, in particular in the Balmer- and/or Lyman-series. The spectra show that the dominant recombination mechanism is 3-body recombination into excited states of deuterium and that the populations

  8. Evidence of Recombination in Intrapatient Populations of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sentandreu, Vicente; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Bracho, María Alma; Valero, Ana; Gosalbes, María José; Ortega, Enrique; Moya, Andrés; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide and a potential cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in the future. HCV is characterized by a high level of genetic heterogeneity. Although homologous recombination has been demonstrated in many members of the family Flaviviridae, to which HCV belongs, there are only a few studies reporting recombination on natural populations of HCV, suggesting that these events are rare in vivo. Furthermore, these few studies have focused on recombination between different HCV genotypes/subtypes but there are no reports on the extent of intra-genotype or intra-subtype recombination between viral strains infecting the same patient. Given the important implications of recombination for RNA virus evolution, our aim in this study has been to assess the existence and eventually the frequency of intragenic recombination on HCV. For this, we retrospectively have analyzed two regions of the HCV genome (NS5A and E1-E2) in samples from two different groups: (i) patients infected only with HCV (either treated with interferon plus ribavirin or treatment naïve), and (ii) HCV-HIV co-infected patients (with and without treatment against HIV). The complete data set comprised 17712 sequences from 136 serum samples derived from 111 patients. Recombination analyses were performed using 6 different methods implemented in the program RDP3. Recombination events were considered when detected by at least 3 of the 6 methods used and were identified in 10.7% of the amplified samples, distributed throughout all the groups described and the two genomic regions studied. The resulting recombination events were further verified by detailed phylogenetic analyses. The complete experimental procedure was applied to an artificial mixture of relatively closely viral populations and the ensuing analyses failed to reveal artifactual recombination. From these results we conclude that recombination should be considered as a potentially

  9. Recombination of Globally Circulating Varicella-Zoster Virus

    PubMed Central

    Depledge, Daniel P.; Kundu, Samit; Atkinson, Claire; Brown, Julianne; Haque, Tanzina; Hussaini, Yusuf; MacMahon, Eithne; Molyneaux, Pamela; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Sengupta, Nitu; Koay, Evelyn S. C.; Tang, Julian W.; Underhill, Gillian S.; Grahn, Anna; Studahl, Marie; Breuer, Judith; Bergström, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human herpesvirus, which during primary infection typically causes varicella (chicken pox) and establishes lifelong latency in sensory and autonomic ganglia. Later in life, the virus may reactivate to cause herpes zoster (HZ; also known as shingles). To prevent these diseases, a live-attenuated heterogeneous vaccine preparation, vOka, is used routinely in many countries worldwide. Recent studies of another alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus, demonstrate that live-attenuated vaccine strains can recombine in vivo, creating virulent progeny. These findings raised concerns about using attenuated herpesvirus vaccines under conditions that favor recombination. To investigate whether VZV may undergo recombination, which is a prerequisite for VZV vaccination to create such conditions, we here analyzed 115 complete VZV genomes. Our results demonstrate that recombination occurs frequently for VZV. It thus seems that VZV is fully capable of recombination if given the opportunity, which may have important implications for continued VZV vaccination. Although no interclade vaccine-wild-type recombinant strains were found, intraclade recombinants were frequently detected in clade 2, which harbors the vaccine strains, suggesting that the vaccine strains have already been involved in recombination events, either in vivo or in vitro during passages in cell culture. Finally, previous partial and complete genomic studies have described strains that do not cluster phylogenetically to any of the five established clades. The additional VZV strains sequenced here, in combination with those previously published, have enabled us to formally define a novel sixth VZV clade. IMPORTANCE Although genetic recombination has been demonstrated to frequently occur for other human alphaherpesviruses, herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2, only a few ancient and isolated recent recombination events have hitherto been demonstrated for VZV. In the

  10. Initiation of Meiotic Recombination in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajeev; de Massy, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by the induction of programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). DSB repair promotes homologous interactions and pairing and leads to the formation of crossovers (COs), which are required for the proper reductional segregation at the first meiotic division. In mammals, several hundred DSBs are generated at the beginning of meiotic prophase by the catalytic activity of SPO11. Currently it is not well understood how the frequency and timing of DSB formation and their localization are regulated. Several approaches in humans and mice have provided an extensive description of the localization of initiation events based on CO mapping, leading to the identification and characterization of preferred sites (hotspots) of initiation. This review presents the current knowledge about the proteins known to be involved in this process, the sites where initiation takes place, and the factors that control hotspot localization. PMID:24710101

  11. Expression of recombinant ADAMTS in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gavin C; Vankemmelbeke, Mireille N; Buttle, David J

    2010-01-01

    The "a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs" (ADAMTS) enzymes are secreted proteinases involved in development, blood clotting and the turnover of extracellular matrix. Manufacturing recombinant enzyme presents quite a challenge due to the presence of disulphide bridges, the large size and modular structure. A sub-group of these enzymes are known as "aggrecanases" and it is likely that they are involved in a number of pathologies related to increased turnover of the extracellular matrix, particularly in tissues where the concentration of proteoglycans is high, such as cartilage and the central nervous system. We have expressed three of these enzymes, ADAMTS-1, -4 and -5, in insect cells using plasmid-based systems.

  12. Epidemiology, Genetic Recombination, and Pathogenesis of Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Wong, Gary; Shi, Weifeng; Liu, Jun; Lai, Alexander C K; Zhou, Jiyong; Liu, Wenjun; Bi, Yuhai; Gao, George F

    2016-06-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) were first described in the 1960s for patients with the common cold. Since then, more HCoVs have been discovered, including those that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), two pathogens that, upon infection, can cause fatal respiratory disease in humans. It was recently discovered that dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia harbor three different HCoV species, including a dominant MERS HCoV lineage that was responsible for the outbreaks in the Middle East and South Korea during 2015. In this review we aim to compare and contrast the different HCoVs with regard to epidemiology and pathogenesis, in addition to the virus evolution and recombination events which have, on occasion, resulted in outbreaks amongst humans.

  13. Visible charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.; Schechtman, N.; Synakowski, E.J.

    1991-03-01

    Visible charge exchange recombination spectroscopy is routinely used to measure the time evolution of the ion temperature (T{sub i}) and toroidal rotation velocity (v{sub {phi}}) profiles on TFTR. These measurements are made with the CHERS diagnostic, a fiber-optically coupled spectrometer equipped with a two-dimensional photodiode array detector which provides both spectral and spatial resolution. The instrumentation, data analysis techniques, and examples of T{sub i} and v{sub {phi}} measurements are described. Recently, CHERS has been used to perform impurity transport experiments: radial profiles of diffusivities and convective velocities for helium and iron have been deduced from measurements of the time evolutions of He{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 24+} profiles following impurity injection. Examples of these measurements are given. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Overview of the purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Paul T

    2015-04-01

    When the first version of this unit was written in 1995, protein purification of recombinant proteins was based on a variety of standard chromatographic methods and approaches, many of which were described and mentioned throughout Current Protocols in Protein Science. In the interim, there has been a shift toward an almost universal usage of the affinity or fusion tag. This may not be the case for biotechnology manufacture where affinity tags can complicate producing proteins under regulatory conditions. Regardless of the protein expression system, questions are asked as to which and how many affinity tags to use, where to attach them in the protein, and whether to engineer a self-cleavage system or simply leave them on. We will briefly address some of these issues. Also, although this overview focuses on E.coli, protein expression and purification, other commonly used expression systems are mentioned and, apart from cell-breakage methods, protein purification methods and strategies are essentially the same.

  15. Recombinant Brucella abortus gene expressing immunogenic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, J.E.; Tabatabai, L.B.

    1991-06-11

    This patent describes a synthetic recombinant DNA molecule containing a DNA sequence. It comprises a gene of Brucella abortus encoding an immunogenic protein having a molecular weight of approximately 31,000 daltons as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, the protein having an isoelectric point around 4.9, and containing a twenty-five amino acid sequence from its amino terminal end consisting of Gln-Ala-Pro-Thr-Phe-Phe-Arg-Ile-Gly-Thr-Gly-Gly-Thr-Ala-Gly-Thr-Tyr-Tyr-Pro-Ile-Gly-Gly-Leu-Ile-Ala, wherein Gln, Ala, Pro, Thr, Phe, Arg, Ile, Gly, Tyr, and Leu, respectively, represent glutamine, alanine, proline, threonine, phenylalanine, arginine, isolecuine, glycine, tyrosine, and leucine.

  16. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukić, D.; Savin, D. W.; Schnell, M.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E.; Schippers, S.; Müller, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Sprenger, F.; Wolf, A.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N. R.

    2006-05-01

    Recent X-ray satelitte observations of active galactic nuclei point out shortcomings in our understanding of low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) for iron M- shell ions. In order to resolve this issue and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for modeling astrophysical plasmas, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring at the Max- Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage rings are currently the only laboratory method capable of studying low temperature DR. We use our results to produce experimentally- derived DR rate coefficients. We are also providing our data to atomic theorist to benchmark their DR calculations. Here we will report our recent DR results for selected Fe M-shell ions. At temperatures where these ions are predicted to form in photoionized gas, we find a significant discrepancy between our experimental results and previously recommended DR rate coefficients.

  17. How homologous recombination maintains telomere integrity.

    PubMed

    Tacconi, Eliana M C; Tarsounas, Madalena

    2015-06-01

    Telomeres protect the ends of linear chromosomes against loss of genetic information and inappropriate processing as damaged DNA and are therefore crucial to the maintenance of chromosome integrity. In addition to providing a pathway for genome-wide DNA repair, homologous recombination (HR) plays a key role in telomere replication and capping. Consistent with this, the genomic instability characteristic of HR-deficient cells and tumours is driven in part by telomere dysfunction. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which HR modulates the response to intrinsic cellular challenges that arise during telomere replication, as well as its impact on the assembly of telomere protective structures. How normal and tumour cells differ in their ability to maintain telomeres is deeply relevant to the search for treatments that would selectively eliminate cells whose capacity for HR-mediated repair has been compromised.

  18. Site specific radioiodination of recombinant hirudin

    SciTech Connect

    Tuong, A.; Maftouh, M.; Picard, C.; Gachon, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Recombinant hirudin variant rHV2-Lys47 was radioiodinated using the chloramine-T method. Depending on the reaction pH, the two tyrosine residues, Tyr3 and Tyr63, responded differently to iodination but without change in total iodination yield. Of the incorporated -125 iodine 80% was located on Tyr3 at pH 7.4, but 65% was found on Tyr63 at pH 4. These distinct iodination patterns suggest the existence of a pH-dependent multimerization and/or important conformational changes in the tertiary structure with pH. Each radiotracer was purified to high specific activity by simple low-pressure chromatography including gel filtration and reverse-phase separation, both on short cartridges. The method was validated by reverse-phase and anion-exchange HPLC with on-line radioactivity detection. The iodination sites were characterized following carboxypeptidase Y cleavage coupled with radio-HPLC.

  19. Meiotic recombination in mammals: localization and regulation.

    PubMed

    Baudat, Frédéric; Imai, Yukiko; de Massy, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    During meiosis, a programmed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leads to the exchange of genetic material between homologous chromosomes. These exchanges increase genome diversity and are essential for proper chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. Recent findings have highlighted an unexpected molecular control of the distribution of meiotic DSBs in mammals by a rapidly evolving gene, PR domain-containing 9 (PRDM9), and genome-wide analyses have facilitated the characterization of meiotic DSB sites at unprecedented resolution. In addition, the identification of new players in DSB repair processes has allowed the delineation of recombination pathways that have two major outcomes, crossovers and non-crossovers, which have distinct mechanistic roles and consequences for genome evolution.

  20. Recombining overlapping BACs into single large BACs.

    PubMed

    Kotzamanis, George; Kotsinas, Athanassios

    2015-01-01

    BAC clones containing the entire genomic region of a gene including the long-range regulatory elements are very useful for gene functional analysis. However, large genes often span more than the insert of a BAC clone, and single BACs covering the entire region of interest are not available. Here, we describe a general system for linking two or more overlapping BACs into a single clone. Two rounds of homologous recombination are used. In the first, the BAC inserts are subcloned into the pBACLink vectors. In the second, the two BACs are combined together. Multiple BACs in a contig can be combined by alternating use of the pBACLInk vectors, resulting in several BAC clones containing as much of the genomic region of a gene as required. Such BACs can then be used in gene expression studies and/or gene therapy applications.

  1. Enzymic properties of recombinant BACE2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Tae; Downs, Deborah; Wu, Shili; Dashti, Azar; Pan, Yujun; Zhai, Peng; Wang, Xinjuan; Zhang, Xuejun C; Lin, Xinli

    2002-11-01

    BACE2 (Memapsin 1) is a membrane-bound aspartic protease that is highly homologous with BACE1 (Memapsin 2). While BACE1 processes the amyloid precursor protein (APP) at a key step in generating the beta-amyloid peptide and presumably causes Alzheimer's disease (AD), BACE2 has not been demonstrated to be directly involved in APP processing, and its physiological functions remain to be determined. In vivo, BACE2 is expressed as a precursor protein containing pre-, pro-, protease, transmembrane, and cytosolic domains/peptides. To determine the enzymatic properties of BACE2, two variants of its pro-protease domain, pro-BACE2-T1 (PB2-T1) and pro-BACE2-T2 (PB2-T2), were constructed. They have been expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies, refolded and purified. These two recombinant proteins have the same N terminus but differ at their C-terminal ends: PB2-T1 ends at Pro466, on the boundary of the postulated transmembrane domain, and PB2-T2 ends at Ser431, close to the homologous ends of other aspartic proteases such as pepsin. While PB2-T1 shares similar substrate specificities with BACE1 and other 'general' aspartic proteases, the specificity of PB2-T2 is more constrained, apparently preferring to cleave at the NH2-terminal side of paired basic residues. Unlike other 'typical' aspartic proteases, which are active only under acidic conditions, the recombinant BACE2, PB2-T1, was active at a broad pH range. In addition, pro-BACE2 can be processed at its in vivo maturation site by BACE1.

  2. Reflections: ethics and the recombinant DNA debate.

    PubMed

    Robb, J W

    1982-01-01

    This essay is an attempt to apply a mode of ethical reflection to questions related to the recombinant DNA debate. The author suggests that adequate ethical analysis must include at least five aspects of a moral situation 1) the nature of the act itself; 2) consequences that result from an action or decision; 3) civil and criminal laws; 4) moral principles; and 5) motivation or intention. This paradigm for analysis is applied to the recombinant DNA scene, particularly as these factors relate to 1) risks vs benefits; 2) laws and regulations; 3) the marketplace; and 4) human genetic intervention. The analysis does not provide answers to these vexing questions, but attempts to raise the consciousness level of the reader concerning significant ethical issues. Undergirding the discussion is the humanistic theme of the primacy of the concern for the public good, and that freedom of inquiry can only survive in a socially conscious context. Fear of the unknown is no reason for prohibiting DNA research, but since the stakes are high as new developments emerge that pertain to the genetic restructuring of the human species, the author suggests that caution and responsible judgment are mandatory. Since ethics is concerned with ideal moral judgments, and applied ethics relates to the real world in which we function, the demand for clear and careful thought concerning the short-term and long-term consequences of our work is a primary ingredient of what it means to be responsible. In the final analysis, ethical responsibility rests on the individual; without a sense of personal integrity and what that implies about oneself and society, blatant opportunism can easily become the generally accepted mode of behavior and decision. If this occurs, traditional ethical concerns become irrelevant.

  3. Functional, Responsive Materials Assembled from Recombinant Oleosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel

    Biological cells are surrounded by a plasma membrane made primarily of phospholipids that form a bilayer. This membrane is permselective and compartmentalizes the cell. A simple form of artificial cell is the vesicle, in which a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounds an aqueous solution. However, there is no a priori reason why a membrane needs to be made of phospholipids. It could be made of any surfactant that forms a bilayer. We have assembled membranes and other structures from the recombinant plant protein oleosin. The ability to assemble from a recombinant protein means that every molecule is identical, we have complete control over the sequence, and hence can build in designer functionality with high fidelity, including adhesion and enzymatic activity. Such incorporation is trivial using the tools of molecular biology. We find that while many variants of oleosin make membranes, others make micelles and sheets. We show how the type of supramolecular structure can be altered by the conditions of solvent, such as ionic strength, and the architecture of the surfactant itself. We show that protease cleavable domains can be incorporated within oleosin, and be engineered to protect other functional domains such as adhesive motifs, to make responsive materials whose activity and shape depend on the action of proteases. We will also present the idea of making ``Franken''-oleosins, where large domains of native oleosin are replaced with domains from other functional proteins, to make hybrids conferred by the donor protein. Thus, we can view oleosin as a template upon which a vast array of designer functionalities can be imparted..

  4. Not so fast on recombination analysis of Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regarding the letter published in the Journal of Virology Vol. 82 No. 13 p. 6782 indicating that “powerful evidence” of recombination is a call for caution in the use of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) based vaccines, I would like to suggest that evidence for recombination is still weak. The authors ...

  5. Fullerene concentration dependent bimolecular recombination in organic photovoltaic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaake, Loren G.; Sun, Yanming; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Heeger, Alan J.

    2013-04-01

    Organic photovoltaic devices made of a solution processed small molecule and a fullerene show a decrease in short circuit current with decreasing fullerene amounts. Transient absorption experiments show that the rate of bimolecular recombination increases as the system is deprived of fullerene. A simple expression for the bimolecular recombination coefficient derived by accounting for intrinsic carrier generation reproduces the observed behavior.

  6. Sequence determinants of breakpoint location during HIV-1 intersubtype recombination.

    PubMed

    Baird, Heather A; Galetto, Román; Gao, Yong; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Abreha, Measho; Archer, John; Fan, Jun; Robertson, David L; Arts, Eric J; Negroni, Matteo

    2006-01-01

    Retroviral recombination results from strand switching, during reverse transcription, between the two copies of genomic RNA present in the virus. We analysed recombination in part of the envelope gene, between HIV-1 subtype A and D strains. After a single infection cycle, breakpoints clustered in regions corresponding to the constant portions of Env. With some exceptions, a similar distribution was observed after multiple infection cycles, and among recombinant sequences in the HIV Sequence Database. We compared the experimental data with computer simulations made using a program that only allows recombination to occur whenever an identical base is present in the aligned parental RNAs. Experimental recombination was more frequent than expected on the basis of simulated recombination when, in a region spanning 40 nt from the 5' border of a breakpoint, no more than two discordant bases between the parental RNAs were present. When these requirements were not fulfilled, breakpoints were distributed randomly along the RNA, closer to the distribution predicted by computer simulation. A significant preference for recombination was also observed for regions containing homopolymeric stretches. These results define, for the first time, local sequence determinants for recombination between divergent HIV-1 isolates.

  7. Sequence determinants of breakpoint location during HIV-1 intersubtype recombination

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Heather A.; Galetto, Román; Gao, Yong; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Abreha, Measho; Archer, John; Fan, Jun; Robertson, David L.; Arts, Eric J.; Negroni, Matteo

    2006-01-01

    Retroviral recombination results from strand switching, during reverse transcription, between the two copies of genomic RNA present in the virus. We analysed recombination in part of the envelope gene, between HIV-1 subtype A and D strains. After a single infection cycle, breakpoints clustered in regions corresponding to the constant portions of Env. With some exceptions, a similar distribution was observed after multiple infection cycles, and among recombinant sequences in the HIV Sequence Database. We compared the experimental data with computer simulations made using a program that only allows recombination to occur whenever an identical base is present in the aligned parental RNAs. Experimental recombination was more frequent than expected on the basis of simulated recombination when, in a region spanning 40 nt from the 5′ border of a breakpoint, no more than two discordant bases between the parental RNAs were present. When these requirements were not fulfilled, breakpoints were distributed randomly along the RNA, closer to the distribution predicted by computer simulation. A significant preference for recombination was also observed for regions containing homopolymeric stretches. These results define, for the first time, local sequence determinants for recombination between divergent HIV-1 isolates. PMID:17003055

  8. Recombinant expression of hydroxylated human collagen in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rutschmann, Christoph; Baumann, Stephan; Cabalzar, Jürg; Luther, Kelvin B; Hennet, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body and thereby a structural protein of considerable biotechnological interest. The complex maturation process of collagen, including essential post-translational modifications such as prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation, has precluded large-scale production of recombinant collagen featuring the biophysical properties of endogenous collagen. The characterization of new prolyl and lysyl hydroxylase genes encoded by the giant virus mimivirus reveals a method for production of hydroxylated collagen. The coexpression of a human collagen type III construct together with mimivirus prolyl and lysyl hydroxylases in Escherichia coli yielded up to 90 mg of hydroxylated collagen per liter culture. The respective levels of prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation reaching 25 % and 26 % were similar to the hydroxylation levels of native human collagen type III. The distribution of hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine along recombinant collagen was also similar to that of native collagen as determined by mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides. The triple helix signature of recombinant hydroxylated collagen was confirmed by circular dichroism, which also showed that hydroxylation increased the thermal stability of the recombinant collagen construct. Recombinant hydroxylated collagen produced in E. coli supported the growth of human umbilical endothelial cells, underlining the biocompatibility of the recombinant protein as extracellular matrix. The high yield of recombinant protein expression and the extensive level of prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation achieved indicate that recombinant hydroxylated collagen can be produced at large scale for biomaterials engineering in the context of biomedical applications.

  9. The Landscape of Realized Homologous Recombination in Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Koji; Didelot, Xavier; Jolley, Keith A; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Maiden, Martin C J; Sheppard, Samuel K; Falush, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Recombination enhances the adaptive potential of organisms by allowing genetic variants to be tested on multiple genomic backgrounds. Its distribution in the genome can provide insight into the evolutionary forces that underlie traits, such as the emergence of pathogenicity. Here, we examined landscapes of realized homologous recombination of 500 genomes from ten bacterial species and found all species have "hot" regions with elevated rates relative to the genome average. We examined the size, gene content, and chromosomal features associated with these regions and the correlations between closely related species. The recombination landscape is variable and evolves rapidly. For example in Salmonella, only short regions of around 1 kb in length are hot whereas in the closely related species Escherichia coli, some hot regions exceed 100 kb, spanning many genes. Only Streptococcus pyogenes shows evidence for the positive correlation between GC content and recombination that has been reported for several eukaryotes. Genes with function related to the cell surface/membrane are often found in recombination hot regions but E. coli is the only species where genes annotated as "virulence associated" are consistently hotter. There is also evidence that some genes with "housekeeping" functions tend to be overrepresented in cold regions. For example, ribosomal proteins showed low recombination in all of the species. Among specific genes, transferrin-binding proteins are recombination hot in all three of the species in which they were found, and are subject to interspecies recombination.

  10. Inference of Ancestral Recombination Graphs through Topological Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, Pablo G.; Levine, Arnold J.; Rabadán, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    The recent explosion of genomic data has underscored the need for interpretable and comprehensive analyses that can capture complex phylogenetic relationships within and across species. Recombination, reassortment and horizontal gene transfer constitute examples of pervasive biological phenomena that cannot be captured by tree-like representations. Starting from hundreds of genomes, we are interested in the reconstruction of potential evolutionary histories leading to the observed data. Ancestral recombination graphs represent potential histories that explicitly accommodate recombination and mutation events across orthologous genomes. However, they are computationally costly to reconstruct, usually being infeasible for more than few tens of genomes. Recently, Topological Data Analysis (TDA) methods have been proposed as robust and scalable methods that can capture the genetic scale and frequency of recombination. We build upon previous TDA developments for detecting and quantifying recombination, and present a novel framework that can be applied to hundreds of genomes and can be interpreted in terms of minimal histories of mutation and recombination events, quantifying the scales and identifying the genomic locations of recombinations. We implement this framework in a software package, called TARGet, and apply it to several examples, including small migration between different populations, human recombination, and horizontal evolution in finches inhabiting the Galápagos Islands. PMID:27532298

  11. Recombination in viruses: mechanisms, methods of study, and evolutionary consequences.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Arenas, Miguel; Galán, Juan Carlos; Palero, Ferran; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Recombination is a pervasive process generating diversity in most viruses. It joins variants that arise independently within the same molecule, creating new opportunities for viruses to overcome selective pressures and to adapt to new environments and hosts. Consequently, the analysis of viral recombination attracts the interest of clinicians, epidemiologists, molecular biologists and evolutionary biologists. In this review we present an overview of three major areas related to viral recombination: (i) the molecular mechanisms that underlie recombination in model viruses, including DNA-viruses (Herpesvirus) and RNA-viruses (Human Influenza Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus), (ii) the analytical procedures to detect recombination in viral sequences and to determine the recombination breakpoints, along with the conceptual and methodological tools currently used and a brief overview of the impact of new sequencing technologies on the detection of recombination, and (iii) the major areas in the evolutionary analysis of viral populations on which recombination has an impact. These include the evaluation of selective pressures acting on viral populations, the application of evolutionary reconstructions in the characterization of centralized genes for vaccine design, and the evaluation of linkage disequilibrium and population structure.

  12. Recombinant HT.sub.m4 gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Bing; Adra, Chaker N.; Lelias, Jean-Michel

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein and a recombinant HT.sub.m4 protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy.

  13. Measurements of EEDF in recombination dominated afterglow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasil, R.; Korolov, I.; Kotrik, T.; Varju, J.; Dohnal, P.; Donko, Z.; Bano, G.; Glosik, J.

    2009-11-01

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) have been measured in decaying plasma in Flowing Afterglow Langmuir Probe (FALP) experiment. The measurements have been carried out in diffusion and recombination governed plasmas used for studies of recombination of KrD+ and H3+ ions.

  14. Procedures for monitoring recombinant erythropoietin and analogs in doping.

    PubMed

    Lamon, Séverine; Robinson, Neil; Saugy, Martial

    2010-03-01

    Hemoglobin concentration is one of the principal factors of aerobic power and, consequently, of performance in many types of physical activities. The use of recombinant human erythropoietin is, therefore, particularly powerful for improving the physical performances of patients, and, more generally, improving their quality of life. This article discusses procedures for monitoring recombinant erythropoietin and its analogues in doping for athletic performance.

  15. Heterogeneity in rates of recombination across the mouse genome

    SciTech Connect

    Nachman, M.W.; Churchill, G.A.

    1996-02-01

    If loci are randomly distributed on a physical map, the density of markers on a genetic map will be inversely proportional to recombination rate. First proposed by Mary Lyon, we have used this idea to estimate recombination rates from the Drosophila melanogaster linkage map. These results were compared with results of two other studies that estimated regional recombination rates in D. melanogaster using both physical and genetic maps. The three methods were largely concordant in identifying large-scale genomic patterns of recombination. The marker density method was then applied to the Mus musculus microsatellite linkage map. The distribution of microsatellites provided evidence for heterogeneity in recombination rates. Centromeric regions for several mouse chromosomes had significantly greater numbers of markers than expected, suggesting that recombination rates were lower in these regions. In contrast, most telomeric regions contained significantly fewer markers than expected. This indicates that recombination rates are elevated at the telomeres of many mouse chromosomes and is consistent with a comparison of the genetic and cytogenetic maps in these regions. The density of markers on a genetic map may provide a generally useful way to estimate regional recombination rates in species for which genetic, but not physical, maps are available. 44 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Oxygen recombination in the sealed nickel-cadmium cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Al H.; Barrera, Tom P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what parameters are most critical for controlling overcharge pressure in a sealed nickel cadmium cell. Topics covered in viewgraph format are: parameters examined; oxygen evolution and recombination; experimental test description; and effect of parameters on recombination rate.

  17. A Heritable Recombination system for synthetic Darwinian evolution in yeast.

    PubMed

    Romanini, Dante W; Peralta-Yahya, Pamela; Mondol, Vanessa; Cornish, Virginia W

    2012-12-21

    Genetic recombination is central to the generation of molecular diversity and enhancement of evolutionary fitness in living systems. Methods such as DNA shuffling that recapitulate this diversity mechanism in vitro are powerful tools for engineering biomolecules with useful new functions by directed evolution. Synthetic biology now brings demand for analogous technologies that enable the controlled recombination of beneficial mutations in living cells. Thus, here we create a Heritable Recombination system centered around a library cassette plasmid that enables inducible mutagenesis via homologous recombination and subsequent combination of beneficial mutations through sexual reproduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using repair of nonsense codons in auxotrophic markers as a model, Heritable Recombination was optimized to give mutagenesis efficiencies of up to 6% and to allow successive repair of different markers through two cycles of sexual reproduction and recombination. Finally, Heritable Recombination was employed to change the substrate specificity of a biosynthetic enzyme, with beneficial mutations in three different active site loops crossed over three continuous rounds of mutation and selection to cover a total sequence diversity of 10(13). Heritable Recombination, while at an early stage of development, breaks the transformation barrier to library size and can be immediately applied to combinatorial crossing of beneficial mutations for cell engineering, adding important features to the growing arsenal of next generation molecular biology tools for synthetic biology.

  18. [Enhancement of epidermal regeneration by recombinant vaccinia virus growth factor].

    PubMed

    Petrov, V S; Cheshenko, I O; Omigov, V V; Azaev, M Sh; Krendel'shchikov, A V; Ovechkina, L G; Cheshenko, N V; Malygin, E G

    1998-01-01

    Examining the specific activity has showed that recombinant vaccinia virus growth factor binds to appropriate receptors on the A-431 cell surface and prompts the healing acceleration of degree III burns in rats. This recombinant factor did not demonstrate pyrogenicity or toxicogenicity in tests on rabbits, guinea-pits, noninbred albino mice.

  19. Recombination of simple molecular ions studied in storage ring: dissociative recombination of H2O+

    PubMed

    Rosen; Derkatch; Semaniak; Neau; al-Khalili; Le Padellec A; Vikor; Thomas; Danared; af Ugglas M; Larsson

    2000-01-01

    Dissociative recombination of vibrationally relaxed H2O+ ions with electrons has been studied in the heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING. Absolute cross-sections have been measured for collision energies between 0 eV and 30 eV. The energy dependence of the cross-section below 0.1 eV is found to be much steeper than the E-1 behaviour associated with the dominance of the direct recombination mechanism. Resonant structures found at 4 eV and 11 eV have been attributed to the electron capture to Rydberg states converging to electronically excited ionic states. Complete branching fractions for all dissociation channels have been measured at a collision energy of 0 eV. The dissociation process is dominated by three-body H + H + O breakup that occurs with a branching ratio of 0.71.

  20. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications.

  1. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications. PMID:26943906

  2. Multiple exciton generation and recombination in carbon nanotubes and nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2013-06-18

    Semiconducting nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and nanocrystals (NCs) exhibit unique size-dependent quantum properties. They have therefore attracted considerable attention from the viewpoints of fundamental physics and functional device applications. SWCNTs and NCs also provide an excellent new stage for experimental studies of many-body effects of electrons and excitons on optical processes in nanomaterials. In this Account, we discuss multiple exciton generation and recombination in SWCNTs and NCs for next-generation photovoltaics. Strongly correlated ensembles of conduction-band electrons and valence-band holes in semiconductors are complex quantum systems that exhibit unique optical phenomena. In bulk crystals, the carrier recombination dynamics can be described by a simple model, which includes the nonradiative single-carrier trapping rate, the radiative two-carrier recombination rate, and the nonradiative three-carrier Auger recombination rate. The nonradiative Auger recombination rate determines the carrier recombination dynamics at high carrier density and depends on the spatial localization of carriers in two-dimensional quantum wells. The Auger recombination and multiple exciton generation rates can be advantageously manipulated by nanomaterials with designated energy structures. In addition, SWCNTs and NCs show quantized recombination dynamics of multiple excitons and carriers. In one-dimensional SWCNTs, excitons have large binding energies and are very stable at room temperature. The extremely rapid Auger recombination between excitons determines the photoluminescence (PL) intensity, the PL linewidth, and the PL lifetime. SWCNTs can undergo multiple exciton generation, while strong exciton-exciton interactions and complicated exciton structures affect the quantized Auger rate and the multiple exciton generation efficiency. Interestingly, in zero-dimensional NC quantum dots, quantized Auger recombination causes unique

  3. Optimal recombination in genetic algorithms for flowshop scheduling problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, Julia

    2016-10-01

    The optimal recombination problem consists in finding the best possible offspring as a result of a recombination operator in a genetic algorithm, given two parent solutions. We prove NP-hardness of the optimal recombination for various variants of the flowshop scheduling problem with makespan criterion and criterion of maximum lateness. An algorithm for solving the optimal recombination problem for permutation flowshop problems is built, using enumeration of prefect matchings in a special bipartite graph. The algorithm is adopted for the classical flowshop scheduling problem and for the no-wait flowshop problem. It is shown that the optimal recombination problem for the permutation flowshop scheduling problem is solvable in polynomial time for almost all pairs of parent solutions as the number of jobs tends to infinity.

  4. Utilization of Site-Specific Recombination in Biopharmaceutical Production.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Damavandi, Narges; Akbari Eidgahi, Mohammad Reza; Davami, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian expression systems, due to their capacity in post-translational modification, are preferred systems for biopharmaceutical protein production. Several recombinant protein systems have been introduced to the market, most of which are under clinical development. In spite of significant improvements such as cell line engineering, introducing novel expression methods, gene silencing and process development, expression level is unpredictable and unstable because of the random location of integration in the genome. Site-specific recombination techniques are capable of producing stable and high producer clonal cells; therefore, they are gaining more importance in the biopharmaceutical production. Site-specific recombination methods increase the recombinant protein production by specifically inserting a vector at a locus with specific expression trait. The present review focused on the latest developments in site-specific recombination techniques, their specific features and comparisons.

  5. CRISPR-directed mitotic recombination enables genetic mapping without crosses.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, Meru J; Bloom, Joshua S; Day, Laura; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2016-05-27

    Linkage and association studies have mapped thousands of genomic regions that contribute to phenotypic variation, but narrowing these regions to the underlying causal genes and variants has proven much more challenging. Resolution of genetic mapping is limited by the recombination rate. We developed a method that uses CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats) to build mapping panels with targeted recombination events. We tested the method by generating a panel with recombination events spaced along a yeast chromosome arm, mapping trait variation, and then targeting a high density of recombination events to the region of interest. Using this approach, we fine-mapped manganese sensitivity to a single polymorphism in the transporter Pmr1. Targeting recombination events to regions of interest allows us to rapidly and systematically identify causal variants underlying trait differences.

  6. Natural recombination between tobacco and tomato mosaic viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Mei; He, Cheng-Qiang; Ding, Nai-Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a positive-sense plant RNA virus which has a wide host range and a worldwide distribution. Other than a troublesome pathogen, TMV is regarded as a model system pioneering biologic research for a century. The tomato strain of TMV has been recognized to be a distinct tobamovirus as the tomato mosaic virus (ToMV). Recombination has been increasingly recognized as an important factor generating genetic diversity in many RNA viruses. However, it is still unclear whether recombination can function in driving the evolution of tobamoviruses. Herein, based on sequence comparison, we found three recombinants involving each viral gene, all of which might be derived from homologous or aberrant homologous recombination between TMV and ToMV. The study provided evidence that recombination did contribute to the genetic diversity of tobamoviruses.

  7. Sex recombination, and reproductive fitness: an experimental study using Paramecium

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, D.

    1982-08-01

    The effect of sex and recombination on reproductive fitness are measured using five wild stocks of Paramecium primaurelia. Among the wild stocks there were highly significant differences in growth rates. No hybrid had as low a fitness as the least fit parental stock. Recombination produced genotypes of higher fitness than those of either parent only in the cross between the two stocks of lowest fitness. The increase in variance of fitness as a result of recombination was almost exclusively attributable to the generation lines with low fitness. The fitness consequences of sexuality and mate choice were stock specific; some individuals leaving the most descendants by inbreeding, others by outcrossing. For most crosses the short-term advantage of sex, if any, accrue from the fusion of different gametes (hybrid vigor) and not from recombination. Since the homozygous genotype with the highest fitnes left the most progeny by inbreeding (no recombination), the persistence of conjugation in P. primaurelia is paradoxical. (JMT)

  8. Proteolysis of recombinant proteins in bioengineered plant cells.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Priyen; Schlüter, Urte; van Wyk, Stefan; Kunert, Karl Josef; Vorster, Barend Juan

    2014-01-01

    Plants are increasingly used as alternative expression hosts for the production of recombinant proteins offering many advantages including higher biomass and the ability to perform post-translational modifications on complex proteins. Key challenges for optimized accumulation of recombinant proteins in a plant system still remain, including endogenous plant proteolytic activity, which may severely compromise recombinant protein stability. Several strategies have recently been applied to improve protein stability by limiting protease action such as recombinant protein production in various sub-cellular compartments or application of protease inhibitors to limit protease action. A short update on the current strategies applied is provided here, with particular focus on sub-cellular sites previously selected for recombinant protein production and the co-expression of protease inhibitors to limit protease activity.

  9. Streptomyces as host for recombinant production of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins.

    PubMed

    Vallin, Carlos; Ramos, Astrid; Pimienta, Elsa; Rodríguez, Caridad; Hernández, Tairí; Hernández, Ivones; Del Sol, Ricardo; Rosabal, Grisel; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Anné, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    The 45/47 kDa APA protein (Rv1860) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was produced by Streptomyces lividans. The recombinant protein could be recovered from the culture medium of an S. lividans clone containing the apa gene under control of the promoter and signal sequence of the Streptomyces coelicolor agarase gene. The recombinant protein production was further scaled-up using fermentation conditions. The APA protein was subsequently purified from the culture supernatant by means of immunochromatography. About 80 mg of recombinant protein were obtained per liter of culture media. In vivo tests with the APA protein purified from S. lividans TK24/pRGAPA1 revealed that the recombinant protein was antigenic and could induce high titers of specific antibodies in the mouse biological model. Results obtained concerning heterologous production of APA, its immunogenic and antigenic capacity, demonstrated the potential of S. lividans as a valuable host for the production of recombinant proteins from M. tuberculosis.

  10. Utilization of Site-Specific Recombination in Biopharmaceutical Production

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Damavandi, Narges; Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Davami, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian expression systems, due to their capacity in post-translational modification, are preferred systems for biopharmaceutical protein production. Several recombinant protein systems have been introduced to the market, most of which are under clinical development. In spite of significant improvements such as cell line engineering, introducing novel expression methods, gene silencing and process development, expression level is unpredictable and unstable because of the random location of integration in the genome. Site-specific recombination techniques are capable of producing stable and high producer clonal cells; therefore, they are gaining more importance in the biopharmaceutical production. Site-specific recombination methods increase the recombinant protein production by specifically inserting a vector at a locus with specific expression trait. The present review focused on the latest developments in site-specific recombination techniques, their specific features and comparisons. PMID:26602035

  11. Recombination, Pairing, and Synapsis of Homologs during Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Zickler, Denise; Kleckner, Nancy

    2015-05-18

    Recombination is a prominent feature of meiosis in which it plays an important role in increasing genetic diversity during inheritance. Additionally, in most organisms, recombination also plays mechanical roles in chromosomal processes, most notably to mediate pairing of homologous chromosomes during prophase and, ultimately, to ensure regular segregation of homologous chromosomes when they separate at the first meiotic division. Recombinational interactions are also subject to important spatial patterning at both early and late stages. Recombination-mediated processes occur in physical and functional linkage with meiotic axial chromosome structure, with interplay in both directions, before, during, and after formation and dissolution of the synaptonemal complex (SC), a highly conserved meiosis-specific structure that links homolog axes along their lengths. These diverse processes also are integrated with recombination-independent interactions between homologous chromosomes, nonhomology-based chromosome couplings/clusterings, and diverse types of chromosome movement. This review provides an overview of these diverse processes and their interrelationships.

  12. Natural competence and recombination in the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Kung, Stephanie H; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2011-08-01

    Homologous recombination is one of many forces contributing to the diversity, adaptation, and emergence of pathogens. For naturally competent bacteria, transformation is one possible route for the acquisition of novel genetic material. This study demonstrates that Xylella fastidiosa, a generalist bacterial plant pathogen responsible for many emerging plant diseases, is naturally competent and able to homologously recombine exogenous DNA into its genome. Several factors that affect transformation and recombination efficiencies, such as nutrient availability, growth stage, and methylation of transforming DNA, were identified. Recombination was observed in at least one out of every 10(6) cells when exogenous plasmid DNA was supplied and one out of every 10(7) cells when different strains were grown together in vitro. Based on previous genomic studies and experimental data presented here, there is mounting evidence that recombination can occur at relatively high rates and could play a large role in shaping the genetic diversity of X. fastidiosa.

  13. Estimation of recombination frequency in bi-parental genetic populations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ziqi; Li, Huihui; Zhang, Luyan; Wang, Jiankang

    2012-06-01

    Summary Linkage analysis plays an important role in genetic studies. In linkage analysis, accurate estimation of recombination frequency is essential. Many bi-parental populations have been used, and determining an appropriate population is of great importance in precise recombination frequency. In this study, we investigated the estimation efficiency of recombination frequency in 12 bi-parental populations. The criteria that we used for comparison were LOD score in testing linkage relationship, deviation between estimated and real recombination frequency, standard error (SE) of estimates and the least theoretical population size (PS) required to observe at least one recombinant and to declare the statistically significant linkage relationship. Theoretical and simulation results indicated that larger PS and smaller recombination frequency resulted in higher LOD score and smaller deviation. Lower LOD score, higher deviation and higher SE for estimating the recombination frequency in the advanced backcrossing and selfing populations are larger than those in backcross and F2 populations, respectively. For advanced backcrossing and selfing populations, larger populations were needed in order to observe at least one recombinant and to declare significant linkage. In comparison, in F2 and F3 populations higher LOD score, lower deviation and SE were observed for co-dominant markers. A much larger population was needed to observe at least one recombinant and to detect loose linkage for dominant and recessive markers. Therefore, advanced backcrossing and selfing populations had lower precision in estimating the recombination frequency. F2 and F3 populations together with co-dominant markers represent the ideal situation for linkage analysis and linkage map construction.

  14. Effect of sex, age, and breed on genetic recombination features in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meiotic recombination is a fundamental biological process which generates genetic diversity, affects fertility, and influences evolvability. Here we investigate the roles of sex, age, and breed in cattle recombination features, including recombination rate, location and crossover interference. Usin...

  15. 76 FR 3150 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines...: The NIH Guidelines currently require that recombinant DNA experiments designed to create...

  16. 75 FR 42114 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH... transgenic rodents by recombinant DNA technology must be registered with the Institutional...

  17. Auger recombination as the dominant recombination process in indium nitride at low temperatures during steady-state photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Seetoh, I. P.; Soh, C. B.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Chua, S. J.

    2013-03-11

    Auger recombination in InN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition was studied by steady-state photoluminescence at different laser excitation powers and sample temperatures. It was dominant over radiative recombination and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination at low temperatures, contributing to the sub-linear relationship between the integrated photoluminescence intensity and laser excitation power. Auger recombination rates increased gradually with temperature with an activation energy of 10-17 meV, in good agreement with values from transient photoluminescence reported in literature. As the Auger recombination rates were independent of material quality, they may form an upper limit to the luminous efficiency of InN.

  18. Evidence of recombination within human alpha-papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Manuel; Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a causal role in cervical cancer with almost half a million new cases occurring each year. Presence of the carcinogenic HPV is necessary for the development of the invasive carcinoma of the genital tract. Therefore, persistent infection with carcinogenic HPV causes virtually all cervical cancers. Some aspects of the molecular evolution of this virus, as the putative importance of recombination in its evolutionary history, are an opened current question. In addition, recombination could also be a significant issue nowadays since the frequency of co-infection with more than one HPV type is not a rare event and, thus, new recombinant types could be currently being generated. Results We have used human alpha-PV sequences from the public database at Los Alamos National Laboratory to report evidence that recombination may exist in this virus. A model-based population genetic approach was used to infer the recombination signal from the HPV DNA sequences grouped attending to phylogenetic and epidemiological information, as well as to clinical manifestations. Our results agree with recently published ones that use a different methodology to detect recombination associated to the gene L2. In addition, we have detected significant recombination signal in the genes E6, E7, L2 and L1 at different groups, and importantly within the high-risk type HPV16. The method used has recently been shown to be one of the most powerful and reliable procedures to detect the recombination signal. Conclusion We provide new support to the recent evidence of recombination in HPV. Additionally, we performed the recombination estimation assuming the best-fit model of nucleotide substitution and rate variation among sites, of the HPV DNA sequence sets. We found that the gene with recombination in most of the groups is L2 but the highest values were detected in L1 and E6. Gene E7 was recombinant only within the HPV16 type. The topic deserves further study

  19. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 49, Recombination at the DNA level

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This volume contains full papers prepared by the participants to the 1984 Cold Springs Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. This year's theme is entitled Recombination at the DNA level. The volume consists of 93 articles grouped into subject areas entitled chromosome mechanics, yeast systems, mammalian homologous recombination, transposons, mu, plant transposons/T4 recombination, topoisomerase, resolvase and gyrase, Escherichia coli general recombination, RecA, repair, leukaryotic enzymes, integration and excision of bacteriophage, site-specific recombination, and recombination in vitro.

  20. A transient assay for recombination demonstrates that Arabidopsis SNM1 and XRCC3 enhance non-homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R A; Hellens, R P; Love, D R

    2011-09-16

    Replacement of endogenous genes by homologous recombination is rare in plants; the majority of genetic modifications are the result of transforming DNA molecules undergoing random genomic insertion by way of non-homologous recombination. Factors that affect chromatin remodeling and DNA repair are thought to have the potential to enhance the frequency of homologous recombination in plants. Conventional tools to study the frequencies of genetic recombination often rely on stable transformation-based approaches, with these systems being rarely capable of high-throughput or combinatorial analysis. We developed a series of vectors that use chemiluminescent (LUC and REN) reporter genes to assay the relative frequency of homologous and non-homologous recombination in plants. These transient assay vectors were used to screen 14 candidate genes for their effects on recombination frequencies in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Over-expression of Arabidopsis genes with sequence similarity to SNM1 from yeast and XRCC3 from humans enhanced the frequency of non-homologous recombination when assayed using two different donor vectors. Transient N. benthamiana leaf systems were also used in an alternative assay for preliminary measurements of homologous recombination frequencies, which were found to be enhanced by over-expression of RAD52, MIM and RAD51 from yeast, as well as CHR24 from Arabidopsis. The findings for the assays described here are in line with previous studies that analyzed recombination frequencies using stable transformation. The assays we report have revealed functions in non-homologous recombination for the Arabidopsis SNM1 and XRCC3 genes, so the suppression of these genes' expression offers a potential means to enhance the gene targeting frequency in plants. Furthermore, our findings also indicate that plant gene targeting frequencies could be enhanced by over-expression of RAD52, MIM, CHR24, and RAD51 genes.

  1. Dielectronic recombination of Er-like tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, A. S.

    2012-03-01

    Theoretical studies of dielectronic recombination, a very important process for both atomic and plasma physics, are carried out for low-ionized Er-like W. The dielectronic recombination (DR) of the Er-like ion W6+ proceeds via electron capture into the intermediate autoionizing states of the Tm-like ion W5+ followed by the radiative decay to singly-excited bound states. In particular, energy levels, radiative transition probabilities, and autoionization rates for [Cd]4f145p55l'nl, [Cd]4f145p56l''nl, [Cd]4f135p65l'nl, and [Cd]4f135p66l''nl (l'=d,f,g, l''=s,p,d,f,g, n=5-7) states in Tm-like tungsten (W5+) are calculated using the relativistic many-body perturbation theory and relativistic all-order single-double method as well as the Hartree-Fock-relativistic method (cowan code). Branching ratios relative to the first threshold and intensity factors are calculated for satellite lines. DR rate coefficients are determined for the singly-excited [Cd]4f145p6nl (n=5-7) and nonautoionizing doubly-excited [Cd]4f145p55d2, [Cd]4f135p65d2, [Cd]4f135p66s2, [Cd]4f135p65d6s, and [Cd]4f135p65d6p states. Also, contributions from the autoionizing doubly-excited [Cd]4f145p55l'nl, [Cd]4f145p56l''nl, [Cd]4f135p65l'nl, and [Cd]4f135p66l''nl states (with n up to 100), which are very important for calculating total DR rates, are estimated. Synthetic dielectronic satellite spectra from Tm-like W are simulated in a broad spectral range from 140 to 1200 Å. These relativistic calculations provide recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of W5+ ion properties useful for a variety of applications, including for fusion applications.

  2. High Negative Interference and Recombination in Bacteriophage T5

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Barbara North

    1980-01-01

    The process of close recombinant formation in bacteriophage T5 crosses has been studied by examining the structure of internal heterozygotes (HETs), the immediate products of recombination events. The T5 system was chosen because it permits the study of internal heterozygotes exclusively, thus avoiding the ambiguities inherent in previous studies with T4. The heterozygotes were obtained by the nonselective screening of progeny phage in a prematurely lysed sample from an eight-factor cross. The molecular structure of each HET was inferred from the strand genotypes displayed among its progeny. This investigation presents unequivocal evidence that both overlap and insertion HETs are intermediates in recombinant formation and that insertion HETs are a significant source of close double recombinants. There is evidence suggesting that mismatch repair of overlap HETs could be the source of close triple exchanges. Thus, a significant part, and perhaps all, of the high negative interference for close-marker recombination observed in this system is a direct consequence of the fine structure of the recombinational intermediates. These findings are compatible with recombination models proposed by others, in which a single branched intermediate can give rise to HETs of both the overlap and insertion types. PMID:6937420

  3. Histone methylation and V(D)J recombination.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Noriko; Lieber, Michael R

    2014-09-01

    V(D)J recombination is the process by which the diversity of antigen receptor genes is generated and is also indispensable for lymphocyte development. This recombination event occurs in a cell lineage- and stage-specific manner, and is carefully controlled by chromatin structure and ordered histone modifications. The recombinationally active V(D)J loci are associated with hypermethylation at lysine4 of histone H3 and hyperacetylation of histones H3/H4. The recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) and RAG2 complex initiates recombination by introducing double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSS) adjacent to each coding sequence. To be recognized by the RAG complex, RSS sites must be within an open chromatin context. In addition, the RAG complex specifically recognizes hypermethylated H3K4 through its plant homeodomain (PHD) finger in the RAG2 C terminus, which stimulates RAG catalytic activity via that interaction. In this review, we describe how histone methylation controls V(D)J recombination and discuss its potential role in lymphoid malignancy by mistargeting the RAG complex.

  4. Transcription-replication collision increases recombination efficiency between plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jialiang, Li; Feng, Chen; Zhen, Xu; Jibing, Chen; Xiang, Lv; Lingling, Zhang; Depei, Liu

    2013-11-01

    It has been proposed that the stalling of the replication forks can induce homologous recombination in several organisms, and that arrested replication forks may offer nuclease targets, thereby providing a substrate for proteins involved in double-strand repair. In this article, we constructed a plasmid with the potential for transcription-replication collision (TRC), in which DNA replication and RNA transcription occur on the same DNA template simultaneously. Theoretically, transcription will impede DNA replication and increase homologous recombination. To validate this hypothesis, another plasmid was constructed that contained a homologous sequence with the exception of some mutated sites. Co-transfection of these two plasmids into 293T cells resulted in increased recombination frequency. The ratio of these two plasmids also affected the recombination frequency. Moreover, we found high expression levels of RAD51, which indicated that the increase in the recombination rate was probably via the homologous recombination pathway. These results indicate that mutant genes in plasmids can be repaired by TRC-induced recombination.

  5. Assortative mating for fitness and the evolution of recombination.

    PubMed

    Blachford, Alistair; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2006-07-01

    To understand selection on recombination, we need to consider how linkage disequilibria develop and how recombination alters these disequilibria. Any factor that affects the development of disequilibria, including nonrandom mating, can potentially change selection on recombination. Assortative mating is known to affect linkage disequilibria but its effects on the evolution of recombination have not been previously studied. Given that assortative mating for fitness can arise indirectly via a number of biologically realistic scenarios, it is plausible that weak assortative mating occurs across a diverse set of taxa. Using a modifier model, we examine how assortative mating for fitness affects the evolution of recombination under two evolutionary scenarios: selective sweeps and mutation-selection balance. We find there is no net effect of assortative mating during a selective sweep. In contrast, assortative mating could have a large effect on recombination when deleterious alleles are maintained at mutation-selection balance but only if assortative mating is sufficiently strong. Upon considering reasonable values for the number of loci affecting fitness components, the strength of selection, and the mutation rate, we conclude that the correlation in fitness between mates is unlikely to be sufficiently high for assortative mating to affect the evolution of recombination in most species.

  6. Homologous Recombination between Autonomously Replicating Plasmids in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ayares, David; Spencer, James; Schwartz, Faina; Morse, Brian; Kucherlapati, Raju

    1985-01-01

    The ability of autonomously replicating plasmids to recombine in mammalian cells was investigated. Two deletion plasmids of the eukaryotic-prokaryotic shuttle vector pSV2neo were cotransfected into transformed monkey COS cells. Examination of the low molecular weight DNA isolated after 48 hr of incubation revealed that recombination between the plasmids had occurred. The DNA was also used to transform recA- E. coli. Yield of neo R colonies signified homologous recombination. Examination of the plasmid DNA from these colonies confirmed this view. Double-strand breaks in one or both of the input plasmids at the sites of deletion resulted in an enhancement of recombination frequency. The recombination process yielded monomeric and dimeric molecules. Examination of these molecules revealed that reciprocal recombination as well as gene conversion events were involved in the generation of plasmids bearing an intact neo gene. The COS cell system we describe is analogous to study of bacteriophage recombination and yeast random-spore analysis. PMID:2996980

  7. Selective maintenance of recombination between the sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Otto, S P

    2014-07-01

    A hallmark of many sex chromosomes is the dramatically reduced rate of recombination between them in the heterogametic sex (e.g. between the X and Y). Sexually antagonistic selection is thought to be the main selective driver of this reduced recombination, with tighter linkage strengthening the association between alleles favourable to females and the X, as well as alleles favourable to males and the Y. Nevertheless, many sex chromosomes retain substantial levels of recombination over millions of years, and some old sex chromosomes remain homomorphic with few signs of recombination suppression and the chromosomal degradation expected to follow. This paper explores the selective factors that can maintain recombination between the sex chromosomes. Specifically, by analysing the dynamics of genes that modify the rate of recombination, I present results demonstrating that certain forms of selection - all involving overdominance in males - can positively maintain recombination in the pseudo-autosomal region. To understand these cases, one has to revise our standard view of sexual antagonistic selection as involving two partners (males and females) to three partners (the X in females, the X in males and the Y).

  8. A Glance at Recombination Hotspots in the Domestic Cat.

    PubMed

    Alhaddad, Hasan; Zhang, Chi; Rannala, Bruce; Lyons, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    Recombination has essential roles in increasing genetic variability within a population and in ensuring successful meiotic events. The objective of this study is to (i) infer the population-scaled recombination rate (ρ), and (ii) identify and characterize regions of increased recombination rate for the domestic cat, Felis silvestris catus. SNPs (n = 701) were genotyped in twenty-two East Asian feral cats (random bred). The SNPs covered ten different chromosomal regions (A1, A2, B3, C2, D1, D2, D4, E2, F2, X) with an average region size of 850 Kb and an average SNP density of 70 SNPs/region. The Bayesian method in the program inferRho was used to infer regional population recombination rates and hotspots localities. The regions exhibited variable population recombination rates and four decisive recombination hotspots were identified on cat chromosome A2, D1, and E2 regions. As a description of the identified hotspots, no correlation was detected between the GC content and the locality of recombination spots, and the hotspots enclosed L2 LINE elements and MIR and tRNA-Lys SINE elements.

  9. Phylogenetic and Recombination Analysis of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jisuk; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) severely damages and reduces the yield of many economically important plants worldwide. In this study, we determined the whole-genome sequences of 10 TSWV isolates recently identified from various regions and hosts in Korea. Phylogenetic analysis of these 10 isolates as well as the three previously sequenced isolates indicated that the 13 Korean TSWV isolates could be divided into two groups reflecting either two different origins or divergences of Korean TSWV isolates. In addition, the complete nucleotide sequences for the 13 Korean TSWV isolates along with previously sequenced TSWV RNA segments from Korea and other countries were subjected to phylogenetic and recombination analysis. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that both the RNA L and RNA M segments of most Korean isolates might have originated in Western Europe and North America but that the RNA S segments for all Korean isolates might have originated in China and Japan. Recombination analysis identified a total of 12 recombination events among all isolates and segments and five recombination events among the 13 Korea isolates; among the five recombinants from Korea, three contained the whole RNA L segment, suggesting reassortment rather than recombination. Our analyses provide evidence that both recombination and reassortment have contributed to the molecular diversity of TSWV. PMID:23696821

  10. A Glance at Recombination Hotspots in the Domestic Cat

    PubMed Central

    Alhaddad, Hasan; Zhang, Chi; Rannala, Bruce; Lyons, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination has essential roles in increasing genetic variability within a population and in ensuring successful meiotic events. The objective of this study is to (i) infer the population-scaled recombination rate (ρ), and (ii) identify and characterize regions of increased recombination rate for the domestic cat, Felis silvestris catus. SNPs (n = 701) were genotyped in twenty-two East Asian feral cats (random bred). The SNPs covered ten different chromosomal regions (A1, A2, B3, C2, D1, D2, D4, E2, F2, X) with an average region size of 850 Kb and an average SNP density of 70 SNPs/region. The Bayesian method in the program inferRho was used to infer regional population recombination rates and hotspots localities. The regions exhibited variable population recombination rates and four decisive recombination hotspots were identified on cat chromosome A2, D1, and E2 regions. As a description of the identified hotspots, no correlation was detected between the GC content and the locality of recombination spots, and the hotspots enclosed L2 LINE elements and MIR and tRNA-Lys SINE elements. PMID:26859385

  11. Monte Carlo Simulations of the Inside Intron Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebrat, Stanisław; PȨKALSKI, Andrzej; Scharf, Fabian

    Biological genomes are divided into coding and non-coding regions. Introns are non-coding parts within genes, while the remaining non-coding parts are intergenic sequences. To study evolutionary significance of the inside intron recombination we have used two models based on the Monte Carlo method. In our computer simulations we have implemented the internal structure of genes by declaring the probability of recombination between exons. One situation when inside intron recombination is advantageous is recovering functional genes by combining proper exons dispersed in the genetic pool of the population after a long period without selection for the function of the gene. Populations have to pass through the bottleneck, then. These events are rather rare and we have expected that there should be other phenomena giving profits from the inside intron recombination. In fact we have found that inside intron recombination is advantageous only in the case when after recombination, besides the recombinant forms, parental haplotypes are available and selection is set already on gametes.

  12. Allelic exchange in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with long linear recombination substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, V; Pavelka, M S; Bardarov, S S; Martin, J; Weisbrod, T R; McAdam, R A; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1996-01-01

    Genetic studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been greatly hampered by the inability to introduce specific chromosomal mutations. Whereas the ability to perform allelic exchanges has provided a useful method of gene disruption in other organisms, in the clinically important species of mycobacteria, such as M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis, similar approaches have thus far been unsuccessful. In this communication, we report the development of a shuttle mutagenesis strategy that involves the use of long linear recombination substrates to reproducibly obtain recombinants by allelic exchange in M. tuberculosis. Long linear recombination substrates, approximately 40 to 50 kb in length, were generated by constructing libraries in the excisable cosmid vector pYUB328. The cosmid vector could be readily excised from the recombinant cosmids by digestion with PacI, a restriction endonuclease for which there exist few, if any, sites in mycobacterial genomes. A cosmid containing the mycobacterial leuD gene was isolated, and a selectable marker conferring resistance to kanamycin was inserted into the leuD gene in the recombinant cosmid by interplasmid recombination in Escherichia coli. A long linear recombination substrate containing the insertionally mutated leuD gene was generated by PacI digestion. Electroporation of this recombination substrate containing the insertionally mutated leuD allele resulted in the generation of leucine auxotrophic mutants by homologous recombination in 6% of the kanamycin-resistant transformants for both the Erdman and H37Rv strains of M. tuberculosis. The ability to perform allelic exchanges provides an important approach for investigating the biology of this pathogen as well as developing new live-cell M. tuberculosis-based vaccines. PMID:8550428

  13. The Contribution of Genetic Recombination to CRISPR Array Evolution.

    PubMed

    Kupczok, Anne; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2015-06-16

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a microbial immune system against foreign DNA. Recognition sequences (spacers) encoded within the CRISPR array mediate the immune reaction in a sequence-specific manner. The known mechanisms for the evolution of CRISPR arrays include spacer acquisition from foreign DNA elements at the time of invasion and array erosion through spacer deletion. Here, we consider the contribution of genetic recombination between homologous CRISPR arrays to the evolution of spacer repertoire. Acquisition of spacers from exogenic arrays via recombination may confer the recipient with immunity against unencountered antagonists. For this purpose, we develop a novel method for the detection of recombination in CRISPR arrays by modeling the spacer order in arrays from multiple strains from the same species. Because the evolutionary signal of spacer recombination may be similar to that of pervasive spacer deletions or independent spacer acquisition, our method entails a robustness analysis of the recombination inference by a statistical comparison to resampled and perturbed data sets. We analyze CRISPR data sets from four bacterial species: two Gammaproteobacteria species harboring CRISPR type I and two Streptococcus species harboring CRISPR type II loci. We find that CRISPR array evolution in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus agalactiae can be explained solely by vertical inheritance and differential spacer deletion. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we find an excess of single spacers potentially incorporated into the CRISPR locus during independent acquisition events. In Streptococcus thermophilus, evidence for spacer acquisition by recombination is present in 5 out of 70 strains. Genetic recombination has been proposed to accelerate adaptation by combining beneficial mutations that arose in independent lineages. However, for most species under study, we find that CRISPR evolution is shaped mainly by spacer acquisition and

  14. Widespread homologous recombination within and between Streptomyces species.

    PubMed

    Doroghazi, James R; Buckley, Daniel H

    2010-09-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is widespread in the microbial world, but its impact on the origin and persistence of microbial species remains poorly defined. HGT can result in either acquisition of new genetic material or homologous replacement of existing genes. The evolutionary significance of homologous recombination in a population can be quantified by examining the relative rates at which polymorphisms are introduced from recombination (rho) and mutation (theta(w)). We used multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) to quantify both intraspecies and interspecies homologous recombination among streptomycetes, multicellular Gram-positive bacteria ubiquitous in soil, which are an important source of antibiotics and bioactive compounds. Intraspecies recombination was examined using strains of Streptomyces flavogriseus isolated from soils at five locations spanning 1000 km. The strains had >99.8% nucleotide identity across the loci examined. We found remarkable levels of gene exchange within S. flavogriseus (rho/theta(w)=27.9), and found that the population was in linkage equilibrium (standardized index of association=0.0018), providing evidence for a freely recombining sexual population structure. We also examined interspecies homologous recombination among different Streptomyces species in an MLSA data set and found that 40% of the species had housekeeping genes acquired through HGT. The recombination rate between these named species (rho/theta(w)=0.21) exceeds that observed within many species of bacteria. Despite widespread gene exchange in the genus, the intraspecies recombination rate exceeded the interspecies rate by two orders of magnitude suggesting that patterns of gene exchange and recombination may shape the evolution of streptomycetes.

  15. Dissociative recombination and the decay of a molecular ultracold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennick, C. J.; Saquet, N.; Morrison, J. P.; Ortega-Arroyo, J.; Godin, P.; Fu, L.; Schulz-Weiling, M.; Grant, E. R.

    2011-07-01

    Double-resonant photoexcitation of nitric oxide in a molecular beam creates a dense ensemble of 51f(2) Rydberg states, which evolves to form a plasma of free electrons trapped in the potential well of an NO+ spacecharge. The plasma travels at the velocity of the molecular beam, and, on passing through a grounded grid, yields an electron time-of-flight signal that gauges the plasma size and quantity of trapped electrons. This plasma expands at a rate that fits with an electron temperature as low as 5 K. Dissociative recombination of NO+ ions with electrons provides the primary dissipation mechanism for the plasma. We have identified three dissociation pathways, and quantified their relative contributions to the measured rate: Two-body dissociative recombination competes with direct three-body recombination to neutral dissociation products, and with a process in which three-body recombination and electron-impact ionization form an equilibrium population of high-Rydberg states that decays by predissociation. Using available collision-theory rate constants for three-body recombination and ionization, together with quantum mechanical estimates of predissociation rates, we predict that the relaxation of the plasma to a high-Rydberg equilibrium outpaces direct three-body dissociative recombination, and, among second-order processes, the rate of two-body electron-cation dissociative recombination substantially exceeds the rate at which the high-Rydberg equilibrium dissociatively relaxes. The rate constant for dissociative recombination extracted from these data conforms with predictions drawn from theory for isolated electron-ion collisions. Methods based on the dissipation of molecular ultracold plasmas may provide a means for estimating rates of dissociative recombination for a variety of complex molecules.

  16. Recombination characteristics of therapeutic ion beams on ion chamber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Matsuyama, Tetsuharu; Sato, Shinji; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    In heavy ion radiotherapy, ionization chambers are regarded as a standard for determining the absorbed dose given to patients. In ion dosimetry, it is necessary to correct the radiation quality, which depends on the initial recombination effect. This study reveals for the radiation quality dependence of the initial recombination in air in ion dosimetry. Ionization charge was measured for the beams of protons at 40-160 MeV, carbon at 21-400 MeV/n, and iron at 23.5-500 MeV/n using two identical parallel-plate ionization chambers placed in series along the beam axis. The downstream chamber was used as a monitor operated with a constant applied voltage, while the other chamber was used for recombination measurement by changing the voltage. The ratio of the ionization charge measured by the two ionization chambers showed a linear relationship with the inverse of the voltage in the high-voltage region. The initial recombination factor was estimated by extrapolating the obtained linear relationship to infinite voltage. The extent of the initial recombination was found to increase with decreasing incident energy or increasing atomic number of the beam. This behavior can be explained with an amorphous track structure model: the increase of ionization density in the core region of the track due to decreasing kinetic energy or increasing atomic number leads to denser initial ion production and results in a higher recombination probability. For therapeutic carbon ion beams, the extent of the initial recombination was not constant but changed by 0.6% even in the target region. This tendency was quantitatively well reproduced with the track-structure based on the initial recombination model; however, the transitional change in the track structure is considered to play an important role in further understanding of the characteristics of the initial recombination.

  17. Sortase-catalyzed in vitro functionalization of a HER2-specific recombinant Fab for tumor targeting of the plant cytotoxin gelonin

    PubMed Central

    Kornberger, Petra; Skerra, Arne

    2014-01-01

    We report on the preparation of a new type of immunotoxin via in vitro ligation of the αHer2 antigen binding fragment (Fab) of the clinically-validated antibody trastuzumab to the plant toxin gelonin, employing catalysis by the bacterial enzyme sortase A (SrtA). The αHer2 Fab was fused with the extended SrtA recognition motif LPET↓GLEH6 at the C-terminus of its heavy chain, thereby preventing interference with antigen binding, while the toxin was equipped with a Gly2 sequence at its N-terminus, distant to the catalytically active site in the C-terminal region. Site-specific in vitro transpeptidation led to a novel antibody-toxin conjugate wherein gelonin had effectively replaced the Fc region of a conventional (monomerized) immunoglobulin. After optimization of reaction conditions and incubation time, the resulting Fab-Gelonin ligation product was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure by means of Strep-Tactin affinity chromatography—utilizing the Strep-tag II appended to gelonin—and size exclusion chromatography. Binding activity of the immunotoxin for the Her2 ectodomain was indistinguishable from the unligated Fab as measured by real-time surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Specific cytotoxic potency of Fab-Gelonin was demonstrated against two Her2-positive cell lines, resulting in EC50 values of ~1 nM or lower, indicating a 1000-fold enhanced cell-killing activity compared with gelonin itself. Thus, our strategy provides a convenient route to the modular construction of functional immunotoxins from Fabs of established tumor-specific antibodies with gelonin or related proteotoxins, also avoiding the elevated biosafety levels that would be mandatory for the direct biotechnological preparation of corresponding fusion proteins. PMID:24492291

  18. Sortase-catalyzed in vitro functionalization of a HER2-specific recombinant Fab for tumor targeting of the plant cytotoxin gelonin.

    PubMed

    Kornberger, Petra; Skerra, Arne

    2014-01-01

    We report on the preparation of a new type of immunotoxin via in vitro ligation of the αHer2 antigen binding fragment (Fab) of the clinically-validated antibody trastuzumab to the plant toxin gelonin, employing catalysis by the bacterial enzyme sortase A (SrtA). The αHer2 Fab was fused with the extended SrtA recognition motif LPET↓GLEH 6 at the C-terminus of its heavy chain, thereby preventing interference with antigen binding, while the toxin was equipped with a Gly 2 sequence at its N-terminus, distant to the catalytically active site in the C-terminal region. Site-specific in vitro transpeptidation led to a novel antibody-toxin conjugate wherein gelonin had effectively replaced the Fc region of a conventional (monomerized) immunoglobulin. After optimization of reaction conditions and incubation time, the resulting Fab-Gelonin ligation product was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure by means of Strep-Tactin affinity chromatography--utilizing the Strep-tag II appended to gelonin--and size exclusion chromatography. Binding activity of the immunotoxin for the Her2 ectodomain was indistinguishable from the unligated Fab as measured by real-time surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Specific cytotoxic potency of Fab-Gelonin was demonstrated against two Her2-positive cell lines, resulting in EC 50 values of ~1 nM or lower, indicating a 1000-fold enhanced cell-killing activity compared with gelonin itself. Thus, our strategy provides a convenient route to the modular construction of functional immunotoxins from Fabs of established tumor-specific antibodies with gelonin or related proteotoxins, also avoiding the elevated biosafety levels that would be mandatory for the direct biotechnological preparation of corresponding fusion proteins.

  19. Dynamics of carrier recombination in a semiconductor laser structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhioev, R. I. Kavokin, K. V.; Kusrayev, Yu. G.; Poletaev, N. K.

    2015-11-15

    Carrier-recombination dynamics is studied by the method of optical orientation at room temperature in the active layer of a laser diode structure. The dependence of the degree of electron-spin orientation on the excitation density is attributed to saturation of the nonradiative-recombination channel. The time of electron capture at recombination centers is determined to be τ{sub e} = 5 × 10{sup –9} s. The temperature of nonequilibrium electrons heated by a He–Ne laser is estimated.

  20. Interference in the recombination of frequency-entangled photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Kevin A.; Garces, Veneranda G.

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental studies of the recombination of frequency-entangled photon pairs into single photons in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal. With a delay ? between pair members, the measured rate of pair recombination ? presents a width of 25.6 fsec. It is observed that, depending on experimental conditions, ? can contain interference fringes that arise from the spatial correlations of the photon pairs. In particular, these correlations imply that each photon of a pair interferes with itself in the experiment before pair recombination, leading to the fringes in ?. A theoretical model is developed that provides favorable comparisons with the experimental results.

  1. Detection of interstellar recombination lines from emitters of intermediate mass.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaisson, E. J.; Black, J. H.; Dupree, A. K.; Cesarsky, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The 18-cm microwave spectra of Orion B and W3A show evidence of an emission feature to the high-frequency side of the carbon recombination line. Observations at different frequencies establish that this feature results from electronic recombination. In addition, theoretical considerations, results of 21-cm observations, and computer-simulated spectra suggest that the new feature originates in a predominantly neutral hydrogen region and can be explained by a superposition of recombination lines from any or all of the following elements: Mg-24, Si-28, S-32, and Fe-56.

  2. [Recombinant Antibodies and Their Employment in Cancer Therapy].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2015-01-01

    Development of recombinant therapeutic antibodies is recently one of the fastest growing disciplines of applied biomedical research. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies are increasingly applied in biological therapy of many serious human diseases and are currently an irreplaceable part of a comprehensive cancer therapy. First mouse therapeutic antibodies had only limited applicability due to the strong immune response; however, technological advances enabled engineering of antibodies with increased specificity and efficacy, and on the other hand with reduced adverse effects due to lower antigenicity. This review provides a summary of knowledge about recombinant therapeutic antibodies, their mechanism of action and approaches how to improve their efficacy.

  3. Further corrections to the theory of cosmological recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1990-01-01

    Krolik (1989) pointed out that frequency redistribution due to scattering is more important than cosmological expansion in determining the Ly-alpha frequency profile during cosmological recombination, and that its effects substantially modify the rate of recombination. Although the first statement is true, the second statement is not: a basic symmetry of photon scattering leads to identical cancellations which almost completely erase the effects of both coherent and incoherent scattering. Only a small correction due to atomic recoil alters the line profile from the prediction of pure cosmological expansion, so that the pace of cosmological recombination can be well approximated by ignoring Ly-alpha scattering.

  4. General features of the dissociative recombination of polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, S. T.; Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss some aspects of a simple expression for the low-energy dissociative recombination cross section that applies when the recombination process is dominated by the indirect mechanism. In most previous applications, this expression has been applied to capture into vibrationally excited Rydberg states with the assumption that capture is always followed by prompt dissociation. Here we consider the dissociative recombination of larger polyatomic ions and electrons. More specifically, we consider capture into electronically core-excited Rydberg states, and begin to assess its potential importance for larger systems.

  5. Mean recombination time of diffusion controlled geminate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mozumder, A.

    1982-05-15

    A recently introduced method by Deutch for determining the mean passage time for diffusion controlled processes (J. Chem. Phys. 73, 4700 (1980)) has been further developed for application to the reactions of geminate pairs. First, a nonzero probability of escaping geminate recombination requires a normalized definition of mean recombination time which is done consistently. Second, only a finite dose results in a finite mean reaction time. Adopting a special outer boundary condition related to the dose, mean recombination times are calculated for ionic and neutral geminate reactions. For application in radiation- and photochemistry, fully and partially diffusion controlled conditions are applied to ionic and neutral cases, respectively.

  6. Determination of surface recombination velocity in heavily doped silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, M.; Gatos, H. C.; Actor, G.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed and successfully tested for the determination of the effective surface recombination velocity of silicon layers doped by diffusion of phosphorus to a level of 10 to the 19th to 10 to the 21st per cu cm. The effective recombination velocity was obtained from the dependence of the electron-beam-induced current on the penetration of the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope. A special silicon diode was constructed which permitted the collection at the p-n junction of the carriers excited by the electron beam. This diode also permitted the study of the effects of surface preparation on the effective surface recombination velocity.

  7. General features of the dissociative recombination of polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, S. T.; Jungen, Ch.; Schneider, I. F.; Dulieu, O.; Robert, J.

    2015-01-29

    We discuss some aspects of a simple expression for the low-energy dissociative recombination cross section that applies when the recombination process is dominated by the indirect mechanism. In most previous applications, this expression has been applied to capture into vibrationally excited Rydberg states with the assumption that capture is always followed by prompt dissociation. Here we consider the dissociative recombination of larger polyatomic ions and electrons. More specifically, we consider capture into electronically core-excited Rydberg states, and begin to assess its potential importance for larger systems.

  8. Precise genome editing by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Hoshijima, K.; Jurynec, M.J.; Grunwald, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods are presented for creating precise modifications of the zebrafish genome. Edited alleles are generated by homologous recombination between the host genome and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) donor molecules, stimulated by the induction of double-strand breaks at targeted loci in the host genome. Because several kilobase-long tracts of sequence can be exchanged, multiple genome modifications can be generated simultaneously at a single locus. Methods are described for creating: (1) alleles with simple sequence changes or in-frame additions, (2) knockin/knockout alleles that express a reporter protein from an endogenous locus, and (3) conditional alleles in which exons are flanked by recombinogenic loxP sites. Significantly, our approach to genome editing allows the incorporation of a linked reporter gene into the donor sequences so that successfully edited alleles can be identified by virtue of expression of the reporter. Factors affecting the efficiency of genome editing are discussed, including the finding that dsDNA products of I-SceI meganuclease enzyme digestion are particularly effective as donor molecules for gene-editing events. Reagents and procedures are described for accomplishing efficient genome editing in the zebrafish. PMID:27443923

  9. Overview of the Purification of Recombinant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    When the first version of this unit was written in 1995 protein purification of recombinant proteins was based on a variety of standard chromatographic methods and approaches many of which were described and mentioned in this unit and elsewhere in the book. In the interim there has been a shift towards an almost universal usage of the affinity or fusion tag. This may not be the case for biotechnology manufacture where affinity tags can complicate producing proteins under regulatory conditions. Regardless of the protein expression system, questions are asked as to which and how many affinity tags to use, where to attach them in the protein and whether to engineer a self cleavage system or simply leave them on. We will briefly address some of these issues. Also although this overview focuses on E.coli, protein expression and purification from the other commonly used expression systems are mentioned and apart from cell breakage methods, the protein purification methods and strategies are essentially the same. PMID:25829302

  10. HSV Recombinant Vectors for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manservigi, Roberto; Argnani, Rafaela; Marconi, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The very deep knowledge acquired on the genetics and molecular biology of herpes simplex virus (HSV), has allowed the development of potential replication-competent and replication-defective vectors for several applications in human healthcare. These include delivery and expression of human genes to cells of the nervous systems, selective destruction of cancer cells, prophylaxis against infection with HSV or other infectious diseases, and targeted infection to specific tissues or organs. Replication-defective recombinant vectors are non-toxic gene transfer tools that preserve most of the neurotropic features of wild type HSV-1, particularly the ability to express genes after having established latent infections, and are thus proficient candidates for therapeutic gene transfer settings in neurons. A replication-defective HSV vector for the treatment of pain has recently entered in phase 1 clinical trial. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are becoming a suitable and powerful tool to eradicate brain tumours due to their ability to replicate and spread only within the tumour mass, and have reached phase II/III clinical trials in some cases. The progress in understanding the host immune response induced by the vector is also improving the use of HSV as a vaccine vector against both HSV infection and other pathogens. This review briefly summarizes the obstacle encountered in the delivery of HSV vectors and examines the various strategies developed or proposed to overcome such challenges. PMID:20835362

  11. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukic, D. V.; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Sprenger, F.; Lestinsky, M.; Wolf, A.

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show rich spectra of X-ray absorption lines. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between approx. 15-17 A. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Currently, laboratory measurements of low temperature DR can only be performed at storage rings. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling and to benchmark theoretical DR calculations. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR of Fe XIV forming Fe XIII.

  12. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukic, D. V.; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Sprenger, F.; Lestinsky, M.; Wolf, A.

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show rich spectra of X-ray absorption lines. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between ˜ 15-17 Å. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Currently, laboratory measurements of low temperature DR can only be performed at storage rings. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling and to benchmark theoretical DR calculations. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR of Fe XIV forming Fe XIII.

  13. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  14. Precise genome editing by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Hoshijima, K; Jurynec, M J; Grunwald, D J

    2016-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods are presented for creating precise modifications of the zebrafish genome. Edited alleles are generated by homologous recombination between the host genome and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) donor molecules, stimulated by the induction of double-strand breaks at targeted loci in the host genome. Because several kilobase-long tracts of sequence can be exchanged, multiple genome modifications can be generated simultaneously at a single locus. Methods are described for creating: (1) alleles with simple sequence changes or in-frame additions, (2) knockin/knockout alleles that express a reporter protein from an endogenous locus, and (3) conditional alleles in which exons are flanked by recombinogenic loxP sites. Significantly, our approach to genome editing allows the incorporation of a linked reporter gene into the donor sequences so that successfully edited alleles can be identified by virtue of expression of the reporter. Factors affecting the efficiency of genome editing are discussed, including the finding that dsDNA products of I-SceI meganuclease enzyme digestion are particularly effective as donor molecules for gene-editing events. Reagents and procedures are described for accomplishing efficient genome editing in the zebrafish.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of recombinant follicle stimulating hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, B. H.; Bloemendal, M.; Mulders, J. W. M.; Hadden, J. M.; Chapman, D.; Van Stokkum, I. H. M.; Van Grondelle, R.

    1996-09-01

    Recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (recFSH, Org. 32489) has been characterized by absorption (UV and IR), (polarized) fluorescence, linear-dichroism (LD) and circular-dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Absorption and fluorescence spectra of the isolated subunits have also been measured. From the spectra the extinction coefficient, fluorescence quantum yield and anisotropy have been calculated. Global analysis is used to characterize the bands in the spectra. The adsorption, CD, LD and fluorescence excitation spectra all contain a band around 300 nm that appears to be a sensitive indicator for the intactness of the protein. Evidence is provided for the involvement of tyrosinate in the fluorescence, and for a close contact between the tryptophan (in the β subunit) with at least one tyrosine of the α subunit. The overall secondary structure of recFSH has been determined from its far-UV CD and its IR absorption spectrum. The secondary structure of recFSH is estimated to contain 15-25% α-helix, 15-25% β-turn and 30-40% β-sheet. The β-sheet in recFSH is almost exclusively antiparallel. The results confirm that recFSH contains significantly more α-helix than the closed related human glycoproteins, chorionic gonadotropin and lutropin; however, the α-helices may be short and distorted.

  16. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  17. Therapeutic Use of Native and Recombinant Enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Ylä-Pelto, Jani; Tripathi, Lav; Susi, Petri

    2016-02-23

    Research on human enteroviruses has resulted in the identification of more than 100 enterovirus types, which use more than 10 protein receptors and/or attachment factors required in cell binding and initiation of the replication cycle. Many of these "viral" receptors are overexpressed in cancer cells. Receptor binding and the ability to replicate in specific target cells define the tropism and pathogenesis of enterovirus types, because cellular infection often results in cytolytic response, i.e., disruption of the cells. Viral tropism and cytolytic properties thus make native enteroviruses prime candidates for oncolytic virotherapy. Copy DNA cloning and modification of enterovirus genomes have resulted in the generation of enterovirus vectors with properties that are useful in therapy or in vaccine trials where foreign antigenic epitopes are expressed from or on the surface of the vector virus. The small genome size and compact particle structure, however, set limits to enterovirus genome modifications. This review focuses on the therapeutic use of native and recombinant enteroviruses and the methods that have been applied to modify enterovirus genomes for therapy.

  18. Phosphorylation of Recombinant Tristetraprolin in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Heping; Lin, Rui

    2009-01-01

    Tristetraprolin/zinc finger protein 36 (TTP/ZFP36) binds and destabilizes some proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs. TTP-deficient mice develop a profound inflammatory syndrome due to excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines. TTP gene expression is induced by various factors including insulin, cinnamon, and green tea extracts. Previous studies have shown that TTP is highly phosphorylated in vivo and multiple phosphorylation sites are identified in human TTP. This study evaluated the potential protein kinases that could phosphorylate recombinant TTP in vitro. Motif scanning suggested that TTP was a potential substrate for various kinases. SDS-PAGE showed that in vitro phosphorylation of TTP with p42 and p38 MAP kinases resulted in visible electrophoretic mobility shift of TTP to higher molecular masses. Autoradiography showed that TTP was phosphorylated in vitro by GSK3b, PKA, PKB, PKC, but not Cdc2, in addition to p42, p38, and JNK. These results demonstrate that TTP is a substrate for a number of protein kinases in vitro. PMID:18071886

  19. Rad54, the Motor of Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Mazin, Alexander V.; Mazina, Olga M.; Bugreev, Dmitry V.; Rossi, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) performs crucial functions including DNA repair, segregation of homologous chromosomes, propagation of genetic diversity, and maintenance of telomeres. HR is responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA interstrand cross-links. The process of HR is initiated at the site of DNA breaks and gaps and involves a search for homologous sequences promoted by Rad51 and auxiliary proteins followed by the subsequent invasion of broken DNA ends into the homologous duplex DNA that then serves as a template for repair. The invasion produces a cross-stranded structure, known as the Holliday junction. Here, we describe the properties of Rad54, an important and versatile HR protein that is evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotes. Rad54 is a motor protein that translocates along dsDNA and performs several important functions in HR. The current review focuses on the recently identified Rad54 activities which contribute to the late phase of HR, especially the branch migration of Holliday junctions. PMID:20089461

  20. Genome-Wide Analyses of Recombination Prone Regions Predict Role of DNA Structural Motif in Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swapan Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2009-01-01

    HapMap findings reveal surprisingly asymmetric distribution of recombinogenic regions. Short recombinogenic regions (hotspots) are interspersed between large relatively non-recombinogenic regions. This raises the interesting possibility of DNA sequence and/or other cis- elements as determinants of recombination. We hypothesized the involvement of non-canonical sequences that can result in local non-B DNA structures and tested this using the G-quadruplex DNA as a model. G-quadruplex or G4 DNA is a unique form of four-stranded non-B DNA structure that engages certain G-rich sequences, presence of such motifs has been noted within telomeres. In support of this hypothesis, genome-wide computational analyses presented here reveal enrichment of potential G4 (PG4) DNA forming sequences within 25618 human hotspots relative to 9290 coldspots (p<0.0001). Furthermore, co-occurrence of PG4 DNA within several short sequence elements that are associated with recombinogenic regions was found to be significantly more than randomly expected. Interestingly, analyses of more than 50 DNA binding factors revealed that co-occurrence of PG4 DNA with target DNA binding sites of transcription factors c-Rel, NF-kappa B (p50 and p65) and Evi-1 was significantly enriched in recombination-prone regions. These observations support involvement of G4 DNA in recombination, predicting a functional model that is consistent with duplex-strand separation induced by formation of G4 motifs in supercoiled DNA and/or when assisted by other cellular factors. PMID:19198658

  1. Auger recombination in sodium-iodide scintillators from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Andrew; Åberg, Daniel; Schleife, André; Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2015-04-01

    Scintillator radiation detectors suffer from low energy resolution that has been attributed to non-linear light yield response to the energy of the incident gamma rays. Auger recombination is a key non-radiative recombination channel that scales with the third power of the excitation density and may play a role in the non-proportionality problem of scintillators. In this work, we study direct and phonon-assisted Auger recombination in NaI using first-principles calculations. Our results show that phonon-assisted Auger recombination, mediated primarily by short-range phonon scattering, dominates at room temperature. We discuss our findings in light of the much larger values obtained by numerical fits to z-scan experiments.

  2. Modulation of meiotic homologous recombination by DNA helicases.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander

    2016-12-08

    DNA helicases are ATP-driven motor proteins which translocate along DNA capable of dismantling DNA-DNA interactions and/or removing proteins bound to DNA. These biochemical capabilities make DNA helicases main regulators of crucial DNA metabolic processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and genetic recombination. This budding topic will focus on reviewing the function of DNA helicases important for homologous recombination during meiosis, and discuss recent advances in how these modulators of meiotic recombination are themselves regulated. The emphasis is placed on work in the two model yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which has vastly expanded our understanding of meiotic homologous recombination, a process whose correct execution is instrumental for healthy gamete formation, and thus functioning sexual reproduction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Iron ionization and recombination rates and ionization equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, M.; Raymond, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the past few years important progress has been made on the knowledge of ionization and recombination rates of iron, an astrophysically abundant heavy element and a major impurity in laboratory fusion devices. We make a critical review of the existing data on ionization and dielectronic recombination and present new computations of radiative recombination rate coefficients of Fe(+14) through Fe(+25) using the photoionization cross sections of Clark et al. (1986). We provide analytical fits to the recommended data (direct ionization and excitation-autoionization cross sections; radiative and dielectronic recombination rate coefficients). Finally we determine the iron ionic fractions at ionization equilibrium and compare them with previous computations as well as with observational data.

  4. Nonradiative recombination of excitons in semimagnetic quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Chernenko, A. V.

    2015-12-15

    The mechanisms of the nonradiative recombination of excitons in neutral and charged quantum dots based on II–VI semimagnetic semiconductors are investigated. It is shown that, along with the dipole–dipole and direct-exchange mechanisms, there is one more mechanism referred to as the indirect-exchange mechanism and related to sp–d mixing. The selection rules for nonradiative recombination by exchange mechanisms are subsequently derived. The dependence of the efficiency of all recombination mechanisms on the quantum-dot size is studied. The experimentally observed growth in the intracenter photoluminescence intensity with decreasing size of dots and nanocrystals is accounted for. Methods for experimental determination of the contributions of different mechanisms to nonradiative recombination are discussed.

  5. Auger recombination in sodium-iodide scintillators from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, Andrew; Åberg, Daniel; Schleife, André; Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2015-04-06

    Scintillator radiation detectors suffer from low energy resolution that has been attributed to non-linear light yield response to the energy of the incident gamma rays. Auger recombination is a key non-radiative recombination channel that scales with the third power of the excitation density and may play a role in the non-proportionality problem of scintillators. In this work, we study direct and phonon-assisted Auger recombination in NaI using first-principles calculations. Our results show that phonon-assisted Auger recombination, mediated primarily by short-range phonon scattering, dominates at room temperature. We discuss our findings in light of the much larger values obtained by numerical fits to z-scan experiments.

  6. Effect Of Auger Recombination In An Ion Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents theoretical calculations of contribution of Auger recombination to depletion of charge carriers from ionization track left by passage of energetic heavy ion through silicon-based electronic device.

  7. A phylogenetic survey of recombination frequency in plant RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Chare, E R; Holmes, E C

    2006-05-01

    The severe economic consequences of emerging plant viruses highlights the importance of studies of plant virus evolution. One question of particular relevance is the extent to which the genomes of plant viruses are shaped by recombination. To this end we conducted a phylogenetic survey of recombination frequency in a wide range of positive-sense RNA plant viruses, utilizing 975 capsid gene sequences and 157 complete genome sequences. In total, 12 of the 36 RNA virus species analyzed showed evidence for recombination, comprising 17% of the capsid gene sequence alignments and 44% of the genome sequence alignments. Given the conservative nature of our analysis, we propose that recombination is a relatively common process in some plant RNA viruses, most notably the potyviruses.

  8. Sex influence on recombination frequency in Secale cereale L.

    PubMed

    Benito, C; Romero, M P; Henriques-Gil, N; Llorente, F; Figueiras, A M

    1996-10-01

    The variation in recombination frequency (rf) is important to plant breeders since their major objective is to obtain favorable recombinants of linked genes. One source of variation in rf is sex. Sex differences for recombination frequencies were studied in four of the seven chromosomes of Secale cereale L. cv 'Ailés' using isozyme and storage protein loci and were determined on the basis of reciprocal crosses between heterozygous plants of cv. 'Ailés' and homozygous plants of the inbred line 'Riodeva'. The differences were found to be strongly segmentspecific. In some cases the level of crossing-over in male and female meiosis was about the same (between Pgm1 and Ndh1 loci on chromosome arm 4RS). However, for most of the chromosome segments in 1R, 3RL and 6RL the male rf was significantly higher than the female rf. Different hypotheses about the mechanisms of plant sex differences for recombination are discussed.

  9. Non-Enzymatic Template-Directed Recombination of RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Nechaev, Sergey Y.; Lutay, Alexei V.; Vlassov, Valentin V.; Zenkova, Marina A.

    2009-01-01

    RNA non-enzymatic recombination reactions are of great interest within the hypothesis of the “RNA world”, which argues that at some stage of prebiotic life development proteins were not yet engaged in biochemical reactions and RNA carried out both the information storage task and the full range of catalytic roles necessary in primitive self-replicating systems. Here we report on the study of recombination reaction occuring between two 96 nucleotides (nts) fragments of RNAs under physiological conditions and governed by a short oligodeoxyribonucleotide template, partially complementary to sequences within each of the RNAs. Analysis of recombination products shows that ligation is predominantly template-directed, and occurs within the complementary complex with the template in “butt-to-butt” manner, in 1- or 3- nts bulges or in 2–3 nts internal loops. Minor recombination products formed in the template-independent manner are detected as well. PMID:19468339

  10. Purification of recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant ovalbumin expressed in bacterial host is essentially free from post-translational modifications and can be useful in understanding the structure-function relationship of the protein. In this study, ovalbumin was expressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. Ovalbumin inclusion bodies were solubilized using urea and refolded by decreasing the urea concentration by dilution. Refolded protein was purified by anion exchange chromatography. Overall recovery of purified recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies was about 30% with 98% purity. Purified recombinant ovalbumin was characterized by mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Recombinant ovalbumin was shown to be resistant to trypsin using protease resistance assay. This indicated proper refolding of ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of E. coli. This method provides a simple way of producing ovalbumin free of post-translational modifications.

  11. Paracentric inversions do not normally generate monocentric recombinant chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.; Callen, D.F.; Gardner, R.J.M.

    1995-11-20

    Dr. Pettenati et al. recently reported a review of paracentric inversions in humans in which they concluded that carriers of these have a 3.8% risk of viable offspring with recombinant chromosomes. We are of the view that there are serious problems with this estimate which should be much closer to zero. The only recombinant chromosomes which can be generated by a paracentric inversion undergoing a normal meiotic division are dicentrics and acentric fragments. Only two such cases were found by Pettenati et al. Several of the alleged monocentric recombinants were originally reported as arising from parental insertions (3-break rearrangements) and it is not legitimate to include them in any analysis of paracentric inversions. Any monocentric recombinant chromosome can only arise from a paracentric inversion by some abnormal process which must involve chromatid breakage and reunion. 4 refs.

  12. Meiotic recombination in normal and cloned bulls and their offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homologous chromosome pairing and recombination are essential components of meiosis and sexual reproduction. The reshuffling of genetic material through breakage and reunion of chromatids ensure proper segregation of homologous chromosomes in reduction division and genetic diversity in the progeny....

  13. Dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens using recombinant DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R A; Bloom, B R; Grosskinsky, C M; Ivanyi, J; Thomas, D; Davis, R W

    1985-01-01

    A recombinant DNA strategy has been used systematically to survey the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome for sequences that encode specific antigens detected by monoclonal antibodies. M. tuberculosis genomic DNA fragments with randomly generated endpoints were used to construct a large lambda gt11 recombinant DNA expression library. Sufficient numbers of recombinants were produced to contain inserts whose endpoints occur at nearly every base pair in the pathogen genome. Protein antigens specified by linear segments of pathogen DNA and produced by the recombinant phage of Escherichia coli were screened with monoclonal antibody probes. This approach was coupled with an improved detection method for gene isolation using antibodies to clonally isolate DNA sequences that specify polypeptide components of M. tuberculosis. The methodology described here, which is applicable to other pathogens, offers possibilities for the development of more sensitive and specific immunodiagnostic and seroepidemiological tests for tuberculosis and, ultimately, for the development of more effective vaccines. Images PMID:2581251

  14. Break-induced replication and recombinational telomere elongation in yeast.

    PubMed

    McEachern, Michael J; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    When a telomere becomes unprotected or if only one end of a chromosomal double-strand break succeeds in recombining with a template sequence, DNA can be repaired by a recombination-dependent DNA replication process termed break-induced replication (BIR). In budding yeasts, there are two BIR pathways, one dependent on the Rad51 recombinase protein and one Rad51 independent; these two repair processes lead to different types of survivors in cells lacking the telomerase enzyme that is required for normal telomere maintenance. Recombination at telomeres is triggered by either excessive telomere shortening or disruptions in the function of telomere-binding proteins. Telomere elongation by BIR appears to often occur through a "roll and spread" mechanism. In this process, a telomeric circle produced by recombination at a dysfunctional telomere acts as a template for a rolling circle BIR event to form an elongated telomere. Additional BIR events can then copy the elongated sequence to all other telomeres.

  15. Investigation of nonradiative recombination in semiconductors by photothermal displacement spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dersch, H.; Amer, N.M.

    1985-06-01

    The dynamics of nonradiative recombination processes are investigated by measuring the thermal expansion and subsequent displacement of a sample surface caused by the absorption of a modulated laser beam. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Low-energy dissociative recombination in small polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Jungen, Ch; Pratt, S T

    2010-12-07

    Indirect dissociative recombination of low-energy electrons and molecular ions often occurs through capture into vibrationally excited Rydberg states. Properties of vibrational autoionization, the inverse of this capture mechanism, are used to develop some general ideas about the indirect recombination process, and these ideas are illustrated by examples from the literature. In particular, the Δv = -1 propensity rule for vibrational autoionization, i.e., that vibrational autoionization occurs by the minimum energetically allowed change in vibrational quantum numbers, leads to the prediction of thresholds in the dissociative recombination cross sections and rates at the corresponding vibrational thresholds. Capture into rotationally excited Rydberg states is also discussed in terms of recent low-temperature studies of the dissociative recombination of H(3)(+).

  17. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  18. Recombination of open-f-shell tungsten ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, C.; Badnell, N. R.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Wolf, A.

    2017-03-01

    We review experimental and theoretical efforts aimed at a detailed understanding of the recombination of electrons with highly charged tungsten ions characterised by an open 4f sub-shell. Highly charged tungsten occurs as a plasma contaminant in ITER-like tokamak experiments, where it acts as an unwanted cooling agent. Modelling of the charge state populations in a plasma requires reliable thermal rate coefficients for charge-changing electron collisions. The electron recombination of medium-charged tungsten species with open 4f sub-shells is especially challenging to compute reliably. Storage-ring experiments have been conducted that yielded recombination rate coefficients at high energy resolution and well-understood systematics. Significant deviations compared to simplified, but prevalent, computational models have been found. A new class of ab initio numerical calculations has been developed that provides reliable predictions of the total plasma recombination rate coefficients for these ions.

  19. Recombinant Salmonella Bacteria Vectoring HIV/AIDS Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Ruhanya, Vurayai

    2013-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is an important public health problem globally. An affordable, easy-to-deliver and protective HIV vaccine is therefore required to curb the pandemic from spreading further. Recombinant Salmonella bacteria can be harnessed to vector HIV antigens or DNA vaccines to the immune system for induction of specific protective immunity. These are capable of activating the innate, humoral and cellular immune responses at both mucosal and systemic compartments. Several studies have already demonstrated the utility of live recombinant Salmonella in delivering expressed foreign antigens as well as DNA vaccines to the host immune system. This review gives an overview of the studies in which recombinant Salmonella bacteria were used to vector HIV/AIDS antigens and DNA vaccines. Most of the recombinant Salmonella-based HIV/AIDS vaccines developed so far have only been tested in animals (mainly mice) and are yet to reach human trials.

  20. Measurement of recombination in MicroBooNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao; Balasubramanian, Supraja; Yang, Tingjun; MicroBooNE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    MicroBooNE uses the Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) technology to detect neutrino interactions from the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. Traveling through the detector volume, charged particles deposit energy by ionizing the argon and create positive argon ions and electron pairs along their trajectory. The electrons can recombine with an argon ion and reform a neutral atom and, as a result, the measured energy is only a fraction of the total energy lost by the particle. This process is called electron-ion recombination. Understanding this recombination effect is particularly important for performing calorimetry, identifying particle types, and achieving good energy resolution in LAr TPCs. This talk will present the status of MicroBooNE's first recombination measurement obtained with cosmic ray data.

  1. Products of Dissociative Recombination in the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, Philip

    1996-01-01

    SRI International undertook a novel experimental measurement of the product states formed by dissociative recombination (DR) of O2(+), NO(+), and N2(+) as a function of both electron energy and reactant ion vibrational level. For these measurements we used a recently developed experimental technique for measuring dissociation product distributions that allows both the branching ratios to be accurately determined and the electronic and rovibrational state composition of the reactant ions to be specified. DR is the dominant electron loss mechanism in all regions of the ionosphere. In this process, electron attachment to the molecular ion produces an unstable neutral molecule that rapidly dissociates. For a molecular ion such as O2(+), the dissociation recombination reaction is (1) O2(+) + e yields O + O + W. The atomic products of this reaction, in this case two oxygen atoms, can be produced in a variety of excited states and with a variety of kinetic energies, as represented by W in Eq. (1). These atoms are not only active in the neutral chemistry of the ionosphere, but are also especially important because their optical emissions are often used to infer in situ concentrations of the parent molecular ion and ambient electron densities. Many laboratory measurements have been made of DR reaction rates under a wide range of electron temperatures, but very little is known about the actual distributions among the final states of the atomic products. This lack of knowledge seriously limits the validity and effectiveness of efforts to model both natural and man-made ionospheric disturbances. Bates recently identified major deficiencies in the currently accepted branching ratios for O2(+) as they relate to blue and green line emission measurements in the nocturnal F-region. During our two-year effort, we partially satisfied our ambitious goals. We constructed and operated a variable pressure, electron-impact ion source and a high pressure, hollow-cathode discharge ion

  2. Recombinant Protein Production and Insect Cell Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Andrews, Angela D. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using virtually infected or stably transformed insect cells containing a gene encoding the described polypeptide. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  3. Recombinant protein production and insect cell culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas (Inventor); Francis, Karen (Inventor); Andrews, Angela (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using the cultured insect cells as host for a virus encoding the described polypeptide such as baculovirus. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  4. A novel exploratory method for visual recombination detection

    PubMed Central

    Strimmer, Korbinian; Forslund, Kristoffer; Holland, Barbara; Moulton, Vincent

    2003-01-01

    A versatile visual approach for detecting recombination and identifying recombination breakpoints within a sequence alignment is presented. The method is based on two novel diagrams - the highway plot and the occupancy plot - that graphically portray phylogenetic inhomogeneity along an alignment, and can be viewed as a synthesis of two widely used but unrelated methods: bootscanning and quartet-mapping. To illustrate the method, simulated data and HIV-1 and influenza A datasets are investigated. PMID:12734013

  5. Recombination Processes on Low Bandgap Antimonides for Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saroop, Sudesh

    1999-09-01

    Recombination processes in antimonide-based (TPV) devices have been investigated using a technique, in which a Nd-YAG pulsed laser is materials for thermophotovoltaic radio-frequency (RF) photoreflectance used to excite excess carriers and the short-pulse response and photoconductivity decay are monitored with an inductively-coupled non-contacting RF probe. The system has been used to characterize surface and bulk recombination mechanisms in Sb-based materials.

  6. Fixation of Emerging Interviral Recombinants in Cucumber Mosaic Virus Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pita, Justin S.

    2013-01-01

    Interstrain recombinants were observed in the progenies of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) reassortant L1L2F3 containing RNAs 1 and 2 from LS-CMV and RNA 3 from Fny-CMV. We characterized these recombinants, and we found that their fixation was controlled by the nature of the replicating RNAs 1 and 2. We demonstrate that the 2b gene partially affects this fixation process, but only in the context of homologous RNAs 1 and 2. PMID:23115282

  7. Characterization of recombinant β-amylases from Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Koide, Tomojiro; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2011-01-01

    Four putative β-amylase genes found in the Oryza sativa cDNA sequence database (KOME) were expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant proteins from two of these genes showed β-amylase activity. Similarly to β-amylases from other plants, the optimum pH of the recombinant rice β-amylases was about 5.5-6.0, but they exhibited inferior heat stability to soybean β-amylase.

  8. Recombination of H3+ Ions with Electrons in Afterglow Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Rainer; Glosik, Juraj; Dohnal, Petr; Rubovic, Peter; Kalosi, Abel; Plasil, Radek

    2015-09-01

    Our past and ongoing flowing and stationary afterglow experiments at temperatures from 60-340 K have resulted in a more complete picture of the plasma recombination of H3+ ions: (1) Optical absorption studies indicate that at T = 300 K both para and ortho H3+ ions recombine with nearly the same binary coefficient αbin ~ 0.6 × 10-7 cm3/s. However, at T = 60 K para H3+ recombines faster by about a factor of ~10 than does ortho H3+.(2) Earlier discrepancies between data obtained in plasmas and those obtained in merged-beam or storage-rings have been traced to ternary recombination due to ambient helium atoms and/or hydrogen molecules. Ternary recombination of H3+ due to He or H2 is more efficient by factors ~ 102 or 105, respectively, than expected from the theoretical model of Bates and Khare for atomic ions. (3) The ternary processes enhance recombination at low third-body densities (1017 cm-3) but then level off (``saturate'') when their contribution approaches ~ 1.5 × 10-7 cm3/s. This saturation can lead to the false inference that the overall recombination is binary, resulting in a recombination coefficient that is about 3 times too large. (4) A tentative complex model has been developed that rationalizes the observed effects. This work was partly supported by Czech Science Foundation projects GACR 14-14649P and GACR 15-15077S and by Charles University in Prague projects GAUK 692214, GAUK 572214, UNCE 204020/2012 and SVV 260.

  9. Extensive Interallelic Polymorphisms Drive Meiotic Recombination into a Crossover Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dooner, Hugo K.

    2002-01-01

    Recombinants isolated from most meiotic intragenic recombination experiments in maize, but not in yeast, are borne principally on crossover chromosomes. This excess of crossovers is not explained readily by the canonical double-strand break repair model of recombination, proposed to account for a large body of yeast data, which predicts that crossovers (COs) and noncrossovers (NCOs) should be recovered equally. An attempt has been made here to identify general rules governing the recovery of the CO and NCO classes of intragenic recombinants in maize. Recombination was analyzed in bz heterozygotes between a variety of mutations derived from the same or different progenitor alleles. The mutations include point mutations, transposon insertions, and transposon excision footprints. Consequently, the differences between the bz heteroalleles ranged from just two nucleotides to many nucleotides, indels, and insertions. In this article, allelic pairs differing at only two positions are referred to as dimorphic to distinguish them from polymorphic pairs, which differ at multiple positions. The present study has revealed the following effects at these bz heteroalleles: (1) recombination between polymorphic heteroalleles produces mostly CO chromosomes; (2) recombination between dimorphic heteroalleles produces both CO and NCO chromosomes, in ratios apparently dependent on the nature of the heteroalleles; and (3) in dimorphic heterozygotes, the two NCO classes are recovered in approximately equal numbers when the two mutations are point mutations but not when one or both mutations are insertions. These observations are discussed in light of a recent version of the double-strand break repair model of recombination that postulates separate pathways for the formation of CO and NCO products. PMID:12034905

  10. Recombinant pharmaceuticals from plants: the plant endomembrane system as bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Alessandro; Pedrazzini, Emanuela

    2005-08-01

    The production of safe pharmaceuticals at affordable costs is one of the great challenges of our times. Research has proven that transgenic plants can fulfill this need. This review focuses on the peculiar features of plant cells that allow high accumulation of recombinant proteins. The endomembrane system and the secretory pathway of plant cells in themselves offer a fascinating model of protein sorting, and in practical terms, represent the potential for the facile and very low-cost purification of recombinant pharmaceutical proteins.

  11. Recombinant HT{sub m4} gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, B.; Adra, C.N.; Lelias, J.M.

    1996-09-03

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein and a recombinant HT{sub m4} protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy. 2 figs.

  12. The Time Scale of Recombination Rate Evolution in Great Apes.

    PubMed

    Stevison, Laurie S; Woerner, August E; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Kelley, Joanna L; Veeramah, Krishna R; McManus, Kimberly F; Bustamante, Carlos D; Hammer, Michael F; Wall, Jeffrey D

    2016-04-01

    We present three linkage-disequilibrium (LD)-based recombination maps generated using whole-genome sequence data from 10 Nigerian chimpanzees, 13 bonobos, and 15 western gorillas, collected as part of the Great Ape Genome Project (Prado-Martinez J, et al. 2013. Great ape genetic diversity and population history. Nature 499:471-475). We also identified species-specific recombination hotspots in each group using a modified LDhot framework, which greatly improves statistical power to detect hotspots at varying strengths. We show that fewer hotspots are shared among chimpanzee subspecies than within human populations, further narrowing the time scale of complete hotspot turnover. Further, using species-specific PRDM9 sequences to predict potential binding sites (PBS), we show higher predicted PRDM9 binding in recombination hotspots as compared to matched cold spot regions in multiple great ape species, including at least one chimpanzee subspecies. We found that correlations between broad-scale recombination rates decline more rapidly than nucleotide divergence between species. We also compared the skew of recombination rates at centromeres and telomeres between species and show a skew from chromosome means extending as far as 10-15 Mb from chromosome ends. Further, we examined broad-scale recombination rate changes near a translocation in gorillas and found minimal differences as compared to other great ape species perhaps because the coordinates relative to the chromosome ends were unaffected. Finally, on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis, we found that various correlates of recombination rate persist throughout the African great apes including repeats, diversity, and divergence. Our study is the first to analyze within- and between-species genome-wide recombination rate variation in several close relatives.

  13. Transcript-RNA-templated DNA recombination and repair.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Havva; Shen, Ying; Huang, Fei; Patel, Mikir; Yang, Taehwan; Ashley, Katie; Mazin, Alexander V; Storici, Francesca

    2014-11-20

    Homologous recombination is a molecular process that has multiple important roles in DNA metabolism, both for DNA repair and genetic variation in all forms of life. Generally, homologous recombination involves the exchange of genetic information between two identical or nearly identical DNA molecules; however, homologous recombination can also occur between RNA molecules, as shown for RNA viruses. Previous research showed that synthetic RNA oligonucleotides can act as templates for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in yeast and human cells, and artificial long RNA templates injected in ciliate cells can guide genomic rearrangements. Here we report that endogenous transcript RNA mediates homologous recombination with chromosomal DNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We developed a system to detect the events of homologous recombination initiated by transcript RNA following the repair of a chromosomal DSB occurring either in a homologous but remote locus, or in the same transcript-generating locus in reverse-transcription-defective yeast strains. We found that RNA-DNA recombination is blocked by ribonucleases H1 and H2. In the presence of H-type ribonucleases, DSB repair proceeds through a complementary DNA intermediate, whereas in their absence, it proceeds directly through RNA. The proximity of the transcript to its chromosomal DNA partner in the same locus facilitates Rad52-driven homologous recombination during DSB repair. We demonstrate that yeast and human Rad52 proteins efficiently catalyse annealing of RNA to a DSB-like DNA end in vitro. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of homologous recombination and DNA repair in which transcript RNA is used as a template for DSB repair. Thus, considering the abundance of RNA transcripts in cells, RNA may have a marked impact on genomic stability and plasticity.

  14. Major psychological factors affecting acceptance of gene-recombination technology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the validity of a causal model that was made to predict the acceptance of gene-recombination technology. A structural equation model was used as a causal model. First of all, based on preceding studies, the factors of perceived risk, perceived benefit, and trust were set up as important psychological factors determining acceptance of gene-recombination technology in the structural equation model. An additional factor, "sense of bioethics," which I consider to be important for acceptance of biotechnology, was added to the model. Based on previous studies, trust was set up to have an indirect influence on the acceptance of gene-recombination technology through perceived risk and perceived benefit in the model. Participants were 231 undergraduate students in Japan who answered a questionnaire with a 5-point bipolar scale. The results indicated that the proposed model fits the data well, and showed that acceptance of gene-recombination technology is explained largely by four factors, that is, perceived risk, perceived benefit, trust, and sense of bioethics, whether the technology is applied to plants, animals, or human beings. However, the relative importance of the four factors was found to vary depending on whether the gene-recombination technology was applied to plants, animals, or human beings. Specifically, the factor of sense of bioethics is the most important factor in acceptance of plant gene-recombination technology and animal gene-recombination technology, and the factors of trust and perceived risk are the most important factors in acceptance of human being gene-recombination technology.

  15. Unified Theoretical Approach to Electron-Ion Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anil

    1998-05-01

    Electron-ion recombination occurs via the electron continuum and embedded resonances that are coupled to each other and thus unified in nature. However, theoretical methods generally separate the two as ``radiative recombination" (RR), referring to recombination through the non-resonant continuum, and ``di-electronic recombination" (DR) through the autoionizing resonances. A computationally unified scheme(S.N. Nahar and A.K. Pradhan, Phys.Rev.Lett.) 68,1488(1992); H.L. Zhang and A.K. Pradhan, Phys.Rev.Lett. 78,195(1997) is described that employs the coupled channel R-matrix method, and detailed balance (the Milne relation), to obtain photo-recombination cross sections including both the continuum and resonant recombination in an ab intio manner. In the energy region corresponding to high-n Rydberg resonances, where the background recombination (RR) is negligibly small, a precise theory of DR (R.H. Bell and M.J. Seaton, J.Phys.B) 18,1589(1985) yields DR collision strengths consistent with their threshold behaviour leading to the cross section for electron impact excitation. For highly charged ions the relativistic fine structure and the effect of radiation damping of resonances are considered. Theoretical cross sections agree well with recent experiments on ion stograge rings and the electron-beam-ion-trap (EBIT). Total electron-ion recombination rates can be obtained for practical applications. For many complex atomic systems, such as the important Iron-peak elements, the new results differ considerably from those hitherto available.

  16. Green factory: plants as bioproduction platforms for recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfeng; Dolan, Maureen C; Medrano, Giuliana; Cramer, Carole L; Weathers, Pamela J

    2012-01-01

    Molecular farming, long considered a promising strategy to produce valuable recombinant proteins not only for human and veterinary medicine, but also for agriculture and industry, now has some commercially available products. Various plant-based production platforms including whole-plants, aquatic plants, plant cell suspensions, and plant tissues (hairy roots) have been compared in terms of their advantages and limits. Effective recombinant strategies are summarized along with descriptions of scalable culture systems and examples of commercial progress and success.

  17. The Functions of BRCA2 in Homologous Recombinational Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    February 2004. 2. A manuscript related to this project entitled "Human Rad51C deficiency destabilizes XRCC3 , impairs recombination and radiosensitizes...Cell Biol 15: 1968-1973 15. Brenneman MA et al. (2000) XRCC3 is required for efficient repair of chromosome breaks by homologous recombination. Mutat...JBiol Chem 278: 2469-2478 APPENDICES 1. Lio, Y-C, Schild, D, Brenneman, MA, Redpath, JL, and Chen, DJ (2004) Human RadS1C deficiency destabilizes XRCC3

  18. A study of recombinant protective H. pylori antigens

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zheng; Tao, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Ai-Long; Wang, Pi-Long

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant vector which can express Mr26000 outer membrane protein (OMP) from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), and to obtain the vaccine protecting against H. pylori infection and a diagnostic reagent kit quickly detecting H. pylori infection. METHODS: The gene encoding the structural Mr26000 outer membrane protein of H. pylori was amplified from H. pylori chromosomal DNA by PCR, and inserted in the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a(+), which was transformed into the Top10 E. coli strain. Recombinant vector was selected, identified and transformed into BL-21(DE3) E. coli strain. The recombinant fusion proteins were expressed. The antigenicity of recombinant protein was studied by ELISA or immunoblotting and immunized Balb/c mice. RESULTS: The gene of Mr26000 OMP was amplified to be 594 base pairs, 1.1% of the cloned genes was mutated and 1.51% of amino acid residues was changed, but there was homogeneity between them. The recombinant fusion protein encoded objective polypeptides of 198 amino acid residues, corresponding to calculated molecular masses of Mr26000. The level of soluble expression products was about 38.96% of the total cell protein. After purification by Ni-NTA agarose resin columniation, the purity of objective protein became about 90%. The ELISA results showed that recombinant fusion protein could be recognized by patient serum infected with H. pylori and rabbit serum immunized with the recombinant protein. Furthermore, Balb/c mice immunized with the recombinant protein were protected against H. pylori infection. CONCLUSION: Mr26000 OMP may be a candidate vaccine preventing H. pylori infection. PMID:11925614

  19. Dissociative Recombination of Molecular Ions for Astrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Oldrich; Becker, A.; Buhr, H.; Fleischmann, Andreas; Gamer, Lisa; Geppert, W.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Schwalm, D.; Spruck, K.; Wolf, A.; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2014-06-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions is a key chemical process in the cold interstellar medium (ISM). DR affects the composition, charge state, and energy balance of such environments. Astrochemical models of the ISM require reliable total DR cross sections as well as knowledge of the chemical composition of the neutral DR products. We have systematically measured DR for many astrophysically relevant molecular ions utilizing the TSR storage ring at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, Germany. We used the merged ion-electron beam technique combined with an energy- and position-sensitive imaging detector and are able to study DR down to plasma temperatures as low as 10 K. The DR count rate is used to obtain an absolute merged beams DR rate coefficient from which we can derive a thermal rate coefficient needed for plasma models. Additionally we determine the masses of the DR products by measuring their kinetic energy in the laboratory reference frame. This allows us to assign particular DR fragmentation channels and to obtain their branching ratios. All this information is particularly important for understanding DR of heteronuclear polyatomic ions. We will present DR results for several ions recently investigated at TSR. A new Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) is currently being commissioned at MPIK. With the chamber cooled down to ~10 K and a base pressure better than 10-13 mbar, this setup will allow internal cooling of the stored ions down to their rotational ground states, thus opening a new era in DR experiments. New technological challenges arise due to the ultracold, ultra-high vacuum environment of the CSR and thus the detection techniques used at TSR cannot be easily transferred to CSR. We will present new approaches for DR fragment detection in cryogenic environment. This work is supported in part by NASA and the NSF.

  20. Generation of Food-Grade Recombinant Lactic Acid Bacterium Strains by Site-Specific Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Martín, M. Cruz; Alonso, Juan C.; Suárez, Juan E.; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2000-01-01

    The construction of a delivery and clearing system for the generation of food-grade recombinant lactic acid bacterium strains, based on the use of an integrase (Int) and a resolvo-invertase (β-recombinase) and their respective target sites (attP-attB and six, respectively) is reported. The delivery system contains a heterologous replication origin and antibiotic resistance markers surrounded by two directly oriented six sites, a multiple cloning site where passenger DNA could be inserted (e.g., the cI gene of bacteriophage A2), the int gene, and the attP site of phage A2. The clearing system provides a plasmid-borne gene encoding β-recombinase. The nonreplicative vector-borne delivery system was transformed into Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 and, by site-specific recombination, integrated as a single copy in an orientation- and Int-dependent manner into the attB site present in the genome of the host strain. The transfer of the clearing system into this strain, with the subsequent expression of the β-recombinase, led to site-specific DNA resolution of the non-food-grade DNA. These methods were validated by the construction of a stable food-grade L. casei ATCC 393-derived strain completely immune to phage A2 infection during milk fermentation. PMID:10831443