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Sample records for recombinant corynebacterium glutamicum

  1. Biosynthesis of trans-4-hydroxyproline by recombinant strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline (trans-Hyp), one of the hydroxyproline (Hyp) isomers, is a useful chiral building block in the production of many pharmaceuticals. Although there are some natural biosynthetic pathways of trans-Hyp existing in microorganisms, the yield is still too low to be scaled up for industrial applications. Until now the production of trans-Hyp is mainly from the acid hydrolysis of collagen. Due to the increasing environmental concerns on those severe chemical processes and complicated downstream separation, it is essential to explore some environment-friendly processes such as constructing new recombinant strains to develop efficient process for trans-Hyp production. Result In this study, the genes of trans-proline 4-hydroxylase (trans-P4H) from diverse resources were cloned and expressed in Corynebacterium glutamicum and Escherichia coli, respectively. The trans-Hyp production by these recombinant strains was investigated. The results showed that all the genes from different resources had been expressed actively. Both the recombinant C. glutamicum and E. coli strains could produce trans-Hyp in the absence of proline and 2-oxoglutarate. Conclusions The whole cell microbial systems for trans-Hyp production have been successfully constructed by introducing trans-P4H into C. glutamicum and E. coli. Although the highest yield was obtained in recombinant E. coli, using recombinant C. glutamicum strains to produce trans-Hyp was a new attempt. PMID:24885047

  2. A New Strategy for Production of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid in Recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum with High Yield

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Liu, Wenjing; Cheng, Xuelian; Wang, Jing; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a nonprotein amino acid involved in tetrapyrrole synthesis, has been widely applied in agriculture, medicine, and food production. Many engineered metabolic pathways have been constructed; however, the production yields are still low. In this study, several 5-aminolevulinic acid synthases (ALASs) from different sources were evaluated and compared with respect to their ALA production capacities in an engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum CgS1 strain that can accumulate succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA). A codon-optimized ALAS from Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003 displayed the best potential. Recombinant strain CgS1/pEC-SB produced 7.6 g/liter ALA using a mineral salt medium in a fed-batch fermentation mode. Employing two-stage fermentation, 12.46 g/liter ALA was produced within 17 h, with a productivity of 0.73 g/liter/h, in recombinant C. glutamicum. Through overexpression of the heterologous nonspecific ALA exporter RhtA from Escherichia coli, the titer was further increased to 14.7 g/liter. This indicated that strain CgS1/pEC-SB-rhtA holds attractive industrial application potential for the future. IMPORTANCE In this study, a two-stage fermentation strategy was used for production of the value-added nonprotein amino acid 5-aminolevulinic acid from glucose and glycine in a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) host, Corynebacterium glutamicum. The ALA titer represented the highest in the literature, to our knowledge. This high production capacity, combined with the potential easy downstream processes, made the recombinant strain an attractive candidate for industrial use in the future. PMID:26921424

  3. Productivity of cyclohexanone oxidation of the recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum expressing chnB of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Doo, Eun-Hee; Lee, Won-Heong; Seo, Hyo-Seel; Seo, Jin-Ho; Park, Jin-Byung

    2009-06-15

    The biocatalytic efficiency of recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum expressing the chnB gene encoding cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIMB 9871 was investigated. Optimization of an expression system and induction conditions enabled the recombinant biocatalyst to produce CHMO to a specific activity of ca. 0.5 U mg(-1) protein. Tight control of feeding of an energy source (i.e., glucose) and dissolved oxygen tension during fed-batch culture-based biotransformation allowed the cells to produce epsilon-caprolactone to a concentration of 16.0 g l(-1). The specific and volumetric productivity for cyclohexanone oxidation were 0.12 g g drycells(-1)h(-1) (17.5 U g(-1) of dry cells) and 2.3 g l(-1)h(-1) (330 U l(-1)), respectively. These values correspond to over 5.4- and 2.7-fold of recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the same gene under similar reaction conditions. It could be concluded that the recombinant C. glutamicum is a promising biocatalyst for Baeyer-Villiger oxidations.

  4. 3-Amino-4-hydroxybenzoic acid production from sweet sorghum juice by recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sasaki, Kengo; Uematsu, Kouji; Tsuge, Yota; Teramura, Hiroshi; Okai, Naoko; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Katsuyama, Yohei; Sugai, Yoshinori; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Hirano, Ko; Sazuka, Takashi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    The production of the bioplastic precursor 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-AHBA) from sweet sorghum juice, which contains amino acids and the fermentable sugars sucrose, glucose and fructose, was assessed to address the limitations of producing bio-based chemicals from renewable feedstocks. Recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum strain KT01 expressing griH and griI derived from Streptomyces griseus produced 3,4-AHBA from the sweet sorghum juice of cultivar SIL-05 at a final concentration (1.0 g l(-1)) that was 5-fold higher than that from pure sucrose. Fractionation of sweet sorghum juice by nanofiltration (NF) membrane separation (molecular weight cut-off 150) revealed that the NF-concentrated fraction, which contained the highest concentrations of amino acids, increased 3,4-AHBA production, whereas the NF-filtrated fraction inhibited 3,4-AHBA biosynthesis. Amino acid supplementation experiments revealed that leucine specifically enhanced 3,4-AHBA production by strain KT01. Taken together, these results suggest that sweet sorghum juice is a potentially suitable feedstock for 3,4-AHBA production by recombinant C. glutamicum. PMID:26409852

  5. Production of L-ornithine from sucrose and molasses by recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Bu, Yi-Fan; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Sucrose and molasses are attractive raw materials for industrial fermentation. Although Corynebacterium glutamicum shows sucrose-utilizing activity, sucrose or molasses is only a fraction of carbon source used in the fermentation medium in most works. An engineered C. glutamicum strain was constructed for producing L-ornithine with sucrose or molasses as a sole carbon source by transferring Mannheimia succiniciproducens β-fructofuranosidase gene (sacC). The engineered strain, C. glutamicum ΔAPE6937R42 (pEC-sacC), produced 22.0 g/L of L-ornithine with sucrose as the sole carbon source, which is on par with that obtained by the parent strain C. glutamicum ΔAPE6937R42 with glucose as the sole carbon. The resulting strain C. glutamicum ΔAPE6937R42 (pEC-sacC) produced 27.0 g/L of L-ornithine with molasses as the sole carbon source, which is higher than that obtained by the parent strain C. glutamicum ΔAPE6937R42 with glucose as the sole carbon. This strategy can be applied for developing sucrose- or molasses-utilizing industrial strains.

  6. Ethambutol-mediated cell wall modification in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum increases the biotransformation rates of cyclohexanone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ji-Yeong; Lee, Jung-Eun; Yang, Kyung-Mi; Cho, Suekyung; Kim, Arim; Kwon, Yong-Uk; Kwon, Yong-Euk; Park, Jin-Byung

    2012-01-01

    The effects of structural modification of cell wall on the biotransformation capability by recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum cells, expressing the chnB gene encoding cyclohexanone monooxygenase of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIMB 9871, were investigated. Baeyer-Villiger oxygenation of 2-(2'-acetoxyethyl) cyclohexanone (MW 170 Da) into R-7-(2'-acetoxyethyl)-2-oxepanone was used as a model reaction. The whole-cell biotransformation followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The V (max) and K (S) values were estimated as 96.8 U g(-1) of dry cells and 0.98 mM, respectively. The V (max) was comparable with that of cyclohexanone oxygenation, whereas the K (S) was almost eightfold higher. The K (S) value of 2-(2'-acetoxyethyl) cyclohexanone oxygenation was reduced by ca. 30% via altering the cell envelop structure of C. glutamicum with ethambutol, which inhibits arabinosyl transferases involved in the biosynthesis of cell wall arabinogalactan and mycolate layers. The higher whole-cell biotransformation rate was also observed in the oxygenation of ethyl 2-cyclohexanone acetate upon ethambutol treatment of the recombinant C. glutamicum. Therefore, it was assumed that the biotransformation efficiency of C. glutamicum-based biocatalysts, with respect to medium- to large-sized lipophilic organic substrates (MW > ca. 170), can be enhanced by engineering their cell wall outer layers, which are known to function as a formidable barrier to lipophilic molecules.

  7. Biosynthesis of rare ketoses through constructing a recombination pathway in an engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiangang; Zhu, Yueming; Li, Jitao; Men, Yan; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Rare sugars have various known biological functions and potential for applications in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and food industries. Here we designed and constructed a recombination pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum, in which dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), an intermediate of the glycolytic pathway, and a variety of aldehydes were condensed to synthesize rare ketoses sequentially by rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase (RhaD) and fructose-1-phosphatase (YqaB) obtained from Escherichia coli. A wild-type strain harboring this artificial pathway had the ability to produce D-sorbose and D-psicose using D-glyceraldehyde and glucose as the substrates. The tpi gene, encoding triose phosphate isomerase was further deleted, and the concentration of DHAP increased to nearly 20-fold relative to that of the wild-type. After additional optimization of expression levels from rhaD and yqaB genes and of the fermentation conditions, the engineered strain SY6(pVRTY) exhibited preferable performance for rare ketoses production. Its yield increased to 0.59 mol/mol D-glyceraldehyde from 0.33 mol/mol D-glyceraldehyde and productivity to 2.35 g/L h from 0.58 g/L h. Moreover, this strain accumulated 19.5 g/L of D-sorbose and 13.4 g/L of D-psicose using a fed-batch culture mode under the optimal conditions. In addition, it was verified that the strain SY6(pVRTY) meanwhile had the ability to synthesize C4, C5, C6, and C7 rare ketoses when a range of representative achiral and homochiral aldehydes were applied as the substrates. Therefore, the platform strain exhibited the potential for microbial production of rare ketoses and deoxysugars.

  8. Amino acid production from rice straw and wheat bran hydrolysates by recombinant pentose-utilizing Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Vipin; Meiswinkel, Tobias M; Wendisch, Volker F; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2011-12-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum wild type lacks the ability to utilize the pentose fractions of lignocellulosic hydrolysates, but it is known that recombinants expressing the araBAD operon and/or the xylA gene from Escherichia coli are able to grow with the pentoses xylose and arabinose as sole carbon sources. Recombinant pentose-utilizing strains derived from C. glutamicum wild type or from the L-lysine-producing C. glutamicum strain DM1729 utilized arabinose and/or xylose when these were added as pure chemicals to glucose-based minimal medium or when they were present in acid hydrolysates of rice straw or wheat bran. The recombinants grew to higher biomass concentrations and produced more L-glutamate and L-lysine, respectively, than the empty vector control strains, which utilized the glucose fraction. Typically, arabinose and xylose were co-utilized by the recombinant strains along with glucose either when acid rice straw and wheat bran hydrolysates were used or when blends of pure arabinose, xylose, and glucose were used. With acid hydrolysates growth, amino acid production and sugar consumption were delayed and slower as compared to media with blends of pure arabinose, xylose, and glucose. The ethambutol-triggered production of up to 93 ± 4 mM L-glutamate by the wild type-derived pentose-utilizing recombinant and the production of up to 42 ± 2 mM L-lysine by the recombinant pentose-utilizing lysine producer on media containing acid rice straw or wheat bran hydrolysate as carbon and energy source revealed that acid hydrolysates of agricultural waste materials may provide an alternative feedstock for large-scale amino acid production. PMID:21796382

  9. The Actinobacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum, an Industrial Workhorse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Young; Na, Yoon-Ah; Kim, Eungsoo; Lee, Heung-Shick; Kim, Pil

    2016-05-28

    Starting as a glutamate producer, Corynebacterium glutamicum has played a variety of roles in the industrial production of amino acids, one of the most important areas of white biotechnology. From shortly after its genome information became available, C. glutamicum has been applied in various production processes for value-added chemicals, fuels, and polymers, as a key organism in industrial biotechnology alongside the surprising progress in systems biology and metabolic engineering. In addition, recent studies have suggested another potential for C. glutamicum as a synthetic biology platform chassis that could move the new era of industrial microbial biotechnology beyond the classical field. Here, we review the recent progress and perspectives in relation to C. glutamicum, which demonstrate it as one of the most promising and valuable workhorses in the field of industrial biotechnology.

  10. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for cadaverine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mimitsuka, Takashi; Sawai, Hideki; Hatsu, Masahiro; Yamada, Katsushige

    2007-09-01

    Cadaverine, the expected raw material of polyamides, is produced by decarboxylation of L-lysine. If we could produce cadaverine from the cheapest sugar, and as a renewable resource, it would be an effective solution against global warming, but there has been no attempt to produce cadaverine from glucose by fermentation. We focused on Corynebacterium glutamicum, whose L-lysine fermentation ability is superior, and constructed a metabolically engineered C. glutamicum in which the L-homoserine dehydrogenase gene (hom) was replaced by the L-lysine decarboxylase gene (cadA) of Escherichia coli. In this recombinant strain, cadaverine was produced at a concentration of 2.6 g/l, equivalent to up to 9.1% (molecular yield) of the glucose transformed into cadaverine in neutralizing cultivation. This is the first report of cadaverine fermentation by C. glutamicum.

  11. Corynebacterium glutamicum Metabolic Engineering with CRISPR Interference (CRISPRi).

    PubMed

    Cleto, Sara; Jensen, Jaide Vk; Wendisch, Volker F; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-05-20

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important organism for the industrial production of amino acids. Metabolic pathways in this organism are usually engineered by conventional methods such as homologous recombination, which depends on rare double-crossover events. To facilitate the mapping of gene expression levels to metabolic outputs, we applied CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) technology using deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) to repress genes in C. glutamicum. We then determined the effects of target repression on amino acid titers. Single-guide RNAs directing dCas9 to specific targets reduced expression of pgi and pck up to 98%, and of pyk up to 97%, resulting in titer enhancement ratios of l-lysine and l-glutamate production comparable to levels achieved by gene deletion. This approach for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering, which only requires 3 days, indicates that CRISPRi can be used for quick and efficient metabolic pathway remodeling without the need for gene deletions or mutations and subsequent selection.

  12. D-Allulose Production from D-Fructose by Permeabilized Recombinant Cells of Corynebacterium glutamicum Cells Expressing D-Allulose 3-Epimerase Flavonifractor plautii

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Soon; Kim, Taeyong; Hong, Seung-Hye; Shin, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyoung-Rok; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2016-01-01

    A d-allulose 3-epimerase from Flavonifractor plautii was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum. The maximum activity of the enzyme purified from recombinant E. coli cells was observed at pH 7.0, 65°C, and 1 mM Co2+ with a half-life of 40 min at 65°C, Km of 162 mM, and kcat of 25280 1/s. For increased d-allulose production, recombinant C. glutamicum cells were permeabilized via combined treatments with 20 mg/L penicillin and 10% (v/v) toluene. Under optimized conditions, 10 g/L permeabilized cells produced 235 g/L d-allulose from 750 g/L d-fructose after 40 min, with a conversion rate of 31% (w/w) and volumetric productivity of 353 g/L/h, which were 1.4- and 2.1-fold higher than those obtained for nonpermeabilized cells, respectively. PMID:27467527

  13. Carotenoid biosynthesis and overproduction in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Corynebacterium glutamicum contains the glycosylated C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin as yellow pigment. Starting from isopentenyl pyrophosphate, which is generated in the non-mevalonate pathway, decaprenoxanthin is synthesized via the intermediates farnesyl pyrophosphate, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, lycopene and flavuxanthin. Results Here, we showed that the genes of the carotenoid gene cluster crtE-cg0722-crtBIYeYfEb are co-transcribed and characterized defined gene deletion mutants. Gene deletion analysis revealed that crtI, crtEb, and crtYeYf, respectively, code for the only phytoene desaturase, lycopene elongase, and carotenoid C45/C50 ɛ-cyclase, respectively. However, the genome of C. glutamicum also encodes a second carotenoid gene cluster comprising crtB2I2-1/2 shown to be co-transcribed, as well. Ectopic expression of crtB2 could compensate for the lack of phytoene synthase CrtB in C. glutamicum ΔcrtB, thus, C. glutamicum possesses two functional phytoene synthases, namely CrtB and CrtB2. Genetic evidence for a crtI2-1/2 encoded phytoene desaturase could not be obtained since plasmid-borne expression of crtI2-1/2 did not compensate for the lack of phytoene desaturase CrtI in C. glutamicum ΔcrtI. The potential of C. glutamicum to overproduce carotenoids was estimated with lycopene as example. Deletion of the gene crtEb prevented conversion of lycopene to decaprenoxanthin and entailed accumulation of lycopene to 0.03 ± 0.01 mg/g cell dry weight (CDW). When the genes crtE, crtB and crtI for conversion of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to lycopene were overexpressed in C. glutamicum ΔcrtEb intensely red-pigmented cells and an 80 fold increased lycopene content of 2.4 ± 0.3 mg/g CDW were obtained. Conclusion C. glutamicum possesses a certain degree of redundancy in the biosynthesis of the C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin as it possesses two functional phytoene synthase genes. Already metabolic engineering of only the terminal reactions

  14. 3-Methyl-1-butanol Biosynthesis in an Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shiyuan; Xu, Jingliang; Chen, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiekun; Zhang, Yu; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2016-05-01

    Biofuel offers a promising solution to the adverse environmental problems and depletion in reserves of fossil fuels. Higher alcohols including 3-methyl-1-butanol were paid much more attention as fuel substitute in recent years, due to its similar properties to gasoline. In the present work, 3-methyl-1-butanol production in engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum was studied. α-Ketoisovalerate decarboxylase gene (kivd) from Lactococcus lactis combined with alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adh2, adhA, and adh3) from three organisms were overexpressed in C. glutamicum. Enzymatic assay and alcohol production results showed that adh3 from Zymomonas mobilis was the optimum candidate for 3-methyl-1-butanol production in C. glutamicum. The recombinant with kivd and adh3 could produce 0.182 g/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol and 0.144 g/L of isobutanol after 12 h of incubation. Further inactivation of the E1 subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex gene (aceE) and lactic dehydrogenase gene (ldh) in the above C. glutamicum strain would improve the 3-Methyl-1-butanol titer to 0.497 g/L after 12 h of incubation. PMID:26961908

  15. Corynebacterium glutamicum promoters: a practical approach

    PubMed Central

    Pátek, Miroslav; Holátko, Jiří; Busche, Tobias; Kalinowski, Jörn; Nešvera, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Transcription initiation is the key step in gene expression in bacteria, and it is therefore studied for both theoretical and practical reasons. Promoters, the traffic lights of transcription initiation, are used as construction elements in biotechnological efforts to coordinate ‘green waves’ in the metabolic pathways leading to the desired metabolites. Detailed analyses of Corynebacterium glutamicum promoters have already provided large amounts of data on their structures, regulatory mechanisms and practical capabilities in metabolic engineering. In this minireview the main aspects of promoter studies, the methods developed for their analysis and their practical use in C. glutamicum are discussed. These include definitions of the consensus sequences of the distinct promoter classes, promoter localization and characterization, activity measurements, the functions of transcriptional regulators and examples of practical uses of constitutive, inducible and modified promoters in biotechnology. The implications of the introduction of novel techniques, such as in vitro transcription and RNA sequencing, to C. glutamicum promoter studies are outlined. PMID:23305350

  16. Enhancement of γ-aminobutyric acid production in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum by co-expressing two glutamate decarboxylase genes from Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Jiang, Junjun; Li, Yongfu; Li, Youxin; Xie, Yilong

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), a non-protein amino acid, is a bioactive component in the food, feed and pharmaceutical fields. To establish an effective single-step production system for GABA, a recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum strain co-expressing two glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) genes (gadB1 and gadB2) derived from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 was constructed. Compared with the GABA production of the gadB1 or gadB2 single-expressing strains, GABA production by the gadB1-gadB2 co-expressing strain increased more than twofold. By optimising urea supplementation, the total production of L-glutamate and GABA increased from 22.57 ± 1.24 to 30.18 ± 1.33 g L⁻¹, and GABA production increased from 4.02 ± 0.95 to 18.66 ± 2.11 g L⁻¹ after 84-h cultivation. Under optimal urea supplementation, L-glutamate continued to be consumed, GABA continued to accumulate after 36 h of fermentation, and the pH level fluctuated. GABA production increased to a maximum level of 27.13 ± 0.54 g L⁻¹ after 120-h flask cultivation and 26.32 g L⁻¹ after 60-h fed-batch fermentation. The conversion ratio of L-glutamate to GABA reached 0.60-0.74 mol mol⁻¹. By co-expressing gadB1 and gadB2 and optimising the urea addition method, C. glutamicum was genetically improved for de novo biosynthesis of GABA from its own accumulated L-glutamate.

  17. Corynebacterium glutamicum Metabolic Engineering with CRISPR Interference (CRISPRi)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important organism for the industrial production of amino acids. Metabolic pathways in this organism are usually engineered by conventional methods such as homologous recombination, which depends on rare double-crossover events. To facilitate the mapping of gene expression levels to metabolic outputs, we applied CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) technology using deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) to repress genes in C. glutamicum. We then determined the effects of target repression on amino acid titers. Single-guide RNAs directing dCas9 to specific targets reduced expression of pgi and pck up to 98%, and of pyk up to 97%, resulting in titer enhancement ratios of l-lysine and l-glutamate production comparable to levels achieved by gene deletion. This approach for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering, which only requires 3 days, indicates that CRISPRi can be used for quick and efficient metabolic pathway remodeling without the need for gene deletions or mutations and subsequent selection. PMID:26829286

  18. Analysis and Engineering of Metabolic Pathway Fluxes in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Christoph

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum was discovered as a natural overproducer of glutamate about 50 years ago. Linked to the steadily increasing economical importance of this microorganism for production of glutamate and other amino acids, the quest for efficient production strains has been an intense area of research during the past few decades. Efficient production strains were created by applying classical mutagenesis and selection and especially metabolic engineering strategies with the advent of recombinant DNA technology. Hereby experimental and computational approaches have provided fascinating insights into the metabolism of this microorganism and directed strain engineering. Today, C. glutamicum is applied to the industrial production of more than 2 million tons of amino acids per year. The huge achievements in recent years, including the sequencing of the complete genome and efficient post genomic approaches, now provide the basis for a new, fascinating era of research - analysis of metabolic and regulatory properties of C. glutamicum on a global scale towards novel and superior bioprocesses.

  19. Corynebacterium glutamicum Metabolic Engineering with CRISPR Interference (CRISPRi).

    PubMed

    Cleto, Sara; Jensen, Jaide Vk; Wendisch, Volker F; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-05-20

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important organism for the industrial production of amino acids. Metabolic pathways in this organism are usually engineered by conventional methods such as homologous recombination, which depends on rare double-crossover events. To facilitate the mapping of gene expression levels to metabolic outputs, we applied CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) technology using deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) to repress genes in C. glutamicum. We then determined the effects of target repression on amino acid titers. Single-guide RNAs directing dCas9 to specific targets reduced expression of pgi and pck up to 98%, and of pyk up to 97%, resulting in titer enhancement ratios of l-lysine and l-glutamate production comparable to levels achieved by gene deletion. This approach for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering, which only requires 3 days, indicates that CRISPRi can be used for quick and efficient metabolic pathway remodeling without the need for gene deletions or mutations and subsequent selection. PMID:26829286

  20. Phenylacetic acid catabolism and its transcriptional regulation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Kohl, Thomas A; Rückert, Christian; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Li, Ling-Hao; Ding, Jiu-Yuan; Kalinowski, Jörn; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2012-08-01

    The industrially important organism Corynebacterium glutamicum has been characterized in recent years for its robust ability to assimilate aromatic compounds. In this study, C. glutamicum strain AS 1.542 was investigated for its ability to catabolize phenylacetic acid (PAA). The paa genes were identified; they are organized as a continuous paa gene cluster. The type strain of C. glutamicum, ATCC 13032, is not able to catabolize PAA, but the recombinant strain ATCC 13032/pEC-K18mob2::paa gained the ability to grow on PAA. The paaR gene, encoding a TetR family transcription regulator, was studied in detail. Disruption of paaR in strain AS 1.542 resulted in transcriptional increases of all paa genes. Transcription start sites and putative promoter regions were determined. An imperfect palindromic motif (5'-ACTNACCGNNCGNNCGGTNAGT-3'; 22 bp) was identified in the upstream regions of paa genes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) demonstrated specific binding of PaaR to this motif, and phenylacetyl coenzyme A (PA-CoA) blocked binding. It was concluded that PaaR is the negative regulator of PAA degradation and that PA-CoA is the PaaR effector. In addition, GlxR binding sites were found, and binding to GlxR was confirmed. Therefore, PAA catabolism in C. glutamicum is regulated by the pathway-specific repressor PaaR, and also likely by the global transcription regulator GlxR. By comparative genomic analysis, we reconstructed orthologous PaaR regulons in 57 species, including species of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Flavobacteria, that carry PAA utilization genes and operate by conserved binding motifs, suggesting that PaaR-like regulation might commonly exist in these bacteria.

  1. Metabolic Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for Methanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Witthoff, Sabrina; Schmitz, Katja; Niedenführ, Sebastian; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is already an important carbon feedstock in the chemical industry, but it has found only limited application in biotechnological production processes. This can be mostly attributed to the inability of most microbial platform organisms to utilize methanol as a carbon and energy source. With the aim to turn methanol into a suitable feedstock for microbial production processes, we engineered the industrially important but nonmethylotrophic bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum toward the utilization of methanol as an auxiliary carbon source in a sugar-based medium. Initial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde was achieved by heterologous expression of a methanol dehydrogenase from Bacillus methanolicus, whereas assimilation of formaldehyde was realized by implementing the two key enzymes of the ribulose monophosphate pathway of Bacillus subtilis: 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase. The recombinant C. glutamicum strain showed an average methanol consumption rate of 1.7 ± 0.3 mM/h (mean ± standard deviation) in a glucose-methanol medium, and the culture grew to a higher cell density than in medium without methanol. In addition, [13C]methanol-labeling experiments revealed labeling fractions of 3 to 10% in the m + 1 mass isotopomers of various intracellular metabolites. In the background of a C. glutamicum Δald ΔadhE mutant being strongly impaired in its ability to oxidize formaldehyde to CO2, the m + 1 labeling of these intermediates was increased (8 to 25%), pointing toward higher formaldehyde assimilation capabilities of this strain. The engineered C. glutamicum strains represent a promising starting point for the development of sugar-based biotechnological production processes using methanol as an auxiliary substrate. PMID:25595770

  2. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for methanol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Witthoff, Sabrina; Schmitz, Katja; Niedenführ, Sebastian; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan; Bott, Michael; Marienhagen, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Methanol is already an important carbon feedstock in the chemical industry, but it has found only limited application in biotechnological production processes. This can be mostly attributed to the inability of most microbial platform organisms to utilize methanol as a carbon and energy source. With the aim to turn methanol into a suitable feedstock for microbial production processes, we engineered the industrially important but nonmethylotrophic bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum toward the utilization of methanol as an auxiliary carbon source in a sugar-based medium. Initial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde was achieved by heterologous expression of a methanol dehydrogenase from Bacillus methanolicus, whereas assimilation of formaldehyde was realized by implementing the two key enzymes of the ribulose monophosphate pathway of Bacillus subtilis: 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase. The recombinant C. glutamicum strain showed an average methanol consumption rate of 1.7 ± 0.3 mM/h (mean ± standard deviation) in a glucose-methanol medium, and the culture grew to a higher cell density than in medium without methanol. In addition, [(13)C]methanol-labeling experiments revealed labeling fractions of 3 to 10% in the m + 1 mass isotopomers of various intracellular metabolites. In the background of a C. glutamicum Δald ΔadhE mutant being strongly impaired in its ability to oxidize formaldehyde to CO2, the m + 1 labeling of these intermediates was increased (8 to 25%), pointing toward higher formaldehyde assimilation capabilities of this strain. The engineered C. glutamicum strains represent a promising starting point for the development of sugar-based biotechnological production processes using methanol as an auxiliary substrate.

  3. Crystal Structure of Amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Joo, Seongjoon; Kim, Sangwoo; Seo, Hogyun; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2016-07-20

    Amylomaltase is an essential enzyme in maltose utilization and maltodextrin metabolism, and it has been industrially used for the production of cyclodextrin and modification of starch. We determined the crystal structure of amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAM) at a resolution of 1.7 Å. Although CgAM forms a dimer without NaCl, it exists as a monomer in physiological concentration of NaCl. CgAM is composed of N- and C-terminal domains, which can be further divided into two and four subdomains, respectively. It exhibits a unique structural feature at the functionally unknown N-domain and also shows two striking differences at the C-domain compared to other amylomaltases. These differences at extended edge of the substrate-binding site might affect substrate specificity for large cyclodextrin formation. The bis-tris methane and sulfate molecules bound at the substrate-binding site of our current structure mimic the binding of the hydroxyl groups of glucose bound at subsites -1 and -2, respectively. PMID:27366969

  4. Improving the secretion of cadaverine in Corynebacterium glutamicum by cadaverine-lysine antiporter.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Dongxia; Huang, Yunyan; Liu, Meng; Wang, Hongxin; Tang, Qi; Lu, Fuping

    2014-04-01

    Cadaverine (1,5-pentanediamine, diaminopentane), the desired raw material of bio-polyamides, is an important industrial chemical with a wide range of applications. Biosynthesis of cadaverine in Corynebacterium glutamicum has been a competitive way in place of petroleum-based chemical synthesis method. To date, the cadaverine exporter has not been found in C. glutamicum. In order to improve cadaverine secretion, the cadaverine-lysine antiporter CadB from Escherichia coli was studied in C. glutamicum. Fusion expression of cadB and green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene confirmed that CadB could express in the cell membrane of C. glutamicum. Co-expression of cadB and ldc from Hafnia alvei in C. glutamicum showed that the cadaverine secretion rate increased by 22 % and the yield of total cadaverine and extracellular cadaverine increased by 30 and 73 %, respectively. Moreover, the recombinant strain cultured at acid and neutral pH separately hardly had any difference in cadaverine concentrations. These results suggested that CadB could be expressed in the cell membrane of C. glutamicum and that recombinant CadB could improve cadaverine secretion and the yield of cadaverine. Moreover, the pH value did not affect the function of recombinant CadB. These results may be a promising metabolic engineering strategy for improving the yield of the desired product by enhancing its export out of the cell. PMID:24510022

  5. Production and glucosylation of C50 and C 40 carotenoids by metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Heider, Sabine A E; Peters-Wendisch, Petra; Netzer, Roman; Stafnes, Marit; Brautaset, Trygve; Wendisch, Volker F

    2014-02-01

    The yellow-pigmented soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 is accumulating the cyclic C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin and its glucosides. Carotenoid pathway engineering was previously shown to allow for efficient lycopene production. Here, engineering of C. glutamicum for production of endogenous decaprenoxanthin as well as of the heterologous C50 carotenoids C.p.450 and sarcinaxanthin is described. Plasmid-borne overexpression of genes for lycopene cyclization and hydroxylation from C. glutamicum, Dietzia sp., and Micrococcus luteus, in a lycopene-producing platform strain constructed here, resulted in accumulation of these three C50 carotenoids to concentrations of about 3-4 mg/g CDW. Chromosomal deletion of a putative carotenoid glycosyltransferase gene cg0730/crtX in these strains entailed production of non-glucosylated derivatives of decaprenoxanthin, C.p.450, and sarcinaxanthin, respectively. Upon introduction of glucosyltransferase genes from M. luteus, C. glutamicum, and Pantoea ananatis, these hydroxylated C50 carotenoids were glucosylated. We here also demonstrate production of the C40 carotenoids β-carotene and zeaxanthin in recombinant C. glutamicum strains and co-expression of the P. ananatis crtX gene was used to obtain glucosylated zeaxanthin. Together, our results show that C. glutamicum is a potentially valuable host for production of a wide range of glucosylated C40 and C50 carotenoids. PMID:24270893

  6. Production of the Marine Carotenoid Astaxanthin by Metabolically Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Henke, Nadja A; Heider, Sabine A E; Peters-Wendisch, Petra; Wendisch, Volker F

    2016-01-01

    Astaxanthin, a red C40 carotenoid, is one of the most abundant marine carotenoids. It is currently used as a food and feed additive in a hundred-ton scale and is furthermore an attractive component for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications with antioxidant activities. Corynebacterium glutamicum, which naturally synthesizes the yellow C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin, is an industrially relevant microorganism used in the million-ton amino acid production. In this work, engineering of a genome-reduced C. glutamicum with optimized precursor supply for astaxanthin production is described. This involved expression of heterologous genes encoding for lycopene cyclase CrtY, β-carotene ketolase CrtW, and hydroxylase CrtZ. For balanced expression of crtW and crtZ their translation initiation rates were varied in a systematic approach using different ribosome binding sites, spacing, and translational start codons. Furthermore, β-carotene ketolases and hydroxylases from different marine bacteria were tested with regard to efficient astaxanthin production in C. glutamicum. In shaking flasks, the C. glutamicum strains developed here overproduced astaxanthin with volumetric productivities up to 0.4 mg·L(-1)·h(-1) which are competitive with current algae-based production. Since C. glutamicum can grow to high cell densities of up to 100 g cell dry weight (CDW)·L(-1), the recombinant strains developed here are a starting point for astaxanthin production by C. glutamicum. PMID:27376307

  7. Production of the Marine Carotenoid Astaxanthin by Metabolically Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Nadja A.; Heider, Sabine A. E.; Peters-Wendisch, Petra; Wendisch, Volker F.

    2016-01-01

    Astaxanthin, a red C40 carotenoid, is one of the most abundant marine carotenoids. It is currently used as a food and feed additive in a hundred-ton scale and is furthermore an attractive component for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications with antioxidant activities. Corynebacterium glutamicum, which naturally synthesizes the yellow C50 carotenoid decaprenoxanthin, is an industrially relevant microorganism used in the million-ton amino acid production. In this work, engineering of a genome-reduced C. glutamicum with optimized precursor supply for astaxanthin production is described. This involved expression of heterologous genes encoding for lycopene cyclase CrtY, β-carotene ketolase CrtW, and hydroxylase CrtZ. For balanced expression of crtW and crtZ their translation initiation rates were varied in a systematic approach using different ribosome binding sites, spacing, and translational start codons. Furthermore, β-carotene ketolases and hydroxylases from different marine bacteria were tested with regard to efficient astaxanthin production in C. glutamicum. In shaking flasks, the C. glutamicum strains developed here overproduced astaxanthin with volumetric productivities up to 0.4 mg·L−1·h−1 which are competitive with current algae-based production. Since C. glutamicum can grow to high cell densities of up to 100 g cell dry weight (CDW)·L−1, the recombinant strains developed here are a starting point for astaxanthin production by C. glutamicum. PMID:27376307

  8. Functional Characterization of Corynebacterium alkanolyticum β-Xylosidase and Xyloside ABC Transporter in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akira; Hiraga, Kazumi; Suda, Masako; Yukawa, Hideaki; Inui, Masayuki

    2015-06-15

    The Corynebacterium alkanolyticum xylEFGD gene cluster comprises the xylD gene that encodes an intracellular β-xylosidase next to the xylEFG operon encoding a substrate-binding protein and two membrane permease proteins of a xyloside ABC transporter. Cloning of the cluster revealed a recombinant β-xylosidase of moderately high activity (turnover for p-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside of 111 ± 4 s(-1)), weak α-l-arabinofuranosidase activity (turnover for p-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofuranoside of 5 ± 1 s(-1)), and high tolerance to product inhibition (Ki for xylose of 67.6 ± 2.6 mM). Heterologous expression of the entire cluster under the control of the strong constitutive tac promoter in the Corynebacterium glutamicum xylose-fermenting strain X1 enabled the resultant strain X1EFGD to rapidly utilize not only xylooligosaccharides but also arabino-xylooligosaccharides. The ability to utilize arabino-xylooligosaccharides depended on cgR_2369, a gene encoding a multitask ATP-binding protein. Heterologous expression of the contiguous xylD gene in strain X1 led to strain X1D with 10-fold greater β-xylosidase activity than strain X1EFGD, albeit with a total loss of arabino-xylooligosaccharide utilization ability and only half the ability to utilize xylooligosaccharides. The findings suggest some inherent ability of C. glutamicum to take up xylooligosaccharides, an ability that is enhanced by in the presence of a functional xylEFG-encoded xyloside ABC transporter. The finding that xylEFG imparts nonnative ability to take up arabino-xylooligosaccharides should be useful in constructing industrial strains with efficient fermentation of arabinoxylan, a major component of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates. PMID:25862223

  9. Functional Characterization of Corynebacterium alkanolyticum β-Xylosidase and Xyloside ABC Transporter in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Akira; Hiraga, Kazumi; Suda, Masako; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    The Corynebacterium alkanolyticum xylEFGD gene cluster comprises the xylD gene that encodes an intracellular β-xylosidase next to the xylEFG operon encoding a substrate-binding protein and two membrane permease proteins of a xyloside ABC transporter. Cloning of the cluster revealed a recombinant β-xylosidase of moderately high activity (turnover for p-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside of 111 ± 4 s−1), weak α-l-arabinofuranosidase activity (turnover for p-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofuranoside of 5 ± 1 s−1), and high tolerance to product inhibition (Ki for xylose of 67.6 ± 2.6 mM). Heterologous expression of the entire cluster under the control of the strong constitutive tac promoter in the Corynebacterium glutamicum xylose-fermenting strain X1 enabled the resultant strain X1EFGD to rapidly utilize not only xylooligosaccharides but also arabino-xylooligosaccharides. The ability to utilize arabino-xylooligosaccharides depended on cgR_2369, a gene encoding a multitask ATP-binding protein. Heterologous expression of the contiguous xylD gene in strain X1 led to strain X1D with 10-fold greater β-xylosidase activity than strain X1EFGD, albeit with a total loss of arabino-xylooligosaccharide utilization ability and only half the ability to utilize xylooligosaccharides. The findings suggest some inherent ability of C. glutamicum to take up xylooligosaccharides, an ability that is enhanced by in the presence of a functional xylEFG-encoded xyloside ABC transporter. The finding that xylEFG imparts nonnative ability to take up arabino-xylooligosaccharides should be useful in constructing industrial strains with efficient fermentation of arabinoxylan, a major component of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates. PMID:25862223

  10. Expression and secretion of heterologous proteases by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed Central

    Billman-Jacobe, H; Wang, L; Kortt, A; Stewart, D; Radford, A

    1995-01-01

    Genes encoding the basic protease of Dichelobacter nodosus (bprV) and the subtilisin of Bacillus subtilis (aprE) were cloned and expressed in Corynebacterium glutamicum. In each case, enzymatically active protein was detected in the supernatants of liquid cultures. While the secretion of subtilisin was directed by its own signal peptide, the natural signal peptide of the bprV basic protease did not facilitate secretion. A hybrid aprE-bprV gene in which the promoter and signal peptide coding sequences of subtilisin replaced those of bprV could be expressed, and basic protease was secreted by C. glutamicum. Expression of these proteases in C. glutamicum provides an opportunity to compare protein secretion from this gram-positive host with that from other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. PMID:7747974

  11. Ohr Protects Corynebacterium glutamicum against Organic Hydroperoxide Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiao; Guan, Jingyuan; Zhang, Yaoling; Ding, Wei; Chaudhry, Muhammad Tausif; Wang, Yao; Shen, Xihui

    2015-01-01

    Ohr, a bacterial protein encoded by the Organic Hydroperoxide Resistance (ohr) gene, plays a critical role in resistance to organic hydroperoxides. In the present study, we show that the Cys-based thiol-dependent Ohr of Corynebacterium glutamicum decomposes organic hydroperoxides more efficiently than hydrogen peroxide. Replacement of either of the two Cys residues of Ohr by a Ser residue resulted in drastic loss of activity. The electron donors supporting regeneration of the peroxidase activity of the oxidized Ohr of C. glutamicum were principally lipoylated proteins (LpdA and Lpd/SucB). A Δohr mutant exhibited significantly decreased resistance to organic hydroperoxides and marked accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo; protein carbonylation was also enhanced notably. The resistance to hydrogen peroxide also decreased, but protein carbonylation did not rise to any great extent. Together, the results unequivocally show that Ohr is essential for mediation of organic hydroperoxide resistance by C. glutamicum. PMID:26121694

  12. Succinic acid production from corn cob hydrolysates by genetically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Zhang, Hengli; Cai, Heng; Zhou, Zhihui; Chen, Yilu; Chen, Yali; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum wild type lacks the ability to utilize the xylose fractions of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. In the present work, we constructed a xylose metabolic pathway in C. glutamicum by heterologous expression of the xylA and xylB genes coming from Escherichia coli. Dilute-acid hydrolysates of corn cobs containing xylose and glucose were used as a substrate for succinic acid production by recombinant C. glutamicum NC-2. The results indicated that the available activated charcoal pretreatment in dilute-acid hydrolysates of corn cobs could be able to overcome the inhibitory effect in succinic acid production. Succinic acid was shown to be efficiently produced from corn cob hydrolysates (55 g l(-1) xylose and 4 g l(-1) glucose) under oxygen deprivation with addition of sodium carbonate. Succinic acid concentration reached 40.8 g l(-1) with a yield of 0.69 g g(-1) total sugars within 48 h. It was the first report of succinic acid production from corn cob hydrolysates by metabolically engineered C. glutamicum. This study suggested that dilute-acid hydrolysates of corn cobs may be an alternative substrate for the efficient production of succinic acid by C. glutamicum. PMID:24078255

  13. Construction of a novel expression system for use in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinyu; Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Hailing; Tan, Yanzhen; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-09-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important microorganism for production of amino acids in industrial fermentation. Suitable vectors are needed for metabolic engineering in C. glutamicum. Most available vectors used in C. glutamicum carry antibiotic resistant genes as a genetic labeling for rapid identification of recombinant strains, and antibiotics have to be added to maintain the vector when growing the cells. These vectors, though excellent for laboratory use, are not preferable choices for industry-scale fermentation. In this work, we developed a novel expression system for use in C. glutamicum, which do not require antibiotics when used for industrial fermentation. This system includes two vectors: the shuttle vector pJYW-4 for expression of genes and the vector pJYW-6 for deletion of the essential gene alr in C. glutamicum. The vector pJYW-4 contains a large multiple cloning site for cloning multiple genes and two selective markers: one is the kanamycin-resistant gene kan and the other is an essential gene alr. The selective marker kan facilitates molecular manipulation or fermentations in the laboratory, and the selection marker alr is good for use in industry-scale fermentation, allowing in vivo maintenance of the expression vector through auxotrophic complementation; therefore, the two selection markers in pJYW-4 make it useful for both laboratory research and industrial fermentation, and convenient to transfer valuable laboratory-developed strains into industrial production. This newly-constructed expression system was successfully used to increase L-valine production in C. glutamicum ATCC 14067, indicating its potential on developing amino acid-producing C. glutamicum strains.

  14. Functional characterization of a vanillin dehydrogenase in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Si, Meiru; Zhang, Weipeng; Zhang, Yaoling; Chen, Can; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Shaolin; Shen, Xihui

    2015-01-01

    Vanillin dehydrogenase (VDH) is a crucial enzyme involved in the degradation of lignin-derived aromatic compounds. Herein, the VDH from Corynebacterium glutamicum was characterized. The relative molecular mass (Mr) determined by SDS-PAGE was ~51kDa, whereas the apparent native Mr values revealed by gel filtration chromatography were 49.5, 92.3, 159.0 and 199.2kDa, indicating the presence of dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric forms. Moreover, the enzyme showed its highest level of activity toward vanillin at pH 7.0 and 30C, and interestingly, it could utilize NAD+ and NADP+ as coenzymes with similar efficiency and showed no obvious difference toward NAD+ and NADP+. In addition to vanillin, this enzyme exhibited catalytic activity toward a broad range of substrates, including p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, o-phthaldialdehyde, cinnamaldehyde, syringaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Conserved catalytic residues or putative cofactor interactive sites were identified based on sequence alignment and comparison with previous studies, and the function of selected residues were verified by site-directed mutagenesis analysis. Finally, the vdh deletion mutant partially lost its ability to grow on vanillin, indicating the presence of alternative VDH(s) in Corynebacterium glutamicum. Taken together, this study contributes to understanding the VDH diversity from bacteria and the aromatic metabolism pathways in C. glutamicum. PMID:25622822

  15. Functional characterization of a vanillin dehydrogenase in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Si, Meiru; Zhang, Weipeng; Zhang, Yaoling; Chen, Can; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Shaolin; Shen, Xihui

    2015-01-27

    Vanillin dehydrogenase (VDH) is a crucial enzyme involved in the degradation of lignin-derived aromatic compounds. Herein, the VDH from Corynebacterium glutamicum was characterized. The relative molecular mass (Mr) determined by SDS-PAGE was ~51 kDa, whereas the apparent native Mr values revealed by gel filtration chromatography were 49.5, 92.3, 159.0 and 199.2 kDa, indicating the presence of dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric forms. Moreover, the enzyme showed its highest level of activity toward vanillin at pH 7.0 and 30°C, and interestingly, it could utilize NAD(+) and NADP(+) as coenzymes with similar efficiency and showed no obvious difference toward NAD(+) and NADP(+). In addition to vanillin, this enzyme exhibited catalytic activity toward a broad range of substrates, including p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, o-phthaldialdehyde, cinnamaldehyde, syringaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Conserved catalytic residues or putative cofactor interactive sites were identified based on sequence alignment and comparison with previous studies, and the function of selected residues were verified by site-directed mutagenesis analysis. Finally, the vdh deletion mutant partially lost its ability to grow on vanillin, indicating the presence of alternative VDH(s) in Corynebacterium glutamicum. Taken together, this study contributes to understanding the VDH diversity from bacteria and the aromatic metabolism pathways in C. glutamicum.

  16. Effect of Corynebacterium glutamicum on Livestock Material Burial Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bit-Na; Cho, Ho-Seong; Cha, Yougin; Park, Joon-Kyu; Kim, Geonha; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-08-28

    In recent years, foot-and-mouth disease has occurred in all parts of the world. The animals with the disease are buried in the ground; therefore, their concentration could affect ground or groundwater. Moreover, the complete degradation of carcasses is not a certainty, and their disposal is important to prevent humans, livestock, and the environment from being affected with the disease. The treatment of Corynebacterium glutamicum is a feasible method to reduce the risk of carcass decomposition affecting humans or the environment. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of C. glutamicum on the soil environment with a carcass. The composition of amino acids in the soil treated with C. glutamicum was generally higher than those in the untreated soil. Moreover, the plant root in the soil samples treated with C. glutamicum had 84.0% amino acids relative to the standard value and was similar to that of the control. The results of this study suggest the possibility to reduce the toxicity of a grave land containing animals with this disease. PMID:27160580

  17. Formation of volutin granules in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Pallerla, Srinivas Reddy; Knebel, Sandra; Polen, Tino; Klauth, Peter; Hollender, Juliane; Wendisch, Volker F; Schoberth, Siegfried M

    2005-02-01

    Volutin granules are intracellular storages of complexed inorganic polyphosphate (poly P). Histochemical staining procedures differentiate between pathogenic corynebacteria such as Corynebacterum diphtheriae (containing volutin) and non-pathogenic species, such as C. glutamicum. Here we report that strains ATCC13032 and MH20-22B of the non-pathogenic C. glutamicum also formed subcellular entities (18-37% of the total cell volume) that had the typical characteristics of volutin granules: (i) volutin staining, (ii) green UV fluorescence when stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, (iii) electron-dense and rich in phosphorus when determined with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis, and (iv) 31P NMR poly P resonances of isolated granules dissolved in EDTA. MgCl2 addition to the growth medium stimulated granule formation but did not effect expression of genes involved in poly P metabolism. Granular volutin fractions from lysed cells contained polyphosphate glucokinase as detected by SDS-PAGE/MALDI-TOF, indicating that this poly P metabolizing enzyme is present also in intact poly P granules. The results suggest that formation of volutin is a more widespread phenomenon than generally accepted. PMID:15668011

  18. Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for growth and succinate production from levoglucosan, a pyrolytic sugar substrate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Um, Youngsoon; Bott, Michael; Woo, Han Min

    2015-10-01

    Thermochemical processing provides continuous production of bio-oils from lignocellulosic biomass. Levoglucosan, a pyrolytic sugar substrate C6H10O5 in a bio-oil, has been used for ethanol production using engineered Escherichia coli. Here we provide the first example for succinate production from levoglucosan with Corynebacterium glutamicum, a well-known industrial amino acid producer. Heterologous expression of a gene encoding a sugar kinase from Lipomyces starkeyi, Gibberella zeae or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was employed for levoglucosan conversion in C. glutamicum because the wild type was unable to utilize levoglucosan as sole carbon source. As result, expression of a levoglucosan kinase (LGK) of L. starkeyi only enabled growth with levoglucosan as sole carbon source in CgXII minimal medium by catalyzing conversion of levoglucosan to glucose-6-phosphate. Subsequently, the lgk gene was expressed in an aerobic succinate producer of C. glutamicum, strain BL-1. The recombinant strain showed a higher succinate yield (0.25 g g(-1)) from 2% (w/v) levoglucosan than the reference strain BL-1 from 2% (w/v) glucose (0.19 g g(-1)), confirming that levoglucosan is an attractive carbon substrate for C. glutamicum producer strains. In summary, we demonstrated that a pyrolytic sugar could be a potential carbon source for microbial cell factories. PMID:26363018

  19. Genetic characterization of 4-cresol catabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Li, Tang; Chen, Xi; Chaudhry, Muhammad Tausif; Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2014-12-20

    Corynebacterium glutamicum uses 4-cresol as sole carbon source for growth. Protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity had been detected when C. glutamicum was grown with 4-cresol. In this work, we found that 4-cresol was catabolized via 4-hydroxybenzoate and protocatechuate as intermediate metabolites, and a genetic cluster called cre (designated for 4-cresol, creABCDEFGHIR, tagged as ncgl0521-ncgl0531 in NCBI) was identified. The cre gene cluster comprises of 11 genes, and six of them were experimentally confirmed to be involving in 4-cresol catabolism. The genes creD, creE, and creJ were involved in oxidation of 4-cresol into 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol. The creD encoded a protein showing Mg(2+)-dependent phosphohydrolase activity. The genes creE, creF, creJ encoded a putative P450 system. The creG encoded a NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenase and catalyzed 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol to 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. Two other genes creH and creI were involved in conversion of 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol to 4-hydroxybenzoate, but their catalytic function is still unknown. Similar genetic clusters with high DNA sequence identity were identified in Arthrobacter and additional Corynebacterium species, suggesting that this genetic organization for 4-cresol catabolism might be more widely distributed in Gram-positive bacteria.

  20. Characterization of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase from Corynebacterium glutamicum and its impact on amino acid production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Corynebacterium glutamicum cg1790/pgk encodes an enzyme active as a 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) (EC 2.7.2.3) catalyzing phosphoryl transfer from 1,3-biphosphoglycerate (bPG) to ADP to yield 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG) and ATP in substrate chain phosphorylation. Results C. glutamicum 3-phosphoglycerate kinase was purified to homogeneity from the soluble fraction of recombinant E. coli. PGKHis was found to be active as a homodimer with molecular weight of 104 kDa. The enzyme preferred conditions of pH 7.0 to 7.4 and required Mg2+ for its activity. PGKHis is thermo labile and it has shown maximal activity at 50–65°C. The maximal activity of PGKHis was estimated to be 220 and 150 U mg-1 with KM values of 0.26 and 0.11 mM for 3-phosphoglycerate and ATP, respectively. A 3-phosphoglycerate kinase negative C. glutamicum strain ∆pgk was constructed and shown to lack the ability to grow under glycolytic or gluconeogenic conditions unless PGK was expressed from a plasmid to restore growth. When pgk was overexpressed in L-arginine and L-ornithine production strains the production increased by 8% and by 17.5%, respectively. Conclusion Unlike many bacterial PGKs, C. glutamicum PGK is active as a homodimer. PGK is essential for growth of C. glutamicum with carbon sources requiring glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Competitive inhibition by ADP reveals the critical role of PGK in gluconeogenesis by energy charge. Pgk overexpression improved the productivity in L-arginine and L-ornithine production strains. PMID:24593686

  1. Engineering a Lysine-ON Riboswitch for Metabolic Control of Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-12-18

    Riboswitches are natural RNA elements that regulate gene expression by binding a ligand. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of altering a natural lysine-OFF riboswitch from Eschericia coli (ECRS) to a synthetic lysine-ON riboswitch and using it for metabolic control. To this end, a lysine-ON riboswitch library was constructed using tetA-based dual genetic selection. After screening the library, the functionality of the selected lysine-ON riboswitches was examined using a report gene, lacZ. Selected lysine-ON riboswitches were introduced into the lysE gene (encoding a lysine transport protein) of Corynebacterium glutamicum and used to achieve dynamic control of lysine transport in a recombinant lysine-producing strain, C. glutamicum LPECRS, which bears a deregulated aspartokinase and a lysine-OFF riboswitch for dynamic control of the enzyme citrate synthase. Batch fermentation results of the strains showed that the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain with an additional lysine-ON riboswitch for the control of lysE achieved a 21% increase in the yield of lysine compared to that of the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain and even a 89% increase in yield compared to that of the strain with deregulated aspartokinase. This work provides a useful approach to generate lysine-ON riboswitches for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering and demonstrates for the first time a synergetic effect of lysine-ON and -OFF riboswitches for improving lysine production in this industrially important microorganism. The approach can be used to dynamically control other genes and can be applied to other microorganisms. PMID:26300047

  2. Characterization of the mannitol catabolic operon of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xue; Okai, Naoko; Vertès, Alain A; Inatomi, Ken-Ichi; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2011-09-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes a mannitol catabolic operon, which comprises three genes: the DeoR-type repressor coding gene mtlR (sucR), an MFS transporter gene (mtlT), and a mannitol 2-dehydrogenase gene (mtlD). The mtlR gene is located upstream of the mtlTD genes in the opposite orientation. In spite of this, wild-type C. glutamicum lacks the ability to utilize mannitol. This wild-type phenotype results from the genetic regulation of the genes coding for mannitol transport and catalytic proteins mediated by the autoregulated MtlR protein since mtlR mutants grow on mannitol as the sole carbon source. MtlR binds to sites near the mtlR (two sites) and mtlTD promoters (one site downstream of the promoter), with the consensus sequence 5'-TCTAACA-3' being required for its binding. The newly discovered operon comprises the three basic functional elements required for mannitol utilization: regulation, transport, and metabolism to fructose, further processed to the common intermediate of glycolysis fructose-6-phosphate. When relieved from MtlR repression, C. glutamicum, which lacks a functional fructokinase, excretes the fructose derived from mannitol and imports it by the fructose-specific PTS. In order to use mannitol from seaweed biomass hydrolysates as a carbon source for the production of useful commodity chemicals and materials, an overexpression system using the tac promoter was developed. For congruence with the operon, we propose to rename sucR as the mtlR gene. PMID:21655984

  3. Structural basis for cytokinin production by LOG from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hogyun; Kim, Sangwoo; Sagong, Hye-Young; Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Kim, Il-Kwon; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2016-08-10

    "Lonely guy" (LOG) has been identified as a cytokinin-producing enzyme in plants and plant-interacting fungi. The gene product of Cg2612 from the soil-dwelling bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum was annotated as an LDC. However, the facts that C. glutamicum lacks an LDC and Cg2612 has high amino acid similarity with LOG proteins suggest that Cg2612 is possibly an LOG protein. To investigate the function of Cg2612, we determined its crystal structure at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Cg2612 functions as a dimer and shows an overall structure similar to other known LOGs, such as LOGs from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtLOG), Claviceps purpurea (CpLOG), and Mycobacterium marinum (MmLOG). Cg2612 also contains a "PGGXGTXXE" motif that contributes to the formation of an active site similar to other LOGs. Moreover, biochemical studies on Cg2612 revealed that the protein has phosphoribohydrolase activity but not LDC activity. Based on these structural and biochemical studies, we propose that Cg2612 is not an LDC family enzyme, but instead belongs to the LOG family. In addition, the prenyl-binding site of Cg2612 (CgLOG) comprised residues identical to those seen in AtLOG and CpLOG, albeit dissimilar to those in MmLOG. The work provides structural and functional implications for LOG-like proteins from other microorganisms.

  4. Bio-based production of organic acids with Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Wieschalka, Stefan; Blombach, Bastian; Bott, Michael; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2013-03-01

    The shortage of oil resources, the steadily rising oil prices and the impact of its use on the environment evokes an increasing political, industrial and technical interest for development of safe and efficient processes for the production of chemicals from renewable biomass. Thus, microbial fermentation of renewable feedstocks found its way in white biotechnology, complementing more and more traditional crude oil-based chemical processes. Rational strain design of appropriate microorganisms has become possible due to steadily increasing knowledge on metabolism and pathway regulation of industrially relevant organisms and, aside from process engineering and optimization, has an outstanding impact on improving the performance of such hosts. Corynebacterium glutamicum is well known as workhorse for the industrial production of numerous amino acids. However, recent studies also explored the usefulness of this organism for the production of several organic acids and great efforts have been made for improvement of the performance. This review summarizes the current knowledge and recent achievements on metabolic engineering approaches to tailor C. glutamicum for the bio-based production of organic acids. We focus here on the fermentative production of pyruvate, L- and D-lactate, 2-ketoisovalerate, 2-ketoglutarate, and succinate. These organic acids represent a class of compounds with manifold application ranges, e.g. in pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry, as food additives, and economically very interesting, as precursors for a variety of bulk chemicals and commercially important polymers. PMID:23199277

  5. Anaerobic Growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum via Mixed-Acid Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Andrea; Koch-Koerfges, Abigail; Krumbach, Karin; Brocker, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a model organism in microbial biotechnology, is known to metabolize glucose under oxygen-deprived conditions to l-lactate, succinate, and acetate without significant growth. This property is exploited for efficient production of lactate and succinate. Our detailed analysis revealed that marginal growth takes place under anaerobic conditions with glucose, fructose, sucrose, or ribose as a carbon and energy source but not with gluconate, pyruvate, lactate, propionate, or acetate. Supplementation of glucose minimal medium with tryptone strongly enhanced growth up to a final optical density at 600 nm (OD600) of 12, whereas tryptone alone did not allow growth. Amino acids with a high ATP demand for biosynthesis and amino acids of the glutamate family were particularly important for growth stimulation, indicating ATP limitation and a restricted carbon flux into the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle toward 2-oxoglutarate. Anaerobic cultivation in a bioreactor with constant nitrogen flushing disclosed that CO2 is required to achieve maximal growth and that the pH tolerance is reduced compared to that under aerobic conditions, reflecting a decreased capability for pH homeostasis. Continued growth under anaerobic conditions indicated the absence of an oxygen-requiring reaction that is essential for biomass formation. The results provide an improved understanding of the physiology of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions. PMID:26276118

  6. Bio-based production of organic acids with Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Wieschalka, Stefan; Blombach, Bastian; Bott, Michael; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2013-03-01

    The shortage of oil resources, the steadily rising oil prices and the impact of its use on the environment evokes an increasing political, industrial and technical interest for development of safe and efficient processes for the production of chemicals from renewable biomass. Thus, microbial fermentation of renewable feedstocks found its way in white biotechnology, complementing more and more traditional crude oil-based chemical processes. Rational strain design of appropriate microorganisms has become possible due to steadily increasing knowledge on metabolism and pathway regulation of industrially relevant organisms and, aside from process engineering and optimization, has an outstanding impact on improving the performance of such hosts. Corynebacterium glutamicum is well known as workhorse for the industrial production of numerous amino acids. However, recent studies also explored the usefulness of this organism for the production of several organic acids and great efforts have been made for improvement of the performance. This review summarizes the current knowledge and recent achievements on metabolic engineering approaches to tailor C. glutamicum for the bio-based production of organic acids. We focus here on the fermentative production of pyruvate, L- and D-lactate, 2-ketoisovalerate, 2-ketoglutarate, and succinate. These organic acids represent a class of compounds with manifold application ranges, e.g. in pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry, as food additives, and economically very interesting, as precursors for a variety of bulk chemicals and commercially important polymers.

  7. Structural basis for cytokinin production by LOG from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hogyun; Kim, Sangwoo; Sagong, Hye-Young; Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Kim, Il-Kwon; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    “Lonely guy” (LOG) has been identified as a cytokinin-producing enzyme in plants and plant-interacting fungi. The gene product of Cg2612 from the soil-dwelling bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum was annotated as an LDC. However, the facts that C. glutamicum lacks an LDC and Cg2612 has high amino acid similarity with LOG proteins suggest that Cg2612 is possibly an LOG protein. To investigate the function of Cg2612, we determined its crystal structure at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Cg2612 functions as a dimer and shows an overall structure similar to other known LOGs, such as LOGs from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtLOG), Claviceps purpurea (CpLOG), and Mycobacterium marinum (MmLOG). Cg2612 also contains a “PGGXGTXXE” motif that contributes to the formation of an active site similar to other LOGs. Moreover, biochemical studies on Cg2612 revealed that the protein has phosphoribohydrolase activity but not LDC activity. Based on these structural and biochemical studies, we propose that Cg2612 is not an LDC family enzyme, but instead belongs to the LOG family. In addition, the prenyl-binding site of Cg2612 (CgLOG) comprised residues identical to those seen in AtLOG and CpLOG, albeit dissimilar to those in MmLOG. The work provides structural and functional implications for LOG-like proteins from other microorganisms. PMID:27507425

  8. Systems metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for production of the chemical chaperone ectoine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The stabilizing and function-preserving effects of ectoines have attracted considerable biotechnological interest up to industrial scale processes for their production. These rely on the release of ectoines from high-salinity-cultivated microbial producer cells upon an osmotic down-shock in rather complex processor configurations. There is growing interest in uncoupling the production of ectoines from the typical conditions required for their synthesis, and instead design strains that naturally release ectoines into the medium without the need for osmotic changes, since the use of high-salinity media in the fermentation process imposes notable constraints on the costs, design, and durability of fermenter systems. Results Here, we used a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain as a cellular chassis to establish a microbial cell factory for the biotechnological production of ectoines. The implementation of a mutant aspartokinase enzyme ensured efficient supply of L-aspartate-beta-semialdehyde, the precursor for ectoine biosynthesis. We further engineered the genome of the basic C. glutamicum strain by integrating a codon-optimized synthetic ectABCD gene cluster under expressional control of the strong and constitutive C. glutamicum tuf promoter. The resulting recombinant strain produced ectoine and excreted it into the medium; however, lysine was still found as a by-product. Subsequent inactivation of the L-lysine exporter prevented the undesired excretion of lysine while ectoine was still exported. Using the streamlined cell factory, a fed-batch process was established that allowed the production of ectoine with an overall productivity of 6.7 g L-1 day-1 under growth conditions that did not rely on the use of high-salinity media. Conclusions The present study describes the construction of a stable microbial cell factory for recombinant production of ectoine. We successfully applied metabolic engineering strategies to optimize its synthetic production in the

  9. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum to produce GDP-L-fucose from glucose and mannose.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Wook; Park, Jin-Byung; Park, Yong-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum was metabolically engineered to convert glucose and mannose into guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-L-fucose, a precursor of fucosyl-oligosaccharides, which are involved in various biological and pathological functions. This was done by introducing the gmd and wcaG genes of Escherichia coli encoding GDP-D-mannose-4,6-dehydratase and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose-3,5-epimerase-4-reductase, respectively, which are known as key enzymes in the production of GDP-L-fucose from GDP-D-mannose. Coexpression of the genes allowed the recombinant C. glutamicum cells to produce GDP-L-fucose in a minimal medium containing glucose and mannose as carbon sources. The specific product formation rate was much higher during growth on mannose than on glucose. In addition, the specific product formation rate was further increased by coexpressing the endogenous phosphomanno-mutase gene (manB) and GTP-mannose-1-phosphate guanylyl-transferase gene (manC), which are involved in the conversion of mannose-6-phosphate into GDP-D-mannose. However, the overexpression of manA encoding mannose-6-phosphate isomerase, catalyzing interconversion of mannose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate showed a negative effect on formation of the target product. Overall, coexpression of gmd, wcaG, manB and manC in C. glutamicum enabled production of GDP-L-fucose at the specific rate of 0.11 mg g cell(-1) h(-1). The specific GDP-L-fucose content reached 5.5 mg g cell(-1), which is a 2.4-fold higher than that of the recombinant E. coli overexpressing gmd, wcaG, manB and manC under comparable conditions. Well-established metabolic engineering tools may permit optimization of the carbon and cofactor metabolisms of C. glutamicum to further improve their production capacity.

  10. High-level production of Bacillus cereus phospholipase C in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Ravasi, Pablo; Braia, Mauricio; Eberhardt, Florencia; Elena, Claudia; Cerminati, Sebastián; Peirú, Salvador; Castelli, Maria Eugenia; Menzella, Hugo G

    2015-12-20

    Enzymatic oil degumming (removal of phospholipids) using phospholipase C (PLC) is a well-established and environmentally friendly process for vegetable oil refining. In this work, we report the production of recombinant Bacillus cereus PLC in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13869 in a high cell density fermentation process and its performance in soybean oil degumming. A final concentration of 5.5g/L of the recombinant enzyme was achieved when the respective gene was expressed from the tac promoter in a semi-defined medium. After treatment with trypsin to cleave the propeptide, the mature enzyme completely hydrolyzed phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, which represent 70% of the phospholipids present in soybean oil. The results presented here show the feasibility of using B. cereus PLC for oil degumming and provide a manufacturing process for the cost effective production of this enzyme. PMID:26519562

  11. Bio-based production of organic acids with Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Wieschalka, Stefan; Blombach, Bastian; Bott, Michael; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of oil resources, the steadily rising oil prices and the impact of its use on the environment evokes an increasing political, industrial and technical interest for development of safe and efficient processes for the production of chemicals from renewable biomass. Thus, microbial fermentation of renewable feedstocks found its way in white biotechnology, complementing more and more traditional crude oil-based chemical processes. Rational strain design of appropriate microorganisms has become possible due to steadily increasing knowledge on metabolism and pathway regulation of industrially relevant organisms and, aside from process engineering and optimization, has an outstanding impact on improving the performance of such hosts. Corynebacterium glutamicum is well known as workhorse for the industrial production of numerous amino acids. However, recent studies also explored the usefulness of this organism for the production of several organic acids and great efforts have been made for improvement of the performance. This review summarizes the current knowledge and recent achievements on metabolic engineering approaches to tailor C. glutamicum for the bio-based production of organic acids. We focus here on the fermentative production of pyruvate, l-and d-lactate, 2-ketoisovalerate, 2-ketoglutarate, and succinate. These organic acids represent a class of compounds with manifold application ranges, e.g. in pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry, as food additives, and economically very interesting, as precursors for a variety of bulk chemicals and commercially important polymers. Funding Information Work in the laboratories of the authors was supported by the Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe (FNR) of the Bundesministerium für Ernährung, Landwirtschaft und Verbraucherschutz (BMELV; FNR Grants 220-095-08A and 220-095-08D; Bio-ProChemBB project, ERA-IB programme), by the Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt (DBU Grant AZ13040/05) and the Evonik Degussa AG. PMID

  12. Properties of Cassava Starch Modified by Amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Suriyakul Na Ayudhaya, Pitcha; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook; Laohasongkram, Kalaya; Chaiwanichsiri, Saiwarun

    2016-06-01

    Amylomaltase (α-1,4-glucanotransferase, AM; EC 2.4.1.25) from Corynebacterium glutamicum expressed in Escherichia coli was used to prepare the enzyme-modified cassava starch for food application. About 5% to 15% (w/v) of cassava starch slurries were incubated with 1, 3, or 5 units of amylomaltase/g starch. Apparent amylose, amylopectin chain length distribution, thermal properties, freeze-thaw stability, thermo-reversibility, and gel strength of the obtained modified starches were measured. The apparent amylose content and retrogradation enthalpy were lower, whereas the retrogradation temperatures, freeze-thaw stability, and thermo-reversibility were higher than those of the native cassava starch. However, when amylomaltase content was increased to 20 units of amylomaltase/g starch and for 24 h, the modified starch showed an improvement in the thermo-reversibility property. When used in panna cotta, the gel strength of the sample using the 20 units/24 h modified cassava starch was similar to that of using gelatin. PMID:27105125

  13. Properties of Cassava Starch Modified by Amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Suriyakul Na Ayudhaya, Pitcha; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook; Laohasongkram, Kalaya; Chaiwanichsiri, Saiwarun

    2016-06-01

    Amylomaltase (α-1,4-glucanotransferase, AM; EC 2.4.1.25) from Corynebacterium glutamicum expressed in Escherichia coli was used to prepare the enzyme-modified cassava starch for food application. About 5% to 15% (w/v) of cassava starch slurries were incubated with 1, 3, or 5 units of amylomaltase/g starch. Apparent amylose, amylopectin chain length distribution, thermal properties, freeze-thaw stability, thermo-reversibility, and gel strength of the obtained modified starches were measured. The apparent amylose content and retrogradation enthalpy were lower, whereas the retrogradation temperatures, freeze-thaw stability, and thermo-reversibility were higher than those of the native cassava starch. However, when amylomaltase content was increased to 20 units of amylomaltase/g starch and for 24 h, the modified starch showed an improvement in the thermo-reversibility property. When used in panna cotta, the gel strength of the sample using the 20 units/24 h modified cassava starch was similar to that of using gelatin.

  14. Updates on industrial production of amino acids using Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Wendisch, Volker F; Jorge, João M P; Pérez-García, Fernando; Sgobba, Elvira

    2016-06-01

    L-Amino acids find various applications in biotechnology. L-Glutamic acid and its salts are used as flavor enhancers. Other L-amino acids are used as food or feed additives, in parenteral nutrition or as building blocks for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. L-amino acids are synthesized from precursors of central carbon metabolism. Based on the knowledge of the biochemical pathways microbial fermentation processes of food, feed and pharma amino acids have been developed. Production strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum, which has been used safely for more than 50 years in food biotechnology, and Escherichia coli are constantly improved using metabolic engineering approaches. Research towards new processes is ongoing. Fermentative production of L-amino acids in the million-ton-scale has shaped modern biotechnology and its markets continue to grow steadily. This review focusses on recent achievements in strain development for amino acid production including the use of CRISPRi/dCas9, genome-reduced strains, biosensors and synthetic pathways to enable utilization of alternative carbon sources. PMID:27116971

  15. Overexpression of Mycothiol Disulfide Reductase Enhances Corynebacterium glutamicum Robustness by Modulating Cellular Redox Homeostasis and Antioxidant Proteins under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Si, Meiru; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Bing; Wei, Dawei; Chen, Keqi; Yang, Xu; Xiao, He; Shen, Xihui

    2016-01-01

    Mycothiol (MSH) is the dominant low-molecular-weight thiol (LMWT) unique to high-(G+C)-content Gram-positive Actinobacteria, such as Corynebacterium glutamicum, and is oxidised into its disulfide form mycothiol disulfide (MSSM) under oxidative conditions. Mycothiol disulfide reductase (Mtr), an NADPH-dependent enzyme, reduces MSSM to MSH, thus maintaining intracellular redox homeostasis. In this study, a recombinant plasmid was constructed to overexpress Mtr in C. glutamicum using the expression vector pXMJ19-His6. Mtr-overexpressing C. glutamicum cells showed increased tolerance to ROS induced by oxidants, bactericidal antibiotics, alkylating agents, and heavy metals. The physiological roles of Mtr in resistance to oxidative stresses were corroborated by decreased ROS levels, reduced carbonylation damage, decreased loss of reduced protein thiols, and a massive increase in the levels of reversible protein thiols in Mtr-overexpressing cells exposed to stressful conditions. Moreover, overexpression of Mtr caused a marked increase in the ratio of reduced to oxidised mycothiol (MSH:MSSM), and significantly enhanced the activities of a variety of antioxidant enzymes, including mycothiol peroxidase (MPx), mycoredoxin 1 (Mrx1), thioredoxin 1 (Trx1), and methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA). Taken together, these results indicate that the Mtr protein functions in C. glutamicum by protecting cells against oxidative stress. PMID:27383057

  16. Degradation and assimilation of aromatic compounds by Corynebacterium glutamicum: another potential for applications for this bacterium?

    PubMed

    Shen, Xi-Hui; Zhou, Ning-Yi; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2012-07-01

    With the implementation of the well-established molecular tools and systems biology techniques, new knowledge on aromatic degradation and assimilation by Corynebacterium glutamicum has been emerging. This review summarizes recent findings on degradation of aromatic compounds by C. glutamicum. Among these findings, the mycothiol-dependent gentisate pathway was firstly discovered in C. glutamicum. Other important knowledge derived from C. glutamicum would be the discovery of linkages among aromatic degradation and primary metabolisms such as gluconeogenesis and central carbon metabolism. Various transporters in C. glutamicum have also been identified, and they play an essential role in microbial assimilation of aromatic compounds. Regulation on aromatic degradation occurs mainly at transcription level via pathway-specific regulators, but global regulator(s) is presumably involved in the regulation. It is concluded that C. glutamicum is a very useful model organism to disclose new knowledge of biochemistry, physiology, and genetics of the catabolism of aromatic compounds in high GC content Gram-positive bacteria, and that the new physiological properties of aromatic degradation and assimilation are potentially important for industrial applications of C. glutamicum.

  17. Development of Fatty Acid-Producing Corynebacterium glutamicum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Takeno, Seiki; Takasaki, Manami; Urabayashi, Akinobu; Mimura, Akinori; Muramatsu, Tetsuhiro; Mitsuhashi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    To date, no information has been made available on the genetic traits that lead to increased carbon flow into the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway of Corynebacterium glutamicum. To develop basic technologies for engineering, we employed an approach that begins by isolating a fatty acid-secreting mutant without depending on mutagenic treatment. This was followed by genome analysis to characterize its genetic background. The selection of spontaneous mutants resistant to the palmitic acid ester surfactant Tween 40 resulted in the isolation of a desired mutant that produced oleic acid, suggesting that a single mutation would cause increased carbon flow down the pathway and subsequent excretion of the oversupplied fatty acid into the medium. Two additional rounds of selection of spontaneous cerulenin-resistant mutants led to increased production of the fatty acid in a stepwise manner. Whole-genome sequencing of the resulting best strain identified three specific mutations (fasR20, fasA63up, and fasA2623). Allele-specific PCR analysis showed that the mutations arose in that order. Reconstitution experiments with these mutations revealed that only fasR20 gave rise to oleic acid production in the wild-type strain. The other two mutations contributed to an increase in oleic acid production. Deletion of fasR from the wild-type strain led to oleic acid production as well. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the fasR20 mutation brought about upregulation of the fasA and fasB genes encoding fatty acid synthases IA and IB, respectively, by 1.31-fold ± 0.11-fold and 1.29-fold ± 0.12-fold, respectively, and of the accD1 gene encoding the β-subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase by 3.56-fold ± 0.97-fold. On the other hand, the fasA63up mutation upregulated the fasA gene by 2.67-fold ± 0.16-fold. In flask cultivation with 1% glucose, the fasR20 fasA63up fasA2623 triple mutant produced approximately 280 mg of fatty acids/liter, which consisted mainly of oleic

  18. Production of protocatechuic acid by Corynebacterium glutamicum expressing chorismate-pyruvate lyase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Okai, Naoko; Miyoshi, Takanori; Takeshima, Yasunobu; Kuwahara, Hiroaki; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid; PCA) serves as a building block for polymers and pharmaceuticals. In this study, the biosynthetic pathway for PCA from glucose was engineered in Corynebacterium glutamicum. The pathway to PCA-employed elements of the chorismate pathway by using chorismate-pyruvate lyase (CPL) and 4-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (4-HBA hydroxylase). As C. glutamicum has the potential to synthesize the aromatic amino acid intermediate chorismate and possesses 4-HBA hydroxylase, we focused on expressing Escherichia coli CPL in a phenylalanine-producing strain of C. glutamicum ATCC21420. To secrete PCA, the gene (ubiC) encoding CPL from E. coli was expressed in C. glutamicum ATCC 21420 (strain F(UbiC)). The formation of 28.8 mg/L of extracellular 4-HBA (36 h) and 213 ± 29 mg/L of extracellular PCA (80 h) was obtained by the C. glutamicum strain F(UbiC) from glucose. The strain ATCC21420 was also found to produce extracellular PCA. PCA fermentation was performed using C. glutamicum strain F(UbiC) in a bioreactor at the optimized pH of 7.5. C. glutamicum F(UbiC) produced 615 ± 2.1 mg/L of PCA from 50 g/L of glucose after 72 h. Further, fed-batch fermentation of PCA by C. glutamicum F(UbiC) was performed with feedings of glucose every 24 h. The maximum production of PCA (1140.0 ± 11.6 mg/L) was achieved when 117.0 g/L of glucose was added over 96 h of fed-batch fermentation. PMID:26392137

  19. Physiological roles of mycothiol in detoxification and tolerance to multiple poisonous chemicals in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Bao; Long, Ming-Xiu; Yin, Ya-Jie; Si, Mei-Ru; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Yao; Shen, Xi-Hui

    2013-06-01

    Mycothiol (MSH) plays important roles in maintaining cytosolic redox homeostasis and in adapting to reactive oxygen species in the high-(G + C)-content Gram-positive Actinobacteria. However, its physiological roles are ill defined compared to glutathione, the functional analog of MSH in Gram-negative bacteria and most eukaryotes. In this research, we explored the impact of intracellular MSH on cellular physiology by using MSH-deficient mutants in the model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum. We found that intracellular MSH contributes significantly to resistance to alkylating agents, glyphosate, ethanol, antibiotics, heavy metals and aromatic compounds. In addition, intracellular MSH is beneficial for withstanding oxidative stress induced by various oxidants in C. glutamicum. This study greatly expanded our current knowledge on the physiological functions of mycothiol in C. glutamicum and could be applied to improve the robustness of this scientifically and commercially important species in the future. PMID:23615850

  20. Bio-based production of chemicals, materials and fuels -Corynebacterium glutamicum as versatile cell factory.

    PubMed

    Becker, Judith; Wittmann, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    Since their discovery almost 60 years ago, Corynebacterium glutamicum and related subspecies are writing a remarkable success story in industrial biotechnology. Today, these gram-positive soil bacteria, traditionally well-known as excellent producers of L-amino acids are becoming flexible, efficient production platforms for various chemicals, materials and fuels. This development is intensively driven by systems metabolic engineering concepts integrating systems biology and synthetic biology into strain engineering.

  1. Roles of N287 in catalysis and product formation of amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Nimpiboon, Pitchanan; Krusong, Kuakarun; Kaulpiboon, Jarunee; Kidokoro, Shun-Ichi; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook

    2016-09-16

    Amylomaltase catalyzes intermolecular and intramolecular transglucosylation reactions to form linear and cyclic oligosaccharides, respectively. The aim of this work is to investigate the structure-function relationship of amylomaltase from a mesophilic Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAM). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to substitute Tyr for Asn287 (N287Y) to determine its role in controlling amylomaltase activity and product formation. Expression of the wild-type (WT) and N287Y was achieved by cultivating recombinant cells in the medium containing lactose at 16 °C for 14 h. The purified mutated enzyme showed a significant decrease in all transglucosylation activities while hydrolysis activity was not changed. Optimum temperature and pH for disproportionation reaction were slightly changed upon mutation while those for cyclization reaction were not changed. Interestingly, N287Y showed a change in large-ring cyclodextrin (LR-CD) product profile in which the larger size was observed together with an increase in thermostability and substrate preference for G5 in addition to G3. The secondary structure of the mutated enzyme was slightly changed in related to the WT as evidenced from circular dichroism analysis. This work thus demonstrates that N287 is required for transglucosylation activities of CgAM. Having an aromatic residue in this position increased thermostability, changed product profile and substrate preference but demolished most enzyme activities. PMID:27507216

  2. Growth response of Avena sativa in amino-acids-rich soils converted from phenol-contaminated soils by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Youn; Kim, Bit-Na; Choi, Yong Woo; Yoo, Kye Sang; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2012-04-01

    The biodegradation of phenol in laboratory-contaminated soil was investigated using the Gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum. This study showed that the phenol degradation caused by C. glutamicum was greatly enhanced by the addition of 1% yeast extract. From the toxicity test using Daphnia magna, the soil did not exhibit any hazardous effects after the phenol was removed using C. glutamicum. Additionally, the treatment of the phenolcontaminated soils with C. glutamicum increased various soil amino acid compositions, such as glycine, threonine, isoleucine, alanine, valine, leucine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. This phenomenon induced an increase in the seed germination rate and the root elongation of Avena sativa (oat). This probably reflects that increased soil amino acid composition due to C. glutamicum treatment strengthens the plant roots. Therefore, the phenol-contaminated soil was effectively converted through increased soil amino acid composition, and additionally, the phenol in the soil environment was biodegraded by C. glutamicum.

  3. Monitoring of population dynamics of Corynebacterium glutamicum by multiparameter flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Neumeyer, Andrea; Hübschmann, Thomas; Müller, Susann; Frunzke, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Phenotypic variation of microbial populations is a well-known phenomenon and may have significant impact on the success of industrial bioprocesses. Flow cytometry (FC) and the large repertoire of fluorescent dyes bring the high-throughput analysis of multiple parameters in single bacterial cells into reach. In this study, we evaluated a set of different fluorescent dyes for suitability in FC single cell analysis of the biotechnological platform organism Corynebacterium glutamicum. Already simple scattering properties of C. glutamicum cells in the flow cytometer were shown to provide valuable information on the growth activity of analysed cells. Furthermore, we used DAPI staining for a FC-based determination of the DNA content of C. glutamicum cells grown on standard minimal or complex media. Characteristic DNA patterns were observed mirroring the typical uncoupled DNA synthesis in the logarithmic (log) growth phase and are in agreement with a symmetric type of cell division of C. glutamicum. Application of the fluorescent dyes Syto 9, propidium iodide, and DiOC2(3) allowed the identification of subpopulations with reduced viability and membrane potential within early log and stationary phase populations. The presented data highlight the potential of FC-based analyses for online monitoring of C. glutamicum bioprocesses and provide a first reference for future applications and protocols. PMID:23279937

  4. Altered acetylation and succinylation profiles in Corynebacterium glutamicum in response to conditions inducing glutamate overproduction.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuta; Nagano-Shoji, Megumi; Kubo, Shosei; Kawamura, Yumi; Yoshida, Ayako; Kawasaki, Hisashi; Nishiyama, Makoto; Yoshida, Minoru; Kosono, Saori

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is utilized during industrial fermentation to produce amino acids such as L-glutamate. During L-glutamate fermentation, C. glutamicum changes the flux of central carbon metabolism to favor L-glutamate production, but the molecular mechanisms that explain these flux changes remain largely unknown. Here, we found that the profiles of two major lysine acyl modifications were significantly altered upon glutamate overproduction in C. glutamicum; acetylation decreased, whereas succinylation increased. A label-free semi-quantitative proteomic analysis identified 604 acetylated proteins with 1328 unique acetylation sites and 288 succinylated proteins with 651 unique succinylation sites. Acetylation and succinylation targeted enzymes in central carbon metabolic pathways that are directly related to glutamate production, including the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC), a key enzyme regulating glutamate overproduction. Structural mapping revealed that several critical lysine residues in the ODHC components were susceptible to acetylation and succinylation. Furthermore, induction of glutamate production was associated with changes in the extent of acetylation and succinylation of lysine, suggesting that these modifications may affect the activity of enzymes involved in glutamate production. Deletion of phosphotransacetylase decreased the extent of protein acetylation in nonproducing condition, suggesting that acetyl phosphate-dependent acetylation is active in C. glutamicum. However, no effect was observed on the profiles of acetylation and succinylation in glutamate-producing condition upon disruption of acetyl phosphate metabolism or deacetylase homologs. It was considered likely that the reduced acetylation in glutamate-producing condition may reflect metabolic states where the flux through acid-producing pathways is very low, and substrates for acetylation do not accumulate in the cell. Succinylation would occur more

  5. Anaerobic growth and potential for amino acid production by nitrate respiration in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Seiki; Ohnishi, Junko; Komatsu, Tomoha; Masaki, Tatsuya; Sen, Kikuo; Ikeda, Masato

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen limitation is a crucial problem in amino acid fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum. Toward this subject, our study was initiated by analysis of the oxygen-requiring properties of C. glutamicum, generally regarded as a strict aerobe. This organism formed colonies on agar plates up to relatively low oxygen concentrations (0.5% O(2)), while no visible colonies were formed in the absence of O(2). However, in the presence of nitrate (NO3-), the organism exhibited limited growth anaerobically with production of nitrite (NO2-), indicating that C. glutamicum can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor. Assays of cell extracts from aerobic and hypoxic cultures yielded comparable nitrate reductase activities, irrespective of nitrate levels. Genome analysis revealed a narK2GHJI cluster potentially relevant to nitrate reductase and transport. Disruptions of narG and narJ abolished the nitrate-dependent anaerobic growth with the loss of nitrate reductase activity. Disruption of the putative nitrate/nitrite antiporter gene narK2 did not affect the enzyme activity but impaired the anaerobic growth. These indicate that this locus is responsible for nitrate respiration. Agar piece assays using L-lysine- and L-arginine-producing strains showed that production of both amino acids occurred anaerobically by nitrate respiration, indicating the potential of C. glutamicum for anaerobic amino acid production.

  6. In vitro functional characterization of the Na+/H+ antiporters in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ning; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Haijiao; Liu, Qingdai; Liu, Jun; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-02-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, typically used as industrial workhorse for amino acid production, is a moderately salt-alkali-tolerant microorganism with optimal growth at pH 7-9. However, little is known about the mechanisms of salt-alkali tolerance in C. glutamicum. Here, the catalytic capacity of three putative Na(+)/H(+) antiporters from C. glutamicum (designated as Cg-Mrp1, Cg-Mrp2 and Cg-NhaP) were characterized in an antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc strain. Only Cg-Mrp1 was able to effectively complement the Na(+)-sensitive of E. coli KNabc. Cg-Mrp1 exhibited obvious Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport activities with low apparent Km values of 1.08 mM and 1.41 mM for Na(+) and Li(+), respectively. The Na(+)/H(+) antiport activity of Cg-Mrp1 was optimal in the alkaline pH range. All three antiporters showed detectable K(+)/H(+) antiport activitiy. Cg-NhaP also exhibited Na(+)(Li(+),Rb(+))/H(+) antiport activities but at lower levels of activity. Interestingly, overexpression of Cg-Mrp2 exhibited clear Na(+)(K(+))/H(+) antiport activities. These results suggest that C. glutamicum Na(+)(K(+))/H(+) antiporters may have overlapping roles in coping with salt-alkali and perhaps high-osmolarity stress.

  7. Carbohydrate metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum and applications for the metabolic engineering of L-lysine production strains.

    PubMed

    Blombach, Bastian; Seibold, Gerd M

    2010-05-01

    Carbohydrates exclusively serve as feedstock for industrial amino acid production with Corynebacterium glutamicum. Due to the industrial interest, knowledge about the pathways for carbohydrate metabolization in C. glutamicum steadily increases, enabling the rational design of optimized strains and production processes. In this review, we provide an overview of the metabolic pathways for utilization of hexoses (glucose, fructose), disaccharides (sucrose, maltose), pentoses (D-ribose, L-arabinose, D-xylose), gluconate, and beta-glucosides present in C. glutamicum. Recent approaches of metabolic engineering of L: -lysine production strains based on the known pathways are described and evaluated with respect to L: -lysine yields.

  8. Global Transcriptomic Analysis of the Response of Corynebacterium glutamicum to Vanillin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Can; Pan, Junfeng; Yang, Xiaobing; Guo, Chenghao; Ding, Wei; Si, Meiru; Zhang, Yi; Shen, Xihui; Wang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant and renewable resource for biofuels and bio-based chemicals. Vanillin is one of the major phenolic inhibitors in biomass production using lignocellulose. To assess the response of Corynebacterium glutamicum to vanillin stress, we performed a global transcriptional response analysis. The transcriptional data showed that the vanillin stress not only affected the genes involved in degradation of vanillin, but also differentially regulated several genes related to the stress response, ribosome/translation, protein secretion, and the cell envelope. Moreover, deletion of the sigH or msrA gene in C. glutamicum resulted in a decrease in cell viability under vanillin stress. These insights will promote further engineering of model industrial strains, with enhanced tolerance or degradation ability to vanillin to enable suitable production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:27760214

  9. Corynebacterium glutamicum superoxide dismutase is a manganese-strict non-cambialistic enzyme in vitro.

    PubMed

    El Shafey, H M; Ghanem, S; Merkamm, M; Guyonvarch, A

    2008-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) of Corynebacterium glutamicum was purified and characterized. The enzyme had a native molecular weight of about 80kDa, whereas a monomer with molecular weight of 24kDa was found on SDS-PAGE suggesting it to be homotetramer. The native SOD activity stained gel revealed a unique cytosolic enzyme. Supplementing growth media with manganese increased the specific activity significantly, while adding iron did not result in significant difference. No growth perturbation was observed with the supplemented media. In vitro metal removal and replacement studies revealed conservation of about 85% of the specific activity by substitution with manganese, while substitution with copper, iron, nickel or zinc did not restore any significant specific activity. Manganese was identified by atomic absorption spectrometer, while no signals corresponding to fixing other metallic elements were detected. Thus, C. glutamicum SOD could be considered a strict (non-cambialistic) manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). PMID:16809027

  10. Generation of Minicells from an Endotoxin-Free Gram-Positive Strain Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Young; Choy, Hyon E; Lee, Jin-Ho; Kim, Geun-Joong

    2015-04-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) incorporating bacterial minicells have been evaluated as a very powerful tool in view of biocompatibility. However, limited studies have been carried out on these systems, mainly using minicells from Salmonella sp. and Escherichia coli. Thus, we generated a new minicell-producing strain from an endotoxin-free Corynebacterium glutamicum by the inactivation of genes related to cell division. The two knockout strains, ΔparA and Δncgl1366, showed distinct abilities to produce minicells. The resulting minicells were purified via sequential antibiotic treatments and centrifugations, which resulted in reproducible yields. PMID:25341464

  11. Impact of different CO2/HCO3- levels on metabolism and regulation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Blombach, Bastian; Buchholz, Jens; Busche, Tobias; Kalinowski, Jörn; Takors, Ralf

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the growth kinetics and transcriptional responses of Corynebacterium glutamicum in environments with low (pCO2<40 mbar) and high (pCO2 ≥ 300 mbar) CO2/HCO3(-) levels compared to standard conditions. When cultivated at high CO2/HCO3(-)-levels, C. glutamicum showed increased (63%) biomass to substrate yields during the initial growth phase. Other kinetic parameters such as growth rate (μ), specific glucose consumption rate (qS), and selected enzymatic activities of anaplerotic reactions, the pentose phosphate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle were similar to standard conditions. However, microarray hybridization disclosed a complex transcriptional response involving 117 differentially expressed genes. Among those, 60 genes were assigned to the complete DtxR/RipA regulon controlling iron homeostasis in C. glutamicum. Impaired growth of a ΔdtxR mutant at high CO2/HCO3(-) levels validated the relevance of this master regulator to cope with excessive CO2/HCO3(-) availability. At low CO2/HCO3(-) levels, C. glutamicum grew in a bi-level manner with three distinct growth phases. Differential analyses revealed approximately doubled activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase accompanied by the formation of L-alanine and L-valine during the lowest μ occurring in mid-phase of the cultivation. DNA microarray analysis revealed more than 100 differentially expressed genes in growth phase II compared to phase I including almost all thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) biosynthesis genes, which were significantly up regulated. Concluding, we hypothesize that C. glutamicum counteracts the lack of CO2/HCO3(-) by triggering TPP biosynthesis for increasing the activities of TPP-dependent enzymes involved in CO2 formation.

  12. Pupylated proteins in Corynebacterium glutamicum revealed by MudPIT analysis.

    PubMed

    Küberl, Andreas; Fränzel, Benjamin; Eggeling, Lothar; Polen, Tino; Wolters, Dirk Andreas; Bott, Michael

    2014-06-01

    In a manner similar to ubiquitin, the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) has been shown to target proteins for degradation via the proteasome in mycobacteria. However, not all actinobacteria possessing the Pup protein also contain a proteasome. In this study, we set out to study pupylation in the proteasome-lacking non-pathogenic model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum. A defined pup deletion mutant of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 grew aerobically as the parent strain in standard glucose minimal medium, indicating that pupylation is dispensable under these conditions. After expression of a Pup derivative carrying an aminoterminal polyhistidine tag in the Δpup mutant and Ni(2+)-chelate affinity chromatography, pupylated proteins were isolated. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS of the elution fraction unraveled 55 proteins being pupylated in C. glutamicum and 66 pupylation sites. Similar to mycobacteria, the majority of pupylated proteins are involved in metabolism or translation. Our results define the first pupylome of an actinobacterial species lacking a proteasome, confirming that other fates besides proteasomal degradation are possible for pupylated proteins. PMID:24737727

  13. Characterization of citrate utilization in Corynebacterium glutamicum by transcriptome and proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Polen, Tino; Schluesener, Daniela; Poetsch, Ansgar; Bott, Michael; Wendisch, Volker F

    2007-08-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum grows aerobically on a variety of carbohydrates and organic acids as single or combined sources of carbon and energy. To characterize the citrate utilization in C. glutamicum on a genomewide scale, a comparative analysis was carried out by combining transcriptome and proteome analysis. In cells grown on citrate, transcriptome analysis revealed highest expression changes for two different citrate-uptake systems encoded by citM and tctCBA, whereas genes encoding uptake systems for the glucose- (ptsG), sucrose- (ptsS) and fructose- (ptsF) specific PTS components and permeases for gluconate (gntP) and glutamate (gluC) displayed decreased mRNA levels in citrate-grown cells. This pattern was also observed when cells grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium plus citrate were compared with cells grown in LB medium, indicating some kind of catabolite repression. Genes encoding enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase, succinyl-CoA synthetase, succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase), malic enzyme, PEP carboxykinase, gluconeogenic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ATP synthase displayed increased expression in cells grown on citrate. Accordingly, proteome analysis revealed elevated protein levels of these enzymes and showed a good correlation with the mRNA levels. In conclusion, this study revealed the citrate stimulon in C. glutamicum and the regulated central metabolic genes when grown on citrate. PMID:17559405

  14. FudC, a protein primarily responsible for furfural detoxification in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Yota; Kudou, Motonori; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Ishii, Jun; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    Lignocellulosic hydrolysates contain compounds that inhibit microbial growth and fermentation, thereby decreasing the productivity of biofuel and biochemical production. In particular, the heterocyclic aldehyde furfural is one of the most toxic compounds found in these hydrolysates. We previously demonstrated that Corynebacterium glutamicum converts furfural into the less toxic compounds furfuryl alcohol and 2-furoic acid. To date, however, the genes involved in these oxidation and reduction reactions have not been identified in the C. glutamicum genome. Here, we show that Cgl0331 (designated FudC) is mainly responsible for the reduction of furfural into furfuryl alcohol in C. glutamicum. Deletion of the gene encoding FudC markedly diminished the in vivo reduction of furfural to furfuryl alcohol. Purified His-tagged FudC protein from Escherichia coli was also shown to convert furfural into furfuryl alcohol in an in vitro reaction utilizing NADPH, but not NADH, as a cofactor. Kinetic measurements demonstrated that FudC has a high affinity for furfural but has a narrow substrate range for other aldehydes compared to the protein responsible for furfural reduction in E. coli.

  15. Codon Usage Patterns in Corynebacterium glutamicum: Mutational Bias, Natural Selection and Amino Acid Conservation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiming; Wu, Jinyu; Yang, Huanming; Bao, Qiyu

    2010-01-01

    The alternative synonymous codons in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a well-known bacterium used in industry for the production of amino acid, have been investigated by multivariate analysis. As C. glutamicum is a GC-rich organism, G and C are expected to predominate at the third position of codons. Indeed, overall codon usage analyses have indicated that C and/or G ending codons are predominant in this organism. Through multivariate statistical analysis, apart from mutational selection, we identified three other trends of codon usage variation among the genes. Firstly, the majority of highly expressed genes are scattered towards the positive end of the first axis, whereas the majority of lowly expressed genes are clustered towards the other end of the first axis. Furthermore, the distinct difference in the two sets of genes was that the C ending codons are predominate in putatively highly expressed genes, suggesting that the C ending codons are translationally optimal in this organism. Secondly, the majority of the putatively highly expressed genes have a tendency to locate on the leading strand, which indicates that replicational and transciptional selection might be invoked. Thirdly, highly expressed genes are more conserved than lowly expressed genes by synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions among orthologous genes fromthe genomes of C. glutamicum and C. diphtheriae. We also analyzed other factors such as the length of genes and hydrophobicity that might influence codon usage and found their contributions to be weak. PMID:20445740

  16. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for methionine production by removing feedback inhibition and increasing NADPH level.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Cong, Hua; Liu, Bingnan; Song, Jinzhu; Sun, Xueying; Zhang, Junzheng; Yang, Qian

    2016-09-01

    Relieving the feedback inhibition of key enzymes in a metabolic pathway is frequently the first step of producer-strain construction by genetic engineering. However, the strict feedback regulation exercised by microorganisms in methionine biosynthesis often makes it difficult to produce methionine at a high level. In this study, Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was metabolically engineered for methionine production. First, the metD gene encoding the methionine uptake system was deleted to achieve extracellular accumulation of methionine. Then, random mutagenesis was performed to remove feedback inhibition by metabolic end-products. The resulting strain C. glutamicum ENM-16 was further engineered to block or decrease competitive branch pathways by deleting the thrB gene and changing the start codon of the dapA gene, followed by point mutations of lysC (C932T) and pyc (G1A, C1372T) to increase methionine precursor supply. To enrich the NADPH pool, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the pentose phosphate pathway were mutated to reduce their sensitivity to inhibition by intracellular metabolites. The resultant strain C. glutamicum LY-5 produced 6.85 ± 0.23 g methionine l(-1) with substrate-specific yield (Y P/S) of 0.08 mol per mol of glucose after 72 h fed-batch fermentation. The strategies described here will be useful for construction of methionine engineering strains. PMID:27255137

  17. Codon Usage Patterns in Corynebacterium glutamicum: Mutational Bias, Natural Selection and Amino Acid Conservation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiming; Wu, Jinyu; Yang, Huanming; Bao, Qiyu

    2010-01-01

    The alternative synonymous codons in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a well-known bacterium used in industry for the production of amino acid, have been investigated by multivariate analysis. As C. glutamicum is a GC-rich organism, G and C are expected to predominate at the third position of codons. Indeed, overall codon usage analyses have indicated that C and/or G ending codons are predominant in this organism. Through multivariate statistical analysis, apart from mutational selection, we identified three other trends of codon usage variation among the genes. Firstly, the majority of highly expressed genes are scattered towards the positive end of the first axis, whereas the majority of lowly expressed genes are clustered towards the other end of the first axis. Furthermore, the distinct difference in the two sets of genes was that the C ending codons are predominate in putatively highly expressed genes, suggesting that the C ending codons are translationally optimal in this organism. Secondly, the majority of the putatively highly expressed genes have a tendency to locate on the leading strand, which indicates that replicational and transciptional selection might be invoked. Thirdly, highly expressed genes are more conserved than lowly expressed genes by synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions among orthologous genes fromthe genomes of C. glutamicum and C. diphtheriae. We also analyzed other factors such as the length of genes and hydrophobicity that might influence codon usage and found their contributions to be weak.

  18. Chromosome segregation impacts on cell growth and division site selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Schauss, Astrid; Krämer, Reinhard; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids.

  19. Succinate production from CO₂-grown microalgal biomass as carbon source using engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum through consolidated bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungseok; Sim, Sang Jun; Bott, Michael; Um, Youngsoon; Oh, Min-Kyu; Woo, Han Min

    2014-07-24

    The potential for production of chemicals from microalgal biomass has been considered as an alternative route for CO₂ mitigation and establishment of biorefineries. This study presents the development of consolidated bioprocessing for succinate production from microalgal biomass using engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum. Starch-degrading and succinate-producing C. glutamicum strains produced succinate (0.16 g succinate/g total carbon source) from a mixture of starch and glucose as a model microalgal biomass. Subsequently, the engineered C. glutamicum strains were able to produce succinate (0.28 g succinate/g of total sugars including starch) from pretreated microalgal biomass of CO₂-grown Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. For the first time, this work shows succinate production from CO₂ via sequential fermentations of CO₂-grown microalgae and engineered C. glutamicum. Therefore, consolidated bioprocessing based on microalgal biomass could be useful to promote variety of biorefineries.

  20. Development and experimental verification of a genome-scale metabolic model for Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Shinfuku, Yohei; Sorpitiporn, Natee; Sono, Masahiro; Furusawa, Chikara; Hirasawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Background In silico genome-scale metabolic models enable the analysis of the characteristics of metabolic systems of organisms. In this study, we reconstructed a genome-scale metabolic model of Corynebacterium glutamicum on the basis of genome sequence annotation and physiological data. The metabolic characteristics were analyzed using flux balance analysis (FBA), and the results of FBA were validated using data from culture experiments performed at different oxygen uptake rates. Results The reconstructed genome-scale metabolic model of C. glutamicum contains 502 reactions and 423 metabolites. We collected the reactions and biomass components from the database and literatures, and made the model available for the flux balance analysis by filling gaps in the reaction networks and removing inadequate loop reactions. Using the framework of FBA and our genome-scale metabolic model, we first simulated the changes in the metabolic flux profiles that occur on changing the oxygen uptake rate. The predicted production yields of carbon dioxide and organic acids agreed well with the experimental data. The metabolic profiles of amino acid production phases were also investigated. A comprehensive gene deletion study was performed in which the effects of gene deletions on metabolic fluxes were simulated; this helped in the identification of several genes whose deletion resulted in an improvement in organic acid production. Conclusion The genome-scale metabolic model provides useful information for the evaluation of the metabolic capabilities and prediction of the metabolic characteristics of C. glutamicum. This can form a basis for the in silico design of C. glutamicum metabolic networks for improved bioproduction of desirable metabolites. PMID:19646286

  1. Characterization and crystal structure of lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase (cDHDPS) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, E.A.; Bannon, G.A.; Glenn, K.C.; Jeong, S.S.; Sturman, E.J.; Rydel, T.J.

    2008-11-21

    The lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase enzyme (cDHDPS) was recently successfully introduced into maize plants to enhance the level of lysine in the grain. To better understand lysine insensitivity of the cDHDPS, we expressed, purified, kinetically characterized the protein, and solved its X-ray crystal structure. The cDHDPS enzyme has a fold and overall structure that is highly similar to other DHDPS proteins. A noteworthy feature of the active site is the evidence that the catalytic lysine residue forms a Schiff base adduct with pyruvate. Analyses of the cDHDPS structure in the vicinity of the putative binding site for S-lysine revealed that the allosteric binding site in the Escherichia coli DHDPS protein does not exist in cDHDPS due to three non-conservative amino acids substitutions, and this is likely why cDHDPS is not feedback inhibited by lysine.

  2. Scanning the Corynebacterium glutamicum R genome for high-efficiency secretion signal sequences.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Keiro; Tsuchida, Yoshiki; Okibe, Naoko; Teramoto, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    Systematic screening of secretion proteins using an approach based on the completely sequenced genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum R revealed 405 candidate signal peptides, 108 of which were able to heterologously secrete an active-form alpha-amylase derived from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. These comprised 90 general secretory (Sec)-type, 10 twin-arginine translocator (Tat)-type and eight Sec-type with presumptive lipobox peptides. Only Sec- and Tat-type signals directed high-efficiency secretion. In two assays, 11 of these signals resulted in 50- to 150-fold increased amounts of secreted alpha-amylase compared with the well-known corynebacterial secretory protein PS2. While the presence of an AXA motif at the cleavage sites was readily apparent, it was the presence of a glutamine residue adjacent to the cleavage site that may affect secretion efficiency. PMID:19246745

  3. Impact of pulsed electric fields on Corynebacterium glutamicum cell membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Tryfona, Theodora; Bustard, Mark T

    2008-04-01

    The permeability barrier of the microbial cell envelope for substrates and products often causes very low reaction rates of whole cells. Therefore, it is of interest to develop an effective method to reduce this permeability barrier in order to increase product yields. Utilisation of pulse electric fields may improve amino acid release from Corynebacterium glutamicum by up to several orders of magnitude. In particular pulsed electric fields may change the cell/membrane's dielectric properties and induce the release of intracellular metabolites. In this study the parameters for successful electropermeabilization were determined and the viabilities of treated cells were examined. We also found that pulse treated cells not only maintained their viabilities but also their ability to reproduce, post-pulse treatment. Since electropermeabilized cells could maintain both their viabilities and ability to reproduce, we believe that this preliminary data may contribute to the optimization of fermentative production of amino acids and bioprocess enhancement through electropermeabilization and may be beneficial to industrial bioprocesses.

  4. Aerobic production of succinate from arabinose by metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Zhu, Nianqing; Xia, Huihua

    2014-01-01

    Arabinose is considered as an ideal feedstock for the microbial production of value-added chemicals due to its abundance in hemicellulosic wastes. In this study, the araBAD operon from Escherichia coli was introduced into succinate-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum, which enabled aerobic production of succinate using arabinose as sole carbon source. The engineered strain ZX1 (pXaraBAD, pEacsAgltA) produced 74.4 mM succinate with a yield of 0.58 mol (mol arabinose)(-1), which represented 69.9% of the theoretically maximal yield. Moreover, this strain produced 110.2 mM succinate using combined substrates of glucose and arabinose. To date, this is the highest succinate production under aerobic conditions in minimal medium.

  5. Formation of xylitol and xylitol-5-phosphate and its impact on growth of d-xylose-utilizing Corynebacterium glutamicum strains.

    PubMed

    Radek, Andreas; Müller, Moritz-Fabian; Gätgens, Jochem; Eggeling, Lothar; Krumbach, Karin; Marienhagen, Jan; Noack, Stephan

    2016-08-10

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum has no endogenous metabolic activity for utilizing the lignocellulosic pentose d-xylose for cell growth. Therefore, two different engineering approaches have been pursued resulting in platform strains harbouring a functional version of either the Isomerase (ISO) or the Weimberg (WMB) pathway for d-xylose assimilation. In a previous study we found for C. glutamicum WMB by-product formation of xylitol during growth on d-xylose and speculated that the observed lower growth rates are due to the growth inhibiting effect of this compound. Based on a detailed phenotyping of the ISO, WMB and the wild-type strain of C. glutamicum, we here show that this organism has a natural capability to synthesize xylitol from d-xylose under aerobic cultivation conditions. We furthermore observed the intracellular accumulation of xylitol-5-phosphate as a result of the intracellular phosphorylation of xylitol, which was particularly pronounced in the C. glutamicum ISO strain. Interestingly, low amounts of supplemented xylitol strongly inhibit growth of this strain on d-xylose, d-glucose and d-arabitol. These findings demonstrate that xylitol is a suitable substrate of the endogenous xylulokinase (XK, encoded by xylB) and its overexpression in the ISO strain leads to a significant phosphorylation of xylitol in C. glutamicum. Therefore, in order to circumvent cytotoxicity by xylitol-5-phosphate, the WMB pathway represents an interesting alternative route for engineering C. glutamicum towards efficient d-xylose utilization.

  6. C1 Metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum: an Endogenous Pathway for Oxidation of Methanol to Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Witthoff, Sabrina; Mühlroth, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Methanol is considered an interesting carbon source in “bio-based” microbial production processes. Since Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important host in industrial biotechnology, in particular for amino acid production, we performed studies of the response of this organism to methanol. The C. glutamicum wild type was able to convert 13C-labeled methanol to 13CO2. Analysis of global gene expression in the presence of methanol revealed several genes of ethanol catabolism to be upregulated, indicating that some of the corresponding enzymes are involved in methanol oxidation. Indeed, a mutant lacking the alcohol dehydrogenase gene adhA showed a 62% reduced methanol consumption rate, indicating that AdhA is mainly responsible for methanol oxidation to formaldehyde. Further studies revealed that oxidation of formaldehyde to formate is catalyzed predominantly by two enzymes, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase Ald and the mycothiol-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase AdhE. The Δald ΔadhE and Δald ΔmshC deletion mutants were severely impaired in their ability to oxidize formaldehyde, but residual methanol oxidation to CO2 was still possible. The oxidation of formate to CO2 is catalyzed by the formate dehydrogenase FdhF, recently identified by us. Similar to the case with ethanol, methanol catabolism is subject to carbon catabolite repression in the presence of glucose and is dependent on the transcriptional regulator RamA, which was previously shown to be essential for expression of adhA and ald. In conclusion, we were able to show that C. glutamicum possesses an endogenous pathway for methanol oxidation to CO2 and to identify the enzymes and a transcriptional regulator involved in this pathway. PMID:24014532

  7. C1 metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum: an endogenous pathway for oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Witthoff, Sabrina; Mühlroth, Alice; Marienhagen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Methanol is considered an interesting carbon source in "bio-based" microbial production processes. Since Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important host in industrial biotechnology, in particular for amino acid production, we performed studies of the response of this organism to methanol. The C. glutamicum wild type was able to convert (13)C-labeled methanol to (13)CO2. Analysis of global gene expression in the presence of methanol revealed several genes of ethanol catabolism to be upregulated, indicating that some of the corresponding enzymes are involved in methanol oxidation. Indeed, a mutant lacking the alcohol dehydrogenase gene adhA showed a 62% reduced methanol consumption rate, indicating that AdhA is mainly responsible for methanol oxidation to formaldehyde. Further studies revealed that oxidation of formaldehyde to formate is catalyzed predominantly by two enzymes, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase Ald and the mycothiol-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase AdhE. The Δald ΔadhE and Δald ΔmshC deletion mutants were severely impaired in their ability to oxidize formaldehyde, but residual methanol oxidation to CO2 was still possible. The oxidation of formate to CO2 is catalyzed by the formate dehydrogenase FdhF, recently identified by us. Similar to the case with ethanol, methanol catabolism is subject to carbon catabolite repression in the presence of glucose and is dependent on the transcriptional regulator RamA, which was previously shown to be essential for expression of adhA and ald. In conclusion, we were able to show that C. glutamicum possesses an endogenous pathway for methanol oxidation to CO2 and to identify the enzymes and a transcriptional regulator involved in this pathway.

  8. A proteomic study of Corynebacterium glutamicum AAA+ protease FtsH

    PubMed Central

    Lüdke, Alja; Krämer, Reinhard; Burkovski, Andreas; Schluesener, Daniela; Poetsch, Ansgar

    2007-01-01

    Background The influence of the membrane-bound AAA+ protease FtsH on membrane and cytoplasmic proteins of Corynebacterium glutamicum was investigated in this study. For the analysis of the membrane fraction, anion exchange chromatography was combined with SDS-PAGE, while the cytoplasmic protein fraction was studied by conventional two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Results In contrast to the situation in other bacteria, deletion of C. glutamicum ftsH has no significant effect on growth in standard minimal medium or response to heat or osmotic stress. On the proteome level, deletion of the ftsH gene resulted in a strong increase of ten cytoplasmic and membrane proteins, namely biotin carboxylase/biotin carboxyl carrier protein (accBC), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gap), homocysteine methyltransferase (metE), malate synthase (aceB), isocitrate lyase (aceA), a conserved hypothetical protein (NCgl1985), succinate dehydrogenase A (sdhA), succinate dehydrogenase B (sdhB), succinate dehydrogenase CD (sdhCD), and glutamate binding protein (gluB), while 38 cytoplasmic and membrane-associated proteins showed a decreased abundance. The decreasing amount of succinate dehydrogenase A (sdhA) in the cytoplasmic fraction of the ftsH mutant compared to the wild type and its increasing abundance in the membrane fraction indicates that FtsH might be involved in the cleavage of a membrane anchor of this membrane-associated protein and by this changes its localization. Conclusion The data obtained hint to an involvement of C. glutamicum FtsH protease mainly in regulation of energy and carbon metabolism, while the protease is not involved in stress response, as found in other bacteria. PMID:17254330

  9. Production of L-lysine on different silage juices using genetically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Andreas; Wagner, Ines; Sieker, Tim; Ulber, Roland; Schneider, Konstantin; Peifer, Susanne; Heinzle, Elmar

    2013-01-20

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, the best established industrial producer organism for lysine was genetically modified to allow the production of lysine on grass and corn silages. The resulting strain C. glutamicum lysC(fbr)dld(Psod)pyc(Psod)malE(Psod)fbp(Psod)gapX(Psod) was based on earlier work (Neuner and Heinzle, 2011). That mutant carries a point mutation in the aspartokinase (lysC) regulatory subunit gene as well as overexpression of D-lactate dehydrogenase (dld), pyruvate carboxylase (pyc) and malic enzyme (malE) using the strong Psod promoter. Here, we additionally overexpressed fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (fbp) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapX) using the same promoter. The resulting strain grew readily on grass and corn silages with a specific growth rate of 0.35 h⁻¹ and lysine carbon yields of approximately 90 C-mmol (C-mol)⁻¹. Lysine yields were hardly affected by oxygen limitation whereas linear growth was observed under oxygen limiting conditions. Overall, this strain seems very robust with respect to the composition of silage utilizing all quantified low molecular weight substrates, e.g. lactate, glucose, fructose, maltose, quinate, fumarate, glutamate, leucine, isoleucine and alanine.

  10. Biosensor-driven adaptive laboratory evolution of l-valine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Regina; Gätgens, Cornelia; Gätgens, Jochem; Polen, Tino; Kalinowski, Jörn; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution has proven a valuable strategy for metabolic engineering. Here, we established an experimental evolution approach for improving microbial metabolite production by imposing an artificial selective pressure on the fluorescent output of a biosensor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Cells showing the highest fluorescent output were iteratively isolated and (re-)cultivated. The L-valine producer Corynebacterium glutamicum ΔaceE was equipped with an L-valine-responsive sensor based on the transcriptional regulator Lrp of C. glutamicum. Evolved strains featured a significantly higher growth rate, increased L-valine titers (~25%) and a 3-4-fold reduction of by-product formation. Genome sequencing resulted in the identification of a loss-of-function mutation (UreD-E188*) in the gene ureD (urease accessory protein), which was shown to increase L-valine production by up to 100%. Furthermore, decreased L-alanine formation was attributed to a mutation in the global regulator GlxR. These results emphasize biosensor-driven evolution as a straightforward approach to improve growth and productivity of microbial production strains.

  11. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13869 for L-valine production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Li, Yanyan; Hu, Jinyu; Dong, Xunyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-05-01

    In this study, an L-valine-producing strain was developed from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13869 through deletion of the three genes aceE, alaT and ilvA combined with the overexpression of six genes ilvB, ilvN, ilvC, lrp1, brnF and brnE. Overexpression of lrp1 alone increased L-valine production by 16-fold. Deletion of the aceE, alaT and ilvA increased L-valine production by 44-fold. Overexpression of the six genes ilvB, ilvN, ilvC, lrp1, brnE and brnF in the triple deletion mutant WCC003 further increased L-valine production. The strain WCC003/pJYW-4-ilvBNC1-lrp1-brnFE produced 243mM L-valine in flask cultivation and 437mM (51g/L) L-valine in fed-batch fermentation and lacked detectable amino-acid byproduct such as l-alanine and l-isoleucine that are usually found in the fermentation of L-valine-producing C. glutamicum.

  12. Biosensor-driven adaptive laboratory evolution of l-valine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Regina; Gätgens, Cornelia; Gätgens, Jochem; Polen, Tino; Kalinowski, Jörn; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution has proven a valuable strategy for metabolic engineering. Here, we established an experimental evolution approach for improving microbial metabolite production by imposing an artificial selective pressure on the fluorescent output of a biosensor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Cells showing the highest fluorescent output were iteratively isolated and (re-)cultivated. The L-valine producer Corynebacterium glutamicum ΔaceE was equipped with an L-valine-responsive sensor based on the transcriptional regulator Lrp of C. glutamicum. Evolved strains featured a significantly higher growth rate, increased L-valine titers (~25%) and a 3-4-fold reduction of by-product formation. Genome sequencing resulted in the identification of a loss-of-function mutation (UreD-E188*) in the gene ureD (urease accessory protein), which was shown to increase L-valine production by up to 100%. Furthermore, decreased L-alanine formation was attributed to a mutation in the global regulator GlxR. These results emphasize biosensor-driven evolution as a straightforward approach to improve growth and productivity of microbial production strains. PMID:26453945

  13. The small 6C RNA of Corynebacterium glutamicum is involved in the SOS response.

    PubMed

    Pahlke, Jennifer; Dostálová, Hana; Holátko, Jiří; Degner, Ursula; Bott, Michael; Pátek, Miroslav; Polen, Tino

    2016-09-01

    The 6C RNA family is a class of small RNAs highly conserved in Actinobacteria, including the genera Mycobacterium, Streptomyces and Corynebacterium whose physiological function has not yet been elucidated. We found that strong transcription of the cgb_03605 gene, which encodes 6C RNA in C. glutamicum, was driven by the SigA- and SigB-dependent promoter Pcgb_03605. 6C RNA was detected at high level during exponential growth phase (180 to 240 molcules per cell) which even increased at the entry of the stationary phase. 6C RNA level did not decrease within 240 min after transcription had been stopped with rifampicin, which suggests high 6C RNA stability. The expression of cgb_03605 further increased approximately twofold in the presence of DNA-damaging mitomycin C (MMC) and nearly threefold in the absence of LexA. Deletion of the 6C RNA gene cgb_03605 resulted in a higher sensitivity of C. glutamicum toward MMC and UV radiation. These results indicate that 6C RNA is involved in the DNA damage response. Both 6C RNA level-dependent pausing of cell growth and branched cell morphology in response to MMC suggest that 6C RNA may also be involved in a control of cell division. PMID:27362471

  14. Detoxification of furfural in Corynebacterium glutamicum under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Yota; Hori, Yoshimi; Kudou, Motonori; Ishii, Jun; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    The toxic fermentation inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates raise serious problems for the microbial production of fuels and chemicals. Furfural is considered to be one of the most toxic compounds among these inhibitors. Here, we describe the detoxification of furfural in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic culture conditions, furfuryl alcohol and 2-furoic acid were produced as detoxification products of furfural. The ratio of the products varied depending on the initial furfural concentration. Neither furfuryl alcohol nor 2-furoic acid showed any toxic effect on cell growth, and both compounds were determined to be the end products of furfural degradation. Interestingly, unlike under aerobic conditions, most of the furfural was converted to furfuryl alcohol under anaerobic conditions, without affecting the glucose consumption rate. Both the NADH/NAD(+) and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio decreased in the accordance with furfural concentration under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. These results indicate the presence of a single or multiple endogenous enzymes with broad and high affinity for furfural and co-factors in C. glutamicum ATCC13032.

  15. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for the de novo production of ethylene glycol from glucose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Huang, Jinhai; Wu, Yao; Liu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    Development of sustainable biological process for the production of bulk chemicals from renewable feedstock is an important goal of white biotechnology. Ethylene glycol (EG) is a large-volume commodity chemical with an annual production of over 20 million tons, and it is currently produced exclusively by petrochemical route. Herein, we report a novel biosynthetic route to produce EG from glucose by the extension of serine synthesis pathway of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The EG synthesis is achieved by the reduction of glycoaldehyde derived from serine. The transformation of serine to glycoaldehyde is catalyzed either by the sequential enzymatic deamination and decarboxylation or by the enzymatic decarboxylation and oxidation. We screened the corresponding enzymes and optimized the production strain by combinatorial optimization and metabolic engineering. The best engineered C. glutamicum strain is able to accumulate 3.5 g/L of EG with the yield of 0.25 mol/mol glucose in batch cultivation. This study lays the basis for developing an efficient biological process for EG production.

  16. Deregulation of Feedback Inhibition of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase for Improved Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Frank, Doinita; Rappert, Sugima

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) controls the metabolic flux distribution of anaplerotic pathways. In this study, the feedback inhibition of Corynebacterium glutamicum PEPC was rationally deregulated, and its effect on metabolic flux redistribution was evaluated. Based on rational protein design, six PEPC mutants were designed, and all of them showed significantly reduced sensitivity toward aspartate and malate inhibition. Introducing one of the point mutations (N917G) into the ppc gene, encoding PEPC of the lysine-producing strain C. glutamicum LC298, resulted in ∼37% improved lysine production. In vitro enzyme assays and 13C-based metabolic flux analysis showed ca. 20 and 30% increases in the PEPC activity and corresponding flux, respectively, in the mutant strain. Higher demand for NADPH in the mutant strain increased the flux toward pentose phosphate pathway, which increased the supply of NADPH for enhanced lysine production. The present study highlights the importance of allosteric regulation on the flux control of central metabolism. The strategy described here can also be implemented to improve other oxaloacetate-derived products. PMID:24334667

  17. Functional Identification of Novel Genes Involved in the Glutathione-Independent Gentisate Pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xi-Hui; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Huang, Yan; Liu, Zhi-Pei; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2005-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum used gentisate and 3-hydroxybenzoate as its sole carbon and energy source for growth. By genome-wide data mining, a gene cluster designated ncg12918-ncg12923 was proposed to encode putative proteins involved in gentisate/3-hydroxybenzoate pathway. Genes encoding gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (ncg12920) and fumarylpyruvate hydrolase (ncg12919) were identified by cloning and expression of each gene in Escherichia coli. The gene of ncg12918 encoding a hypothetical protein (Ncg12918) was proved to be essential for gentisate-3-hydroxybenzoate assimilation. Mutant strain RES167Δncg12918 lost the ability to grow on gentisate or 3-hydroxybenzoate, but this ability could be restored in C. glutamicum upon the complementation with pXMJ19-ncg12918. Cloning and expression of this ncg12918 gene in E. coli showed that Ncg12918 is a glutathione-independent maleylpyruvate isomerase. Upstream of ncg12920, the genes ncg12921-ncg12923 were located, which were essential for gentisate and/or 3-hydroxybenzoate catabolism. The Ncg12921 was able to up-regulate gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, maleylpyruvate isomerase, and fumarylpyruvate hydrolase activities. The genes ncg12922 and ncg12923 were deduced to encode a gentisate transporter protein and a 3-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase, respectively, and were essential for gentisate or 3-hydroxybenzoate assimilation. Based on the results obtained in this study, a GSH-independent gentisate pathway was proposed, and genes involved in this pathway were identified. PMID:16000747

  18. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum strain ATCC13032 to produce L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tianyu; Hu, Xiaoqing; Hu, Jinyu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    L-Methionine-producing strain QW102/pJYW-4-hom(m) -lysC(m) -brnFE was developed from Corynebacterium glutamicum strain ATCC13032, using metabolic engineering strategies. These strategies involved (i) deletion of the gene thrB encoding homoserine kinase to increase the precursor supply, (ii) deletion of the gene mcbR encoding the regulator McbR to release the transcriptional repression to various genes in the l-methionine biosynthetic pathway, (iii) overexpression of the gene lysC(m) encoding feedback-resistant aspartate kinase and the gene hom(m) encoding feedback-resistant homoserine dehydrogenase to further increase the precursor supply, and (iv) overexpression of the gene cluster brnF and brnE encoding the export protein complex BrnFE to increase extracellular l-methionine concentration. QW102/pJYW-4-hom(m) -lysC(m) -brnFE produced 42.2 mM (6.3 g/L) l-methionine after 64-H fed-batch fermentation. These results suggest that l-methionine-producing strains can be developed from wild-type C. glutamicum strains by rationally metabolic engineering.

  19. Transcriptomic analysis for elucidating the physiological effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid accumulation on Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoli; Jin, Haiying; Cheng, Xuelian; Wang, Qian; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-11-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), the committed intermediate of the heme biosynthetic pathway, attracts close attention among researchers because of its potential applications to cancer treatment and agriculture. Overexpression of heterologous hemA and hemL, which encode glutamyl-tRNA reductase and glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminotransferase, respectively, in Corynebacterium glutamicum produces ALA, although whether ALA accumulation causes unintended effects on the host is unknown. Here we used an integrated systems approach to compare global transcriptional changes induced by the expression of hemA and hemL. Metabolic pathway such as glycolysis was inhibited, but tricarboxylic acid cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, and respiratory metabolism were stimulated. Moreover, the transcriptional levels of certain genes involved in heme biosynthesis were up-regulated, and the data implicate the two-component system (TCS) HrrSA was involved in the regulation of heme synthesis. With these understandings, it is proposed that ALA accumulation stimulates heme synthesis pathway and respiratory metabolism. Our study illuminates the physiological effects of overexpressing hemA and hemL on the phenotype of C. glutamicum and contributes important insights into the regulatory mechanisms of the heme biosynthetic pathways. PMID:27664748

  20. The small 6C RNA of Corynebacterium glutamicum is involved in the SOS response.

    PubMed

    Pahlke, Jennifer; Dostálová, Hana; Holátko, Jiří; Degner, Ursula; Bott, Michael; Pátek, Miroslav; Polen, Tino

    2016-09-01

    The 6C RNA family is a class of small RNAs highly conserved in Actinobacteria, including the genera Mycobacterium, Streptomyces and Corynebacterium whose physiological function has not yet been elucidated. We found that strong transcription of the cgb_03605 gene, which encodes 6C RNA in C. glutamicum, was driven by the SigA- and SigB-dependent promoter Pcgb_03605. 6C RNA was detected at high level during exponential growth phase (180 to 240 molcules per cell) which even increased at the entry of the stationary phase. 6C RNA level did not decrease within 240 min after transcription had been stopped with rifampicin, which suggests high 6C RNA stability. The expression of cgb_03605 further increased approximately twofold in the presence of DNA-damaging mitomycin C (MMC) and nearly threefold in the absence of LexA. Deletion of the 6C RNA gene cgb_03605 resulted in a higher sensitivity of C. glutamicum toward MMC and UV radiation. These results indicate that 6C RNA is involved in the DNA damage response. Both 6C RNA level-dependent pausing of cell growth and branched cell morphology in response to MMC suggest that 6C RNA may also be involved in a control of cell division.

  1. Recent advances in the metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for the production of lactate and succinate from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Yota; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-03-01

    Recent increasing attention to environmental issues and the shortage of oil resources have spurred political and industrial interest in the development of environmental friendly and cost-effective processes for the production of bio-based chemicals from renewable resources. Thus, microbial production of commercially important chemicals is viewed as a desirable way to replace current petrochemical production. Corynebacterium glutamicum, a Gram-positive soil bacterium, is one of the most important industrial microorganisms as a platform for the production of various amino acids. Recent research has explored the use of C. glutamicum as a potential cell factory for producing organic acids such as lactate and succinate, both of which are commercially important bulk chemicals. Here, we summarize current understanding in this field and recent metabolic engineering efforts to develop C. glutamicum strains that efficiently produce L- and D-lactate, and succinate from renewable resources.

  2. Engineering Corynebacterium glutamicum for fast production of L-lysine and L-pipecolic acid.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, Fernando; Peters-Wendisch, Petra; Wendisch, Volker F

    2016-09-01

    The Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum is widely used for fermentative production of amino acids. The world production of L-lysine has surpassed 2 million tons per year. Glucose uptake and phosphorylation by C. glutamicum mainly occur by the phosphotransferase system (PTS) and to lesser extent by inositol permeases and glucokinases. Heterologous expression of the genes for the high-affinity glucose permease from Streptomyces coelicolor and Bacillus subtilis glucokinase fully compensated for the absence of the PTS in Δhpr strains. Growth of PTS-positive strains with glucose was accelerated when the endogenous inositol permease IolT2 and glucokinase from B. subtilis were overproduced with balanced translation initiation rates using plasmid pEKEx3-IolTBest. When the genome-reduced C. glutamicum strain GRLys1 carrying additional in-frame deletions of sugR and ldhA to derepress glycolytic and PTS genes and to circumvent formation of L-lactate as by-product was transformed with this plasmid or with pVWEx1-IolTBest, 18 to 20 % higher volumetric productivities and 70 to 72 % higher specific productivities as compared to the parental strain resulted. The non-proteinogenic amino acid L-pipecolic acid (L-PA), a precursor of immunosuppressants, peptide antibiotics, or piperidine alkaloids, can be derived from L-lysine. To enable production of L-PA by the constructed L-lysine-producing strain, the L-lysine 6-dehydrogenase gene lysDH from Silicibacter pomeroyi and the endogenous pyrroline 5-carboxylate reductase gene proC were overexpressed as synthetic operon. This enabled C. glutamicum to produce L-PA with a yield of 0.09 ± 0.01 g g(-1) and a volumetric productivity of 0.04 ± 0.01 g L(-1) h(-1).To the best of our knowledge, this is the first fermentative process for the production of L-PA from glucose.

  3. Corynebacterium glutamicum harbours a molybdenum cofactor-dependent formate dehydrogenase which alleviates growth inhibition in the presence of formate.

    PubMed

    Witthoff, Sabrina; Eggeling, Lothar; Bott, Michael; Polen, Tino

    2012-09-01

    Here, we show that Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 co-metabolizes formate when it is grown with glucose as the carbon and energy source. CO(2) measurements during bioreactor cultivation and use of (13)C-labelled formate demonstrated that formate is almost completely oxidized to CO(2). The deletion of fdhF (cg0618), annotated as formate dehydrogenase (FDH) and located in a cluster of genes conserved in the family Corynebacteriaceae, prevented formate utilization. Similarly, deletion of fdhD (cg0616) resulted in the inability to metabolize formate and deletion of cg0617 markedly reduced formate utilization. These results illustrated that all three gene products are required for FDH activity. Growth studies with molybdate and tungstate indicated that the FDH from C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 is a molybdenum-dependent enzyme. The presence of 100 mM formate caused a 25 % lowered growth rate during cultivation of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 wild-type in glucose minimal medium. This inhibitory effect was increased in the strains lacking FDH activity. Our data demonstrate that C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 possesses an FDH with a currently unknown electron acceptor. The presence of the FDH might help the soil bacterium C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 to alleviate growth retardation caused by formate, which is ubiquitously present in the environment. PMID:22767548

  4. Arabinan-deficient mutants of Corynebacterium glutamicum and the consequent flux in decaprenylmonophosphoryl-D-arabinose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alderwick, Luke J; Dover, Lynn G; Seidel, Mathias; Gande, Roland; Sahm, Hermann; Eggeling, Lothar; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2006-11-01

    The arabinogalactan (AG) of Corynebacterianeae is a critical macromolecule that tethers mycolic acids to peptidoglycan, thus forming a highly impermeable cell wall matrix termed the mycolyl-arabinogalactan peptidoglycan complex (mAGP). The front line anti-tuberculosis drug, ethambutol (Emb), targets the Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium glutamicum arabinofuranosyltransferase Mt-EmbA, Mt-EmbB and Cg-Emb enzymes, respectively, which are responsible for the biosynthesis of the arabinan domain of AG. The substrate utilized by these important glycosyltransferases, decaprenylmonophosphoryl-D-arabinose (DPA), is synthesized via a decaprenylphosphoryl-5-phosphoribose (DPPR) synthase (UbiA), which catalyzes the transfer of 5-phospho-ribofuranose-pyrophosphate (pRpp) to decaprenol phosphate to form DPPR. Glycosyl compositional analysis of cell walls extracted from a C. glutamicum::ubiA mutant revealed a galactan core consisting of alternating beta(1-->5)-Galf and beta(1-->6)-Galf residues, completely devoid of arabinan and a concomitant loss of cell-wall-bound mycolic acids. In addition, in vitro assays demonstrated a complete loss of arabinofuranosyltransferase activity and DPA biosynthesis in the C. glutamicum::ubiA mutant when supplemented with p[14C]Rpp, the precursor of DPA. Interestingly, in vitro arabinofuranosyltransferase activity was restored in the C. glutamicum::ubiA mutant when supplemented with exogenous DP[14C]A substrate, and C. glutamicum strains deficient in ubiA, emb, and aftA all exhibited different levels of DPA biosynthesis.

  5. Pushing product formation to its limit: metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for L-leucine overproduction.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Klaffl, Simon; Polen, Tino; Eggeling, Lothar; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using metabolic engineering, an efficient L-leucine production strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum was developed. In the wild type of C. glutamicum, the leuA-encoded 2-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS) is inhibited by low L-leucine concentrations with a K(i) of 0.4 mM. We identified a feedback-resistant IMPS variant, which carries two amino acid exchanges (R529H, G532D). The corresponding leuA(fbr) gene devoid of the attenuator region and under control of a strong promoter was integrated in one, two or three copies into the genome and combined with additional genomic modifications aimed at increasing L-leucine production. These modifications involved (i) deletion of the gene encoding the repressor LtbR to increase expression of leuBCD, (ii) deletion of the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator IolR to increase glucose uptake, (iii) reduction of citrate synthase activity to increase precursor supply, and (iv) introduction of a gene encoding a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase. The production performance of the resulting strains was characterized in bioreactor cultivations. Under fed-batch conditions, the best producer strain accumulated L-leucine to levels exceeding the solubility limit of about 24 g/l. The molar product yield was 0.30 mol L-leucine per mol glucose and the volumetric productivity was 4.3 mmol l⁻¹ h⁻¹. These values were obtained in a defined minimal medium with a prototrophic and plasmid-free strain, making this process highly interesting for industrial application. PMID:24333966

  6. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. PMID:26168906

  7. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum.

  8. Efficient aerobic succinate production from glucose in minimal medium with Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Litsanov, Boris; Kabus, Armin; Brocker, Melanie; Bott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary Corynebacterium glutamicum, an established industrial amino acid producer, has been genetically modified for efficient succinate production from the renewable carbon source glucose under fully aerobic conditions in minimal medium. The initial deletion of the succinate dehydrogenase genes (sdhCAB) led to an accumulation of 4.7 g l−1 (40 mM) succinate as well as high amounts of acetate (125 mM) as by‐product. By deleting genes for all known acetate‐producing pathways (pta‐ackA, pqo and cat) acetate production could be strongly reduced by 83% and succinate production increased up to 7.8 g l−1 (66 mM). Whereas overexpression of the glyoxylate shunt genes (aceA and aceB) or overproduction of the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PCx) had only minor effects on succinate production, simultaneous overproduction of pyruvate carboxylase and PEP carboxylase resulted in a strain that produced 9.7 g l−1 (82 mM) succinate with a specific productivity of 1.60 mmol g (cdw)−1 h−1. This value represents the highest productivity among currently described aerobic bacterial succinate producers. Optimization of the production conditions by decoupling succinate production from cell growth using the most advanced producer strain (C. glutamicumΔpqoΔpta‐ackAΔsdhCABΔcat/pAN6‐pycP458Sppc) led to an additional increase of the product yield to 0.45 mol succinate mol−1 glucose and a titre of 10.6 g l−1 (90 mM) succinate. PMID:22018023

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of the β-Type Carbonic Anhydrase Gene bca by RamA in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Adnan; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase catalyzes the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and maintains the balance of CO2/HCO3- in the intracellular environment, specifically for carboxylation/decarboxylation reactions. In Corynebacterium glutamicum, two putative genes, namely the bca (cg2954) and gca (cg0155) genes, coding for β-type and γ-type carbonic anhydrase, respectively, have been identified. We here analyze the transcriptional organization of these genes. The transcriptional start site (TSS) of the bca gene was shown to be the first nucleotide “A” of its putative translational start codon (ATG) and thus, bca codes for a leaderless transcript. The TSS of the gca gene was identified as an “A” residue located at position -20 relative to the first nucleotide of the annotated translational start codon of the cg0154 gene, which is located immediately upstream of gca. Comparative expression analysis revealed carbon source-dependent regulation of the bca gene, with 1.5- to 2-fold lower promoter activity in cells grown on acetate as compared to glucose as sole carbon source. Based on higher expression of bca in a mutant deficient of the regulator of acetate metabolism RamA as compared to the wild-type of C. glutamicum and based on the binding of His-tagged RamA protein to the bca promoter region, we here present evidence that RamA negatively regulates expression of bca in C. glutamicum. Functional characterization of a gca deletion mutant of C. glutamicum revealed the same growth characteristics of C. glutamicum ∆gca as that of wild-type C. glutamicum and no effect on expression of the bca gene. PMID:27119954

  10. Characterization of a Unique Pathway for 4-Cresol Catabolism Initiated by Phosphorylation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Ma, Li; Qi, Feifei; Zheng, Xianliang; Jiang, Chengying; Li, Ailei; Wan, Xiaobo; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Li, Shengying

    2016-03-18

    4-Cresol is not only a significant synthetic intermediate for production of many aromatic chemicals, but also a priority environmental pollutant because of its toxicity to higher organisms. In our previous studies, a gene cluster implicated to be involved in 4-cresol catabolism, creCDEFGHIR, was identified in Corynebacterium glutamicum and partially characterized in vivo. In this work, we report on the discovery of a novel 4-cresol biodegradation pathway that employs phosphorylated intermediates. This unique pathway initiates with the phosphorylation of the hydroxyl group of 4-cresol, which is catalyzed by a novel 4-methylbenzyl phosphate synthase, CreHI. Next, a unique class I P450 system, CreJEF, specifically recognizes phosphorylated intermediates and successively oxidizes the aromatic methyl group into carboxylic acid functionality via alcohol and aldehyde intermediates. Moreover, CreD (phosphohydrolase), CreC (alcohol dehydrogenase), and CreG (aldehyde dehydrogenase) were also found to be required for efficient oxidative transformations in this pathway. Steady-state kinetic parameters (Km and kcat) for each catabolic step were determined, and these results suggest that kinetic controls serve a key role in directing the metabolic flux to the most energy effective route. PMID:26817843

  11. Structural Insights into a Novel Class of Aspartate Aminotransferase from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAspAT) is a PLP-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the production of L-aspartate and α-ketoglutarate from L-glutamate and oxaloacetate in L-lysine biosynthesis. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of CgAspAT and compare it with those of other aspartate aminotransferases (AspATs) from the aminotransferase class I, we determined the crystal structure of CgAspAT. CgAspAT functions as a dimer, and the CgAspAT monomer consists of two domains, the core domain and the auxiliary domain. The PLP cofactor is found to be bound to CgAspAT and stabilized through unique residues. In our current structure, a citrate molecule is bound at the active site of one molecule and mimics binding of the glutamate substrate. The residues involved in binding of the PLP cofactor and the glutamate substrate were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, compared with other AspATs from aminotransferase subgroup Ia and Ib, CgAspAT exhibited unique binding sites for both cofactor and substrate; moreover, it was found to have unusual structural features in the auxiliary domain. Based on these structural differences, we propose that CgAspAT does not belong to either subgroup Ia or Ib, and can be categorized into a subgroup Ic. The phylogenetic tree and RMSD analysis also indicates that CgAspAT is located in an independent AspAT subgroup. PMID:27355211

  12. Structural insights into domain movement and cofactor specificity of glutamate dehydrogenase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Kim, Il-Kwon; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2015-04-10

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of amino acids by converting glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, and vice versa. To investigate the molecular mechanism of GDH, we determined a crystal structure of the Corynebacterium glutamicum-derived GDH (CgGDH) in complex with its NADP cofactor and α-ketoglutarate substrate. CgGDH functions as a hexamer, and each CgGDH monomer comprises 2 separate domains; a Rossmann fold cofactor-binding domain and a substrate-binding domain. The structural comparison between the apo- and cofactor/substrate-binding forms revealed that the CgGDH enzyme undergoes a domain movement during catalysis. In the apo-form, CgGDH exists as an open state, and upon binding of the substrate and cofactor the protein undergoes a conformation change to a closed state. Our structural study also revealed that CgGDH has cofactor specificity for NADP, but not NAD, and this was confirmed by GDH activity measurements. Residues involved in the stabilization of the NADP cofactor and the α-ketoglutarate substrate were identified, and their roles in substrate/cofactor binding were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

  13. Characterization of a Unique Pathway for 4-Cresol Catabolism Initiated by Phosphorylation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Ma, Li; Qi, Feifei; Zheng, Xianliang; Jiang, Chengying; Li, Ailei; Wan, Xiaobo; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Li, Shengying

    2016-03-18

    4-Cresol is not only a significant synthetic intermediate for production of many aromatic chemicals, but also a priority environmental pollutant because of its toxicity to higher organisms. In our previous studies, a gene cluster implicated to be involved in 4-cresol catabolism, creCDEFGHIR, was identified in Corynebacterium glutamicum and partially characterized in vivo. In this work, we report on the discovery of a novel 4-cresol biodegradation pathway that employs phosphorylated intermediates. This unique pathway initiates with the phosphorylation of the hydroxyl group of 4-cresol, which is catalyzed by a novel 4-methylbenzyl phosphate synthase, CreHI. Next, a unique class I P450 system, CreJEF, specifically recognizes phosphorylated intermediates and successively oxidizes the aromatic methyl group into carboxylic acid functionality via alcohol and aldehyde intermediates. Moreover, CreD (phosphohydrolase), CreC (alcohol dehydrogenase), and CreG (aldehyde dehydrogenase) were also found to be required for efficient oxidative transformations in this pathway. Steady-state kinetic parameters (Km and kcat) for each catabolic step were determined, and these results suggest that kinetic controls serve a key role in directing the metabolic flux to the most energy effective route.

  14. Structure of a GTP-dependent Bacterial PEP-carboxykinase from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    SciTech Connect

    Aich, Sanjukta; Prasad, Lata; Delbaere, Louis T.J.

    2008-06-23

    GTP-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) is the key enzyme that controls the blood glucose level during fasting in higher animals. Here we report the first substrate-free structure of a GTP-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase from a bacterium, Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgPCK). The protein crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1} with four molecules per asymmetric unit. The 2.3 {angstrom} resolution structure was solved by molecular replacement using the human cytosolic PCK (hcPCK) structure (PDB ID: 1KHF) as the starting model. The four molecules in the asymmetric unit pack as two dimers, and is an artifact of crystal packing. However, the P-loop and the guanine binding loop of the substrate-free CgPCK structure have different conformations from the other published GTP-specific PCK structures, which all have bound substrates and/or metal ions. It appears that a change in the P-loop and guanine binding loop conformation is necessary for substrate binding in GTP-specific PCKs, as opposed to overall domain movement in ATP-specific PCKs.

  15. Rho and RNase play a central role in FMN riboswitch regulation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Norihiko; Tanaka, Yuya; Inui, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to their ligand. Although these regulations are thought to be performed without any aid of other factors, recent studies suggested the participation of protein factors such as transcriptional termination factor Rho and RNase in some riboswitch regulations. However, to what extent these protein factors contribute to the regulation was unclear. Here, we studied the regulatory mechanism of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch of Corynebacterium glutamicum which controls the expression of downstream ribM gene. Our results showed that this riboswitch downregulates both ribM mRNA and RibM protein levels in FMN-rich cells. Analysis of mRNA stability and chromatin immunoprecipitation-real-time PCR analysis targeting RNA polymerase suggested the involvement of the mRNA degradation and premature transcriptional termination in this regulation, respectively. Simultaneous disruption of RNase E/G and Rho function completely abolished the regulation at the mRNA level. Also, the regulation at the protein level was largely diminished. However, some FMN-dependent regulation at the protein level remained, suggesting the presence of other minor regulatory mechanisms. Altogether, we demonstrated for the first time that two protein factors, Rho and RNase E/G, play a central role in the riboswitch-mediated gene expression control.

  16. Mutagenesis for improvement of activity and thermostability of amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Nimpiboon, Pitchanan; Kaulpiboon, Jarunee; Krusong, Kuakarun; Nakamura, Shigeyoshi; Kidokoro, Shun-ichi; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook

    2016-05-01

    This work aims to improve thermostability of amylomaltase from a mesophilic Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAM) by random and site-directed mutagenesis. From error prone PCR, a mutated CgAM with higher thermostability at 50 °C compared to the wild-type was selected and sequenced. The result showed that the mutant contains a single mutation of A406V. Site-directed mutagenesis was then performed to construct A406V and A406L. Both mutated CgAMs showed higher intermolecular transglucosylation activity with an upward shift in the optimum temperature and a slight increase in the optimum pH for disproportionation and cyclization reactions. Thermostability of both mutated CgAMs at 35-40 °C was significantly increased with a higher peak temperature from DSC spectra when compared to the wild-type. A406V had a greater effect on activity and thermostability than A406L. The catalytic efficiency values kcat/Km of A406V- and A406L-CgAMs were 2.9 and 1.4 times higher than that of the wild-type, respectively, mainly due to a significant increase in kcat. LR-CD product analysis demonstrated that A406V gave higher product yield, especially at longer incubation time and higher temperature, in comparison to the wild-type enzyme. PMID:26875536

  17. Proteome turnover in bacteria: current status for Corynebacterium glutamicum and related bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Trötschel, Christian; Albaum, Stefan P; Poetsch, Ansgar

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of high-resolution mass spectrometry together with sophisticated data analysis and interpretation algorithms, determination of protein synthesis and degradation rates (i.e. protein turnover) on a proteome-wide scale by employing stable isotope-labelled amino acids has become feasible. These dynamic data provide a deeper understanding of protein homeostasis and stress response mechanisms in microorganisms than well-established ‘steady state’ proteomics approaches. In this article, we summarize the technological challenges and solutions both on the biochemistry/mass spectrometry and bioinformatics level for turnover proteomics with a focus on chromatographic techniques. Although the number of available case studies for Corynebacterium glutamicum and related actinobacteria is still very limited, our review illustrates the potential of protein turnover studies for an improved understanding of questions in the area of biotechnology and biomedicine. Here, new insights from investigations of growth phase transition and different stress dynamics including iron, acid and heat stress for pathogenic but also for industrial actinobacteria are presented. Finally, we will comment on the advantages of integrated software solutions for biologists and briefly discuss the remaining technical challenges and upcoming possibilities for protein turnover analysis. PMID:23425033

  18. Dihydroxyacetone production in an engineered Escherichia coli through expression of Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydroxyacetone phosphate dephosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishist Kumar; Tear, Crystal Jing Ying; Lim, Chan Yuen

    2016-05-01

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) has several industrial applications such as a tanning agent in tanning lotions in the cosmetic industry; its production via microbial fermentation would present a more sustainable option for the future. Here we genetically engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli) for DHA production from glucose. Deletion of E. coli triose phosphate isomerase (tpiA) gene was carried out to accumulate dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), for use as the main intermediate or precursor for DHA production. The accumulated DHAP was then converted to DHA through the heterologous expression of Corynebacterium glutamicum DHAP dephosphorylase (cghdpA) gene. To conserve DHAP exclusively for DHA production we removed methylglyoxal synthase (mgsA) gene in the ΔtpiA strain. This drastically improved DHA production from 0.83g/l (0.06g DHA/g glucose) in the ΔtpiA strain bearing cghdpA to 5.84g/l (0.41g DHA/g glucose) in the ΔtpiAΔmgsA double mutant containing the same gene. To limit the conversion of intracellular DHA to glycerol, glycerol dehydrogenase (gldA) gene was further knocked out resulting in a ΔtpiAΔmgsAΔgldA triple mutant. This triple mutant expressing the cghdpA gene produced 6.60g/l of DHA at 87% of the maximum theoretical yield. In summary, we demonstrated an efficient system for DHA production in genetically engineered E. coli strain. PMID:26992791

  19. Impact of pulsed electric fields on Corynebacterium glutamicum cell membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Tryfona, Theodora; Bustard, Mark T

    2008-04-01

    The permeability barrier of the microbial cell envelope for substrates and products often causes very low reaction rates of whole cells. Therefore, it is of interest to develop an effective method to reduce this permeability barrier in order to increase product yields. Utilisation of pulse electric fields may improve amino acid release from Corynebacterium glutamicum by up to several orders of magnitude. In particular pulsed electric fields may change the cell/membrane's dielectric properties and induce the release of intracellular metabolites. In this study the parameters for successful electropermeabilization were determined and the viabilities of treated cells were examined. We also found that pulse treated cells not only maintained their viabilities but also their ability to reproduce, post-pulse treatment. Since electropermeabilized cells could maintain both their viabilities and ability to reproduce, we believe that this preliminary data may contribute to the optimization of fermentative production of amino acids and bioprocess enhancement through electropermeabilization and may be beneficial to industrial bioprocesses. PMID:18499054

  20. Heterologous expression and localization of gentisate transporter Ncg12922 from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Ying; Yan Dazhong; Zhou Ningyi . E-mail: n.zhou@pentium.whiov.ac.cn

    2006-07-28

    Ralstonia sp. strain U2 metabolizes naphthalene via gentisate (2,5-dihydroxybenzoate) to central metabolites, but it was found unable to utilize gentisate as growth substrate. A putative gentisate transporter encoded by ncg12922 from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was functionally expressed in Ralstonia sp. strain U2, converting strain U2 to a gentisate utilizer. After ncg12922 was inserted into plasmid pGFPe with green fluorescence protein gene gfp, the expressed fusion protein Ncg12922-GFP could be visualized in the periphery of Escherichia coli cells under confocal microscope, consistent with a cytoplasmic membrane location. In contrast, GFP was ubiquitous in the cytoplasm of E. coli cells carrying pGFPe only. Gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase activity was present in the cell extract from strain U2 induced with gentisate but at a much lower level (one-fifth) than that obtained with salicylate. However, it exhibited a similar level in strain U2 containing Ncg12922 induced either by salicylate or gentisate.

  1. Economically enhanced succinic acid fermentation from cassava bagasse hydrolysate using Corynebacterium glutamicum immobilized in porous polyurethane filler.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinchi; Chen, Yong; Ren, Hengfei; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Ting; Zhao, Nan; Ying, Hanjie

    2014-12-01

    An immobilized fermentation system, using cassava bagasse hydrolysate (CBH) and mixed alkalis, was developed to achieve economical succinic acid production by Corynebacterium glutamicum. The C. glutamicum strains were immobilized in porous polyurethane filler (PPF). CBH was used efficiently as a carbon source instead of more expensive glucose. Moreover, as a novel method for regulating pH, the easily decomposing NaHCO3 was replaced by mixed alkalis (NaOH and Mg(OH)2) for succinic acid production by C. glutamicum. Using CBH and mixed alkalis in the immobilized batch fermentation system, succinic acid productivity of 0.42gL(-1)h(-1) was obtained from 35gL(-1) glucose of CBH, which is similar to that obtained with conventional free-cell fermentation with glucose and NaHCO3. In repeated batch fermentation, an average of 22.5gL(-1) succinic acid could be obtained from each batch, which demonstrated the enhanced stability of the immobilized C. glutamicum cells.

  2. Dual transcriptional control of the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene ald of Corynebacterium glutamicum by RamA and RamB.

    PubMed

    Auchter, Marc; Arndt, Annette; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2009-03-10

    Corynebacterium glutamicum has been shown to grow with ethanol as the sole or as additional carbon and energy source and accordingly, to possess both alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activities, which are responsible for the two-step ethanol oxidation to acetate. Here we identify and functionally analyze the C. glutamicum ALDH gene (cg3096, ald), its expression and its regulation. Directed inactivation of the chromosomal ald gene led to the absence of detectable ALDH activity and to the inability to grow on or to utilize ethanol, indicating that the ald gene product is essential for ethanol metabolism and that no ALDH isoenzymes are present in C. glutamicum. Transcriptional analysis revealed that ald from C. glutamicum is monocistronic, that ald transcription is initiated 92 nucleotides upstream of the translational start codon ATG and that ald expression is much lower in the presence of glucose in the growth medium. Further analysis revealed that transcription of the ald gene is under control of the transcriptional regulators RamA and RamB. Both these proteins directly bind to the respective promoter region, RamA is essential for expression and RamB exerts a slightly negative effect on ald expression on all carbon sources tested.

  3. Expression of the Bacillus subtilis sacB gene leads to sucrose sensitivity in the gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum but not in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, W; Schäfer, A; Pühler, A; Labes, G; Wohlleben, W

    1992-01-01

    The expression of the structural gene (sacB) encoding Bacillus subtilis levansucrase in two gram-positive soil bacteria, Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 and Streptomyces lividans 1326, was investigated. sacB expression in the presence of sucrose is lethal to C. glutamicum but not to S. lividans. While S. lividans secretes levansucrase into the medium, we could show that the enzyme is retained by C. glutamicum cells. Our results imply that the sacB gene can be used as a positive selection system in coryneform bacteria. PMID:1644774

  4. Construction of a novel twin-arginine translocation (Tat)-dependent type expression vector for secretory production of heterologous proteins in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lirong; Jia, Huimin; Xu, Daqing

    2015-11-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is recognized as a favorable host for the secretory production of heterologous proteins. However, there are few secretion-type expression vectors available for protein production in C. glutamicum. In this study, we constructed a shuttle expression vector pAU3, which harbors the strong promoter tac-M for constitutive gene transcription, the consensus RBS sequence for protein translation, and the strong cgR_0949 signal sequence for protein secretion via the Tat pathway in C. glutamicum. The applicability of pAU3 was confirmed by the highly efficient expression and secretion of the CAT protein in C. glutamicum. The vector pAU3 is highly useful for secretory production of heterologous proteins in C. glutamicum.

  5. Development of a secretion system for the production of heterologous proteins in Corynebacterium glutamicum using the Porin B signal peptide.

    PubMed

    An, Seul Ji; Yim, Sung Sun; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2013-06-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is one of the useful hosts for the secretory production of heterologous proteins because of intrinsic attributes such as the presence of few endogenous proteins and proteases in culture medium. Here, we report the development of a new secretory system for the production of heterologous proteins by using the porin B (PorB) signal peptide in C. glutamicum. We examined two different endoxylanases and an antibody fragment (scFv) as model proteins for secretory production. In the flask cultivations, all the examined proteins were successfully produced as active forms into the culture medium with high efficiency. For the high-level production of endoxylanase, fed-batch cultivation was also performed in a lab-scale (5L) bioreactor, and the endoxylanases were efficiently secreted in the culture medium at levels as high as 615mg/L. From the culture supernatant, the secreted endoxylanases could be purified with high purity via one-step affinity column chromatography.

  6. Evaluation of the food grade expression systems NICE and pSIP for the production of 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Kaswurm, Vanja; Nguyen, Tien-Thanh; Maischberger, Thomas; Kulbe, Klaus D; Michlmayr, Herbert

    2013-01-28

    2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase (2,5-DKG reductase) catalyses the reduction of 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid (2,5-DKG) to 2-keto-L-gulonic acid (2-KLG), a direct precursor (lactone) of L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C). This reaction is an essential step in the biocatalytic production of the food supplement vitamin C from D-glucose or D-gluconic acid. As 2,5-DKG reductase is usually produced recombinantly, it is of interest to establish an efficient process for 2,5-DKG reductase production that also satisfies food safety requirements. In the present study, three recently described food grade variants of the Lactobacillales based expression systems pSIP (Lactobacillus plantarum) and NICE (Lactococcus lactis) were evaluated with regard to their effictiveness to produce 2,5-DKG reductase from Corynebacterium glutamicum. Our results indicate that both systems are suitable for 2,5-DKG reductase expression. Maximum production yields were obtained with Lb. plantarum/pSIP609 by pH control at 6.5. With 262 U per litre of broth, this represents the highest heterologous expression level so far reported for 2,5-DKG reductase from C. glutamicum. Accordingly, Lb. plantarum/pSIP609 might be an interesting alternative to Escherichia coli expression systems for industrial 2,5-DKG reductase production.

  7. Evaluation of the food grade expression systems NICE and pSIP for the production of 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase (2,5-DKG reductase) catalyses the reduction of 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid (2,5-DKG) to 2-keto-L-gulonic acid (2-KLG), a direct precursor (lactone) of L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C). This reaction is an essential step in the biocatalytic production of the food supplement vitamin C from D-glucose or D-gluconic acid. As 2,5-DKG reductase is usually produced recombinantly, it is of interest to establish an efficient process for 2,5-DKG reductase production that also satisfies food safety requirements. In the present study, three recently described food grade variants of the Lactobacillales based expression systems pSIP (Lactobacillus plantarum) and NICE (Lactococcus lactis) were evaluated with regard to their effictiveness to produce 2,5-DKG reductase from Corynebacterium glutamicum. Our results indicate that both systems are suitable for 2,5-DKG reductase expression. Maximum production yields were obtained with Lb. plantarum/pSIP609 by pH control at 6.5. With 262 U per litre of broth, this represents the highest heterologous expression level so far reported for 2,5-DKG reductase from C. glutamicum. Accordingly, Lb. plantarum/pSIP609 might be an interesting alternative to Escherichia coli expression systems for industrial 2,5-DKG reductase production. PMID:23356419

  8. Enhancement of biomolecule transport by electroporation: a review of theory and practical application to transformation of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Tryfona, Theodora; Bustard, Mark T

    2006-02-20

    Selective and reversible permeabilization of the cell wall permeability barrier is the focus for many biotechnological applications. In this article, the basic principles for reversible membrane permeabilization, based on biological, chemical, and physical methods are reviewed. Emphasis is given to electroporation (electropermeabilization) which tends to be the most popular method for membrane permeabilization and for introduction of foreign molecules into the cells. The applications of this method in industrial processes as well as the critical factors and parameters which affect the success of this approach are discussed. The different strategies developed throughout the years for increased transformation efficiencies of the industrially important amino acid-overproducing bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum, are also summarized.

  9. Transcriptional response of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 to hydrogen peroxide stress and characterization of the OxyR regulon.

    PubMed

    Milse, Johanna; Petri, Kathrin; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2014-11-20

    The aerobic soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 has a remarkable natural resistance to hydrogen peroxide. A major player in hydrogen peroxide defense is the LysR type transcriptional regulator OxyR, homologs of which are present in a wide range of bacteria. In this study, the global transcriptional response of C. glutamicum to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide was examined using whole genome DNA microarrays, demonstrating the dynamic reaction of the regulatory networks. Deletion of oxyR resulted in an increased resistance of the C. glutamicum mutant to hydrogen peroxide. By performing DNA microarray hybridizations and RT-qPCR, differentially expressed genes were detected in the mutant. The direct control by OxyR was verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assays for 12 target regions. The results demonstrated that OxyR in C. glutamicum acts as a transcriptional repressor under non-stress conditions for a total of 23 genes. The regulated genes encode proteins related to oxidative stress response (e.g. katA), iron homeostasis (e.g. dps) and sulfur metabolism (e.g. suf cluster). Besides the regulator of the suf cluster, SufR, OxyR regulated the gene cg1695 encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, indicating the role of OxyR as a master regulator in defense against oxidative stress. Using a modified DNase footprint approach, the OxyR-binding sites in five target promoter regions, katA, cydA, hemH, dps and cg1292, were localized and in each upstream region at least two overlapping binding sites were found. The DNA regions protected by the OxyR protein are about 56bp in length and do not have evident sequence similarities. Still, by giving an insight in the H2O2 stimulon and extending the OxyR regulon this study considerably contributes to the understanding of the response of C. glutamicum to hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress.

  10. Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for high-yield L-valine production under oxygen deprivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Suda, Masako; Uematsu, Kimio; Natsuma, Yumi; Hiraga, Kazumi; Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2013-02-01

    We previously demonstrated efficient L-valine production by metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum under oxygen deprivation. To achieve the high productivity, a NADH/NADPH cofactor imbalance during the synthesis of l-valine was overcome by engineering NAD-preferring mutant acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase (AHAIR) and using NAD-specific leucine dehydrogenase from Lysinibacillus sphaericus. Lactate as a by-product was largely eliminated by disrupting the lactate dehydrogenase gene ldhA. Nonetheless, a few other by-products, particularly succinate, were still produced and acted to suppress the L-valine yield. Eliminating these by-products therefore was deemed key to improving theL-valine yield. By additionally disrupting the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene ppc, succinate production was effectively suppressed, but both glucose consumption and L-valine production dropped considerably due to the severely elevated intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio. In contrast, this perturbed intracellular redox state was more than compensated for by deletion of three genes associated with NADH-producing acetate synthesis and overexpression of five glycolytic genes, including gapA, encoding NADH-inhibited glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Inserting feedback-resistant mutant acetohydroxy acid synthase and NAD-preferring mutant AHAIR in the chromosome resulted in higher L-valine yield and productivity. Deleting the alanine transaminase gene avtA suppressed alanine production. The resultant strain produced 1,280 mM L-valine at a yield of 88% mol mol of glucose(-1) after 24 h under oxygen deprivation, a vastly improved yield over our previous best.

  11. Production of 2-ketoisocaproate with Corynebacterium glutamicum strains devoid of plasmids and heterologous genes.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Polen, Tino; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2015-03-01

    2-Ketoisocaproate (KIC), the last intermediate in l-leucine biosynthesis, has various medical and industrial applications. After deletion of the ilvE gene for transaminase B in l-leucine production strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum, KIC became the major product, however, the strains were auxotrophic for l-isoleucine. To avoid auxotrophy, reduction of IlvE activity by exchanging the ATG start codon of ilvE by GTG was tested instead of an ilvE deletion. The resulting strains were indeed able to grow in glucose minimal medium without amino acid supplementation, but at the cost of lowered growth rates and KIC production parameters. The best production performance was obtained with strain MV-KICF1, which carried besides the ilvE start codon exchange three copies of a gene for a feedback-resistant 2-isopropylmalate synthase, one copy of a gene for a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase and deletions of ltbR and iolR encoding transcriptional regulators. In the presence of 1 mM l-isoleucine, MV-KICF1 accumulated 47 mM KIC (6.1 g l(-1)) with a yield of 0.20 mol/mol glucose and a volumetric productivity of 1.41 mmol KIC l(-1)  h(-1). Since MV-KICF1 is plasmid free and lacks heterologous genes, it is an interesting strain for industrial application and as platform for the production of KIC-derived compounds, such as 3-methyl-1-butanol. PMID:25488800

  12. Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for xylitol production from lignocellulosic pentose sugars.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Kiran S; Wendisch, Volker F; Nampoothiri, Kesavan Madhavan

    2016-07-20

    Xylitol is a non-fermentable sugar alcohol used as sweetener. Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 was metabolically engineered for xylitol production from the lignocellulosic pentose sugars xylose and arabinose. Direct conversion of xylose to xylitol was achieved through the heterologous expression of NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (xr) gene from Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. Xylitol synthesis from arabinose was attained through polycistronic expression of l-arabinose isomerase (araA), d-psicose 3 epimerase (dpe) and l-xylulose reductase (lxr) genes from Escherichia coli, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Mycobacterium smegmatis, respectively. Expression of xr and the synthetic araA-dpe-lxr operon under the control of IPTG-inducible Ptac promoter enabled production of xylitol from both xylose and arabinose in the mineral (CGXII) medium with glucose as carbon source. Additional expression of a pentose transporter (araTF) gene enhanced xylitol production by about four-fold compared to the parent strain. The constructed strain Cg-ax3 produced 6.7±0.4g/L of xylitol in batch fermentations and 31±0.5g/L of xylitol in fed-batch fermentations with a specific productivity of 0.28±0.05g/g cdw/h. The strain Cg-ax3 was also validated for xylitol production from pentose rich, acid pre-treated liquor of sorghum stover (SAPL) and the results were comparable in both SAPL (27±0.3g/L) and mineral medium (31±0.5g/L). PMID:27184428

  13. Production of a novel polygalacturonic acid bioflocculant REA-11 by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    He, Ning; Li, Yin; Chen, Jian

    2004-08-01

    The production of a novel polygalacturonic acid bioflocculant REA-11 from a newly isolated strain, Corynebacterium glutamicum CCTCC M201005, was investigated. Sucrose was chosen as a carbon source for REA-11 production. Complex nitrogen sources containing urea and an organic nitrogen compound enhanced both bacterial growth and REA-11 production, among which urea plus corn steep liquor was shown to be the most efficient combination. A cost-effective medium for REA-11 production mainly comprised 17 g/l sucrose, 0.45 g/l urea, and 5 ml/l corn steep liquor, under which conditions the flocculating activity reached 390 U/ml. The molar ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C/N) significantly affected REA-11 production, where a C/N ratio of 20:1 was shown to be the best. Interestingly, by simultaneously feeding sucrose and urea at a C/N ratio of 20:1 at 24 h of fermentation, REA-11 production (458 U/ml) was enhanced by 17% compared to the control. In a 10 l jar fermentor, lower dissolved oxygen tension was favorable for REA-11 production: a flocculating activity of 520 U/ml was achieved at a kappaLa of 100 h(-1). REA-11 raw product is relatively thermo-stable at acidic pH ranges of 3.0-6.5. Preliminary application studies showed that REA-11 had stronger flocculating activity to Kaolin clay suspension compared to chemical flocculants. In addition, the capability of decolorizing molasses wastewater indicates the industrial potential of this novel bioflocculant. PMID:15081493

  14. Enhanced valine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum with defective H+-ATPase and C-terminal truncated acetohydroxyacid synthase.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Hijikata, Nowaki; Aoki, Ryo; Takesue, Nobuchika; Yokota, Atsushi

    2008-11-01

    We have reported increased glutamate production by a mutant of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC14067 (strain F172-8) with reduced H(+)-ATPase activity under biotin-limiting culture conditions (Aoki et al. Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 69, 1466-1472 (2005)). In the present study, we examined valine production by an H(+)-ATPase-defective mutant of C. glutamicum. Using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique, we constructed a newly defined H(+)-ATPase-defective mutant from ATCC13032. After transforming the new strain (A-1) with a C-terminal truncation of acetohydroxyacid synthase gene (ilvBN), valine production increased from 21.7 mM for the wild-type strain to 46.7 mM for the A-1 in shaking flask cultures with 555 mM glucose. Increased production of the valine intermediate acetoin was also observed in A-1, and was reduced by inserting acetohydroxyacid isomeroreductase gene (ilvC) into the ilvBN plasmid. After transformation with this new construct, valine production increased from 38.3 mM for the wild-type strain to 95.7 mM for A-1 strain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that an H(+)-ATPase-defective mutant of C. glutamicum is capable of valine production. Our combined results with glutamate and valine suggest that the H(+)-ATPase defect is also effective in the fermentative production of other practical compounds.

  15. Cutting the Gordian Knot: Identifiability of anaplerotic reactions in Corynebacterium glutamicum by means of (13) C-metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Kappelmann, Jannick; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Noack, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is the major workhorse for the microbial production of several amino and organic acids. As long as these derive from tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, the activity of anaplerotic reactions is pivotal for a high biosynthetic yield. To determine single anaplerotic activities (13) C-Metabolic Flux Analysis ((13) C-MFA) has been extensively used for C. glutamicum, however with different network topologies, inconsistent or poorly determined anaplerotic reaction rates. Therefore, in this study we set out to investigate whether a focused isotopomer model of the anaplerotic node can at all admit a unique solution for all fluxes. By analyzing different scenarios of active anaplerotic reactions, we show in full generality that for C. glutamicum only certain anaplerotic deletion mutants allow to uniquely determine the anaplerotic fluxes from (13) C-isotopomer data. We stress that the result of this analysis for different assumptions on active enzymes is directly transferable to other compartment-free organisms. Our results demonstrate that there exist biologically relevant metabolic network topologies for which the flux distribution cannot be inferred by classical (13) C-MFA. PMID:26375179

  16. Direct production of organic acids from starch by cell surface-engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum in anaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We produced organic acids, including lactate and succinate, directly from soluble starch under anaerobic conditions using high cell-density cultures of Corynebacterium glutamicum displaying α-amylase (AmyA) from Streptococcus bovis 148 on the cell surface. Notably, reactions performed under anaerobic conditions at 35 and 40°C, which are higher than the optimal growth temperature of 30°C, showed 32% and 19%, respectively, higher productivity of the organic acids lactate, succinate, and acetate compared to that at 30°C. However, α-amylase was not stably anchored and released into the medium from the cell surface during reactions at these higher temperatures, as demonstrated by the 61% and 85% decreases in activity, respectively, from baseline, compared to the only 8% decrease at 30°C. The AmyA-displaying C. glutamicum cells retained their starch-degrading capacity during five 10 h reaction cycles at 30°C, producing 107.8 g/l of total organic acids, including 88.9 g/l lactate and 14.0 g/l succinate. The applicability of cell surface-engineering technology for the production of organic acids from biomass by high cell-density cultures of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions was demonstrated. PMID:24342107

  17. The physiological role of riboflavin transporter and involvement of FMN-riboswitch in its gene expression in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Norihiko; Tanaka, Yuya; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2014-05-01

    Riboflavin is a precursor of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which work as cofactors of numerous enzymes. Understanding the supply system of these cofactors in bacteria, particularly those used for industrial production of value added chemicals, is important given the pivotal role the cofactors play in substrate metabolism. In this work, we examined the effect of disruption of riboflavin utilization genes on cell growth, cytoplasmic flavin levels, and expression of riboflavin transporter in Corynebacterium glutamicum. Disruption of the ribA gene that encodes bifunctional GTP cyclohydrolase II/3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate synthase in C. glutamicum suppressed growth in the absence of supplemental riboflavin. The growth was fully recovered upon supplementation with 1 μM riboflavin, albeit at reduced intracellular concentrations of FMN and FAD during the log phase. Concomitant disruption of the ribA and ribM gene that encodes a riboflavin transporter exacerbated supplemental riboflavin requirement from 1 μM to 50 μM. RibM expression in FMN-rich cells was about 100-fold lower than that in FMN-limited cells. Mutations in putative FMN-riboswitch present immediately upstream of the ribM gene abolished the FMN response. This 5'UTR sequence of ribM constitutes a functional FMN-riboswitch in C. glutamicum. PMID:24531272

  18. Identification of mannose uptake and catabolism genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum and genetic engineering for simultaneous utilization of mannose and glucose.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Miho; Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2011-03-01

    Here, focus is on Corynebacterium glutamicum mannose metabolic genes with the aim to improve this industrially important microorganism's ability to ferment mannose present in mixed sugar substrates. cgR_0857 encodes C. glutamicum's protein with 36% amino acid sequence identity to mannose 6-phosphate isomerase encoded by manA of Escherichia coli. Its deletion mutant did not grow on mannose and exhibited noticeably reduced growth on glucose as sole carbon sources. In effect, C. glutamicum manA is not only essential for growth on mannose but also important in glucose metabolism. A double deletion mutant of genes encoding glucose and fructose permeases (ptsG and ptsF, respectively) of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) was not able to grow on mannose unlike the respective single deletion mutants with mannose utilization ability. A mutant deficient in ptsH, a general PTS gene, did not utilize mannose. These indicate that the glucose-PTS and fructose-PTS are responsible for mannose uptake in C. glutamicum. When cultured with a glucose and mannose mixture, mannose utilization of manA-overexpressing strain CRM1 was significantly higher than that of its wild-type counterpart, but with a strong preference for glucose. ptsF-overexpressing strain CRM2 co-utilized mannose and glucose, but at a total sugar consumption rate much lower than that of the wild-type strain and CRM1. Strain CRM3 overexpressing both manA and ptsF efficiently co-utilized mannose and glucose. Under oxygen-deprived conditions, high volumetric productivity of organic acids concomitant with the simultaneous consumption of the mixed sugars was achieved by the densely packed growth-arrested CRM3 cells.

  19. High-resolution detection of DNA binding sites of the global transcriptional regulator GlxR in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, Britta; Sala, Claudia; Kohl, Thomas A; Uplekar, Swapna; Baumbach, Jan; Cole, Stewart T; Pühler, Alfred; Tauch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator GlxR has been characterized as a global hub within the gene-regulatory network of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with a specific anti-GlxR antibody and subsequent high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) was applied to C. glutamicum to get new in vivo insights into the gene composition of the GlxR regulon. In a comparative approach, C. glutamicum cells were grown with either glucose or acetate as the sole carbon source prior to immunoprecipitation. High-throughput sequencing resulted in 69 million reads and 2.6 Gb of genomic information. After mapping of these data on the genome sequence of C. glutamicum, 107 enriched DNA fragments were detected from cells grown with glucose as carbon source. GlxR binding sites were identified in the sequence of 79 enriched DNA fragments, of which 21 sites were not previously reported. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with 40-mer oligomers covering the GlxR binding sites were performed for validation of the in vivo results. The detection of new binding sites confirmed the role of GlxR as a regulator of carbon source metabolism and energy conversion, but additionally revealed binding of GlxR in front of the 6C non-coding RNA gene and to non-canonical DNA binding sites within protein-coding regions. The present study underlines the dynamics within the GlxR regulon by identifying in vivo targets during growth on glucose and contributes to the expansion of knowledge of this important transcriptional regulator.

  20. Identification and Characterization of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Uptake System GabPCg (NCgl0464) in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi; Ma, Wen-hua; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is widely used for industrial production of various amino acids and vitamins, and there is growing interest in engineering this bacterium for more commercial bioproducts such as γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, a C. glutamicum GABA-specific transporter (GabPCg) encoded by ncgl0464 was identified and characterized. GabPCg plays a major role in GABA uptake and is essential to C. glutamicum growing on GABA. GABA uptake by GabPCg was weakly competed by l-Asn and l-Gln and stimulated by sodium ion (Na+). The Km and Vmax values were determined to be 41.1 ± 4.5 μM and 36.8 ± 2.6 nmol min−1 (mg dry weight [DW])−1, respectively, at pH 6.5 and 34.2 ± 1.1 μM and 67.3 ± 1.0 nmol min−1 (mg DW)−1, respectively, at pH 7.5. GabPCg has 29% amino acid sequence identity to a previously and functionally identified aromatic amino acid transporter (TyrP) of Escherichia coli but low identities to the currently known GABA transporters (17% and 15% to E. coli GabP and Bacillus subtilis GabP, respectively). The mutant RES167 Δncgl0464/pGXKZ9 with the GabPCg deletion showed 12.5% higher productivity of GABA than RES167/pGXKZ9. It is concluded that GabPCg represents a new type of GABA transporter and is potentially important for engineering GABA-producing C. glutamicum strains. PMID:22307305

  1. Development and application of an arabinose-inducible expression system by facilitating inducer uptake in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Shang, Xiuling; Lai, Shujuan; Zhang, Guoqiang; Liang, Yong; Wen, Tingyi

    2012-08-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is currently used for the industrial production of a variety of biological materials. Many available inducible expression systems in this species use lac-derived promoters from Escherichia coli that exhibit much lower levels of inducible expression and leaky basal expression. We developed an arabinose-inducible expression system that contains the L-arabinose regulator AraC, the P(BAD) promoter from the araBAD operon, and the L-arabinose transporter AraE, all of which are derived from E. coli. The level of inducible P(BAD)-based expression could be modulated over a wide concentration range from 0.001 to 0.4% L-arabinose. This system tightly controlled the expression of the uracil phosphoribosyltransferase without leaky expression. When the gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was under the control of P(BAD) promoter, flow cytometry analysis showed that GFP was expressed in a highly homogeneous profile throughout the cell population. In contrast to the case in E. coli, P(BAD) induction was not significantly affected in the presence of different carbon sources in C. glutamicum, which makes it useful in fermentation applications. We used this system to regulate the expression of the odhI gene from C. glutamicum, which encodes an inhibitor of α-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, resulting in high levels of glutamate production (up to 13.7 mM) under biotin nonlimiting conditions. This system provides an efficient tool available for molecular biology and metabolic engineering of C. glutamicum.

  2. A TatABC-Type Tat Translocase Is Required for Unimpaired Aerobic Growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Dan; Schmitz, Sabrina; Freudl, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria and the thylakoid membrane of plant chloroplasts. Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative bacteria possess a TatABC-type Tat translocase in which each of the three inner membrane proteins TatA, TatB, and TatC performs a mechanistically distinct function. In contrast, low-GC Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, use a TatAC-type minimal Tat translocase in which the TatB function is carried out by a bifunctional TatA. In high-GC Gram-positive Actinobacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium glutamicum, tatA, tatB, and tatC genes can be identified, suggesting that these organisms, just like E. coli, might use TatABC-type Tat translocases as well. However, since contrary to this view a previous study has suggested that C. glutamicum might in fact use a TatAC translocase with TatB only playing a minor role, we reexamined the requirement of TatB for Tat-dependent protein translocation in this microorganism. Under aerobic conditions, the misassembly of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein QcrA was identified as a major reason for the severe growth defect of Tat-defective C. glutamicum mutant strains. Furthermore, our results clearly show that TatB, besides TatA and TatC, is strictly required for unimpaired aerobic growth. In addition, TatB was also found to be essential for the secretion of a heterologous Tat-dependent model protein into the C. glutamicum culture supernatant. Together with our finding that expression of the C. glutamicum TatB in an E. coli ΔtatB mutant strain resulted in the formation of an active Tat translocase, our results clearly indicate that a TatABC translocase is used as the physiologically relevant functional unit for Tat-dependent protein translocation in C. glutamicum and, most likely, also in other TatB-containing Actinobacteria. PMID:25837592

  3. Identification of D-amino acid dehydrogenase as an upstream regulator of the autoinduction of a putative acyltransferase in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Jae; Shin, Hee-Sung; Lee, Heung-Shick; Jin, Shouguang; Ha, Un-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Expression of a putative acyltransferase encoded by NCgl- 0350 of Corynebacterium glutamicum is induced by cell-free culture fluids obtained from stationary-phase growth of both C. glutamicum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, providing evidence for interspecies communication. Here, we further confirmed that such communication occurs by showing that acyltransferase expression is induced by culture fluid obtained from diverse Gram-negative and -positive bacterial strains, including Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium sp. strain JC1, and Mycobacterium smegmatis. A homologous acyltransferase encoded by PA5238 of P. aeruginosa was also induced by fluids obtained from P. aeruginosa as well as other bacterial strains, as observed for NCgl0350 of C. glutamicum. Because C. glutamicum is difficult to study using molecular approaches, the homologous gene PA5238 of P. aeruginosa was used to identify PA5309 as an upstream regulator of expression. A homologous D-amino acid dehydrogenase encoded by NCgl- 2909 of C. glutamicum was cloned based on amino acid similarity to PA5309, and its role in the regulation of NCgl0350 expression was confirmed. Moreover, NCgl2909 played positive roles in growth of C. glutamicum. Thus, we identified a D-amino acid dehydrogenase as an upstream regulator of the autoinduction of a putative acyltransferase in C. glutamicum. PMID:27225460

  4. Gene expression analysis of Corynebacterium glutamicum subjected to long-term lactic acid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Kinga; Satorhelyi, Peter; Lange, Christian; Wendisch, Volker F; Silakowski, Barbara; Scherer, Siegfried; Neuhaus, Klaus

    2007-08-01

    Corynebacteria form an important part of the red smear cheese microbial surface consortium. To gain a better understanding of molecular adaptation due to low pH induced by lactose fermentation, the global gene expression profile of Corynebacterium glutamicum adapted to pH 5.7 with lactic acid under continuous growth in a chemostat was characterized by DNA microarray analysis. Expression of a total of 116 genes was increased and that of 90 genes was decreased compared to pH 7.5 without lactic acid, representing 7% of the genes in the genome. The up-regulated genes encode mainly transcriptional regulators, proteins responsible for export, import, and metabolism, and several proteins of unknown function. As much as 45% of the up-regulated open reading frames code for hypothetical proteins. These results were validated using real-time reverse transcription-PCR. To characterize the functions of 38 up-regulated genes, 36 single-crossover disruption mutants were generated and analyzed for their lactic acid sensitivities. However, only a sigB knockout mutant showed a highly significant negative effect on growth at low pH, suggesting a function in organic-acid adaptation. A sigE mutant already displayed growth retardation at neutral pH but grew better at acidic pH than the sigB mutant. The lack of acid-sensitive phenotypes in 34 out of 36 disrupted genes suggests either a considerable redundancy in acid adaptation response or coincidental effects. Other up-regulated genes included genes for ion transporters and metabolic pathways, including carbohydrate and respiratory metabolism. The enhanced expression of the nrd (ribonucleotide reductase) operon and a DNA ATPase repair protein implies a cellular response to combat acid-induced DNA damage. Surprisingly, multiple iron uptake systems (totaling 15% of the genes induced >or=2-fold) were induced at low pH. This induction was shown to be coincidental and could be attributed to iron-sequestering effects in complex media at low p

  5. Biosynthesis of l-Sorbose and l-Psicose Based on C—C Bond Formation Catalyzed by Aldolases in an Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum Strain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiangang; Li, Jitao; Men, Yan; Zhu, Yueming; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    The property of loose stereochemical control at aldol products from aldolases helped to synthesize multiple polyhydroxylated compounds with nonnatural stereoconfiguration. In this study, we discovered for the first time that some fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolases (FruA) and tagatose 1,6-diphosphate (TagA) aldolases lost their strict stereoselectivity when using l-glyceraldehyde and synthesized not only l-sorbose but also a high proportion of l-psicose. Among the aldolases tested, TagA from Bacillus licheniformis (BGatY) showed the highest enzyme activity with l-glyceraldehyde. Subsequently, a “one-pot” reaction based on BGatY and fructose-1-phosphatase (YqaB) generated 378 mg/liter l-psicose and 199 mg/liter l-sorbose from dihydroxyacetone-phosphate (DHAP) and l-glyceraldehyde. Because of the high cost and instability of DHAP, a microbial fermentation strategy was used further to produce l-sorbose/l-psicose from glucose and l-glyceraldehyde, in which DHAP was obtained from glucose through the glycolytic pathway, and some recombination pathways based on FruA or TagA and YqaB were constructed in Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum strains. After evaluation of different host cells and combinations of FruA or TagA with YqaB and optimization of gene expression, recombinant C. glutamicum strain WT(pXFTY) was selected and produced 2.53 g/liter total ketoses, with a yield of 0.50 g/g l-glyceraldehyde. Moreover, deletion of gene cgl0331, encoding the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in C. glutamicum, was confirmed for the first time to significantly decrease conversion of l-glyceraldehyde to glycerol and to increase yield of target products. Finally, fed-batch culture of strain SY14(pXFTY) produced 3.5 g/liter l-sorbose and 2.3 g/liter l-psicose, with a yield of 0.61 g/g l-glyceraldehyde. This microbial fermentation strategy also could be applied to efficiently synthesize other l-sugars. PMID:25888171

  6. Biosynthesis of l-Sorbose and l-Psicose Based on C-C Bond Formation Catalyzed by Aldolases in an Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum Strain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiangang; Li, Jitao; Men, Yan; Zhu, Yueming; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-07-01

    The property of loose stereochemical control at aldol products from aldolases helped to synthesize multiple polyhydroxylated compounds with nonnatural stereoconfiguration. In this study, we discovered for the first time that some fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolases (FruA) and tagatose 1,6-diphosphate (TagA) aldolases lost their strict stereoselectivity when using l-glyceraldehyde and synthesized not only l-sorbose but also a high proportion of l-psicose. Among the aldolases tested, TagA from Bacillus licheniformis (BGatY) showed the highest enzyme activity with l-glyceraldehyde. Subsequently, a "one-pot" reaction based on BGatY and fructose-1-phosphatase (YqaB) generated 378 mg/liter l-psicose and 199 mg/liter l-sorbose from dihydroxyacetone-phosphate (DHAP) and l-glyceraldehyde. Because of the high cost and instability of DHAP, a microbial fermentation strategy was used further to produce l-sorbose/l-psicose from glucose and l-glyceraldehyde, in which DHAP was obtained from glucose through the glycolytic pathway, and some recombination pathways based on FruA or TagA and YqaB were constructed in Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum strains. After evaluation of different host cells and combinations of FruA or TagA with YqaB and optimization of gene expression, recombinant C. glutamicum strain WT(pXFTY) was selected and produced 2.53 g/liter total ketoses, with a yield of 0.50 g/g l-glyceraldehyde. Moreover, deletion of gene cgl0331, encoding the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in C. glutamicum, was confirmed for the first time to significantly decrease conversion of l-glyceraldehyde to glycerol and to increase yield of target products. Finally, fed-batch culture of strain SY14(pXFTY) produced 3.5 g/liter l-sorbose and 2.3 g/liter l-psicose, with a yield of 0.61 g/g l-glyceraldehyde. This microbial fermentation strategy also could be applied to efficiently synthesize other l-sugars.

  7. Osmo-sensing by N- and C-terminal extensions of the glycine betaine uptake system BetP of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Peter, H; Burkovski, A; Krämer, R

    1998-01-30

    The major uptake carrier for the compatible solute glycine betaine in Corynebacterium glutamicum is the secondary transport system BetP. It is effectively regulated by the external osmolality both on the level of expression and of activity. BetP carries highly charged domains both at the N and at the C terminus. We investigated the role of these extensions in the regulatory response to hyperosmotic stress. Mutants of the betP gene coding for proteins with truncated N- and C-terminal extensions were expressed in the C. glutamicum betP deletion strain DHP1 and were functionally characterized with respect to regulation of activity. The optimum of activation at 1.3 osmol/kg in wild type was shifted in the recombinant strains to about 2.6 osmol/kg in mutants with deletions in the N-terminal part. Deletions in the C-terminal domain resulted in a complete loss of regulation. The altered response to changes in osmolality led to severe consequences in the cellular adaption to hyperosmotic stress. Whereas in the wild type, the steady state level of glycine betaine accumulation is maintained by activity regulation of the BetP system itself, in the mutant with BetP proteins carrying truncations in the C-terminal domain, the observed steady state betaine accumulation was found to be due to a kinetic balance of unregulated glycine betaine uptake by the modifed BetP and efflux via the mechanosensitive efflux channel for compatible solutes at the same time. PMID:9446558

  8. (L)-Valine production with minimization of by-products' synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum and Brevibacterium flavum.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaohu; Chen, Xinde; Zhang, Yue; Qian, He; Zhang, Weiguo

    2012-12-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 and Brevibacterium flavum JV16 were engineered for L-valine production by over-expressing ilvEBN ( r ) C genes at 31 °C in 72 h fermentation. Different strategies were carried out to reduce the by-products' accumulation in L-valine fermentation and also to increase the availability of precursor for L-valine biosynthesis. The native promoter of ilvA of C. glutamicum was replaced with a weak promoter MPilvA (P-ilvAM1CG) to reduce the biosynthetic rate of L-isoleucine. Effect of different relative dissolved oxygen on L-valine production and by-products' formation was recorded, indicating that 15 % saturation may be the most appropriate relative dissolved oxygen for L-valine fermentation with almost no L-lactic acid and L-glutamate formed. To minimize L-alanine accumulation, alaT and/or avtA was inactivated in C. glutamicum and B. flavum, respectively. Compared to high concentration of L-alanine accumulated by alaT inactivated strains harboring ilvEBN ( r ) C genes, L-alanine concentration was reduced to 0.18 g/L by C. glutamicum ATCC13032MPilvA△avtA pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C, and 0.22 g/L by B. flavum JV16avtA::Cm pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C. Meanwhile, L-valine production and conversion efficiency were enhanced to 31.15 g/L and 0.173 g/g by C. glutamicum ATCC13032MPilvA△avtA pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C, 38.82 g/L and 0.252 g/g by B. flavum JV16avtA::Cm pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C. This study provides combined strategies to improve L-valine yield by minimization of by-products' production.

  9. Enhancement of biomolecule transport by electroporation: a review of theory and practical application to transformation of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Tryfona, Theodora; Bustard, Mark T

    2006-02-20

    Selective and reversible permeabilization of the cell wall permeability barrier is the focus for many biotechnological applications. In this article, the basic principles for reversible membrane permeabilization, based on biological, chemical, and physical methods are reviewed. Emphasis is given to electroporation (electropermeabilization) which tends to be the most popular method for membrane permeabilization and for introduction of foreign molecules into the cells. The applications of this method in industrial processes as well as the critical factors and parameters which affect the success of this approach are discussed. The different strategies developed throughout the years for increased transformation efficiencies of the industrially important amino acid-overproducing bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum, are also summarized. PMID:16224791

  10. Influence of L-isoleucine and pantothenate auxotrophy for L-valine formation in Corynebacterium glutamicum revisited by metabolome analyses.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Makus, Pia; Klein, Bianca; Lang, Siegmund; Oldiges, Marco

    2008-04-01

    The effect of different amounts of supplemented L-isoleucine and pantothenate has been analysed with the auxotrophic strain Corynebacterium glutamicum DeltailvA DeltapanB, showing that the final biomass concentration of this preliminary L-valine production strain can be controlled by the amount of added L-isoleucine. One gramme cell dry weight is formed from 48 micromol L-isoleucine. Different amounts of available pantothenate affect the intracellular pyruvate concentration. By limiting pantothenate supplementation from 0.8 to 0.1 microM, a 35-fold increase of cytoplasmic pyruvate up to 14.2 mM can be observed, resulting in the increased formation of L-valine, L-alanine and organic acids in the presence of low pantothenate concentrations. These findings can be used to redirect the carbon flux from glycolysis via pyruvate to the TCA cycle towards the desired product L-valine.

  11. Factors enhancing L-valine production by the growth-limited L-isoleucine auxotrophic strain Corynebacterium glutamicum DeltailvA DeltapanB ilvNM13 (pECKAilvBNC).

    PubMed

    Denina, Ilze; Paegle, Longina; Prouza, Marek; Holátko, Jiri; Pátek, Miroslav; Nesvera, Jan; Ruklisha, Maija

    2010-07-01

    Cell growth limitation is known to be an important condition that enhances L: -valine synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum recombinant strains with L: -isoleucine auxotrophy. To identify whether it is the limited availability of L: -isoleucine itself or the L: -isoleucine limitation-induced rel-dependent ppGpp-mediated stringent response that is essential for the enhancement of L: -valine synthesis in growth-limited C. glutamicum cells, we deleted the rel gene, thereby constructing a relaxed (rel (-) ) C. glutamicum DeltailvA DeltapanB Deltarel ilvNM13 (pECKAilvBNC) strain. Variations in enzyme activity and L: -valine synthesis in rel (+) and rel (-) strains under conditions of L: -isoleucine excess and limitation were investigated. A sharp increase in acetohydroxy acid synthase (AHAS) activity, a slight increase in acetohydroxyacid isomeroreductase (AHAIR) activity, and a dramatic increase in L: -valine synthesis were observed in both rel (+) and rel (-) cells exposed to L: -isoleucine limitation. Although the positive effect of induction of the stringent response on AHAS and AHAIR upregulation in cells was not confirmed, we found the stringent response to be beneficial for maintaining increased AHAS, dihydroxyacid dehydratase, and transaminase B activity and L: -valine synthesis in cells during the stationary growth phase.

  12. Regulation of the malic enzyme gene malE by the transcriptional regulator MalR in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Krause, Jens P; Polen, Tino; Youn, Jung-Won; Emer, Denise; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wendisch, Volker F

    2012-06-15

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a Gram-positive nonpathogenic bacterium that is used for the biotechnological production of amino acids. Here, we investigated the transcriptional control of the malE gene encoding malic enzyme (MalE) in C. glutamicum ATCC 13032, which is known to involve the nitrogen regulator AmtR. Gel shift experiments using purified regulators RamA and RamB revealed binding of these regulators to the malE promoter. In DNA-affinity purification experiments a hitherto uncharacterized transcriptional regulator belonging to the MarR family was found to bind to malE promoter DNA and was designated as MalR. C. glutamicum cells overexpressing malR showed reduced MalE activities in LB medium or in minimal media with acetate, glucose, pyruvate or citrate. Deletion of malR positively affected MalE activities during growth in LB medium and minimal media with pyruvate, glucose or the TCA cycle dicarboxylates l-malate, succinate and fumarate. Transcriptional fusion analysis revealed elevated malE promoter activity in the malR deletion mutant during growth in pyruvate minimal medium suggesting that MalR acts as a repressor of malE. Purified MalR bound malE promoter DNA in gel shift experiments. Two MalR binding sites were identified in the malE promoter by mutational analysis. Thus, MalR contributes to the complex transcriptional control of malE which also involves RamA, RamB and AmtR. PMID:22261175

  13. In Vivo Fluxes in the Ammonium-Assimilatory Pathways in Corynebacterium glutamicum Studied by 15N Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, M.; de Graaf, A. A.; Sahm, H.

    1999-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS)–glutamine 2-oxoglutarate-aminotransferase (GOGAT) represent the two main pathways of ammonium assimilation in Corynebacterium glutamicum. In this study, the ammonium assimilating fluxes in vivo in the wild-type ATCC 13032 strain and its GDH mutant were quantitated in continuous cultures. To do this, the incorporation of 15N label from [15N]ammonium in glutamate and glutamine was monitored with a time resolution of about 10 min with in vivo 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) used in combination with a recently developed high-cell-density membrane-cyclone NMR bioreactor system. The data were used to tune a standard differential equation model of ammonium assimilation that comprised ammonia transmembrane diffusion, GDH, GS, GOGAT, and glutamine amidotransferases, as well as the anabolic incorporation of glutamate and glutamine into biomass. The results provided a detailed picture of the fluxes involved in ammonium assimilation in the two different C. glutamicum strains in vivo. In both strains, transmembrane equilibration of 100 mM [15N]ammonium took less than 2 min. In the wild type, an unexpectedly high fraction of 28% of the NH4+ was assimilated via the GS reaction in glutamine, while 72% were assimilated by the reversible GDH reaction via glutamate. GOGAT was inactive. The analysis identified glutamine as an important nitrogen donor in amidotransferase reactions. The experimentally determined amount of 28% of nitrogen assimilated via glutamine is close to a theoretical 21% calculated from the high peptidoglycan content of C. glutamicum. In the GDH mutant, glutamate was exclusively synthesized over the GS/GOGAT pathway. Its level was threefold reduced compared to the wild type. PMID:10049869

  14. Role of Corynebacterium glutamicum sprA Encoding a Serine Protease in glxR-Mediated Global Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Eun-Ji; Park, Joon-Song; Kim, Younhee; Lee, Heung-Shick

    2014-01-01

    The global regulator glxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum is involved in many cellular activities. Considering its role, the GlxR protein likely interacts with other proteins to obtain, maintain, and control its activity. To isolate proteins interacting with GlxR, we used a two-hybrid system with GlxR as the bait. Subsequently, the partner, a subtilisin-like serine protease, was isolated from a C. glutamicum genomic library. Unlike glxR, which showed constitutive expression, the expression of sprA, encoding a serine protease, was maximal in the log phase. Purified His6-SprA protein underwent self-proteolysis and proteolyzed purified GlxR. The proteolytic action of SprA on GlxR was not observed in the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which modulates GlxR activity. The C. glutamicum sprA deletion mutant (ΔsprA) and sprA-overexpressing (P180-sprA) strains showed reduced growth. The activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase (a tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme) in these strains decreased to 30–50% of that in the wild-type strain. In the P180-sprA strain, proteins involved in diverse cellular functions such as energy and carbon metabolism (NCgl2809), nitrogen metabolism (NCgl0049), methylation reactions (NCgl0719), and peptidoglycan biosynthesis (NCgl1267), as well as stress, starvation, and survival (NCgl0938) were affected and showed decreased transcription. Taken together, these data suggest that SprA, as a serine protease, performs a novel regulatory role not only in glxR-mediated gene expression but also in other areas of cell physiology. In addition, the tight control of SprA and GlxR availability may indicate their importance in global gene regulation. PMID:24691519

  15. Gene expression profiling of Corynebacterium glutamicum during Anaerobic nitrate respiration: induction of the SOS response for cell survival.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Taku; Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2011-03-01

    The gene expression profile of Corynebacterium glutamicum under anaerobic nitrate respiration revealed marked differences in the expression levels of a number of genes involved in a variety of cellular functions, including carbon metabolism and respiratory electron transport chain, compared to the profile under aerobic conditions using DNA microarrays. Many SOS genes were upregulated by the shift from aerobic to anaerobic nitrate respiration. An elongated cell morphology, similar to that induced by the DivS-mediated suppression of cell division upon cell exposure to the DNA-damaging reagent mitomycin C, was observed in cells subjected to anaerobic nitrate respiration. None of these transcriptional and morphological differences were observed in a recA mutant strain lacking a functional RecA regulator of the SOS response. The recA mutant cells additionally showed significantly reduced viability compared to wild-type cells similarly grown under anaerobic nitrate respiration. These results suggest a role for the RecA-mediated SOS response in the ability of cells to survive any DNA damage that may result from anaerobic nitrate respiration in C. glutamicum.

  16. The impact of the C-terminal domain on the gating properties of MscCG from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Becker, Michael; Ebrahimian, Haleh; Konishi, Tomoyuki; Kawasaki, Hisashi; Krämer, Reinhard; Martinac, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The mechanosensitive (MS) channel MscCG from the soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum functions as a major glutamate exporter. MscCG belongs to a subfamily of the bacterial MscS-like channels, which play an important role in osmoregulation. To understand the structural and functional features of MscCG, we investigated the role of the carboxyl-terminal domain, whose relevance for the channel gating has been unknown. The chimeric channel MscS-(C-MscCG), which is a fusion protein between the carboxyl terminal domain of MscCG and the MscS channel, was examined by the patch clamp technique. We found that the chimeric channel exhibited MS channel activity in Escherichia coli spheroplasts characterized by a lower activation threshold and slow closing compared to MscS. The chimeric channel MscS-(C-MscCG) was successfully reconstituted into azolectin liposomes and exhibited gating hysteresis in a voltage-dependent manner, especially at high pipette voltages. Moreover, the channel remained open after releasing pipette pressure at membrane potentials physiologically relevant for C. glutamicum. This contribution to the gating hysteresis of the C-terminal domain of MscCG confers to the channel gating properties highly suitable for release of intracellular solutes.

  17. Production of carbon-13-labeled cadaverine by engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum using carbon-13-labeled methanol as co-substrate.

    PubMed

    Leßmeier, Lennart; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Carnicer, Marc; Heux, Stephanie; Portais, Jean-Charles; Wendisch, Volker F

    2015-12-01

    Methanol, a one-carbon compound, can be utilized by a variety of bacteria and other organisms as carbon and energy source and is regarded as a promising substrate for biotechnological production. In this study, a strain of non-methylotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum, which was able to produce the polyamide building block cadaverine as non-native product, was engineered for co-utilization of methanol. Expression of the gene encoding NAD+-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh) from the natural methylotroph Bacillus methanolicus increased methanol oxidation. Deletion of the endogenous aldehyde dehydrogenase genes ald and fadH prevented methanol oxidation to carbon dioxide and formaldehyde detoxification via the linear formaldehyde dissimilation pathway. Heterologous expression of genes for the key enzymes hexulose-6-phosphate synthase and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase of the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway in this strain restored growth in the presence of methanol or formaldehyde, which suggested efficient formaldehyde detoxification involving RuMP key enzymes. While growth with methanol as sole carbon source was not observed, the fate of 13C-methanol added as co-substrate to sugars was followed and the isotopologue distribution indicated incorporation into central metabolites and in vivo activity of the RuMP pathway. In addition, 13C-label from methanol was traced to the secreted product cadaverine. Thus, this synthetic biology approach led to a C. glutamicum strain that converted the non-natural carbon substrate methanol at least partially to the non-native product cadaverine.

  18. Modular Optimization of a Hemicellulose-Utilizing Pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum for Consolidated Bioprocessing of Hemicellulosic Biomass.

    PubMed

    Yim, Sung Sun; Choi, Jae Woong; Lee, Se Hwa; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2016-04-15

    Hemicellulose, which is the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose, has the potential to become a major feedstock for microbial fermentation to produce various biofuels and chemicals. To utilize hemicellulose economically, it is necessary to develop a consolidated bioprocess (CBP), in which all processes from biomass degradation to the production of target products occur in a single bioreactor. Here, we report a modularly engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum strain suitable for CBP using hemicellulosic biomass (xylan) as a feedstock. The hemicellulose-utilizing pathway was divided into three distinct modules, and each module was separately optimized. In the module for xylose utilization, the expression level of the xylose isomerase (xylA) and xylulokinase (xylB) genes was optimized with synthetic promoters of different strengths. Then, the module for xylose transport was engineered with combinatorial sets of synthetic promoters and heterologous transporters to achieve the fastest cell growth rate on xylose (0.372 h(-1)). Next, the module for the enzymatic degradation of xylan to xylose was also engineered with different combinations of promoters and signal peptides to efficiently secrete both endoxylanase and xylosidase into the extracellular medium. Finally, each optimized module was integrated into a single plasmid to construct a highly efficient xylan-utilizing pathway. Subsequently, the direct production of lysine from xylan was successfully demonstrated with the engineered pathway. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the development of a consolidated bioprocessing C. glutamicum strain for hemicellulosic biomass.

  19. Corynebacterium glutamicum as a potent biocatalyst for the bioconversion of pentose sugars to value-added products.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Vipin; Murali, Anusree; Dhar, Kiran S; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, the industrial microbe traditionally used for the production of amino acids, proved its value for the fermentative production of diverse products through genetic/metabolic engineering. A successful demonstration of the heterologous expression of arabinose and xylose utilization genes made them interesting biocatalysts for pentose fermentation, which are the main components in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Its ability to withstand substantial amount of general growth inhibitors like furfurals, hydroxyl methyl furfurals and organic acids generated from the acid/alkali hydrolysis of lignocellulosics in growth arrested conditions and its ability to produce amino acids like glutamate and lysine in acid hydrolysates of rice straw and wheat bran, indicate the future prospective of this bacterium as a potent biocatalyst in fermentation biotechnology. However, the efforts so far on these lines have not yet been reviewed, and hence an attempt is made to look into the efficacy and prospects of C. glutamicum to utilize the normally non-fermentable pentose sugars from lignocellulosic biomass for the production of commodity chemicals. PMID:22094976

  20. Functional Expression of the PorAH Channel from Corynebacterium glutamicum in Cell-free Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Parthasarathi; Demange, Pascal; Saurel, Olivier; Tropis, Marielle; Daffé, Mamadou; Dötsch, Volker; Ghazi, Alexandre; Bernhard, Frank; Milon, Alain

    2011-01-01

    PorA and PorH are two small membrane proteins from the outer membrane of Corynebacterium glutamicum, which have been shown to form heteromeric ion channels and to be post-translationally modified by mycolic acids. Any structural details of the channel could not be analyzed so far due to tremendous difficulties in the production of sufficient amounts of protein samples. Cell-free (CF) expression is a new and remarkably successful strategy for the production of membrane proteins for which toxicity, membrane targeting, and degradation are key issues. In addition, reaction conditions can easily be modified to modulate the quality of synthesized protein samples. We developed an efficient CF expression strategy to produce the channel subunits devoid of post-translational modifications. 15N-labeled PorA and PorH samples were furthermore characterized by NMR and gave well resolved spectra, opening the way for structural studies. The comparison of ion channel activities of CF-expressed proteins with channels isolated from C. glutamicum gave clear insights on the influence of the mycolic acid modification of the two subunits on their functional properties. PMID:21799011

  1. Corynebacterium glutamicum as a potent biocatalyst for the bioconversion of pentose sugars to value-added products.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Vipin; Murali, Anusree; Dhar, Kiran S; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, the industrial microbe traditionally used for the production of amino acids, proved its value for the fermentative production of diverse products through genetic/metabolic engineering. A successful demonstration of the heterologous expression of arabinose and xylose utilization genes made them interesting biocatalysts for pentose fermentation, which are the main components in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Its ability to withstand substantial amount of general growth inhibitors like furfurals, hydroxyl methyl furfurals and organic acids generated from the acid/alkali hydrolysis of lignocellulosics in growth arrested conditions and its ability to produce amino acids like glutamate and lysine in acid hydrolysates of rice straw and wheat bran, indicate the future prospective of this bacterium as a potent biocatalyst in fermentation biotechnology. However, the efforts so far on these lines have not yet been reviewed, and hence an attempt is made to look into the efficacy and prospects of C. glutamicum to utilize the normally non-fermentable pentose sugars from lignocellulosic biomass for the production of commodity chemicals.

  2. Production of L-glutamic Acid with Corynebacterium glutamicum (NCIM 2168) and Pseudomonas reptilivora (NCIM 2598): A Study on Immobilization and Reusability

    PubMed Central

    Shyamkumar, Rajaram; Moorthy, Innasi Muthu Ganesh; Ponmurugan, Karuppiah; Baskar, Rajoo

    2014-01-01

    Background L-glutamic acid is one of the major amino acids that is present in a wide variety of foods. It is mainly used as a food additive and flavor enhancer in the form of sodium salt. Corynebacterium glutamicum (C. glutamicum) is one of the major organisms widely used for glutamic acid production. Methods The study was dealing with immobilization of C. glutamicum and mixed culture of C. glutamicum and Pseudomonas reptilivora (P. reptilivora) for L-glutamic acid production using submerged fermentation. 2, 3 and 5% sodium alginate concentrations were used for production and reusability of immobilized cells for 5 more trials. Results The results revealed that 2% sodium alginate concentration produced the highest yield (13.026±0.247 g/l by C. glutamicum and 16.026±0.475 g/l by mixed immobilized culture). Moreover, reusability of immobilized cells was evaluated in 2% concentration with 5 more trials. However, when the number of cycles increased, the production of L-glutamic acid decreased. Conclusion Production of glutamic acid using optimized medium minimizes the time needed for designing the medium composition. It also minimizes external contamination. Glutamic acid production gradually decreased due to multiple uses of beads and consequently it reduces the shelf life. PMID:25215180

  3. Overexpression of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes in Corynebacterium glutamicum enhances glucose metabolism and alanine production under oxygen deprivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shogo; Gunji, Wataru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Toda, Hiroshi; Suda, Masako; Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that Corynebacterium glutamicum strain ΔldhAΔppc+alaD+gapA, overexpressing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding gapA, shows significantly improved glucose consumption and alanine formation under oxygen deprivation conditions (T. Jojima, M. Fujii, E. Mori, M. Inui, and H. Yukawa, Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 87:159-165, 2010). In this study, we employ stepwise overexpression and chromosomal integration of a total of four genes encoding glycolytic enzymes (herein referred to as glycolytic genes) to demonstrate further successive improvements in C. glutamicum glucose metabolism under oxygen deprivation. In addition to gapA, overexpressing pyruvate kinase-encoding pyk and phosphofructokinase-encoding pfk enabled strain GLY2/pCRD500 to realize respective 13% and 20% improved rates of glucose consumption and alanine formation compared to GLY1/pCRD500. Subsequent overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-encoding gpi in strain GLY3/pCRD500 further improved its glucose metabolism. Notably, both alanine productivity and yield increased after each overexpression step. After 48 h of incubation, GLY3/pCRD500 produced 2,430 mM alanine at a yield of 91.8%. This was 6.4-fold higher productivity than that of the wild-type strain. Intracellular metabolite analysis showed that gapA overexpression led to a decreased concentration of metabolites upstream of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, suggesting that the overexpression resolved a bottleneck in glycolysis. Changing ratios of the extracellular metabolites by overexpression of glycolytic genes resulted in reduction of the intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio, which also plays an important role on the improvement of glucose consumption. Enhanced alanine dehydrogenase activity using a high-copy-number plasmid further accelerated the overall alanine productivity. Increase in glycolytic enzyme activities is a promising approach to make drastic progress in growth-arrested bioprocesses.

  4. Analysis of SOS-induced spontaneous prophage induction in Corynebacterium glutamicum at the single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Arun M; Heyer, Antonia; Krämer, Christina; Grünberger, Alexander; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Frunzke, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the Gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 contains three integrated prophage elements (CGP1 to -3). Recently, it was shown that the large lysogenic prophage CGP3 (∼187 kbp) is excised spontaneously in a small number of cells. In this study, we provide evidence that a spontaneously induced SOS response is partly responsible for the observed spontaneous CGP3 induction. Whereas previous studies focused mainly on the induction of prophages at the population level, we analyzed the spontaneous CGP3 induction at the single-cell level using promoters of phage genes (Pint2 and Plysin) fused to reporter genes encoding fluorescent proteins. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed a spontaneous CGP3 activity in about 0.01 to 0.08% of the cells grown in standard minimal medium, which displayed a significantly reduced viability. A PrecA-eyfp promoter fusion revealed that a small fraction of C. glutamicum cells (∼0.2%) exhibited a spontaneous induction of the SOS response. Correlation of PrecA to the activity of downstream SOS genes (PdivS and PrecN) confirmed a bona fide induction of this stress response rather than stochastic gene expression. Interestingly, the reporter output of PrecA and CGP3 promoter fusions displayed a positive correlation at the single-cell level (ρ = 0.44 to 0.77). Furthermore, analysis of the PrecA-eyfp/Pint2-e2-crimson strain during growth revealed the highest percentage of spontaneous PrecA and Pint2 activity in the early exponential phase, when fast replication occurs. Based on these studies, we postulate that spontaneously occurring DNA damage induces the SOS response, which in turn triggers the induction of lysogenic prophages. PMID:24163339

  5. Reactions upstream of glycerate-1,3-bisphosphate drive Corynebacterium glutamicum (D)-lactate productivity under oxygen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Yota; Yamamoto, Shougo; Suda, Masako; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2013-08-01

    We previously demonstrated the simplicity of oxygen-deprived Corynebacterium glutamicum to produce D-lactate, a primary building block of next-generation biodegradable plastics, at very high optical purity by introducing heterologous D-ldhA gene from Lactobacillus delbrueckii. Here, we independently evaluated the effects of overexpressing each of genes encoding the ten glycolytic enzymes on D-lactate production in C. glutamicum. We consequently show that while the reactions catalyzed by glucokinase (GLK), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), phosphofructokinase (PFK), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), and bisphosphate aldolase had positive effects on D-lactate productivity by increasing 98, 39, 15, 13, and 10 %, respectively, in 10 h reactions in minimal salts medium, the reaction catalyzed by pyruvate kinase had large negative effect by decreasing 70 %. The other glycolytic enzymes did not affect D-lactate productivity when each of encoding genes was overexpressed. It is noteworthy that all reactions associated with positive effects are located upstream of glycerate-1,3-bisphosphate in the glycolytic pathway. The D-lactate yield also increased by especially overexpressing TPI encoding gene up to 94.5 %. Interestingly, overexpression of PFK encoding gene reduced the yield of succinate, one of the main by-products of D-lactate production, by 52 %, whereas overexpression of GAPDH encoding gene increased succinate yield by 26 %. Overexpression of GLK encoding gene markedly increased the yield of dihydroxyacetone and glycerol by 10- and 5.8-fold in exchange with decreasing the D-lactate yield. The effect of overexpressing glycolytic genes was also evaluated in 80 h long-term reactions. The variety of effects of overexpressing each of genes encoding the ten glycolytic enzymes on D-lactate production is discussed. PMID:23712891

  6. From zero to hero - production of bio-based nylon from renewable resources using engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Kind, Stefanie; Neubauer, Steffi; Becker, Judith; Yamamoto, Motonori; Völkert, Martin; Abendroth, Gregory von; Zelder, Oskar; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    Polyamides are important industrial polymers. Currently, they are produced exclusively from petrochemical monomers. Herein, we report the production of a novel bio-nylon, PA5.10 through an integration of biological and chemical approaches. First, systems metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum was used to create an effective microbial cell factory for the production of diaminopentane as the polymer building block. In this way, a hyper-producer, with a high diaminopentane yield of 41% in shake flask culture, was generated. Subsequent fed-batch production of C. glutamicum DAP-16 allowed a molar yield of 50%, a productivity of 2.2gL(-1)h(-1), and a final titer of 88gL(-1). The streamlined producer accumulated diaminopentane without generating any by-products. Solvent extraction from alkalized broth and two-step distillation provided highly pure diaminopentane (99.8%), which was then directly accessible for poly-condensation. Chemical polymerization with sebacic acid, a ten-carbon dicarboxylic acid derived from castor plant oil, yielded the bio-nylon, PA5.10. In pure form and reinforced with glass fibers, the novel 100% bio-polyamide achieved an excellent melting temperature and the mechanical strength of the well-established petrochemical polymers, PA6 and PA6.6. It even outperformed the oil-based products in terms of having a 6% lower density. It thus holds high promise for applications in energy-friendly transportation. The demonstration of a novel route for generation of bio-based nylon from renewable sources opens the way to production of sustainable bio-polymers with enhanced material properties and represents a milestone in industrial production. PMID:24831706

  7. From zero to hero - production of bio-based nylon from renewable resources using engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Kind, Stefanie; Neubauer, Steffi; Becker, Judith; Yamamoto, Motonori; Völkert, Martin; Abendroth, Gregory von; Zelder, Oskar; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    Polyamides are important industrial polymers. Currently, they are produced exclusively from petrochemical monomers. Herein, we report the production of a novel bio-nylon, PA5.10 through an integration of biological and chemical approaches. First, systems metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum was used to create an effective microbial cell factory for the production of diaminopentane as the polymer building block. In this way, a hyper-producer, with a high diaminopentane yield of 41% in shake flask culture, was generated. Subsequent fed-batch production of C. glutamicum DAP-16 allowed a molar yield of 50%, a productivity of 2.2gL(-1)h(-1), and a final titer of 88gL(-1). The streamlined producer accumulated diaminopentane without generating any by-products. Solvent extraction from alkalized broth and two-step distillation provided highly pure diaminopentane (99.8%), which was then directly accessible for poly-condensation. Chemical polymerization with sebacic acid, a ten-carbon dicarboxylic acid derived from castor plant oil, yielded the bio-nylon, PA5.10. In pure form and reinforced with glass fibers, the novel 100% bio-polyamide achieved an excellent melting temperature and the mechanical strength of the well-established petrochemical polymers, PA6 and PA6.6. It even outperformed the oil-based products in terms of having a 6% lower density. It thus holds high promise for applications in energy-friendly transportation. The demonstration of a novel route for generation of bio-based nylon from renewable sources opens the way to production of sustainable bio-polymers with enhanced material properties and represents a milestone in industrial production.

  8. Analysis of SOS-induced spontaneous prophage induction in Corynebacterium glutamicum at the single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Arun M; Heyer, Antonia; Krämer, Christina; Grünberger, Alexander; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Frunzke, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the Gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 contains three integrated prophage elements (CGP1 to -3). Recently, it was shown that the large lysogenic prophage CGP3 (∼187 kbp) is excised spontaneously in a small number of cells. In this study, we provide evidence that a spontaneously induced SOS response is partly responsible for the observed spontaneous CGP3 induction. Whereas previous studies focused mainly on the induction of prophages at the population level, we analyzed the spontaneous CGP3 induction at the single-cell level using promoters of phage genes (Pint2 and Plysin) fused to reporter genes encoding fluorescent proteins. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed a spontaneous CGP3 activity in about 0.01 to 0.08% of the cells grown in standard minimal medium, which displayed a significantly reduced viability. A PrecA-eyfp promoter fusion revealed that a small fraction of C. glutamicum cells (∼0.2%) exhibited a spontaneous induction of the SOS response. Correlation of PrecA to the activity of downstream SOS genes (PdivS and PrecN) confirmed a bona fide induction of this stress response rather than stochastic gene expression. Interestingly, the reporter output of PrecA and CGP3 promoter fusions displayed a positive correlation at the single-cell level (ρ = 0.44 to 0.77). Furthermore, analysis of the PrecA-eyfp/Pint2-e2-crimson strain during growth revealed the highest percentage of spontaneous PrecA and Pint2 activity in the early exponential phase, when fast replication occurs. Based on these studies, we postulate that spontaneously occurring DNA damage induces the SOS response, which in turn triggers the induction of lysogenic prophages.

  9. Protein S-Mycothiolation Functions as Redox-Switch and Thiol Protection Mechanism in Corynebacterium glutamicum Under Hypochlorite Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Bui Khanh; Busche, Tobias; Van Laer, Koen; Bäsell, Katrin; Becher, Dörte; Clermont, Lina; Seibold, Gerd M.; Persicke, Marcus; Kalinowski, Jörn; Messens, Joris

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein S-bacillithiolation was recently discovered as important thiol protection and redox-switch mechanism in response to hypochlorite stress in Firmicutes bacteria. Here we used transcriptomics to analyze the NaOCl stress response in the mycothiol (MSH)-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum. We further applied thiol-redox proteomics and mass spectrometry (MS) to identify protein S-mycothiolation. Results: Transcriptomics revealed the strong upregulation of the disulfide stress σH regulon by NaOCl stress in C. glutamicum, including genes for the anti sigma factor (rshA), the thioredoxin and MSH pathways (trxB1, trxC, cg1375, trxB, mshC, mca, mtr) that maintain the redox balance. We identified 25 S-mycothiolated proteins in NaOCl-treated cells by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), including 16 proteins that are reversibly oxidized by NaOCl in the thiol-redox proteome. The S-mycothiolome includes the methionine synthase (MetE), the maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP), the myoinositol-1-phosphate synthase (Ino1), enzymes for the biosynthesis of nucleotides (GuaB1, GuaB2, PurL, NadC), and thiamine (ThiD), translation proteins (TufA, PheT, RpsF, RplM, RpsM, RpsC), and antioxidant enzymes (Tpx, Gpx, MsrA). We further show that S-mycothiolation of the thiol peroxidase (Tpx) affects its peroxiredoxin activity in vitro that can be restored by mycoredoxin1. LC-MS/MS analysis further identified 8 proteins with S-cysteinylations in the mshC mutant suggesting that cysteine can be used for S-thiolations in the absence of MSH. Innovation and Conclusion: We identified widespread protein S-mycothiolations in the MSH-producing C. glutamicum and demonstrate that S-mycothiolation reversibly affects the peroxidase activity of Tpx. Interestingly, many targets are conserved S-thiolated across bacillithiol- and MSH-producing bacteria, which could become future drug targets in related pathogenic Gram-positives. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 589–605

  10. The identification of enzyme targets for the optimization of a valine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum strain using a kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Jørgen Barsett; Oldiges, Marco; Takors, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The enzyme targets for the rational optimization of a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain constructed for valine production are identified by analyzing the control of flux in the valine/leucine pathway. The control analysis is based on measurements of the intracellular metabolite concentrations and on a kinetic model of the reactions in the investigated pathway. Data-driven and model-based methods are used and evaluated against each other. The approach taken gives a quantitative evaluation of the flux control and it is demonstrated how the understanding of flux control is used to reach specific recommendations for strain optimization. The flux control coefficients (FCCs) with respect to the valine excretion rate were calculated, and it was found that the control is distributed mainly between the acetohydroxyacid synthase enzyme (FCC = 0.32), the branched chain amino acid transaminase (FCC = 0.27), and the exporting translocase (FCC = 0.43). The availability of the precursor pyruvate has substantial influence on the valine flux, whereas the cometabolites are less important as demonstrated by the calculation of the respective response coefficients. The model is further used to make in-silico predictions of the change in valine flux following a change in enzyme level. A doubling of the enzyme level of valine translocase will result in an increase in valine flux of 31%. By optimizing the enzyme levels with respect to valine flux it was found that the valine flux can be increased by a factor 2.5 when the optimal enzyme levels are implemented.

  11. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1). Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1) derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization. PMID:23092390

  12. Synthesis of β-alanine from L-aspartate using L-aspartate-α-decarboxylase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Zhao, Lianzhen; Li, Youran; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Guiyang

    2014-08-01

    β-Alanine is mainly produced by chemical methods in current industrial processes. Here, panD from Corynebacterium glutamicum encoding L-aspartate-α-decarboxylase (ADC) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). ADC C.g catalyzes the α-decarboxylation of L-aspartate to β-alanine. The purified ADC C.g was optimal at 55 °C and pH 6 with excellent stability at 16-37 °C and pH 4-7. A pH-stat directed, fed-batch feeding strategy was developed for enzymatic synthesis of β-alanine to keep the pH value within 6-7.2 and thus attenuate substrate inhibition. A maximum conversion of 97.2 % was obtained with an initial 5 g L-aspartate/l and another three feedings of 0.5 % (w/v) L-aspartate at 8 h intervals. The final β-alanine concentration was 12.85 g/l after 36 h. This is the first study concerning the enzymatic production of β-alanine by using ADC.

  13. Enhancing the supply of oxaloacetate for L-glutamate production by pyc overexpression in different Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuan; Wang, Jing; Xie, Xixian; Xu, Qingyang; Zhang, Chenglin; Chen, Ning

    2013-06-01

    During L-glutamate production, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase (PCx) play important roles in supplying oxaloacetate to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To explore the significance of PCx for L-glutamate overproduction, the pyc gene encoding PCx was amplified in Corynebacterium glutamicum GDK-9 triggered by biotin limitation and CN1021 triggered by a temperature shock, respectively. In the fed-batch cultures, GDK-9pXMJ19pyc exhibited 7.4 % lower L-alanine excretion and no improved L-glutamate production. In contrast, CN1021pXMJ19pyc finally exhibited 13 % lower L-alanine excretion and identical L-glutamate production, however, 8.5 % higher L-glutamate production was detected during a short period of the fermentation. It was indicated that pyc overexpression in L-glutamate producer strains, especially CN1021, increased the supply of oxaloacetate for L-glutamate synthesis and decreased byproduct excretion at the pyruvate node.

  14. The TetR-Type Transcriptional Repressor RolR from Corynebacterium glutamicum Regulates Resorcinol Catabolism by Binding to a Unique Operator, rolO

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tang; Zhao, Kexin; Huang, Yan; Li, Defeng; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Zhou, Nan; Fan, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    The rol (designated for resorcinol) gene cluster rolRHMD is involved in resorcinol catabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum, and RolR is the TetR-type regulator. In this study, we investigated how RolR regulated the transcription of the rol genes in C. glutamicum. The transcription start sites and promoters of rolR and rolHMD were identified. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and promoter activity analysis indicated that RolR negatively regulated the transcription of rolHMD and of its own gene. Further, a 29-bp operator rolO was located at the intergenic region of rolR and rolHMD and was identified as the sole binding site for RolR. It contained two overlapping inverted repeats and they were essential for RolR-binding. The binding of RolR to rolO was affected by resorcinol and hydroxyquinol, which are the starting compounds of resorcinol catabolic pathway. These two compounds were able to dissociate RolR-rolO complex, thus releasing RolR from the complex and derepressing the transcription of rol genes in C. glutamicum. It is proposed that the binding of RolR to its operator rolO blocks the transcription of rolHMD and of its own gene, thus negatively regulated resorcinol degradation in C. glutamicum. PMID:22706057

  15. Mycothiol protects Corynebacterium glutamicum against acid stress via maintaining intracellular pH homeostasis, scavenging ROS, and S-mycothiolating MetE.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingbao; Yang, Xiaobing; Yin, Yajie; Lin, Jinshui; Chen, Can; Pan, Junfeng; Si, Meiru; Shen, Xihui

    2016-07-14

    Mycothiol (MSH) plays a major role in protecting cells against oxidative stress and detoxification from a broad range of exogenous toxic agents. In the present study, we reveal that intracellular MSH contributes significantly to the adaptation to acidic conditions in the model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum. We present evidence that MSH confers C. glutamicum with the ability to adapt to acidic conditions by maintaining pHi homeostasis, scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and protecting methionine synthesis by the S-mycothiolation modification of methionine synthase (MetE). The role of MSH in acid adaptation was further confirmed by improving the acid tolerance of C. glutamicum by overexpressing the key MSH synthesis gene mshA. Hence, our work provides insights into a previously unknown, but important, aspect of the C. glutamicum cellular response to acid stress. The results reported here may help to understand acid tolerance mechanisms in acid sensitive bacteria and may open a new avenue for improving acid resistance in industry strains for the production of bio-based chemicals from renewable biomass. PMID:27250661

  16. Regulation of expression of sodA and msrA genes of Corynebacterium glutamicum in response to oxidative and radiative stress.

    PubMed

    El Shafey, H M; Ghanem, S

    2015-03-20

    Promoters of genes encoding superoxide dismutase (sodA) and peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase (msrA) from Cory-nebacterium glutamicum were cloned and sequenced. Promoter region analysis of sodA-msrA was unable to identify putative sites of fixed eventual regulators except for possible sites of fixed OxyR and integra-tion host factor. A study of the regulation of these genes was performed using the lacZ gene of Escherichia coli as a reporter placed under the control of sequences downstream of sodA and msrA. In silico analysis was used to identify regulators in the genome of C. glutamicum, which revealed the absence of homologs of soxRS and arcA and the presence of inactive oxyR and putative candidates of the homologs of ahpC, ohrR, integration host factor, furA, IdeR, diphtheria toxin repressor, and mntR.

  17. Secretory production of an FAD cofactor-containing cytosolic enzyme (sorbitol-xylitol oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor) using the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Scheele, Sandra; Oertel, Dan; Bongaerts, Johannes; Evers, Stefan; Hellmuth, Hendrik; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Bott, Michael; Freudl, Roland

    2013-03-01

    Carbohydrate oxidases are biotechnologically interesting enzymes that require a tightly or covalently bound cofactor for activity. Using the industrial workhorse Corynebacterium glutamicum as the expression host, successful secretion of a normally cytosolic FAD cofactor-containing sorbitol-xylitol oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor was achieved by using the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) protein export machinery for protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane. Our results demonstrate for the first time that, also for cofactor-containing proteins, a secretory production strategy is a feasible and promising alternative to conventional intracellular expression strategies.

  18. Secretory production of an FAD cofactor-containing cytosolic enzyme (sorbitol-xylitol oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor) using the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Scheele, Sandra; Oertel, Dan; Bongaerts, Johannes; Evers, Stefan; Hellmuth, Hendrik; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Bott, Michael; Freudl, Roland

    2013-03-01

    Carbohydrate oxidases are biotechnologically interesting enzymes that require a tightly or covalently bound cofactor for activity. Using the industrial workhorse Corynebacterium glutamicum as the expression host, successful secretion of a normally cytosolic FAD cofactor-containing sorbitol-xylitol oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor was achieved by using the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) protein export machinery for protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane. Our results demonstrate for the first time that, also for cofactor-containing proteins, a secretory production strategy is a feasible and promising alternative to conventional intracellular expression strategies. PMID:23163932

  19. Corynebacterium glutamicum Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A Uses both Mycoredoxin and Thioredoxin for Regeneration and Oxidative Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Si, Meiru; Zhang, Lei; Chaudhry, Muhammad Tausif; Ding, Wei; Xu, Yixiang; Chen, Can; Akbar, Ali; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation of methionine leads to the formation of the S and R diastereomers of methionine sulfoxide (MetO), which can be reversed by the actions of two structurally unrelated classes of methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr), MsrA and MsrB, respectively. Although MsrAs have long been demonstrated in numerous bacteria, their physiological and biochemical functions remain largely unknown in Actinomycetes. Here, we report that a Corynebacterium glutamicum methionine sulfoxide reductase A (CgMsrA) that belongs to the 3-Cys family of MsrAs plays important roles in oxidative stress resistance. Deletion of the msrA gene in C. glutamicum resulted in decrease of cell viability, increase of ROS production, and increase of protein carbonylation levels under various stress conditions. The physiological roles of CgMsrA in resistance to oxidative stresses were corroborated by its induced expression under various stresses, regulated directly by the stress-responsive extracytoplasmic-function (ECF) sigma factor SigH. Activity assays performed with various regeneration pathways showed that CgMsrA can reduce MetO via both the thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase (Trx/TrxR) and mycoredoxin 1/mycothione reductase/mycothiol (Mrx1/Mtr/MSH) pathways. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that Cys56 is the peroxidatic cysteine that is oxidized to sulfenic acid, while Cys204 and Cys213 are the resolving Cys residues that form an intramolecular disulfide bond. Mrx1 reduces the sulfenic acid intermediate via the formation of an S-mycothiolated MsrA intermediate (MsrA-SSM) which is then recycled by mycoredoxin and the second molecule of mycothiol, similarly to the glutathione/glutaredoxin/glutathione reductase (GSH/Grx/GR) system. However, Trx reduces the Cys204-Cys213 disulfide bond in CgMsrA produced during MetO reduction via the formation of a transient intermolecular disulfide bond between Trx and CgMsrA. While both the Trx/TrxR and Mrx1/Mtr/MSH pathways are operative in reducing CgMsrA under

  20. Transcriptome and Gene Ontology (GO) Enrichment Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in Biotin Metabolism That Affect l-Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Il; Kim, Jong-Hyeon; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is widely used for amino acid production. In the present study, 543 genes showed a significant change in their mRNA expression levels in l-lysine-producing C. glutamicum ATCC21300 than that in the wild-type C. glutamicum ATCC13032. Among these 543 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 28 genes were up- or downregulated. In addition, 454 DEGs were functionally enriched and categorized based on BLAST sequence homologies and gene ontology (GO) annotations using the Blast2GO software. Interestingly, NCgl0071 (bioB, encoding biotin synthase) was expressed at levels ~20-fold higher in the l-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain. Five other genes involved in biotin metabolism or transport—NCgl2515 (bioA, encoding adenosylmethionine-8-amino-7-oxononanoate aminotransferase), NCgl2516 (bioD, encoding dithiobiotin synthetase), NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885—were also expressed at significantly higher levels in the l-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain, which we determined using both next-generation RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. When we disrupted the bioB gene in C. glutamicum ATCC21300, l-lysine production decreased by approximately 76%, and the three genes involved in biotin transport (NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885) were significantly downregulated. These results will be helpful to improve our understanding of C. glutamicum for industrial amino acid production. PMID:27005618

  1. Exploring the role of sigma factor gene expression on production by Corynebacterium glutamicum: sigma factor H and FMN as example

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Hironori; Wendisch, Volker F.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are known to cope with environmental changes by using alternative sigma factors binding to RNA polymerase core enzyme. Sigma factor is one of the targets to modify transcription regulation in bacteria and to influence production capacities. In this study, the effect of overexpressing each annotated sigma factor gene in Corynebacterium glutamicum WT was assayed using an IPTG inducible plasmid system and different IPTG concentrations. It was revealed that growth was severely decreased when sigD or sigH were overexpressed with IPTG concentrations higher than 50 μM. Overexpression of sigH led to an obvious phenotypic change, a yellow-colored supernatant. High performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that riboflavin was excreted to the medium when sigH was overexpressed and DNA microarray analysis confirmed increased expression of riboflavin biosynthesis genes. In addition, genes for enzymes related to the pentose phosphate pathway and for enzymes dependent on flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), or NADPH as cofactor were upregulated when sigH was overexpressed. To test if sigH overexpression can be exploited for production of riboflavin-derived FMN or FAD, the endogenous gene for bifunctional riboflavin kinase/FMN adenyltransferase was co-expressed with sigH from a plasmid. Balanced expression of sigH and ribF improved accumulation of riboflavin (19.8 ± 0.3 μM) and allowed for its conversion to FMN (33.1 ± 1.8 μM) in the supernatant. While a proof-of-concept was reached, conversion was not complete and titers were not high. This study revealed that inducible and gradable overexpression of sigma factor genes is an interesting approach to switch gene expression profiles and to discover untapped potential of bacteria for chemical production. PMID:26257719

  2. Improvement of the redox balance increases L-valine production by Corynebacterium glutamicum under oxygen deprivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Uematsu, Kimio; Natsuma, Yumi; Suda, Masako; Hiraga, Kazumi; Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2012-02-01

    Production of L-valine under oxygen deprivation conditions by Corynebacterium glutamicum lacking the lactate dehydrogenase gene ldhA and overexpressing the L-valine biosynthesis genes ilvBNCDE was repressed. This was attributed to imbalanced cofactor production and consumption in the overall L-valine synthesis pathway: two moles of NADH was generated and two moles of NADPH was consumed per mole of L-valine produced from one mole of glucose. In order to solve this cofactor imbalance, the coenzyme requirement for L-valine synthesis was converted from NADPH to NADH via modification of acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase encoded by ilvC and introduction of Lysinibacillus sphaericus leucine dehydrogenase in place of endogenous transaminase B, encoded by ilvE. The intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio significantly decreased, and glucose consumption and L-valine production drastically improved. Moreover, L-valine yield increased and succinate formation decreased concomitantly with the decreased intracellular redox state. These observations suggest that the intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio, i.e., reoxidation of NADH, is the primary rate-limiting factor for L-valine production under oxygen deprivation conditions. The L-valine productivity and yield were even better and by-products derived from pyruvate further decreased as a result of a feedback resistance-inducing mutation in the acetohydroxy acid synthase encoded by ilvBN. The resultant strain produced 1,470 mM L-valine after 24 h with a yield of 0.63 mol mol of glucose(-1), and the L-valine productivity reached 1,940 mM after 48 h.

  3. Effect of biotin on transcription levels of key enzymes and glutamate efflux in glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Duan, Zuoying; Shi, Zhongping

    2014-02-01

    Biotin is an important factor affecting the performance of glutamate fermentation by biotin auxotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum and glutamate is over-produced only when initial biotin content is controlled at suitable levels or initial biotin is excessive but with Tween 40 addition during fermentation. The transcription levels of key enzymes at pyruvate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate metabolic nodes, as well as transport protein (TP) of glutamate were investigated under the conditions of varied biotin contents and Tween 40 supplementation. When biotin was insufficient, the genes encoding key enzymes and TP were down-regulated in the early production phase, in particular, the transcription level of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) which was only 2% of that of control. Although the cells' morphology transformation and TP level were not affected, low transcription level of ICDH led to lower final glutamate concentration (64 g/L). When biotin was excessive, the transcription levels of key enzymes were at comparable levels as those of control with ICDH as an exception, which was only 3-22% of control level throughout production phase. In this case, little intracellular glutamate accumulation (1.5 mg/g DCW) and impermeable membrane resulted in non glutamate secretion into broth, even though the quantity of TP was more than 10-folds of control level. Addition of Tween 40 when biotin was excessive stimulated the expression of all key enzymes and TP, intracellular glutamate content was much higher (10-12 mg/g DCW), and final glutamate concentration reached control level (75-80 g/L). Hence, the membrane alteration and TP were indispensable in glutamate secretion. Biotin and Tween 40 influenced the expression level of ICDH and glutamate efflux, thereby influencing glutamate production.

  4. OxyR acts as a transcriptional repressor of hydrogen peroxide-inducible antioxidant genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum R.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2013-07-01

    OxyR, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, has been established as a redox-responsive activator of antioxidant genes in bacteria. This study shows that OxyR acts as a transcriptional repressor of katA, dps, ftn and cydA in Corynebacterium glutamicum R. katA encodes H2O2-detoxifing enzyme catalase, dps and ftn are implicated in iron homeostasis and cydA encodes a subunit of cytochrome bd oxidase. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that expression of katA and dps, but not of ftn and cydA, was induced by H2O2. Disruption of the oxyR gene encoding OxyR resulted in a marked increase in katA and dps mRNAs to a level higher than that induced by H2O2, and the oxyR-deficient mutant showed a H2O2-resistant phenotype. This is in contrast to the conventional OxyR-dependent regulatory model. ftn and cydA were also upregulated by oxyR disruption but to a smaller extent. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that the OxyR protein specifically binds to all four upstream regions of the respective genes under reducing conditions. We observed that the oxidized form of OxyR similarly bound to not only the target promoter regions, but also nonspecific DNA fragments. Based on these findings, we propose that the transcriptional repression by OxyR is alleviated under oxidative stress conditions in a titration mechanism due to the decreased specificity of its DNA-binding activity. DNase I footprinting analyses revealed that the OxyR-binding site in the four target promoters is ~ 50 bp in length and has multiple T-N11-A motifs, a feature of LysR-type transcriptional regulators, but no significant overall sequence conservation. PMID:23621709

  5. Toward homosuccinate fermentation: metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for anaerobic production of succinate from glucose and formate.

    PubMed

    Litsanov, Boris; Brocker, Melanie; Bott, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the capability of Corynebacterium glutamicum for anaerobic succinate production from glucose under nongrowing conditions. In this work, we have addressed two shortfalls of this process, the formation of significant amounts of by-products and the limitation of the yield by the redox balance. To eliminate acetate formation, a derivative of the type strain ATCC 13032 (strain BOL-1), which lacked all known pathways for acetate and lactate synthesis (Δcat Δpqo Δpta-ackA ΔldhA), was constructed. Chromosomal integration of the pyruvate carboxylase gene pyc(P458S) into BOL-1 resulted in strain BOL-2, which catalyzed fast succinate production from glucose with a yield of 1 mol/mol and showed only little acetate formation. In order to provide additional reducing equivalents derived from the cosubstrate formate, the fdh gene from Mycobacterium vaccae, coding for an NAD(+)-coupled formate dehydrogenase (FDH), was chromosomally integrated into BOL-2, leading to strain BOL-3. In an anaerobic batch process with strain BOL-3, a 20% higher succinate yield from glucose was obtained in the presence of formate. A temporary metabolic blockage of strain BOL-3 was prevented by plasmid-borne overexpression of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene gapA. In an anaerobic fed-batch process with glucose and formate, strain BOL-3/pAN6-gap accumulated 1,134 mM succinate in 53 h with an average succinate production rate of 1.59 mmol per g cells (dry weight) (cdw) per h. The succinate yield of 1.67 mol/mol glucose is one of the highest currently described for anaerobic succinate producers and was accompanied by a very low level of by-products (0.10 mol/mol glucose).

  6. Involvement of the Global Regulator GlxR in 3-Hydroxybenzoate and Gentisate Utilization by Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is an industrially important producer of amino acids and organic acids, as well as an emerging model system for aromatic assimilation. An IclR-type regulator GenR has been characterized to activate the transcription of genDFM and genKH operons for 3-hydroxybenzoate and gentisate catabolism and represses its own expression. On the other hand, GlxR, a global regulator of the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein-fumarate nitrate reductase regulator (CRP-FNR) type, was also predicted to be involved in this pathway. In this study, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and footprinting analyses demonstrated that GlxR bound to three sites in the promoter regions of three gen operons. A combination of site-directed mutagenesis of the biding sites, promoter activity assay, and GlxR overexpression demonstrated that GlxR repressed their expression by binding these sites. One GlxR binding site (DFMx) was found to be located −13 to +8 bp upstream of the genDFM promoter, which was involved in negative regulation of genDFM transcription. The GlxR binding site R-KHx01 (located between positions −11 to +5) was upstream of the genKH promoter sequence and involved in negative regulation of its transcription. The binding site R-KHx02, at which GlxR binds to genR promoter to repress its expression, was found within a footprint extending from positions −71 to −91 bp. These results reveal that GlxR represses the transcription of all three gen operons and then contributes to the synchronization of their expression for 3-hydroxybenzoate and gentisate catabolism in collaboration with the specific regulator GenR. PMID:24795375

  7. Methionine uptake in Corynebacterium glutamicum by MetQNI and by MetPS, a novel methionine and alanine importer of the NSS neurotransmitter transporter family.

    PubMed

    Trötschel, Christian; Follmann, Martin; Nettekoven, Jeannine A; Mohrbach, Tobias; Forrest, Lucy R; Burkovski, Andreas; Marin, Kay; Krämer, Reinhard

    2008-12-01

    The soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is a model organism in amino acid biotechnology. Here we present the identification of two different L-methionine uptake systems including the first characterization of a bacterial secondary methionine carrier. The primary carrier MetQNI is a high affinity ABC-type transporter specific for l-methionine. Its expression is under the control of the transcription factor McbR, the global regulator of sulfur metabolism in C. glutamicum. Besides MetQNI, a novel secondary methionine uptake system of the NSS (neurotransmitter:sodium symporter) family was identified and named MetP. The MetP system is characterized by a lower affinity for methionine and uses Na(+) ions for energetic coupling. It is also the main alanine transporter in C. glutamicum and is expressed constitutively. These observations are consistent with models of methionine, alanine, and leucine bound to MetP, derived from the X-ray crystal structure of the LeuT transporter from Aquifex aeolicus. Complementation studies show that MetP consists of two components, a large subunit with 12 predicted transmembrane segments and, surprisingly, an additional subunit with one predicted transmembrane segment only. Thus, this new member of the NSS transporter family adds a novel feature to this class of carriers, namely, the functional dependence on an additional small subunit.

  8. Metabolic flux distributions in Corynebacterium glutamicum during growth and lysine overproduction. Reprinted from Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Vol. 41, Pp 633-646 (1993).

    PubMed

    Vallino, J J; Stephanopoulos, G

    2000-03-20

    The two main contributions of this article are the solidification of Corynebacterium glutamicum biochemistry guided by bioreaction network analysis, and the determination of basal metabolic flux distributions during growth and lysine synthesis. Employed methodology makes use of stoichiometrically based mass balances to determine flux distributions in the C. glutamicum metabolic network. Presented are a brief description of the methodology, a thorough literature review of glutamic acid bacteria biochemistry, and specific results obtained through a combination of fermentation studies and analysis-directed intracellular assays. The latter include the findings of the lack of activity of glyoxylate shunt, and that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) is the only anaplerotic reaction expressed in C. glutamicum cultivated on glucose minimal media. Network simplifications afforded by the above findings facilitated the determination of metabolic flux distributions under a variety of culture conditions and led to the following conclusions. Both the pentose phosphate pathway and PPC support significant fluxes during growth and lysine overproduction, and that flux partitioning at the glucosa-6-phosphate branch point does not appear to limit lysine synthesis. PMID:10699864

  9. Rapid Electron Transfer within the III-IV Supercomplex in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Simone; Fedotovskaya, Olga; Kao, Wei-Chun; Hunte, Carola; Ädelroth, Pia; Bott, Michael; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Brzezinski, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Complex III in C. glutamicum has an unusual di-heme cyt. c1 and it co-purifies with complex IV in a supercomplex. Here, we investigated the kinetics of electron transfer within this supercomplex and in the cyt. aa3 alone (cyt. bc1 was removed genetically). In the reaction of the reduced cyt. aa3 with O2, we identified the same sequence of events as with other A-type oxidases. However, even though this reaction is associated with proton uptake, no pH dependence was observed in the kinetics. For the cyt. bc1-cyt. aa3 supercomplex, we observed that electrons from the c-hemes were transferred to CuA with time constants 0.1–1 ms. The b-hemes were oxidized with a time constant of 6.5 ms, indicating that this electron transfer is rate-limiting for the overall quinol oxidation/O2 reduction activity (~210 e−/s). Furthermore, electron transfer from externally added cyt. c to cyt. aa3 was significantly faster upon removal of cyt. bc1 from the supercomplex, suggesting that one of the c-hemes occupies a position near CuA. In conclusion, isolation of the III-IV-supercomplex allowed us to investigate the kinetics of electron transfer from the b-hemes, via the di-heme cyt. c1 and heme a to the heme a3-CuB catalytic site of cyt. aa3. PMID:27682138

  10. Application of a genetically encoded biosensor for live cell imaging of L-valine production in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient Corynebacterium glutamicum strains.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Nurije; Grünberger, Alexander; Mahr, Regina; Helfrich, Stefan; Nöh, Katharina; Blombach, Bastian; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Frunzke, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biotechnologically relevant metabolites do not impart a conspicuous phenotype to the producing cell. Consequently, the analysis of microbial metabolite production is still dominated by bulk techniques, which may obscure significant variation at the single-cell level. In this study, we have applied the recently developed Lrp-biosensor for monitoring of amino acid production in single cells of gradually engineered L-valine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum strains based on the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient (PDHC) strain C. glutamicum ΔaceE. Online monitoring of the sensor output (eYFP fluorescence) during batch cultivation proved the sensor's suitability for visualizing different production levels. In the following, we conducted live cell imaging studies on C. glutamicum sensor strains using microfluidic chip devices. As expected, the sensor output was higher in microcolonies of high-yield producers in comparison to the basic strain C. glutamicum ΔaceE. Microfluidic cultivation in minimal medium revealed a typical Gaussian distribution of single cell fluorescence during the production phase. Remarkably, low amounts of complex nutrients completely changed the observed phenotypic pattern of all strains, resulting in a phenotypic split of the population. Whereas some cells stopped growing and initiated L-valine production, others continued to grow or showed a delayed transition to production. Depending on the cultivation conditions, a considerable fraction of non-fluorescent cells was observed, suggesting a loss of metabolic activity. These studies demonstrate that genetically encoded biosensors are a valuable tool for monitoring single cell productivity and to study the phenotypic pattern of microbial production strains.

  11. Single-Domain Peptidyl-Prolyl cis/trans Isomerase FkpA from Corynebacterium glutamicum Improves the Biomass Yield at Increased Growth Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kallscheuer, Nicolai; Bott, Michael; van Ooyen, Jan; Polen, Tino

    2015-11-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases) catalyze the rate-limiting protein folding step at peptidyl bonds preceding proline residues and were found to be involved in several biological processes, including gene expression, signal transduction, and protein secretion. Representative enzymes were found in almost all sequenced genomes, including Corynebacterium glutamicum, a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive and industrial workhorse for the production of amino acids. In C. glutamicum, a predicted single-domain FK-506 (tacrolimus) binding protein (FKBP)-type PPIase (FkpA) is encoded directly downstream of gltA, which encodes citrate synthase (CS). This gene cluster is also present in other Actinobacteria. Here we carried out in vitro and in vivo experiments to study the function and influence of predicted FkpA in C. glutamicum. In vitro, FkpA indeed shows typical PPIase activity with artificial substrates and is inhibited by FK-506. Furthermore, FkpA delays the aggregation of CS, which is also inhibited by FK-506. Surprisingly, FkpA has a positive effect on the activity and temperature range of CS in vitro. Deletion of fkpA causes a 50% reduced biomass yield compared to that of the wild type when grown at 37°C, whereas there is only a 10% reduced biomass yield at the optimal growth temperature of 30°C accompanied by accumulation of 7 mM l-glutamate and 22 mM 2-oxoglutarate. Thus, FkpA may be exploited for improved product formation in biotechnical processes. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed 69 genes which exhibit ≥2-fold mRNA level changes in C. glutamicum ΔfkpA, giving insight into the transcriptional response upon mild heat stress when FkpA is absent. PMID:26341203

  12. Single-Domain Peptidyl-Prolyl cis/trans Isomerase FkpA from Corynebacterium glutamicum Improves the Biomass Yield at Increased Growth Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kallscheuer, Nicolai; Bott, Michael; van Ooyen, Jan; Polen, Tino

    2015-11-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases) catalyze the rate-limiting protein folding step at peptidyl bonds preceding proline residues and were found to be involved in several biological processes, including gene expression, signal transduction, and protein secretion. Representative enzymes were found in almost all sequenced genomes, including Corynebacterium glutamicum, a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive and industrial workhorse for the production of amino acids. In C. glutamicum, a predicted single-domain FK-506 (tacrolimus) binding protein (FKBP)-type PPIase (FkpA) is encoded directly downstream of gltA, which encodes citrate synthase (CS). This gene cluster is also present in other Actinobacteria. Here we carried out in vitro and in vivo experiments to study the function and influence of predicted FkpA in C. glutamicum. In vitro, FkpA indeed shows typical PPIase activity with artificial substrates and is inhibited by FK-506. Furthermore, FkpA delays the aggregation of CS, which is also inhibited by FK-506. Surprisingly, FkpA has a positive effect on the activity and temperature range of CS in vitro. Deletion of fkpA causes a 50% reduced biomass yield compared to that of the wild type when grown at 37°C, whereas there is only a 10% reduced biomass yield at the optimal growth temperature of 30°C accompanied by accumulation of 7 mM l-glutamate and 22 mM 2-oxoglutarate. Thus, FkpA may be exploited for improved product formation in biotechnical processes. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed 69 genes which exhibit ≥2-fold mRNA level changes in C. glutamicum ΔfkpA, giving insight into the transcriptional response upon mild heat stress when FkpA is absent.

  13. Transcriptome sequencing revealed the transcriptional organization at ribosome-mediated attenuation sites in Corynebacterium glutamicum and identified a novel attenuator involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Neshat, Armin; Mentz, Almut; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2014-11-20

    The Gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum belongs to the order Corynebacteriales and is used as a producer of amino acids at industrial scales. Due to its economic importance, gene expression and particularly the regulation of amino acid biosynthesis has been investigated extensively. Applying the high-resolution technique of transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), recently a vast amount of data has been generated that was used to comprehensively analyze the C. glutamicum transcriptome. By analyzing RNA-seq data from a small RNA cDNA library of C. glutamicum, short transcripts in the known transcriptional attenuators sites of the trp operon, the ilvBNC operon and the leuA gene were verified. Furthermore, whole transcriptome RNA-seq data were used to elucidate the transcriptional organization of these three amino acid biosynthesis operons. In addition, we discovered and analyzed the novel attenuator aroR, located upstream of the aroF gene (cg1129). The DAHP synthase encoded by aroF catalyzes the first step in aromatic amino acid synthesis. The AroR leader peptide contains the amino acid sequence motif F-Y-F, indicating a regulatory effect by phenylalanine and tyrosine. Analysis by real-time RT-PCR suggests that the attenuator regulates the transcription of aroF in dependence of the cellular amount of tRNA loaded with phenylalanine when comparing a phenylalanine-auxotrophic C. glutamicum mutant fed with limiting and excess amounts of a phenylalanine-containing dipeptide. Additionally, the very interesting finding was made that all analyzed attenuators are leaderless transcripts. PMID:24910972

  14. Platform engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum with reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity for improved production of L-lysine, L-valine, and 2-ketoisovalerate.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Jens; Schwentner, Andreas; Brunnenkan, Britta; Gabris, Christina; Grimm, Simon; Gerstmeir, Robert; Takors, Ralf; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Blombach, Bastian

    2013-09-01

    Exchange of the native Corynebacterium glutamicum promoter of the aceE gene, encoding the E1p subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC), with mutated dapA promoter variants led to a series of C. glutamicum strains with gradually reduced growth rates and PDHC activities. Upon overexpression of the l-valine biosynthetic genes ilvBNCE, all strains produced l-valine. Among these strains, C. glutamicum aceE A16 (pJC4 ilvBNCE) showed the highest biomass and product yields, and thus it was further improved by additional deletion of the pqo and ppc genes, encoding pyruvate:quinone oxidoreductase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, respectively. In fed-batch fermentations at high cell densities, C. glutamicum aceE A16 Δpqo Δppc (pJC4 ilvBNCE) produced up to 738 mM (i.e., 86.5 g/liter) l-valine with an overall yield (YP/S) of 0.36 mol per mol of glucose and a volumetric productivity (QP) of 13.6 mM per h [1.6 g/(liter × h)]. Additional inactivation of the transaminase B gene (ilvE) and overexpression of ilvBNCD instead of ilvBNCE transformed the l-valine-producing strain into a 2-ketoisovalerate producer, excreting up to 303 mM (35 g/liter) 2-ketoisovalerate with a YP/S of 0.24 mol per mol of glucose and a QP of 6.9 mM per h [0.8 g/(liter × h)]. The replacement of the aceE promoter by the dapA-A16 promoter in the two C. glutamicum l-lysine producers DM1800 and DM1933 improved the production by 100% and 44%, respectively. These results demonstrate that C. glutamicum strains with reduced PDHC activity are an excellent platform for the production of pyruvate-derived products.

  15. Acyl-CoA sensing by FasR to adjust fatty acid synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Irzik, Kristina; van Ooyen, Jan; Gätgens, Jochem; Krumbach, Karin; Bott, Michael; Eggeling, Lothar

    2014-12-20

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, like Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a member of the Corynebacteriales, which have linear fatty acids and as branched fatty acids the mycolic acids. We identified accD1 and fasA as key genes of fatty acid synthesis, encoding the β-subunit of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase and a type-I fatty acid synthase, respectively, and observed their repression during growth on minimal medium with acetate. We also identified the transcriptional regulator FasR and its binding sites in the 5′ upstream regions of accD1 and fasA. In the present work we establish by co-isolation and gel-mobility shifts oleoyl-CoA and palmitoyl-CoA as effectors of FasR, and show by DNA microarray analysis that in presence of exogeneous fatty acids accD1 and fasA are repressed. These results are evidence that acyl-CoA derivatives derived from extracellular fatty acids interact with FasR to repress the genes of fatty acid synthesis. This model also explains the observed repression of accD1 and fasA during growth on acetate, where apparently the known high intracellular acetyl-CoA concentration during growth on this substrate requires reduced accD1 and fasA expression for fine control of de novo fatty acid synthesis. Consequently, this mechanism ensures that membrane lipid homeostasis is maintained when specific nutrients are available resulting in increased acetyl-CoA concentration, as is the case with acetate, or when fatty acids are directly available from the extracellular environment. However, the genes specific to mycolic acid synthesis, which are in part shared with linear fatty acid synthesis, are not controlled by FasR, which is in agreement with the fact that they can not be supplied from the extracellular environment but that their synthesis fully depends on a constant supply of linear fatty acid chains. PMID:25449109

  16. Genetic makeup of the Corynebacterium glutamicum LexA regulon deduced from comparative transcriptomics and in vitro DNA band shift assays.

    PubMed

    Jochmann, Nina; Kurze, Anna-Katharina; Czaja, Lisa F; Brinkrolf, Karina; Brune, Iris; Hüser, Andrea T; Hansmeier, Nicole; Pühler, Alfred; Borovok, Ilya; Tauch, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    The lexA gene of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was deleted to create the mutant strain C. glutamicum NJ2114, which has an elongated cell morphology and an increased doubling time. To characterize the SOS regulon in C. glutamicum, the transcriptomes of NJ2114 and a DNA-damage-induced wild-type strain were compared with that of a wild-type control using DNA microarray hybridization. The expression data were combined with bioinformatic pattern searches for LexA binding sites, leading to the detection of 46 potential SOS boxes located upstream of differentially expressed transcription units. Binding of a hexahistidyl-tagged LexA protein to 40 double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the potential SOS boxes was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. It turned out that LexA binds not only to SOS boxes in the promoter-operator region of upregulated genes, but also to SOS boxes detected upstream of downregulated genes. These results demonstrated that LexA controls directly the expression of at least 48 SOS genes organized in 36 transcription units. The deduced genes encode a variety of physiological functions, many of them involved in DNA repair and survival after DNA damage, but nearly half of them have hitherto unknown functions. Alignment of the LexA binding sites allowed the corynebacterial SOS box consensus sequence TcGAA(a/c)AnnTGTtCGA to be deduced. Furthermore, the common intergenic region of lexA and the differentially expressed divS-nrdR operon, encoding a cell division suppressor and a regulator of deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, was characterized in detail. Promoter mapping revealed differences in divS-nrdR expression during SOS response and normal growth conditions. One of the four LexA binding sites detected in the intergenic region is involved in regulating divS-nrdR transcription, whereas the other sites are apparently used for negative autoregulation of lexA expression.

  17. Genetic makeup of the Corynebacterium glutamicum LexA regulon deduced from comparative transcriptomics and in vitro DNA band shift assays.

    PubMed

    Jochmann, Nina; Kurze, Anna-Katharina; Czaja, Lisa F; Brinkrolf, Karina; Brune, Iris; Hüser, Andrea T; Hansmeier, Nicole; Pühler, Alfred; Borovok, Ilya; Tauch, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    The lexA gene of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was deleted to create the mutant strain C. glutamicum NJ2114, which has an elongated cell morphology and an increased doubling time. To characterize the SOS regulon in C. glutamicum, the transcriptomes of NJ2114 and a DNA-damage-induced wild-type strain were compared with that of a wild-type control using DNA microarray hybridization. The expression data were combined with bioinformatic pattern searches for LexA binding sites, leading to the detection of 46 potential SOS boxes located upstream of differentially expressed transcription units. Binding of a hexahistidyl-tagged LexA protein to 40 double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the potential SOS boxes was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. It turned out that LexA binds not only to SOS boxes in the promoter-operator region of upregulated genes, but also to SOS boxes detected upstream of downregulated genes. These results demonstrated that LexA controls directly the expression of at least 48 SOS genes organized in 36 transcription units. The deduced genes encode a variety of physiological functions, many of them involved in DNA repair and survival after DNA damage, but nearly half of them have hitherto unknown functions. Alignment of the LexA binding sites allowed the corynebacterial SOS box consensus sequence TcGAA(a/c)AnnTGTtCGA to be deduced. Furthermore, the common intergenic region of lexA and the differentially expressed divS-nrdR operon, encoding a cell division suppressor and a regulator of deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis, was characterized in detail. Promoter mapping revealed differences in divS-nrdR expression during SOS response and normal growth conditions. One of the four LexA binding sites detected in the intergenic region is involved in regulating divS-nrdR transcription, whereas the other sites are apparently used for negative autoregulation of lexA expression. PMID:19372162

  18. Roles of export genes cgmA and lysE for the production of L-arginine and L-citrulline by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Dorit; Jorge, João M P; Pérez-García, Fernando; Taniguchi, Hironori; Wendisch, Volker F

    2016-10-01

    L-arginine is a semi-essential amino acid with application in cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and food industries. Metabolic engineering strategies have been applied for overproduction of L-arginine by Corynebacterium glutamicum. LysE was the only known L-arginine exporter of this bacterium. However, an L-arginine-producing strain carrying a deletion of lysE still accumulated about 10 mM L-arginine in the growth medium. Overexpression of the putative putrescine and cadaverine export permease gene cgmA was shown to compensate for the lack of lysE with regard to L-arginine export. Moreover, plasmid-borne overexpression of cgmA rescued the toxic effect caused by feeding of the dipeptide Arg-Ala to lysE-deficient C. glutamicum and argO-deficient Escherichia coli strains. Deletion of the repressor gene cgmR improved L-arginine titers by 5 %. Production of L-lysine and L-citrulline was not affected by cgmA overexpression. Taken together, CgmA may function as an export system not only for the diamine putrescine and cadaverine but also for L-arginine. The major export system for L-lysine and L-arginine LysE may also play a role in L-citrulline export since production of L-citrulline was reduced when lysE was deleted and improved by 45 % when lysE was overproduced.

  19. Cloning of the trp gene cluster from a tryptophan-hyperproducing strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum: identification of a mutation in the trp leader sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Heery, D M; Dunican, L K

    1993-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 21850 produces up to 5 g of extracellular L-tryptophan per liter in broth culture and displays resistance to several synthetic analogs of aromatic amino acids. Here we report the cloning of the tryptophan biosynthesis (trp) gene cluster of this strain on a 14.5-kb BamHI fragment. Subcloning and complementation of Escherichia coli trp auxotrophs revealed that as in Brevibacterium lactofermentum, the C. glutamicum trp genes are clustered in an operon in the order trpE, trpD, trpC, trpB, trpA. The cloned fragment also confers increased resistance to the analogs 5-methyltryptophan and 6-fluorotryptophan on E. coli. The sequence of the ATCC 21850 trpE gene revealed no significant changes when compared to the trpE sequence of a wild-type strain reported previously. However, analysis of the promoter-regulatory region revealed a nonsense (TGG-to-TGA) mutation in the third of three tandem Trp codons present within a trp leader gene. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of the corresponding region confirmed the absence of this mutation in the wild-type strain. RNA secondary-structure predictions and sequence similarities to the E. coli trp attenuator suggest that this mutation results in a constitutive antitermination response. PMID:7683184

  20. Metabolic engineering of an ATP-neutral Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum: growth restoration by an adaptive point mutation in NADH dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Komati Reddy, Gajendar; Lindner, Steffen N; Wendisch, Volker F

    2015-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum uses the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway of glycolysis and gains 2 mol of ATP per mol of glucose by substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP). To engineer glycolysis without net ATP formation by SLP, endogenous phosphorylating NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was replaced by nonphosphorylating NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapN) from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which irreversibly converts glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) to 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG) without generating ATP. As shown recently (S. Takeno, R. Murata, R. Kobayashi, S. Mitsuhashi, and M. Ikeda, Appl Environ Microbiol 76:7154-7160, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01464-10), this ATP-neutral, NADPH-generating glycolytic pathway did not allow for the growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum with glucose as the sole carbon source unless hitherto unknown suppressor mutations occurred; however, these mutations were not disclosed. In the present study, a suppressor mutation was identified, and it was shown that heterologous expression of udhA encoding soluble transhydrogenase from Escherichia coli partly restored growth, suggesting that growth was inhibited by NADPH accumulation. Moreover, genome sequence analysis of second-site suppressor mutants that were able to grow faster with glucose revealed a single point mutation in the gene of non-proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-II) leading to the amino acid change D213G, which was shared by these suppressor mutants. Since related NDH-II enzymes accepting NADPH as the substrate possess asparagine or glutamine residues at this position, D213G, D213N, and D213Q variants of C. glutamicum NDH-II were constructed and were shown to oxidize NADPH in addition to NADH. Taking these findings together, ATP-neutral glycolysis by the replacement of endogenous NAD-dependent GAPDH with NADP-dependent GapN became possible via oxidation of NADPH formed in this pathway by mutant NADPH

  1. Corynebacterium glutamicum Zur acts as a zinc-sensing transcriptional repressor of both zinc-inducible and zinc-repressible genes involved in zinc homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2012-12-01

    Zur is a zinc-dependent transcriptional repressor of zinc uptake systems in bacteria. In the present study, we examined the role of Corynebacterium glutamicum Zur in the zinc-inducible expression of two genes: one encoding a cation diffusion facilitator (zrf) and the other a metal-translocating P-type ATPase (zra). Both genes were shown to be involved in zinc resistance. Disruption of the zur gene encoding Zur resulted in constitutive expression of zrf and zra mRNAs. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that the Zur protein binds to the zrf and zra promoters, for which the in vivo activities were up-regulated in response to excess zinc. Interestingly, the in vitro DNA binding activity of Zur was inhibited by zinc, in contrast to its zinc-dependent binding to the promoter region of a zinc-repressible ABC transporter gene znuB2. A 21-bp motif found in the Zur binding site overlaps the putative -35 region of both the zrf and zra promoters. This new motif is a 10-1-10 direct repeat sequence distinct from the 10-1-10 inverted repeat sequence of a previously identified Zur box for zinc-dependent binding. Nevertheless, their 10-bp elements share some sequence similarities. Overexpression of zur in the zur deletion mutant background, as well as deletion of zur in the zrf and zra double deletion mutant background, resulted in decreased resistance to zinc. These results suggest that the direct negative control of both zinc uptake and export systems by Zur is central to C. glutamicum zinc homeostasis and is effected in distinct ways. PMID:23061624

  2. Scale-up from shake flasks to fermenters in batch and continuous mode with Corynebacterium glutamicum on lactic acid based on oxygen transfer and pH.

    PubMed

    Seletzky, Juri M; Noak, Ute; Fricke, Jens; Welk, Eike; Eberhard, Werner; Knocke, Christof; Büchs, Jochen

    2007-11-01

    Scale-up from shake flasks to fermenters has been hampered by the lack of knowledge concerning the influence of operating conditions on mass transfer, hydromechanics, and power input. However, in recent years the properties of shake flasks have been described with empirical models. A practical scale-up strategy for everyday use is introduced for the scale-up of aerobic cultures from shake flasks to fermenters in batch and continuous mode. The strategy is based on empirical correlations of the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L) a) and the pH. The accuracy of the empirical k(L) a correlations and the assumptions required to use these correlations for an arbitrary biological medium are discussed. To determine the optimal pH of the culture medium a simple laboratory method based on titration curves of the medium and a mechanistic pH model, which is solely based on the medium composition, is applied. The effectiveness of the scale-up strategy is demonstrated by comparing the behavior of Corynebacterium glutamicum on lactic acid in shake flasks and fermenters in batch and continuous mode. The maximum growth rate (micro(max) = 0.32 h(-1)) and the oxygen substrate coefficient (Y O2 /S= 0.0174 mol/l) of C. glutamicum on lactic acid were equal for shake flask, fermenter, batch, and continuous cultures. The biomass substrate yield was independent of the scale, but was lower in batch cultures (Y(X/S) = 0.36 g/g) than in continuous cultures (Y(X/S) = 0.45 g/g). The experimental data (biomass, respiration, pH) could be described with a simple biological model combined with a mechanistic pH model.

  3. Comparative 13C metabolic flux analysis of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient, L-valine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Blombach, Bastian; Lang, Siegmund; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    L-Valine can be formed successfully using C. glutamicum strains missing an active pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC). Wild-type C. glutamicum and four PDHC-deficient strains were compared by (13)C metabolic flux analysis, especially focusing on the split ratio between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Compared to the wild type, showing a carbon flux of 69% ± 14% through the PPP, a strong increase in the PPP flux was observed in PDHC-deficient strains with a maximum of 113% ± 22%. The shift in the split ratio can be explained by an increased demand of NADPH for l-valine formation. In accordance, the introduction of the Escherichia coli transhydrogenase PntAB, catalyzing the reversible conversion of NADH to NADPH, into an L-valine-producing C. glutamicum strain caused the PPP flux to decrease to 57% ± 6%, which is below the wild-type split ratio. Hence, transhydrogenase activity offers an alternative perspective for sufficient NADPH supply, which is relevant for most amino acid production systems. Moreover, as demonstrated for L-valine, this bypass leads to a significant increase of product yield due to a concurrent reduction in carbon dioxide formation via the PPP.

  4. Two-step production of gamma-aminobutyric acid from cassava powder using Corynebacterium glutamicum and Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Taowei; Rao, Zhiming; Kimani, Bernard Gitura; Xu, Meijuan; Zhang, Xian; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-08-01

    Production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from crop biomass such as cassava in high concentration is desirable, but difficult to achieve. A safe biotechnological route was investigated to produce GABA from cassava powder by C. glutamicum G01 and L. plantarum GB01-21. Liquefied cassava powder was first transformed to glutamic acid by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation with C. glutamicum G01, followed by biotransformation of glutamic acid to GABA with resting cells of L. plantarum GB01-21 in the reaction medium. After optimizing the reaction conditions, the maximum concentration of GABA reached 80.5 g/L with a GABA productivity of 2.68 g/L/h. This is the highest yield ever reported of GABA production from cassava-derived glucose. The bioprocess provides the added advantage of employing nonpathogenic microorganisms, C. glutamicum and L. plantarum, in microbial production of GABA from cassava biomass, which can be used in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  5. GenR, an IclR-type regulator, activates and represses the transcription of gen genes involved in 3-hydroxybenzoate and gentisate catabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hongjun; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2013-04-01

    The genes required for 3-hydroxybenzoate and gentisate catabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum are closely clustered in three operons. GenR, an IclR-type regulator, can activate the transcription of genKH and genDFM operons in response to 3-hydroxybenzoate and gentisate, and it can repress its own expression. Footprinting analyses demonstrated that GenR bound to four sites with different affinities. Two GenR-binding sites (DFMn01 and DFMn02) were found to be located between positions --41 and --84 upstream of the --35 and --10 regions of the genDFM promoter, which was involved in positive regulation of genDFM transcription. The GenR binding site R-KHn01 (located between positions --47 and --16) overlapped the --35 region of the genKH promoter sequence and is involved in positive regulation of its transcription. The binding site R-KHn02, at which GenR binds to its own promoter, was found within a footprint extending from position --44 to --67. It appeared to be involved in negative regulation of the activity of the genR promoter. A consensus motif with a 5-bp imperfect palindromic sequence [ATTCC-N(7(5))-GGAAT] was identified among all four GenR binding sites and found to be necessary to GenR regulation through site-directed mutagenesis. The results reveal a new regulatory function of the IclR family in the catabolism of aromatic compounds.

  6. Corynebacterium glutamicum CsoR acts as a transcriptional repressor of two copper/zinc-inducible P(1B)-type ATPase operons.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of regulation of the expression of copA and copB, encoding putative copper-translocating P(1B)-type ATPases in Corynebacterium glutamicum, was investigated. The levels of copA and copB mRNAs were upregulated in response to excess copper as well as excess zinc. Disruption of csoR, encoding a transcriptional regulator, resulted in constitutive expression of copA and copB. The CsoR protein bound to the promoter regions of the copA-csoR and the cgR_0124-copB-cgR_0126 operon. In vitro DNA binding activity was strongly inhibited by copper, but much less inhibited by zinc. A csoR-deficient mutant showed slightly increased resistance to copper, but slightly decreased resistance to zinc. These findings indicate that CsoR acts as a transcriptional repressor not only of the cognate copA-csoR operon but also of the cgR_0124-copB-cgR_0126 operon, which is not physically linked to csoR on the chromosome, and that CsoR plays a major role in copper homeostasis. PMID:23090582

  7. A de novo NADPH generation pathway for improving lysine production of Corynebacterium glutamicum by rational design of the coenzyme specificity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Chen, Zhen; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Engineering the cofactor availability is a common strategy of metabolic engineering to improve the production of many industrially important compounds. In this work, a de novo NADPH generation pathway is proposed by altering the coenzyme specificity of a native NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) to NADP, which consequently has the potential to produce additional NADPH in the glycolytic pathway. Specifically, the coenzyme specificity of GAPDH of Corynebacterium glutamicum is systematically manipulated by rational protein design and the effect of the manipulation for cellular metabolism and lysine production is evaluated. By a combinatorial modification of four key residues within the coenzyme binding sites, different GAPDH mutants with varied coenzyme specificity were constructed. While increasing the catalytic efficiency of GAPDH towards NADP enhanced lysine production in all of the tested mutants, the most significant improvement of lysine production (~60%) was achieved with the mutant showing similar preference towards both NAD and NADP. Metabolic flux analysis with (13)C isotope studies confirmed that there was no significant change of flux towards the pentose phosphate pathway and the increased lysine yield was mainly attributed to the NADPH generated by the mutated GAPDH. The present study highlights the importance of protein engineering as a key strategy in de novo pathway design and overproduction of desired products.

  8. The LysE superfamily: topology of the lysine exporter LysE of Corynebacterium glutamicum, a paradyme for a novel superfamily of transmembrane solute translocators.

    PubMed

    Vrljic, M; Garg, J; Bellmann, A; Wachi, S; Freudl, R; Malecki, M J; Sahm, H; Kozina, V J; Eggeling, L; Saier, M H; Eggeling, L; Saier, M H

    1999-11-01

    In Corynebacterium glutamicum the LysE carrier protein exhibits the unique function of exporting L-lysine. We here analyze the membrane topology of LysE, a protein of 236 amino acyl residues, using PhoA- and LacZ-fusions. The amino-terminal end of LysE is located in the cytoplasm whereas the carboxy-terminal end is found in the periplasm. Although 6 hydrophobic domains were identified based on hydropathy analyses, only five transmembrane spanning helices appear to be present. The additional hydrophobic segment may dip into the membrane or be surface localized. We show that LysE is a member of a family of proteins found, for example, in Escherichia coil, Bacillus subtilis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Helicobacter pylori. This family, which we have designated the LysE family, is distantly related to two additional protein families which we have designated the YahN and CadD families. These three families, the members of which exhibit similar sizes, hydropathy profiles, and sequence motifs comprise the LysE superfamily. Functionally characterized members of the LysE superfamily export L-lysine, cadmium and possibly quarternary amines. We suggest that LysE superfamily members will prove to catalyze export of a variety of biologically important solutes. PMID:10943564

  9. The DeoR-type transcriptional regulator SugR acts as a repressor for genes encoding the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalat, Lars; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Hartmann, Michelle; Mormann, Sascha; Tauch, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2007-01-01

    Background The major uptake system responsible for the transport of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 is the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The genes encoding PTS components, namely ptsI, ptsH, and ptsF belong to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, whereas ptsG and ptsS are located in two separate regions of the C. glutamicum genome. Due to the localization within and adjacent to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, two genes coding for DeoR-type transcriptional regulators, cg2118 and sugR, are putative candidates involved in the transcriptional regulation of the fructose-PTS cluster genes. Results Four transcripts of the extended fructose-PTS gene cluster that comprise the genes sugR-cg2116, ptsI, cg2118-fruK-ptsF, and ptsH, respectively, were characterized. In addition, it was shown that transcription of the fructose-PTS gene cluster is enhanced during growth on glucose or fructose when compared to acetate. Subsequently, the two genes sugR and cg2118 encoding for DeoR-type regulators were mutated and PTS gene transcription was found to be strongly enhanced in the presence of acetate only in the sugR deletion mutant. The SugR regulon was further characterized by microarray hybridizations using the sugR mutant and its parental strain, revealing that also the PTS genes ptsG and ptsS belong to this regulon. Binding of purified SugR repressor protein to a 21 bp sequence identified the SugR binding site as an AC-rich motif. The two experimentally identified SugR binding sites in the fructose-PTS gene cluster are located within or downstream of the mapped promoters, typical for transcriptional repressors. Effector studies using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) revealed the fructose PTS-specific metabolite fructose-1-phosphate (F-1-P) as a highly efficient, negative effector of the SugR repressor, acting in the micromolar range. Beside F-1-P, other sugar-phosphates like fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P

  10. GenR, an IclR-Type Regulator, Activates and Represses the Transcription of gen Genes Involved in 3-Hydroxybenzoate and Gentisate Catabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Hongjun

    2013-01-01

    The genes required for 3-hydroxybenzoate and gentisate catabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum are closely clustered in three operons. GenR, an IclR-type regulator, can activate the transcription of genKH and genDFM operons in response to 3-hydroxybenzoate and gentisate, and it can repress its own expression. Footprinting analyses demonstrated that GenR bound to four sites with different affinities. Two GenR-binding sites (DFMn01 and DFMn02) were found to be located between positions −41 and −84 upstream of the −35 and −10 regions of the genDFM promoter, which was involved in positive regulation of genDFM transcription. The GenR binding site R-KHn01 (located between positions −47 and −16) overlapped the −35 region of the genKH promoter sequence and is involved in positive regulation of its transcription. The binding site R-KHn02, at which GenR binds to its own promoter, was found within a footprint extending from position −44 to −67. It appeared to be involved in negative regulation of the activity of the genR promoter. A consensus motif with a 5-bp imperfect palindromic sequence [ATTCC-N7(5)-GGAAT] was identified among all four GenR binding sites and found to be necessary to GenR regulation through site-directed mutagenesis. The results reveal a new regulatory function of the IclR family in the catabolism of aromatic compounds. PMID:23354754

  11. The Crystal Structures of Apo and cAMP-Bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum Reveal Structural and Dynamic Changes upon cAMP Binding in CRP/FNR Family Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Philip D.; Jungwirth, Britta; Pojer, Florence; Bußmann, Michael; Money, Victoria A.; Cole, Stewart T.; Pühler, Alfred; Tauch, Andreas; Bott, Michael; Cann, Martin J.; Pohl, Ehmke

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator) transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition. PMID:25469635

  12. AraR, an l-Arabinose-Responsive Transcriptional Regulator in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 31831, Exerts Different Degrees of Repression Depending on the Location of Its Binding Sites within the Three Target Promoter Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kuge, Takayuki; Teramoto, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 31831, a LacI-type transcriptional regulator AraR, represses the expression of l-arabinose catabolism (araBDA), uptake (araE), and the regulator (araR) genes clustered on the chromosome. AraR binds to three sites: one (BSB) between the divergent operons (araBDA and galM-araR) and two (BSE1 and BSE2) upstream of araE. l-Arabinose acts as an inducer of the AraR-mediated regulation. Here, we examined the roles of these AraR-binding sites in the expression of the AraR regulon. BSB mutation resulted in derepression of both araBDA and galM-araR operons. The effects of BSE1 and/or BSE2 mutation on araE expression revealed that the two sites independently function as the cis elements, but BSE1 plays the primary role. However, AraR was shown to bind to these sites with almost the same affinity in vitro. Taken together, the expression of araBDA and araE is strongly repressed by binding of AraR to a single site immediately downstream of the respective transcriptional start sites, whereas the binding site overlapping the −10 or −35 region of the galM-araR and araE promoters is less effective in repression. Furthermore, downregulation of araBDA and araE dependent on l-arabinose catabolism observed in the BSB mutant and the AraR-independent araR promoter identified within galM-araR add complexity to regulation of the AraR regulon derepressed by l-arabinose. IMPORTANCE Corynebacterium glutamicum has a long history as an industrial workhorse for large-scale production of amino acids. An important aspect of industrial microorganisms is the utilization of the broad range of sugars for cell growth and production process. Most C. glutamicum strains are unable to use a pentose sugar l-arabinose as a carbon source. However, genes for l-arabinose utilization and its regulation have been recently identified in C. glutamicum ATCC 31831. This study elucidates the roles of the multiple binding sites of the transcriptional repressor AraR in the

  13. Corynebacterium glutamicum Is Equipped with Four Secondary Carriers for Compatible Solutes: Identification, Sequencing, and Characterization of the Proline/Ectoine Uptake System, ProP, and the Ectoine/Proline/Glycine Betaine Carrier, EctP

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Heidi; Weil, Brita; Burkovski, Andreas; Krämer, Reinhard; Morbach, Susanne

    1998-01-01

    Gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum uses the compatible solutes glycine betaine, proline, and ectoine for protection against hyperosmotic shock. Osmoregulated glycine betaine carrier BetP and proline permease PutP have been previously characterized; we have identified and characterized two additional osmoregulated secondary transporters for compatible solutes in C. glutamicum, namely, the proline/ectoine carrier, ProP, and the ectoine/glycine betaine/proline carrier, EctP. A ΔbetP ΔputP ΔproP ΔectP mutant was unable to respond to hyperosmotic stress, indicating that no additional uptake system for these compatible solutes is present. Osmoregulated ProP consists of 504 residues and preferred proline (Km, 48 μM) to ectoine (Km, 132 μM). The proP gene could not be expressed from its own promoter in C. glutamicum; however, expression was observed in Escherichia coli. ProP belongs to the major facilitator superfamily, whereas EctP, together with the betaine carrier, BetP, is a member of a newly established subfamily of the sodium/solute symporter superfamily. The constitutively expressed ectP codes for a 615-residue transporter. EctP preferred ectoine (Km, 63 μM) to betaine (Km, 333 μM) and proline (Km, 1,200 μM). Its activity was regulated by the external osmolality. The related betaine transporter, BetP, could be activated directly by altering the membrane state with local anesthetics, but this was not the case for EctP. Furthermore, the onset of osmotic activation was virtually instantaneous for BetP, whereas it took about 10 s for EctP. PMID:9811661

  14. Corynebacterium glutamicum is equipped with four secondary carriers for compatible solutes: identification, sequencing, and characterization of the proline/ectoine uptake system, ProP, and the ectoine/proline/glycine betaine carrier, EctP.

    PubMed

    Peter, H; Weil, B; Burkovski, A; Krämer, R; Morbach, S

    1998-11-01

    Gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum uses the compatible solutes glycine betaine, proline, and ectoine for protection against hyperosmotic shock. Osmoregulated glycine betaine carrier BetP and proline permease PutP have been previously characterized; we have identified and characterized two additional osmoregulated secondary transporters for compatible solutes in C. glutamicum, namely, the proline/ectoine carrier, ProP, and the ectoine/glycine betaine/proline carrier, EctP. A DeltabetP DeltaputP DeltaproP DeltaectP mutant was unable to respond to hyperosmotic stress, indicating that no additional uptake system for these compatible solutes is present. Osmoregulated ProP consists of 504 residues and preferred proline (Km, 48 microM) to ectoine (Km, 132 microM). The proP gene could not be expressed from its own promoter in C. glutamicum; however, expression was observed in Escherichia coli. ProP belongs to the major facilitator superfamily, whereas EctP, together with the betaine carrier, BetP, is a member of a newly established subfamily of the sodium/solute symporter superfamily. The constitutively expressed ectP codes for a 615-residue transporter. EctP preferred ectoine (Km, 63 microM) to betaine (Km, 333 microM) and proline (Km, 1,200 microM). Its activity was regulated by the external osmolality. The related betaine transporter, BetP, could be activated directly by altering the membrane state with local anesthetics, but this was not the case for EctP. Furthermore, the onset of osmotic activation was virtually instantaneous for BetP, whereas it took about 10 s for EctP.

  15. l-Lysine production independent of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway by Corynebacterium glutamicum with the Streptococcus mutans gapN gene.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Seiki; Hori, Kazumasa; Ohtani, Sachiko; Mimura, Akinori; Mitsuhashi, Satoshi; Ikeda, Masato

    2016-09-01

    We have recently developed a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain that generates NADPH via the glycolytic pathway by replacing endogenous NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA) with a nonphosphorylating NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapN) from Streptococcus mutans. Strain RE2, a suppressor mutant spontaneously isolated for its improved growth on glucose from the engineered strain, was proven to be a high-potential host for l-lysine production (Takeno et al., 2010). In this study, the suppressor mutation was identified to be a point mutation in rho encoding the transcription termination factor Rho. Strain RE2 still showed retarded growth despite the mutation rho696. Our strategy for reconciling improved growth with a high level of l-lysine production was to use GapA together with GapN only in the early growth phase, and subsequently shift this combination-type glycolysis to one that depends only on GapN in the rest of the growth phase. To achieve this, we expressed gapA under the myo-inositol-inducible promoter of iolT1 encoding a myo-inositol transporter in strain RE2. The resulting strain RE2A(iol) was engineered into an l-lysine producer by introduction of a plasmid carrying the desensitized lysC, followed by examination for culture conditions with myo-inositol supplementation. We found that as a higher concentration of myo-inositol was added to the seed culture, the following fermentation period became shorter while maintaining a high level of l-lysine production. This finally reached a fermentation period comparable to that of the control GapA strain, and yielded a 1.5-fold higher production rate compared with strain RE2. The transcript level of gapA, as well as the GapA activity, in the early growth phase increased in proportion to the myo-inositol concentration and then fell to low levels in the subsequent growth phase, indicating that improved growth was a result of increased GapA activity, especially in the

  16. l-Lysine production independent of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway by Corynebacterium glutamicum with the Streptococcus mutans gapN gene.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Seiki; Hori, Kazumasa; Ohtani, Sachiko; Mimura, Akinori; Mitsuhashi, Satoshi; Ikeda, Masato

    2016-09-01

    We have recently developed a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain that generates NADPH via the glycolytic pathway by replacing endogenous NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA) with a nonphosphorylating NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapN) from Streptococcus mutans. Strain RE2, a suppressor mutant spontaneously isolated for its improved growth on glucose from the engineered strain, was proven to be a high-potential host for l-lysine production (Takeno et al., 2010). In this study, the suppressor mutation was identified to be a point mutation in rho encoding the transcription termination factor Rho. Strain RE2 still showed retarded growth despite the mutation rho696. Our strategy for reconciling improved growth with a high level of l-lysine production was to use GapA together with GapN only in the early growth phase, and subsequently shift this combination-type glycolysis to one that depends only on GapN in the rest of the growth phase. To achieve this, we expressed gapA under the myo-inositol-inducible promoter of iolT1 encoding a myo-inositol transporter in strain RE2. The resulting strain RE2A(iol) was engineered into an l-lysine producer by introduction of a plasmid carrying the desensitized lysC, followed by examination for culture conditions with myo-inositol supplementation. We found that as a higher concentration of myo-inositol was added to the seed culture, the following fermentation period became shorter while maintaining a high level of l-lysine production. This finally reached a fermentation period comparable to that of the control GapA strain, and yielded a 1.5-fold higher production rate compared with strain RE2. The transcript level of gapA, as well as the GapA activity, in the early growth phase increased in proportion to the myo-inositol concentration and then fell to low levels in the subsequent growth phase, indicating that improved growth was a result of increased GapA activity, especially in the

  17. Complex Regulation of the Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Gene pck and Characterization of Its GntR-Type Regulator IolR as a Repressor of myo-Inositol Utilization Genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Klaffl, Simon; Brocker, Melanie; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    DNA affinity chromatography with the promoter region of the Corynebacterium glutamicum pck gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, led to the isolation of four transcriptional regulators, i.e., RamA, GntR1, GntR2, and IolR. Determination of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity of the ΔramA, ΔgntR1 ΔgntR2, and ΔiolR deletion mutants indicated that RamA represses pck during growth on glucose about 2-fold, whereas GntR1, GntR2, and IolR activate pck expression about 2-fold irrespective of whether glucose or acetate served as the carbon source. The DNA binding sites of the four regulators in the pck promoter region were identified and their positions correlated with the predicted functions as repressor or activators. The iolR gene is located upstream and in a divergent orientation with respect to a iol gene cluster, encoding proteins involved in myo-inositol uptake and degradation. Comparative DNA microarray analysis of the ΔiolR mutant and the parental wild-type strain revealed strongly (>100-fold) elevated mRNA levels of the iol genes in the mutant, indicating that the primary function of IolR is the repression of the iol genes. IolR binding sites were identified in the promoter regions of iolC, iolT1, and iolR. IolR therefore is presumably subject to negative autoregulation. A consensus DNA binding motif (5′-KGWCHTRACA-3′) which corresponds well to those of other GntR-type regulators of the HutC family was identified. Taken together, our results disclose a complex regulation of the pck gene in C. glutamicum and identify IolR as an efficient repressor of genes involved in myo-inositol catabolism of this organism. PMID:23873914

  18. Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite: A novel biosorbent for removal of As(III) and As(V) ions.

    PubMed

    Podder, M S; Majumder, C B

    2016-11-01

    The optimization of biosorption/bioaccumulation process of both As(III) and As(V) has been investigated by using the biosorbent; biofilm of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 supported on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite (MGAC). The presence of functional groups on the cell wall surface of the biomass that may interact with the metal ions was proved by FT-IR. To determine the most appropriate correlation for the equilibrium curves employing the procedure of the non-linear regression for curve fitting analysis, isotherm studies were performed for As(III) and As(V) using 30 isotherm models. The pattern of biosorption/bioaccumulation fitted well with Vieth-Sladek isotherm model for As(III) and Brouers-Sotolongo and Fritz-Schlunder-V isotherm models for As(V). The maximum biosorption/bioaccumulation capacity estimated using Langmuir model were 2584.668mg/g for As(III) and 2651.675mg/g for As(V) at 30°C temperature and 220min contact time. The results showed that As(III) and As(V) removal was strongly pH-dependent with an optimum pH value of 7.0. D-R isotherm studies specified that ion exchange might play a prominent role.

  19. Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite: A novel biosorbent for removal of As(III) and As(V) ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podder, M. S.; Majumder, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    The optimization of biosorption/bioaccumulation process of both As(III) and As(V) has been investigated by using the biosorbent; biofilm of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 supported on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite (MGAC). The presence of functional groups on the cell wall surface of the biomass that may interact with the metal ions was proved by FT-IR. To determine the most appropriate correlation for the equilibrium curves employing the procedure of the non-linear regression for curve fitting analysis, isotherm studies were performed for As(III) and As(V) using 30 isotherm models. The pattern of biosorption/bioaccumulation fitted well with Vieth-Sladek isotherm model for As(III) and Brouers-Sotolongo and Fritz-Schlunder-V isotherm models for As(V). The maximum biosorption/bioaccumulation capacity estimated using Langmuir model were 2584.668 mg/g for As(III) and 2651.675 mg/g for As(V) at 30 °C temperature and 220 min contact time. The results showed that As(III) and As(V) removal was strongly pH-dependent with an optimum pH value of 7.0. D-R isotherm studies specified that ion exchange might play a prominent role.

  20. A novel aceE mutation leading to a better growth profile and a higher L-serine production in a high-yield L-serine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum strain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen; Chen, Ziwei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Guoqiang; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Shi, Jinsong; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-09-01

    A comparative genomic analysis was performed to study the genetic variations between the L-serine-producing strain Corynebacterium glutamicum SYPS-062 and the mutant strain SYPS-062-33a, which was derived from SYPS-062 by random mutagenesis with enhanced L-serine production. Some variant genes between the two strains were reversely mutated or deleted in the genome of SYPS-062-33a to verify the influences of the gene mutations introduced by random mutagenesis. It was found that a His-594 → Tyr mutation in aceE was responsible for the more accumulation of by-products, such as L-alanine and L-valine, in SYPS-062-33a. Furthermore, the influence of this point mutation on the L-serine production was investigated, and the results suggested that this point mutation led to a better growth profile and a higher L-serine production in the high-yield strain 33a∆SSAAI, which was derived from SYPS-062-33a by metabolic engineering with the highest L-serine production to date.

  1. Application of DEN refinement and automated model building to a difficult case of molecular-replacement phasing: the structure of a putative succinyl-diaminopimelate desuccinylase from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Brunger, Axel T.; Das, Debanu; Deacon, Ashley M.; Grant, Joanna; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Read, Randy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Levitt, Michael; Schröder, Gunnar F.

    2012-01-01

    Phasing by molecular replacement remains difficult for targets that are far from the search model or in situations where the crystal diffracts only weakly or to low resolution. Here, the process of determining and refining the structure of Cgl1109, a putative succinyl-diaminopimelate desuccinylase from Corynebacterium glutamicum, at ∼3 Å resolution is described using a combination of homology modeling with MODELLER, molecular-replacement phasing with Phaser, deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement and automated model building using AutoBuild in a semi-automated fashion, followed by final refinement cycles with phenix.refine and Coot. This difficult molecular-replacement case illustrates the power of including DEN restraints derived from a starting model to guide the movements of the model during refinement. The resulting improved model phases provide better starting points for automated model building and produce more significant difference peaks in anomalous difference Fourier maps to locate anomalous scatterers than does standard refinement. This example also illustrates a current limitation of automated procedures that require manual adjustment of local sequence misalignments between the homology model and the target sequence. PMID:22505259

  2. The flexible feedstock concept in Industrial Biotechnology: Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and yeast strains for access to alternative carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Wendisch, Volker F; Brito, Luciana Fernandes; Gil Lopez, Marina; Hennig, Guido; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Sgobba, Elvira; Veldmann, Kareen H

    2016-09-20

    Most biotechnological processes are based on glucose that is either present in molasses or generated from starch by enzymatic hydrolysis. At the very high, million-ton scale production volumes, for instance for fermentative production of the biofuel ethanol or of commodity chemicals such as organic acids and amino acids, competing uses of carbon sources e.g. in human and animal nutrition have to be taken into account. Thus, the biotechnological production hosts E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, bacilli and Baker's yeast used in these large scale processes have been engineered for efficient utilization of alternative carbon sources. This flexible feedstock concept is central to the use of non-glucose second and third generation feedstocks in the emerging bioeconomy. The metabolic engineering efforts to broaden the substrate scope of E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, B. subtilis and yeasts to include non-native carbon sources will be reviewed. Strategies to enable simultaneous consumption of mixtures of native and non-native carbon sources present in biomass hydrolysates will be summarized and a perspective on how to further increase feedstock flexibility for the realization of biorefinery processes will be given. PMID:27491712

  3. The flexible feedstock concept in Industrial Biotechnology: Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and yeast strains for access to alternative carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Wendisch, Volker F; Brito, Luciana Fernandes; Gil Lopez, Marina; Hennig, Guido; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Sgobba, Elvira; Veldmann, Kareen H

    2016-09-20

    Most biotechnological processes are based on glucose that is either present in molasses or generated from starch by enzymatic hydrolysis. At the very high, million-ton scale production volumes, for instance for fermentative production of the biofuel ethanol or of commodity chemicals such as organic acids and amino acids, competing uses of carbon sources e.g. in human and animal nutrition have to be taken into account. Thus, the biotechnological production hosts E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, bacilli and Baker's yeast used in these large scale processes have been engineered for efficient utilization of alternative carbon sources. This flexible feedstock concept is central to the use of non-glucose second and third generation feedstocks in the emerging bioeconomy. The metabolic engineering efforts to broaden the substrate scope of E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, B. subtilis and yeasts to include non-native carbon sources will be reviewed. Strategies to enable simultaneous consumption of mixtures of native and non-native carbon sources present in biomass hydrolysates will be summarized and a perspective on how to further increase feedstock flexibility for the realization of biorefinery processes will be given.

  4. The LacI-Type transcriptional regulator AraR acts as an L-arabinose-responsive repressor of L-arabinose utilization genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 31831.

    PubMed

    Kuge, Takayuki; Teramoto, Haruhiko; Yukawa, Hideaki; Inui, Masayuki

    2014-06-01

    The Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 31831 araBDA operon consists of three l-arabinose catabolic genes, upstream of which the galM, araR, and araE genes are located in opposite orientation. araR encodes a LacI-type transcriptional regulator that negatively regulates the l-arabinose-inducible expression of araBDA and araE (encoding an l-arabinose transporter), through a mechanism that has yet to be identified. Here we show that the AraR protein binds in vitro to three sites: one upstream of araBDA and two upstream of araE. We verify that a 16-bp consensus palindromic sequence is essential for binding of AraR, using a series of mutations introduced upstream of araB in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Moreover, the DNA-binding activity of AraR is reduced by l-arabinose. We employ quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses using various mutant strains deficient in l-arabinose utilization genes to demonstrate that the prominent upregulation of araBDA and araE within 5 min of l-arabinose supplementation is dependent on the uptake but independent of the catabolism of l-arabinose. Similar expression patterns, together with the upregulation by araR disruption without l-arabinose, are evident with the apparent galM-araR operon, although attendant changes in expression levels are much smaller than those realized with the expression of araBDA and araE. The AraR-binding site upstream of araB overlaps the -10 region of the divergent galM promoter. These observations indicate that AraR acts as a transcriptional repressor of araBDA, araE, and galM-araR and that l-arabinose acts as an intracellular negative effector of the AraR-dependent regulation.

  5. Corynebacterium vaginale.

    PubMed

    Dunkelberg, W E

    1977-01-01

    Corynebacterium vaginale is a sexually transmitted organism which was first recognized in 1953. It appears to utilize glycogen stored in vaginal epithelial cells, causing a malodorous vaginal discharge characterized by an abnormally high pH (5.0 to 5.5) and composed mainly of epithelial cells and hordes of bacilli. Infected men are asymptomatic, carry the organism for an unknown period of time, and transmit it through intercourse. The organism requires five B-vitamins, purines, pyrimidines, and a fermentable carbohydrate; neither factors X nor V are required. It is not a member of genus Haemophilus and is not likely to be a Corynebacterium. Appearing mainly Gram-negative, it has many characteristics of Gram-positive organisms including its pattern of sensitivity to antibiotics and the possession of certain enzyme systems. As the cause of bacterial vaginitis, C. vaginale may be the most prevalent sexually-transmitted organism.

  6. Corynebacterium Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cazanave, Charles; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Corynebacterium species may be challenging. Corynebacterium species are occasional causes of prosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few data are available on the subject. Based on the literature, C. amycolatum, C. aurimucosum, C. jeikeium, and C. striatum are the most common Corynebacterium species that cause PJI. We designed a rapid PCR assay to detect the most common human Corynebacterium species, with a specific focus on PJI. A polyphosphate kinase gene identified using whole-genome sequence was targeted. The assay differentiates the antibiotic-resistant species C. jeikeium and C. urealyticum from other species in a single assay. The assay was applied to a collection of human Corynebacterium isolates from multiple clinical sources, and clinically relevant species were detected. The assay was then tested on Corynebacterium isolates specifically associated with PJI; all were detected. We also describe the first case of C. simulans PJI. PMID:22337986

  7. [Corynebacterium ulcerans pulmonary infection].

    PubMed

    Thouvenin, Maxime; Beilouny, Bassam; Badell, Edgar; Guiso, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is a bacterium able to infect humans by inducing a disease close to diphtheria. We describe the case of a 83-year-old patient hospitalized as a matter of urgency in intensive care for which C. ulcerans was isolated in pure culture in its bronchial samples. Even if the isolate was not secreting toxin in vitro, it possesses the tox gene which motivated the use of specific antitoxin serum. After two months of intensive care the patient went out of the service. It is about a remarkable case of clinicobiologic collaboration.

  8. Assessment of robustness against dissolved oxygen/substrate oscillations for C. glutamicum DM1933 in two-compartment bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Käß, Friedrich; Hariskos, Ioanna; Michel, Andrea; Brandt, Hans-Jürgen; Spann, Robert; Junne, Stefan; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Neubauer, Peter; Oldiges, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important organism for industrial biotechnology; particularly, in amino acid production (e.g. L-lysine). Production scales often reach reactor working volumes of several hundred cubic meters, which triggers inhomogeneous distribution of substrates and dissolved gasses due to increasing mixing times. Individual cells which follow the flow profile through the reactor are experiencing oscillating microenvironments. Oscillations can have an influence on the process performance, which is a subject of scale-down experiments. In this work, L-lysine-producing C. glutamicum DM1933 was assessed for its robustness against continuous dissolved oxygen and substrate supply oscillation in two-compartment scale-down bioreactors. Aerobic, substrate-limited stirred tank and non-aerated, substrate-excess plug flow compartments were applied for oscillation. Inhomogeneity of substrate and oxygen supply was observed to cause rapid side product turnover, redistribution of oxygen uptake from oxygen limited into fully aerobic zones, and intermediate medium acidification. However, process inhomogeneity did not impair productivity or growth at plug flow residence times of several minutes. In a focused analysis of proteome, metabolome, transcriptome, and other physiological parameters, no changes were identified in response to process inhomogeneity. In conclusion, fed-batch processes with C. glutamicum DM1933 possess remarkable robustness against oxygen and substrate supply oscillation, which is a unique property in the field of published scale-down studies. Microbial physiology of C. glutamicum appears to be ideally adapted to both homogeneous and inhomogeneous conditions. This ensures exceptional suitability for cultivation at increased mixing times, which is suggested to constitute an important basis for the long-lasting success in large scale bioprocess application. PMID:24218302

  9. Importance of NADPH supply for improved L-valine formation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Blombach, Bastian; Zönnchen, Enrico; Makus, Pia; Lang, Siegmund; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Oldiges, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Cofactor recycling is known to be crucial for amino acid synthesis. Hence, cofactor supply was now analyzed for L-valine to identify new targets for an improvement of production. The central carbon metabolism was analyzed by stoichiometric modeling to estimate the influence of cofactors and to quantify the theoretical yield of L-valine on glucose. Three different optimal routes for L-valine biosynthesis were identified by elementary mode (EM) analysis. The modes differed mainly in the manner of NADPH regeneration, substantiating that the cofactor supply may be crucial for efficient L-valine production. Although the isocitrate dehydrogenase as an NADPH source within the tricarboxylic acid cycle only enables an L-valine yield of Y(Val/Glc) = 0.5 mol L-valine/mol glucose (mol Val/mol Glc), the pentose phosphate pathway seems to be the most promising NADPH source. Based on the theoretical calculation of EMs, the gene encoding phosphoglucoisomerase (PGI) was deleted to achieve this EM with a theoretical yield Y(Val/Glc) = 0.86 mol Val/mol Glc during the production phase. The intracellular NADPH concentration was significantly increased in the PGI-deficient mutant. L-Valine yield increased from 0.49 +/- 0.13 to 0.67 +/- 0.03 mol Val/mol Glc, and, concomitantly, the formation of by-products such as pyruvate was reduced.

  10. Corynebacterium species isolated from patients with mastitis.

    PubMed

    Paviour, Sue; Musaad, Sahar; Roberts, Sally; Taylor, Graeme; Taylor, Susan; Shore, Keith; Lang, Selwyn; Holland, David

    2002-12-01

    Corynebacteria were isolated from breast tissue, pus, or deep wound swabs of 24 women; the most common species isolated was the newly described Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii, followed by Corynebacterium amycolatum and Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum. Gram-positive bacilli were seen in samples sent for culture or in histological specimens for 12 women, and 9 of the 12 women from whom adequate histological specimens were obtained had conditions that met the criteria for granulomatous lobular mastitis, a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology.

  11. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production

    PubMed Central

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L−1 L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g−1 glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  12. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production.

    PubMed

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L(-1) L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g(-1) glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  13. Characterization of Corynebacterium species in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Venezia, Jaime; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Marini, Robert P.; Shen, Zeli; Buckley, Ellen M.; Peters, Yaicha; Taylor, Nancy; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Tondella, Maria L.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Corynebacterium are important primary and opportunistic pathogens. Many are zoonotic agents. In this report, phenotypic (API Coryne analysis), genetic (rpoB and 16S rRNA gene sequencing), and physical methods (MS) were used to distinguish the closely related diphtheroid species Corynebacterium ulcerans and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, and to definitively diagnose Corynebacterium renale from cephalic implants of rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques used in cognitive neuroscience research. Throat and cephalic implant cultures yielded 85 isolates from 43 macaques. Identification by API Coryne yielded C. ulcerans (n = 74), Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (n = 2), C. renale or most closely related to C. renale (n = 3), and commensals and opportunists (n = 6). The two isolates identified as C. pseudotuberculosis by API Coryne required genetic and MS analysis for accurate characterization as C. ulcerans. Of three isolates identified as C. renale by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, only one could be confirmed as such by API Coryne, rpoB gene sequencing and MS. This study emphasizes the importance of adjunct methods in identification of coryneforms and is the first isolation of C. renale from cephalic implants in macaques. PMID:22723254

  14. Corynebacterium timonense sp. nov. and Corynebacterium massiliense sp. nov., isolated from human blood and human articular hip fluid.

    PubMed

    Merhej, Vicky; Falsen, Enevold; Raoult, Didier; Roux, Véronique

    2009-08-01

    Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from the blood of a patient with endocarditis (strain 5401744T) and from the hip joint fluid of a patient with an infected orthopaedic prosthesis (strain 5402485T). These strains were characterized by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Based on cellular morphology and biochemical criteria the two isolates were tentatively assigned to the genus Corynebacterium, although they did not correspond to any recognized species. The predominant fatty acids were a mix of C18:2omega6,9c and anteiso-C18:0 (32.1% of the total), C16:0 (26.3%) and C18:1omega9c (22.5%) for strain 5402485T and C18:1omega9c (36.4%), C17:1omega9c (27.1%) and C16:0 (10.9%) for strain 5401744T. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons showed that strain 5401744T was closely related to the type strains of Corynebacterium auris, Corynebacterium capitovis, Corynebacterium lipophiloflavum and Corynebacterium mycetoides (97.0, 96.6, 96.5 and 96.3% similarity, respectively) and strain 5402485T was closely related to the type strains of Corynebacterium macginleyi, Corynebacterium accolens, Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum, Corynebacterium confusum, Corynebacterium mastitidis and Corynebacterium renale (95.6, 95.3, 95.3, 94.5, 94.0 and 93.5%, respectively). On the basis of phenotypic data and phylogenetic inference, these isolates are considered to represent two novel species of the genus Corynebacterium, for which the names Corynebacterium timonense sp. nov. (type strain, 5401744T=CSUR P20T=CIP 109424T=CCUG 53856T) and Corynebacterium massiliense sp. nov. (type strain, 5402485T=CSUR P19T=CIP 109423T=CCUG 53857T) are proposed.

  15. Propionibacterium, Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium and Lepra bacilli.

    PubMed

    Barksdale, L; Kim, K S

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented which suggests that certain key markers of lepra bacilli reside collectively in Proprionibacterium acnes, Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum and Mycobacterium leprae. The unrestricted replication of Mycobacterium leprae depends most probably upon the presence of an immune-deficiency-inducing viral agent or possibly on the combined effects of the organisms considered.

  16. The DeoR-Type Regulator SugR Represses Expression of ptsG in Corynebacterium glutamicum▿

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Verena; Wendisch, Volker F.

    2007-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum grows on a variety of carbohydrates and organic acids. Uptake of the preferred carbon source glucose via the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) is reduced during coutilization of glucose with acetate, sucrose, or fructose compared to growth on glucose as the sole carbon source. Here we show that the DeoR-type regulator SugR (NCgl1856) represses expression of ptsG, which encodes the glucose-specific PTS enzyme II. Overexpression of sugR resulted in reduced ptsG mRNA levels, decreased glucose utilization, and perturbed growth on media containing glucose. In mutants lacking sugR, expression of the ptsG′-′cat fusion was increased two- to sevenfold during growth on gluconeogenic carbon sources but remained similar during growth on glucose or other sugars. As shown by DNA microarray analysis, SugR also regulates expression of other genes, including ptsS and the putative NCgl1859-fruK-ptsF operon. Purified SugR bound to DNA regions upstream of ptsG, ptsS, and NCgl1859, and a 75-bp ptsG promoter fragment was sufficient for SugR binding. Fructose-6-phosphate interfered with binding of SugR to the ptsG promoter DNA. Thus, while during growth on gluconeogenic carbon sources SugR represses ptsG, ptsG expression is derepressed during growth on glucose or under other conditions characterized by high fructose-6-phosphate concentrations, representing one mechanism which allows C. glutamicum to adapt glucose uptake to carbon source availability. PMID:17293426

  17. Corynebacterium ulcerans, an emerging human pathogen.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Elena; Antunes, Camila A; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L; Burkovski, Andreas; Tauch, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    While formerly known infections of Corynebacterium ulcerans are rare and mainly associated with contact to infected cattle, C. ulcerans has become an emerging pathogen today. In Western Europe, cases of respiratory diphtheria caused by C. ulcerans have been reported more often than infections by Corynebacterium diphtheria, while systemic infections are also increasingly reported. Little is known about factors that contribute to host colonization and virulence of this zoonotic pathogen. Research in this field has received new impetus by the publication of several C. ulcerans genome sequences in the past years. This review gives a comprehensive overview of the basic knowledge of C. ulcerans, as well as the recent advances made in the analysis of putative virulence factors.

  18. Corynebacterium ulcerans, an emerging human pathogen.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Elena; Antunes, Camila A; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L; Burkovski, Andreas; Tauch, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    While formerly known infections of Corynebacterium ulcerans are rare and mainly associated with contact to infected cattle, C. ulcerans has become an emerging pathogen today. In Western Europe, cases of respiratory diphtheria caused by C. ulcerans have been reported more often than infections by Corynebacterium diphtheria, while systemic infections are also increasingly reported. Little is known about factors that contribute to host colonization and virulence of this zoonotic pathogen. Research in this field has received new impetus by the publication of several C. ulcerans genome sequences in the past years. This review gives a comprehensive overview of the basic knowledge of C. ulcerans, as well as the recent advances made in the analysis of putative virulence factors. PMID:27545005

  19. Equi factors in the identification of Corynebacterium equi Magnusson.

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, J F; Lastra, M; Barksdale, L

    1982-01-01

    The production of equi factor(s) by 173 serologically verified Corynebacterium equi isolates was tested by streaking strains at right angles to a culture of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis or Staphylococcus aureus on a cattle blood agar plate. All strains produced equi factor(s). This characteristic was more specific than other tests used on the strains. Images PMID:6759534

  20. Production of riboflavin by metabolically engineered Corynebacterium ammoniagenes.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, S; Yonetani, Y; Maruyama, A; Teshiba, S

    2000-06-01

    Improved strains for the production of riboflavin (vitamin B2) were constructed through metabolic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques in Corynebacterium ammoniagenes. A C. ammoniagenes strain harboring a plasmid containing its riboflavin biosynthetic genes accumulated 17-fold as much riboflavin as the host strain. In order to increase the expression of the biosynthetic genes, we isolated DNA fragments that had promoter activities in C. ammoniagenes. When the DNA fragment (P54-6) showing the strongest promoter activity in minimum medium was introduced into the upstream region of the riboflavin biosynthetic genes, the accumulation of riboflavin was 3-fold elevated. In that strain, the activity of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase II, the first enzyme in riboflavin biosynthesis, was 2.4-fold elevated whereas that of riboflavin synthase, the last enzyme in the biosynthesis, was 44.1-fold elevated. Changing the sequence containing the putative ribosome-binding sequence of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate synthase/GTP cyclohydrolase II gene led to higher GTP cyclohydrolase II activity and strong enhancement of riboflavin production. Throughout the strain improvement, the activity of GTP cyclohydrolase II correlated with the productivity of riboflavin. In the highest producer strain, riboflavin was produced at the level of 15.3 g l(-1) for 72 h in a 5-l jar fermentor without any end product inhibition. PMID:10919325

  1. The killing of macrophages by Corynebacterium ulcerans.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Lührmann, Anja; Wiesmann, Veit; Wittenberg, Thomas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway with a very broad host spectrum to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the molecular basis of pathogenicity are scarce. In this study, the interaction of 2 C. ulcerans isolates - one from an asymptomatic dog, one from a fatal case of human infection - with human macrophages was investigated. C. ulcerans strains were able to survive in macrophages for at least 20 hours. Uptake led to delay of phagolysosome maturation and detrimental effects on the macrophages as deduced from cytotoxicity measurements and FACS analyses. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen.

  2. Antimicrobial Treatment Options for Granulomatous Mastitis Caused by Corynebacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Dobinson, Hazel C.; Anderson, Trevor P.; Chambers, Stephen T.; Doogue, Matthew P.; Seaward, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium species are increasingly recognized as important pathogens in granulomatous mastitis. Currently, there are no published treatment protocols for Corynebacterium breast infections. This study describes antimicrobial treatment options in the context of other management strategies used for granulomatous mastitis. Corynebacterium spp. isolated from breast tissue and aspirate samples stored from 2002 to 2013 were identified and determined to the species level using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S RNA sequencing, and rpoB gene targets. The MICs for 12 antimicrobials were performed using Etest for each isolate. Correlations of these with antimicrobial characteristics, choice of antimicrobial, and disease outcome were evaluated. Corynebacterium spp. from breast tissue and aspirate samples were confirmed in 17 isolates from 16 patients. Based on EUCAST breakpoints, Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii isolates (n = 11) were susceptible to seven antibiotic classes but resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum isolates (n = 4) were multidrug resistant. Two nonlipophilic species were isolated, Corynebacterium glucuronolyticum and Corynebacterium freneyi, both of which have various susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents. Short-course antimicrobial therapy was common (median, 6 courses per subject; range, 1 to 9 courses). Patients with C. kroppenstedtii presented with a hot painful breast mass and underwent multiple surgical procedures (median, 4 procedures; range, 2 to 6 procedures). The management of Corynebacterium breast infections requires a multidisciplinary approach and includes culture and appropriate sensitivity testing to guide antimicrobial therapy. Established infections have a poor outcome, possibly because adequate concentrations of some drugs will be difficult to achieve in lipophilic granulomata. Lipophilic antimicrobial therapy may offer a therapeutic

  3. Antimicrobial Treatment Options for Granulomatous Mastitis Caused by Corynebacterium Species.

    PubMed

    Dobinson, Hazel C; Anderson, Trevor P; Chambers, Stephen T; Doogue, Matthew P; Seaward, Lois; Werno, Anja M

    2015-09-01

    Corynebacterium species are increasingly recognized as important pathogens in granulomatous mastitis. Currently, there are no published treatment protocols for Corynebacterium breast infections. This study describes antimicrobial treatment options in the context of other management strategies used for granulomatous mastitis. Corynebacterium spp. isolated from breast tissue and aspirate samples stored from 2002 to 2013 were identified and determined to the species level using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 16S RNA sequencing, and rpoB gene targets. The MICs for 12 antimicrobials were performed using Etest for each isolate. Correlations of these with antimicrobial characteristics, choice of antimicrobial, and disease outcome were evaluated. Corynebacterium spp. from breast tissue and aspirate samples were confirmed in 17 isolates from 16 patients. Based on EUCAST breakpoints, Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii isolates (n = 11) were susceptible to seven antibiotic classes but resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum isolates (n = 4) were multidrug resistant. Two nonlipophilic species were isolated, Corynebacterium glucuronolyticum and Corynebacterium freneyi, both of which have various susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents. Short-course antimicrobial therapy was common (median, 6 courses per subject; range, 1 to 9 courses). Patients with C. kroppenstedtii presented with a hot painful breast mass and underwent multiple surgical procedures (median, 4 procedures; range, 2 to 6 procedures). The management of Corynebacterium breast infections requires a multidisciplinary approach and includes culture and appropriate sensitivity testing to guide antimicrobial therapy. Established infections have a poor outcome, possibly because adequate concentrations of some drugs will be difficult to achieve in lipophilic granulomata. Lipophilic antimicrobial therapy may offer a therapeutic

  4. Description of Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum sp. nov., a leprosy-derived Corynebacterium.

    PubMed

    Brown, S; Lanéelle, M A; Asselineau, J; Barksdale, L

    1984-01-01

    Leprosy-derived corynebacteria (LDC) have been extensively studied over the past decade. A composite of their biological properties (cell morphology, staining reactions, cellular inclusions and guanine-plus-cytosine content of their deoxyribonucleic acid; 16 strains studied) and their chemical structures (peptidoglycan type, major cell wall polysaccharide, major glycolipid as well as characteristic mycolic acids) appears to define them as members of the genus Corynebacterium. In relation to other corynebacteria found in humans, including "JK corynebacteria", they seem to be distinct. They are here named Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum sp. nov. because they produce a 10-methyloctadecanoic (tuberculostearic) acid (8 strains studied). This and some of their other attributes are considered in relation to properties of leprosy bacilli and Mycobacterium leprae.

  5. Isolation of Corynebacterium xerosis from animal clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Vela, A I; Gracía, E; Fernández, A; Domínguez, L; Fernández-Garayzábal, J F

    2006-06-01

    This article describes the first identification of Corynebacterium xerosis from animal clinical specimens, which was confirmed by microbiological and molecular genetic (16S rRNA gene sequencing) methods.

  6. Retrospective Evaluation of Canine Dermatitis Secondary to Corynebacterium spp.

    PubMed

    Boynosky, Nicole Ann; Stokking, Laura B

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium species are considered nonpathogenic in canine dermatitis; however, potential clinical significance has been demonstrated in canine otitis externa and from a dog bite wound in a human. Objectives of this study were to identify the predominant Corynebacterium species present in lesions of canine dermatitis, assess pathogenic role, determine antimicrobial susceptibility, and evaluate clinical response. Of 37 isolates identified as Corynebacterium, 31 were Corynebacterium auriscanis . Most Corynebacterium isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol (97%), tetracyclines (92%), and amikacin (89%); isolate susceptibilities to β-lactams, trimethoprim-sulfonamides, and fluoroquinolones were <50%. Most cultures grew mixed populations of bacteria; C. auriscanis was the only organism isolated in three patients. At recheck, 2-8 wk after initial presentation, pleomorphic rods were absent or significantly decreased in all patients. Two of three C. auriscanis isolates were obtained in pure culture and were evaluable, meaning patient had an initial exam and recheck examination. Both patients were already on antimicrobials to which C. auriscanis was resistant in vitro. Both improved after doxycycline administration. C. auriscanis may act as an opportunistic pathogen in canine dermatitis and may not respond to antimicrobial therapy based on susceptibilities for other organisms in mixed infections. Occasionally, Corynebacterium isolated alone may be pathogenic.

  7. Complete genome sequence, lifestyle, and multi-drug resistance of the human pathogen Corynebacterium resistens DSM 45100 isolated from blood samples of a leukemia patient

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Corynebacterium resistens was initially recovered from human infections and recognized as a new coryneform species that is highly resistant to antimicrobial agents. Bacteremia associated with this organism in immunocompromised patients was rapidly fatal as standard minocycline therapies failed. C. resistens DSM 45100 was isolated from a blood culture of samples taken from a patient with acute myelocytic leukemia. The complete genome sequence of C. resistens DSM 45100 was determined by pyrosequencing to identify genes contributing to multi-drug resistance, virulence, and the lipophilic lifestyle of this newly described human pathogen. Results The genome of C. resistens DSM 45100 consists of a circular chromosome of 2,601,311 bp in size and the 28,312-bp plasmid pJA144188. Metabolic analysis showed that the genome of C. resistens DSM 45100 lacks genes for typical sugar uptake systems, anaplerotic functions, and a fatty acid synthase, explaining the strict lipophilic lifestyle of this species. The genome encodes a broad spectrum of enzymes ensuring the availability of exogenous fatty acids for growth, including predicted virulence factors that probably contribute to fatty acid metabolism by damaging host tissue. C. resistens DSM 45100 is able to use external L-histidine as a combined carbon and nitrogen source, presumably as a result of adaptation to the hitherto unknown habitat on the human skin. Plasmid pJA144188 harbors several genes contributing to antibiotic resistance of C. resistens DSM 45100, including a tetracycline resistance region of the Tet W type known from Lactobacillus reuteri and Streptococcus suis. The tet(W) gene of pJA144188 was cloned in Corynebacterium glutamicum and was shown to confer high levels of resistance to tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline in vitro. Conclusions The detected gene repertoire of C. resistens DSM 45100 provides insights into the lipophilic lifestyle and virulence functions of this newly recognized

  8. Staphylococcus aureus Shifts toward Commensalism in Response to Corynebacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Matthew M.; Freire, Marcelo O.; Gabrilska, Rebecca A.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.; Lemon, Katherine P.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus–human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe–microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr) system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence toward a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species. PMID:27582729

  9. Staphylococcus aureus Shifts toward Commensalism in Response to Corynebacterium Species.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Matthew M; Freire, Marcelo O; Gabrilska, Rebecca A; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Lemon, Katherine P

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus-human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe-microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr) system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence toward a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus Shifts toward Commensalism in Response to Corynebacterium Species.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Matthew M; Freire, Marcelo O; Gabrilska, Rebecca A; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Lemon, Katherine P

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus-human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe-microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr) system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence toward a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species. PMID:27582729

  11. Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum: a Potentially Misidentified and Multiresistant Corynebacterium Species Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Hinić, V.; Lang, C.; Weisser, M.; Straub, C.; Frei, R.

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum is a lipophilic corynebacterium validly characterized in 2004. We provide clinical information on 18 patients from whom this organism was isolated. The majority of the patients were hospitalized and had a history of prolonged treatment with broad-spectrum antimicrobials. In 7 (38.9%) of the 18 cases, the isolates were found to be clinically relevant. The present report also includes detailed data on the biochemical and molecular identification of C. tuberculostearicum, as well as its identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Our data demonstrate that routine biochemical tests do not provide reliable identification of C. tuberculostearicum. MALDI-TOF MS represents a helpful tool for the identification of this species, since all of the strains matched C. tuberculostearicum as the first choice and 58.3% (7/12) of the strains processed with the full extraction protocol generated scores of >2.000. Nevertheless, partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing still represents the gold standard for the identification of this species. Due to the challenging identification of C. tuberculostearicum, we presume that this organism is often misidentified and its clinical relevance is underestimated. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile of C. tuberculostearicum presented here reveals that 14 (87.5%) of the 16 strains analyzed exhibited multidrug resistance. PMID:22593594

  12. Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum: a potentially misidentified and multiresistant Corynebacterium species isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Hinic, V; Lang, C; Weisser, M; Straub, C; Frei, R; Goldenberger, D

    2012-08-01

    Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum is a lipophilic corynebacterium validly characterized in 2004. We provide clinical information on 18 patients from whom this organism was isolated. The majority of the patients were hospitalized and had a history of prolonged treatment with broad-spectrum antimicrobials. In 7 (38.9%) of the 18 cases, the isolates were found to be clinically relevant. The present report also includes detailed data on the biochemical and molecular identification of C. tuberculostearicum, as well as its identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Our data demonstrate that routine biochemical tests do not provide reliable identification of C. tuberculostearicum. MALDI-TOF MS represents a helpful tool for the identification of this species, since all of the strains matched C. tuberculostearicum as the first choice and 58.3% (7/12) of the strains processed with the full extraction protocol generated scores of >2.000. Nevertheless, partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing still represents the gold standard for the identification of this species. Due to the challenging identification of C. tuberculostearicum, we presume that this organism is often misidentified and its clinical relevance is underestimated. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile of C. tuberculostearicum presented here reveals that 14 (87.5%) of the 16 strains analyzed exhibited multidrug resistance.

  13. Transitional Forms of Corynebacterium acnes in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zierdt, C. H.; Wertlake, P. T.

    1969-01-01

    A clear-cut triad of sequential Corynebacterium acnes transitional forms from disease has been discovered. This entity includes three major forms which are capable of stabilization in culture, the spherical, the intermediate, and the definitive C. acnes. During conversion or reversion among the three forms, a variety of forms with mixed characteristics was observed. The spherical form was gram-negative and osmotically fragile, but it possessed a vestigial cell wall and mesosomes which excluded it from the L forms. In lieu of the L-form designation, the term “transitional” was adopted for all forms leading up to the definitive C. acnes. Culture of the spherical form was successful only on Mycoplasma-type media. The intermediate form was gram-negative, had mixed spherical and filamentous morphology, and bore a striking resemblance to Streptobacillus moniliformis. Like the spherical form, it was nutritionally exacting. The definitive form of C. acnes was preceded by gram-positive transitional forms of C. acnes morphology. It lacked, however, the carbohydrases and proteinases of C. acnes and susceptibility to C. acnes bacteriophages. Reversion was often blocked at this stage. A series of blood cultures from a patient with endocarditis was studied. Postmortem stain sections of the heart-valve lesion included intracellular masses of gram-negative spherical organisms. Indirect fluorescent antibody staining of these masses was strongly positive with antiserum to the spherical form and weakly positive with antiserum to the intermediate form. Images PMID:4886295

  14. Minimal nitrogen requirements of Corynebacterium renal strains.

    PubMed

    VanEseltine, W P; Cox, W M; Kadis, S

    1978-01-01

    Corynebacterium renale strain 10849 was grown in a chemically defined medium containing glucosamine, ammonium sulfate, and 5 amino acids as possible nitrogen sources. Although glucosamine was slightly stimulatory, its omission from the medium had a minimal effect on growth, and washed cells introduced into glucosamine-free medium grew readily through 10 serial transfers, demonstrating that this compound was not required for growth. Individual omissions of isoleucine, valine, methionine, and glutamine resulted in lengthened lag periods and reduced growth rates in initial transfers, but recovery occurred in subsequent serial transfers so that by the 3rd or 4th transfer, growth rates and cell crops were only slightly less than in control cultures in complete medium. Omission of cystine resulted in a permanently low growth rate and reduced cell crop, but this was remedied by substituting various nonnitrogenous compounds containing reduced sulfur. Strain 10849 and 6 additional strains were then serially cultured in a minimal defined medium in which sodium thioglycolate provided reduced sulfur and ammonium sulfate served as sole nitrogen source. Since only ammonium ion was required as the nitrogen source, it could be concluded that C renale, which rapidly hydrolyzes urea, should find an adequate source of nitrogen for growth in the urinary tract of animals. PMID:629434

  15. OXIDATION OF SECONDARY ALCOHOLS BY EXTRACTS OF A CORYNEBACTERIUM.

    PubMed

    ROSENBERG, E; HOLMES, P

    1965-05-01

    Rosenberg, Eugene (University of California, Los Angeles), and Paul Holmes. Oxidation of secondary alcohols by extracts of a Corynebacterium. J. Bacteriol. 89:1212-1216. 1965.-A Corynebacterium was isolated from soil by use of the enrichment culture technique. This Corynebacterium oxidized and grew on the chemically synthesized secondary alcohol, 3-tetrahydrofuranol. Extracts of this organism contained at least two different nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-requiring soluble secondary alcohol dehydrogenases. These enzymes were distinguished by the relative rates at which they oxidized thymidylic acid and 3-tetrahydrofuranol. In addition to their substrate specificity, the two enzymes differed in pH optima and thermal stability. Also, the 3-tetrahydrofuranol dehydrogenase was induced by 3-tetrahydrofuranol, whereas the thymidylic acid dehydrogenase was constitutive.

  16. Genome sequence and description of Corynebacterium ihumii sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Roshan; Dubourg, Grégory; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Couderc, Carine; Michelle, Caroline; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium ihumii strain GD7T sp. nov. is proposed as the type strain of a new species, which belongs to the family Corynebacteriaceae of the class Actinobacteria. This strain was isolated from the fecal flora of a 62 year-old male patient, as a part of the culturomics study. Corynebacterium ihumii is a Gram positive, facultativly anaerobic, nonsporulating bacillus. Here, we describe the features of this organism, together with the high quality draft genome sequence, annotation and the comparison with other member of the genus Corynebacteria. C. ihumii genome is 2,232,265 bp long (one chromosome but no plasmid) containing 2,125 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes, including 4 rRNA genes. The whole-genome shotgun sequence of Corynebacterium ihumii strain GD7T sp. nov has been deposited in EMBL under accession number GCA_000403725. PMID:25197488

  17. Pleurodesis with doxycycline or Corynebacterium parvum in malignant pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Salomaa, E R; Pulkki, K; Helenius, H

    1995-01-01

    Pleurodesis with doxycycline (100 mg and 600 mg) and Corynebacterium parvum (1 mg and 7 mg) were compared in 41 patients with malignant effusion. To evaluate the mechanisms, pleural fluid pH, leukocytes, granulocytes, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and serum IL-6, as well as C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured before and on 2 consecutive days after treatment. Corynebacterium parvum produced a greater acute-phase response measured with fever, serum CRP and IL-6 than doxycycline. However, no change in pleural fluid IL-6 was demonstrated. Among the 35 assessed patients, 26 had objective response, similar in all four treatment groups. Side-effects were more common with Corynebacterium parvum. Based on this preliminary study we conclude that doxycycline, even in low doses, is a highly effective and well tolerated agent for palliative treatment of malignant pleural effusion. As the responses were similar despite different inflammatory reactions, the two agents probably induce pleural obliteration through different mechanisms. PMID:7865226

  18. Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis liver abscess in a mature alpaca (Lama pacos)

    PubMed Central

    Sprake, Philippa; Gold, Jenifer R.

    2012-01-01

    A mature female alpaca was evaluated for weight loss and a 10-day history of anorexia, diarrhea, abdominal distension, and ventral edema. Ultrasonography revealed a hepatic mass, culture of which identified Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. This is the first reported case of an internal caseous lymphadenitis lesion resulting in clinical disease in a camelid. PMID:23024384

  19. 21 CFR 866.3140 - Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3140 Section 866.3140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3140 - Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3140 Section 866.3140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3140 - Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3140 Section 866.3140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3140 - Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3140 Section 866.3140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3140 - Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Corynebacterium spp. serological reagents. 866.3140 Section 866.3140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  4. Experimental transmission of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in horses by house flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The route of infection of pigeon fever remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to investigate house flies (Musca domestica L.) as vectors of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in horses. Eight ponies were used in a randomized, controlled, blinded experimental study. Ten wounds were creat...

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Eric; Massé, Cynthia; Charest, Hugues; Bernard, Kathryn; Côté, Jean-Charles; Tremblay, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of two toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans strains isolated from two different patients: one from a blood sample and the other from a scar exudate following surgery. Although these two strains harbor the diphtheria toxin gene tox, no full prophage sequences were found in the flanking regions. PMID:26112794

  6. Early prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Jürgen Benjamin; Essig, Andreas; Herrmann, Manuel; Liebold, Andreas; Quader, Mohamed Abo

    2015-12-01

    Corynebacterium (C.) kroppenstedtii is a rarely detected agent of bacterial infections in humans. Here, we describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by C. kroppenstedtii. Application of molecular methods using surgically excised valve tissue was a cornerstone for the establishment of the microbiological diagnosis, which is crucial for targeted antimicrobial treatment.

  7. Application of granular activated carbon/MnFe₂O₄ composite immobilized on C. glutamicum MTCC 2745 to remove As(III) and As(V): Kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Podder, M S; Majumder, C B

    2016-01-15

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 (GAC/MnFe2O4) composite to treat high concentration of arsenic bearing wastewater. Non-linear regression analysis was done for determining the best-fit kinetic model on the basis of three correlation coefficients and three error functions and also for predicting the parameters involved in kinetic models. The results showed that Fractal-like mixed 1,2 order model for As(III) and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo as well as Fractal-like pseudo second order models for As(V) were proficient to provide realistic description of biosorption/bioaccumulation kinetic. Applicability of mechanistic models in the current study exhibited that the rate governing step in biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was film diffusion rather than intraparticle diffusion. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) revealed that biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under studied conditions.

  8. Application of granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite immobilized on C. glutamicum MTCC 2745 to remove As(III) and As(V): Kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podder, M. S.; Majumder, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 (GAC/MnFe2O4) composite to treat high concentration of arsenic bearing wastewater. Non-linear regression analysis was done for determining the best-fit kinetic model on the basis of three correlation coefficients and three error functions and also for predicting the parameters involved in kinetic models. The results showed that Fractal-like mixed 1,2 order model for As(III) and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo as well as Fractal-like pseudo second order models for As(V) were proficient to provide realistic description of biosorption/bioaccumulation kinetic. Applicability of mechanistic models in the current study exhibited that the rate governing step in biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was film diffusion rather than intraparticle diffusion. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0 revealed that biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under studied conditions.

  9. Evolution, epidemiology and diversity of Corynebacterium diphtheriae: New perspectives on an old foe.

    PubMed

    Sangal, Vartul; Hoskisson, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Diphtheria is a debilitating disease caused by toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains and has been effectively controlled by the toxoid vaccine, yet several recent outbreaks have been reported across the globe. Moreover, non-toxigenic C. diphtheriae strains are emerging as a major global health concern by causing severe pharyngitis and tonsillitis, endocarditis, septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. Molecular epidemiological investigations suggest the existence of outbreak-associated clones with multiple genotypes circulating around the world. Evolution and pathogenesis appears to be driven by recombination as major virulence factors, including the tox gene and pilus gene clusters, are found within genomic islands that appear to be mobile between strains. The number of pilus gene clusters and variation introduced by gain or loss of gene function correlate with the variable adhesive and invasive properties of C. diphtheriae strains. Genomic variation does not support the separation of C. diphtheriae strains into biovars which correlates well with findings of studies based on multilocus sequence typing. Genomic analyses of a relatively small number of strains also revealed a recombination driven diversification of strains within a sequence type and indicate a wider diversity among C. diphtheriae strains than previously appreciated. This suggests that there is a need for increased effort from the scientific community to study C. diphtheriae to help understand the genomic diversity and pathogenicity within the population of this important human pathogen. PMID:27291708

  10. Corynebacterium tapiri sp. nov. and Corynebacterium nasicanis sp. nov., isolated from a tapir and a dog, respectively.

    PubMed

    Baumgardt, Sandra; Loncaric, Igor; Kämpfer, Peter; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    Two Gram-stain-positive bacterial isolates, strain 2385/12T and strain 2673/12T were isolated from a tapir and a dog's nose, respectively. The two strains were rod to coccoid-shaped, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. The highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity identified Corynebacterium singulare CCUG 37330T (96.3% similarity) as the nearest relative of strain 2385/12T and suggested the isolate represented a novel species. Corynebacterium humireducens DSM 45392T (98.7% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) was identified as the nearest relative of strain 2673/12T. Results from DNA-DNA hybridization with the type strain of C. humireducens demonstrated that strain 2673/12T also represented a novel species. Strain 2385/12T showed a quinone system consisting predominantly of menaquinones MK-8(H2) and MK-9(H2) whereas strain 2673/12T contained only MK-8(H2) as predominant quinone. The polar lipid profiles of the two strains showed the major compounds phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified glycolipid. Phosphatidylinositol was identified as another major lipid in 2673/12T whereas it was only found in moderate amounts in strain 2385/12T. Furthermore, moderate to minor amounts of phosphatidylinositol-mannoside, β-gentiobiosyl diacylglycerol and variable counts of several unidentified lipids were detected in the two strains. Both strains contained corynemycolic acids. The polyamine patterns were characterized by the major compound putrescine in strain 2385/12T and spermidine in strain 2673/12T. In the fatty acid profiles, predominantly C18:1ω9c and C16:0 were detected. The two strains are distinguishable from each other and the nearest related established species of the genus Corynebacterium phylogenetically and phenotypically. In conclusion, two novel species of the genus Corynebacterium are proposed, namely Corynebacterium tapiri sp. nov. (type strain, 2385/12T = CCUG 65456T = LMG 28165T) and Corynebacterium nasicanis sp. nov. (type

  11. Corynebacterium tapiri sp. nov. and Corynebacterium nasicanis sp. nov., isolated from a tapir and a dog, respectively.

    PubMed

    Baumgardt, Sandra; Loncaric, Igor; Kämpfer, Peter; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    Two Gram-stain-positive bacterial isolates, strain 2385/12T and strain 2673/12T were isolated from a tapir and a dog's nose, respectively. The two strains were rod to coccoid-shaped, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. The highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity identified Corynebacterium singulare CCUG 37330T (96.3% similarity) as the nearest relative of strain 2385/12T and suggested the isolate represented a novel species. Corynebacterium humireducens DSM 45392T (98.7% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) was identified as the nearest relative of strain 2673/12T. Results from DNA-DNA hybridization with the type strain of C. humireducens demonstrated that strain 2673/12T also represented a novel species. Strain 2385/12T showed a quinone system consisting predominantly of menaquinones MK-8(H2) and MK-9(H2) whereas strain 2673/12T contained only MK-8(H2) as predominant quinone. The polar lipid profiles of the two strains showed the major compounds phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified glycolipid. Phosphatidylinositol was identified as another major lipid in 2673/12T whereas it was only found in moderate amounts in strain 2385/12T. Furthermore, moderate to minor amounts of phosphatidylinositol-mannoside, β-gentiobiosyl diacylglycerol and variable counts of several unidentified lipids were detected in the two strains. Both strains contained corynemycolic acids. The polyamine patterns were characterized by the major compound putrescine in strain 2385/12T and spermidine in strain 2673/12T. In the fatty acid profiles, predominantly C18:1ω9c and C16:0 were detected. The two strains are distinguishable from each other and the nearest related established species of the genus Corynebacterium phylogenetically and phenotypically. In conclusion, two novel species of the genus Corynebacterium are proposed, namely Corynebacterium tapiri sp. nov. (type strain, 2385/12T = CCUG 65456T = LMG 28165T) and Corynebacterium nasicanis sp. nov. (type

  12. Corynebacterium guangdongense sp. nov., isolated from a contaminated plate.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Xuan; Yang, Song-Zhen; Feng, Guang-Da; Wang, Yong-Hong; Zhu, Hong-Hui

    2016-08-01

    A novel Gram-reaction-positive, non-motile and facultatively anaerobic bacterium, designated strain S01T, was isolated from a nutrient agar plate kept on a laboratory clean bench at Guangdong Institute of Microbiology, PR China, which was contaminated from an unknown source. Strain S01T was found to be catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Similarity searches revealed that the strain shared the highest 16S rRNA gene similarity with Corynebacterium humireducens MFC-5T (95.9 %). However, phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain S01T was closely related to Corynebacteriumdoosanense JCM 17317T (94.8 %) and Corynebacterium maris JCM 17018T (94.8 %). The major fatty acids were C18:1ω9c, C16:0, 10-methyl C18:0 and C18:0. The respiratory quinones predominantly consisted of MK-8(H2), with small amounts of MK-8 and MK-9(H2). Polar lipids contained phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, an unidentified aminolipid, two unidentified glycolipids and two unidentified lipids. Mycolic acids were present. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid and the major cell-wall sugars were galactose, arabinose and glucose. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain S01T was 70.7±0.1 mol%. The results of phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic analyses indicated that strain S01T represents a novel species of the genus Corynebacterium, for which the name Corynebacterium guangdongense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S01T (=GDMCC 1.1022T=CCTCC AB 2015423T=KCTC 39608T).

  13. Corynebacterium urealyticum: a comprehensive review of an understated organism.

    PubMed

    Salem, Nagla; Salem, Lamyaa; Saber, Sally; Ismail, Ghada; Bluth, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium urealyticum is a Gram positive, slow-growing, lipophilic, multi-drug resistant, urease positive micro-organism with diphtheroid morphology. It has been reported as an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen and as the cause of a variety of diseases including but not limited to cystitis, pyelonephritis, and bacteremia among others. This review serves to describe C. urealyticum with respect to its history, identification, laboratory investigation, relationship to disease and treatment in order to allow increased familiarity with this organism in clinical disease.

  14. Immunological characterization of diphtheria toxin recovered from Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Selim, Salha Abdelkareem; Mohamed, Farida Hessain; Hessain, Ashgan Mohamed; Moussa, Ihab Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Diphtheria toxin (DT) is a potent toxin produced by the so-called diphtheria group which includes Corynebacterium diphtheriae (C. diphtheriae), Corynebacterium ulcerans (C. ulcerans), and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (C. pseudotuberculosis). The present investigation is aimed to study in detail the production of DT by C. pseudotuberculosis. Twenty isolates were obtained from sheep diseased with caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) and twenty-six isolates were obtained from 26 buffaloes diseased with oedematous skin disease (OSD). All isolates were identified by standard microbiological and DT production was assayed serologically by modified Elek test and immunoblotting. All sheep isolates were nitrate negative, failed to hydrolyze starch and could not produce DT, while all buffalo isolates (biotype II) revealed positive results and a specific band of 62 kDa, specific to DT, was resulted in all concentrated cell fractions (CF), but was absent from non-toxigenic biotype I isolates. At the same time, another band of 31 kDa specific to the PLD gene was obtained with all isolates of biotype I and II. Moreover, all isolates showed positive synergistic hemolytic activity and antagonistic hemolysis with β-hemolytic Staphylococci. The obtained results also indicated that C. pseudotuberculosis could be classified into two strains; non-toxigenic biotype I strain, which failed to produce DT as well as being negative to nitrate and starch hydrolysis, and toxigenic biotype II strain, which can reduce nitrate, hydrolyze starch as well as produce DT. PMID:26981011

  15. In vivo labeling with stable isotopes as a tool for the identification of unidentified peaks in the metabolome analysis of Corynebacterium glutamicum by GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Herebian, Diran; Küpper, Uta; Schomburg, Dietmar; Marner, Franz-Josef

    2007-08-01

    Of the hyphenated techniques used for metabolic profiling of cell and tissue extracts, GC/MS is in some ways advantageous as it allows the simultaneous fingerprinting of chemically very different metabolites, and the electron impact mass spectra recorded in many cases lead to unambiguous identification of the compounds. However, prior to chromatography, the hydrophilic substances of the cell extracts have to be converted to vaporizable derivatives, the mass spectra of which often are not known or not listed in the available spectral libraries, even if they are derived from simple biochemicals. Thus, numerous chromatographic peaks remain as yet unidentified. Attempts to identify these peaks afford the acquisition of more data on these compounds. The value of in vivo labeling of metabolites with (13)C and (15)N for this purpose is described.

  16. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and description of Corynebacterium jeddahense sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Edouard, Sophie; Bibi, Fehmida; Dhamodharan, Ramasamy; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Azhar, Esam Ibraheen; Robert, Catherine; Caputo, Aurelia; Yasir, Muhammad; Jiman-Fatani, Asif Ahmad; Alawi, Maha; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium jeddahense sp. nov., strain JCBT, is the type strain of Corynebacterium jeddahense sp. nov., a new species within the genus Corynebacterium. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from fecal flora of a 24-year-old Saudi male suffering from morbid obesity. Corynebacterium jeddahense is a Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic, nonsporulating bacillus. Here, we describe the features of this bacterium, together with the complete genome sequencing and annotation, and compare it to other member of the genus Corynebacterium. The 2,472,125 bp-long genome (1 chromosome but not plasmid) contains 2,359 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes, including 1 rRNA operon. PMID:25197478

  17. Park-Williams Number 8 Strain of Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    PubMed Central

    Lampidis, Theodore; Barksdale, Lane

    1971-01-01

    Five clones of the Park-Williams number 8 strain of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, previously maintained in separate laboratories, were examined for their colonial and biochemical properties, for the restriction and modification system which operates to obscure their lysogeny, and for their capacity to produce large amounts of toxin under ordinary laboratory conditions. The phenotypes of their phage, P, produced in strain 603 and C7 (P·603 and P·C7) differ both as to stability to storage in the cold and to inactivation by antiphage serum. Evidence for a high degree of stability in the integration of P prophage in the PW8 genome is presented. Images PMID:4993328

  18. A Case of Necrotizing Epiglottitis Due to Nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jessica A; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Suchi, Mariko; Chun, Robert H; Willoughby, Rodney E

    2015-07-01

    Diphtheria is a rare cause of infection in highly vaccinated populations and may not be recognized by modern clinicians. Infections by nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae are emerging. We report the first case of necrotizing epiglottitis secondary to nontoxigenic C diphtheriae. A fully vaccinated child developed fever, poor oral intake, and sore throat and was found to have necrotizing epiglottitis. Necrotizing epiglottitis predominantly occurs in the immunocompromised host. Laboratory evaluation revealed pancytopenia, and bone marrow biopsy was diagnostic for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Clinicians should be aware of aggressive infections that identify immunocompromised patients. This case highlights the features of a reemerging pathogen, C diphtheriae.

  19. Corynebacterium urealyticum: a comprehensive review of an understated organism

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Nagla; Salem, Lamyaa; Saber, Sally; Ismail, Ghada; Bluth, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium urealyticum is a Gram positive, slow-growing, lipophilic, multi-drug resistant, urease positive micro-organism with diphtheroid morphology. It has been reported as an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen and as the cause of a variety of diseases including but not limited to cystitis, pyelonephritis, and bacteremia among others. This review serves to describe C. urealyticum with respect to its history, identification, laboratory investigation, relationship to disease and treatment in order to allow increased familiarity with this organism in clinical disease. PMID:26056481

  20. Corynebacterium ulcerans in humans and cattle in North Devon.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A case of Corynebacterium ulcerans sore throat in a community that drank raw milk from its own farm led to the discovery of another symptomless human infection. Eight cows in the herd were found to be infected and the intermittent pattern of excretion was demonstrated in another cow followed through its lactation. Further evidence of milk infected by C. ulcerans was found by examining all raw milk samples submitted to the laboratory. Two other human cases were diagnosed in Devon during the period of this investigation. PMID:6707468

  1. Organ distribution of Corynebacterium parvum labeled with iodine-125.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, N V; Greenberg, C S; Denny, T

    1977-02-01

    Administration of iv, ip, single sc, multiple sc, and footpad injections of [125I]Corynebacterium parvum in mice revealed different patterns of radioactive vaccine distribution in various organs. High deposition and retention were found in the liver, spleen, and gastrointestinal tract and less in the lungs, kidneys, thymus, and bone marrow. Control animals given 125I showed very rapid clearance of the isotope and no retention in the organs. The pattern of distribution of [125I]C. parvum could be useful when protocols for clinical trials are designed.

  2. Corynebacterium amycolatum: An Unexpected Pathogen in the Ear.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Mallika; Naina, P; Balaji, V; Anandan, Shalini

    2015-12-01

    Non-diphtheritic Corynebacteria are now being increasingly recognised as the causative agents of various infections. Among these organisms, Corynebacterium amycolatum is the most frequently isolated one. It has been isolated from urine, pus, catheter tips, blood, prostatic secretion, cerebrospinal fluid and sputum. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports on its role in ear infections. Here, we present 12 cases of ear infection with C.amycolatum. A high index of suspicion is necessary for identification of these gram positive bacilli as they resemble other Corynebacterium species on gram stain. They have metachromatic granules which can be demonstrated by Albert's stain and form characteristic dry, flat colonies on blood agar. These organisms are frequently resistant to ceftriaxone and imipenem. In our study, among the 12 isolates, eight isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone and four to imipenem and two were intermediately susceptible to ceftriaxone although all the 12 strains were uniformly susceptible to vancomycin. All the isolates were negative for toxA and toxB genes by PCR. Genomic sequencing of two isolates confirmed them as C.amycolatum. C.amycolatum is a relatively rare cause of pyogenic ear infections. As it demonstrates more antibiotic resistance than other similar organisms, careful identification with antibiotic susceptibility testing is required in managing these infections. PMID:26816893

  3. Corynebacterium CDC Group G Native and Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Adil; Yu, Siegfried; Koirala, Janak

    2015-08-11

    We report the first case of native and recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis with Corynebacterium CDC group G, a rarely reported cause of infective endocarditis (IE). Previously, there have been only two cases reported for prosthetic valve IE caused by these organisms. A 69-year-old female with a known history of mitral valve regurgitation presented with a 3-day history of high-grade fever, pleuritic chest pain and cough. Echocardiography confirmed findings of mitral valve thickening consistent with endocarditis, which subsequently progressed to become large and mobile vegetations. Both sets of blood cultures taken on admission were positive for Corynebacterium CDC group G. Despite removal of a long-term venous access port, the patient's presumed source of line associated bacteremia, mitral valve replacement, and aggressive antibiotic therapy, the patient had recurrence of vegetations on the prosthetic valve. She underwent replacement of her prosthetic mitral valve in the subsequent 2 weeks, before she progressed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and expired. Although they are typically considered contaminants, corynebacteria, in the appropriate clinical setting, should be recognized, identified, and treated as potentially life-threatening infections, particularly in the case of line-associated bacteremias, and native and prosthetic valve endocarditis.

  4. Corynebacterium CDC Group G Native and Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Adil; Yu, Siegfried; Koirala, Janak

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of native and recurrent prosthetic valve endocarditis with Corynebacterium CDC group G, a rarely reported cause of infective endocarditis (IE). Previously, there have been only two cases reported for prosthetic valve IE caused by these organisms. A 69-year-old female with a known history of mitral valve regurgitation presented with a 3-day history of high-grade fever, pleuritic chest pain and cough. Echocardiography confirmed findings of mitral valve thickening consistent with endocarditis, which subsequently progressed to become large and mobile vegetations. Both sets of blood cultures taken on admission were positive for Corynebacterium CDC group G. Despite removal of a long-term venous access port, the patient’s presumed source of line associated bacteremia, mitral valve replacement, and aggressive antibiotic therapy, the patient had recurrence of vegetations on the prosthetic valve. She underwent replacement of her prosthetic mitral valve in the subsequent 2 weeks, before she progressed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and expired. Although they are typically considered contaminants, corynebacteria, in the appropriate clinical setting, should be recognized, identified, and treated as potentially life-threatening infections, particularly in the case of line-associated bacteremias, and native and prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26500737

  5. Corynebacterium amycolatum: An Unexpected Pathogen in the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Mallika; Naina, P.; Balaji, V.

    2015-01-01

    Non-diphtheritic Corynebacteria are now being increasingly recognised as the causative agents of various infections. Among these organisms, Corynebacterium amycolatum is the most frequently isolated one. It has been isolated from urine, pus, catheter tips, blood, prostatic secretion, cerebrospinal fluid and sputum. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports on its role in ear infections. Here, we present 12 cases of ear infection with C.amycolatum. A high index of suspicion is necessary for identification of these gram positive bacilli as they resemble other Corynebacterium species on gram stain. They have metachromatic granules which can be demonstrated by Albert’s stain and form characteristic dry, flat colonies on blood agar. These organisms are frequently resistant to ceftriaxone and imipenem. In our study, among the 12 isolates, eight isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone and four to imipenem and two were intermediately susceptible to ceftriaxone although all the 12 strains were uniformly susceptible to vancomycin. All the isolates were negative for toxA and toxB genes by PCR. Genomic sequencing of two isolates confirmed them as C.amycolatum. C.amycolatum is a relatively rare cause of pyogenic ear infections. As it demonstrates more antibiotic resistance than other similar organisms, careful identification with antibiotic susceptibility testing is required in managing these infections. PMID:26816893

  6. Experimental transmission of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis biovar equi in horses by house flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The route of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection in horses remains undetermined, but transmission by insects is suspected. Scientists from CMAVE and Auburn University investigated house flies (Musca domestica L.) as possible vectors. Three ponies were directly inoculated with C. pseudotuber...

  7. Experimental inoculation of house flies Musca domestica with Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis serovar equi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Actinomycetales: Corynebacteriaceae) infection in horses causes external abscesses, infection of internal organs and ulcerative lymphangitis. The exact mechanism of infection remains unknown, but fly transmission is suspected. Scientists at Auburn University and U...

  8. Experimental inoculation of house flies, Musca domestica L., with Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis serovar equi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Actinomycetales: Corynebacteriaceae) infection in horses causes three different disease syndromes: external abscesses, infection of internal organs and ulcerative lymphangitis. The route of infection in horses remains undetermined, but transmission by insect vecto...

  9. Corynebacterium diphtheriae infections currently and in the past.

    PubMed

    Zasada, Aleksandra Anna

    2015-01-01

    Along with the introduction of common obligatory vaccinations against diphtheria, the disease has been limited in developed countries. However, diphtheria is still endemic in developing countries. Due to a growing popularity of visiting these countries, there is a risk of importation of the disease to Europe. Studies revealed that over 60% of persons aged >40 years in the Polish population do not have a protective level of antibodies against diphtheria. Furthermore, an access to diphtheria antitoxin, which is essential in diphtheria treatment, is now hardly accessible in Europe. On the other hand, in many countries, including Poland, new infections caused by non-toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae have been emerged. Such infections are frequently manifested by bacteraemia and endocarditis with a high fatality rate, amounting even to 41%. PMID:26519837

  10. Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis RNA-seq data from abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Pablo H.C.G.; Veras, Adonney A.O.; Carneiro, Adriana R.; Barúna, Rafael A.; Guimarães, Luís C.; Pinheiro, Kenny C.; Pinto, Anne C.; Soares, Siomar C.; Schneider, Maria P.C.; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis causes significant loss to goat and sheep farmers because it is the causal agent of the infectious disease caseous lymphadenitis, which may lead to outcomes ranging from skin injury to animal death (Ruiz et al., 2011) [1]. This bacterium was grown under osmotic (2 M), acid (pH) and heat (50 °C) stress and under control (Normal-BHI brain heart infusion) conditions, which simulate the conditions faced by the bacteria during the infectious process. Subsequently, cDNA of each condition was sequenced by the SOLiD3 Plus platform using the RNA-Seq technique [2], [3], [4]. The data produced was processed to evaluate the differential gene expression, which is helpful to understand the adaptation mechanisms during the infection in the host. The sequencing data of all conditions are available in the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) repository under accession number E-MTAB-2017. PMID:26702428

  11. Electron transport in a Park-Williams strain of Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, P. B.; King, H. K.

    1965-01-01

    1. The electron-transport mechanism was examined in the `particulate' and `supernatant' fractions of disintegrated cells of a Park–Williams strain of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. 2. Succinate-oxidase activity was found mainly in the `particulate' fraction, and NADH2 oxidase mainly in the `supernatant', which was devoid of cytochromes and menaquinone. 3. The sum of the activities of particles and supernatant fractions, with respect to both succinate oxidase and NADH2 oxidase, was substantially less than that of the crude cell extract from which they were obtained. Full activity was restored on recombining `particles' and `supernatant'. The characteristics of this reassembled system were investigated. 4. The strain of organism (CN2000) examined contained cytochromes corresponding spectroscopically to `a', `b' and `c' types. All three were reduced by succinate, lactate or NADH2; but a portion of the cytochrome b, susceptible to reduction by dithionite, could not be reduced by the substrates. 5. Triton X-100 inhibits oxidation of succinate by particulate fraction; on adding succinate, the reduction of cytochrome b is not affected but that of cytochromes a and c is delayed. 6. Irradiation at 360mμ completely destroys menaquinone in the particle fraction. Succinate oxidation is severely decreased; succinate dehydrogenase and NADH2 oxidation are little affected. Certain menaquinones will restore succinate oxidation in the irradiated material. 7. On adding succinate to irradiated particulate material cytochrome b is partially reduced at once, but reduction of cytochromes a and c is much delayed. A portion of the cytochrome b remains not reduced, but reduction occurs rapidly on the addition of menaquinone (MK-2). PMID:4286676

  12. Molecular epidemiology and characteristics of Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans strains isolated in Italy during the 1990s.

    PubMed

    von Hunolstein, Christina; Alfarone, Giovanna; Scopetti, Franca; Pataracchia, Marco; La Valle, Roberto; Franchi, Fabio; Pacciani, Laila; Manera, Anna; Giammanco, Anna; Farinelli, Senia; Engler, Kathryn; De Zoysa, Aruni; Efstratiou, Androulla

    2003-02-01

    Five cases of diphtheria were reported in Italy between January 1990 and June 2001. Three cases were confirmed microbiologically by the isolation of toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae (two cases) and Corynebacterium ulcerans (one case). Over the same period, 11 cases of non-toxigenic C. diphtheriae infection were reported to the Italian Public Health Institute, from which the causative organism was isolated from a skin infection in one case and from the throat in the other ten. Seven of the throat isolates were associated with fever, severe pharyngitis and tonsillitis and were all biotype gravis. Because there are no standardized breakpoints, the antimicrobial sensitivities of C. diphtheriae were determined in accordance with the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines for Streptococcus spp. other than Streptococcus pneumoniae. MICs for penicillin ranged between 0.125 and 0.250 mg l(-1) and 7 out of 11 strains had a minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC)/MIC ratio >or= 32. All strains were sensitive to clindamycin (MIC

  13. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  14. CoryneBase: Corynebacterium genomic resources and analysis tools at your fingertips.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Hamed; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Tan, Mui Fern; Jakubovics, Nick S; Wee, Wei Yee; Mutha, Naresh V R; Wong, Guat Jah; Ang, Mia Yang; Yazdi, Amir Hessam; Choo, Siew Woh

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacteria are used for a wide variety of industrial purposes but some species are associated with human diseases. With increasing number of corynebacterial genomes having been sequenced, comparative analysis of these strains may provide better understanding of their biology, phylogeny, virulence and taxonomy that may lead to the discoveries of beneficial industrial strains or contribute to better management of diseases. To facilitate the ongoing research of corynebacteria, a specialized central repository and analysis platform for the corynebacterial research community is needed to host the fast-growing amount of genomic data and facilitate the analysis of these data. Here we present CoryneBase, a genomic database for Corynebacterium with diverse functionality for the analysis of genomes aimed to provide: (1) annotated genome sequences of Corynebacterium where 165,918 coding sequences and 4,180 RNAs can be found in 27 species; (2) access to comprehensive Corynebacterium data through the use of advanced web technologies for interactive web interfaces; and (3) advanced bioinformatic analysis tools consisting of standard BLAST for homology search, VFDB BLAST for sequence homology search against the Virulence Factor Database (VFDB), Pairwise Genome Comparison (PGC) tool for comparative genomic analysis, and a newly designed Pathogenomics Profiling Tool (PathoProT) for comparative pathogenomic analysis. CoryneBase offers the access of a range of Corynebacterium genomic resources as well as analysis tools for comparative genomics and pathogenomics. It is publicly available at http://corynebacterium.um.edu.my/.

  15. Genome Sequence of the Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Cp316 Strain, Isolated from the Abscess of a Californian Horse

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Pinto, Anne Cybelle; Soares, Siomar de Castro; Santos, Anderson Rodrigues; Almeida, Sintia Silva; Guimarães, Luis Carlos; Aburjaile, Flávia Figueira; Barbosa, Eudes Guilherme Vieira; Dorella, Fernanda Alves; Rocha, Flávia Souza; Cerdeira, Louise Teixeira; Barbosa, Maria Silvanira; Tauch, Andreas; Edman, Judy; Spier, Sharon; Miyoshi, Anderson; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Azevedo, Vasco

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is of major veterinary importance because it affects livestock, particularly sheep, goats, and horses, in several countries, including Australia, Brazil, the United States, and Canada, resulting in significant economic losses. In the present study, we describe the complete genome of the Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Cp316 strain, biovar equi, isolated from the abscess of a North American horse. PMID:23144380

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain 1/06-A, Isolated from a Horse in North America

    PubMed Central

    Pethick, Florence E.; Lainson, Alex F.; Yaga, Raja; Flockhart, Allen; Smith, David G. E.; Donachie, Willie; Cerdeira, Louise T.; Silva, Artur; Bol, Erik; Lopes, Thiago S.; Barbosa, Maria S.; Pinto, Anne C.; dos Santos, Anderson R.; Soares, Siomar C.; Almeida, Sintia S.; Guimaraes, Luis C.; Aburjaile, Flavia F.; Abreu, Vinicius A. C.; Ribeiro, Dayana; Fiaux, Karina K.; Diniz, Carlos A. A.; Barbosa, Eudes G. V.; Pereira, Ulisses P.; Hassan, Syed S.; Ali, Amjad; Bakhtiar, Syeda M.; Dorella, Fernanda A.; Carneiro, Adriana R.; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Rocha, Flavia S.; Schneider, Maria P. C.; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis causes disease in several animal species, although distinct biovars exist that appear to be restricted to specific hosts. In order to facilitate a better understanding of the differences between biovars, we report here the complete genome sequence of the equine pathogen Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain 1/06-A. PMID:22843601

  17. Sinus Microbiome Diversity Depletion and Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum Enrichment Mediates Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuanlin; Roediger, Frederick C.; Pletcher, Steven D.; Goldberg, Andrew N.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent mucosal inflammation and microbial infection are characteristics of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Mucosal microbiota dysbiosis is found in other chronic inflammatory diseases; however, the relationship between sinus microbiota composition and CRS is unknown. Using comparative microbiome profiling of a cohort of CRS patients and healthy subjects, we demonstrate that the sinus microbiota of CRS patients exhibits significantly reduced bacterial diversity compared with that of healthy controls. In our cohort of CRS patients, multiple, phylogenetically distinct lactic acid bacteria were depleted concomitant with an increase in the relative abundance of a single species, Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum. We recapitulated the conditions observed in our human cohort in a murine model and confirmed the pathogenic potential of C. tuberculostearicum and the critical necessity for a replete mucosal microbiota to protect against this species. Moreover, Lactobacillus sakei, which was identified from our comparative microbiome analyses as a potentially protective species, defended against C. tuberculostearicum sinus infection, even in the context of a depleted sinus bacterial community. These studies demonstrate that sinus mucosal health is highly dependent on the composition of the resident microbiota as well as identify both a new sino-pathogen and a strong bacterial candidate for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22972842

  18. Sinus microbiome diversity depletion and Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum enrichment mediates rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Nicole A; Nagalingam, Nabeetha A; Song, Yuanlin; Roediger, Frederick C; Pletcher, Steven D; Goldberg, Andrew N; Lynch, Susan V

    2012-09-12

    Persistent mucosal inflammation and microbial infection are characteristics of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Mucosal microbiota dysbiosis is found in other chronic inflammatory diseases; however, the relationship between sinus microbiota composition and CRS is unknown. Using comparative microbiome profiling of a cohort of CRS patients and healthy subjects, we demonstrate that the sinus microbiota of CRS patients exhibits significantly reduced bacterial diversity compared with that of healthy controls. In our cohort of CRS patients, multiple, phylogenetically distinct lactic acid bacteria were depleted concomitant with an increase in the relative abundance of a single species, Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum. We recapitulated the conditions observed in our human cohort in a murine model and confirmed the pathogenic potential of C. tuberculostearicum and the critical necessity for a replete mucosal microbiota to protect against this species. Moreover, Lactobacillus sakei, which was identified from our comparative microbiome analyses as a potentially protective species, defended against C. tuberculostearicum sinus infection, even in the context of a depleted sinus bacterial community. These studies demonstrate that sinus mucosal health is highly dependent on the composition of the resident microbiota as well as identify both a new sino-pathogen and a strong bacterial candidate for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Biofilm production by multiresistant Corynebacterium striatum associated with nosocomial outbreak

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Cassius; Faria, Yuri Vieira; Sant’Anna, Lincoln de Oliveira; Viana, Vanilda Gonçalves; Seabra, Sérgio Henrique; de Souza, Mônica Cristina; Vieira, Verônica Viana; Hirata, Raphael; Moreira, Lílian de Oliveira; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium striatum is a potentially pathogenic microorganism that causes nosocomial outbreaks. However, little is known about its virulence factors that may contribute to healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). We investigated the biofilm production on abiotic surfaces of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and multidrug-susceptible (MDS) strains of C. striatum of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types I-MDR, II-MDR, III-MDS and IV-MDS isolated during a nosocomial outbreak in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The results showed that C. striatum was able to adhere to hydrophilic and hydrophobic abiotic surfaces. The C. striatum 1987/I-MDR strain, predominantly isolated from patients undergoing endotracheal intubation procedures, showed the greatest ability to adhere to all surfaces. C. striatum bound fibrinogen to its surface, which contributed to biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy showed the production of mature biofilms on polyurethane catheters by all pulsotypes. In conclusion, biofilm production may contribute to the establishment of HAIs caused by C. striatum. PMID:25946249

  20. Cultural characteristics and fatty acid composition of Corynebacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Moss, C W; Dowell, V R; Lewis, V J; Schekter, M A

    1967-11-01

    A detailed study of the cultural characteristics and cellular fatty acid composition of 27 isolates of Corynebacterium acnes was performed to establish the properties by which this organism may be identified and characterized. The fatty acids were extracted directly from whole cells and examined as methyl esters by gas-liquid chromatography. Each strain possessed a similar fatty acid profile which was characterized by a large percentage of C15 branched-chain acid. Uniformity in certain biochemical reactions and cultural characteristics was also observed. All strains were catalase-positive, nonmotile, and urease-negative, reduced nitrate, liquefied gelatin, failed to hydrolyze esculin and starch, and gave a positive methyl red test. Glucose, fructose, and glycerol were fermented, but not lactose, salicin, sucrose, maltose, xylose, or arabinose. Production of hydrogen sulfide and indole, fermentation of mannitol, and hemolytic activity were variable characteristics. Two species of the genus Propionibacterium were also tested and found to be similar to C. acnes both in cultural characteristics and fatty acid composition. The results strengthen previous suggestions that C. acnes should be classified in the genus Propionibacterium.

  1. Corynebacterium parvum versus tetracycline as pleural sclerosing agents in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Vargas, F S; Wang, N S; Teixeira, L R; Carmo, A O; Silva, L M; Light, R W

    1995-12-01

    Tetracycline has been one of the most commonly used agents for producing a pleurodesis. However, it is no longer available due to more stringent requirements on the manufacturing process. The objective of this project was to determine whether Corynebacterium parvum is an effective sclerosant in an experimental model in rabbits. The following medications were instilled intrapleurally in anaesthetized male rabbits: tetracycline 35 mg.kg-1 or C. parvum 4 or 8 mg, all diluted with bacteriostatic saline solution. Twenty eight days after the instillation, the animals were sacrificed and the pleural spaces assessed macroscopically for evidence of pleurodesis and microscopically for evidence of fibrosis and inflammation. The intrapleural injection of C. parvum was ineffective in creating pleural fibrosis. The mean degree of pleurodesis in the 10 rabbits who received tetracycline was 3.5 +/- 0.7 (scale 0-4) whilst in the 10 rabbits that received 4 mg C. parvum it was 0.0 +/- 0.0, and in the 10 rabbits that received 8 mg C. parvum it was 0.5 +/- 0.8. Based on this study, we recommend that C. parvum should not be used as a pleural sclerosant in patients with normal pleura. PMID:8666113

  2. Group JK corynebacterium peritonitis in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pierard, D; Lauwers, S; Mouton, M C; Sennesael, J; Verbeelen, D

    1983-01-01

    We describe a case of peritonitis with isolation of a group JK corynebacterium from the peritoneal effluent in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and treated with corticosteroids. Therapy with intraperitoneal vancomycin resulted in a rapid eradication of the organism. However, only 1 month after discontinuation of the 26-day therapy, a second episode of peritonitis with JK corynebacterium occurred. After vancomycin was restarted, the organism disappeared again from the peritoneal fluid, but the patient died a few days later from heart failure apparently unrelated to the infection. Some authors have mentioned the isolation of diphtheroids (without further identification) from peritoneal effluent of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients, but to our knowledge, this is the first report of peritonitis associated with JK corynebacterium, an opportunistic organism that must be differentiated from other corynebacteria. PMID:6630457

  3. Corynebacterium pelargi sp. nov., isolated from the trachea of white stork nestlings.

    PubMed

    Kämpfer, Peter; Jerzak, Leszek; Bochenski, Marcin; Kasprzak, Mariusz; Wilharm, Gottfried; Golke, Jan; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Glaeser, Stefanie P

    2015-05-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, pleomorphic, oxidase-negative, non-motile isolate from the trachea of a white stork from Poland, designated strain 136/3(T), was subjected to a comprehensive taxonomic investigation. A comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed highest similarities to Corynebacterium mustelae , Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis , Corynebacterium vitaeruminis and Corynebacterium ulcerans (96.0-96.3%). The quinone system consisted of major amounts of MK-8(H2), minor amounts of MK-9(H2) and traces of MK-8 and MK-9. The polar lipid profile of strain 136/3(T) contained phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol-mannoside as major lipids and phosphatidylglycerol and an acidic glycolipid in moderate amounts. In addition small amounts of diphosphatidylglycerol, a phospholipid, an aminolipid and two lipids of unknown group affiliation were found. The polyamine pattern was composed of the major components spermidine and spermine. Putrescine, 1,3-diaminopropane, cadaverine, sym-homospermidine and tyramine were found in minor or trace amounts. The diamino acid of the peptidoglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid. In the fatty acid profile straight-chain, saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids predominated (C(18 : 1)ω9c, C(16 : 1)ω7c, C16 : 0, C(18  : 0)). Corynemycolic acids were detected. Physiological traits as well as unique traits of the polar lipid profile and the fatty acid pattern distinguished strain 136/3(T) from the most closely related species. All these results indicate that strain 136/3(T) represents a novel species of the genus Corynebacterium for which we propose the name Corynebacterium pelargi sp. nov. The type strain is 136/3(T) ( =CIP 110778(T) =CCM 8517(T) =LMG 28174(T)). PMID:25678678

  4. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of Corynebacterium timonense type strain 5401744T

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Catherine; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium timonense strain 5401744T is a member of the genus Corynebacterium which contains Gram-positive bacteria with a high G+C content. It was isolated from the blood of a patient with endocarditis. In this work, we describe a set of features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,553,575 bp long genome contains 2,401 protein-coding genes and 55 RNA genes, including between 5 and 6 rRNA operons. PMID:25197476

  5. Studies of an outbreak of Corynebacterium equi pneumonia in foals.

    PubMed

    Smith, B P; Robinson, R C

    1981-10-01

    Five out of 6 foals between 2 and 4 months old, on a ranch in northern California, developed pneumonia within a 3 week period in June and July 1978. Corynebacterium equi was recovered from each of the 5 foals by transtracheal aspiration. Clinical signs were variable but included increased respiratory rate, fever, cough, nasal discharge, harsh airway sounds over middle sized airways and wheezing over small airways. Cyanosis was present in the most severely affected foal. Radiographic findings included diffusely increased interstitial and peribronchial densities, areas of consolidation and, in 3 cases, dense focal areas indicating abscessation. Foals were treated with several different antimicrobial agents. Most were treated with penicillin and gentamicin. Four of the 5 affected foals recovered within 2 to 3 weeks but the first foal to be affected died 2 days after first receiving veterinary attention. At postmortem examination, pulmonary changes considered typical of C equi pneumonia were found, including wet, heavy dark red lungs which failed to collapse and numerous 1 to 7 cm thin-walled abscesses throughout the parenchyma, containing inspissated exudate. C equi was cultured from the exudate. Samples of soil and dust from 9 of 20 areas inhabited by infected foals yielded C equi of the same serological group as found in the foals. Eight paddocks in which foals had not been kept were negative for C equi. The organism was recovered from cobwebs in the stalls occupied by infected foals. Aerosol infection via dust was considered to be the route of infection. Pharyngeal, vaginal and faecal cultures from the dams of 3 affected foals were negative for C equi. Early diagnosis by transtracheal aspiration and appropriate therapy are considered to be extremely important in the successful treatment of C equi pneumonia. Preventive therapy should include control of environmental dust. PMID:7318800

  6. Characterization of surface saccharides in two Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains.

    PubMed

    Mattos-Guaraldi, A L; Cappelli, E A; Previato, J O; Formiga, L C; Andrade, A F

    1999-01-01

    Two Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains were analyzed by assays employing a battery of highly purified fluorescent lectins. From 22 lectins tested only seven with affinity to receptor molecules containing N-acetylglucosamine (D-GlcNAc), N-acetylgalactosamine (D-GalNAc), galactose (D-Gal), mannose-like (D-Man-like) and sialic acid residues showed positive fluorescent labeling. A higher reactivity of Triticum vulgaris (WGA), which binds to sialic acid and/or beta-D-GlcNAc-containing residues, and Bandeiraea simplicifolia II (BS-II), which recognizes alpha and beta-D-GlcNAc units, was shown by the sucrose-fermenting strain. Ricinus communis (RCA-I), which recognizes D-Gal units in addition to both Glycine max (SBA) and Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacaline) agglutinins that bind to D-GalNAc-containing residues, reacted preferentially with the sucrose-negative strain. Canavalia ensiformis (Con A), which recognizes D-Man-like receptors, reacted with both sucrose-fermenting and non-sucrose-fermenting C. diphtheriae biotypes. However, higher interaction was observed with the non-sucrose-fermenting strain. Fluorescence of WGA binding was significantly decreased by neuraminidase treatment suggesting the presence of an exposed sialic acid moiety on C. diphtheriae surfaces. Binding assay using radiolabeled [125I]WGA essentially confirmed the lectin fluorescence studies. N-Acetylneuraminic acid moieties were detected in whole cell hydrolysates as assessed by thin-layer and gas-liquid chromatography. The data indicate differences on the cell surface saccharide ligands between the sucrose-fermenting and the non-sucrose-fermenting C. diphtheriae strains.

  7. Intrapleural Corynebacterium parvum for recurrent malignant pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Foresti, V

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-two consecutive patients with malignant pleural effusions (MPE) were treated with intrapleural Corynebacterium parvum (CBP) associated with parenteral methylprednisolone (MP) to determine its effectiveness and the frequency and nature of adverse reactions. After thoracentesis, 7 mg of CBP (Coparvax Wellcome) in 20 ml of saline were injected into the pleural cavity. On the day of treatment, the patients were given 1 mg/kg i.m. of MP 30 min before thoracentesis. The effectiveness of pleurodesis was assessed as follows: (1) complete response (CR; total resolution of pleural effusion after 3 injections of CBP at the most); (2) partial response (PR; formation of asymptomatic loculated effusion). In 5 patients leukocytes, lymphocytes and monocytes were determined in pleural fluid (PF) and in blood (B) collected before and 7 days after CBP treatment. Two patients were unevaluable. Of 20 evaluable patients, 18 (90%) had a CR and 2 patients (10%) had a PR. Eleven of 22 patients (50%) had a fever. Three patients had prolonged and/or high fever. Seven of 22 patients (32%) had mild chest pain. None of the patients presented other side effects. Twelve of 21 patients (57.1%) had a PF pH > or = 7.30; 2 of these died a few days after the treatment, and 10 had favorable responses. The other 9 patients had a PF pH < 7.30: all had favorable responses. The leukocytes, the lymphocyte subsets, the monocytes, the NK lymphocytes, and their PF/B ratios did not differ significantly before and after CBP treatment. Our study confirms that intrapleural CBP is an effective and simple method to control MPE.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7716350

  8. Genomic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among lipid-requiring diphtheroids from humans and characterization of Corynebacterium macginleyi sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Riegel, P; Ruimy, R; de Briel, D; Prévost, G; Jehl, F; Christen, R; Monteil, H

    1995-01-01

    DNA relatedness experiments were performed with 38 clinical isolates and 13 reference strains of coryneform taxa exhibiting a lipid requirement for optimal growth. Forty-five of these strains split into five genomic groups at the species level, whereas six other strains remained unclustered. Genomospecies II fits Corynebacterium accolens, but the other genomospecies were not genetically related to any of the defined Corynebacterium species. Phylogenetic analyses of genes coding for small-subunit rRNA sequences revealed that two genomospecies (I and III) and C. accolens form a tight cluster within the robust branch that groups all Corynebacterium species presently sequenced. Reference strains of biotypes C-1, C-2, and C-3 of "Corynebacterium pseudogenitalium" were found to fall into genomospecies I, as well as "Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum," Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) coryneform group G-1, and CDC coryneform group G-2 reference strains. Biochemical tests allowed differentiation between genomospecies except between genomospecies IV and V and between six unclustered strains and genomospecies I. We propose a new classification for these lipid-requiring diphtheroids within the genus Corynebacterium with the delineation of some CDC coryneform group G-1 strains (genomospecies III) as a new species for which the name Corynebacterium macginleyi is proposed. The type strain is strain JCL-2 (CIP 104099), isolated from a human corneal ulcer.

  9. Genomic analysis of a nontoxigenic, invasive Corynebacterium diphtheriae strain from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Encinas, Fernando; Marin, Michel A; Ramos, Juliana N; Vieira, Verônica V; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Vicente, Ana Carolina P

    2015-09-01

    We report the complete genome sequence and analysis of an invasive Corynebacterium diphtheriae strain that caused endocarditis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It was selected for sequencing on the basis of the current relevance of nontoxigenic strains for public health. The genomic information was explored in the context of diversity, plasticity and genetic relatedness with other contemporary strains.

  10. Comparison of three techniques for isolation of Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi from contaminated sources.

    PubMed

    Barton, M D; Hughes, K L

    1981-01-01

    Inoculation of a liquid medium comprised of Trypticase soy broth (BBL Microbiology Systems), cycloheximide, nalidixic acid, penicillin, and potassium tellurite and subcultured onto M3 medium plus potassium tellurite was highly successful for the isolation of Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi from soil. PMID:7007424

  11. Pancreatic panniculitis complicated by infection with Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum: A case report.

    PubMed

    Omland, S H; Ekenberg, C; Henrik-Nielsen, R; Friis-Møller, A

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of pancreatic panniculitis in a patient with alcohol abuse where Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum was isolated from a pannicular nodule on the crus. The patient was started on linezolid treatment leading to regression of the patient's symptoms. Upon discontinuation of linezolid treatment progression of the skin symptoms progressed.

  12. Pancreatic panniculitis complicated by infection with Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Omland, S.H.; Ekenberg, C.; Henrik-Nielsen, R.; Friis-Møller, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of pancreatic panniculitis in a patient with alcohol abuse where Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum was isolated from a pannicular nodule on the crus. The patient was started on linezolid treatment leading to regression of the patient's symptoms. Upon discontinuation of linezolid treatment progression of the skin symptoms progressed. PMID:26955524

  13. Successful treatment of Corynebacterium urealyticum encrusting cystitis with systemic and intravesical antimicrobial therapy

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Oriana; Béraud, Romain; Tefft, Karen M.; Muckle, C. Anne

    2015-01-01

    A 6-year-old Saint Bernard dog was diagnosed with encrusting cystitis caused by Corynebacterium urealyticum. The infection persisted despite the prolonged use of antimicrobials and surgical debridement of the urinary bladder. Resolution occurred following intravenous vancomycin, urine acidification, and intravesical gentamicin. The challenges involved in the treatment of encrusting cystitis are described. PMID:25969578

  14. Septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum.

    PubMed

    Westblade, Lars F; Shams, Farah; Duong, Scott; Tariq, Oosman; Bulbin, Alan; Klirsfeld, Dava; Zhen, Wei; Sakaria, Smita; Ford, Bradley A; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Ginocchio, Christine C

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis of a native knee joint due to Corynebacterium striatum, a rare and unusual cause of septic arthritis of native joints. The isolate was identified by a combination of phenotypic, mass spectrometric, and nucleic acid-based assays and exhibited high-level resistance to most antimicrobials.

  15. Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain PA02 Isolated from an Ovine Host in the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Muge, Gabriel R. S.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; de Sá, Pablo H. C. G.; Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Queiroz; Alves, Jorianne Thyeska Castro; Morais, Ezequiel; Silva, André G. M.; Azevedo, Vasco; Folador, Adriana Ribeiro Carneiro; Silva, Artur

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain PA02 isolated from an ovine host. The genome contains 2,328,435 bp, a 52.2% G+C content, 2,035 coding sequences, 12 rRNA operons, 45 tRNAs, and 14 predicted pseudogenes. PMID:27516524

  16. Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain PA02 Isolated from an Ovine Host in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Muge, Gabriel R S; Veras, Adonney A O; de Sá, Pablo H C G; Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Queiroz; Alves, Jorianne Thyeska Castro; Morais, Ezequiel; Silva, André G M; Guimarães, Luís C; Azevedo, Vasco; Folador, Adriana Ribeiro Carneiro; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain PA02 isolated from an ovine host. The genome contains 2,328,435 bp, a 52.2% G+C content, 2,035 coding sequences, 12 rRNA operons, 45 tRNAs, and 14 predicted pseudogenes. PMID:27516524

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans Strain 03-8664 Isolated from a Human Throat.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Luis C; Viana, Marcus V C; Benevides, Leandro J; Mariano, Diego C B; Veras, Adonney A O; Sá, Pablo H C; Rocha, Flávia S; Vilas Boas, Priscilla C B; Soares, Siomar C; Barbosa, Maria S; Guiso, Nicole; Badell, Edgar; Azevedo, Vasco; Ramos, Rommel T J; Silva, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emergent pathogen infecting wild and domesticated animals worldwide that may serve as reservoirs for zoonotic infections. In this study, we present the draft genome of C. ulcerans strain 03-8664. The draft genome has 2,428,683 bp, 2,262 coding sequences, and 12 rRNA genes.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans Strain 03-8664 Isolated from a Human Throat

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Marcus V. C.; Benevides, Leandro J.; Mariano, Diego C. B.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; Sá, Pablo H. C.; Rocha, Flávia S.; Vilas Boas, Priscilla C. B.; Soares, Siomar C.; Barbosa, Maria S.; Guiso, Nicole; Badell, Edgar; Azevedo, Vasco; Ramos, Rommel T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emergent pathogen infecting wild and domesticated animals worldwide that may serve as reservoirs for zoonotic infections. In this study, we present the draft genome of C. ulcerans strain 03-8664. The draft genome has 2,428,683 bp, 2,262 coding sequences, and 12 rRNA genes. PMID:27469956

  19. Lack of effect of immunotherapy with BCG and Corynebacterium parvum on hepatic drug hydroxylation in man.

    PubMed Central

    Wan, H. H.; Thatcher, N.; Mullen, P. W.; Smith, G. N.; Wilkinson, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    Serial serum diphenylhydantoin and urinary 5-(p-hydroxphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin concentrations were determined in 8 patients with malignant disease and 4 healthy volunteers on 2 separate occasions after an oral dose of diphenylhydantoin (500 mg). No significant difference was observed between metabolism before and 10 days after immunization with BCG or Corynebacterium parvum. Volunteers without intervening immunization similarly showed no difference. PMID:444399

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain E19, Isolated from a Horse in Chile.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Q; Dias, Larissa M; Alves, Jorianne T C; Veras, Adonney A O; Guimarães, Luis C; Rocha, Flávia S; Gala-García, Alfonso; Retamal, Patricio; Ramos, Rommel T J; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Carneiro, Adriana R

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is related to several diseases infecting horses and small ruminants, causing economic losses to agribusiness. Here, we present the genome sequence of C. pseudotuberculosis strain E19. The genome includes one circular chromosome 2,367,956 bp (52.1% G+C content), with 2,112 genes predicted, 12 rRNAs, and 48 tRNAs.

  1. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  2. Factors Affecting Isolation and Identification of Haemophilus vaginalis (Corynebacterium vaginale)

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Robert K.; Voss, Jack L.; Smith, Rodney F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of isolation of organisms resembling Haemophilus vaginalis (Corynebacterium vaginale) from vaginal specimens was not significantly affected by anaerobic versus carbon dioxide incubation atmospheres or whether specimens were inoculated on isolation media immediately after collection or after a delay of 6 h. Forty-one clinically isolated strains were provisionally divided into 30 H. vaginalis strains and 11 H. vaginalis-like (HVL) strains based on morphological and growth characteristics. The H. vaginalis strains were less reactive in API-20A identification test strips, (Analytab Products, Inc.) using Lombard-Dowell broth, than in a modified basal medium that contained proteose peptone no. 3 (Difco). The numbers and kinds of substrates fermented by 30 clinical and 2 reference strains of H. vaginalis varied among conventional, API, Minitek (Baltimore Biological Laboratory), and rapid buffered substrate fermentation systems. A greater number and variety of carbohydrates were fermented by the 11 HVL strains more consistently in all four test systems. Analysis of volatile and nonvolatile fermentation end products by gas-liquid chromatography did not reveal significant differences between the H. vaginalis and HVL strains. However, the latter group grew in peptone-yeast extract-glucose broth, whereas the H. vaginalis strains did not grow without the addition of starch to peptone-yeast extract-glucose. All of the reference and clinical strains were similar in their susceptibilities to a variety of antimicrobial compounds except sulfonamides, which inhibited the HVL strains and bifidobacteria but not the H. vaginalis strains. Sulfonamide susceptibility or resistance corresponded in part to the H. vaginalis and HVL-bifidobacteria strain reactions on selected conventional fermentation substrates. Susceptibility or resistance to sulfonamides and metronidazole in conjunction with fermentation tests is described to aid in the separation of H. vaginalis from other

  3. Factors affecting isolation and identification of Haemophilus vaginalis (Corynebacterium vaginale).

    PubMed

    Bailey, R K; Voss, J L; Smith, R F

    1979-01-01

    The rate of isolation of organisms resembling Haemophilus vaginalis (Corynebacterium vaginale) from vaginal specimens was not significantly affected by anaerobic versus carbon dioxide incubation atmospheres or whether specimens were inoculated on isolation media immediately after collection or after a delay of 6 h. Forty-one clinically isolated strains were provisionally divided into 30 H. vaginalis strains and 11 H. vaginalis-like (HVL) strains based on morphological and growth characteristics. The H. vaginalis strains were less reactive in API-20A identification test strips, (Analytab Products, Inc.) using Lombard-Dowell broth, than in a modified basal medium that contained proteose peptone no. 3 (Difco). The numbers and kinds of substrates fermented by 30 clinical and 2 reference strains of H. vaginalis varied among conventional, API, Minitek (Baltimore Biological Laboratory), and rapid buffered substrate fermentation systems. A greater number and variety of carbohydrates were fermented by the 11 HVL strains more consistently in all four test systems. Analysis of volatile and nonvolatile fermentation end products by gas-liquid chromatography did not reveal significant differences between the H. vaginalis and HVL strains. However, the latter group grew in peptone-yeast extract-glucose broth, whereas the H. vaginalis strains did not grow without the addition of starch to peptone-yeast extract-glucose. All of the reference and clinical strains were similar in their susceptibilities to a variety of antimicrobial compounds except sulfonamides, which inhibited the HVL strains and bifidobacteria but not the H. vaginalis strains. Sulfonamide susceptibility or resistance corresponded in part to the H. vaginalis and HVL-bifidobacteria strain reactions on selected conventional fermentation substrates. Susceptibility or resistance to sulfonamides and metronidazole in conjunction with fermentation tests is described to aid in the separation of H. vaginalis from other

  4. Taxonomic characterization of nine strains isolated from clinical and environmental specimens, and proposal of Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Feurer, Carole; Clermont, Dominique; Bimet, François; Candréa, Adina; Jackson, Mary; Glaser, Philippe; Bizet, Chantal; Dauga, Catherine

    2004-07-01

    Nine unidentified Gram-positive, lipophilic corynebacteria were isolated from clinical and food samples and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic analysis. The bacteria were distinguished from Corynebacterium species with validly published names by biochemical tests, fatty acid content and whole-cell protein analysis. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis demonstrated unambiguously that the nine strains were related phylogenetically to the species 'Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum' and represented a distinct subline within the genus Corynebacterium. On the basis of both phenotypic and phylogenetic evidence, the formal description of Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of C. tuberculostearicum is Medalle XT (=LDC-20T=CIP 107291T=CCUG 45418T=ATCC 35529T).

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain PA01, Isolated from Sheep in Pará, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Jorianne T. C.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Q.; de Sá, Pablo H. C. G.; Dias, Larissa M.; Guimarães, Luis C.; Morais, Ezequiel; Silva, André G. M.; Azevedo, Vasco; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Silva, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the etiological agent of caseous lymphadenitis disease. In this work, we present the first complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain PA01, isolated in northern Brazil from an infected sheep. The genome length is 2,337,920 bp, and 2,003 coding sequences (CDS), 12 rRNAs, and 49 tRNAs were predicted. PMID:26823595

  6. Identification of Non-diphtheriae Corynebacterium by Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Alatoom, Adnan A.; Cazanave, Charles J.; Cunningham, Scott A.; Ihde, Sherry M.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry for identification of 92 clinical isolates of Corynebacterium species in comparison to identification using rpoB or 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Eighty isolates (87%) yielded a score of ≥1.700, and all of these were correctly identified to the species level with the exception of Corynebacterium aurimucosum being misidentified as the closely related Corynebacterium minutissimum. PMID:22075579

  7. Exudative pharyngitis possibly due to Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum, a new challenge in the differential diagnosis of diphtheria.

    PubMed Central

    Izurieta, H. S.; Strebel, P. M.; Youngblood, T.; Hollis, D. G.; Popovic, T.

    1997-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum has rarely been reported to cause disease in humans, despite its common presence in the flora of the upper respiratory tract. We report here a case of exudative pharyngitis with pseudomembrane possibly caused by C. pseudodiphtheriticum in a 4-year-old girl. The case initially triggered clinical and laboratory suspicion of diphtheria. Because C. pseudodiphtheriticum can be easily confused with Corynebacterium diphtheriae in Gram stain, clarification of its role in the pathogenesis of exudative pharyngitis in otherwise healthy persons is of public health importance. Simple and rapid screening tests to differentiate C. pseudodiphtheriticum from C. diphtheriae should be performed to prevent unnecessary concern in the community and unnecessary outbreak control measures. PMID:9126447

  8. Metabolism of tetralin (1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene) in Corynebacterium sp. strain C125.

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, J; de Bont, J A

    1993-01-01

    Corynebacterium sp. strain C125, originally isolated on o-xylene, was selected for its ability to grow on tetralin (1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene) as the sole source of carbon and energy. The catabolism of tetralin in Corynebacterium sp. strain C125 was shown to proceed via initial hydroxylation of the benzene nucleus at positions C-5 and C-6, resulting in the formation of the corresponding cis-dihydro diol. Subsequently, the dihydro diol was dehydrogenated by a NAD-dependent dehydrogenase to 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,2-naphthalene diol. The aromatic ring was cleaved in the extradiol position by a catechol-2,3-dioxygenase. The ring fission product was subject to a hydrolytic attack, resulting in the formation of a carboxylic acid-substituted cyclohexanone. This is the first report of the catabolism of tetralin via degradation of the aromatic moiety. PMID:8434923

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the Attenuated Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain T1.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sintia; Loureiro, Dan; Portela, Ricardo W; Mariano, Diego C B; Sousa, Thiago J; Pereira, Felipe L; Dorella, Fernanda A; Carvalho, Alex F; Moura-Costa, Lilia F; Leal, Carlos A G; Figueiredo, Henrique C; Meyer, Roberto; Azevedo, Vasco

    2016-01-01

    We present here the genome sequence of the attenuated Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain T1. The sequencing was performed with an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine platform. The genome is a circular chromosome of 2,337,201 bp, with a G+C content of 52.85% and a total of 2,125 coding sequences (CDSs), 12 rRNAs, 49 tRNAs, and 24 pseudogenes. PMID:27609922

  10. Corynebacterium faecale sp. nov., isolated from the faeces of Assamese macaque.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu; Li, Gui-Ding; Li, Qin-Yuan; Hu, Cai-Juan; Liu, Cheng-Bin; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Cheng-Lin; Han, Li; Huang, Xue-Shi

    2016-07-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, facultatively anaerobic, short rod-shaped, oxidase-negative and non-motile novel strain, designated YIM 101505T, was isolated from the faeces of a primate, Assamese macaque, and was studied to determine its taxonomic position. The cell wall contained meso-diaminopimelic acid and short-chain mycolic acids. Whole cell sugars were mannose, galactose and arabinose as major components. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were C18 : 1ω9c, C16 : 0 and C17 : 1ω8c and the major menaquinone was MK-9(H2). The polar lipids included diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside, glycolipid and six unidentified lipids. The new isolate shared most of the typical chemotaxonomic characteristics of members of the genus Corynebacterium. The closest related species was Corynebacterium efficiens based on 16S rRNA gene (98.1 % similarity) and partial rpoB gene (91.4 % similarity) sequences. Similarities with other species of this genus were below 97 % based on the 16S rRNA gene. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between YIM 101505T and C. efficiens DSM 44549T was 47.7±3.6 %. Moreover, the physiological and biochemical characteristics of YIM 101505T and C. efficiens DSM 44549T were different. Thus, strain YIM 101505T is considered to represent a novel member of the genus Corynebacterium, for which the name Corynebacterium faecale sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIM 101505T (=DSM 45971T=CCTCC AB 2013226T). PMID:27073837

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain E19, Isolated from a Horse in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Q.; Dias, Larissa M.; Alves, Jorianne T. C.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; Guimarães, Luis C.; Rocha, Flávia S.; Gala-García, Alfonso; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is related to several diseases infecting horses and small ruminants, causing economic losses to agribusiness. Here, we present the genome sequence of C. pseudotuberculosis strain E19. The genome includes one circular chromosome 2,367,956 bp (52.1% G+C content), with 2,112 genes predicted, 12 rRNAs, and 48 tRNAs. PMID:26607893

  12. Topically applied antibiotics in acne vulgaris: clinical response and suppression of Corynebacterium acnes in open comedones.

    PubMed

    Resh, W; Stoughton, R B

    1976-02-01

    Topical antibiotics were used on patients with acne vulgaris. Corynebacterium acnes organisms from open comedones were quantitated during treatment, and the progress of the disease was evaluated. Clindamycin lotion completely suppressed the growth of C acnes organisms, whereas erythromycin and tetracycline did not depress the C acnes counts. Taken as a group, these antibiotics gave a substantial improvement of the disease on the treated side as compared with paired untreated sides of the face and back.

  13. Corynebacterium faecale sp. nov., isolated from the faeces of Assamese macaque.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu; Li, Gui-Ding; Li, Qin-Yuan; Hu, Cai-Juan; Liu, Cheng-Bin; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Cheng-Lin; Han, Li; Huang, Xue-Shi

    2016-07-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, facultatively anaerobic, short rod-shaped, oxidase-negative and non-motile novel strain, designated YIM 101505T, was isolated from the faeces of a primate, Assamese macaque, and was studied to determine its taxonomic position. The cell wall contained meso-diaminopimelic acid and short-chain mycolic acids. Whole cell sugars were mannose, galactose and arabinose as major components. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were C18 : 1ω9c, C16 : 0 and C17 : 1ω8c and the major menaquinone was MK-9(H2). The polar lipids included diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside, glycolipid and six unidentified lipids. The new isolate shared most of the typical chemotaxonomic characteristics of members of the genus Corynebacterium. The closest related species was Corynebacterium efficiens based on 16S rRNA gene (98.1 % similarity) and partial rpoB gene (91.4 % similarity) sequences. Similarities with other species of this genus were below 97 % based on the 16S rRNA gene. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between YIM 101505T and C. efficiens DSM 44549T was 47.7±3.6 %. Moreover, the physiological and biochemical characteristics of YIM 101505T and C. efficiens DSM 44549T were different. Thus, strain YIM 101505T is considered to represent a novel member of the genus Corynebacterium, for which the name Corynebacterium faecale sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIM 101505T (=DSM 45971T=CCTCC AB 2013226T).

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Cp31, Isolated from an Egyptian Buffalo

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Ribeiro Carneiro, Adriana; Cybelle Pinto, Anne; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Rodrigues Santos, Anderson; Silva Almeida, Sintia; Guimarães, Luis Carlos; Figueira Aburjaile, Flávia; Vieira Barbosa, Eudes Guilherme; Alves Dorella, Fernanda; Souza Rocha, Flávia; Souza Lopes, Thiago; Kawasaki, Regiane; Gomes Sá, Pablo; da Rocha Coimbra, Nilson Antônio; Teixeira Cerdeira, Louise; Silvanira Barbosa, Maria; Cruz Schneider, Maria Paula; Miyoshi, Anderson; Selim, Salah Abdel Karim; Moawad, Mohamed Salah; Azevedo, Vasco

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is of major veterinary importance because it affects many animal species, causing economically significant livestock diseases and losses. Therefore, the genomic sequencing of various lines of this organism, isolated from different hosts, will aid in the development of diagnostic methods and new prevention and treatment strategies and improve our knowledge of the biology of this microorganism. In this study, we present the genome of C. pseudotuberculosis Cp31, isolated from a buffalo in Egypt. PMID:23144408

  15. Whole-Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis 262 Biovar equi Isolated from Cow Milk

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Carlos Leonardo de A.; Dias, Larissa M.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; Alves, Jorianne T. C.; Cavalcante, Ana Lídia Q.; Dowson, Christopher G.; Azevedo, Vasco; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Silva, Artur

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis 262, isolated from a bovine host. C. pseudotuberculosis is an etiological agent of diseases with medical and veterinary relevance. The genome contains 2,325,749 bp, 52.8% G+C content, 2,022 coding sequences (CDS), 50 pseudogenes, 48 tRNAs, and 12 rRNAs. PMID:27013052

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Attenuated Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain T1

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Sintia; Loureiro, Dan; Mariano, Diego C. B.; Sousa, Thiago J.; Pereira, Felipe L.; Dorella, Fernanda A.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Moura-Costa, Lilia F.; Leal, Carlos A. G.; Figueiredo, Henrique C.; Meyer, Roberto; Azevedo, Vasco

    2016-01-01

    We present here the genome sequence of the attenuated Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain T1. The sequencing was performed with an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine platform. The genome is a circular chromosome of 2,337,201 bp, with a G+C content of 52.85% and a total of 2,125 coding sequences (CDSs), 12 rRNAs, 49 tRNAs, and 24 pseudogenes. PMID:27609922

  17. DNA methylation in leprosy-associated bacteria: Mycobacterium leprae and Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum.

    PubMed

    Hottat, F; Coene, M; Cocito, C

    1988-01-01

    The DNAs of two kinds of microorganisms from human leprosy lesion, Mycobacterium leprae and Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum (also known as "leprosy-derived corynebacterium" or LDC), have been analysed and compared with the genomes of reference bacteria of the CMN group (genera Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium and Nocardia). The guanine-plus-cytosine content (% GC) of DNA was determined by a double-labelling procedure, which is unaffected by the presence of modified and unusual bases (that alter both buoyant density and mid-melting-point determinations). Accordingly, the DNAs of seven LDC strains had GC values of 54-56 mol %, and that of armadillo-grown M. leprae a value of 54.8 +/- 0.9 mol %. Restriction patterns disclosed no methylated cytosine in the DNA sequences CCGG, GGCC, AGCT and GATC of either LDC or M. leprae DNA. N6-methyl adenine was present in the sequence GATC of all LDC strains, but was missing from the genomes of all others CMN organisms analysed, including M. leprae. By HPLC analysis of LDC-DNA hydrolysates, it was found that N6-methyladenine amounted to 1.8% of total DNA adenine, and was present exclusively within GATC sequences, which appeared all to be methylated. It is concluded that LDC represent a group of corynebacteria endowed with high genetic homogeneity and a unique restriction pattern, whereby their genome is easily distinguished from that of M. leprae, which has a similar base composition.

  18. [Corynebacterium group D2. Clinical study, biochemical identification and antibiotic sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Marty, N; Clave, D; Cancet, B; Henry-Ferry, S; Didier, J

    1988-05-01

    The comparative study of 44 isolates of Corynebacterium group D2, from urine, most frequently, shows the pathogenic role of these bacteria in urinary tract infection, with or without urinary stones. These microorganisms have an opportunistic behaviour in other non-urinary sites, and become pathogen in immunosuppressed conditions. The rapid tests as urease, glucose acidification, nitrate reductase, associated with multiple resistance to antibiotics (beta-lactams and aminosides) identify easily Corynebacterium group D2, from 48 h cultures under CO2 conditions. The results of MIC determination of 10 antibiotics, show the high activity (100% sensitivity) of vancomycin and pristinamycin, with MIC modes, respectively, 0.5 and 0.03 mg/l. These antibiotics are the most useful for the treatment of non-urinary infections. Among quinolones, the most active agents are ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin (MIC modes: 4 and 2 mg/l), so these antimicrobials could be used for the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by Corynebacterium group D2.

  19. Interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Corynebacterium spp. with non-phagocytic brain microvascular endothelial cells and phagocytic Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Lakhundi, Sahreena; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that Acanthamoeba interact with bacteria, which may aid in pathogenic bacterial transmission to susceptible hosts, and these interactions may have influenced evolution of bacterial pathogenicity. In this study, we tested if Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive Corynebacterium spp. can associate/invade and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites and cysts, as well as non-phagocytic human brain microvascular endothelial cells. The results revealed that both Corynebacterium spp. and P. aeruginosa were able to associate as well as invade and/or taken up by the phagocytic A. castellanii trophozoite. In contrast, P. aeruginosa exhibited higher association as well as invasion of non-phagocytic HBMEC compared with Corynebacterium spp. Notably, P. aeruginosa remained viable during the encystment process and exhibited higher levels of recovery from mature cysts (74.54 bacteria per amoebae) compared with Corynebacterium spp. (2.69 bacteria per amoeba) (P < 0.05). As Acanthamoeba cysts can be airborne, these findings suggest that Acanthamoeba is a potential vector in the transmission of P. aeruginosa to susceptible hosts. When bacterial-ridden amoebae were exposed to favourable (nutrient-rich) conditions, A. castellanii emerged as vegetative trophozoites and remained viable, and likewise viable P. aeruginosa were also observed but rarely any Corynebacterium spp. were observed. Correspondingly, P. aeruginosa but not Corynebacterium spp. exhibited higher cytotoxicity to non-phagocytic HBMEC, producing more than 75% cell death in 24 h, compared to 20% cell death observed with Corynebacterium spp. Additionally, it was observed that the bacterial conditioned medium had no negative effect on A. castellanii growth. Further characterization of amoebal and bacterial interactions will assist in identifying the role of Acanthamoeba in the transmission and evolution of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25792227

  20. Differential induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha in ovine pulmonary alveolar macrophages following infection with Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, Pasteurella haemolytica, or lentiviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J A; Lairmore, M D; O'Toole, D T; Campos, M

    1991-01-01

    Soluble mediators such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) may be important in the pathogenesis of many chronic pulmonary infections. We examined the ability of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, Pasteurella haemolytica, and ovine lentiviruses (OvLV) to induce TNF-alpha secretion by pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM). Bronchoalveolar lavage cells, composed of greater than 90% PAM, were obtained from normal sheep. Bronchoalveolar lavage cells were cultured for 2, 24, 48, 72, or 168 h in endotoxin-free RPMI medium (with 10% autologous serum) or in medium containing one of the following additives: lipopolysaccharide, 1-micron polystyrene beads, C. pseudotuberculosis, P. haemolytica, or one of two plaque-cloned OvLV, 85/28 or 85/34. Lipopolysaccharide, C. pseudotuberculosis, and P. haemolytica induced TNF-alpha activity in PAM cultures as early as 2 h after inoculation, as assessed by a colorimetric cytotoxicity assay. This activity could be blocked by rabbit anti-recombinant bovine TNF-alpha serum. In contrast, medium alone, polystyrene beads, and productive infection by OvLV did not induce TNF-alpha activity in PAM cultures. Bacterial pathogens which infect pulmonary macrophages may elicit the secretion of TNF-alpha within the lungs and lead to the cachectic state associated with chronic pneumonia. Images PMID:1652561

  1. B7-1/CD80-transduced tumor cells elicit better systemic immunity than wild-type tumor cells admixed with Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; McGowan, P; Ashe, S; Johnston, J V; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E

    1994-10-15

    Tumor cells genetically modified by transduction of B7 (B7-1/CD80), a natural ligand for the T-cell costimulatory molecules CD28 and CTLA-4, can elicit potent tumor immunity, and they can be effective for treatment of established cancers in animal models. In this study, three tumor lines, the EL4 lymphoma, the P815 mastocytoma, and the MCA102 sarcoma were transduced with recombinant retrovirus containing the murine B7 gene, and their potency to induce systemic immunity protective against challenge with wild-type tumor was compared to that of the same tumor cells admixed with the commonly used adjuvant Corynebacterium parvum. While admixture of tumor cells with C. parvum resulted in complete regression of tumors in syngeneic mice, it did not induce protective immunity against a subsequent challenge of wild-type cells from any of the 3 tumors tested. In contrast, B7-transduced EL4 and P815 tumors regressed locally and induced a potent systemic immunity to wild-type tumors and a higher level of cytotoxic T-cell activity than did tumor cells admixed with C. parvum. No systemic immunity was induced by B7-transduced nonimmunogenic MCA102 sarcoma cells. Our results demonstrate that immunogenic tumor cells transduced with the B7 gene are superior to tumor cells mixed with C. parvum for the induction of systemic tumor immunity. PMID:7522958

  2. Detection of Corynebacterium bovis infection in athymic nude mice from a research animal facility in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Kim, Dong-Su; Han, Ju-Hee; Chang, Seo-Na; Kim, Kyung-Sul; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Kim, Dong-Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Jae-Hak

    2014-12-01

    Corynebacterium (C.) bovis infection in nude mice causes hyperkeratosis and weight loss and has been reported worldwide but not in Korea. In 2011, nude mice from an animal facility in Korea were found to have white flakes on their dorsal skin. Histopathological testing revealed that the mice had hyperkeratosis and Gram-positive bacteria were found in the skin. We identified isolated bacteria from the skin lesions as C. bovis using PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. bovis infection in nude mice from Korea.

  3. Metabolism of tetralin (1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene) in Corynebacterium sp. strain C125

    SciTech Connect

    Sikkema, J.; Bont, J.A.M. de )

    1993-02-01

    Tetralin, widely used as a solvent in the petrochemical industry and in paints and waxes, degrades slowly in mixed cultures of microorganisms or in the presence of cosubstrates. This study reports on the metabolism of tetralin in the o-xylene-isolated Corynebacterium sp. strain C125. The researchers found that this organism attacks tetralin by an initial oxidation of the aromatic nucleus at positions C-5 and C-6 and they propose a four step inducible degradation pathway for tetralin starting at that point. The presence of the pathway makes this bacteria an excellent catalyst for the specific production of special cis-dihydro diols.

  4. Growth characteristics of Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium, Microbacterium, and Staphylococcus spp. isolated from surface-ripened cheese.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Jérôme; Rea, Mary C; O'Connor, Paula M; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Cogan, Timothy M

    2007-12-01

    The growth characteristics of five bacteria, Brevibacterium aurantiacum 1-16-58, Corynebacterium casei DPC 5298(T), Corynebacterium variabile DPC 5310, Microbacterium gubbeenense DPC 5286(T), and Staphylococcus saprophyticus 4E61, all of which were isolated from the surface of smear cheese, were studied in complex and chemically defined media. All of the coryneforms, except M. gubbeenense, grew in 12% salt, while B. aurantiacum and S. saprophyticus grew in 15% salt. All five bacteria assimilated lactate in a semisynthetic medium, and none of the coryneform bacteria assimilated lactose. Glucose assimilation was poor, except by S. saprophyticus and C. casei. Five to seven amino acids were assimilated by the coryneforms and 12 by S. saprophyticus. Glutamate, phenylalanine, and proline were utilized by all five bacteria, whereas utilization of serine, threonine, aspartate, histidine, alanine, arginine, leucine, isoleucine, and glycine depended on the organism. Growth of C. casei restarted after addition of glutamate, proline, serine, and lactate at the end of the exponential phase, indicating that these amino acids and lactate can be used as energy sources. Pantothenic acid was essential for the growth of C. casei and M. gubbeenense. Omission of biotin reduced the growth of B. aurantiacum, C. casei, and M. gubbeenense. All of the bacteria contained lactate dehydrogenase activity (with both pyruvate and lactate as substrates) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase activity but not urease activity.

  5. Evaluation of the rapid CORYNE identification system for Corynebacterium species and other coryneforms.

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, S E; Leonard, R B; Briselden, A M; Coyle, M B

    1992-01-01

    The Rapid CORYNE system for identification of aerobic, nonsporeforming, gram-positive rods was evaluated according to the manufacturer's instructions with 177 organisms. After inoculation with a heavy suspension of growth, strips containing 20 cupules were incubated for 24 h, reagents were added, and the results of 21 biochemical reactions were recorded as numerical profiles. The strains consisted of pathogenic species of the genus Corynebacterium, primarily C. diphtheriae (n = 29), opportunistic species of Corynebacterium including C. jeikeium (n = 75), recognized species of non-corynebacteria such as Gardnerella and Arcanobacterium (n = 51), and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) coryneform groups (n = 22). Results from single tests read after 24 h yielded correct identifications to species level with no additional tests for 26 (89.7%) of the pathogenic species; 64 (85.3%) of the opportunistic organisms; 51 (100%) of the non-corynebacteria, and 8 (36.4%) of the CDC coryneform groups. Supplemental tests produced the correct identification for three additional pathogenic isolates (100% total) and four additional isolates from the opportunistic species (90.6% total). Twelve of the 15 isolates not identified by the system were in the CDC coryneform groups. Four of the six misidentified and one of the unidentified isolates were C. matruchotii, which was not included in the data base. The system is an excellent rapid alternative to conventional biochemical tests. PMID:1629322

  6. Tips and tricks for the assembly of a Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis genome using a semiconductor sequencer

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Soares, Siomar de Castro; dos Santos, Anderson Rodrigues; Almeida, Sintia; Guimarães, Luis; Figueira, Flávia; Barbosa, Eudes; Tauch, Andreas; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2013-01-01

    New sequencing platforms have enabled rapid decoding of complete prokaryotic genomes at relatively low cost. The Ion Torrent platform is an example of these technologies, characterized by lower coverage, generating challenges for the genome assembly. One particular problem is the lack of genomes that enable reference-based assembly, such as the one used in the present study, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis biovar equi, which causes high economic losses in the US equine industry. The quality treatment strategy incorporated into the assembly pipeline enabled a 16-fold greater use of the sequencing data obtained compared with traditional quality filter approaches. Data preprocessing prior to the de novo assembly enabled the use of known methodologies in the next-generation sequencing data assembly. Moreover, manual curation was proved to be essential for ensuring a quality assembly, which was validated by comparative genomics with other species of the genus Corynebacterium. The present study presents a modus operandi that enables a greater and better use of data obtained from semiconductor sequencing for obtaining the complete genome from a prokaryotic microorganism, C. pseudotuberculosis, which is not a traditional biological model such as Escherichia coli. PMID:23199210

  7. Desulfurization of dibenzothiophene by a newly isolated Corynebacterium sp. ZD-1 in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao-Dong; Li, Wei; Wang, Da-Hui; Shi, Yao

    2004-01-01

    Sulfur emission through fuel combustion is a global problem because it is a major cause of acid rain. Crud oil contains many heterocyclic organic sulfur compounds, among which dibenzothiophene (DBT) and DBTs bearing alkyl substitutions usually are representative compounds. A strain was isolated from refinery sludge and identified as Corynebacterium ZD-1. The behavior of DBT degradation by ZD-1 in aqueous phase was investigated. Corynebacterium ZD-1 could metabolize DBT to 2-hydroxybiphenyl(2-HBP) as the dead-end metabolite through a sulfur-specific pathway. In shake flask culture, ZD-1 had its maximal desulfurization activity in the late exponential growth phase and the specific production rate of 2-HBP was about 0.14 (mmol x kg dry cell(-1) x min(-1), mmol x KDC(-1) x min(-1)). Active resting cells for desulfurization should be prepared only in this period. 2-HBP inhibited the growth of strain ZD-1, the production of DBT degradation enzymes, and the activity of enzymes. Sulfate inhibited the production of dibenzothiophene (DBT) degradation enzymes but had no effect on the enzymes' activity. The production rates of 2-HBP at lower cell densities were higher and the maximum amount conversion of DBT to 2-HBP (0.067 mmol/L) after 8 h was gained at 9.2 g dry cell/L rather higher cell density. The results indicated that this newly isolated strain could be a promising biocatalyst for DBT desulfurization.

  8. Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans isolated from a hunting dog and its diphtheria toxin antibody titer.

    PubMed

    Katsukawa, Chihiro; Komiya, Takako; Umeda, Kaoru; Goto, Minami; Yanai, Tokuma; Takahashi, Motohide; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Iwaki, Masaaki

    2016-03-01

    Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans is a zoonotic pathogen that produces diphtheria toxin and causes a diphtheria-like illness in humans. The organism is known to infect and circulate among dogs, which can then transmit it to humans. Furthermore, previous studies have found that C. ulcerans is carried by wild animals, including game animals. In the present study, we tested hunting and companion dogs for the presence of toxigenic C. ulcerans and succeeded in isolating the bacterium from a hunting dog. Moreover, several hunting dogs had serum diphtheria antitoxin titers that were higher than the titers required for protection in humans, suggesting a history of exposure to toxigenic Corynebacterium strains. Notably, ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and tox gene sequencing demonstrated that the isolate from the hunting dog clustered with previously characterized C. ulcerans strains isolated from wild animals, as opposed to groups of isolates from humans and companion dogs. Interestingly, the wild animal cluster also contains an isolate from an outdoor breeding dog, which could have formed a bridge between isolates from wild animals and those from companion dogs. The results presented herein provide insight into the mechanism by which the zoonotic pathogen C. ulcerans circulates among wild animals, hunting and companion dogs, and humans. PMID:26853714

  9. Corynebacterium uropygiale sp. nov., isolated from the preen gland of Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Braun, Markus Santhosh; Zimmermann, Stefan; Danner, Maria; Rashid, Harun-or; Wink, Michael

    2016-03-01

    A novel species of fastidious, lipophilic, club-shaped, Gram-positive bacteria was recovered from the preen glands of healthy Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from two different locations. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed highest similarity to Corynebacterium spheniscorum DSM 44757(T) (96.8%) with a 3.2kb stretch of rpoB sharing 82.4% sequence similarity to the same species. DNA fingerprinting by ERIC-PCR and polar lipid profiles clearly differentiated the Turkey isolates from the most closely related Corynebacteria, as did MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Chemotaxonomic tests revealed the presence of corynemycolic acids with C16:0, C18:0, C18:1ω9c and tuberculostearic acid as the major cellular fatty acids. The G+C content of the type strain was 60.7 mol%. The species was susceptible to ampicillin, kanamycin A, streptomycin, amikacin, polymyxin B and vancomycin. From our results, it becomes evident that the isolated organisms represent a new species, for which the name Corynebacterium uropygiale sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Iso10(T) (=DSM 46817(T)=LMG 28616(T)).

  10. Corynebacterium accolens Releases Antipneumococcal Free Fatty Acids from Human Nostril and Skin Surface Triacylglycerols

    PubMed Central

    Bomar, Lindsey; Brugger, Silvio D.; Yost, Brian H.; Davies, Sean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial interspecies interactions play clinically important roles in shaping microbial community composition. We observed that Corynebacterium spp. are overrepresented in children free of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), a common pediatric nasal colonizer and an important infectious agent. Corynebacterium accolens, a benign lipid-requiring species, inhibits pneumococcal growth during in vitro cocultivation on medium supplemented with human skin surface triacylglycerols (TAGs) that are likely present in the nostrils. This inhibition depends on LipS1, a TAG lipase necessary for C. accolens growth on TAGs such as triolein. We determined that C. accolens hydrolysis of triolein releases oleic acid, which inhibits pneumococcus, as do other free fatty acids (FFAs) that might be released by LipS1 from human skin surface TAGs. Our results support a model in which C. accolens hydrolyzes skin surface TAGS in vivo releasing antipneumococcal FFAs. These data indicate that C. accolens may play a beneficial role in sculpting the human microbiome. PMID:26733066

  11. Growth Characteristics of Brevibacterium, Corynebacterium, Microbacterium, and Staphylococcus spp. Isolated from Surface-Ripened Cheese▿

    PubMed Central

    Mounier, Jérôme; Rea, Mary C.; O'Connor, Paula M.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Cogan, Timothy M.

    2007-01-01

    The growth characteristics of five bacteria, Brevibacterium aurantiacum 1-16-58, Corynebacterium casei DPC 5298T, Corynebacterium variabile DPC 5310, Microbacterium gubbeenense DPC 5286T, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus 4E61, all of which were isolated from the surface of smear cheese, were studied in complex and chemically defined media. All of the coryneforms, except M. gubbeenense, grew in 12% salt, while B. aurantiacum and S. saprophyticus grew in 15% salt. All five bacteria assimilated lactate in a semisynthetic medium, and none of the coryneform bacteria assimilated lactose. Glucose assimilation was poor, except by S. saprophyticus and C. casei. Five to seven amino acids were assimilated by the coryneforms and 12 by S. saprophyticus. Glutamate, phenylalanine, and proline were utilized by all five bacteria, whereas utilization of serine, threonine, aspartate, histidine, alanine, arginine, leucine, isoleucine, and glycine depended on the organism. Growth of C. casei restarted after addition of glutamate, proline, serine, and lactate at the end of the exponential phase, indicating that these amino acids and lactate can be used as energy sources. Pantothenic acid was essential for the growth of C. casei and M. gubbeenense. Omission of biotin reduced the growth of B. aurantiacum, C. casei, and M. gubbeenense. All of the bacteria contained lactate dehydrogenase activity (with both pyruvate and lactate as substrates) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase activity but not urease activity. PMID:17921266

  12. Corynebacterium uropygiale sp. nov., isolated from the preen gland of Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Braun, Markus Santhosh; Zimmermann, Stefan; Danner, Maria; Rashid, Harun-or; Wink, Michael

    2016-03-01

    A novel species of fastidious, lipophilic, club-shaped, Gram-positive bacteria was recovered from the preen glands of healthy Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from two different locations. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed highest similarity to Corynebacterium spheniscorum DSM 44757(T) (96.8%) with a 3.2kb stretch of rpoB sharing 82.4% sequence similarity to the same species. DNA fingerprinting by ERIC-PCR and polar lipid profiles clearly differentiated the Turkey isolates from the most closely related Corynebacteria, as did MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Chemotaxonomic tests revealed the presence of corynemycolic acids with C16:0, C18:0, C18:1ω9c and tuberculostearic acid as the major cellular fatty acids. The G+C content of the type strain was 60.7 mol%. The species was susceptible to ampicillin, kanamycin A, streptomycin, amikacin, polymyxin B and vancomycin. From our results, it becomes evident that the isolated organisms represent a new species, for which the name Corynebacterium uropygiale sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Iso10(T) (=DSM 46817(T)=LMG 28616(T)). PMID:26776107

  13. Corynebacterium equi Infections in Horses, 1958-1984: A Review of 131 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zink, M. Christine; Yager, Julie A.; Smart, Nonie L.

    1986-01-01

    Of 131 cases of Corynebacterium equi infection in horses submitted for necropsy to the Ontario Veterinary College or Veterinary Laboratory Services, OMAF, Guelph, Ontario from 1958 to 1984, 115 were diagnosed as suppurative pneumonia, and of these 55 had associated ulcerative enterocolitis. Only five animals had intestinal involvement without pulmonary lesions. The remaining 11 cases included arthritis/cellulitis, skin abscesses and submandibular lymphadenitis. While the lung, intestine and associated lymph nodes yielded C. equi most frequently, in 21% of cases C. equi was also cultured from parenchymatous organs (spleen, liver or kidney) or blood. Corynebacterium equi infection accounted for 10% of all foals submitted for postmortem examination and 45% of all foals with pneumonia. Affected foals were one to four months of age. Submissions occurred between the months of May and August with a peak during July. There was a significantly greater prevalence of C. equi infection in Standardbreds when compared with other breeds. Of foals in this study, 36% were from farms which had had other horses succumb to this disease. Of the foals with pulmonary involvement, 21% did not have fever or clinical signs referable to the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems, findings which indicated that a large percentage of cases were subclinical. PMID:17422658

  14. Non-cell Corynebacterium parvum generated by nanotechnology: a promising immunomodulator with less side effects.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shangxian; Liu, Chenghu; Qu, Shoufang; Song, Jing; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Pin; Wang, Qun; Guo, Chun; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Lining

    2007-10-01

    Corynebacterium parvum (CP), a kind of immunomodulator, has been well documented in immunotherapy to tumor. However, severe side effects, such as intrahepatic granulomas and scleromas in injected areas, restrict its clinical application. To minimize side effects of CP, a non-cell Corynebacterium parvum product (NCPP) was prepared by disposing CP with Nanotechnology. In present study, we compared effect of NCPP with that of CP and found: (1) NCPP with non-formaldehyde residue was easy to be absorbed without swelling and scleroma in local injected areas; (2) NCPP caused no obvious liver injury in murine and macaques; (3) NCPP maintained powerful anti-tumor activity, increased splenic index, elevated macrophage number, phagocytosis and production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and nitric oxide (NO); (4) Importantly, unparallel CP, NCPP could stimulate macrophages to produce low level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-alpha) but high level of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), an inhibitor to fibrosis. Our study has led to the view that NCPP will evolve into a new valuable immunomodulator for clinical application. PMID:17673148

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium ulcerans FRC58, Isolated from the Bronchitic Aspiration of a Patient in France

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andréia do Socorro de Sousa; Baraúna, Rafael Azevedo; de Sá, Pablo Caracciolo Gomes; das Graças, Diego Assis; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Thouvenin, Maxime; Azevedo, Vasco; Badell, Edgar; Guiso, Nicole; da Silva, Artur Luiz da Costa

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is a bacterial species with high importance because it causes infections in animals and, rarely, in humans. Its virulence mechanisms remain unclear. The current study describes the draft genome of C. ulcerans FRC58, which was isolated from the bronchitic aspiration of a patient in France. PMID:24407640

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium variabile Mu292, Isolated from Munster, a French Smear-Ripened Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Sarthou, Anne-Sophie; Loux, Valentin; Vidal, Marie; Bonnarme, Pascal; Irlinger, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Corynebacterium variabile Mu292, which was originally isolated from the surface of Munster, a French smear-ripened cheese. This genome investigation will improve our knowledge on the molecular determinants potentially involved in the adaptation of this strain during the Munster-type cheese manufacturing process. PMID:27445372

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium camporealensis DSM 44610, Isolated from the Milk of a Manchega Sheep with Subclinical Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Rückert, Christian; Albersmeier, Andreas; Winkler, Anika

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium camporealensis has been isolated in pure culture from milk samples of dairy sheep affected by subclinical mastitis. The complete genome sequence of the type strain DSM 44610, recovered from milk of a Manchega sheep, comprises 2,451,810 bp with a mean G+C content of 59.41% and 2,249 protein-coding genes. PMID:26021938

  18. In Vitro Susceptibility of Equine-Obtained Isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis to Gallium Maltolate and 20 Other Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Batista, M.; Lawhon, S. D.; Zhang, S.; Kuskie, K. R.; Swinford, A. K.; Bernstein, L. R.; Cohen, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of gallium maltolate (GaM) and 20 other antimicrobial agents against clinical equine isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The growth of cultured isolates was not inhibited by any concentration of GaM. MIC data revealed susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials. PMID:24829243

  19. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  20. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Corynebacterium epidermidicanis DSM 45586, Isolated from the Skin of a Dog Suffering from Pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Rückert, Christian; Eimer, Janine; Winkler, Anika

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium epidermidicanis DSM 45586 comprises 2,692,072 bp with 58.06% G+C content. The annotation revealed 2,466 protein-coding regions, including genes for surface-anchored proteins with Cna B-type or bacterial Ig-like domains and for an adhesive SpaABC-type pilus with similarity to fimbrial subunits of Corynebacterium resistens DSM 45100. PMID:26294641

  2. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  3. Eosinophilic Granuloma with Splendore-Hoeppli Material Caused by Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans in a Heifer

    PubMed Central

    MURAKAMI, Kenji; HATA, Eiji; HATAMA, Shinichi; WADA, Yoshihiro; ITO, Mitsuru; ISHIKAWA, Yoshiharu; KADOTA, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Raised lesions were present on the left nasal vestibule of a 20-month-old Japanese Brown heifer. The largest mass which caused partial nasal obstruction was removed surgically. Corynebacterium ulcerans was identified in the mass. 16S ribosomal RNA and RNA polymerase beta subunit genes were 100% and 98% identical to other C. ulcerans strains. Histologically, multiple foci of eosinophilic granuloma with Splendore-Hoeppli material were seen. Rod-shaped Gram-positive organisms were detected with metachromatic granules, producing diphtheria toxin with 5, 30 and 48 amino acid differences to another C. ulcerans strain, C. diphtheriae or C. pseudotuberculosis, respectively. The toxin is highly cytotoxic and may be responsible for the formation of abundant Splendore-Hoeppli material. The lesion was therefore judged to be an allergic reaction to bacterial antigens or diphtheria toxin. PMID:24632861

  4. Expression, purification and characterization of cold shock protein A of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lindae, Antje; Eberle, Raphael J; Caruso, Icaro P; Coronado, Monika A; de Moraes, Fabio R; Azevedo, Vasco; Arni, Raghuvir K

    2015-08-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the causative agent of different diseases that cause dramatically reduced yields of wool and milk, and results in weight loss, carcass condemnation and also death mainly in sheep, equids, cattle and goats and therefore globally results in considerable economical loss. Cold shock proteins are conserved in many bacteria and eukaryotic cells and they help to restore normal cell functions after cold shock in which some appear to have specific functions at normal growth temperature as well. Cold shock protein A from C. pseudotuberculosis was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The thermal unfolding/refolding process characterized by circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy techniques indicated that the refolding process was almost completely reversible.

  5. Characterization of novel plasmid p1B146 from Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum.

    PubMed

    Wieteska, Łukasz; Szewczyk, Eligia M; Szemraj, Janusz

    2011-08-01

    Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum B146, a strain derived from healthy human skin, contains a medium copy plasmid, p1B146. This plasmid was cloned and its complete nucleotide sequence determined. As a result, p1B146 was found to be 4.2 kb in size with a 53% G+C content, plus six open reading frames (ORFs) were distinguished. According to a computer-assisted alignment, two of the ORFs exhibited significant similarities to already-known common plasmid proteins, the first being the RepA gene, responsible for plasmid replication via a rolling-circle mechanism, and the second being an FtsK-like protein, the function of which remains unclear. The presence and quantity of RNA fragments in the putative ORFs were also evaluated.

  6. The Genus Corynebacterium and Other Medically Relevant Coryneform-Like Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Catalase-positive Gram-positive bacilli, commonly called “diphtheroids” or “coryneform” bacteria were historically nearly always dismissed as contaminants when recovered from patients, but increasingly have been implicated as the cause of significant infections. These taxa have been underreported, and the taxa were taxonomically confusing. The mechanisms of pathogenesis, especially for newly described taxa, were rarely studied. Antibiotic susceptibility data were relatively scant. In this minireview, clinical relevance, phenotypic and genetic identification methods, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) evaluations, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing involving species in the genus Corynebacterium and other medically relevant Gram-positive rods, collectively called coryneforms, are described. PMID:22837327

  7. Expression, purification and characterization of cold shock protein A of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lindae, Antje; Eberle, Raphael J; Caruso, Icaro P; Coronado, Monika A; de Moraes, Fabio R; Azevedo, Vasco; Arni, Raghuvir K

    2015-08-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the causative agent of different diseases that cause dramatically reduced yields of wool and milk, and results in weight loss, carcass condemnation and also death mainly in sheep, equids, cattle and goats and therefore globally results in considerable economical loss. Cold shock proteins are conserved in many bacteria and eukaryotic cells and they help to restore normal cell functions after cold shock in which some appear to have specific functions at normal growth temperature as well. Cold shock protein A from C. pseudotuberculosis was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The thermal unfolding/refolding process characterized by circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy techniques indicated that the refolding process was almost completely reversible. PMID:25907380

  8. Effect of inducible thrB expression on amino acid production in Corynebacterium lactofermentum ATCC 21799.

    PubMed Central

    Colón, G E; Jetten, M S; Nguyen, T T; Gubler, M E; Follettie, M T; Sinskey, A J; Stephanopoulos, G

    1995-01-01

    Amplification of the operon homdr-thrB encoding a feedback-insensitive homoserine dehydrogenase and a wild-type homoserine kinase in a Corynebacterium lactofermentum lysine-producing strain resulted in both homoserine and threonine accumulation, with some residual lysine production. A plasmid enabling separate transcriptional control of each gene was constructed to determine the effect of various enzyme activity ratios on metabolite accumulation. By increasing the activity of homoserine kinase relative to homoserine dehydrogenase activity, homoserine accumulation in the medium was essentially eliminated and the final threonine titer was increased by about 120%. Furthermore, a fortuitous result of the cloning strategy was an unexplained increase in homoserine dehydrogenase activity. This resulted in a further decrease in lysine production along with a concomitant increase in threonine accumulation. PMID:7887627

  9. Progression of ‘OMICS’ methodologies for understanding the pathogenicity of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis: the Brazilian experience

    PubMed Central

    Dorella, Fernanda A.; Gala-Garcia, Alfonso; Pinto, Anne C.; Sarrouh, Boutros; Antunes, Camila A.; Ribeiro, Dayana; Aburjaile, Flavia F.; Fiaux, Karina K.; Guimarães, Luis C.; Seyffert, Núbia; El-Aouar, Rachid A.; Silva, Renata; Hassan, Syed S.; Castro, Thiago L. P.; Marques, Wanderson S.; Ramos, Rommel; Carneiro, Adriana; de Sá, Pablo; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2013-01-01

    Since the first successful attempt at sequencing the Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis genome, large amounts of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data have been generated. C. pseudotuberculosis is an interesting bacterium due to its great zoonotic potential and because it causes considerable economic losses worldwide. Furthermore, different strains of C. pseudotuberculosis are capable of causing various diseases in different hosts. Currently, we seek information about the phylogenetic relationships between different strains of C. pseudotuberculosis isolates from different hosts across the world and to employ these data to develop tools to diagnose and eradicate the diseases these strains cause. In this review, we present the latest findings on C. pseudotuberculosis that have been obtained with the most advanced techniques for sequencing and genomic organization. We also discuss the development of in silico tools for processing these data to prompt a better understanding of this pathogen. PMID:24688721

  10. Surface modification of polyacrylonitrile fibre by nitrile hydratase from Corynebacterium nitrilophilus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Gao, Huihui; Chen, Jian; Wu, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Previously, nitrile hydratase (NHase) from Corynebacterium nitrilophilus was obtained and showed potential in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibre modification. In the present study, the modification conditions of C. nitrilophilus NHase on PAN were investigated. In the optimal conditions, the wettability and dyeability (anionic and reactive dyes) of PAN treated by C. nitrilophilus NHase reached a similar level of those treated by alkali. In addition, the chemical composition and microscopically observable were changed in the PAN surface after NHase treatment. Meanwhile, it revealed that cutinase combined with NHase facilitates the PAN hydrolysis slightly because of the ester existed in PAN as co-monomer was hydrolyzed. All these results demonstrated that C. nitrilophilus NHase can modify PAN efficiently without textile structure damage, and this study provides a foundation for the further application of C. nitrilophilus NHase in PAN modification industry. PMID:25163886

  11. Effects of non-specific immunopotentiators in experimental Schistosoma mansoni infection. II. Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, K M; Coutinho, E M; Abath, F G; Montenegro, S M

    1996-01-01

    The effects of Corynebacterium parvum on host protection, tissue reaction and "in vivo" chemotaxis in Schistosoma mansoni infected mice were studied. The C. parvum was given intraperitoneally using a dose of 0.7 mg, twice a week (for 4 weeks), thirty days before (prophylactic treatment) or after infection (curative treatment). The host protection was evaluated through the recovery of adult worms by liver perfusion and was lower in the prophylactic group as compared to the control group (p = 0.018), resulting in 44% protection. The "in vivo" leukocyte response in both prophylactic and curative groups was higher as compared to the infected/non treated group (p = 0.009 and p = 0.003, respectively). Tissue reactions were described in the experimental and control groups, but there were not remarkable differences among them. The possible biological implications and relevance of the findings for the defensive response of the host and control of schistosomiasis are discussed. PMID:9293078

  12. Strain-dependent arthritogenic potential of the zoonotic pathogen Corynebacterium ulcerans.

    PubMed

    Dias, A A S O; Silva, F C; Santos, L S; Ribeiro-Carvalho, M M; Sabbadini, P S; Santos, C S; Filardy, A A; Myioshi, A; Azevedo, V A; Hirata, R; Villas-Bôas, M H S; Mattos-Guaraldi, A L

    2011-12-15

    During the last decade the majority of diphtheria cases in Europe had Corynebacterium ulcerans as the etiologic agent with dogs and cats as the reservoir hosts. However, little has been documented about the virulence factors of this zoonotic pathogen. To set up an in vivo experimental C. ulcerans infection model, conventional Swiss Webster mice were intravenously infected with different doses (from 1 × 10(7) to 5 × 10(9) bacteria per mouse) of C. ulcerans strains, namely 809 (from human lower respiratory tract), BR-AD22 (from asymptomatic dog nares) and CDC-KC279. Mortality rates were demonstrated by LD(50) values ranging from 1.9 × 10(8) to 1.3 × 10(9). Viable bacteria were recovered from blood, kidneys, liver, spleen and joints. For CDC-KC279 and 809 strains (2 × 10(8)mL(-1)) approximately 85% and 72% of animals with articular lesions were observed, respectively; BR-AD22-infected mice showed no signs of arthritis. CDC-KC279 and 809 strains exhibited higher arthritogenic potential when compared to the homologous toxigenic (ATCC27012) and non-toxigenic (ATCC27010) strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. A high number of affected joints and arthritis index in addition to the histopathological features, including subcutaneous edema, inflammatory infiltrate, damage to bone tissue and synoviocyte hypertrophy, indicated a strain-dependent ability of C. ulcerans strains to cause severe polyarthritis. A correlation between the arthritis index and systemic levels of IL-6 and TNF-α was observed for C. ulcerans strains, with the exception of the non-arthritogenic BR-AD22 strain. In conclusion, C. ulcerans revealed a strain-dependent arthritogenic potential independent of DNAse, PLD and diphtheria toxin production.

  13. Pathogenicity and genetic variation of 3 strains of Corynebacterium bovis in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dole, Vandana S; Henderson, Kenneth S; Fister, Richard D; Pietrowski, Michael T; Maldonado, Geomaris; Clifford, Charles B

    2013-07-01

    Corynebacterium bovis has been associated with hyperkeratotic dermatitis and acanthosis in mice. We studied 3 different strains of C. bovis: one previously described to cause hyperkeratotic dermatitis (HAC), one that infected athymic nude mice without leading to the classic clinical signs, and one of bovine origin (ATCC 7715). The 3 strains showed a few biochemical and genetic differences. Immunodeficient nude mice were housed in 3 independent isolators and inoculated with pure cultures of the 3 strains. We studied the transmission of these C. bovis studies to isolator-bedding and contact sentinels housed for 5 to 12 wk in filter-top or wire-top cages in the respective isolators. Using a 16S rRNA-based qPCR assay, we did not find consistent differences in growth and transmission among the 3 C. bovis strains, and neither the incidence nor severity of hyperkeratosis or acanthosis differed between strains. Housing in filter-top compared with wire-top cages did not alter the morbidity associated with any of the strains. Our findings confirmed the variability in the gross and histologic changes associated with C. bovis infection of mice. Although bacteriology was a sensitive method for the detection of Corynebacterium spp., standard algorithms occasionally misidentified C. bovis and several related species. Our study demonstrates that PCR of skin swabs or feces is a sensitive and specific method for the detection of C. bovis infection in mice. An rpoB-based screen of samples from North American vivaria revealed that HAC is the predominant C. bovis strain in laboratory mice. PMID:23849444

  14. The core stimulon of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain 1002 identified using ab initio methodologies.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Anne Cybelle; Ramos, Rommel T J; Silva, Wanderson Marques; Rocha, Flávia Souza; Barbosa, Silvanira; Miyoshi, Anderson; Schneider, Maria P C; Silva, Artur; Azevedo, Vasco

    2012-07-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is a bacterium which causes diseases such as caseous lymphadenitis in small ruminants, resulting in large-scale economic losses for agribusiness worldwide. Consequently, this bacterium including its transcriptional profile analysis has been the focus of various studies. Identification of the transcripts that appear under conditions that simulate the environment encountered by this bacterial species in the host is of great importance in discovering new targets for the production of more efficient vaccines. We sequenced the cDNA of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain 1002, using the SOLiD V3 system, under the following conditions: osmotic stress (2 M), acidity (pH), heat shock (50 °C) and control condition (N). To identify the transcripts shared among the stimulons and integrate this information with the results from BLAST and BLAST2GO, we developed the software CoreStImulon (CSI) which allows the user to individually distinguish the genes in terms of their participation in biological processes, their function and cellular location. In the biosynthetic processes, eleven genes represented in the core stimulon and twenty genes in the control were observed. This validates the hypothesis that the organisms strategy for surviving in a hostile environment is through growth reduction. The oxidation reduction process, response to stress process, and cell adhesion are controlled by genes that contribute to bacterial cell maintenance under stress conditions; these could be involved in their pathogenicity. The methodology for identification of transcripts obtained by ab initio assembly and shared among the stimulons permitted candidates selection for vaccine studies. CSI is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/corestimulon/.

  15. A slow-forming isopeptide bond in the structure of the major pilin SpaD from Corynebacterium diphtheriae has implications for pilus assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hae Joo; Paterson, Neil G.; Kim, Chae Un; Middleditch, Martin; Chang, Chungyu; Ton-That, Hung; Baker, Edward N.

    2014-05-01

    Two crystal structures of the major pilin SpaD from C. diphtheriae have been determined at 1.87 and 2.5 Å resolution. The N-terminal domain is found to contain an isopeptide bond that forms slowly over time in the recombinant protein. Given its structural context, this provides insight into the relationship between internal isopeptide-bond formation and pilus assembly. The Gram-positive organism Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the cause of diphtheria in humans, expresses pili on its surface which it uses for adhesion and colonization of its host. These pili are covalent protein polymers composed of three types of pilin subunit that are assembled by specific sortase enzymes. A structural analysis of the major pilin SpaD, which forms the polymeric backbone of one of the three types of pilus expressed by C. diphtheriae, is reported. Mass-spectral and crystallographic analysis shows that SpaD contains three internal Lys–Asn isopeptide bonds. One of these, shown by mass spectrometry to be located in the N-terminal D1 domain of the protein, only forms slowly, implying an energy barrier to bond formation. Two crystal structures, of the full-length three-domain protein at 2.5 Å resolution and of a two-domain (D2-D3) construct at 1.87 Å resolution, show that each of the three Ig-like domains contains a single Lys–Asn isopeptide-bond cross-link, assumed to give mechanical stability as in other such pili. Additional stabilizing features include a disulfide bond in the D3 domain and a calcium-binding loop in D2. The N-terminal D1 domain is more flexible than the others and, by analogy with other major pilins of this type, the slow formation of its isopeptide bond can be attributed to its location adjacent to the lysine used in sortase-mediated polymerization during pilus assembly.

  16. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  17. High quality draft genome sequence of Corynebacterium ulceribovis type strain IMMIB-L1395T (DSM 45146T)

    DOE PAGES

    Yassin, Atteyet F.; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; et al

    2015-08-05

    We report that the Corynebacterium ulceribovis strain IMMIB L-1395T (= DSM 45146T) is an aerobic to facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, non-motile rod-shaped bacterium that was isolated from the skin of the udder of a cow, in Schleswig Holstein, Germany. The cell wall of C. ulceribovis contains corynemycolic acids. The cellular fatty acids are those described for the genus Corynebacterium, but tuberculostearic acid is not present. Here we describe the features of C. ulceribovis strain IMMIB L-1395T, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 2,300,451 bp long genome containing 2,104 protein-coding genes and 54 RNA-encoding genes and is partmore » of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.« less

  18. High quality draft genome sequence of Corynebacterium ulceribovis type strain IMMIB-L1395T (DSM 45146T)

    SciTech Connect

    Yassin, Atteyet F.; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2015-08-05

    We report that the Corynebacterium ulceribovis strain IMMIB L-1395T (= DSM 45146T) is an aerobic to facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive, non-spore-forming, non-motile rod-shaped bacterium that was isolated from the skin of the udder of a cow, in Schleswig Holstein, Germany. The cell wall of C. ulceribovis contains corynemycolic acids. The cellular fatty acids are those described for the genus Corynebacterium, but tuberculostearic acid is not present. Here we describe the features of C. ulceribovis strain IMMIB L-1395T, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 2,300,451 bp long genome containing 2,104 protein-coding genes and 54 RNA-encoding genes and is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.

  19. Strategies used for genetically modifying bacterial genome: ite-directed mutagenesis, gene inactivation, and gene over-expression*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian-zhong; Zhang, Wei-guo

    2016-01-01

    With the availability of the whole genome sequence of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum, strategies for directed DNA manipulation have developed rapidly. DNA manipulation plays an important role in understanding the function of genes and in constructing novel engineering bacteria according to requirement. DNA manipulation involves modifying the autologous genes and expressing the heterogenous genes. Two alternative approaches, using electroporation linear DNA or recombinant suicide plasmid, allow a wide variety of DNA manipulation. However, the over-expression of the desired gene is generally executed via plasmid-mediation. The current review summarizes the common strategies used for genetically modifying E. coli and C. glutamicum genomes, and discusses the technical problem of multi-layered DNA manipulation. Strategies for gene over-expression via integrating into genome are proposed. This review is intended to be an accessible introduction to DNA manipulation within the bacterial genome for novices and a source of the latest experimental information for experienced investigators. PMID:26834010

  20. Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis MB20 bv. equi Isolated from a Pectoral Abscess of an Oldenburg Horse in California

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Luís C.; Veras, Adonney A. O.; de Sá, Pablo H. C. G.; Graças, Diego A.; Pinheiro, Kenny C.; Silva, Andreia S. S.; Folador, Edson L.; Benevides, Leandro J.; Viana, Marcus V. C.; Carneiro, Adriana R.; Schneider, Maria P. C.; Spier, Sharon J.; Edman, Judy M.; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis MB20 bv. equi was sequenced using the Ion Personal Genome Machine (PGM) platform, and showed a size of 2,363,089 bp, with 2,365 coding sequences and a GC content of 52.1%. These results will serve as a basis for further studies on the pathogenicity of C. pseudotuberculosis bv. equi. PMID:25395628

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strain CIP 52.97, Isolated from a Horse in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cerdeira, Louise Teixeira; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Pinto, Anne Cybelle; de Almeida, Sintia Silva; dos Santos, Anderson Rodrigues; Barbosa, Eudes Guilherme Vieira; Ali, Amjad; Aburjaile, Flávia Figueira; de Abreu, Vinicius Augusto Carvalho; Guimarães, Luis Carlos; Soares, Siomar de Castro; Dorella, Fernanda Alves; Rocha, Flávia Souza; Bol, Erick; Gomes de Sá, Pablo Henrique Caracciolo; Lopes, Thiago Souza; Barbosa, Maria Silvanira; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Jucá Ramos, Rommel Thiago; Coimbra, Nilson Antônio da Rocha; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Barh, Debmalya; Jain, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep; Raja, Rathiram; Zambare, Vasudeo; Ghosh, Preetam; Trost, Eva; Tauch, Andreas; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we report the whole-genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis bv. equi strain CIP 52.97 (Collection Institut Pasteur), isolated in 1952 from a case of ulcerative lymphangitis in a Kenyan horse, which has evidently caused significant losses to agribusiness. Therefore, obtaining this genome will allow the detection of important targets for postgenomic studies, with the aim of minimizing problems caused by this microorganism. PMID:22123771

  2. Complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain CIP 52.97, isolated from a horse in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Cerdeira, Louise Teixeira; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; Pinto, Anne Cybelle; de Almeida, Sintia Silva; dos Santos, Anderson Rodrigues; Barbosa, Eudes Guilherme Vieira; Ali, Amjad; Aburjaile, Flávia Figueira; de Abreu, Vinicius Augusto Carvalho; Guimarães, Luis Carlos; Soares, Siomar de Castro; Dorella, Fernanda Alves; Rocha, Flávia Souza; Bol, Erick; Gomes de Sá, Pablo Henrique Caracciolo; Lopes, Thiago Souza; Barbosa, Maria Silvanira; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Jucá Ramos, Rommel Thiago; Coimbra, Nilson Antônio da Rocha; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Barh, Debmalya; Jain, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep; Raja, Rathiram; Zambare, Vasudeo; Ghosh, Preetam; Trost, Eva; Tauch, Andreas; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2011-12-01

    In this work, we report the whole-genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis bv. equi strain CIP 52.97 (Collection Institut Pasteur), isolated in 1952 from a case of ulcerative lymphangitis in a Kenyan horse, which has evidently caused significant losses to agribusiness. Therefore, obtaining this genome will allow the detection of important targets for postgenomic studies, with the aim of minimizing problems caused by this microorganism.

  3. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Corynebacterium striatum confirmed by 16S Ribosomal RNA Sequencing: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium species are non-fermentous Gram-positive bacilli that are normal flora of human skin and mucous membranes and are commonly isolated in clinical specimens. Non-diphtheriae Corynebacterium are regarded as contaminants when found in blood culture. Currently, Corynebacterium striatum is considered one of the emerging nosocomial agents implicated in endocarditis and serious infections. We report a case of native-valve infective endocarditis caused by C. striatum, which was misidentified by automated identification system but identified accurately by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, in a 55-year-old male patient. The patient had two mobile vegetations on his mitral valve, both of which had high embolic risk. Through surgical valve replacement and an antibiotic regimen, the patient recovered completely. In unusual clinical scenarios, C. striatum should not be simply dismissed as a contaminant when isolated from clinical specimens. The possibility of C. striatum infection should be considered even in an immunocompetent patient, and we suggest a genotypic assay, such as 16S rRNA sequencing, to confirm species identity. PMID:27659439

  4. Recombinant baculovirus isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2007-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac or BaculoDirect, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Additionally, many systems require a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay. Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  5. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii CNM633/14 and CNM632/14, Multidrug-Resistant and Antibiotic-Sensitive Isolates from Nodules of Granulomatous Mastitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Francisco; Ariza-Miguel, Jaime; Marrodan-Ciordia, Teresa; Acedo, Alberto; Hernandez, Marta; Tauch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii has been associated with infections of the female breast. Genome sequencing of two strains revealed a specific genomic island in the multidrug-resistant isolate CNM633/14 with similarity to the R plasmid pJA144188 of Corynebacterium resistens DSM 45100, being indicative of the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to C. kroppenstedtii. PMID:25999560

  7. Recombination and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Hawkins, Michelle; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The links between recombination and replication have been appreciated for decades and it is now generally accepted that these two fundamental aspects of DNA metabolism are inseparable: Homologous recombination is essential for completion of DNA replication and vice versa. This review focuses on the roles that recombination enzymes play in underpinning genome duplication, aiding replication fork movement in the face of the many replisome barriers that challenge genome stability. These links have many conserved features across all domains of life, reflecting the conserved nature of the substrate for these reactions, DNA. PMID:25341919

  8. Serology and clinical relevance of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis in native Korean goats (Capra hircus coreanae).

    PubMed

    Jung, Byeong Yeal; Lee, Seung-Hun; Kim, Ha-Young; Byun, Jae-Won; Shin, Dong-Ho; Kim, Daekeun; Kwak, Dongmi

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the seroprevalence and clinical relevance of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, which is the causative agent of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), in native Korean goats (Capra hircus coreanae). A total of 466 native Korean goats from 40 herds (11 to 12 samples per herd) were randomly selected throughout the nation and evaluated by direct palpation, bacterial isolation, ELISA, and PCR. In serological examinations, 267 (57.3 %) of the goats tested were positive against C. pseudotuberculosis. When seroprevalence was analyzed according to age, region, and season, statistically significant differences were observed in relation to all three parameters (P < 0.05). For clinical examination, the superficial lymph nodes of all goats were palpated to diagnose CLA. Pus samples taken from superficial abscesses were used for bacterial isolation. Among the 466 goats tested, 34 (7.3 %) were presumptively diagnosed with CLA, and C. pseudotuberculosis was isolated from 24 goats (70.6 % of goats with CLA lesions) whose infections were confirmed by PCR. Considering the high seroprevalence and bacterial isolation rate from most of the superficial CLA lesions, it is suspected that many internal CLA lesions exist in this goat population. These results suggest that C. pseudotuberculosis infection is widespread in native Korean goats, and appropriate control programs need to be established.

  9. Corynebacterium bovis: Epizootiologic Features and Environmental Contamination in an Enzootically Infected Rodent Room

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Holly N; Wolf, Felix R; Lipman, Neil S

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium bovis is a common pathogen in athymic nude mouse colonies. Control and eradication of the organism are challenging because depopulation and restricted colony access are often not options within vivaria. We evaluated potential sources and dissemination routes of C. bovis in an enzootically infected colony. Immunocompetent mice and personnel were evaluated for their potential to carry C. bovis, and husbandry and sanitation methods were evaluated for their efficacy in preventing cross-contamination. C. bovis was detected in furred immunocompetent mice previously exposed to infected athymic nude mice and in the nasopharynx of humans. Microisolation cages were not effective in maintaining athymic nude mice C. bovis-free when they were housed in a room known to contain immunodeficient mice with C. bovis infections. A tunnel washer that provided a ≥180 °F final rinse provided effective elimination of C. bovis from cage components. Passive and active air sampling techniques showed airborne dispersal of C. bovis despite the use of individually ventilated caging systems and stringent operational standards. Bacterial growth was not observed in settle plates placed inside autoclaved individually ventilated microisolation cages on various ventilated racks for 24-h periods. C. bovis aerosolization was shown to be a means of spread of the bacterium during cage-change procedures inside a class II type A2 biosafety cabinet. Our findings indicate that C. bovis can be a pervasive environmental contaminant in infected rodent holding rooms and successful eradication strategies must include environmental decontamination and attention to air quality. PMID:22776119

  10. Evaluation of three methods for DNA fingerprinting of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strains isolated from goats in Poland.

    PubMed

    Stefańska, Ilona; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Binek, Marian

    2008-01-01

    Phenotypic approaches based on metabolic and biological characteristics of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis have been limited due to insufficient discrimination between closely related isolates. In this paper we present performance and convenience of three molecular typing methods: BOX-PCR, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction site (ADSRRS-fingerprinting) in genome analysis of these bacteria. Among examined 61 strains there were distinguished four, eight and 10 different genotypes by BOX-PCR, RAPD and ADSRRS-fingerprinting, respectively. The value of discrimination index was the lowest for BOX-PCR (D = 0.265), much bigger for RAPD (D = 0.539) and the highest for ADSRRS-fingerprinting (D = 0.604). The good discriminatory ability and reproducibility of RAPD and ADSRRS-fingerprinting indicates that those techniques may be particularly applied for epidemiological studies of C. pseudotuberculosis isolates. We found that ADSRRS-fingerprinting is a rapid method offering good discrimination power, excellent reproducibility and may be applied for epidemiological studies of intraspecific genetic relatedness of C. pseudotuberculosis strains.

  11. Colonization of human epithelial cell lines by Corynebacterium ulcerans from human and animal sources.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Elena; Ott, Lisa; Hasselt, Kristin; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Tauch, Andreas; Burkovski, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Corynebacterium ulcerans is an emerging pathogen transmitted by a zoonotic pathway to humans. Despite rising numbers of infections and potentially fatal outcomes, data on the colonization of the human host are lacking up to now. In this study, adhesion of two C. ulcerans isolates to human epithelial cells, invasion of host cells and the function of two putative virulence factors with respect to these processes were investigated. C. ulcerans strains BR-AD22 and 809 were able to adhere to Detroit562 and HeLa cells, and invade these epithelial cell lines with a rate comparable to other pathogens as shown by scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and replication assays. Infection led to detrimental effects on the cells as deduced from measurements of transepithelial resistance. Mutant strains of putative virulence factors phospholipase D and DIP0733 homologue CULC22_00609 generated in this study showed no influence on colonization under the experimental conditions tested. The data presented here indicate a high infectious potential of this emerging pathogen.

  12. Septicaemia secondary to infection by Corynebacterium macginleyi in an Indian python (Python molurus).

    PubMed

    Martínez, Jorge; Segura, Pablo; García, David; Aduriz, Gorka; Ibabe, José C; Peris, Bernardo; Corpa, Juan M

    2006-09-01

    A seven-year-old female Indian python (Python molurus) weighing about 35kg was euthanased after several clinical episodes of stomatitis, pneumonia, ophthalmitis and dystocia over a period of four years. The animal had been maintained in a terrarium in a circus truck at an adequate temperature. During shows, however, the snake was considered to be exposed to stressful conditions for several hours at a time at low temperatures and with noise and bright lights. A post-mortem examination indicated ulcerative stomatitis, osteomyelitis, severe pneumonia and numerous granulomata and multifocal necrosis in stomach and spleen. Corynebacterium macginleyi was isolated in pure culture from the ulcerative stomatitis, and mixed with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia from the lungs and spleen. The findings indicated that the snake had died from a septicaemic process caused by C. macginleyi, probably originating from the stomatitis. The role of S. maltophilia as a secondary agent is discussed. The stress of the circus show and poor husbandry may have predisposed the animal to infection and septicaemia. This is the first report of C. macginleyi causing disease in a snake.

  13. Study of Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains isolated in Romania, northwestern Russia and the Republic of Moldova.

    PubMed

    Damian, Maria; Grimont, Francine; Narvskaya, Olga; Straut, Monica; Surdeanu, Maria; Cojocaru, Radu; Mokrousov, Igor; Diaconescu, Angela; Andronescu, Constantin; Melnic, Anatol; Mutoi, Ludmila; Grimont, Patrick A D

    2002-03-01

    A selection of 167 Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains isolated in Romania, the Russian Federation and the Republic of Moldova were analysed by biotyping, phage typing, the toxin production test and by molecular techniques such as ribotyping, pulsed field gel electrophoresis and random amplified polymorphic DNA, in order to establish the epidemiological relatedness, genetic divergence and strain circulation within and between the bordering countries. Using a set of five digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotides and BstEII digestion, 34 ribotypes were identified. The strains isolated in the epidemic areas (Russia and Moldova) were very closely related but different from those isolated in Romania. C1 and C5 were the main ribotypes identified in these areas. Neither ribotype was found in Romania, where the main circulating types were C3 and C7. Field inversion gel electrophoresis was more discriminative than ribotyping and revealed 54 macrorestriction profiles after SfiI restriction. Both methods showed a significant homogeneity of the strains from epidemic areas and a large diversity among the Romanian strains. Random amplification was useful as an identification method for the epidemic strains, but not for the Romanian ones which displayed a large number of amplification profiles. The phenotypic methods associated with molecular typing techniques enabled distinguishing between strains, detecting the epidemic clone, and sustaining the absence of transmission across borders.

  14. [Inhibition of adherence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae to human buccal epithelium by glycoside hydrolases from marine hydrobiontes].

    PubMed

    Zaporozhets, T S; Makarenkova, I D; Bakunina, I Iu; Burtseva, Iu V; Kusaĭkin, M I; Balabanova, L A; Zviagintseva, T N; Besednova, N N; Rasskazov, V A

    2010-01-01

    A possibility of adhesion inhibition of Corynebacterium diphtheriae to human buccal epithelium by glycoside hydrolases of marine hydrobiontes was investigated using alpha-galactosidase from marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. KMM 701, total enzyme preparation and beta-1,3-glucanase from marine fungi Chaetomium, total enzyme preparation and beta-1,3-glucanase from marine mollusk Littorina kurila, and total enzyme preparation from crystalline style of marine mollusk Spisula sachalinensis were used. The enzymes were added to test-tubes containing buccal epithelial cells and/or the toxigenic bacterial strain C. diphtheriae No 1129, v. gravis. All the investigated enzymes were able to abort C. diphtheriae adherence, to human buccal epithelocytes. Inhibition of adhesion was more pronounced in the case of treatment of epithelocytes with highly purified enzymes of marine hydrobiontes in comparison with total enzyme preparations. The significant inhibition of C. diphtheriae adhesion was observed when the enzymes were added to the epithelocytes with the attached microorganisms. The results obtained show that glycoside hydrolases of marine hydrobiontes degrade any carbohydrates expressed on cell surface of bacterium or human buccal epithelocytes, impair unique lectin-carbohydrate interaction and prevent the adhesion. PMID:20695214

  15. Rapid Emergence of Daptomycin Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Corynebacterium striatum… A Cautionary Tale

    PubMed Central

    TeKippe, Erin McElvania; Thomas, Benjamin S.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Lawrence, Steven J.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the observation of daptomycin resistance in Corynebacterium striatum, both in vivo and in vitro. We describe a case of C. striatum bacteremia in a patient with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD); the initial isolate recovered was daptomycin susceptible with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.125 μg/ml. Two months later, and after daptomycin therapy, the individual became bacteremic with an isolate of C. striatum with a daptomycin MIC of >256 μg/ml. Methods To study the prevalence of daptomycin resistance in C. striatum, clinical isolates of C. striatum were grown in broth culture containing daptomycin to investigate emergence of resistance to this antimicrobial. Molecular typing was used to evaluate serial isolates from the index patient and the clinical isolates of C. striatum we assayed. Results In vitro analysis of isolates from the index patient and seven of eleven additional C. striatum isolates exhibited emergence of high level daptomycin resistance, despite initially demonstrating low MICs to this antimicrobial agent. This phenotype was persistent even after serial subculture in the absence of daptomycin. Conclusions Together, these data demonstrate that caution should be taken when using daptomycin to treat high-inoculum infections and/or infections of indwelling medical devices with C. striatum. To our knowledge, this is the first report characterizing emergence of daptomycin resistance in C. striatum. PMID:24973133

  16. Corynebacterium diphtheriae HmuT: dissecting the roles of conserved residues in heme pocket stabilization.

    PubMed

    Draganova, Elizabeth B; Adrian, Seth A; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; Keutcha, Cyrianne S; Schmitt, Michael P; Rodgers, Kenton R; Dixon, Dabney W

    2016-10-01

    The heme-binding protein HmuT is part of the Corynebacterium diphtheriae heme uptake pathway and is responsible for the delivery of heme to the HmuUV ABC transporter. HmuT binds heme with a conserved His/Tyr heme axial ligation motif. Sequence alignment revealed additional conserved residues of potential importance for heme binding: R237, Y272 and M292. In this study, site-directed mutations at these three positions provided insight into the nature of axial heme binding to the protein and its effect on the thermal stability of the heme-loaded protein fold. UV-visible absorbance, resonance Raman (rR) and thermal unfolding experiments, along with collision-induced dissociation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, were used to probe the contributions of each mutated residue to the stability of ϖ HmuT. Thermal unfolding and rR experiments revealed that R237 and M292 are important residues for heme binding. Arginine 237 is a hydrogen-bond donor to the phenol side chain of Y235, which serves as an axial heme ligand. Methionine 292 serves a supporting structural role, favoring the R237 hydrogen-bond donation, which elicits a, heretofore, unobserved modulating influence on π donation by the axial tyrosine ligand in the heme carbonyl complex, HmuT-CO. PMID:27561288

  17. Epidemiological survey of Corynebacterium equi infections on five Ontario horse farms.

    PubMed

    Prescott, J F; Travers, M; Yager-Johnson, J A

    1984-01-01

    Corynebacterium equi was cultured from manure or soil on five horse-breeding farms in Ontario at monthly intervals on three occasions during the summer of 1982. The organism was widespread. Contamination by C. equi of the loafing paddock and pasture areas was significantly greater in a farm established 30 years than in two established for four and six years and there was a significant correlation between the C. equi burden in stables, paddocks and pastures and the length of use of the five farms for horses. In all farms, numbers of C. equi in pasture soil exceeded numbers in fresh manure, suggesting that environmental multiplication of the organism might occur. A farm with an endemic C. equi pneumonia problem differed significantly from the other four farms, where disease was not endemic, in the larger number of C. equi isolated in the stable area. By contrast the farm with a C. equi pasture soil burden significantly heavier than on all other farms had no deaths due to C. equi pneumonia. There was a correlation (r = 0.78, p = 0.061) between the number of cases of C. equi pneumonia on the farms and numbers of C. equi in the area of the stables, but not on the paddocks or pastures. About two-thirds of randomly chosen isolates from the farms belonged to the three capsular serotypes most commonly found in pneumonic foals.

  18. Antiproliferative and hepatoprotective activity of metabolites from Corynebacterium xerosis against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Farhadul; Ghosh, Soby; Khanam, Jahan Ara

    2014-01-01

    Objective To find out the effective anticancer drugs from bacterial products, petroleum ether extract of Corynebacterium xerosis. Methods Antiproliferative activity of the metabolite has been measured by monitoring the parameters like tumor weight measurement, tumor cell growth inhibition in mice and survival time of tumor bearing mice, etc. Hepatoprotective effect of the metabolites was determined by observing biochemical, hematological parameters. Results It has been found that the petroleum ether extract bacterial metabolite significantly decrease cell growth (78.58%; P<0.01), tumor weight (36.04 %; P<0.01) and increase the life span of tumor bearing mice (69.23%; P<0.01) at dose 100 mg/kg (i.p.) in comparison to those of untreated Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) bearing mice. The metabolite also alters the depleted hematological parameters like red blood cell, white blood cell, hemoglobin (Hb%), etc. towards normal in tumor bearing mice. Metabolite show no adverse effect on liver functions regarding blood glucose, serum alkaline phosphatases, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase activity and serum billirubin, etc. in normal mice. Histopathological observation of these mice organ does not show any toxic effect on cellular structure. But in the case of EAC bearing untreated mice these hematological and biochemical parameters deteriorate extremely with time whereas petroleum ether extract bacterial metabolite receiving EAC bearing mice nullified the toxicity induced by EAC cells. Conclusion Study results reveal that metabolite possesses significant antiproliferative and hepatoprotective effect against EAC cells. PMID:25183099

  19. Reproductive Pathological Changes Associated with Experimental Subchronic Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection in Nonpregnant Boer Does

    PubMed Central

    Othman, A. M.; Abba, Y.; Jesse, F. F. A.; Ilyasu, Y. M.; Saharee, A. A.; Haron, A. W.; Zamri-Saad, M.; Lila, M. A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), which is a contagious and chronic disease in sheep and goats. In order to assess the histopathological changes observed in the reproductive organs of nonpregnant does infected with the bacteria, 20 apparently healthy adult Boer does were divided into four inoculation groups, intradermal, intranasal, oral, and control, consisting of five goats each. Excluding the control group, which was unexposed, other does were inoculated with 107 CFU/1 mL of live C. pseudotuberculosis through the various routes stated above. Thirty days after infection, the ovaries, uterus, and iliac lymph nodes were collected for bacterial recovery and molecular detection, as well as histopathological examination. The mean changes in necrosis, congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and oedema varied in severity among the ovaries, uterus, and iliac lymph nodes following different inoculation routes. Overall, the intranasal route of inoculation showed more severe (p < 0.05) lesions in all the organs examined. The findings of this study have shown that C. pseudotuberculosis could predispose to infertility resulting from pathological lesions in the uterus and ovaries of does. PMID:27006831

  20. Characterization of the Opp Peptide Transporter of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and Its Role in Virulence and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Pablo M. R. O.; Seyffert, Nubia; Silva, Wanderson M.; Castro, Thiago L. P.; Silva, Renata F.; Lima, Danielle D.; Hirata, Raphael; Silva, Artur; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Despite the economic importance of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), a chronic disease caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, few genes related to the virulence of its etiologic agent have been characterized. The oligopeptide permease (Opp) transporters are located in the plasma membrane and have functions generally related to the uptake of peptides from the extracellular environment. These peptide transporters, in addition to having an important role in cell nutrition, also participate in the regulation of various processes involving intercellular signaling, including the control of the expression of virulence genes in pathogenic bacteria. To study the role of Opp in C. pseudotuberculosis, an OppD deficient strain was constructed via simple crossover with a nonreplicative plasmid carrying part of the oppD gene sequence. As occurred to the wild-type, the ΔoppD strain showed impaired growth when exposed to the toxic glutathione peptide (GSH), indicating two possible scenarios: (i) that this component can be internalized by the bacterium through an Opp-independent pathway or (ii) that there is toxicity while the peptide is extracellular. Additionally, the ΔoppD mutant presented a reduced ability to adhere to and infect macrophages compared to the wild-type, although both strains exhibit the same potential to colonize spleens and cause injury and death to infected mice. PMID:24895581

  1. Differential chemical protection of mammalian cells from the exotoxins of Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Middlebrook, J L; Dorland, R B

    1977-01-01

    Many drugs or chemicals had markedly different effects on the cytotoxicity induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) or Corynebacterium diphtheriae exotoxin (DE). The glycolytic inhibitor NaF protected cells from DE but potentiated the cytotoxicity of PE. Another energy inhibitor, salicylic acid, also protected cells from DE but had no effect with PE. Colchicine and colcemid did not affect the cytotoxicity of either toxin. Cytochalasin B exhibited a modest protection from DE but no effect with PE. Ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the Na+, K+-dependent adenosine 5'-triphosphatase (ATPase), did not affect the cytotoxicity of either toxin. Ruthenium red, a specific inhibitor of the Ca2+, Mg2+,-dependent ATPase, conferred marked protection from DE-induced cytotoxicity but did not affect PE-induced cytotoxicity. A number of local anesthetics were tested, and they too presented differential results with PE and DE. Most chemicals that affected toxin-induced cytotoxicity had little or no influence on the in vitro adenosine 5'-diphosphate-ribosylation catalyzed by either toxin. This work presents further evidence that PE and DE have different mechanisms of intoxication and suggests that these differences lie in the attachment or internalization stages of intoxication. PMID:141424

  2. Corynebacterium diphtheriae methionine sulfoxide reductase a exploits a unique mycothiol redox relay mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tossounian, Maria-Armineh; Pedre, Brandán; Wahni, Khadija; Erdogan, Huriye; Vertommen, Didier; Van Molle, Inge; Messens, Joris

    2015-05-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases are conserved enzymes that reduce oxidized methionines in proteins and play a pivotal role in cellular redox signaling. We have unraveled the redox relay mechanisms of methionine sulfoxide reductase A of the pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae (Cd-MsrA) and shown that this enzyme is coupled to two independent redox relay pathways. Steady-state kinetics combined with mass spectrometry of Cd-MsrA mutants give a view of the essential cysteine residues for catalysis. Cd-MsrA combines a nucleophilic cysteine sulfenylation reaction with an intramolecular disulfide bond cascade linked to the thioredoxin pathway. Within this cascade, the oxidative equivalents are transferred to the surface of the protein while releasing the reduced substrate. Alternatively, MsrA catalyzes methionine sulfoxide reduction linked to the mycothiol/mycoredoxin-1 pathway. After the nucleophilic cysteine sulfenylation reaction, MsrA forms a mixed disulfide with mycothiol, which is transferred via a thiol disulfide relay mechanism to a second cysteine for reduction by mycoredoxin-1. With x-ray crystallography, we visualize two essential intermediates of the thioredoxin relay mechanism and a cacodylate molecule mimicking the substrate interactions in the active site. The interplay of both redox pathways in redox signaling regulation forms the basis for further research into the oxidative stress response of this pathogen.

  3. Hepatoprotective effect of propagermanium on Corynebacterium parvum and lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yokochi, S; Ishiwata, Y; Hashimoto, H; Ninomiya, F; Suzuki, T

    1998-08-01

    Propagermanium is an organic germanium compound with immunopotentiating activity. We examined the hepatoprotective effect of propagermanium and its mechanism in an experimental animal model of acute liver injury induced with Corynebacterium parvum (C. parvum) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Oral pretreatment with propagermanium decreased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity in a dose-dependent manner. Significant attenuation of ALT and AST activity was obtained at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Administration of propagermanium also inhibited the infiltration of mononuclear cells into the liver of mice induced by C. parvum/LPS. Immunohistochemical examination revealed infiltration of the liver by CD4-, CD8-, CD11b- and Gr-1-positive cells. Propagermanium prevented CD4- and CD11b-positive cells from infiltrating the liver. In this animal model, blood cytokine levels increased rapidly after LPS injection, causing severe hepatitis. Notably, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) are important mediators of the progress of liver injury. We demonstrated that propagermanium reduced IFN-gamma production by 53% at a dose of 3 mg/kg and also significantly inhibited the production of interleukin-12 (IL-12). These results indicate that propagermanium inhibits cell infiltration in the liver and cytokine production, and improves massive liver injury in C. parvum/LPS mice. PMID:9716110

  4. Mechanism for macrophage activation against Corynebacterium parvum--participation of T cells and its lymphokines.

    PubMed

    Mori, H; Mihara, M; Uesugi, Y; Nagai, H; Koda, A

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that Corynebacterium parvum activates macrophages to produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF). It is suspected that the activation of macrophages by C. parvum requires T-cell participation. The purpose of this study was to confirm that T cells participate in the activation of macrophages by C. parvum. TNF production in vitro from the spleen cells of BALB/c(-)+/+ mice was abrogated completely by the pre-treatment of spleen cells with anti-Ia antiserum and complement, indicating that Ia+ cells are the source of TNF. TNF production was not elicited at all in BALB/c-nu/nu mice. However, there was an increase in the number of Ia+ cells as well as an increase in the weight of spleen and liver. Supernatant from a culture of spleen cells stimulated with phytohemagglutinin-P (a PHA-induced lymphokine) made it possible for BALB/c-nu/nu mice to produce TNF, associated with an induction of Lyt-1+ cells and Lyt-2+ cells. However, treatment with the lymphokine did not augment the increases of Ia+ cells or liver and spleen weights. These results suggest that increasing the number of Ia+ cells is not sufficient to bring about TNF production; Ia+ cells must also be stimulated by T cells or T-cell lymphokines in order to produce TNF. These results suggest that T cells play an essential role in the activation of Ia+ cells against C. parvum. PMID:7723692

  5. Entry of monocytes into the brain after injection of Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Allore, R J; Richardson, P M

    1998-02-01

    The receptiveness of the brain to monocyte infiltration was studied in rats that had been injected intracerebrally with Corynebacterium parvum. At 0-17 days after intracerebral injection and 18 h after intravenous injection of diI-labeled isogenous mononuclear cells, host rats were sacrificed and cells from the vicinity of the injection site and from the contralateral cerebral hemisphere were dissociated and analyzed by flow cytometry. In rats sacrificed 4-11 days postinjection of C. parvum, diI-labeled mononuclear cells were detected in cell preparations from the hemisphere ipsilateral and, to a lesser extent, contralateral to the injection site. No extravasation of cells from the blood to the brain was detected in rats injected intracerebrally with saline. By immunohistochemistry, many macrophages were detected in the hemisphere ipsilateral to injection of C. parvum. In additional experiments, the dissociated CNS cell population was labeled with OX-42 antibodies to the type 3 complement receptor, which is present on monocytes but not lymphocytes. Some cells in the brain were labeled with both diI and OX-42 and therefore were identified as monocytes that had entered the brain from the blood. In conclusion, monocytes can home to both sides of the brain after unilateral injection of a strong inflammatory agent but monocyte infiltration into the brain is delayed in comparison to monocyte inflammatory responses that have been reported in nonneural tissues. PMID:9500970

  6. Seroma prevention by using Corynebacterium parvum in a rat mastectomy model.

    PubMed

    Tekin, E; Kocdor, M A; Saydam, S; Bora, S; Harmancioglu, O

    2001-01-01

    Seroma formation is the most common complication after mastectomy and continues to be an important problem during the early postoperative period. Several surgical and medical methods have been developed to try to overcome this problem; however, so far none have been used successfully in the routine clinical practice. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Corynebacterium parvum (CP) as a sclerosing agent in both prevention and treatment of seromas after mastectomy and axillary dissection in an animal model. Sixty female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent mastectomy and axillary dissection under general anaesthesia. Following surgery, the rats were treated in 1 of 3 ways. In the prevention group, 1 cm3 (0.35 mg) CP solution was injected beneath the skin flap just before closure of the incision after mastectomy. In the treatment group, animals in which a seroma was formed, the fluid was aspirated, and 1 cm3 CP solution was injected beneath the flap. In the control group, animals in which seromas formed, aspiration only was performed. The frequency of seroma formation decreased when CP solution was injected immediately after the operation (p < 0.01). In addition, seroma formation was effectively treated by CP injection when compared with the control group (p < 0.05). CP was effective as a prophylactic agent in the prevention group and as a therapeutic agent in the treatment group in this experimental model. CP injection may be useful for the management of this problem in a clinical setting. PMID:11490129

  7. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  8. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  9. Successful vaccination against Leishmania chagasi infection in BALB/c mice with freeze-thawed Leishmania antigen and Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Márcia de Carvalho; Gomes, Daniel Cláudio de Oliveira; Marques-da-Silva, Eduardo de Almeida; Serafim, Tiago Donatelli; Afonso, Luis Carlos Crocco; Rezende, Simone Aparecida

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential of a Leishmania antigen vaccine in protecting BALB/c mice against Leishmania chagasi. Mice received two subcutaneous doses of L. amazonensis vaccine with Corynebacterium parvum and subsequent boost was done without adjuvant. One week later, mice were challenged with L. chagasi. We observed that this vaccine caused a significant reduction in parasite load in liver and spleen and induced a high production of IFN-gamma and IL-4 by spleen cells from vaccinated mice in response to Leishmania antigen. Together, our data show that this vaccine is capable of inducing a Th1/Th2 response that is important to control parasite replication. PMID:17919443

  10. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  11. Bayesian Geostatistical Analysis and Ecoclimatic Determinants of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection among Horses.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Courtney; Davis, Elizabeth G; Beard, Laurie A; Lubbers, Brian V; Raghavan, Ram K

    2015-01-01

    Kansas witnessed an unprecedented outbreak in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection among horses, a disease commonly referred to as pigeon fever during fall 2012. Bayesian geostatistical models were developed to identify key environmental and climatic risk factors associated with C. pseudotuberculosis infection in horses. Positive infection status among horses (cases) was determined by positive test results for characteristic abscess formation, positive bacterial culture on purulent material obtained from a lanced abscess (n = 82), or positive serologic evidence of exposure to organism (≥ 1:512)(n = 11). Horses negative for these tests (n = 172)(controls) were considered free of infection. Information pertaining to horse demographics and stabled location were obtained through review of medical records and/or contact with horse owners via telephone. Covariate information for environmental and climatic determinants were obtained from USDA (soil attributes), USGS (land use/land cover), and NASA MODIS and NASA Prediction of Worldwide Renewable Resources (climate). Candidate covariates were screened using univariate regression models followed by Bayesian geostatistical models with and without covariates. The best performing model indicated a protective effect for higher soil moisture content (OR = 0.53, 95% CrI = 0.25, 0.71), and detrimental effects for higher land surface temperature (≥ 35°C) (OR = 2.81, 95% CrI = 2.21, 3.85) and habitat fragmentation (OR = 1.31, 95% CrI = 1.27, 2.22) for C. pseudotuberculosis infection status in horses, while age, gender and breed had no effect. Preventative and ecoclimatic significance of these findings are discussed.

  12. Implantation of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum for elimination of Staphylococcus aureus from the nasal cavity in volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Kiryukhina, Nataliya

    Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is a well-documented risk factor of infection and inflammation of the skin, soft tissues and bacteremia. It is also known that most often etiology of these disorders is associated with autoinfection. The present-day methods of opportunistic pathogens eradication from the nasal cavity are based principally on the use of antiseptic and antibacterial agents. For instance, a local antibiotic mupirocin in the form of nasal ointment is considered to be the gold standard for the treatment of S. aureus carriage. The literature describes investigations showing how mupirocin can strengthen antibiotic resistance in S. aureus strains, including those with methicillin resistance (MRSA). It is also common knowledge that recolonization of the nasal mucous membrane takes place within several months after mupirocin treatment. This circumstance dictates the necessity to look for alternative ways of preventing the S. aureus carriage and methods of elimination. One of the methods of nasal S. aureus elimination is implantation of nonpathogenic microorganisms which will extrude opportunistic pathogens without impinging the symbiotic microbiota. Effectiveness of saline suspension of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum containing spray was assessed in a several chamber experiments with simulation of some spaceflight factors (dry immersion, isolation). Various schemes of application of preparations were applied. In all cases of corynebacteria application the strong inhibiting effect against S. aureus was detected. This fact opens a prospect of using nonpathogenic corynebacteria as a nasal probiotic. Administration of the nasal corynebacteria spray possibly prevented cross-infection by MRSA and appearance of staphylococcal infection. Further pre-clinical and clinical study of this bacterial therapy method is under development.

  13. Proteome scale comparative modeling for conserved drug and vaccine targets identification in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Syed Shah; Tiwari, Sandeep; Guimarães, Luís Carlos; Jamal, Syed Babar; Folador, Edson; Sharma, Neha Barve; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Almeida, Síntia; Ali, Amjad; Islam, Arshad; Póvoa, Fabiana Dias; de Abreu, Vinicius Augusto Carvalho; Jain, Neha; Bhattacharya, Antaripa; Juneja, Lucky; Miyoshi, Anderson; Silva, Artur; Barh, Debmalya; Turjanski, Adrian Gustavo; Azevedo, Vasco; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Cp) is a pathogenic bacterium that causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), ulcerative lymphangitis, mastitis, and edematous to a broad spectrum of hosts, including ruminants, thereby threatening economic and dairy industries worldwide. Currently there is no effective drug or vaccine available against Cp. To identify new targets, we adopted a novel integrative strategy, which began with the prediction of the modelome (tridimensional protein structures for the proteome of an organism, generated through comparative modeling) for 15 previously sequenced C. pseudotuberculosis strains. This pan-modelomics approach identified a set of 331 conserved proteins having 95-100% intra-species sequence similarity. Next, we combined subtractive proteomics and modelomics to reveal a set of 10 Cp proteins, which may be essential for the bacteria. Of these, 4 proteins (tcsR, mtrA, nrdI, and ispH) were essential and non-host homologs (considering man, horse, cow and sheep as hosts) and satisfied all criteria of being putative targets. Additionally, we subjected these 4 proteins to virtual screening of a drug-like compound library. In all cases, molecules predicted to form favorable interactions and which showed high complementarity to the target were found among the top ranking compounds. The remaining 6 essential proteins (adk, gapA, glyA, fumC, gnd, and aspA) have homologs in the host proteomes. Their active site cavities were compared to the respective cavities in host proteins. We propose that some of these proteins can be selectively targeted using structure-based drug design approaches (SBDD). Our results facilitate the selection of C. pseudotuberculosis putative proteins for developing broad-spectrum novel drugs and vaccines. A few of the targets identified here have been validated in other microorganisms, suggesting that our modelome strategy is effective and can also be applicable to other pathogens.

  14. Strategies to prevent, treat, and provoke Corynebacterium-associated hyperkeratosis in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Burr, Holly N; Lipman, Neil S; White, Julie R; Zheng, Junting; Wolf, Felix R

    2011-05-01

    Athymic nude mice infected with Corynebacterium bovis typically exhibit transient hyperkeratotic dermatitis. Our vivarium experienced an increased incidence of disease characterized by persistent skin lesions and increased mortality, leading to this study. For detection of infection, skin and buccal swab methods showed comparable sensitivities in nude mice. Various prevention, treatment, and eradication strategies were evaluated through clinical assessment, microbiology, and histopathology. In experimentally naïve athymic nude mice, a 2-wk course of prophylactic amoxicillin-containing diet (1200 ppm amoxicillin; effective dose, 200 mg/kg) was ineffective at preventing infection or disease. There was also no significant difference in disease duration or severity in athymic nude mice that received amoxicillin diet or penicillin-streptomycin topical spray (penicillin, 2500 U/mL; streptomycin, 2500 μg/mL). Prolonged treatment with 4 or 8 wk of amoxicillin diet cleared only a small number of athymic nude mice that had subclinical C. bovis infections. Antibiotic sensitivity of C. bovis isolates demonstrated a small colony isolate with less susceptibility to all antibiotics compared with a large colony isolate. Resistance did not appear to develop after prolonged treatment with amoxicillin. Provocation testing by administration of cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg i.p. every 48 to 72 h for 90 d) to subclinically infected athymic nude mice resulted in prolonged clinical disease that waxed and waned without progression to severe disease. Our findings suggest that antibiotic prophylaxis and treatment of clinical disease in experimentally naïve mice is unrewarding, eradication of bacterial infection is difficult, and severe disease associated with C. bovis is likely multifactorial.

  15. Bayesian Geostatistical Analysis and Ecoclimatic Determinants of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection among Horses

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Courtney; Davis, Elizabeth G.; Beard, Laurie A.; Lubbers, Brian V.; Raghavan, Ram K.

    2015-01-01

    Kansas witnessed an unprecedented outbreak in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection among horses, a disease commonly referred to as pigeon fever during fall 2012. Bayesian geostatistical models were developed to identify key environmental and climatic risk factors associated with C. pseudotuberculosis infection in horses. Positive infection status among horses (cases) was determined by positive test results for characteristic abscess formation, positive bacterial culture on purulent material obtained from a lanced abscess (n = 82), or positive serologic evidence of exposure to organism (≥1:512)(n = 11). Horses negative for these tests (n = 172)(controls) were considered free of infection. Information pertaining to horse demographics and stabled location were obtained through review of medical records and/or contact with horse owners via telephone. Covariate information for environmental and climatic determinants were obtained from USDA (soil attributes), USGS (land use/land cover), and NASA MODIS and NASA Prediction of Worldwide Renewable Resources (climate). Candidate covariates were screened using univariate regression models followed by Bayesian geostatistical models with and without covariates. The best performing model indicated a protective effect for higher soil moisture content (OR = 0.53, 95% CrI = 0.25, 0.71), and detrimental effects for higher land surface temperature (≥35°C) (OR = 2.81, 95% CrI = 2.21, 3.85) and habitat fragmentation (OR = 1.31, 95% CrI = 1.27, 2.22) for C. pseudotuberculosis infection status in horses, while age, gender and breed had no effect. Preventative and ecoclimatic significance of these findings are discussed. PMID:26473728

  16. Heme Binding by Corynebacterium diphtheriae HmuT: Function and Heme Environment.

    PubMed

    Draganova, Elizabeth B; Akbas, Neval; Adrian, Seth A; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S; Collins, Daniel P; Dawson, John H; Allen, Courtni E; Schmitt, Michael P; Rodgers, Kenton R; Dixon, Dabney W

    2015-11-01

    The heme uptake pathway (hmu) of Corynebacterium diphtheriae utilizes multiple proteins to bind and transport heme into the cell. One of these proteins, HmuT, delivers heme to the ABC transporter HmuUV. In this study, the axial ligation of the heme in ferric HmuT is probed by examination of wild-type (WT) HmuT and a series of conserved heme pocket residue mutants, H136A, Y235A, and M292A. Characterization by UV-visible, resonance Raman, and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopies indicates that H136 and Y235 are the axial ligands in ferric HmuT. Consistent with this assignment of axial ligands, ferric WT and H136A HmuT are difficult to reduce while Y235A is reduced readily in the presence of dithionite. The FeCO Raman shifts in WT, H136A, and Y235A HmuT-CO complexes provide further evidence of the axial ligand assignments. Additionally, these frequencies provide insight into the nonbonding environment of the heme pocket. Ferrous Y235A and the Y235A-CO complex reveal that the imidazole of H136 exists in two forms, one neutral and one with imidazolate character, consistent with a hydrogen bond acceptor on the H136 side of the heme. The ferric fluoride complex of Y235A reveals the presence of at least one hydrogen bond donor on the Y235 side of the heme. Hemoglobin utilization assays showed that the axial Y235 ligand is required for heme uptake in HmuT. PMID:26478504

  17. Surveillance of a Ventilated Rack System for Corynebacterium bovis by Sampling Exhaust-Air Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Christopher A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium bovis causes an opportunistic infection of nude (Foxn1, nu/nu) mice, leading to nude mouse hyperkeratotic dermatitis (scaly skin disease). Enzootic in many nude mouse colonies, C. bovis spreads rapidly to naive nude mice, despite modern husbandry practices, and is very difficult to eradicate. To facilitate rapid detection in support of eradication efforts, we investigated a surveillance method based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) evaluation of swabs collected from the horizontal exhaust manifold (HEM) of an IVC rack system. We first evaluated the efficacy of rack sanitation methods for removing C. bovis DNA from the HEM of racks housing endemic colonies of infected nude mice. Pressurized water used to flush the racks’ air exhaust system followed by a standard rack-washer cycle was ineffective in eliminating C. bovis DNA. Only after autoclaving did all sanitized racks test negative for C. bovis DNA. We then measured the effects of stage of infection (early or established), cage density, and cage location on the rack on time-to-detection at the HEM. Stage of infection significantly affected time-to-detection, independent of cage location. Early infections required 7.3 ± 1.2 d whereas established infections required 1 ± 0 d for detection of C. bovis at the HEM. Cage density influenced the quantity of C. bovis DNA detected but not time-to-detection. The location of the cage on the rack affected the time-to-detection only during early C. bovis infections. We suggest that qPCR swabs of HEM are useful during the routine surveillance of nude mouse colonies for C. bovis infection. PMID:26817981

  18. Biofilm formation and fibrinogen and fibronectin binding activities by Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum invasive strains.

    PubMed

    Souza, Monica Cristina; dos Santos, Louisy Sanches; Sousa, Leonardo Paiva; Faria, Yuri Vieira; Ramos, Juliana Nunes; Sabbadini, Priscila Soares; da Santos, Cíntia Silva; Nagao, Prescilla Emy; Vieira, Verônica Viana; Gomes, Débora Leandro Rama; Hirata Júnior, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza

    2015-06-01

    Biofilm-related infections are considered a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospital environments. Biofilms allow microorganisms to exchange genetic material and to become persistent colonizers and/or multiresistant to antibiotics. Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum (CPS), a commensal bacterium that colonizes skin and mucosal sites has become progressively multiresistant and responsible for severe nosocomial infections. However, virulence factors of this emergent pathogen remain unclear. Herein, we report the adhesive properties and biofilm formation on hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (plastic) abiotic surfaces by CPS strains isolated from patients with localized (ATCC10700/Pharyngitis) and systemic (HHC1507/Bacteremia) infections. Adherence to polystyrene attributed to hydrophobic interactions between bacterial cells and this negatively charged surface indicated the involvement of cell surface hydrophobicity in the initial stage of biofilm formation. Attached microorganisms multiplied and formed microcolonies that accumulated as multilayered cell clusters, a step that involved intercellular adhesion and synthesis of extracellular matrix molecules. Further growth led to the formation of dense bacterial aggregates embedded in the exopolymeric matrix surrounded by voids, typical of mature biofilms. Data also showed CPS recognizing human fibrinogen (Fbg) and fibronectin (Fn) and involvement of these sera components in formation of "conditioning films". These findings suggested that biofilm formation may be associated with the expression of different adhesins. CPS may form biofilms in vivo possibly by an adherent biofilm mode of growth in vitro currently demonstrated on hydrophilic and hydrophobic abiotic surfaces. The affinity to Fbg and Fn and the biofilm-forming ability may contribute to the establishment and dissemination of infection caused by CPS.

  19. Crystal structures of halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyases from Corynebacterium sp. N-1074.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumiaki; Yu, Fujio; Ohtaki, Akashi; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Noguchi, Keiichi; Yohda, Masafumi; Odaka, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyase (H-Lyase) is a bacterial enzyme that is involved in the degradation of halohydrins. This enzyme catalyzes the intramolecular nucleophilic displacement of a halogen by a vicinal hydroxyl group in halohydrins to produce the corresponding epoxides. The epoxide products are subsequently hydrolyzed by an epoxide hydrolase, yielding the corresponding 1, 2-diol. Until now, six different H-Lyases have been studied. These H-Lyases are grouped into three subtypes (A, B, and C) based on amino acid sequence similarities and exhibit different enantioselectivity. Corynebacterium sp. strain N-1074 has two different isozymes of H-Lyase, HheA (A-type) and HheB (B-type). We have determined their crystal structures to elucidate the differences in enantioselectivity among them. All three groups share a similar structure, including catalytic sites. The lack of enantioselectivity of HheA seems to be due to the relatively wide size of the substrate tunnel compared to that of other H-Lyases. Among the B-type H-Lyases, HheB shows relatively high enantioselectivity compared to that of HheBGP1 . This difference seems to be due to amino acid replacements at the active site tunnel. The binding mode of 1, 3-dicyano-2-propanol at the catalytic site in the crystal structure of the HheB-DiCN complex suggests that the product should be (R)-epichlorohydrin, which agrees with the enantioselectivity of HheB. Comparison with the structure of HheC provides a clue for the difference in their enantioselectivity.

  20. Bayesian Geostatistical Analysis and Ecoclimatic Determinants of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Infection among Horses.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Courtney; Davis, Elizabeth G; Beard, Laurie A; Lubbers, Brian V; Raghavan, Ram K

    2015-01-01

    Kansas witnessed an unprecedented outbreak in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection among horses, a disease commonly referred to as pigeon fever during fall 2012. Bayesian geostatistical models were developed to identify key environmental and climatic risk factors associated with C. pseudotuberculosis infection in horses. Positive infection status among horses (cases) was determined by positive test results for characteristic abscess formation, positive bacterial culture on purulent material obtained from a lanced abscess (n = 82), or positive serologic evidence of exposure to organism (≥ 1:512)(n = 11). Horses negative for these tests (n = 172)(controls) were considered free of infection. Information pertaining to horse demographics and stabled location were obtained through review of medical records and/or contact with horse owners via telephone. Covariate information for environmental and climatic determinants were obtained from USDA (soil attributes), USGS (land use/land cover), and NASA MODIS and NASA Prediction of Worldwide Renewable Resources (climate). Candidate covariates were screened using univariate regression models followed by Bayesian geostatistical models with and without covariates. The best performing model indicated a protective effect for higher soil moisture content (OR = 0.53, 95% CrI = 0.25, 0.71), and detrimental effects for higher land surface temperature (≥ 35°C) (OR = 2.81, 95% CrI = 2.21, 3.85) and habitat fragmentation (OR = 1.31, 95% CrI = 1.27, 2.22) for C. pseudotuberculosis infection status in horses, while age, gender and breed had no effect. Preventative and ecoclimatic significance of these findings are discussed. PMID:26473728

  1. Crystal structures of halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyases from Corynebacterium sp. N-1074.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumiaki; Yu, Fujio; Ohtaki, Akashi; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Noguchi, Keiichi; Yohda, Masafumi; Odaka, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyase (H-Lyase) is a bacterial enzyme that is involved in the degradation of halohydrins. This enzyme catalyzes the intramolecular nucleophilic displacement of a halogen by a vicinal hydroxyl group in halohydrins to produce the corresponding epoxides. The epoxide products are subsequently hydrolyzed by an epoxide hydrolase, yielding the corresponding 1, 2-diol. Until now, six different H-Lyases have been studied. These H-Lyases are grouped into three subtypes (A, B, and C) based on amino acid sequence similarities and exhibit different enantioselectivity. Corynebacterium sp. strain N-1074 has two different isozymes of H-Lyase, HheA (A-type) and HheB (B-type). We have determined their crystal structures to elucidate the differences in enantioselectivity among them. All three groups share a similar structure, including catalytic sites. The lack of enantioselectivity of HheA seems to be due to the relatively wide size of the substrate tunnel compared to that of other H-Lyases. Among the B-type H-Lyases, HheB shows relatively high enantioselectivity compared to that of HheBGP1 . This difference seems to be due to amino acid replacements at the active site tunnel. The binding mode of 1, 3-dicyano-2-propanol at the catalytic site in the crystal structure of the HheB-DiCN complex suggests that the product should be (R)-epichlorohydrin, which agrees with the enantioselectivity of HheB. Comparison with the structure of HheC provides a clue for the difference in their enantioselectivity. PMID:26422370

  2. Heat-killed Corynebacterium parvum enhances endotoxin lung injury with increased TNF production in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, S; Ishizaka, A; Sayama, K; Sakamaki, F; Nakamura, H; Terashima, T; Waki, Y; Soejima, K; Nakamura, M; Matsubara, H; Fujishima, S; Kanazawa, M

    1996-03-01

    Corynebacterium parvum (CP) is known to increase susceptibility to endotoxin, which is associated with increased production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We investigated the effect of CP-priming on the pathogenesis of acute lung injury caused by intratracheal Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). Guinea pigs were divided into four groups: (1) control (n=6), (2) CP-alone (n=6), (3) LPS-alone (n=6) and (4) CP + LPS (n=6). A CP dose of 4 mg/kg was injected intraperitoneally 7 d before the study. Animals were observed for 4 h after intratracheal administration of 0.02 mg/kg of LPS. The lung wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/D), [125I] albumin concentration ratio of lung tissue to plasma (T/P) and of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid to plasma (B/P) and differential cell count in BAL fluid were examined. In the LPS-alone group, neither excess lung water nor increased albumin leakage was observed. The CP + LPS group showed increased lung water and albumin leakage as compared with the other three groups (p<0.05). We also observed increased cell counts in BAL fluid (p<0.05), in the CP + LPS group. The spleen weight was increased in guinea pigs pretreated with CP, indicating reticuloendothelial system (RES) activation. In the CP + LPS group, the TNF level was increased in both plasma and BAL fluid. We conclude that pretreatment with CP enhances LPS-induced acute lung injury in parallel with increasing TNF production, which suggests that the activation of mononuclear phagocytes contributes to increased susceptibility to intratracheal endotoxin in guinea pigs. PMID:8630544

  3. Targets of nitric oxide in a mouse model of liver inflammation by Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Chamulitrat, W; Jordan, S J; Mason, R P; Litton, A L; Wilson, J G; Wood, E R; Wolberg, G; Molina y Vedia, L

    1995-01-10

    Treatment of mice with Corynebacterium parvum induces chronic inflammation. This treatment followed by an injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produces hepatic necrosis and death. We examined liver tissue by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and found that, in addition to the previously reported nonheme nitrosyl complexes, heme nitrosyl complexes were also formed. Hemoglobin nitrosyl complexes measured in the whole blood of mice treated with C. parvum were not increased after additional LPS treatment. However, this treatment significantly increased the heme nitrosyl complexes in the liver, whereas the nonheme nitrosyl complex concentration was unaffected. EPR signals from whole blood and liver tissues from mice treated with C. parvum and C. parvum + LPS were inhibited by prolonged treatment with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMA). Nitric oxide (.NO) is known to bind to cytochrome P450 heme, and we consistently found a suppression of EPR signals attributable to ferric low-spin cytochrome P450/P420 peaks in the livers of mice treated with C. parvum and C. parvum + LPS. By performing analyses of EPR spectra obtained from hepatocytes exposed to .NO, we were able to unambiguously identify EPR signals attributable to cytochrome P420 and nonheme nitrosyl complexes in the livers of both treatments. Deconvolution of the composite in vivo EPR spectra indicated that hemoglobin nitrosyl complexes contributed weakly in the C. parvum livers, but threefold more in the C. parvum + LPS livers, suggesting that hemorrhage may have occurred. Experiments with L-NMA treatment revealed that this additional .NO production did not correlate with hepatic necrosis and onset of death. Immunoprecipitation of liver cytosols from C. parvum- and (C. parvum + LPS)-treated mice using an antibody against mouse inducible nitric oxide synthase showed that this enzyme was indeed present in the cytosolic fractions and was absent in those from control livers. Our novel detection of

  4. Vaccination with alum-precipitated recombinant Ancylostoma-secreted protein 1 protects mice against challenge infections with infective hookworm (Ancylostoma caninum) larvae.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, K; Hawdon, J; Hotez, P

    1996-12-01

    Ancylostoma-secreted protein 1 (ASP-1) is the major protein secreted by infective hookworm larvae (Ancylostoma caninum). The Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant protein was evaluated as a vaccine antigen in a mouse model of ancylostomiasis. A. caninum larvae migrate through mouse lungs, with maximal migration occurring 48-54 h after oral infection. Quantitative larval recovery from the lungs at this time was used as an end point for vaccine evaluation. All mice developed antibodies to recombinant ASP-1 (rASP-1) after immunization and boosting with the alum-precipitated protein. The immunized mice had their worm burden reduced 79% (P < .0001) compared with controls. Immunization with rASP-1 in the presence of Corynebacterium parvum adjuvant also showed a vaccine effect (63% protection; P < .0001). The possibility that this protective effect resulted from delayed larval lung entry was excluded. rASP-1 offers promise as a hookworm vaccine antigen. PMID:8940240

  5. Meiotic recombination mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized cell division at the origin of the haploid cells that eventually develop into the gametes. It therefore lies at the heart of Mendelian heredity. Recombination and redistribution of the homologous chromosomes arising during meiosis constitute an important source of genetic diversity, conferring to meiosis a particularly important place in the evolution and the diversification of the species. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing meiotic recombination has considerably progressed these last decades, benefiting from complementary approaches led on various model species. An overview of these mechanisms will be provided as well as a discussion on the implications of these recent discoveries. PMID:27180110

  6. Identification of clinically relevant Corynebacterium strains by Api Coryne, MALDI-TOF-mass spectrometry and molecular approaches.

    PubMed

    Alibi, S; Ferjani, A; Gaillot, O; Marzouk, M; Courcol, R; Boukadida, J

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) for the identification of 97 Corynebacterium clinical in comparison to identification strains by Api Coryne and MALDI-TOF-MS using 16S rRNA gene and hypervariable region of rpoB genes sequencing as a reference method. C. striatum was the predominant species isolated followed by C. amycolatum. There was an agreement between Api Coryne strips and MALDI-TOF-MS identification in 88.65% of cases. MALDI-TOF-MS was unable to differentiate C. aurimucosum from C. minutissimum and C. minutissimum from C. singulare but reliably identify 92 of 97 (94.84%) strains. Two strains remained incompletely identified to the species level by MALDI-TOF-MS and molecular approaches. They belonged to Cellulomonas and Pseudoclavibacter genus. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF-MS is a rapid and reliable method for the identification of Corynebacterium species. However, some limits have been noted and have to be resolved by the application of molecular methods.

  7. Effect of non-cell Corynebacterium Parvum on differentiation and maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenghu; Gao, Shangxian; Qu, Zhonghua; Guo, Chun; Wu, Ping; Shi, Yanping; Zhang, Lining

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium parvum (CP), with their potent anti-tumor activities, has been well documented. Non-cell Corynebacterium Parvum (NCPP) is a neotype of biological preparation, which based on manipulating CP with nanotechnology. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of NCPP/CP on bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) in tumor-bearing mice, especially focused on the differentiation and maturation of these BMDCs. BM cells from tumor-bearing mice administrated with NCPP/CP were analyzed by flow cytometry, which exhibit enhanced numbers of DCs and macrophages. In the meanwhile, flow cytometry analysis showed mild but significant difference for CD80 expression on these LPS- treated BMDCs between NCPP/CP administrated mice and the control animals. Furthermore, antigen presenting assay for these LPS-treated BMDCs showed significant difference for cytolytic assay of CD8+T cells against B16 melanoma cells, which indicate that NCPP treatments have enhanced the cytolytic rates of CD8+T cells from 47.9%±2.3% to 54.2%±2.4%. The data suggest that NCPP/CP treatment can efficiently facilitate the generation of BMDCs in vivo and enhance the maturation of these BMDCs in vitro. PMID:22676053

  8. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction to identify and determine the toxigenicity of Corynebacterium spp with zoonotic potential and an overview of human and animal infections

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Luciene de Fátima Costa; Ribeiro, Dayana; Hirata, Raphael; Pacheco, Luis Gustavo Carvalho; Souza, Monica Cristina; dos Santos, Louisy Sanches; dos Santos, Cíntia Silva; Salah, Mohammad; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Ribeiro, Marcio Garcia; Selim, Salah A; Azevedo, Vasco Ariston de Carvalho; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza

    2013-01-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Corynebacterium ulcerans and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis constitute a group of potentially toxigenic microorganisms that are related to different infectious processes in animal and human hosts. Currently, there is a lack of information on the prevalence of disease caused by these pathogens, which is partially due to a reduction in the frequency of routine laboratory testing. In this study, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) assay that can simultaneously identify and determine the toxigenicity of these corynebacterial species with zoonotic potential was developed. This assay uses five primer pairs targeting the following genes: rpoB (Corynebacterium spp), 16S rRNA (C. ulcerans and C. pseudotuberculosis), pld (C. pseudotuberculosis), dtxR (C. diphtheriae) and tox [diphtheria toxin (DT) ]. In addition to describing this assay, we review the literature regarding the diseases caused by these pathogens. Of the 213 coryneform strains tested, the mPCR results for all toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains of C . diphtheriae, C. ulcerans and C. pseudotuberculosis were in 100% agreement with the results of standard biochemical tests and PCR-DT. As an alternative to conventional methods, due to its advantages of specificity and speed, the mPCR assay used in this study may successfully be applied for the diagnosis of human and/or animal diseases caused by potentially toxigenic corynebacterial species. PMID:23778659

  9. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction to identify and determine the toxigenicity of Corynebacterium spp with zoonotic potential and an overview of human and animal infections.

    PubMed

    Torres, Luciene de Fátima Costa; Ribeiro, Dayana; Hirata Jr, Raphael; Pacheco, Luis Gustavo Carvalho; Souza, Monica Cristina; dos Santos, Louisy Sanches; dos Santos, Cíntia Silva; Salah, Mohammad; Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi da; Ribeiro, Marcio Garcia; Selim, Salah A; Azevedo, Vasco Ariston de Carvalho; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza

    2013-05-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Corynebacterium ulcerans and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis constitute a group of potentially toxigenic microorganisms that are related to different infectious processes in animal and human hosts. Currently, there is a lack of information on the prevalence of disease caused by these pathogens, which is partially due to a reduction in the frequency of routine laboratory testing. In this study, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) assay that can simultaneously identify and determine the toxigenicity of these corynebacterial species with zoonotic potential was developed. This assay uses five primer pairs targeting the following genes: rpoB (Corynebacterium spp), 16S rRNA (C. ulcerans and C. pseudotuberculosis), pld (C. pseudotuberculosis), dtxR (C. diphtheriae) and tox [diphtheria toxin (DT) ]. In addition to describing this assay, we review the literature regarding the diseases caused by these pathogens. Of the 213 coryneform strains tested, the mPCR results for all toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains of C . diphtheriae, C. ulcerans and C. pseudotuberculosis were in 100% agreement with the results of standard biochemical tests and PCR-DT. As an alternative to conventional methods, due to its advantages of specificity and speed, the mPCR assay used in this study may successfully be applied for the diagnosis of human and/or animal diseases caused by potentially toxigenic corynebacterial species.

  10. Complete Genome Sequences of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Strains 3/99-5 and 42/02-A, Isolated from Sheep in Scotland and Australia, Respectively

    PubMed Central

    Pethick, Florence E.; Lainson, Alex F.; Yaga, Raja; Flockhart, Allen; Smith, David G. E.; Donachie, Willie; Cerdeira, Louise T.; Silva, Artur; Bol, Erik; Lopes, Thiago S.; Barbosa, Maria S.; Pinto, Anne C.; dos Santos, Anderson R.; Soares, Siomar C.; Almeida, Sintia S.; Guimaraes, Luis C.; Aburjaile, Flavia F.; Abreu, Vinicius A. C.; Ribeiro, Dayana; Fiaux, Karina K.; Diniz, Carlos A. A.; Barbosa, Eudes G. V.; Pereira, Ulisses P.; Hassan, Syed S.; Ali, Amjad; Bakhtiar, Syeda M.; Dorella, Fernanda A.; Carneiro, Adriana R.; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Rocha, Flavia S.; Schneider, Maria P. C.; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of two ovine-pathogenic Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis isolates: strain 3/99-5, which represents the first C. pseudotuberculosis genome originating from the United Kingdom, and 42/02-A, the second from Australia. These genome sequences will contribute to the objective of determining the global pan-genome of this bacterium. PMID:22887652

  11. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  12. Recombineering Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  13. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  14. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  15. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  16. The recombination epoch revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons.

  17. A novel bioremediation strategy for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants using salt tolerant Corynebacterium variabile HRJ4 and biochar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hairong; Tang, Jingchun; Wang, Lin; Liu, Juncheng; Gurav, Ranjit Gajanan; Sun, Kejing

    2016-09-01

    The present work aimed to develop a novel strategy to bioremediate the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants in the environment. Salt tolerant bacterium was isolated from Dagang oilfield, China and identified as Corynebacterium variabile HRJ4 based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The bacterium had a high salt tolerant capability and biochar was developed as carrier for the bacterium. The bacteria with biochar were most effective in degradation of n-alkanes (C16, C18, C19, C26, C28) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NAP, PYR) mixture. The result demonstrated that immobilization of C. variabile HRJ4 with biochar showed higher degradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (THPs) up to 78.9% after 7-day of incubation as compared to the free leaving bacteria. The approach of this study will be helpful in clean-up of petroleum-contamination in the environments through bioremediation process using eco-friendly and cost effective materials like biochar. PMID:27593267

  18. Dielectronic recombination theory

    SciTech Connect

    LaGattuta, K.J.

    1991-12-31

    A theory now in wide use for the calculation of dielectronic recombination cross sections ({sigma}{sup DR}) and rate coefficients ({alpha}{sup DR}) was one introduced originally by Feshbach for nuclear physics applications, and then later adapted for atomic scattering problems by Hahn. In the following, we briefly review this theory in a very general form, which allows one to account for the effects of overlapping and interacting resonances, as well as continuum-continuum coupling. An extension of our notation will then also allow for the inclusion of the effects of direct radiative recombination, along with a treatment of the interference between radiative and dielectronic recombination. Other approaches to the calculation of {sigma}{sup DR} have been described by Fano and by Seaton. We will not consider those theories here. Calculations of {alpha}{sup DR} have progressed considerably over the last 25 years, since the early work of Burgess. Advances in the reliability of theoretical predictions have also been promoted recently b a variety of direct laboratory measurements of {sigma}{sup DR}. While the measurements of {sigma}{sup DR} for {delta}n {ne} 0 excitations have tended to agree very well with calculations, the case of {delta}n = 0 has been much problematic. However, by invoking a mechanism originally proposed by Jacobs, which takes into account the effect of stray electric fields on high Rydberg states (HRS) participating in the DR process, new calculations have improved the agreement between theory and experiment for these cases. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies still remain.

  19. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  20. Innovation by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, Devin L; Smith, Matthew A; Arnold, Frances H

    2013-12-01

    Swapping fragments among protein homologs can produce chimeric proteins with a wide range of properties, including properties not exhibited by the parents. Computational methods that use information from structures and sequence alignments have been used to design highly functional chimeras and chimera libraries. Recombination has generated proteins with diverse thermostability and mechanical stability, enzyme substrate specificity, and optogenetic properties. Linear regression, Gaussian processes, and support vector machine learning have been used to model sequence-function relationships and predict useful chimeras. These approaches enable engineering of protein chimeras with desired functions, as well as elucidation of the structural basis for these functions.

  1. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  2. Recombinant electric storage battery

    SciTech Connect

    Flicker, R.P.; Fenstermacher, S.

    1989-10-10

    This patent describes a recombinant storage battery. It comprises: a plurality of positive plates containing about 2 to 4 percent of antimony based upon the total weight of the alloy and positive active material, and essentially antimony free negative plates in a closed case; a fibrous sheet plate separator between adjacent ones of the plates, and a body of an electrolyte to which the sheet separators are inert absorbed by each of the separators and maintained in contact with each of the adjacent ones of the plates. Each of the separator sheets comprising first fibers which impart to the sheet a given absorbency greater than 90 percent relative to the electrolyte and second fibers which impart to the sheet a different absorbency less than 80 percent relative to the electrolyte. The first and second fibers being present in such proportions that each of the sheet separators has an absorbency with respect to the electrolyte of from 75 to 95 percent and the second fibers being present in such proportions that the battery has a recombination rate adequate to compensate for gassing.

  3. Whole-Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium auriscanis Strain CIP 106629 Isolated from a Dog with Bilateral Otitis from the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Sandeep; Jamal, Syed Babar; Oliveira, Leticia Castro; Clermont, Dominique; Bizet, Chantal; Mariano, Diego; de Carvalho, Paulo Vinicius Sanches Daltro; Souza, Flavia; Pereira, Felipe Luiz; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Guimarães, Luis C; Dorella, Fernanda; Carvalho, Alex; Leal, Carlos; Barh, Debmalya; Figueiredo, Henrique; Hassan, Syed Shah; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe a set of features of Corynebacterium auriscanis CIP 106629 and details of the draft genome sequence and annotation. The genome comprises a 2.5-Mbp-long single circular genome with 1,797 protein-coding genes, 5 rRNA, 50 tRNA, and 403 pseudogenes, with a G+C content of 58.50%. PMID:27516502

  4. Whole-Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium auriscanis Strain CIP 106629 Isolated from a Dog with Bilateral Otitis from the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sandeep; Jamal, Syed Babar; Oliveira, Leticia Castro; Clermont, Dominique; Bizet, Chantal; Mariano, Diego; de Carvalho, Paulo Vinicius Sanches Daltro; Souza, Flavia; Pereira, Felipe Luiz; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Dorella, Fernanda; Carvalho, Alex; Leal, Carlos; Barh, Debmalya; Figueiredo, Henrique; Hassan, Syed Shah; Azevedo, Vasco

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe a set of features of Corynebacterium auriscanis CIP 106629 and details of the draft genome sequence and annotation. The genome comprises a 2.5-Mbp-long single circular genome with 1,797 protein-coding genes, 5 rRNA, 50 tRNA, and 403 pseudogenes, with a G+C content of 58.50%. PMID:27516502

  5. In Vitro Activity of TD-1792, a Multivalent Glycopeptide-Cephalosporin Antibiotic, against 377 Strains of Anaerobic Bacteria and 34 Strains of Corynebacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Citron, Diane M.; Warren, Yumi A.; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2012-01-01

    TD-1792 is a multivalent glycopeptide-cephalosporin heterodimer antibiotic with potent activity against Gram-positive bacteria. We tested TD-1792 against 377 anaerobes and 34 strains of Corynebacterium species. Against nearly all Gram-positive strains, TD-1792 had an MIC90 of 0.25 μg/ml and was typically 3 to 7 dilutions more active than vancomycin and daptomycin. PMID:22290981

  6. Draft Genome Sequence for the Type Strain of Corynebacterium afermentans LCDC 88-0199T, Isolated from a Human Blood Culture.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Anne-Marie; Bernard, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    A draft genome for Corynebacterium afermentans LCDC 88-0199(T) was investigated. The size of the genome was 2,345,615 bp with an observed G+C content of 64.85%. Annotation revealed 2 rRNA sequences, 54 tRNA genes, and 2,164 coding sequences. Genome coverage was 85× and consisted of 24 contigs with an N50 of 187,988 bp.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence for the Type Strain of Corynebacterium afermentans LCDC 88-0199T, Isolated from a Human Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    A draft genome for Corynebacterium afermentans LCDC 88-0199T was investigated. The size of the genome was 2,345,615 bp with an observed G+C content of 64.85%. Annotation revealed 2 rRNA sequences, 54 tRNA genes, and 2,164 coding sequences. Genome coverage was 85× and consisted of 24 contigs with an N50 of 187,988 bp. PMID:27389276

  8. Unraveling recombination rate evolution using ancestral recombination maps

    PubMed Central

    Munch, Kasper; Schierup, Mikkel H; Mailund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recombination maps of ancestral species can be constructed from comparative analyses of genomes from closely related species, exemplified by a recently published map of the human-chimpanzee ancestor. Such maps resolve differences in recombination rate between species into changes along individual branches in the speciation tree, and allow identification of associated changes in the genomic sequences. We describe how coalescent hidden Markov models are able to call individual recombination events in ancestral species through inference of incomplete lineage sorting along a genomic alignment. In the great apes, speciation events are sufficiently close in time that a map can be inferred for the ancestral species at each internal branch - allowing evolution of recombination rate to be tracked over evolutionary time scales from speciation event to speciation event. We see this approach as a way of characterizing the evolution of recombination rate and the genomic properties that influence it. PMID:25043668

  9. Primordial magnetogenesis before recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, Ophélia; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2016-04-01

    The origin of large magnetic fields in the Universe remains currently unknown. We investigate here a mechanism before recombination based on known physics. The source of the vorticity is due to the changes in the photon distribution function caused by the fluctuations in the background photons. We show that the magnetic field generated in the MHD limit, due to the Coulomb scattering, is of the order 10-49 G on a coherence scale of 10 kpc. We explicitly show that the magnetic fields generated from this process are sustainable and are not erased by resistive diffusion. We compare the results with current observations and discuss the implications. Our seed magnetic fields are generated on small scales whereas the main mechanisms studied in the literature are on scale bigger than 1 Mpc. However, compared to more exotic theories generating seed magnetic fields on similar scales, the strength of our fields are generally smaller.

  10. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Claudia; Späte, Kira; Krampe, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still unsatisfactory and essentially non-existing for the progressive course of the disease. Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) may be a promising neuroprotective/neuroregenerative treatment of MS. In the nervous system, EPO acts anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic and plasticity-modulating. Beneficial effects have been shown in animal models of various neurological and psychiatric diseases, including different models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. EPO is also effective in human brain disease, as shown in double-blind placebo-controlled clinical studies on ischemic stroke and chronic schizophrenia. An exploratory study on chronic progressive MS yielded lasting improvement in motor and cognitive performance upon high-dose long-term EPO treatment. PMID:21180577

  11. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  12. The recombination of genetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic recombination is the major mechanism by which new arrangements of genetic elements are produced in all living organisms, from the simplest bacterial viruses to humans. This volume presents an overview of the types of recombination found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  13. Bimolecular recombination in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Girish; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    The recombination of electrons and holes is a major loss mechanism in photovoltaic devices that controls their performance. We review scientific literature on bimolecular recombination (BR) in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices to bring forward existing ideas on the origin and nature of BR and highlight both experimental and theoretical work done to quantify its extent. For these systems, Langevin theory fails to explain BR, and recombination dynamics turns out to be dependent on mobility, temperature, electric field, charge carrier concentration, and trapped charges. Relationships among the photocurrent, open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and morphology are discussed. Finally, we highlight the recent emergence of a molecular-level picture of recombination, taking into account the spin and delocalization of charges. Together with the macroscopic picture of recombination, these new insights allow for a comprehensive understanding of BR and provide design principles for future materials and devices.

  14. Vaccination with recombinant Parasite Surface Antigen 2 from Leishmania major induces a Th1 type of immune response but does not protect against infection.

    PubMed

    Sjölander, A; Baldwin, T M; Curtis, J M; Bengtsson, K L; Handman, E

    1998-12-01

    Vaccination with the native Parasite Surface Antigen 2 of Leishmania major with Corynebacterium parvum as adjuvant protects mice from leishmaniasis through a Th1 mediated response. Here we show that vaccination with a recombinant form of this protein, purified from Escherichia coli and administered in iscoms or with C. parvum as adjuvant, does not induce protective immunity despite the induction of Th1 responses. The results suggest that protective immunity depends on the ability of the vaccinating antigen to induce Th1-like T cells with ability to be recalled by infection. Therefore, the conformation of antigens may play a more major role for the induction of T cell mediated immunity than originally considered. PMID:9796067

  15. Retroviral recombination during reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, D W; Duesberg, P H

    1990-03-01

    After mixed infection, up to half of related retroviruses are recombinants. During infection, retroviral RNA genomes are first converted to complementary DNA (cDNA) and then to double-stranded DNA. Thus recombination could occur during reverse transcription, by RNA template switching, or after reverse transcription, by breakage and reunion of DNA. It has not been possible to distinguish between these two potential mechanisms of recombination because both single-stranded cDNA and double-stranded proviral DNA exist in infected cells during the eclipse period. Therefore we have analyzed for recombinant molecules among cDNA products transcribed in vitro from RNA of disrupted virions. Since recombinants from allelic parents can only be distinguished from parental genomes by point mutations, we have examined the cDNAs from virions with distinct genetic structures for recombinant-specific size and sequence markers. The parents share a common internal allele that allows homology-directed recombination, but each contains specific flanking sequences. One parent is a synthetically altered Harvey murine sarcoma virus RNA that lacks a retroviral 3' terminus but carries a Moloney murine retrovirus-derived envelope gene (env) fragment 3' of its transforming ras gene. The other parent is intact Moloney virus. Using a Harvey-specific 5' primer and a Moloney-specific 3' primer, we have found recombinant cDNAs with the polymerase chain reaction, proving directly that retroviruses can recombine during reverse transcription unassisted by cellular enzymes, probably by template switching during cDNA synthesis. The recombinants that were obtained in vitro were identical with those obtained in parallel experiments in vivo.

  16. Corynebacterium parvum pleurodesis and survival is not significantly influenced by pleural pH and glucose level.

    PubMed

    Bilaçeroğlu, S; Cağirici, U; Perim, K; Ozacar, R

    1998-02-01

    This study was carried out in the pulmonary department of a referral training hospital for thoracic medicine and surgery, with the aim of assessing the effects of pH and glucose level of a pleural effusion (PE) on survival and the response to pleurodesis (PD) with Corynebacterium parvum. A prospective study was carried out in 204 patients with recurrent, symptomatic PEs (73 benign, 131 malignant). Fifty eight per cent of 204 PEs had low pH (< 7.20; 7.01 +/- 0.14) nd glucose levels (< 60 mg.dL-1; 36 +/- 14 mg.dL-1), whereas the remaining 42% had higher pH (> or = 7.20; 7.36 +/- 0.07 and glucose levels (> or = 60 mg.dL-1; 79 +/- 16 mg.dL-1). PD was attempted twice with 7 mg of C. parvum injected through chest tube in all patients, who were then followed up for the outcome of PD and for survival from the time of PD until death or the closure of the study (August 1996). Of 204 cases, 201 were evaluable for survival and outcome of PD. In 91% of the low-and 82% of the high-pH/glucose benign PEs, complete PD was achieved while the corresponding values for the malignant PEs were 79% and 87%, respectively (p > 0.05). Six per cent of low-and 8% of high-pH benign PEs, and 13% of low- and 9% of high-pH malignant PEs were palliated with partial PD. Failures were 3% and 10% in the low- versus high-pH benign groups, and 8% and 4% in the low- versus high-pH malignancies, respectively. All 201 cases maintained the immediate post-PD outcome throughout the follow-up. Average survival was 21.8 months in high-pH benign PEs versus 21.1 months in low-pH benign PEs, and 9.9 versus 8.7 months, in high- and low-pH malignant PEs, respectively (p > 0.05). We deduce that, regarding survival and the response to pleurodesis with Corynebacterium parvum, there is no significant difference between low- and high-pH/glucose pleural effusions in malignant, or benign cases. PMID:9632902

  17. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  18. Analysis of interchromosomal mitotic recombination.

    PubMed

    McGill, C B; Shafer, B K; Higgins, D R; Strathern, J N

    1990-07-01

    A novel synthetic locus is described that provides a simple assay system for characterizing mitotic recombinants. The locus consists of the TRP1 and HIS3 genes inserted into chromosome III of S. cerevisiae between the CRY1 and MAT loci. Defined trp1 and his3 alleles have been generated that allow the selection of interchromosomal recombinants in this interval. Trp+ or His+ recombinants can be divided into several classes based on coupling of the other alleles in the interval. The tight linkage of the CRY1 and MAT loci, combined with the drug resistance and cell type phenotypes that they respectively control, facilitates the classification of the recombinants without resorting to tetrad dissection. We present the distribution of spontaneous recombinants among the classes defined by this analysis. The data suggest that the recombination intermediate can have regions of symmetric strand exchange and that co-conversion tracts can extend over 1-3 kb. Continuous conversion tracts are favored over discontinuous tracts. The distribution among the classes defined by this analysis is altered in recombinants induced by UV irradiation.

  19. Aspergillus: sex and recombination.

    PubMed

    Varga, János; Szigeti, Gyöngyi; Baranyi, Nikolett; Kocsubé, Sándor; O'Gorman, Céline M; Dyer, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    The genus Aspergillus is one of the most widespread groups of fungi on Earth, comprised of about 300-350 species with very diverse lifestyles. Most species produce asexual propagula (conidia) on conidial heads. Despite their ubiquity, a sexual cycle has not yet been identified for most of the aspergilli. Where sexual reproduction is present, species exhibit either homothallic (self fertile) or heterothallic (obligate outcrossing) breeding systems. A parasexual cycle has also been described in some Aspergillus species. As in other fungi, sexual reproduction is governed by mating-type (MAT) genes, which determine sexual identity and are involved in regulating later stages of sexual development. Previous population genetic studies have indicated that some supposedly asexual aspergilli exhibit evidence of a recombining population structure, suggesting the presence of a cryptic sexual cycle. In addition, genome analyses have revealed networks of genes necessary for sexual reproduction in several Aspergillus species, again consistent with latent sexuality in these fungi. Knowledge of MAT gene presence has then successfully been applied to induce sexual reproduction between MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isolates of certain supposedly asexual aspergilli. Recent progress in understanding the extent and significance of sexual reproduction is described here, with special emphasis on findings that are relevant to clinically important aspergilli.

  20. Aspergillus: sex and recombination.

    PubMed

    Varga, János; Szigeti, Gyöngyi; Baranyi, Nikolett; Kocsubé, Sándor; O'Gorman, Céline M; Dyer, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    The genus Aspergillus is one of the most widespread groups of fungi on Earth, comprised of about 300-350 species with very diverse lifestyles. Most species produce asexual propagula (conidia) on conidial heads. Despite their ubiquity, a sexual cycle has not yet been identified for most of the aspergilli. Where sexual reproduction is present, species exhibit either homothallic (self fertile) or heterothallic (obligate outcrossing) breeding systems. A parasexual cycle has also been described in some Aspergillus species. As in other fungi, sexual reproduction is governed by mating-type (MAT) genes, which determine sexual identity and are involved in regulating later stages of sexual development. Previous population genetic studies have indicated that some supposedly asexual aspergilli exhibit evidence of a recombining population structure, suggesting the presence of a cryptic sexual cycle. In addition, genome analyses have revealed networks of genes necessary for sexual reproduction in several Aspergillus species, again consistent with latent sexuality in these fungi. Knowledge of MAT gene presence has then successfully been applied to induce sexual reproduction between MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isolates of certain supposedly asexual aspergilli. Recent progress in understanding the extent and significance of sexual reproduction is described here, with special emphasis on findings that are relevant to clinically important aspergilli. PMID:25118872

  1. Bacterial interference among nasal inhabitants: eradication of Staphylococcus aureus from nasal cavities by artificial implantation of Corynebacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Y; Nakama, H; Agematsu, K; Uchida, M; Kawakami, Y; Abdul Fattah, A S; Maruchi, N

    2000-02-01

    To evaluate the role of normal flora in the nares in preventing Staphylococcus aureus colonization, we conducted a replacement study in vivo. Staphylococcus epidermidis (rate of colonization: 100%), various species of corynebacteria (52.5%) and S. aureus (25.%) were the major bacterial inhabitants in the nares of 156 healthy volunteers. The low incidence of S. aureus colonization in the carriers with corynebacteria (8.5%), compared to non-carriers (44. 5%) indicated the possibility of competition for survival between S. aureus and corynebacteria. To confirm this hypothesis, we artificially implanted a strain of Corynebacterium sp (API Coryne bioprofile; 5100304), denoted as Co304 into the nares of 17 S. aureus carriers. S. aureus was completely eradicated in 71% of carriers by up to 15 inoculations of Co304. However, similar doses of 0.9% NaCl or S. epidermidis into the nares of 10 volunteers did not eradicate S. aureus. No bacteriocin-like activity against S. aureus was detectable, even after mitomycin C stimulation of Co304. Thus Co304 interfered with S. aureus by a different mechanism to a bacteriocin-like activity.

  2. A lipid chemotactic factor from anaerobic coryneform bacteria including Corynebacterium parvum with activity for macrophages and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R J; McInroy, R J; Wilkinson, P C; White, R G

    1976-01-01

    A lipid with chemoattractant (chemotactic) activity for mouse and guinea-pig macrophages and for human blood monocytes is released by anaerobic coryneform bacteria (including Corynebacterium parvum). The active lipid is associated with fibrillar structures which lie on the outside of the bacterial cell and are released spontaneously during growth. The lipid can also be extracted easily by a number of methods. The fibrils are loosely associated with a capsule-like structure composed largely of polysaccharide. Purification of the active lipid was achieved by chloroform-methanol extraction of the whole organisms yielding a chloroform-soluble fraction attracting mononuclear phagocytes at concentrations around 10 microgram/ml. The infra-red spectrum of this material showed lipid but no peptide or sugar. Thin-layer chromatography yielded twelve spots of which three had chemoattractant properties. The most active of these gave staining reactions consistent with the presence of phospholipid, the other two probably contained free fatty acids and triglycerides. Thin-layer electrophoresis also yielded an active phosphorus-containing spot. Saturated fatty acids of chain lengths found in the anaerobic coryne forms had weak monocyte-attractant activity. As the active material was progressively purified, its activity as a monocyte attractant weakened. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1027716

  3. Mixed infections of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria in South African antelopes presenting with tuberculosis-like lesions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Borna; de Klerk-Lorist, Lin-Mari; Henton, Marijke M; Lane, Emily; Parsons, Sven; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Kotze, Antoinette; van Helden, Paul D; Tanner, Manfred

    2011-01-27

    Routine meat inspection of antelope carcasses from a South African game reserve revealed a high prevalence of tuberculosis-like lesions. This study aimed to identify the causative agent of this disease and to describe its pathological features. In total, 139 antelopes were randomly harvested from the game reserve and subjected to meat inspection. Of these animals, 46 (33%) showed gross visible, tuberculosis-like lesions. Histopathological examination revealed the presence of encapsulated necrogranulomas in organs and/or lymph nodes of 22 of 27 animals tested. Tissue samples from lesions were processed for both non-selective bacterial culture and mycobacterial culture following decontamination. In non-selective cultures of lesions from 25 of 31 animals tested, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis was detected. Isolation of C. pseudotuberculosis was closely associated with the presence of necrogranulomas. In mycobacterial cultures of lesions from 9 of 41 animals tested, different species of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs) were detected. In 5 instances, depending on the culture procedure that was applied, either C. pseudotuberculosis or NTMs were isolated from the same tissue sample. Our results suggest that the disease has been caused by infections with C. pseudotuberculosis. In sub-Saharan Africa, the role of pathogens other than Mycobacterium bovis may be underestimated in causing tuberculosis-like lesions. In cases where potentially pathogenic NTMs are isolated from mycobacterial cultures of tuberculosis-like lesions, the non-use of additional non-selective culture techniques could lead to misinterpretations of the diagnostic test results.

  4. Improvement of enantioselectivity of the B-type halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyase from Corynebacterium sp. N-1074.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumiaki; Yu, Fujio; Ohtaki, Akashi; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Noguchi, Keiichi; Odaka, Masafumi; Yohda, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    Halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyase (H-Lyase) is a bacterial enzyme involved in the degradation of halohydrins. This enzyme catalyzes the intramolecular nucleophilic displacement of a halogen by a vicinal hydroxyl group in halohydrins, producing the corresponding epoxides. The H-Lyases have been classified into A, B and C subtypes based on amino acid sequence similarities. These enzymes have attracted much attention as industrial catalysts in the synthesis of chiral chemicals from prochiral halohydrins. In the present study, we constructed mutants of B-type H-Lyase from Corynebacterium sp. N-1074 (HheB) displaying higher enantioselectivity by structure-based site-directed mutagenesis and random mutagenesis. A triple mutant of HheB exhibited 98.5% enantioselectivity, the highest ever reported, toward (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroxy-butyronitrile production, with the yield reaching approximately two-fold that of the wild-type enzyme. We discuss the structural basis of the high enantioselectivity and productivity of the mutant by comparing the crystal structures of the mutant HheB and the wild-type enzyme in complex with or without the substrate analogue.

  5. The effect of intravenous Corynebacterium parvum on gut associated mononuclear phagocytes in normal and tumour bearing rats.

    PubMed Central

    Souter, R G; Steer, H W

    1982-01-01

    Corynebacterium Parvum, which has been used in the treatment of human colorectal cancer, probably exerts its action through cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). In this study the effect of systemically administered C. parvum has been measured on gut associated MPS cells in normal and colorectal cancer bearing rats. MPS cells are not normally found in samples of lymph obtained after cannulation of the thoracic duct (TDC). However, after total extirpation of the mesenteric lymph nodes, TDC yields samples in which up to 5% of the total cell population appear to be MPS cells. This procedure has been carried out in adult Wistar rats enabling an in vivo study to be made on the effect of C. parvum treatment on the effluent gut cells. Measurements have been made both of the number of cells found in thoracic duct lymph and of their capacity to phagocytose sensitized sheep red blood cells. These measurements were repeated in a mesenteric lymphadenectomized group of rats which had also undergone induction of colonic cancer using dimethylhydrazine. C. parvum treatment did not effect total cell, or phagocyte numbers in thoracic duct lymph (TDL). However rats with colonic cancers showed a marked reduction in the numbers of phagocytic cells in TDL irrespective of C. parvum treatment. PMID:7165995

  6. Bacterial interference among nasal inhabitants: eradication of Staphylococcus aureus from nasal cavities by artificial implantation of Corynebacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Y; Nakama, H; Agematsu, K; Uchida, M; Kawakami, Y; Abdul Fattah, A S; Maruchi, N

    2000-02-01

    To evaluate the role of normal flora in the nares in preventing Staphylococcus aureus colonization, we conducted a replacement study in vivo. Staphylococcus epidermidis (rate of colonization: 100%), various species of corynebacteria (52.5%) and S. aureus (25.%) were the major bacterial inhabitants in the nares of 156 healthy volunteers. The low incidence of S. aureus colonization in the carriers with corynebacteria (8.5%), compared to non-carriers (44. 5%) indicated the possibility of competition for survival between S. aureus and corynebacteria. To confirm this hypothesis, we artificially implanted a strain of Corynebacterium sp (API Coryne bioprofile; 5100304), denoted as Co304 into the nares of 17 S. aureus carriers. S. aureus was completely eradicated in 71% of carriers by up to 15 inoculations of Co304. However, similar doses of 0.9% NaCl or S. epidermidis into the nares of 10 volunteers did not eradicate S. aureus. No bacteriocin-like activity against S. aureus was detectable, even after mitomycin C stimulation of Co304. Thus Co304 interfered with S. aureus by a different mechanism to a bacteriocin-like activity. PMID:10662563

  7. Phenotypic, molecular characterization, antimicrobial susceptibility and draft genome sequence of Corynebacterium argentoratense strains isolated from clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Natal, I.; Sáez-Nieto, J.A.; Rodríguez-Lázaro, D.; Valdezate-Ramos, S.; Parras-Padilla, T.; Medina, M.J.; Rodríguez-Pollán, R.H.; Blom, J.; Tauch, A.; Soriano, F.

    2016-01-01

    During a 12-year period we isolated five Corynebacterium argentoratense strains identified by phenotypic methods, including the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In addition, antimicrobial susceptibility was determined, and genome sequencing for the detection of antibiotic resistance genes was performed. The organisms were isolated from blood and throat cultures and could be identified by all methods used. All strains were resistant to cotrimoxazole, and resistance to β-lactams was partly present. Two strains were resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin. The draft genome sequences of theses isolates revealed the presence of the erm(X) resistance gene that is embedded in the genetic structure of the transposable element Tn5423. Although rarely reported as a human pathogen, C. argentoratense can be involved in bacteraemia and probably in other infections. Our results also show that horizontal transfer of genes responsible for antibiotic resistance is occurring in this species. PMID:26933505

  8. Engineering Corynebacterium crenatum to produce higher alcohols for biofuel using hydrolysates of duckweed (Landoltia punctata) as feedstock.

    PubMed

    Su, Haifeng; Jiang, Juan; Lu, Qiuli; Zhao, Zhao; Xie, Tian; Zhao, Hai; Wang, Maolin

    2015-01-01

    Early trials have demonstrated great potential for the use of duckweed (family Lemnaceae) as the next generation of energy plants for the production of biofuels. Achieving this technological advance demands research to develop novel bioengineering microorganisms that can ferment duckweed feedstock to produce higher alcohols. In this study, we used relevant genes to transfer five metabolic pathways of isoleucine, leucine and valine from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae into the bioengineered microorganism Corynebacterium crenatum. Experimental results showed that the bioengineered strain was able to produce 1026.61 mg/L of 2-methyl-1-butanol by fermenting glucose, compared to 981.79 mg/L from the acid hydrolysates of duckweed. The highest isobutanol yields achieved were 1264.63 mg/L from glucose and 1154.83 mg/L from duckweed, and the corresponding highest yields of 3-methyl-1-butanol were 748.35 and 684.79 mg/L. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of using bioengineered C. crenatum as a platform to construct a bacterial strain that is capable of producing higher alcohols. We have also shown the promise of using duckweed as the basis for developing higher alcohols, illustrating that this group of plants represents an ideal fermentation substrate that can be considered the next generation of alternative energy feedstocks.

  9. Improvement of enantioselectivity of the B-type halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyase from Corynebacterium sp. N-1074.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumiaki; Yu, Fujio; Ohtaki, Akashi; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Noguchi, Keiichi; Odaka, Masafumi; Yohda, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    Halohydrin hydrogen-halide-lyase (H-Lyase) is a bacterial enzyme involved in the degradation of halohydrins. This enzyme catalyzes the intramolecular nucleophilic displacement of a halogen by a vicinal hydroxyl group in halohydrins, producing the corresponding epoxides. The H-Lyases have been classified into A, B and C subtypes based on amino acid sequence similarities. These enzymes have attracted much attention as industrial catalysts in the synthesis of chiral chemicals from prochiral halohydrins. In the present study, we constructed mutants of B-type H-Lyase from Corynebacterium sp. N-1074 (HheB) displaying higher enantioselectivity by structure-based site-directed mutagenesis and random mutagenesis. A triple mutant of HheB exhibited 98.5% enantioselectivity, the highest ever reported, toward (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroxy-butyronitrile production, with the yield reaching approximately two-fold that of the wild-type enzyme. We discuss the structural basis of the high enantioselectivity and productivity of the mutant by comparing the crystal structures of the mutant HheB and the wild-type enzyme in complex with or without the substrate analogue. PMID:27215832

  10. Experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary angiitis induced by intratracheal or intravenous challenge with Corynebacterium parvum in sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Yi, E S; Lee, H; Suh, Y K; Tang, W; Qi, M; Yin, S; Remick, D G; Ulich, T R

    1996-10-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary sarcoidosis are granulomatous diseases of the lung for which clinical presentation and anatomic site of granuloma formation differ. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis is caused by inhaled antigens, whereas the nature and source of the inciting antigen in sarcoidosis is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the route via which antigen is introduced to the lung contributes to the clinicopathological presentation of pulmonary granulomatous disease, rats immunized with intravenous (i.v.) Corynebacterium parvum were challenged after 2 weeks with either intratracheal (i.t.) or i.v. C. parvum. The granulomatous inflammation elicited by i.t. challenge predominantly involved alveolar spaces and histologically simulated extrinsic allergic alveolitis. In contrast, the inflammation induced by i.v. challenge was characterized by granulomatous angiitis and interstitial inflammation simulating sarcoidosis. Elevations of leukocyte counts and TNF levels in bronchoalveolar fluid, which reflect inflammation in the intra-alveolar compartment, were much more pronounced after i.t. than after i.v. challenge. Tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, CC chemokine, CXC chemokine, and adhesion molecule mRNA and protein expression occurred in each model. In conclusion, i.t. or i.v. challenge with C. parvum in sensitized rats caused pulmonary granulomatous inflammation that was histologically similar to human extrinsic allergic alveolitis and sarcoidosis, respectively. Although the soluble and cellular mediators of granulomatous inflammation were qualitatively similar in both disease models, the differing anatomic source of the same antigenic challenge was responsible for differing clinicopathological presentations. PMID:8863677

  11. Controlled release from recombinant polymers.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-09-28

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed.

  12. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  13. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  14. Recombinant DNA means and method

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, B.L.; Mao, J.I.; Moir, D.T.; Taunton-Rigby, A.; Vovis, G.F.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes a transformed living cell selected from the group consisting of fungi, yeast and bacteria, and containing genetic material derived from recombinant DNA material and coding for bovine rennin.

  15. Recombination system for storage batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, B.; Ledjeff, K.; Winsel, A.

    1983-03-29

    A recombination system for catalytic oxidation of hydrogen in storage battery gases includes a gas supply duct which makes it possible for the combustible gas flowing through it to aspirate from the ambient the necessary combustion air, following the principle of a bunsen burner, and to entrain it to the recombination catalyst. In case of over-supply of gas, an acid separator positioned in the gas supply pipe counteracts the gas aspiration by means of its flow impedance and thereby makes the recombination system safe from overload. It can also be connected following a conventional recombiner, thereby increasing its effectiveness, by receiving the excess hydrogen from same and reacting it with the aid of the air aspiration.

  16. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  17. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Helmut; Ledjeff, Konstantin

    1985-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive he discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  18. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, H.; Ledjeff, K.

    1984-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive the discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  19. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  20. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  1. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  2. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Bean, Rachel; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, ns, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z*=1078±11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1σ to R=1.734±0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: γα<0.39 and γi<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  3. Formic Acid-Based Direct, On-Plate Testing of Yeast and Corynebacterium Species by Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Theel, Elitza S.; Schmitt, Bryan H.; Hall, Leslie; Cunningham, Scott A.; Walchak, Robert C.; Patel, Robin

    2012-01-01

    An on-plate testing method using formic acid was evaluated on the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry system using 90 yeast and 78 Corynebacterium species isolates, and 95.6 and 81.1% of yeast and 96.1 and 92.3% of Corynebacterium isolates were correctly identified to the genus and species levels, respectively. The on-plate method using formic acid yielded identification percentages similar to those for the conventional but more laborious tube-based extraction. PMID:22760034

  4. Non-toxigenic tox gene-bearing Corynebacterium ulcerans in a traumatic ulcer from a human case and his asymptomatic dog.

    PubMed

    Fuursted, Kurt; Søes, Lillian Marie; Crewe, Bjørn Thomas; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2015-10-01

    A non-toxigenic tox gene-bearing (NTTB) Corynebacterium ulcerans was grown from the wound of a 61-year-old gardener and in a nasal specimen from the patient's asymptomatic dog. The two isolates were similar in terms of antibiogram, multilocus sequence typing (ST341), virulence genes, and only three SNPs were found to differentiate the two NTTB C. ulcerans isolates supporting a zoonotic transmission to or between the patient and his dog. Of interest, we found that the two C. ulcerans isolates, although not expressing the diphtheria toxin tox, possessed 13 out of 14 recently described virulence candidate genes.

  5. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  6. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  7. Progenitors of Recombining Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  8. Electron-Beam Recombination Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoades, Robert Lewis

    1992-01-01

    The first known instance of electron-beam pumping of the 546.1 nm mercury laser is reported. This has been achieved using high-energy electrons to create intense ionization in a coaxial diode chamber containing a mixture of noble gases with a small amount of mercury vapor. Also reported are the results of a study of the 585.3 nm neon laser in He:Ne:Ar mixtures under similar experimental conditions. Both of these lasers are believed to be predominantly pumped by recombination. For the mercury laser, kinetic processes in the partially ionized plasma following the excitation pulse of high-energy electrons should favor the production of atomic mercury ions and molecular ions containing mercury. Subsequent recombination with electrons heavily favors the production of the 7^3S and 6^3 D states of Hg, of which 7^3S is the upper level of the reported laser. For the neon laser, the dominant recombining ion has been previously shown to be Ne_2^{+}. One of the dominant roles of helium in recombination lasers is inferred from the data for the neon laser at low helium concentrations. Helium appears to be necessary for the rapid relaxation of the electron energy which then increases the reaction rates for all known recombination processes thus increasing the pump rate into the upper state.

  9. Bioconversion of Gibberellin Fermentation Residue into Feed Supplement and Organic Fertilizer Employing Housefly (Musca domestica L.) Assisted by Corynebacterium variabile.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sen; Xie, Jiufeng; Hu, Nan; Liu, Yixiong; Zhang, Jiner; Ye, Xiaobin; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of a considerable quantity of gibberellin fermentation residue (GFR) during gibberellic acid A3 (GA3) production not only results in the waste of many resources, but also poses a potential hazard to the environment, indicating that the safe treatment of GFR has become an urgent issue for GA3 industry. The key to recycle GFR is converting it into an available resource and removing the GA3 residue. To this end, we established a co-bioconversion process in this study using house fly larvae (HFL) and microbes (Corynebacterium variabile) to convert GFR into insect biomass and organic fertilizer. About 85.5% GA3 in the GFR was removed under the following optimized solid-state fermentation conditions: 60% GFR, 40% rice straw powder, pH 8.5 and 6 days at 26 °C. A total of 371 g housefly larvae meal and 2,064 g digested residue were bio-converted from 3,500 g raw GFR mixture contaning1, 400 g rice straw in the unit of (calculated) dry matter. HFL meal derived from GFR contained 56.4% protein, 21.6% fat, and several essential amino acids, suggesting that it is a potential alternative animal feed protein source. Additionally, the digested GFR could be utilized as an organic fertilizer with a content of 3.2% total nitrogen, 2.0% inorganic phosphorus, 1.3% potassium and 91.5% organic matter. This novel GFR bio-conversion method can mitigate potential environmental pollution and recycle the waste resources. PMID:25992605

  10. Experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary angiitis induced by intratracheal or intravenous challenge with Corynebacterium parvum in sensitized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, E. S.; Lee, H.; Suh, Y. K.; Tang, W.; Qi, M.; Yin, S.; Remick, D. G.; Ulich, T. R.

    1996-01-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary sarcoidosis are granulomatous diseases of the lung for which clinical presentation and anatomic site of granuloma formation differ. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis is caused by inhaled antigens, whereas the nature and source of the inciting antigen in sarcoidosis is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the route via which antigen is introduced to the lung contributes to the clinicopathological presentation of pulmonary granulomatous disease, rats immunized with intravenous (i.v.) Corynebacterium parvum were challenged after 2 weeks with either intratracheal (i.t.) or i.v. C. parvum. The granulomatous inflammation elicited by i.t. challenge predominantly involved alveolar spaces and histologically simulated extrinsic allergic alveolitis. In contrast, the inflammation induced by i.v. challenge was characterized by granulomatous angiitis and interstitial inflammation simulating sarcoidosis. Elevations of leukocyte counts and TNF levels in bronchoalveolar fluid, which reflect inflammation in the intra-alveolar compartment, were much more pronounced after i.t. than after i.v. challenge. Tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, CC chemokine, CXC chemokine, and adhesion molecule mRNA and protein expression occurred in each model. In conclusion, i.t. or i.v. challenge with C. parvum in sensitized rats caused pulmonary granulomatous inflammation that was histologically similar to human extrinsic allergic alveolitis and sarcoidosis, respectively. Although the soluble and cellular mediators of granulomatous inflammation were qualitatively similar in both disease models, the differing anatomic source of the same antigenic challenge was responsible for differing clinicopathological presentations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 11 Figure 13 Figure 12 Figure 14 PMID:8863677

  11. Bioconversion of Gibberellin Fermentation Residue into Feed Supplement and Organic Fertilizer Employing Housefly (Musca domestica L.) Assisted by Corynebacterium variabile

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sen; Xie, Jiufeng; Hu, Nan; Liu, Yixiong; Zhang, Jiner; Ye, Xiaobin; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of a considerable quantity of gibberellin fermentation residue (GFR) during gibberellic acid A3 (GA3) production not only results in the waste of many resources, but also poses a potential hazard to the environment, indicating that the safe treatment of GFR has become an urgent issue for GA3 industry. The key to recycle GFR is converting it into an available resource and removing the GA3 residue. To this end, we established a co-bioconversion process in this study using house fly larvae (HFL) and microbes (Corynebacterium variabile) to convert GFR into insect biomass and organic fertilizer. About 85.5% GA3 in the GFR was removed under the following optimized solid-state fermentation conditions: 60% GFR, 40% rice straw powder, pH 8.5 and 6 days at 26°C. A total of 371g housefly larvae meal and 2,064g digested residue were bio-converted from 3,500g raw GFR mixture contaning1, 400g rice straw in the unit of (calculated) dry matter. HFL meal derived from GFR contained 56.4% protein, 21.6% fat, and several essential amino acids, suggesting that it is a potential alternative animal feed protein source. Additionally, the digested GFR could be utilized as an organic fertilizer with a content of 3.2% total nitrogen, 2.0% inorganic phosphorus, 1.3% potassium and 91.5% organic matter. This novel GFR bio-conversion method can mitigate potential environmental pollution and recycle the waste resources. PMID:25992605

  12. Bioconversion of Gibberellin Fermentation Residue into Feed Supplement and Organic Fertilizer Employing Housefly (Musca domestica L.) Assisted by Corynebacterium variabile.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sen; Xie, Jiufeng; Hu, Nan; Liu, Yixiong; Zhang, Jiner; Ye, Xiaobin; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of a considerable quantity of gibberellin fermentation residue (GFR) during gibberellic acid A3 (GA3) production not only results in the waste of many resources, but also poses a potential hazard to the environment, indicating that the safe treatment of GFR has become an urgent issue for GA3 industry. The key to recycle GFR is converting it into an available resource and removing the GA3 residue. To this end, we established a co-bioconversion process in this study using house fly larvae (HFL) and microbes (Corynebacterium variabile) to convert GFR into insect biomass and organic fertilizer. About 85.5% GA3 in the GFR was removed under the following optimized solid-state fermentation conditions: 60% GFR, 40% rice straw powder, pH 8.5 and 6 days at 26 °C. A total of 371 g housefly larvae meal and 2,064 g digested residue were bio-converted from 3,500 g raw GFR mixture contaning1, 400 g rice straw in the unit of (calculated) dry matter. HFL meal derived from GFR contained 56.4% protein, 21.6% fat, and several essential amino acids, suggesting that it is a potential alternative animal feed protein source. Additionally, the digested GFR could be utilized as an organic fertilizer with a content of 3.2% total nitrogen, 2.0% inorganic phosphorus, 1.3% potassium and 91.5% organic matter. This novel GFR bio-conversion method can mitigate potential environmental pollution and recycle the waste resources.

  13. The effect of Corynebacterium parvum therapy on immunoglobulin class and IgG subclass levels in cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    James, K.; Clunie, G. J.; Woodruff, M. F.; McBride, W. H.; Stimson, W. H.; Drew, R.; Catty, D.

    1975-01-01

    Detailed serological studies have been undertaken in a small group of cancer patients receiving nonspecific immunotherapy with Corynebacterium parvum (C. parvum). These patients included 4 cases of recurrent malignant melanoma, 2 of stomach cancer and 2 of recurrent breast cancer. They all received an initial i.v. infusion of 20 mg of a formol killed suspension of C. parvum followed by 2 mg (i.m.) at weekly intervals for 10-11 weeks. This protocol consistently resulted in an increase in the circulating IgG levels of all patients but had a variable effect on their IgA, IgM and IgE levels. Increases in the concentration of all 4 IgG subclasses contributed to the overall increase in IgG levels and these changes ranked IgG2 greater than IgG1 greater than IgG3 = IgG4. It also had an inconsistent effect upon the levels of alpha-macroglobulin in pregnancy but the levels of normal serum alpha2-macroglobulin were virtually unchanged. Pre-existing antibodies to C. parvum were noted in all the patients. Titres rose appreciably following C. parvum administration and remained at high, though fluctuating levels, throughout the 100-day period of observation. Absorption studies suggested that the development of antibodies to C. parvum accounted in part for the increased IgG levels noted following this form of therapy. The significance of these changes in relation to the possible anti-tumour effect of C. parvum is discussed. PMID:61040

  14. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  15. DNA recombination: the replication connection.

    PubMed

    Haber, J E

    1999-07-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise after exposure to ionizing radiation or enzymatic cleavage, but especially during the process of DNA replication itself. Homologous recombination plays a critical role in repair of such DSBs. There has been significant progress in our understanding of two processes that occur in DSB repair: gene conversion and recombination-dependent DNA replication. Recent evidence suggests that gene conversion and break-induced replication are related processes that both begin with the establishment of a replication fork in which both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis occur. There has also been much progress in characterization of the biochemical roles of recombination proteins that are highly conserved from yeast to humans.

  16. The Dissociative Recombination of OH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum chemical calculations of the cross sections and rates for the dissociative recombination of the upsilon = 0 level of the ground state of OH(+) show that recombination occurs primarily along the 2 (2)Pi diabatic route. The products are 0((1)D) and a hot H atom with 6.1 eV kinetic energy. The coupling to the resonances is very small and the indirect recombination mechanism plays only a minor role. The recommended value for the rate coefficient is (6.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp -9)x (T(e)/1300)(exp -0.48) cu.cm/s for 10 less than T(e) less than 1000 K.

  17. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need for additional cofactors, but does not discriminate non-carboxylated prothrombin from biologically active γ-carboxylated prothrombin. Here we report that recombinant trocarin and oscutarin could not efficiently generate thrombin without additional protein co-factors. We confirm that both trocarin and oscutarin are similar to human coagulation Factor X (FX), explaining the need for additional cofactors. Sequencing of a genomic fragment containing 7 out of the 8 exons coding for oscutarin further confirmed the similarity to human FX. PMID:23111318

  18. Selenium incorporation using recombinant techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, Helen

    2010-04-01

    An overview of techniques for recombinant incorporation of selenium and subsequent purification and crystallization of the resulting labelled protein. Using selenomethionine to phase macromolecular structures is common practice in structure determination, along with the use of selenocysteine. Selenium is consequently the most commonly used heavy atom for MAD. In addition to the well established recombinant techniques for the incorporation of selenium in prokaryal expression systems, there have been recent advances in selenium labelling in eukaryal expression, which will be discussed. Tips and things to consider for the purification and crystallization of seleno-labelled proteins are also included.

  19. Classifications and comparisons of multilocus recombination distributions

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Samuel; Liberman, Uri

    1978-01-01

    Various classifications and representations of multilocus recombination structures are delineated based on generalized notions of linkage values and recombination rates. An important class of recombination distributions (called the count-location chiasma process) is parameterized by a distribution of the number of crossover events and, for each such crossover count, by a conditional distribution of crossover locations. A number of properties of this recombination structure are developed. A multilocus definition of a “natural” recombination range is set forth. Orderings among recombination distributions in the multilocus setting are also discussed. Comparisons are made in terms of complete linkage, free assortment and noninterference schemes serving as standards. PMID:16592601

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of the Two Unrelated Macrolide-Resistant Corynebacterium argentoratense Strains CNM 463/05 and CNM 601/08, Isolated from Patients in the University Hospital of León, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Francisco; Acedo, Alberto; Hernandez, Marta; Tauch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium argentoratense has been associated mainly with infections in the human respiratory tract. Genome sequencing of two unrelated clinical macrolide-resistant strains, CNM 463/05 and CNM 601/08, revealed the presence of the antibiotic resistance gene erm(X) allocated to a specific genomic region with 100% similarity to the widely distributed transposable element Tn5432. PMID:26159536