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Sample records for recombinant luminescent bacterial

  1. [Effect of salts on luminescence of natural and recombinant luminescent bacterial biosensors].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, D G; Aleshina, E S

    2008-01-01

    Effect of cations K+, Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ and anions SO4(2-), HCO3(-), and CO3(2-) on the luminescence intensity of the marine luminescent bacterium Photobacterium phorphoreum (Microbiosensor B-17 677f) and the recombinant strain Escherichia coli with cloned lux operon of P. leiognathi (Ekolyum-9). It is found that small concentrations of chlorides and sulfates of the cations studied had a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect on bacterial bioluminescence; as the concentration of agents increased, activation was succeeded by quenching. The strength of the inhibitory effect, which is characterized by EC50, decreased in the series Ca2+ > Na+ > Mg2+ > K+. Carbonates and hydrocarbonates had a pronounced inhibitory effect on the bioluminescence intensity, determined by an increase in pH. We showed that some types of highly mineralized water with a high hydrocarbonate content have a marked inhibitory effect on the luminescence intensity of microbial luminescent biosensors, mimicking the effect of chemical pollutants.

  2. Analysis of bioavailable phenols from natural samples by recombinant luminescent bacterial sensors.

    PubMed

    Leedjärv, Anu; Ivask, Angela; Virta, Marko; Kahru, Anne

    2006-09-01

    A whole-cell recombinant bacterial sensor for the detection of phenolic compounds was constructed and used for the analysis of bioavailable phenols in natural samples. The sensor Pseudomonas fluorescens OS8(pDNdmpRlux) contains luxCDABE operon as a reporter under the control of phenol-inducible Po promoter from Pseudomonas sp. CF600. Expression of lux genes from the Po promoter, and thus the production of bioluminescence is controlled by the transcriptional activator DmpR, which initiates transcription in the presence of phenolic compounds. To take into account possible quenching (turbidity, toxicity) and/or stimulating effects of the environmental samples on the bacterial luminescence, control bacteria comparable to the sensors but lacking the phenol recognising elements were constructed and used in parallel in assays. The sensor bacteria were inducible with phenol, methylphenols, 2,3-, 2,4-, 2,6- and 3,4-dimethylphenol, resorcinol and 5-methylresorcinol but not with 2,5-dimethylresorcinol. The detection limits for different phenols varied from 0.03 mg/l (2-methylphenol) to 42.7 mg/l (5-methylresorcinol), being 0.08 mg/l for phenol, the most abundant phenolic contaminant in the environment. Different phenolic compounds had an additive effect on the inducibility of the sensor. The constructed sensor bacteria were applied on groundwaters and semi-coke leachates to estimate the bioavailable fraction of phenols. The sensor-determined amount of phenols in different samples varied from 6% to 95% of total phenol content depending on the nature of the sample. As the phenol-recognising unit in the sensor originates from a natural phenol biodegradation pathway, the sensor-determined amount of phenols corresponds to the biodegradable amount of phenolic pollutants in the samples and therefore this sensor could be used to estimate the natural biodegradation potential of phenolic compounds in the complex environmental mixtures and matrixes.

  3. [Conditions that influence bacterial luminescence in the presence of blood serum].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, D G; Poliakov, E G

    2005-01-01

    Conditions that influence the luminescence of natural and recombinant luminescent bacteria in the presence of blood serum were studied. In general, blood serum quenched the luminescence of the marine Photobacterium phosphoreum and the recombinant Escherichia coli strains harboring the luminescent system genes of Photobacterium leiognathi, but enhanced the luminescence of the soil bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens Zm1 and the recombinant E. coli strain harboring the lux operon of P. luminescens Zm1. The quenching effect of blood serum increased with its concentration and the time and temperature of incubation. The components of blood serum that determine the degree and specificity of its action on bacterial luminescence were identified.

  4. [Biotests for mineral waters with natural and recombinant luminescent microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, D G; Aleshina, E S

    2008-01-01

    We have developed methods of biotesting mineral waters involving use of natural or recombinant luminescent strains with elimination of the effect of salt concentration and pH. To overcome the adverse effect of high salt concentrations, disguising the action of chemical pollutants, a special method of mineral water sample preparation is proposed. In this method, the marine luminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum (Microbiosensor B17 677f) is used as a test object. Samples to be analyzed are supplemented with NaCl depending on their natural salt concentration to adjust it to 3 g/l. Another approach, more universal and efficient, involves pH adjustment in the samples to 7.5. This value is suitable for application of both Microbiosensor B17 677f and the recombinant Escherichia coli strain harboring the cloned lux operon of P. leiognathi (Ecolum 9). It has been shown that this treatment, retaining the natural luminescence level of the bacterial biosensors, allows bioluminescent detection of exogenous pollutants added to the samples, including benzene and Cr(VI).

  5. Extended recombinant bacterial ghost system.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, W; Witte, A; Eko, F O; Kamal, M; Jechlinger, W; Brand, E; Marchart, J; Haidinger, W; Huter, V; Felnerova, D; Stralis-Alves, N; Lechleitner, S; Melzer, H; Szostak, M P; Resch, S; Mader, H; Kuen, B; Mayr, B; Mayrhofer, P; Geretschläger, R; Haslberger, A; Hensel, A

    1999-08-20

    Controlled expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts from a variety of bacteria are used as non-living candidate vaccines. In the recombinant ghost system, foreign proteins are attached on the inside of the inner membrane as fusions with specific anchor sequences. Ghosts have a sealed periplasmic space and the export of proteins into this space vastly extends the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts to function as carriers of foreign antigens. In addition, S-layer proteins forming shell-like self assembly structures can be expressed in candidate vaccine strains prior to E-mediated lysis. Such recombinant S-layer proteins carrying foreign epitopes further extend the possibilities of ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes. As ghosts have inherent adjuvant properties, they can be used as adjuvants in combination with subunit vaccines. Subunits or other ligands can also be coupled to matrixes like dextran which are used to fill the internal lumen of ghosts. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral immunization of experimental animals with recombinant ghosts induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in this production. This fact explains the superior quality of ghosts when compared to other inactivated vaccines. The endotoxic component of the outer membrane does not limit the use of ghosts as vaccine candidates but triggers the release of several potent immunoregulatory cytokines. As carriers, there is no limitation in the size of foreign antigens that can be inserted in the membrane and the capacity of all spaces including the membranes, peri

  6. Bacterial Recombineering: Genome Engineering via Phage-Based Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Pines, Gur; Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The ability to specifically modify bacterial genomes in a precise and efficient manner is highly desired in various fields, ranging from molecular genetics to metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Much has changed from the initial realization that phage-derived genes may be employed for such tasks to today, where recombineering enables complex genetic edits within a genome or a population. Here, we review the major developments leading to recombineering becoming the method of choice for in situ bacterial genome editing while highlighting the various applications of recombineering in pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology. We also present the current understanding of the mechanism of recombineering. Finally, we discuss in detail issues surrounding recombineering efficiency and future directions for recombineering-based genome editing.

  7. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes.

  8. Homologous recombination using bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cary; Fischer, Tobias; Munroe, Elizabeth

    2015-02-02

    This protocol introduces the technique of homologous recombination in bacteria to insert a linear DNA fragment into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). Homologous recombination allows the modification of large DNA molecules, in contrast with conventional restriction endonuclease-based strategies, which cleave large DNAs into numerous fragments and are unlikely to permit the precise targeting afforded by recombination-based approaches. The method uses a phage lambda-derived recombination system (using exo, beta, and gam) as well as other enzymatic activities provided by the host (Escherichia coli). In the method described here, a DNA fragment encoding enhanced cyan fluorescent protein is inserted immediately after the start codon of the gene encoding choline acetyltransferase ("ChAT"), the final enzyme in acetylcholine biosynthesis, using homologous recombination between sequences that are present both on the introduced DNA fragment and in the target BAC. The desired recombination products are identified via positive selection for resistance to kanamycin. In principle, the resulting modified BAC could be used to produce transgenic mice that express this fluorescent protein in cholinergic neurons. The approach described here could be used to insert any DNA fragment.

  9. Surface Bacterial-Spore Assay Using Tb3+/DPA Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    Equipment and a method for rapidly assaying solid surfaces for contamination by bacterial spores are undergoing development. The method would yield a total (nonviable plus viable) spore count of a surface within minutes and a viable-spore count in about one hour. In this method, spores would be collected from a surface by use of a transparent polymeric tape coated on one side with a polymeric adhesive that would be permeated with one or more reagent(s) for detection of spores by use of visible luminescence. The sticky side of the tape would be pressed against a surface to be assayed, then the tape with captured spores would be placed in a reader that illuminates the sample with ultraviolet light and counts the green luminescence spots under a microscope to quantify the number of bacterial spores per unit area. The visible luminescence spots seen through the microscope would be counted to determine the concentration of spores on the surface. This method is based on the chemical and physical principles of methods described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, including Live/Dead Spore Assay Using DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence (NPO-30444), Vol. 27, No. 3 (March 2003), page 7a. To recapitulate: The basic idea is to exploit the observations that (1) dipicolinic acid (DPA) is present naturally only in bacterial spores; and (2) when bound to Tb3+ ions, DPA triggers intense green luminescence of the ions under ultraviolet excitation; (3) DPA can be released from the viable spores by using L-alanine to make them germinate; and (4) by autoclaving, microwaving, or sonicating the sample, one can cause all the spores (non-viable as well as viable) to release their DPA. One candidate material for use as the adhesive in the present method is polydimethysiloxane (PDMS). In one variant of the method for obtaining counts of all (viable and nonviable) spores the PDMS would be doped with TbCl3. After collection of a sample, the spores immobilized on the sticky tape surface

  10. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    PubMed

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research.

  11. Bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Hg in Soil to Nine Recombinant Luminescent Metal Sensor Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Olesja; Rõlova, Taisia; Kahru, Anne; Ivask, Angela

    2008-01-01

    A set of nine recombinant heavy metal-specific luminescent bacterial sensors belonging to Gram-negative (Escherichia and Pseudomonas) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus and Bacillus) genera and containing various types of recombinant metal-response genetic elements was characterized for heavy metal bioavailability studies. All nine strains were induced by Hg and Cd and five strains also by Zn. As a lowest limit, the sensors were detecting 0.03 μg·L-1 of Hg, 2 μg·L-1 of Cd and 400 μg·L-1 of Zn. Limit of determination of the sensors depended mostly on metal-response element, whereas the toxicity of those metals towards the sensor bacteria was mostly dependent on the type of the host bacterium, with Gram-positive strains being more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. The set of sensors was used to evaluate bioavailability of Hg, Cd and Zn in spiked soils. The bioavailable fraction of Cd and Zn in soil suspension assay (2.6 – 5.1% and 0.32 – 0.61%, of the total Cd and Zn, respectively) was almost comparable for all the sensors, whereas the bioavailability of Hg was about 10-fold higher for Gram-negative sensor cells (30.5% of total Hg), compared to Gram-positive ones (3.2% of the total Hg). For Zn, the bioavailable fraction in soil-water suspensions and respective extracts was comparable (0.37 versus 0.33% of the total Zn). However, in the case of Cd, for all the sensors used and for Hg concerning only Gram-negative sensor strains, the bioavailable fraction in soil-water suspensions exceeded the water-extracted fraction about 14-fold, indicating that upon direct contact, an additional fraction of Cd and Hg was mobilized by those sensor bacteria. Thus, for robust bioavailability studies of heavy metals in soils any type of genetic metal-response elements could be used for the construction of the sensor strains. However, Gram-positive and Gram-negative senor strains should be used in parallel as the bioavailability of heavy metals to those bacterial groups may be

  12. Bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Hg in Soil to Nine Recombinant Luminescent Metal Sensor Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Olesja; Rõlova, Taisia; Kahru, Anne; Ivask, Angela

    2008-11-04

    A set of nine recombinant heavy metal-specific luminescent bacterial sensors belonging to Gram-negative (Escherichia and Pseudomonas) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus and Bacillus) genera and containing various types of recombinant metalresponse genetic elements was characterized for heavy metal bioavailability studies. All nine strains were induced by Hg and Cd and five strains also by Zn. As a lowest limit, the sensors were detecting 0.03 μg·L(-1) of Hg, 2 μg·L(-1) of Cd and 400 μg·L(-1) of Zn. Limit of determination of the sensors depended mostly on metal-response element, whereas the toxicity of those metals towards the sensor bacteria was mostly dependent on the type of the host bacterium, with Gram-positive strains being more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. The set of sensors was used to evaluate bioavailability of Hg, Cd and Zn in spiked soils. The bioavailable fraction of Cd and Zn in soil suspension assay (2.6 - 5.1% and 0.32 - 0.61%, of the total Cd and Zn, respectively) was almost comparable for all the sensors, whereas the bioavailability of Hg was about 10-fold higher for Gram-negative sensor cells (30.5% of total Hg), compared to Gram-positive ones (3.2% of the total Hg). For Zn, the bioavailable fraction in soil-water suspensions and respective extracts was comparable (0.37 versus 0.33% of the total Zn). However, in the case of Cd, for all the sensors used and for Hg concerning only Gram-negative sensor strains, the bioavailable fraction in soilwater suspensions exceeded the water-extracted fraction about 14-fold, indicating that upon direct contact, an additional fraction of Cd and Hg was mobilized by those sensor bacteria. Thus, for robust bioavailability studies of heavy metals in soils any type of genetic metal-response elements could be used for the construction of the sensor strains. However, Gram-positive and Gram-negative senor strains should be used in parallel as the bioavailability of heavy metals to those bacterial groups may be

  13. Comparisons of Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium phosphoreum, and recombinant luminescent using Escherichia coli as BOD measurement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Kuo, Jong-Tar; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Liao, Yi-Ru; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2010-01-01

    To shorten the time needed to measure biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in water samples and to provide a rapid feedback of the real condition of water quality, we tested and evaluated the validity and reliability of luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium phosphoreum, and recombinant Escherichia coli as potential indicators of BOD in the domestic wastewaters. The results indicate that the luminescence intensities of these strains are dependent on temperature, pH, and BOD concentration. In comparison to the standard BOD(5) method, the time needed for BOD measurement can be shortened by 90, 120, and 150 min when V. fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and recombinant E. coli, respectively, are used. Recombinant E. coli can be adapted to measure BOD in domestic wastewater containing a wide range of BOD concentrations, V. fischeri is not suitable for measuring diluted wastewater, and P. phosphoreum has only a limited application in measuring concentrated wastewater. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which V. fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and recombinant luminescent E. coli are compared in terms of their potential in BOD measurement systems.

  14. Luminescence, radiative recombination, and current voltage characteristics in sensitized TiO2 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smestad, Greg P.

    1992-12-01

    A connection is made between the luminescence or radiative recombination in an absorber material and the current voltage characteristics of a quantum converter of light. A relationship between luminescence and voltage is derived, using detailed balance and the chemical potential of the excitation, which is similar to that obtained using the techniques of Shockley and Queisser or R. T. Ross. This model relates the absorptivity and photoluminescence efficiency of the light absorber to the I V curve. In this way both thermodynamic properties, or voltage, and the kinetics, or charge transfer and current, can be combined in order to optimize materials and configurations. The model is applied to dye sensitized Ti02 solar cells, and compared with preliminary experimental data for Ru based charge transfer dyes and inorganic compounds. The luminescence model is found to be applicable to dye sensitized converters, as well as to standard silicon solar cells, light detectors, and LEDs.

  15. Correlated Mutations and Homologous Recombination Within Bacterial Populations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mingzhi; Kussell, Edo

    2017-02-01

    Inferring the rate of homologous recombination within a bacterial population remains a key challenge in quantifying the basic parameters of bacterial evolution. Due to the high sequence similarity within a clonal population, and unique aspects of bacterial DNA transfer processes, detecting recombination events based on phylogenetic reconstruction is often difficult, and estimating recombination rates using coalescent model-based methods is computationally expensive, and often infeasible for large sequencing data sets. Here, we present an efficient solution by introducing a set of mutational correlation functions computed using pairwise sequence comparison, which characterize various facets of bacterial recombination. We provide analytical expressions for these functions, which precisely recapitulate simulation results of neutral and adapting populations under different coalescent models. We used these to fit correlation functions measured at synonymous substitutions using whole-genome data on Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae populations. We calculated and corrected for the effect of sample selection bias, i.e., the uneven sampling of individuals from natural microbial populations that exists in most datasets. Our method is fast and efficient, and does not employ phylogenetic inference or other computationally intensive numerics. By simply fitting analytical forms to measurements from sequence data, we show that recombination rates can be inferred, and the relative ages of different samples can be estimated. Our approach, which is based on population genetic modeling, is broadly applicable to a wide variety of data, and its computational efficiency makes it particularly attractive for use in the analysis of large sequencing datasets.

  16. Recombination luminescence from electron-irradiated Li-diffused Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. S.; Compton, W. D.; Noonan, J. R.; Streetman, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    Lithium doping has a dramatic effect on the low-temperature photoluminescence of electron-irradiated Si. In oxigen-lean Si with Li doping, a new irradiation-dependent luminescence band between 0.75 and 1.05 eV is observed, which is dominated by a zero-phonon peak at 1.045 eV. This band is believed to be due to radiative transitions involving a Li-modified divacancy. This band is present also in oxygen-rich, Li-diffused Si and is accompanied by bands previously related to the Si-G15(K) center and the divacancy. The intensities of the Li-modified divacancy and Si-G15(K) center bands are relatively weak in the oxygen-rich material, apparently due to the formation of lithium-oxygen complexes which reduce the concentration of unassociated interstitial Li and O.

  17. Fluorescence-PCR Assays and Isolation of Luminescent Bacterial Clones Using an Automated Plate Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The genes responsible for luminescence in various species of the marine microorganism "Photobacterium", have been used for many years as a tool by researchers and instructors. In particular, the "lux" operon of "Photobacterium fischeri" has been used by many instructors to teach recombinant DNA techniques. Two methods using an automated plate…

  18. Inferring Ancestral Recombination Graphs from Bacterial Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Timothy G.; Welch, David; Drummond, Alexei J.; Biggs, Patrick J.; George, Tessy; French, Nigel P.

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a central feature of bacterial evolution, yet it confounds traditional phylogenetic methods. While a number of methods specific to bacterial evolution have been developed, none of these permit joint inference of a bacterial recombination graph and associated parameters. In this article, we present a new method which addresses this shortcoming. Our method uses a novel Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to perform phylogenetic inference under the ClonalOrigin model. We demonstrate the utility of our method by applying it to ribosomal multilocus sequence typing data sequenced from pathogenic and nonpathogenic Escherichia coli serotype O157 and O26 isolates collected in rural New Zealand. The method is implemented as an open source BEAST 2 package, Bacter, which is available via the project web page at http://tgvaughan.github.io/bacter. PMID:28007885

  19. Method bacterial endospore quantification using lanthanide dipicolinate luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor); Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J. (Inventor); Kirby, James Patrick (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A lanthanide is combined with a medium to be tested for endospores. The dipicolinic acid released from the endospores binds the lanthanides, which have distinctive emission (i.e., luminescence) spectra, and are detected using photoluminescence. The concentration of spores is determined by preparing a calibration curve generated from photoluminescence spectra of lanthanide complex mixed with spores of a known concentration. A lanthanide complex is used as the analysis reagent, and is comprised of lanthanide ions bound to multidentate ligands that increase the dipicolinic acid binding constant through a cooperative binding effect with respect to lanthanide chloride. The resulting combined effect of increasing the binding constant and eliminating coordinated water and multiple equilibria increase the sensitivity of the endospore assay by an estimated three to four orders of magnitude over prior art of endospore detection based on lanthanide luminescence.

  20. Live/Dead Bacterial Spore Assay Using DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of measuring the fraction of bacterial spores in a sample that remain viable exploits DPA-triggered luminescence of Tb(3+) and is based partly on the same principles as those described earlier. Unlike prior methods for performing such live/dead assays of bacterial spores, this method does not involve counting colonies formed by cultivation (which can take days), or counting of spores under a microscope, and works whether or not bacterial spores are attached to other small particles (i.e., dust), and can be implemented on a time scale of about 20 minutes.

  1. Differential analysis of bactericidal systems of blood serum with recombinant luminescent Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains.

    PubMed

    Deryabin, D G; Karimov, I F; Manukhov, I V; Tolmacheva, N A; Balabanov, V P

    2012-11-01

    Luminescence intensity of recombinant Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains with cloned luxCD(AB)E genes of the natural luminescent microorganism Photobacterium leiognathi was studied under the influence of 30 individual samples of human blood serum of different component composition. A relationship was found between the level of residual bioluminescence and degree of the bactericidal effect. Moreover, the inhibition of E. coli lux+ luminescence was shown to be related to activity of the complement-lysozyme system. The reaction of B. subtilis lux+ primarily depended on the presence of β-lysin in the blood serum. These data provide an experimental substantiation of a new method of differential analysis of humoral factors of nonspecific innate immunity with recombinant luminescent bacteria.

  2. Genetic manipulation of poxviruses using bacterial artificial chromosome recombineering.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Matthew G

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for genetic manipulation of poxviruses rely on low-frequency natural recombination in virus-infected cells. Although these powerful systems represent the technical foundation of current knowledge and applications of poxviruses, they require long (≥ 500 bp) flanking sequences for homologous recombination, an efficient viral selection method, and burdensome, time-consuming plaque purification. The beginning of the twenty-first century has seen the application of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology to poxviruses as an alternative method for their genetic manipulation, following the invention of a long-sought-after method for deriving a BAC clone of vaccinia virus (VAC-BAC) by Arban Domi and Bernard Moss. The key advantages of the BAC system are the ease and versatility of performing genetic manipulation using bacteriophage λ Red recombination (recombineering), which requires only ∼50 bp homology arms that can be easily created by PCR, and which allows seamless mutations lacking any marker gene without having to perform transient-dominant selection. On the other hand, there are disadvantages, including the significant setup time, the risk of contamination of the cloned genome with bacterial insertion sequences, and the nontrivial issue of removal of the BAC cassette from derived viruses. These must be carefully weighed to decide whether the use of BACs will be advantageous for a particular application, making pox-BAC systems likely to complement, rather than supplant, traditional methods in most laboratories.

  3. Species Specific Bacterial Spore Detection Using Lateral-Flow Immunoassay with DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of detecting bacterial spores incorporates (1) A method of lateral-flow immunoassay in combination with (2) A method based on the luminescence of Tb3+ ions to which molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) released from the spores have become bound. The present combination of lateral-flow immunoassay and DPA-triggered Tb luminescence was developed as a superior alternative to a prior lateral-flow immunoassay method in which detection involves the visual observation and/or measurement of red light scattered from colloidal gold nanoparticles. The advantage of the present combination method is that it affords both (1) High selectivity for spores of the species of bacteria that one seeks to detect (a characteristic of lateral-flow immunoassay in general) and (2) Detection sensitivity much greater (by virtue of the use of DPA-triggered Tb luminescence instead of gold nanoparticles) than that of the prior lateral-flow immunoassay method

  4. Recombination luminescence of CaSO4:Tb3+ and CaSO4:Gd3+phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtseva, Irina; Lushchik, Aleksandr; Maaroos, Aarne; Azmaganbetova, Zhannur; Nurakhmetov, Turlybek; Salikhoja, Zhussupbek

    2012-08-01

    A comparative study of the excitation of luminescence by VUV radiation as well as of thermally and photostimulated luminescence has been carried out for CaSO4:Tb3+ and CaSO4:Gd3+ phosphors, where Na+ or F- ions are used for charge compensation. The distinction in hole processes for the phosphors with Na+ or F- compensators is determined by the differing thermal stability of the holes localized at/near Tb3+Na+ and Gd3+Na+ (up to 100-160 K) or at/near Tb3+F- V Ca and Gd3+F- V Ca centers involving also a cation vacancy (up to 400-550 K). Tunnel luminescence in the pairs of localized electrons and holes nearby Tb3+ or Gd3+ has been detected. The mechanisms of electron-hole, hole-electron and tunnel recombination luminescence as well as a subsequent released energy transfer to RE3+ ions are considered.

  5. Effect of concentrating and exposing the bioluminescent bacteria to the non-luminescent allo-bacterial extracellular products on their luminescence.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, J; Geetha Priya, G; Kannapiran, E

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a biochemical process occurring in many organisms. Bacterial bioluminescence has been investigated extensively that lead to many applications of such knowledge. Quorum sensing in the bioluminescent bacteria is a chemical signal process to recognize the strength of its own population to start luminescence in harmony. There is a mechanism in these bacteria to also recognize inter-species strength. When there is a higher number of these bacteria, the possibility and frequency of cell-cell physical contact will be high. In this study, the physical proximity was artificially enhanced between cells and the effect on luminescence in the concentrated cells in the normal culture medium and in the presence of other non-bacterial cell-free supernatants was investigated. The role of such physical contact in the quorum sensing in the bioluminescence is not known. Increase in the luminescence of V. fischeri when concentrated shows that the presence of physical proximity facilitates the quorum sensing for their bioluminescence.

  6. A New, Sensitive Marine Microalgal Recombinant Biosensor Using Luminescence Monitoring for Toxicity Testing of Antifouling Biocides

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie; Leroy, Fanny; Bouget, François-Yves

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we propose the use of the marine green alga Ostreococcus tauri, the smallest free-living eukaryotic cell known to date, as a new luminescent biosensor for toxicity testing in the environment. Diuron and Irgarol 1051, two antifouling biocides commonly encountered in coastal waters, were chosen to test this new biosensor along with two degradation products of diuron. The effects of various concentrations of the antifoulants on four genetic constructs of O. tauri (based on genes involved in photosynthesis, cell cycle, and circadian clock) were compared using 96-well culture microplates and a luminometer to automatically measure luminescence over 3 days. This was compared to growth inhibition of O. tauri wild type under the same conditions. Luminescence appeared to be more sensitive than growth inhibition as an indicator of toxicity. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKA), a protein involved in the cell cycle, fused to luciferase (CDKA-Luc) was found to be the most sensitive of the biosensors, allowing an accurate determination of the 50% effective concentration (EC50) after only 2 days (diuron, 5.65 ± 0.44 μg/liter; Irgarol 1015, 0.76 ± 0.10 μg/liter). The effects of the antifoulants on the CDKA-Luc biosensor were then compared to growth inhibition in natural marine phytoplankton. The effective concentrations of diuron and Irgarol 1051 were found to be similar, indicating that this biosensor would be suitable as a reliable ecotoxicological test. The advantage of this biosensor over cell growth inhibition testing is that the process can be easily automated and could provide a high-throughput laboratory approach to perform short-term toxicity tests. The ability to genetically transform and culture recombinant O. tauri gives it huge potential for screening many other toxic compounds. PMID:23144143

  7. An efficient depyrogenation method for recombinant bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Basto, Afonso P; Morais, Joana; Marcelino, Eduardo; Leitão, Alexandre; Santos, Dulce M

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins are anchored in the outer membrane lipid layer in close association with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and with other hydrophobic membrane proteins, making their purification technically challenging. We have previously shown that a thorough delipidation of outer membrane preparations from the Escherichia coli expression host is an important step to eliminate contaminant proteins when purifying recombinant antigens expressed in fusion with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprI lipoprotein. Here we report the cloning and expression of three antigens in fusion with OprI (ovalbumin, eGFP and BbPDI) and our efforts to deal with the variable LPS contamination levels observed in different batches of purified lipoproteins. The use of polymyxin B columns or endotoxin removal polycationic magnetic beads for depyrogenation of purified lipoproteins resulted in high protein losses and the use of Triton X-114 or sodium deoxycholate during the course of affinity chromatography showed to be ineffective to reduce LPS contamination. Instead, performing a hot phenol/water LPS extraction from outer membrane preparations prior to metal affinity chromatography allowed the purification of the recombinant fusion lipoproteins with LPS contents below 0.02EU/μg of protein. The purified recombinant lipoproteins retain their capacity to stimulate bone marrow-derived dendritic cells allowing for the study of their immunomodulatory properties through TLR2/1. This is a simple and easy to scale up method that can also be considered for the purification of other outer membrane lipoproteins.

  8. LuxG is a functioning flavin reductase for bacterial luminescence.

    PubMed

    Nijvipakul, Sarayut; Wongratana, Janewit; Suadee, Chutintorn; Entsch, Barrie; Ballou, David P; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2008-03-01

    The luxG gene is part of the lux operon of marine luminous bacteria. luxG has been proposed to be a flavin reductase that supplies reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMN) for bacterial luminescence. However, this role has never been established because the gene product has not been successfully expressed and characterized. In this study, luxG from Photobacterium leiognathi TH1 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli in both native and C-terminal His6-tagged forms. Sequence analysis indicates that the protein consists of 237 amino acids, corresponding to a subunit molecular mass of 26.3 kDa. Both expressed forms of LuxG were purified to homogeneity, and their biochemical properties were characterized. Purified LuxG is homodimeric and has no bound prosthetic group. The enzyme can catalyze oxidation of NADH in the presence of free flavin, indicating that it can function as a flavin reductase in luminous bacteria. NADPH can also be used as a reducing substrate for the LuxG reaction, but with much less efficiency than NADH. With NADH and FMN as substrates, a Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed a series of convergent lines characteristic of a ternary-complex kinetic model. From steady-state kinetics data at 4 degrees C pH 8.0, Km for NADH, Km for FMN, and kcat were calculated to be 15.1 microM, 2.7 microM, and 1.7 s(-1), respectively. Coupled assays between LuxG and luciferases from P. leiognathi TH1 and Vibrio campbellii also showed that LuxG could supply FMNH- for light emission in vitro. A luxG gene knockout mutant of P. leiognathi TH1 exhibited a much dimmer luminescent phenotype compared to the native P. leiognathi TH1, implying that LuxG is the most significant source of FMNH- for the luminescence reaction in vivo.

  9. Ratiometric luminescent detection of bacterial spores with terbium chelated semiconducting polymer dots.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Sun, Kai; Chang, Kaiwen; Yu, Jiangbo; Chiu, Daniel T; Wu, Changfeng; Qin, Weiping

    2013-10-01

    We report a ratiometric fluorescent sensor based on semiconducting polymer dots chelated with terbium ions to detect bacterial spores in aqueous solution. Fluorescent polyfluorene (PFO) dots serve as a scaffold to coordinate with lanthanide ions that can be sensitized by calcium dipicolinate (CaDPA), an important biomarker of bacterial spores. The absorption band of PFO dots extends to deep UV region, allowing both the reference and the sensitizer can be excited with a single wavelength (~275 nm). The fluorescence of PFO remains constant as a reference, while the Tb(3+) ions exhibit enhanced luminescence upon binding with DPA. The sharp fluorescence peaks of β-phase PFO dots and the narrow-band emissions of Tb(3+) ions enable ratiometric and sensitive CaDPA detection with a linear response over nanomolar concentration and a detection limit of ~0.2 nM. The Pdots based sensor also show excellent selectivity to CaDPA over other aromatic ligands. Our results indicate that the Tb(3+) chelated Pdots sensor is promising for sensitive and rapid detection of bacterial spores.

  10. Donor-acceptor pair recombination luminescence from monoclinic Cu{sub 2}SnS{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, Naoya; Tanaka, Kunihiko Uchiki, Hisao; Kanai, Ayaka; Araki, Hideaki

    2015-07-20

    The defect levels in Cu{sub 2}SnS{sub 3} (CTS) were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. A CTS thin film was prepared on a soda-lime glass/molybdenum substrate by thermal co-evaporation and sulfurization. The crystal structure was determined to be monoclinic, and the compositional ratios of Cu/Sn and S/Metal were determined to be 1.8 and 1.2, respectively. The photon energy of the PL spectra observed from the CTS thin film was lower than that previously reported. All fitted PL peaks were associated with defect related luminescence. The PL peaks observed at 0.843 and 0.867 eV were assigned to donor-acceptor pair recombination luminescence, the thermal activation energies of which were determined to be 22.9 and 24.8 meV, respectively.

  11. The Effect of Pre-irradiation Defects on the Recombination Luminescence in Activated Crystals K2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koketai, Temirgaly; Tagayeva, Batima; Tussupbekova, Ainura; Mussenova, Elmira

    The recombinational luminescence of crystals of K2SO4-Mn2+ and K2SO4-Ni2+ is studied in the article. It is established that impurity ions form the radiation induced centers. The cause of changes of the distribution of lightsum on TSL peaks of a matrix is established. It is proposed that it is related to pre-radiation defeсts in crystals. It is established from this effect that ions of Mn2+ and Ni2+ selectively replace cations in a crystal lattice of potassium sulfate.

  12. Recombination luminescence of LaPO4-Eu and LaPO4-Pr nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyy, T. S.; Vistovskyy, V. V.; Khapko, Z. A.; Pushak, A. S.; Mitina, N. E.; Zaichenko, A. S.; Gektin, A. V.; Voloshinovskii, A. S.

    2013-06-01

    The study of the spectral-luminescence parameters of LaPO4-Eu and LaPO4-Pr nanoparticles upon excitation by the synchrotron radiation with photon energies 4-40 eV was performed. The differences of the luminescence intensity dependence on the size for LaPO4-Eu and LaPO4-Pr nanoparticles excited at the range of matrix transparency, the range of band-to-band transitions, and the range of electronic excitation multiplication were revealed. The observed regularities are explained in terms of the electron-phonon and electron-electron scattering, surface losses, and exciton diffusion. The ratio between the length of thermalization and electron mean free path and the size of nanoparticle is determinative for the luminescence intensity upon excitation in the range of fundamental absorption of matrix and X-ray excitation.

  13. Ectopic mitotic recombination in Drosophila probed with bacterial beta-galactosidase gene-based reporter transgenes.

    PubMed Central

    Bärtsch, S; Dücker, K; Würgler, F E; Sengstag, C

    1997-01-01

    Plasmids were constructed to investigate homologous mitotic recombination in Drosophila cells. Heteroalleles containing truncated but overlapping segments of the bacterial beta-galactosidase gene (lacZ) were positioned either on separate plasmids or as direct repeats on the same chromosome. Recombination reconstituted a functional lacZgene leading to expression of LacZ+activity detectable by histochemical staining. High extrachromosomal recombination (ECR) frequencies between unlinked heteroalleles were observed upon transient co-transfection into Drosophila melanogaster Schneider line 2 (S2) cells. Stably transfected cells containing the lacZ heteroalleles linked on a chromosome exhibited intrachromosomal recombination (ICR) frequencies two orders of magnitude lower than ECR frequencies. Recombination was inducible by exposing the cells to ethyl methanesulphonate or mitomycin C. Recombination products were characterized by multiplex PCR analysis and unequal sister chromatid recombination was found as the predominant mechanism reconstituting the lacZ gene. To investigate recombination in vivo imaginal disc cells from transgenic larvae carrying the reporter gene on the X chromosome were isolated and stained for LacZ+ activity. The presence of a few LacZ+ clones indicated that mitotic recombination events occurred at frequencies two orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding event in cultured cells and late during larval development. PMID:9380517

  14. [Glycosides of hydroxylamine derivatives. I. phase transfer synthesis and study of isatine-3-oximes glucosaminides influence on bacterial luminescence].

    PubMed

    Kur'ianov, V O; Chupakhina, T A; Shapovalova, A A; Katsev, A M; Chirva, V Ia

    2011-01-01

    In the phase transfer system solid calcium carbonate-acetonitrile, per acetate alpha-D-glucosaminilchloride glycosilate easily deprotoned isatine-3-oximes hydroxyl groups. It was found that the presence in the reaction mixture a catalytic amounts of 15-crown-5 accelerated the process twice. Obtained O-beta-D-glucosaminides were identified with 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Features of synthesized compound's NMR spectra are discussed in comparison with those of another N-acetylglucosamine 1-O-derivatives. The biological activity of the some oximes with different substituents in isatin residuum has been studied in a test of inhibition of bioluminescence of marine luminescent bacteria Photobacterium leiognathi Sh12. The nature of N-substituent of isatin fragment and 5-substituent of isatin main structure is compared with glycosides ability to suppress bacterial luminescence.

  15. Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constants of Charge Recombination Reactions in Bacterial Reaction Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy, T. T.; Yen, V. T. H.; Thao, T. T.; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    The bacterial reaction center couples light-induced electron transfer via a tightly bound ubiquinone (QA) to a mobile ubiquinone (QB). Based on the electron transfer theory by Marcus, we have investigated the rate of charge recombination reactions from Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, by mean of finding an approximation formula. The results obtained are verified for not only at high and low temperature as the previous works but also at the medium temperature range.

  16. ClonalFrameML: Efficient Inference of Recombination in Whole Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Didelot, Xavier; Wilson, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Recombination is an important evolutionary force in bacteria, but it remains challenging to reconstruct the imports that occurred in the ancestry of a genomic sample. Here we present ClonalFrameML, which uses maximum likelihood inference to simultaneously detect recombination in bacterial genomes and account for it in phylogenetic reconstruction. ClonalFrameML can analyse hundreds of genomes in a matter of hours, and we demonstrate its usefulness on simulated and real datasets. We find evidence for recombination hotspots associated with mobile elements in Clostridium difficile ST6 and a previously undescribed 310kb chromosomal replacement in Staphylococcus aureus ST582. ClonalFrameML is freely available at http://clonalframeml.googlecode.com/. PMID:25675341

  17. Recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Gurkan, Cemal; Ellar, David J

    2005-01-01

    The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris is a popular heterologous expression host for the recombinant production of a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins. The rapid emergence of P. pastoris as a robust heterologous expression host was facilitated by the ease with which it can be manipulated and propagated, which is comparable to that of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. P. pastoris offers further advantages such as the tightly-regulated alcohol oxidase promoter that is particularly suitable for heterologous expression of foreign genes. While recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives is highly desirable, attempts at their heterologous expression using the traditional E. coli expression system can be problematic due to the formation of inclusion bodies that often severely limit the final yields of biologically active products. However, recent literature now suggests that P. pastoris may be an attractive alternative host for the heterologous production of bacterial toxins, such as those from the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, and Corynebacterium, as well as their more complex derivatives. Here, we review the recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in P. pastoris with special emphasis on their potential clinical applications. Considering that de novo design and construction of synthetic toxin genes have often been necessary to achieve optimal heterologous expression in P. pastoris, we also present general guidelines to this end based on our experience with the P. pastoris expression of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa1 toxin. PMID:16336647

  18. New strategies for combination vaccines based on the extended recombinant bacterial ghost system.

    PubMed

    Eko, F O; Witte, A; Huter, V; Kuen, B; Fürst-Ladani, S; Haslberger, A; Katinger, A; Hensel, A; Szostak, M P; Resch, S; Mader, H; Raza, P; Brand, E; Marchart, J; Jechlinger, W; Haidinger, W; Lubitz, W

    1999-03-26

    Controlled expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts have been produced from a great variety of bacteria and are used as non-living candidate vaccines. In the recombinant ghost system, foreign proteins are attached on the inside of the inner membrane as fusions with specific anchor sequences. Ghosts have a sealed periplasmic space and the export of proteins into this space vastly extents the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts to function as carriers of foreign antigens, immunomodulators or other substances. In addition, S-layer proteins forming shell-like self assembly structures can be expressed in bacterial candidate vaccine strains prior to E-mediated lysis. Such recombinant S-layer proteins carrying inserts of foreign epitopes of up to 600 amino acids within the flexible surface loop areas of the S-layer further extend the possibilities of ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes. As ghosts do not need the addition of adjuvants to induce immunity in experimental animals they can also be used as carriers or targeting vehicles or as adjuvants in combination with subunit vaccines. Matrixes like dextran which can be used to fill the internal lumen of ghosts can be substituted with various ligands to bind the subunit or other materials of interest. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral immunization of experimental animals with recombinant ghosts induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of ghosts and recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in the production of ghosts. This fact explains the superior quality of ghosts when compared to other inactivated vaccines. As carriers of foreign

  19. Rapid phylogenetic analysis of large samples of recombinant bacterial whole genome sequences using Gubbins

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Nicholas J.; Page, Andrew J.; Connor, Thomas R.; Delaney, Aidan J.; Keane, Jacqueline A.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Parkhill, Julian; Harris, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of new sequencing technologies has facilitated the use of bacterial whole genome alignments for evolutionary studies and outbreak analyses. These datasets, of increasing size, often include examples of multiple different mechanisms of horizontal sequence transfer resulting in substantial alterations to prokaryotic chromosomes. The impact of these processes demands rapid and flexible approaches able to account for recombination when reconstructing isolates’ recent diversification. Gubbins is an iterative algorithm that uses spatial scanning statistics to identify loci containing elevated densities of base substitutions suggestive of horizontal sequence transfer while concurrently constructing a maximum likelihood phylogeny based on the putative point mutations outside these regions of high sequence diversity. Simulations demonstrate the algorithm generates highly accurate reconstructions under realistically parameterized models of bacterial evolution, and achieves convergence in only a few hours on alignments of hundreds of bacterial genome sequences. Gubbins is appropriate for reconstructing the recent evolutionary history of a variety of haploid genotype alignments, as it makes no assumptions about the underlying mechanism of recombination. The software is freely available for download at github.com/sanger-pathogens/Gubbins, implemented in Python and C and supported on Linux and Mac OS X. PMID:25414349

  20. [Characteristics of the response of natural and recombinant luminescent microorganisms in the presence of Fe2+ ions].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, D G; Karimov, I F

    2010-01-01

    It was found that divalent iron ions have alternative effects on the bioluminescence of the natural marine microorganism Photobacterium phosphoreum and the recombinant Escherichia coli strain with a cloned lux operon of P. leiognathi. In the presence of 0.25-5.0 mM FeSO4, the bioluminescence intensity of the former and the latter increased and decreased, respectively. To establish the causes of these differences, we studied the characteristics of the fatty acid composition of the compared microorganisms. The fatty acid profile of E. coli was characterized by a high proportion of unsaturated 11-octadecenoic (vaccenic) acid. A study of this acid in a cell-free enzyme system used for bioluminescence generation showed that it is a potent inhibitor of bacterial bioluminescence. It was found that such effects are enhanced if 11-octadecenoid acid is preincubated with Fe2+.

  1. Measurements of Ca²⁺ concentration with recombinant targeted luminescent probes.

    PubMed

    Ottolini, Denis; Calì, Tito; Brini, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades the study of Ca(2+) homeostasis in living cells has been enhanced by the explosive development of genetically encoded Ca(2+)-indicators. The cloning of the Ca(2+)-sensitive photoprotein aequorin and of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria has been enormously advantageous. As polypeptides, aequorin and GFP allow their endogenous production in cell systems as diverse as bacteria, yeast, slime molds, plants, and mammalian cells. Moreover, it is possible to specifically localize them within the cell by including defined targeting signals in the amino acid sequence. These two proteins have been extensively engineered to obtain several recombinant probes for different biological parameters, among which Ca(2+) concentration reporters are probably the most relevant. The GFP-based Ca(2+) probes and aequorin are widely employed in the study of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. The new generation of bioluminescent probes that couple the Ca(2+) sensitivity of aequorin to GFP fluorescence emission allows real-time measurements of subcellular Ca(2+) changes in single cell imaging experiments and the video-imaging of Ca(2+) concentrations changes in live transgenic animals that express GFP-aequorin bifunctional probes.

  2. [Dual promoters enhance heterologous enzyme production from bacterial phage based recombinant Bacillus subtilis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Yan; Xing, Miao

    2006-03-01

    The effect of dual promoters on recombinant protein production from bacterial phage based Bacillus subtilis expression system was investigated. Alpha amylase (from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens) and penicillin acylase (from Bacillus megaterium) were selected as the indicating enzymes. Both the promoterless genes and the promoter-bearing genes were isolated through PCR amplification with properly designed primers, and were inserted into plasmid pSG703 that contains the lacZ-cat expression cartridge. The lysogenic B. subtilis (phi105 MU331) was transformed with the resultant recombinant plasmids, and the heterologous genes were thereby integrated into the chromosommal DNA of B. subtilis via homologous recombination. The transformants were designated as B. subtilis AMY1, B. subtilis AMY2, B. subtilis PA1, and B. subtilis PA2, respectively. In the recombinant B. subtilis strains, the inserted sequences were located down stream of a strong phage promoter that could be activated by thermal induction. In B. subtilis AMY1 and B. subtilis PA1, transcription of the heterologous genes was only initiated by the phage promoter after heat shock, whereas in B. subtilis AMY2 and B. subtilis PA2, transcription of the heterologous genes was initiated by dual promoters, the phage promoter and the native promoter. The application of dual promoters increased the productivity of both enzymes, with 133% enhancement for alpha-amylase production and 113% enhancement for penicillin acylase production.

  3. Recombinant bacterial expression and purification of human fragile X mental retardation protein isoform 1.

    PubMed

    Evans, Timothy L; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2010-12-01

    The loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) leads to fragile X syndrome. FMRP has two types of RNA binding domains, two K-homology domains and an arginine-glycine-glycine box domain, and it is proposed to act as a translation regulator of specific messenger RNA. The interest to produce sufficient quantities of pure recombinant FMRP for biochemical and biophysical studies is high. However, the recombinant bacterial expression of FMRP has had limited success, and subsequent recombinant eukaryotic and in vitro expression has also resulted in limited success. In addition, the in vitro and eukaryotic expression systems may produce FMRP which is posttranslationally modified, as phosphorylation and arginine methylation have been shown to occur on FMRP. In this study, we have successfully isolated the conditions for recombinant expression, purification and long-term storage of FMRP using Escherichia coli, with a high yield. The expression of FMRP using E. coli renders the protein devoid of the posttranslational modifications of phosphorylation and arginine methylation, allowing the study of the direct effects of these modifications individually and simultaneously. In order to assure that FMRP retained activity throughout the process, we used fluorescence spectroscopy to assay the binding activity of the FMRP arginine-glycine-glycine box for the semaphorin 3F mRNA and confirmed that FMRP remained active.

  4. Luminescent-Activated Transfected Killer Cells to Monitor Leukocyte Trafficking During Systemic Bacterial and Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Baquir, Beverlie; Palosaari, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Background. Activated transfected killer (ATAK) cells are immortal phagocytes transfected with a luminescence reporter that effectively treat lethal infections in neutropenic mice. Their in vivo trafficking, lifespan, and immunogenicity are unknown. Methods. Mice were made neutropenic; infected or not with Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Candida albicans, or Aspergillus fumigatus; and treated intraperitoneally with ATAK cells. Cell trafficking and lifespan were assessed by in vivo imaging and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Results. In uninfected neutropenic mice, ATAK cells spread from the mesentery into visceral organs on days 1–3. Splenic accumulation of ATAK cells increased at day 1 after infection with S. aureus and A. baumannii, and kidney accumulation increased in mice infected with C. albicans. Lung accumulation was seen at day 3 in mice infected by inhalation with A. fumigatus. By day 8, coincident with increasing anti-ATAK antibodies, luminescence signal was lost and there was no detectable mRNA transcription from ATAK cells. Conclusions. ATAK cells accumulated in target organs with distinct profiles, depending on the microbial etiology of infection. Finally, generation of an anti-ATAK immune response may provide an important safety mechanism that helps clear the cells from the host as the marrow recovers. PMID:22124127

  5. Room temperature electrocompetent bacterial cells improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qiang; Yin, Jia; Fu, Jun; Herrmann, Jennifer; Li, Yuezhong; Yin, Yulong; Stewart, A. Francis; Müller, Rolf; Zhang, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial competent cells are essential for cloning, construction of DNA libraries, and mutagenesis in every molecular biology laboratory. Among various transformation methods, electroporation is found to own the best transformation efficiency. Previous electroporation methods are based on washing and electroporating the bacterial cells in ice-cold condition that make them fragile and prone to death. Here we present simple temperature shift based methods that improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency in E. coli and several other gram-negative bacteria thereby economizing time and cost. Increased transformation efficiency of large DNA molecules is a significant advantage that might facilitate the cloning of large fragments from genomic DNA preparations and metagenomics samples. PMID:27095488

  6. De novo generation of infectious prions with bacterially expressed recombinant prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Fei; Wang, Xinhe; Xu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Huaiyi; Yu, Guohua; Yuan, Chonggang; Ma, Jiyan

    2013-12-01

    The prion hypothesis is strongly supported by the fact that prion infectivity and the pathogenic conformer of prion protein (PrP) are simultaneously propagated in vitro by the serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA). However, due to sPMCA's enormous amplification power, whether an infectious prion can be formed de novo with bacterially expressed recombinant PrP (rPrP) remains to be satisfactorily resolved. To address this question, we performed unseeded sPMCA with rPrP in a laboratory that has never been exposed to any native prions. Two types of proteinase K (PK)-resistant and self-perpetuating recombinant PrP conformers (rPrP-res) with PK-resistant cores of 17 or 14 kDa were generated. A bioassay revealed that rPrP-res(17kDa) was highly infectious, causing prion disease in wild-type mice with an average survival time of about 172 d. In contrast, rPrP-res(14kDa) completely failed to induce any disease. Our findings reveal that sPMCA is sufficient to initiate various self-perpetuating PK-resistant rPrP conformers, but not all of them possess in vivo infectivity. Moreover, generating an infectious prion in a prion-free environment establishes that an infectious prion can be formed de novo with bacterially expressed rPrP.

  7. Genome-wide survey of codons under diversifying selection in a highly recombining bacterial species, Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Koji; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Morimoto, Shinpei; Kikutake, Chie; Komukai, Sho; Matelska, Dorota; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanisław; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Selection has been a central issue in biology in eukaryotes as well as prokaryotes. Inference of selection in recombining bacterial species, compared with clonal ones, has been a challenge. It is not known how codons under diversifying selection are distributed along the chromosome or among functional categories or how frequently such codons are subject to mutual homologous recombination. Here, we explored these questions by analysing genes present in >90% among 29 genomes of Helicobacter pylori, one of the bacterial species with the highest mutation and recombination rates. By a method for recombining sequences, we identified codons under diversifying selection (dN/dS > 1), which were widely distributed and accounted for ∼0.2% of all the codons of the genome. The codons were enriched in genes of host interaction/cell surface and genome maintenance (DNA replication, recombination, repair, and restriction modification system). The encoded amino acid residues were sometimes found adjacent to critical catalytic/binding residues in protein structures. Furthermore, by estimating the intensity of homologous recombination at a single nucleotide level, we found that these codons appear to be more frequently subject to recombination. We expect that the present study provides a new approach to population genomics of selection in recombining prokaryotes. PMID:26961370

  8. Use of recombination-mediated genetic engineering for construction of rescue human cytomegalovirus bacterial artificial chromosome clones.

    PubMed

    Dulal, Kalpana; Silver, Benjamin; Zhu, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination system. A gene capture method, or gap repair cloning, to seize large fragments of DNA from the virus BAC in order to generate rescue viruses, is described in detail. Construction of rescue clones using gap repair cloning is highly efficient and provides a novel use of the homologous recombination-based method in E. coli for molecular cloning, known colloquially as recombineering, when rescuing large BAC deletions. This method of excising large fragments of DNA provides important prospects for in vitro homologous recombination for genetic cloning.

  9. Synthesis of the milk oligosaccharide 2'-fucosyllactose using recombinant bacterial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Albermann, C; Piepersberg, W; Wehmeier, U F

    2001-08-23

    The enzymatic synthesis of GDP-beta-L-fucose and its enzymatic transfer reaction using recombinant enzymes from bacterial sources was examined. The GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase and the GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose 3,5-epimerase-4-reductase from Escherichia coli K-12, respectively, were used to catalyse the conversion of GDP-alpha-D-mannose to GDP-beta-L-fucose with 78% yield. For the transfer of the L-fucose to an acceptor, we cloned and overproduced the alpha-(1-->2)-fucosyltransferase (FucT2) protein from Helicobacter pylori. We were able to synthesise 2'-fucosyllactose using the overproduced FucT2 enzyme, enzymatically synthesised GDP-L-fucose and lactose. The isolation of 2'-fucosyllactose was accomplished by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration to give 65% yield.

  10. Bacterial-based systems for expression and purification of recombinant Lassa virus proteins of immunological relevance

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Luis M; Matschiner, Alex; Fair, Joseph N; Goba, Augustine; Sampey, Darryl B; Ferro, Philip J; Cashman, Kathleen A; Schoepp, Randal J; Tesh, Robert B; Bausch, Daniel G; Garry, Robert F; Guttieri, Mary C

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a significant requirement for the development and acquisition of reagents that will facilitate effective diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Lassa fever. In this regard, recombinant Lassa virus (LASV) proteins may serve as valuable tools in diverse antiviral applications. Bacterial-based systems were engineered for expression and purification of recombinant LASV nucleoprotein (NP), glycoprotein 1 (GP1), and glycoprotein 2 (GP2). Results Full-length NP and the ectodomains of GP1 and GP2 were generated as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusions in the Rosetta strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli) using pMAL-c2x vectors. Average fusion protein yields per liter of culture for MBP-NP, MBP-GP1, and MBP-GP2 were 10 mg, 9 mg, and 9 mg, respectively. Each protein was captured from cell lysates using amylose resin, cleaved with Factor Xa, and purified using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Fermentation cultures resulted in average yields per liter of 1.6 mg, 1.5 mg, and 0.7 mg of purified NP, GP1 and GP2, respectively. LASV-specific antibodies in human convalescent sera specifically detected each of the purified recombinant LASV proteins, highlighting their utility in diagnostic applications. In addition, mouse hyperimmune ascitic fluids (MHAF) against a panel of Old and New World arenaviruses demonstrated selective cross reactivity with LASV proteins in Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Conclusion These results demonstrate the potential for developing broadly reactive immunological assays that employ all three arenaviral proteins individually and in combination. PMID:18538016

  11. Recombination produces coherent bacterial species clusters in both core and accessory genomes

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Nicholas J.; Gutmann, Michael U.; Corander, Jukka; Hanage, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Population samples show bacterial genomes can be divided into a core of ubiquitous genes and accessory genes that are present in a fraction of isolates. The ecological significance of this variation in gene content remains unclear. However, microbiologists agree that a bacterial species should be ‘genomically coherent’, even though there is no consensus on how this should be determined. Results: We use a parsimonious model combining diversification in both the core and accessory genome, including mutation, homologous recombination (HR) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) introducing new loci, to produce a population of interacting clusters of strains with varying genome content. New loci introduced by HGT may then be transferred on by HR. The model fits well to a systematic population sample of 616 pneumococcal genomes, capturing the major features of the population structure with parameter values that agree well with empirical estimates. Conclusions: The model does not include explicit selection on individual genes, suggesting that crude comparisons of gene content may be a poor predictor of ecological function. We identify a clearly divergent subpopulation of pneumococci that are inconsistent with the model and may be considered genomically incoherent with the rest of the population. These strains have a distinct disease tropism and may be rationally defined as a separate species. We also find deviations from the model that may be explained by recent population bottlenecks or spatial structure.

  12. A novel, sensitive method to evaluate potato germplasm for bacterial wilt resistance using a luminescent Ralstonia solanacearum reporter strain.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andrea Paola Zuluaga; Ferreira, Virginia; Pianzzola, María Julia; Siri, María Inés; Coll, Núria S; Valls, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Several breeding programs are under way to introduce resistance to bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in solanaceous crops. The lack of screening methods allowing easy measurement of pathogen colonization and the inability to detect latent (i.e., symptomless) infections are major limitations when evaluating resistance to this disease in plant germplasm. We describe a new method to study the interaction between R. solanacearum and potato germplasm that overcomes these restrictions. The R. solanacearum UY031 was genetically modified to constitutively generate light from a synthetic luxCDABE operon stably inserted in its chromosome. Colonization of this reporter strain on different potato accessions was followed using life imaging. Bacterial detection in planta by this nondisruptive system correlated with the development of wilting symptoms. In addition, we demonstrated that quantitative detection of the recombinant strain using a luminometer can identify latent infections on symptomless potato plants. We have developed a novel, unsophisticated, and accurate method for high-throughput evaluation of pathogen colonization in plant populations. We applied this method to compare the behavior of potato accessions with contrasting resistance to R. solanacearum. This new system will be especially useful to detect latency in symptomless parental lines before their inclusion in long-term breeding programs for disease resistance.

  13. Recombination luminescence and trap levels in undoped and Al-doped ZnO thin films on quartz and GaSe (0 0 0 1) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Evtodiev, I.; Caraman, I.; Leontie, L.; Rusu, D.-I.; Dafinei, A.; Nedeff, V.; Lazar, G.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO films on GaSe create electron trapping states and PL recombination levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn and Al diffusion in GaSe produces low-energy widening of its PL emission. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO:Al films on GaSe lamellas are suitable for gas-discharge lamp applications. -- Abstract: Photoluminescence spectra of ZnO and ZnO:Al (1.00, 2.00 and 5.00 at.%) films on GaSe (0 0 0 1) lamellas and amorphous quartz substrates, obtained by annealing, at 700 K, of undoped and Al-doped metal films, are investigated. For all samples, the nonequilibrium charge carriers recombine by radiative band-to-band transitions with energy of 3.27 eV, via recombination levels created by the monoionized oxygen atoms, forming the impurity band laying in the region 2.00 - 2.70 eV. Al doping induces an additional recombination level at 1.13 eV above the top of the valence band of ZnO films on GaSe substrates. As a result of thermal diffusion of Zn and Al into the GaSe interface layer from ZnO:Al/GaSe heterojunction, electron trap levels located at 0.22 eV and 0.26 eV below the conduction band edge of GaSe, as well as a deep recombination level, responsible for the luminescent emission in the region 1.10 - 1.40 eV, are created.

  14. Highly Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Homologous Recombination Promotes the Rapid Generation of Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes of Pseudorabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jin-Chao; Tang, Yan-Dong; Zhao, Kuan; Wang, Tong-Yun; Liu, Ji-Ting; Gao, Jia-Cong; Chang, Xiao-Bo; Cui, Hong-Yu; Tian, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Xue-Hui; An, Tong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are powerful tools for the manipulation of the large genomes of DNA viruses, such as herpesviruses. However, the methods currently used to construct the recombinant viruses, an important intermediate link in the generation of BACs, involve the laborious process of multiple plaque purifications. Moreover, some fastidious viruses may be lost or damaged during these processes, making it impossible to generate BACs from these large-genome DNA viruses. Here, we introduce the CRISPR/Cas9 as a site-specific gene knock-in instrument that promotes the homologs recombination of a linearized transfer vector and the Pseudorabies virus genome through double incisions. The efficiency of recombination is as high as 86%. To our knowledge, this is the highest efficiency ever reported for Pseudorabies virus recombination. We also demonstrate that the positions and distances of the CRISPR/Cas9 single guide RNAs from the homology arms correlate with the efficiency of homologous recombination. Our work show a simple and fast cloning method of BACs with large genome inserted by greatly enhancing the HR efficiencies through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homology-directed repair mechanism, and this method could be of helpful for manipulating large DNA viruses, and will provide a successful model for insertion of large DNA fragments into other viruses. PMID:28066407

  15. Acute toxicity evaluation of explosive wastewater by bacterial bioluminescence assays using a freshwater luminescent bacterium, Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhengfang; Zhao, Quanlin; Zhang, Mohe; Gao, Yuchen

    2011-02-28

    The compositions of explosive wastewater generated from TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) purification stage were characterized by using UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) and gas chromatograph/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The acute toxicity was evaluated by bacterium bioluminescence assay using a freshwater luminescent bacterium (Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov.) and a marine luminescent bacterium (Photobacterium phosphoreum). The results showed that the wastewater's biodegradability was poor due to the high amount of chemical oxygen demand (COD). The main organic components were dinitrotoluene sulfonates (DNTS) with small amount of TNT, dinitrotoluene (DNT), mononitrotoluene (MNT) and other derivatives of nitrobenzene. It was highly toxic to luminescent bacteria P. phosphoreum and V. qinghaiensis sp. Nov. After reaction time of 15 min, the relative concentration of toxic pollutants (expressed as reciprocal of dilution ratio of wastewater) at 50% of luminescence inhibition ratio was 5.32×10(-4) for P. phosphoreu, while that was 4.34×10(-4) for V. qinghaiensis. V. qinghaiensis is more sensitive and suitable for evaluating the wastewater's acute toxicity than P. phosphoreum. After adsorption by resin, the acute toxicity can be greatly reduced, which is helpful for further treatment by biological methods.

  16. Enhanced production of ε-caprolactone by coexpression of bacterial hemoglobin gene in recombinant Escherichia coli expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-12-28

    Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in a microbial system expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) can be influenced by not only the efficient regeneration of NADPH but also a sufficient supply of oxygen. In this study, the bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria (vhb) was introduced into the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing CHMO to investigate the effects of an oxygen-carrying protein on microbial BV oxidation of cyclohexanone. Coexpression of Vhb allowed the recombinant E. coli strain to produce a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 15.7 g/l in a fed-batch BV oxidation of cyclohexanone, which corresponded to a 43% improvement compared with the control strain expressing CHMO only under the same conditions.

  17. Self-trapped excitons in pure and Na- and Tl-doped caesium halides and the recombination luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chun-Rong; Chen, Ling-Fu; Song, K. S.

    1999-07-01

    On the basis of a method used earlier to predict the off-centre relaxed triplet self-trapped excitons in alkali halides, similar systems in caesium halides are studied. This work confirms the expected off-centre relaxation along the [100] cubic axes with increasing magnitude in the order CsI, CsBr and CsCl. The calculated emission energies are in reasonable agreement with observed values. The well-known 2.95 eV emission band of CsI:Na has been studied as a tunnelling recombination between a close pair consisting of a VK centre and a Na atom. For a number of close-pair geometries the emission energies are close to 3 eV. The strong emission bands of CsI:Tl at 2.25 eV and 2.55 eV have been interpreted as arising from tunnelling recombination of close pairs each consisting of a Tl0 and a VK centre. The calculated emission energies and polarizations are discussed in conjunction with the experimental data.

  18. Comparison of the response of bacterial luminescence and mitochondrial respiration to the effluent of an oil refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Riisberg, M.; Bratlie, E.; Stenersen, J.

    1996-04-01

    The effects of oil refinery effluents on rat mitochondrial respiration and on the luminescence of the bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum were compared. Mitochondria from male Wistar rat livers were exposed to different concentrations of refinery effluents in a semiclosed 3-ml reaction vessel. Respiration was measured polarographically with an oxygen electrode. Effects on P. phosphoreum were measured by the standard test developed by Microbics. The mitochondrial method showed EC50s in the range from 1 to 7.5%, while Microtox gave EC50 in the range from 30 to 42%. The higher sensitivity of mitochondria may be exploited in the development of a sensitive biosensor for toxicity of oil refinery effluents.

  19. A versatile bacterial expression vector designed for single-step cloning of multiple DNA fragments using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Mats A; Gowda, Naveen Kumar Chandappa; Andréasson, Claes

    2014-06-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is the starting point for biochemical and biophysical analyses and requires methodology to efficiently proceed from gene sequence to purified protein. While optimized strategies for the efficient cloning of single-gene fragments for bacterial expression is available, efficient multiple DNA fragment cloning still presents a challenge. To facilitate this step, we have developed an efficient cloning strategy based on yeast homologous recombination cloning (YHRC) into the new pET-based bacterial expression vector pSUMO-YHRC. The vector supports cloning for untagged expression as well as fusions to His6-SUMO or His6 tags. We demonstrate that YHRC from single PCR products of 6 independent genes into the vector results in virtually no background. Importantly, in a quantitative assay for functional expression we find that single-step YHRC of 7 DNA fragments can be performed with very high cloning efficiencies. The method and reagents described in this paper significantly simplifies the construction of expression plasmids from multiple DNA fragments, including complex gene fusions, chimeric genes and polycistronic constructs.

  20. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012 individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is<107. An argument for high Ne values for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but this diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimate Ne correctly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne ×s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifs is above 10-7 or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9 per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more

  1. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    DOE PAGES

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012 individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is<107. An argument for high Ne values for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but thismore » diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimate Ne correctly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne ×s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifs is above 10-7 or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9 per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more sophisticated theory considers that bacterial genomes have millions of sites each and selection events on these many sites could interfere with each other, so that only larger effects would be important. However, bacteria can exchange genetic material, and in principle, this exchange could eliminate the interference between the evolution of

  2. Optimization of Recombinant Expression of Synthetic Bacterial Phytase in Pichia pastoris Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Ali; Dehnavi, Ehsan; Aghaeepoor, Mojtaba; Amani, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli phytase is an acidic histidine phytase with great specific activity. Pichia pastoris is a powerful system for the heterologous expression of active and soluble proteins which can express recombinant proteins in high cell density fermenter without loss of product yield and efficiently secrete heterologous proteins into the media. Recombinant protein expression is influenced by expression conditions such as temperature, concentration of inducer, and pH. By optimization, the yield of expressed proteins can be increase. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been widely used for the optimization and studying of different parameters in biotechnological processes. Objectives: In this study, the expression of synthetic appA gene in P. pastoris was greatly improved by adjusting the expression condition. Materials and Methods: The appA gene with 410 amino acids was synthesized by P. pastoris codon preference and cloned in expression vector pPinkα-HC, under the control of AOX1 promoter, and it was transformed into P. pastoris GS115 by electroporation. Recombinant phytase was expressed in buffered methanol-complex medium (BMMY) and the expression was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and enzymatic assay. To achieve the highest level of expression, methanol concentration, pH and temperature were optimized via RSM. Finally, the optimum pH and temperature for recombinant phytase activity was determined. Results: Escherichia coli phytase was expressed in P. pastoris under different cultivation conditions (post-induction temperature, methanol concentration, and post-induction pH). The optimized conditions by RSM using face centered central composite design were 1% (v/v) methanol, pH = 5.8, and 24.5°C. Under the optimized conditions, appA was successfully expressed in P. pastoris and the maximum phytase activity was 237.2 U/mL after 72 hours of expression. Conclusions: By optimization of recombinant

  3. Expression of recombinant staphylokinase, a fibrin-specific plasminogen activator of bacterial origin, in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Gerszberg, Aneta; Wiktorek-Smagur, Aneta; Hnatuszko-Konka, Katarzyna; Łuchniak, Piotr; Kononowicz, Andrzej K

    2012-03-01

    One of the most dynamically developing sectors of green biotechnology is molecular farming using transgenic plants as natural bioreactors for the large scale production of recombinant proteins with biopharmaceutical and therapeutic values. Such properties are characteristic of certain proteins of bacterial origin, including staphylokinase. For many years, work has been carried out on the use of this protein in thrombolytic therapy. In this study, transgenic Solanum tuberosum plants expressing a CaMV::sak-mgpf-gusA gene fusion, were obtained. AGL1 A. tumefaciens strain was used in the process of transformation. The presence of the staphylokinase gene was confirmed by PCR in 22.5% of the investigated plants. The expression of the fusion transgene was detected using the β-glucuronidase activity assay in 32 putative transgenic plants. Furthermore, on the basis of the GUS histochemical reaction, the transgene expression pattern had a strong, constitutive character in seven of the transformants. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of a protein extract from the SAK/PCR-positive plants, revealed the presence of a119 kDa protein that corresponds to that of the fusion protein SAK-mGFP-GUSA. Western blot analysis, using an antibody against staphylokinase, showed the presence of the staphylokinase domain in the 119 kDa protein in six analyzed transformants. However, the enzymatic test revealed amidolytic activity characteristic of staphylokinase in the protein extract of only one plant. This is the first report on a Solanum tuberosum plant producing a recombinant staphylokinase protein, a plasminogen activator of bacterial origin.

  4. Cumulant analysis of charge recombination kinetics in bacterial reaction centers reconstituted into lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, G; Mallardi, A; Giustini, M; Berti, D; Venturoli, G

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge recombination between the primary photoxidized donor (P(+)) and the secondary reduced quinone acceptor (Q(B)(-)) have been studied in reaction centers (RCs) from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporated into lecithin vesicles containing large ubiquinone pools over the temperature range 275 K = (50 +/- 15) nm). Following these premises, we describe the kinetics of P(+)Q(B)(-) recombination with a truncated cumulant expansion and relate it to P(Q) and to the free energy changes for Q(A)(-)Q(B) --> Q(A)Q(B)(-) electron transfer (DeltaG(AB)(o)) and for quinone binding (DeltaG(bind)(o)) at Q(B). The model accounts well for the temperature and quinone dependence of the charge recombination kinetics, yielding DeltaG(AB)(o) = -7.67 +/- 0.05 kJ mol(-1) and DeltaG(bind)(o) = -14.6 +/- 0.6 kJ mol(-1) at 298 K. PMID:10968981

  5. Lederberg on bacterial recombination, Haldane, and cold war genetics: an interview.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    2014-01-01

    Joshua Lederberg (1925-2008), was one of the pioneers of molecular genetics perhaps best known for his discovery of genetic recombination in bacteria which earned him a Nobel Prize in 1958 (shared with George Beadle and Edward Tatum). Lederberg's interests were broad including the origin of life, exobiology (a term that he coined) and emerging diseases and artificial intelligence in his, later years. This article contains the transcription of an interview in excerpts, docu- menting the interactions between Lederberg and fellow biologist J.B.S. Haldane wlich lasted from 1946 until Haldane's death in Kolkata (then Calcutta) in 1964.

  6. Recombining Low Homology, Functionally Rich Regions of Bacterial Subtilisins by Combinatorial Fragment Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D. Dafydd

    2011-01-01

    Combinatorial fragment exchange was utilised to recombine key structural and functional low homology regions of bacilli subtilisins to generate new active hybrid proteases with altered substrate profiles. Up to six different regions comprising mostly of loop residues from the commercially important subtilisin Savinase were exchanged with the structurally equivalent regions of six other subtilisins. The six additional subtilisins derive from diverse origins and included thermophilic and intracellular subtilisins as well as other academically and commercially relevant subtilisins. Savinase was largely tolerant to fragment exchange; rational replacement of all six regions with 5 of 6 donating subtilisin sequences preserved activity, albeit reduced compared to Savinase. A combinatorial approach was used to generate hybrid Savinase variants in which the sequences derived from all seven subtilisins at each region were recombined to generate new region combinations. Variants with different substrate profiles and with greater apparent activity compared to Savinase and the rational fragment exchange variants were generated with the substrate profile exhibited by variants dependent on the sequence combination at each region. PMID:21915310

  7. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-08-10

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z.

  8. Recombinant expression and purification of "virus-like" bacterial encapsulin protein cages.

    PubMed

    Rurup, W Frederik; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Koay, Melissa S T

    2015-01-01

    Ultracentrifugation, particularly the use of sucrose or cesium chloride density gradients, is a highly reliable and efficient technique for the purification of virus-like particles and protein cages. Since virus-like particles and protein cages have a unique size compared to cellular macromolecules and organelles, the rate of migration can be used as a tool for purification. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of recently discovered virus-like assemblies called bacterial encapsulins from Thermotoga maritima and Brevibacterium linens.

  9. Luminescence decay of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Uttamchandani, D.; Sander, D.; O'Donnell, K. P.

    1993-04-01

    The luminescence decay pattern of porous silicon samples prepared by electrochemical etching is characterised experimentally by a non-exponential profile, a strong dependence on temperature and an absence of spectral diffusion. We describe this luminescence as carrier-dopping-assisted recombination. Following the correlation function approach to non-dispersive transport developed by Scher and co-workers [Physics Today 41 (1991) 26], we suggest a simple derivation of analytical functions which accurately describes the anomalous luminescence decay of porous silicon, and show that this model includes exponential and Kohlrausch [Pogg. Ann. Phys. 119 (1863) 352] (stretched-exponential) relaxations as special cases.

  10. Luminescence nanothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaque, Daniel; Vetrone, Fiorenzo

    2012-07-01

    The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed.The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed. This work was supported by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (Project S2009/MAT-1756), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia (MAT2010-16161) and by Caja Madrid Foundation.

  11. Production of cocktail of polyclonal antibodies using bacterial expressed recombinant protein for multiple virus detection.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Reetika; Mandal, Bikash; Paul, Prabir Kumar; Chigurupati, Phaneendra; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Cocktail of polyclonal antibodies (PAb) were produced that will help in multiple virus detection and overcome the limitation of individual virus purification, protein expression and purification as well as immunization in multiple rabbits. A dual fusion construct was developed using conserved coat protein (CP) sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) in an expression vector, pET-28a(+). The fusion protein (∼40kDa) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Likewise, a triple fusion construct was developed by fusing conserved CP sequences of CMV and PRSV with conserved nucleocapsid protein (N) sequence of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) and expressed as a fusion protein (∼50kDa) in pET-28a(+). PAb made separately to each of these three viruses recognized the double and triple fusion proteins in Western blot indicating retention of desired epitopes for binding with target antibodies. The fusion proteins (∼40kDa and ∼50kDa) were used to produce cocktail of PAb by immunizing rabbits, which simultaneously detected natural infection of CMV and PRSV or CMV, PRSV and GBNV in Cucurbitaceous, Solanaceous and other hosts in DAC-ELISA. This is the first report on production of a cocktail of PAb to recombinant fusion protein of two or three distinct viruses.

  12. Bacterial production and structure-functional validation of a recombinant antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of an anti-cancer therapeutic antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hun; Sim, Dae-Won; Park, Dongsun; Jung, Tai-Geun; Lee, Seonghwan; Oh, Taeheun; Ha, Jong-Ryul; Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Seo, Min-Duk; Kang, Ho Chul; Kim, Young Pil; Won, Hyung-Sik

    2016-12-01

    Fragment engineering of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has emerged as an excellent paradigm to develop highly efficient therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents. Engineered mAb fragments can be economically produced in bacterial systems using recombinant DNA technologies. In this work, we established recombinant production in Escherichia coli for monovalent antigen-binding fragment (Fab) adopted from a clinically used anticancer mAB drug cetuximab targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Recombinant DNA constructs were designed to express both polypeptide chains comprising Fab in a single vector and to secrete them to bacterial periplasmic space for efficient folding. Particularly, a C-terminal engineering to confer an interchain disulfide bond appeared to be able to enhance its heterodimeric integrity and EGFR-binding activity. Conformational relevance of the purified final product was validated by mass spectrometry and crystal structure at 1.9 Å resolution. Finally, our recombinant cetuximab-Fab was found to have strong binding affinity to EGFR overexpressed in human squamous carcinoma model (A431) cells. Its binding ability was comparable to that of cetuximab. Its EGFR-binding affinity was estimated at approximately 0.7 nM of Kd in vitro, which was quite stronger than the binding affinity of natural ligand EGF. Hence, the results validate that our construction could serve as an efficient platform to produce a recombinant cetuximab-Fab with a retained antigen-binding functionality.

  13. Type III restriction is alleviated by bacteriophage (RecE) homologous recombination function but enhanced by bacterial (RecBCD) function.

    PubMed

    Handa, Naofumi; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2005-11-01

    Previous works have demonstrated that DNA breaks generated by restriction enzymes stimulate, and are repaired by, homologous recombination with an intact, homologous DNA region through the function of lambdoid bacteriophages lambda and Rac. In the present work, we examined the effect of bacteriophage functions, expressed in bacterial cells, on restriction of an infecting tester phage in a simple plaque formation assay. The efficiency of plaque formation on an Escherichia coli host carrying EcoRI, a type II restriction system, is not increased by the presence of Rac prophage-presumably because, under the single-infection conditions of the plaque assay, a broken phage DNA cannot find a homologue with which to recombine. To our surprise, however, we found that the efficiency of plaque formation in the presence of a type III restriction system, EcoP1 or EcoP15, is increased by the bacteriophage-mediated homologous recombination functions recE and recT of Rac prophage. This type III restriction alleviation does not depend on lar on Rac, unlike type I restriction alleviation. On the other hand, bacterial RecBCD-homologous recombination function enhances type III restriction. These results led us to hypothesize that the action of type III restriction enzymes takes place on replicated or replicating DNA in vivo and leaves daughter DNAs with breaks at nonallelic sites, that bacteriophage-mediated homologous recombination reconstitutes an intact DNA from them, and that RecBCD exonuclease blocks this repair by degradation from the restriction breaks.

  14. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) activity upon recombinant expression and purification of human telomerase in a bacterial system.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Debra T; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Larson, Amy C; Hansen, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase biogenesis is a highly regulated process that solves the DNA end-replication problem. Recombinant expression has so far been accomplished only within a eukaryotic background. Towards structural and functional analyses, we developed bacterial expression of human telomerase. Positive activity by the telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) was identified in cell extracts of Escherichia coli expressing a sequence-optimized hTERT gene, the full-length hTR RNA with a self-splicing hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, and the human heat shock complex of Hsp90, Hsp70, p60/Hop, Hsp40, and p23. The Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin did not affect post-assembly TRAP activity. By various purification methods, TRAP activity was also obtained upon expression of only hTERT and hTR. hTERT was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry in a ∼120 kDa SDS-PAGE fragment from a TRAP-positive purification fraction. TRAP activity was also supported by hTR constructs lacking the box H/ACA small nucleolar RNA domain. End-point TRAP indicated expression levels within 3-fold of that from HeLa carcinoma cells, which is several orders of magnitude below detection by the direct assay. These results represent the first report of TRAP activity from a bacterium and provide a facile system for the investigation of assembly factors and anti-cancer therapeutics independently of a eukaryotic setting.

  15. Cytogenetic mapping with centromeric bacterial artificial chromosomes contigs shows that this recombination-poor region comprises more than half of barley chromosome 3H.

    PubMed

    Aliyeva-Schnorr, Lala; Beier, Sebastian; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Doležel, Jaroslav; Stein, Nils; Houben, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Genetic maps are based on the frequency of recombination and often show different positions of molecular markers in comparison to physical maps, particularly in the centromere that is generally poor in meiotic recombinations. To decipher the position and order of DNA sequences genetically mapped to the centromere of barley (Hordeum vulgare) chromosome 3H, fluorescence in situ hybridization with mitotic metaphase and meiotic pachytene chromosomes was performed with 70 genomic single-copy probes derived from 65 fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) contigs genetically assigned to this recombination cold spot. The total physical distribution of the centromeric 5.5 cM bin of 3H comprises 58% of the mitotic metaphase chromosome length. Mitotic and meiotic chromatin of this recombination-poor region is preferentially marked by a heterochromatin-typical histone mark (H3K9me2), while recombination enriched subterminal chromosome regions are enriched in euchromatin-typical histone marks (H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K27me3) suggesting that the meiotic recombination rate could be influenced by the chromatin landscape.

  16. Novel Variants of Streptococcus thermophilus Bacteriophages Are Indicative of Genetic Recombination among Phages from Different Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Paula; Janzen, Thomas; Neves, Ana Rute; Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H; Lametsch, René; Neve, Horst; Franz, Charles M A P; Vogensen, Finn K

    2017-03-01

    Bacteriophages are the main cause of fermentation failures in dairy plants. The majority of Streptococcus thermophilus phages can be divided into either cos- or pac-type phages and are additionally characterized by examining the V2 region of their antireceptors. We screened a large number of S. thermophilus phages from the Chr. Hansen A/S collection, using PCR specific for the cos- or pac-type phages, as well as for the V2 antireceptor region. Three phages did not produce positive results with the assays. Analysis of phage morphologies indicated that two of these phages, CHPC577 and CHPC926, had shorter tails than the traditional S. thermophilus phages. The third phage, CHPC1151, had a tail size similar to those of the cos- or pac-type phages, but it displayed a different baseplate structure. Sequencing analysis revealed the genetic similarity of CHPC577 and CHPC926 with a subgroup of Lactococcus lactis P335 phages. Phage CHPC1151 was closely related to the atypical S. thermophilus phage 5093, homologous with a nondairy streptococcal prophage. By testing adsorption of the related streptococcal and lactococcal phages to the surface of S. thermophilus and L. lactis strains, we revealed the possibility of cross-interactions. Our data indicated that the use of S. thermophilus together with L. lactis, extensively applied for dairy fermentations, triggered the recombination between phages infecting different bacterial species. A notable diversity among S. thermophilus phage populations requires that a new classification of the group be proposed.IMPORTANCEStreptococcus thermophilus is a component of thermophilic starter cultures commonly used for cheese and yogurt production. Characterizing streptococcal phages, understanding their genetic relationships, and studying their interactions with various hosts are the necessary steps for preventing and controlling phage attacks that occur during dairy fermentations.

  17. Expression screening of bacterial libraries of recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants for candidates with thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Varsha; Gierczak, Richard F; Sheffield, William P

    2013-12-01

    Exhaustive mutagenesis studies of the reactive centre loop (RCL), a key structural component of proteins belonging to the serpin superfamily of protease inhibitors, are complicated by the size of the RCL, serpin conformational complexity, and, for most serpins, the lack of a serpin-dependent phenotype of expressing cells. Here, we describe a thrombin capture assay that distinguished thrombin-inhibitory recombinant human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API M358R) from non-inhibitory API variants in Escherichia coli lysates prepared from either single clones or pools. Binding of API proteins in the lysates to thrombin immobilized on microtiter plate wells was quantified via colour generated by a peroxidase-coupled anti-API antibody. Bacterial expression plasmids encoding inhibitory API M358R were mixed 1:99 with plasmids encoding non-inhibitory API T345R/M358R and the resulting library screened in pools of 10. All above-background signals arising from pools or subsequently re-probed single clones were linked to the presence of plasmids encoding API M358R. Screening of a portion of another expression library encoding hypervariable API with all possibilities at codons 352-358 also yielded only novel, thrombin-inhibitory variants. Probing a smaller library expressing all possible codons at Ala347 yielded the wild type, 6 different functional variants, one partially active variant, and two variants with no thrombin-inhibitory activity. API antigen levels varied considerably less among Ala347 variants than activity levels, and comparison of rate constants of inhibition of purified API variants to their corresponding thrombin capture assay lysate values was used to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. The results indicate that the approach is sufficiently robust to correctly identify functional versus non-functional candidates in API expression libraries, and could be of value in systematically probing structure/function relationships not only in the API

  18. Novel Variants of Streptococcus thermophilus Bacteriophages Are Indicative of Genetic Recombination among Phages from Different Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Szymczak, Paula; Neves, Ana Rute; Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H.; Lametsch, René; Neve, Horst; Franz, Charles M. A. P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages are the main cause of fermentation failures in dairy plants. The majority of Streptococcus thermophilus phages can be divided into either cos- or pac-type phages and are additionally characterized by examining the V2 region of their antireceptors. We screened a large number of S. thermophilus phages from the Chr. Hansen A/S collection, using PCR specific for the cos- or pac-type phages, as well as for the V2 antireceptor region. Three phages did not produce positive results with the assays. Analysis of phage morphologies indicated that two of these phages, CHPC577 and CHPC926, had shorter tails than the traditional S. thermophilus phages. The third phage, CHPC1151, had a tail size similar to those of the cos- or pac-type phages, but it displayed a different baseplate structure. Sequencing analysis revealed the genetic similarity of CHPC577 and CHPC926 with a subgroup of Lactococcus lactis P335 phages. Phage CHPC1151 was closely related to the atypical S. thermophilus phage 5093, homologous with a nondairy streptococcal prophage. By testing adsorption of the related streptococcal and lactococcal phages to the surface of S. thermophilus and L. lactis strains, we revealed the possibility of cross-interactions. Our data indicated that the use of S. thermophilus together with L. lactis, extensively applied for dairy fermentations, triggered the recombination between phages infecting different bacterial species. A notable diversity among S. thermophilus phage populations requires that a new classification of the group be proposed. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus thermophilus is a component of thermophilic starter cultures commonly used for cheese and yogurt production. Characterizing streptococcal phages, understanding their genetic relationships, and studying their interactions with various hosts are the necessary steps for preventing and controlling phage attacks that occur during dairy fermentations. PMID:28039135

  19. Removal of bacterial suspension water occupying the intercellular space of detached leaves after agroinfiltration improves the yield of recombinant hemagglutinin in a Nicotiana benthamiana transient gene expression system.

    PubMed

    Fujiuchi, Naomichi; Matsuda, Ryo; Matoba, Nobuyuki; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    The use of detached leaves instead of whole plants provides an alternative means for recombinant protein production based on Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient gene overexpression. However, the process for high-level protein production in detached leaves has not yet been established. In this study, we focused on leaf handling and maintenance conditions immediately after infiltration with Agrobacterium suspension (agroinfiltration) to improve recombinant protein expression in detached Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. We demonstrated that the residual water of bacterial suspension in detached leaves had significant impact on the yield of recombinant influenza hemagglutinin (HA). Immediately after agroinfiltration, detached leaves were stored in a dehumidified chamber to allow bacterial suspension water occupying intercellular space to be removed by transpiration. We varied the duration of this water removal treatment from 0.7 to 4.4 h, which resulted in leaf fresh weights ranging from 0.94 to 1.28 g g(-1) relative to weights measured just before agroinfiltration. We used these relative fresh weights (RFWs) as an indicator of the amount of residual water. The detached leaves were then incubated in humidified chambers for 6 days. We found that the presence of residual water significantly decreased HA yield, with a clear inverse correlation observed between HA yield and RFW. We next compared HA yields in detached leaves with those obtained from intact leaves by whole-plant expression performed at the same time. The maximum HA yield obtained from a detached leaf with a RFW of approximately 1.0, namely, 800 μg gFW(-1), was comparable to the mean HA yield of 846 μg gFW(-1) generated in intact leaves. Our results indicate the necessity of removing bacterial suspension water from agroinfiltrated detached leaves in transient overexpression systems and point to a critical factor enabling the detached-leaf system as a viable recombinant protein factory.

  20. Recombinant bacterial amylopullulanases

    PubMed Central

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2013-01-01

    Pullulanases are endo-acting enzymes capable of hydrolyzing α-1, 6-glycosidic linkages in starch, pullulan, amylopectin, and related oligosaccharides, while amylopullulanases are bifunctional enzymes with an active site capable of cleaving both α-1, 4 and α-1, 6 linkages in starch, amylose and other oligosaccharides, and α-1, 6 linkages in pullulan. The amylopullulanases are classified in GH13 and GH57 family enzymes based on the architecture of catalytic domain and number of conserved sequences. The enzymes with two active sites, one for the hydrolysis of α-1, 4- glycosidic bond and the other for α-1, 6-glycosidic bond, are called α-amylase-pullulanases, while amylopullulanases have only one active site for cleaving both α-1, 4- and α-1, 6-glycosidic bonds. The amylopullulanases produced by bacteria find applications in the starch and baking industries as a catalyst for one step starch liquefaction-saccharification for making various sugar syrups, as antistaling agent in bread and as a detergent additive. PMID:23645215

  1. The Role of Trap-assisted Recombination in Luminescent Properties of Organometal Halide CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Films and Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Hai-Yu; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Hao, Ya-Wei; Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Bing-Rong; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid metal halide perovskites have been paid enormous attentions in photophysics research, whose excellent performances were attributed to their intriguing charge carriers proprieties. However, it still remains far from satisfaction in the comprehensive understanding of perovskite charge-transport properities, especially about trap-assisted recombination process. In this Letter, through time-resolved transient absorption (TA) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements, we provided a relative comprehensive investigation on the charge carriers recombination dynamics of CH3NH3PbBr3 (MAPbBr3) perovskite films and quantum dots (QDs), especially about trap-assisted recombination. It was found that the integral recombination mode of MAPbBr3 films was highly sensitive to the density distribution of generated charge carriers and trap states. Additional, Trap effects would be gradually weakened with elevated carrier densities. Furthermore, the trap-assisted recombination can be removed from MAPbBr3 QDs through its own surface passivation mechanism and this specialty may render the QDs as a new material in illuminating research. This work provides deeper physical insights into the dynamics processes of MAPbBr3 materials and paves a way toward more light-harvesting applications in future. PMID:27249792

  2. Bacterial DNA repair genes and their eukaryotic homologues: 5. The role of recombination in DNA repair and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Nowosielska, Anetta

    2007-01-01

    Recombinational repair is a well conserved DNA repair mechanism present in all living organisms. Repair by homologous recombination is generally accurate as it uses undamaged homologous DNA molecule as a repair template. In Escherichia coli homologous recombination repairs both the double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can be induced upon exposure to exogenous sources such as ionizing radiation or endogenous DNA-damaging agents including reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as during natural biological processes like conjugation. However, the bulk of double strand breaks are formed during replication fork collapse encountering an unrepaired single strand gap in DNA. Under such circumstances DNA replication on the damaged template can be resumed only if supported by homologous recombination. This functional cooperation of homologous recombination with replication machinery enables successful completion of genome duplication and faithful transmission of genetic material to a daughter cell. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination is also involved in essential biological processes such as preservation of genome integrity, DNA damage checkpoint activation, DNA damage repair, DNA replication, mating type switching, transposition, immune system development and meiosis. When unregulated, recombination can lead to genome instability and carcinogenesis.

  3. An efficient tag derived from the common epitope of tospoviral NSs proteins for monitoring recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial and plant systems.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao-Wen; Chen, Kuan-Chun; Raja, Joseph A J; Li, Jian-Xian; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2013-04-15

    NSscon (23 aa), a common epitope in the gene silencing suppressor NSs proteins of the members of the Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) serogroup, was previously identified. In this investigation, we expressed different green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused deletions of NSscon in bacteria and reacted with NSscon monoclonal antibody (MAb). Our results indicated that the core 9 amino acids, "(109)KFTMHNQIF(117)", denoted as "nss", retain the reactivity of NSscon. In bacterial pET system, four different recombinant proteins labeled with nss, either at N- or C-extremes, were readily detectable without position effects, with sensitivity superior to that for the polyhistidine-tag. When the nss-tagged Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) helper component-protease (HC-Pro) and WSMoV nucleocapsid protein were transiently expressed by agroinfiltration in tobacco, they were readily detectable and the tag's possible efficacy for gene silencing suppression was not noticed. Co-immunoprecipitation of nss-tagged and non-tagged proteins expressed from bacteria confirmed the interaction of potyviral HC-Pro and coat protein. Thus, we conclude that this novel nss sequence is highly valuable for tagging recombinant proteins in both bacterial and plant expression systems.

  4. Measuring Carrier Lifetime in GaAs by Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1986-01-01

    Luminescence proposed as nondestructive technique for measuring Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination lifetime GaAs. Sample irradiated, and luminescence escapes through surface. Measurement requires no mechanical or electrical contact with sample. No ohmic contacts or p/n junctions needed. Sample not scrapped after tested.

  5. Phage display and bacterial expression of a recombinant Fab specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O6 lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Tout, N L; Lam, J S

    1997-01-01

    Immunotherapy with antibodies (Abs) against the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains an alternative to serotype-specific LPS-based vaccines due to their limited use and to antibiotics due to the intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials observed in P. aeruginosa. We have chosen a monoclonal Ab (MAb), MF23-1, that binds to the O antigen of the most clinically relevant serotype, IATS O6, for producing a recombinant antibody. Heavy (H) and light (L) chain genes were isolated from MF23-1 to form a functional Fab molecule in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and on the surface of phage by using phagemid vector pComb3. The entire kappa L chain gene was used, but the H chain gene was amplified to 2 amino acids past cysteine 128 which is involved in interchain disulfide bond formation with the L chain. The truncated H chain associated with the L chain in the periplasm of E. coli to form a functional Fab molecule that bound in both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence assay to O6 LPS. Therefore, the remainder of the CH1 past cysteine 128 is not essential for stable formation of the Fab portion of MF23-1. This recombinant Fab (r-Fab) was shown to be specific for the LPS of the most predominant clinical isolate, serotype O6, while no cross-reactivity was detected to the LPS of the other 19 remaining serotypes. This r-Fab was also expressed on the surface of filamentous phage upon addition of helper phage to recombinant E. coli containing phagemid. Recombinant phage from clones MT13 and MT24 bound specifically to O6 LPS in ELISA. These results represent an important step toward the design of therapeutic Abs to be used against P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:9067648

  6. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  7. Bacterial expression and antibiotic activities of recombinant variants of human β-defensins on pathogenic bacteria and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Garcia, Ligia; Ortiz, Ernesto; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo

    2013-05-01

    Five variants of human β-defensins (HBDs) were expressed in Escherichia coli using two vector systems (pET28a(+) and pQE30) with inducible expression by IPTG. The last vector has not been previously reported as an expression system for HBDs. The recombinant peptides were different in their lengths and overall charge. The HBDs were expressed as soluble or insoluble proteins depending on the expression system used, and the final protein yields ranged from 0.5 to 1.6 mg of peptide/g of wet weight cells, with purities higher than 90%. The recombinant HBDs demonstrated a direct correlation between antimicrobial activity and the number of basic charged residues; that is, their antimicrobial activity was as follows: HBD3-M-HBD2 > HBD3 = HBD3-M = HB2-KLK > HBD2 when assayed against E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, HBD2 had the best antimicrobial activity against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv (1.5 μM) and the heterologous tandem peptide, HBD3-M-HBD2, had the best minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value (2.7 μM) against a multidrug resistance strain (MDR) of M. tuberculosis, demonstrating the feasibility of the use of HBDs against pathogenic M. tuberculosis reported to be resistant to commercial antibiotics.

  8. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  9. Design of a comprehensive biochemistry and molecular biology experiment: phase variation caused by recombinational regulation of bacterial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation, antibody agglutination test, and PCR analysis. Phase variation was observed by baterial motility assay and identified by antibody agglutination test and PCR analysis. This comprehensive experiment can be performed to help students improve their ability to use the knowledge acquired in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Anti-bacterial activity of recombinant human β-defensin-3 secreted in the milk of transgenic goats produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Luo, Yan; Ge, Hengtao; Han, Chengquan; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Quan, Fusheng; Gao, Mingqing; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether recombinant human β-defensin-3 (rHBD3) in the milk of transgenic goats has an anti-bacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) that could cause mastitis. A HBD3 mammary-specific expression vector was transfected by electroporation into goat fetal fibroblasts which were used to produce fourteen healthy transgenic goats by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The expression level of rHBD3 in the milk of the six transgenic goats ranged from 98 to 121 µg/ml at 15 days of lactation, and was maintained at 90-111 µg/ml during the following 2 months. Milk samples from transgenic goats showed an obvious inhibitory activity against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of rHBD3 in milk against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae were 9.5-10.5, 21.8-23.0 and 17.3-18.5 µg/mL, respectively, which was similar to those of the HBD3 standard (P>0.05). The in vivo anti-bacterial activities of rHBD3 in milk were examined by intramammary infusion of viable bacterial inoculums. We observed that 9/10 and 8/10 glands of non-transgenic goats infused with S. aureus and E. coli became infected. The mean numbers of viable bacteria went up to 2.9×10(3) and 95.4×10(3) CFU/ml at 48 h after infusion, respectively; the mean somatic cell counts (SCC) in infected glands reached up to 260.4×10(5) and 622.2×10(5) cells/ml, which were significantly higher than the SCC in uninfected goat glands. In contrast, no bacteria was presented in glands of transgenic goats and PBS-infused controls, and the SSC did not significantly change throughout the period. Moreover, the compositions and protein profiles of milk from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were identical. The present study demonstrated that HBD3 were an effective anti-bacterial protein to enhance the mastitis resistance of dairy animals.

  11. Cattle Immunized with a Recombinant Subunit Vaccine Formulation Exhibits a Trend towards Protection against Histophilus somni Bacterial Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Madampage, Claudia Avis; Wilson, Don; Townsend, Hugh; Crockford, Gordon; Rawlyk, Neil; Dent, Donna; Evans, Brock; Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Dorin, Craig; Potter, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Histophilosis, a mucosal and septicemic infection of cattle is caused by the Gram negative pathogen Histophilus somni (H. somni). As existing vaccines against H. somni infection have shown to be of limited efficacy, we used a reverse vaccinology approach to identify new vaccine candidates. Three groups (B, C, D) of cattle were immunized with subunit vaccines and a control group (group A) was vaccinated with adjuvant alone. All four groups were challenged with H. somni. The results demonstrate that there was no significant difference in clinical signs, joint lesions, weight change or rectal temperature between any of the vaccinated groups (B,C,D) vs the control group A. However, the trend to protection was greatest for group C vaccinates. The group C vaccine was a pool of six recombinant proteins. Serum antibody responses determined using ELISA showed significantly higher titers for group C, with P values ranging from < 0.0148 to < 0.0002, than group A. Even though serum antibody titers in group B (5 out of 6 antigens) and group D were significantly higher compared to group A, they exerted less of a trend towards protection. In conclusion, the vaccine used in group C exhibits a trend towards protective immunity in cattle and would be a good candidate for further analysis to determine which proteins were responsible for the trend towards protection. PMID:27501390

  12. One-step affinity tag purification of full-length recombinant human AP-1 complexes from bacterial inclusion bodies using a polycistronic expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Ming; Lee, A-Young; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2008-05-01

    The AP-1 transcription factor is a dimeric protein complex formed primarily between Jun (c-Jun, JunB, JunD) and Fos (c-Fos, FosB, Fra-1, Fra-2) family members. These distinct AP-1 complexes are expressed in many cell types and modulate target gene expression implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses. Although the importance of AP-1 has long been recognized, the biochemical characterization of AP-1 remains limited in part due to the difficulty in purifying full-length, reconstituted dimers with active DNA-binding and transcriptional activity. Using a combination of bacterial coexpression and epitope-tagging methods, we successfully purified all 12 heterodimers (3 Junx4 Fos) of full-length human AP-1 complexes as well as c-Jun/c-Jun, JunD/JunD, and c-Jun/JunD dimers from bacterial inclusion bodies using one-step nickel-NTA affinity tag purification following denaturation and renaturation of coexpressed AP-1 subunits. Coexpression of two constitutive components in a dimeric AP-1 complex helps stabilize the proteins when compared with individual protein expression in bacteria. Purified dimeric AP-1 complexes are functional in sequence-specific DNA binding, as illustrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting, and are also active in transcription with in vitro-reconstituted human papillomavirus (HPV) chromatin containing AP-1-binding sites in the native configuration of HPV nucleosomes. The availability of these recombinant full-length human AP-1 complexes has greatly facilitated mechanistic studies of AP-1-regulated gene transcription in many biological systems.

  13. Enhanced expression of a recombinant bacterial laccase at low temperature and microaerobic conditions: purification and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Mohammadian, Mahdi; Fathi-Roudsari, Mehrnoosh; Mollania, Nasrin; Badoei-Dalfard, Arastoo; Khajeh, Khosro

    2010-08-01

    Laccases (benzenediol oxygen oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.2) have many biotechnological applications because of their oxidation ability towards a wide range of phenolic compounds. Within recent years, researchers have been highly interested in the identification and characterization of laccases from bacterial sources. In this study, we have isolated and cloned a gene encoding laccase (CotA) from Bacillus sp. HR03 and then expressed it under microaerobic conditions and decreased temperature in order to obtain high amounts of soluble protein. The laccase was purified and its biochemical properties were investigated using three common laccase substrates, 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), syringaldazine (SGZ) and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (2,6-DMP). K(M) and k(cat) were calculated 535 microM and 127 s(-1) for ABTS, 53 microM and 3 s(-1) for 2, 6-DMP and 5 microM and 20 s(-1) for SGZ when the whole reactions were carried out at room temperature. Laccase activity was also studied when the enzyme was preincubated at 70 and 80 degrees C. With SGZ as the substrate, the activity was increased three-fold after 50 min preincubation at 70 degrees C and 2.4-fold after 10 min preincubation at 80 degrees C. Preincubation of the enzyme in 70 degrees C for 30 min raised the activity four-fold with ABTS as the substrate. Also, L-dopa was used as a substrate. The enzyme was able to oxidize L-dopa with the K(M) and k(cat) of 1,493 microM and 194 s(-1), respectively.

  14. Formation of reactive oxygen species by human and bacterial pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes reconstituted from recombinant components

    PubMed Central

    Ambrus, Attila; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Torocsik, Beata; Tretter, Laszlo; Nilsson, Mattias; Jordan, Frank; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Individual recombinant components of pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (PDHc, OGDHc) of human and Escherichia coli (E. coli) origin were expressed and purified from E. coli with optimized protocols. The four multienzyme complexes were each reconstituted under optimal conditions at different stoichiometric ratios. Binding stoichiometries for the highest catalytic efficiency were determined from the rate of NADH generation by the complexes at physiological pH. Since some of these complexes were shown to possess ‘moonlighting’ activities under pathological conditions often accompanied by acidosis, activities were also determined at pH 6.3. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by the E3 component of hOGDHc is a pathologically relevant feature, superoxide generation by the complexes with optimal stoichiometry was measured by the acetylated cytochrome c reduction method in both the forward and the reverse catalytic directions. Various known affectors of physiological activity and ROS production, including Ca2+, ADP, lipoylation status or pH, were investigated. The human complexes were also reconstituted with the most prevalent human pathological mutant of the E3 component, G194C and characterized; isolated human E3 with the G194C substitution was previously reported to have an enhanced ROS generating capacity. It is demonstrated that: i. PDHc, similarly to OGDHc, is able to generate ROS and this feature is displayed by both the E. coli and human complexes, ii. Reconstituted hPDHc generates ROS at a significantly higher rate as compared to hOGDHc in both the forward and the reverse reactions when ROS generation is calculated for unit mass of their common E3 component, iii. The E1 component or E1-E2 subcomplex generates significant amount of ROS only in hOGDHc; iv. Incorporation of the G194C variant of hE3, the result of a disease-causing mutation, into reconstituted hOGDHc and hPDHc indeed leads to a decreased activity of both

  15. Formation of reactive oxygen species by human and bacterial pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes reconstituted from recombinant components.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, Attila; Nemeria, Natalia S; Torocsik, Beata; Tretter, Laszlo; Nilsson, Mattias; Jordan, Frank; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2015-12-01

    Individual recombinant components of pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (PDHc, OGDHc) of human and Escherichia coli (E. coli) origin were expressed and purified from E. coli with optimized protocols. The four multienzyme complexes were each reconstituted under optimal conditions at different stoichiometric ratios. Binding stoichiometries for the highest catalytic efficiency were determined from the rate of NADH generation by the complexes at physiological pH. Since some of these complexes were shown to possess 'moonlighting' activities under pathological conditions often accompanied by acidosis, activities were also determined at pH 6.3. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by the E3 component of hOGDHc is a pathologically relevant feature, superoxide generation by the complexes with optimal stoichiometry was measured by the acetylated cytochrome c reduction method in both the forward and the reverse catalytic directions. Various known affectors of physiological activity and ROS production, including Ca(2+), ADP, lipoylation status or pH, were investigated. The human complexes were also reconstituted with the most prevalent human pathological mutant of the E3 component, G194C and characterized; isolated human E3 with the G194C substitution was previously reported to have an enhanced ROS generating capacity. It is demonstrated that: i. PDHc, similarly to OGDHc, is able to generate ROS and this feature is displayed by both the E. coli and human complexes, ii. Reconstituted hPDHc generates ROS at a significantly higher rate as compared to hOGDHc in both the forward and the reverse reactions when ROS generation is calculated for unit mass of their common E3 component, iii. The E1 component or E1-E2 subcomplex generates significant amount of ROS only in hOGDHc; iv. Incorporation of the G194C variant of hE3, the result of a disease-causing mutation, into reconstituted hOGDHc and hPDHc indeed leads to a decreased activity of both

  16. Impact of two DNA repair pathways, homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, on bacterial spore inactivation under simulated martian environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Ralf; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2011-09-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis were used as a model system to study the impact of the two major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms [homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ)] on the survivability of air-dried mono- and multilayers of bacterial spores under a simulated martian environment; i.e., an environment with low temperature (-10 °C), pure CO 2 atmosphere (99.99% CO 2), 200-1100 nm UV-VIS-NIR radiation, and 0.69 kPa pressure. Spores in multilayers exhibited low inactivation rates compared to monolayers, mainly due to shadowing effects of overlying spores. Simulated martian UV irradiation reduced dramatically spore viability, whereas when shielded from martian UV radiation, spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to simulated martian environmental conditions than were wild-type spores. In addition, NHEJ-deficient spores were consistently more sensitive than HR-deficient spores to simulated Mars environmental conditions, suggesting that DSBs were an important type of DNA damage. The results indicated that both HR and NHEJ provide an efficient set of DNA repair pathways ensuring spore survival after exposure to simulated martian environmental conditions.

  17. Combined prime-boost vaccination against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) using a recombinant vaccinia virus and a bacterial plasmid both expressing TBE virus non-structural NS1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Aleshin, SE; Timofeev, AV; Khoretonenko, MV; Zakharova, LG; Pashvykina, GV; Stephenson, JR; Shneider, AM; Altstein, AD

    2005-01-01

    Background Heterologous prime-boost immunization protocols using different gene expression systems have proven to be successful tools in protecting against various diseases in experimental animal models. The main reason for using this approach is to exploit the ability of expression cassettes to prime or boost the immune system in different ways during vaccination procedures. The purpose of the project was to study the ability of recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) and bacterial plasmid, both carrying the NS1 gene from tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus under the control of different promoters, to protect mice against lethal challenge using a heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol. Results The heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol, using a VV recombinant and bacterial plasmid, both containing the NS1 TBE virus protein gene under the control of different promoters, achieved a high level of protection in mice against lethal challenge with a highly pathogenic TBE virus strain. No signs of pronounced TBE infection were detected in the surviving animals. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocols using recombinant VV and bacterial plasmids could be used for the development of flavivirus vaccines. PMID:16076390

  18. Protective efficacy of a recombinant bacterial artificial chromosome clone of a very virulent Marek's disease virus containing a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Mays, Jody K; Black-Pyrkosz, Alexis; Spatz, Stephen; Fadly, Aly M; Dunn, John R

    2016-12-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV), an alphaherpesvirus, causes Marek's disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease in poultry characterized by T-cell lymphomas, nerve lesions, and mortality. Vaccination is used worldwide to control MD, but increasingly virulent field strains can overcome this protection, driving a need to create new vaccines. Previous studies revealed that insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) long terminal repeat (LTR) into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of a very virulent strain of MDV, Md5, rendered the resultant recombinant virus, rMd5 REV-LTR BAC, fully attenuated in maternal antibody positive (Mab+) chickens at passage 40. In the current study, the protective efficacy of rMd5 REV-LTR BAC was evaluated. First, passage 70 was identified as being fully attenuated in maternal antibody negative chickens and chosen as the optimal passage level for use in protective efficacy studies. Second, three protective efficacy trials were conducted comparing the rMd5 REV-LTR p70 BAC to the CVI988/Rispens vaccine. Groups of Mab+ and Mab- 15I5 × 71 chickens were vaccinated in ovo at 18 days of embryonation or intra-abdominally at day of hatch, and challenged at 5 days post-hatch with the vv+MDV strain 686. Vaccination at day of hatch and in ovo with rMd5 REV-LTR p70 BAC protected chickens against MDV-induced bursa and thymic atrophy, but did not provide the same level of protection against MD tumours as that afforded by the commercial vaccine, CVI988/Rispens.

  19. Detection of biological aerosols by luminescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Peter J.; Tieman, Darlene; Coon, Phillip A.; Paterno, Dorothea A.; Milton, Maurice M.

    1999-12-01

    Luciferin-Luciferase (L-L) luminescence techniques were used to successfully measure adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (pg/ml) in concentrated aerosol samples containing either vegetative bacterial cells or spores. Aerosols were collected with wet and dry sampling devices. Evaluation for the presence of total bio-mass from bacterial and non-bacterial sources of ATP was achieved by suspending the collected aerosol samples in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pipeting a 50-(mu) l aliquot of the PBS suspension into a FiltravetteTM, and then adding bacterial releasing agent (BRA). The sample was then reacted with L-L, and the resulting Relative Luminescence Units (RLU's), indicative of ATP from all sources, were measured. Bacterial cells were enumerated with the additional application of a wash with somatic cell releasing agent (SRA) to remove any interferences and non-bacterial sources of ATP prior to BRA application. This step removes interfering substances and non-bacterial sources of ATP. For spore analysis, an equi-volume sample of the PBS suspension was added to an equi-volume of trypticase soy broth (TSB), incubated at 37 C for 15 minutes, and processed using methods identical to bacterial cell analysis. Using these technique we were able to detect Bacillus subtilin variation niger, formerly known as Bacillus globigii (BG), in aerosol samples at concentrations greater than or equal to 105 colony forming units (CFU) per ml. Results of field and chamber trials show that one can detect the presence of bacterial and non-bacterial sources of ATP. One can also differentiate spore and vegetative bacterial cells. These techniques may be appropriate to situations where the measurement of bacterial aerosols is needed.

  20. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2016-09-01

    Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  1. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and recombinant plasmid pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA by bacterial magnetosomes for osteosarcoma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li; Ke, Youqun; Yu, Shuisheng; Jing, Juehua

    2016-01-01

    To explore a novel combination of chemotherapy, gene therapy, and thermotherapy for osteosarcoma, a targeted heat-sensitive co-delivery system based on bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) was developed. The optimal culture conditions of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) AMB-1 and characterization of BMs were achieved. A recombinant eukaryotic plasmid heat shock protein 70-polo-like kinase 1-short hairpin RNA (pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA) under transcriptional control of a thermosensitive promoter (human HSP70 promoter) was constructed for gene therapy. Doxorubicin (DOX) and pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA were included in the targeted thermosensitive co-delivery system, and in vitro DOX release activity, targeted gene silencing efficiency and in vitro antitumor efficacy were investigated. The results showed that the optimal culture conditions of MTB AMB-1 are an oxygen concentration of 4.0%, a pH value of 7.0, 20 μmol/L of ferrous sulfate, 800 mg/L of sodium nitrate, and 200 mg/L of succinic acid. The temperature of BMs reached 43°C within 3 minutes and could be maintained for 30 minutes by adjusting the magnitude of the alternating magnetic field (AMF). The diameters of BMs, BM-DOX, BM-recombinant eukaryotic plasmid pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA (shPlk1), and BM-DOX-shPlk1 were 43.7±4.6, 79.2±5.4, 88.9±7.8, and 133.5±11.4 nm, respectively. The zeta potentials of BMs, BM-DOX, BM-shPlk1, and BM-DOX-shPlk1 were −29.4±6.9, −9.5±5.6, −16.7±4.8, and −10.3±3.1 mV, respectively. Besides, the system exhibited good release behavior. DOX release rate from BM-DOX-shPlk1 was 54% after incubation with phosphate-buffered saline at 43°C and 37% after incubation with 50% fetal bovine serum, which was significantly higher than that at 37°C (P<0.05). In addition, the expressions of Plk1 mRNA and protein were significantly suppressed in cells treated with BM-DOX-shPlk1 following hyperthermia treatment under the influence of an AMF compared to other groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, evaluation of the effect of in

  2. [Cloning and expression of genes of the luminescence system in Photobacterium leiognathi].

    PubMed

    Illarionov, B A; Protopopova, M V

    1987-08-01

    The genes of Photobacterium leiognathi luminescence system were cloned in plasmid pUC18. Escherichia coli cells harboring a recombinant plasmid pPHL1 are luminescent. pPHL1 contains luciferase genes and genes responsible for aldehyde biosynthesis. The luminescence of Escherichia coli is subject to autoinductor regulation similar to the one existing in luminescent bacteria. The 2.7 kb fragment of Photobacterium leiognathi DNA containing the genes for alpha- and beta-luciferase subunits were cloned in pUC19.

  3. Selective excitation of the yellow luminescence of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, J.S.; Yu, P.Y.; Teo, K.L.; Weber, E.R.; Grzegory, I.; Uchida, K.

    1999-07-01

    The yellow luminescence of n-type GaN has been studied with selective excitation using a combination of Ar ion and dye lasers. Narrower structures whose peak energies follow the excitation photon energy over the width of the yellow luminescence have been observed. Unlike the yellow luminescence excited by above band gap excitations, these fine structures exhibits thermal activated quenching behavior. We propose that these fine structures are due to emission occurring at complexes of shallow donors and deep acceptors which can be resonantly excited by photons with energies below the band gap. The activation energy deduced from their intensity is that for delocalization of electrons out of the complexes. Our results therefore suggest that there is more than one recombination channel (usually assumed to be due to distant donor-acceptor pairs) to the yellow luminescence in GaN.

  4. Recombineering: genetic engineering in bacteria using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Lynn C; Sawitzke, James A; Li, Xintian; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2014-04-14

    The bacterial chromosome and bacterial plasmids can be engineered in vivo by homologous recombination using PCR products and synthetic oligonucleotides as substrates. This is possible because bacteriophage-encoded recombination proteins efficiently recombine sequences with homologies as short as 35 to 50 bases. Recombineering allows DNA sequences to be inserted or deleted without regard to location of restriction sites. This unit first describes preparation of electrocompetent cells expressing the recombineering functions and their transformation with dsDNA or ssDNA. It then presents support protocols that describe several two-step selection/counter-selection methods of making genetic alterations without leaving any unwanted changes in the targeted DNA, and a method for retrieving onto a plasmid a genetic marker (cloning by retrieval) from the Escherichia coli chromosome or a co-electroporated DNA fragment. Additional protocols describe methods to screen for unselected mutations, removal of the defective prophage from recombineering strains, and other useful techniques.

  5. Recombinant Baculovirus Isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3 ), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac(®) or BaculoDirect™, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Previously, many methods required a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. Fortunately, this step is no longer required for most systems currently available. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay or real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac(®) system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  6. Time-resolved measurements of Cooper-pair radiative recombination in InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, S. S.; Nakajima, H.; Kumano, H.; Suemune, I.; Irie, H.; Asano, Y.; Akahane, K.; Sasaki, M.; Murayama, A.

    2015-08-21

    We studied InAs quantum dots (QDs) where electron Cooper pairs penetrate from an adjacent niobium (Nb) superconductor with the proximity effect. With time-resolved luminescence measurements at the wavelength around 1550 nm, we observed luminescence enhancement and reduction of luminescence decay time constants at temperature below the superconducting critical temperature (T{sub C}) of Nb. On the basis of these measurements, we propose a method to determine the contribution of Cooper-pair recombination in InAs QDs. We show that the luminescence enhancement measured below T{sub C} is well explained with our theory including Cooper-pair recombination.

  7. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition.

  8. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  9. Study of Luminescence Characteristics of Trivalent Terbium in Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Mike S.; Armagan, Guzin; Winfree, William P.

    1995-01-01

    An important use of silicate glasses doped with terbium oxide (Tb2O3) is their use as fiber optic sensors for high-resolution imaging applications requiring the detection of x-rays (e.g. tomography and radiography). The x-ray radiation is absorbed by the glass, producing electron-hole pairs (excitons). The excitons migrate through the glass matrix and then recombine, emitting characteristic Tb(3+) luminescence in the optical wavelength region. This emission is due to forbidden transitions of 4f electrons and therefore has a long decay time. Long decay time is undesirable when imaging transient events since it results in blurring in time of the images. It has been reported elsewhere that in crystals Tb(3+) ions can act both as luminescence centers and as fluorescence traps. These traps can capture excitons and delay their recombination. This delayed fluorescence is seen as a long lived, secondary component to the luminescence decay curve, or afterglow. Such a secondary decay component to the luminescence decay of Tb(3+) has been observed before in soda glass following pulsed optical excitation. In order to determine the conditions under which afterglow occurs, an understanding of the material's luminescent properties is required.

  10. Lunar luminescence measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of lunar sites obtained in June 1983 have been analyzed for residual luminescence using the spectral line depth technique. The results or three sites each at three wavelengths are presented. The sites observed were Mare Crisium, Kepler, and Aristarchus. In each case, the value quoted was based not only on the strong Fraunhofer line in the spectral range covered but also on from 11 to 21 weaker lines within 80 A of the strongest feature. These data do not support previous observations. The values given do not indicate a greatly reddened spectrum, and the luminescence spectrum of the mare site is not significantly different from the two young crater sites. These observations cannot be adequately explained by thermal luminescence, theories of direct excitation are also unable to explain the strength of the flux.

  11. Wireless Luminescence Integrated Sensors (WLIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Sayler, G.S.

    2003-11-10

    The goal of this project was the development of a family of wireless, single-chip, luminescence-sensing devices to solve a number of difficult distributed measurement problems in areas ranging from environmental monitoring and assessment to high-throughput screening of combinatorial chemistry libraries. These wireless luminescence integrated sensors (WLIS) consist of a microluminometer, wireless data transmitter, and RF power input circuit all realized in a standard integrated circuit (IC) process with genetically engineered, whole-cell, bioluminescent bioreporters encapsulated and deposited on the IC. The end product is a family of compact, low-power, rugged, low-cost sensors. As part of this program they developed an integrated photodiode/signal-processing scheme with an rms noise level of 175 electrons/second for a 13-minute integration time, and a quantum efficiency of 66% at the 490-nm bioluminescent wavelength. this performance provided a detection limit of < 1000 photons/second. Although sol-gel has previously been used to encapsulate yeast cells, the reaction conditions necessary for polymerization (primarily low pH) have beforehand proven too harsh for bacterial cell immobilizations. Utilizing sonication methods, they have were able to initiate polymerization under pH conditions conductive to cell survival. both a toluene bioreporter (Pseudomonas putida TVA8) and a naphthalene bioreporter (Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44) were successfully encapsulated in sol-gel and shown to produce a fairly significant bioluminescent response. In addition to the previously developed naphthalene- and toluene-sensitive bioreporters, they developed a yeast-based xenoestrogen reporter. This technology has been licensed by Micro Systems Technologies, a startup company in Dayton, Ohio for applications in environmental containments monitoring, and for detecting weapons of mass destruction (i.e. homeland security).

  12. Peculiarities of thermal extinction of deep-center luminescence in cadmium selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Ermolovich, I.B.; Bulakh, B.M.

    1986-10-01

    The authors study the mechanisms of thermal extinction of the luminescence bands in cadmium selenide with lambda mad = 0.92 (band I) and 1.16 um (band II), for which the main photoluminescence centers are responsible. CdSe crystals grown from the gas phase and deliberately not doped were studied. The curves of the intensities of the bands I and II in the layers and single crystals are shown. A model is presented of the configurational coordinates for explaining the internal mechanism of extinction of impurity luminescence in crystal phosphors. A diagram is shown of the recombination transitions for wide-gap crystal phosphors with the anticipation of two luminescence centers and a nonradiative recombination center. This study proves that the corresponding luminescence centers in cadmium selenide single crystals and layers have the same physicochemical structure.

  13. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    PubMed Central

    Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry. PMID:26137472

  14. Tobacco mosaic virus infection results in an increase in recombination frequency and resistance to viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens in the progeny of infected tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Kathiria, Palak; Sidler, Corinne; Golubov, Andrey; Kalischuk, Melanie; Kawchuk, Lawrence M; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-08-01

    Our previous experiments showed that infection of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) leads to an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). The progeny of infected plants also had an increased rate of rearrangements in resistance gene-like loci. Here, we report that tobacco plants infected with TMV exhibited an increase in HRF in two consecutive generations. Analysis of global genome methylation showed the hypermethylated genome in both generations of plants, whereas analysis of methylation via 5-methyl cytosine antibodies demonstrated both hypomethylation and hypermethylation. Analysis of the response of the progeny of infected plants to TMV, Pseudomonas syringae, or Phytophthora nicotianae revealed a significant delay in symptom development. Infection of these plants with TMV or P. syringae showed higher levels of induction of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1 gene expression and higher levels of callose deposition. Our experiments suggest that viral infection triggers specific changes in progeny that promote higher levels of HRF at the transgene and higher resistance to stress as compared with the progeny of unstressed plants. However, data reported in these studies do not establish evidence of a link between recombination frequency and stress resistance.

  15. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  16. Oligonucleotide recombination enabled site-specific mutagenesis in bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombineering refers to a strategy for engineering DNA sequences using a specialized mode of homologous recombination. This technology can be used for rapidly constructing precise changes in bacterial genome sequences in vivo. Oligo recombination is one type of recombineering that uses ssDNA olig...

  17. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein.

    PubMed

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98-99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample.

  18. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H.

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821T, an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98–99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample. PMID:25843055

  19. CCD Luminescence Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom

    1987-01-01

    New diagnostic tool used to understand performance and failures of microelectronic devices. Microscope integrated to low-noise charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera to produce new instrument for analyzing performance and failures of microelectronics devices that emit infrared light during operation. CCD camera also used to indentify very clearly parts that have failed where luminescence typically found.

  20. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1997-02-04

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition. 14 figs.

  1. A broadly applicable function for describing luminescence dose response

    SciTech Connect

    Burbidge, C. I.

    2015-07-28

    The basic form of luminescence dose response is investigated, with the aim of developing a single function to account for the appearance of linear, superlinear, sublinear, and supralinear behaviors and variations in saturation signal level and rate. A function is assembled based on the assumption of first order behavior in different major factors contributing to measured luminescence-dosimetric signals. Different versions of the function are developed for standardized and non-dose-normalized responses. Data generated using a two trap two recombination center model and experimental data for natural quartz are analyzed to compare results obtained using different signals, measurement protocols, pretreatment conditions, and radiation qualities. The function well describes a range of dose dependent behavior, including sublinear, superlinear, supralinear, and non-monotonic responses and relative response to α and β radiation, based on change in relative recombination and trapping probability affecting signals sourced from a single electron trap.

  2. Comparison of mammalian and bacterial expression library screening to detect recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants with enhanced thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Gierczak, Richard F; Bhakta, Varsha; Xie, Michael; Sheffield, William P

    2015-08-20

    Serpins are a widely distributed family of serine proteases. A key determinant of their specificity is the reactive centre loop (RCL), a surface motif of ∼20 amino acids in length. Expression libraries of variant serpins could be rapidly probed with proteases to develop novel inhibitors if optimal systems were available. The serpin variant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor M358R (API M358R) inhibits the coagulation protease thrombin, but at sub-maximal rates compared to other serpins. Here we compared two approaches to isolate functional API variants from serpin expression libraries, using the same small library of API randomized at residue 358 (M358X): flow cytometry of transfected HEK 293 cells expressing membrane-displayed API; and a thrombin capture assay (TCA) performed on pools of bacterial lysates expressing soluble API. No enrichment for specific P1 residues was observed when the RCL codons of the 1% of sorted transfected 293 cells with the highest fluorescent thrombin-binding signals were subcloned and sequenced. In contrast, screening of 16 pools of bacterial API-expressing transformants led to the facile identification of API M358R and M358K as functional variants. Kinetic characterization showed that API M358R inhibited thrombin 17-fold more rapidly than API M358K. Reducing the incubation time with immobilized thrombin improved the sensitivity of TCA to detect supra-active API M358R variants and was used to screen a hypervariable library of API variants expressing 16 different amino acids at residues 352-357. The most active variant isolated, with TLSATP substituted for FLEAI, inhibited thrombin 2.9-fold more rapidly than API M358R. Our results indicate that flow cytometric approaches used in protein engineering of antibodies are not appropriate for serpins, and highlight the utility of the optimized TCA for serpin protein engineering.

  3. Temperature influence on luminescent coupling efficiency in concentrator MJ SCs

    SciTech Connect

    Shvarts, Maxim Emelyanov, Viktor; Mintairov, Mikhail; Evstropov, Valery; Timoshina, Nailya

    2015-09-28

    In the work, presented are the results of investigation of temperature dependencies of the luminescent coupling effectiveness in lattice-matched (LM) GaInP/GaAs/Ge and metamorphic (MM) GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells. The “ordinary” luminescent coupling effectiveness rise has been observed with temperature decrease for GaAs-Ge, GaInP-GaInAs and GaInAs-Ge pairs of subcells, and its limiting values have been defined. A “reverse” behavior of the luminescent coupling effectiveness for the GaInP-GaAs pair has been found, determined emittance potential drop of wideband GaInP p-n junction. It is shown that the established “unusual” behavior of the LC efficiency may be determined by the presence of thermalized centers of non-radiative recombination of charge carriers for the GaInP subcell in GaInP/GaAs/Ge LM structure. Estimation of characteristic parameters for the nonradiative recombination processes in wideband GaInP p-n junction has been carried out, and values for the energy of the nonradiative center thermalization (E{sub nrad2} =79.42meV) and for the activation energy of nonradiative band-to-band recombination (E{sub A}=33.4meV) have been obtained.

  4. A unique DNA repair and recombination gene (recN) sequence for identification and intraspecific molecular typing of bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and its comparative analysis with ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aundy; Prameela, Thekkan Puthiyaveedu; Suseelabhai, Rajamma

    2013-06-01

    Ribosomal gene sequences are a popular choice for identification of bacterial species and, often, for making phylogenetic interpretations. Although very popular, the sequences of 16S rDNA and 16-23S intergenic sequences often fail to differentiate closely related species of bacteria. The availability of complete genome sequences of bacteria, in the recent years, has accelerated the search for new genome targets for phylogenetic interpretations. The recently published full genome data of nine strains of R. solanacearum, which causes bacterial wilt of crop plants, has provided enormous genomic choices for phylogenetic analysis in this globally important plant pathogen. We have compared a gene candidate recN, which codes for DNA repair and recombination function, with 16S rDNA/16-23S intergenic ribosomal gene sequences for identification and intraspecific phylogenetic interpretations in R. solanacearum. recN gene sequence analysis of R. solanacearum revealed subgroups within phylotypes (or newly proposed species within plant pathogenic genus, Ralstonia), indicating its usefulness for intraspecific genotyping. The taxonomic discriminatory power of recN gene sequence was found to be superior to ribosomal DNA sequences. In all, the recN-sequence-based phylogenetic tree generated with the Bayesian model depicted 21 haplotypes against 15 and 13 haplotypes obtained with 16S rDNA and 16-23S rDNA intergenic sequences, respectively. Besides this, we have observed high percentage of polymorphic sites (S 23.04%), high rate of mutations (Eta 276) and high codon bias index (CBI 0.60), which makes the recN an ideal gene candidate for intraspecific molecular typing of this important plant pathogen.

  5. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  6. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Erwin, David N.; Kiel, Johnathan L.; Batishko, Charles R.; Stahl, Kurt A.

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  7. Microstructural lines involving luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-01

    Japanese National Printing Bureau has been focused upon the development of anti-copy lines for many years. The basic concept with regard to security measure lies in the merge of art and technology. On this basis, our originally developed anti-copy lines show flexibility to various security designs. Our newest anti-copy lines comprising from the Tri-Branched and Divided Lines shows clearer latent image effect compared to that of our other developed anti-copy lines. However, the anti-copy effect of security printing lines with microstructure is deteriorating due to the emergence of digital image techniques with higher resolution. In this situation, this paper introduces a new security measure comprising from luminescence and security printing lines with microstructure. It gives rise to a latent image effect under UV light due to the characteristic microstructure while visually same density. The principle advantage is that the combination of the anti-copy and luminescent feature strongly enhances its secure effect in documents. There is no necessity of two kinds of inks and any specially designed equipment to produce security documents with microstructural lines involving luminescence.

  8. Improved NADPH Regeneration for Fungal Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase by Co-Expressing Bacterial Glucose Dehydrogenase in Resting-Cell Biotransformation of Recombinant Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyunwoo; Durairaj, Pradeepraj; Lee, Dowoo; Ahsan, Md Murshidul; Yun, Hyungdon

    2016-12-28

    Fungal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes catalyze versatile monooxygenase reactions and play a major role in fungal adaptations owing to their essential roles in the production avoid metabolites critical for pathogenesis, detoxification of xenobiotics, and exploitation avoid substrates. Although fungal CYP-dependent biotransformation for the selective oxidation avoid organic compounds in yeast system is advantageous, it often suffers from a shortage avoid intracellular NADPH. In this study, we aimed to investigate the use of bacterial glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) for the intracellular electron regeneration of fungal CYP monooxygenase in a yeast reconstituted system. The benzoate hydroxylase FoCYP53A19 and its homologous redox partner FoCPR from Fusarium oxysporum were co-expressed with the BsGDH from Bacillus subtilis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterologous expression and biotransformations. We attempted to optimize several bottlenecks concerning the efficiency of fungal CYP-mediated whole-cell-biotransformation to enhance the conversion. The catalytic performance of the intracellular NADPH regeneration system facilitated the hydroxylation of benzoic acid to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid with high conversion in the resting-cell reaction. The FoCYP53A19+FoCPR+BsGDH reconstituted system produced 0.47 mM 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (94% conversion) in the resting-cell biotransformations performed in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) containing 0.5 mM benzoic acid and 0.25% glucose for 24 h at 30°C. The "coupled-enzyme" system can certainly improve the overall performance of NADPH-dependent whole-cell biotransformations in a yeast system.

  9. An Introduction to Luminescence in Inorganic Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, John A.

    1980-01-01

    Introduces luminescence by characterizing phosphors, describing phosphor phenomena, presenting a configurational coordinate model of characteristic luminescence, and describing some commercial applications of phosphors. (CS)

  10. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  11. Interactions between bicarbonate, potassium, and magnesium, and sulfur-dependent induction of luminescence in Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Yosuke; Era, Mariko; Ogawa, Akane; Morita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    In spite of its central importance in research efforts, the relationship between seawater compounds and bacterial luminescence has not previously been investigated in detail. Thus, in this study, we investigated the effect of cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH(4) (+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) and anions (Cl(-) , HCO(3) (-) , CO(3) (2-) , and NO(3) (-) ) on the induction of both inorganic (sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate) and organic (L-cysteine and L-cystine) sulfur-dependent luminescence in Vibrio fischeri. We found that HCO(3) (-) (bicarbonate) and CO(3) (2-) (carbonate), in the form of various compounds, had a stimulatory effect on sulfur-dependent luminescence. The luminescence induced by bicarbonate was further promoted by the addition of magnesium. Potassium also increased sulfur-dependent luminescence when sulfate or thiosulfate was supplied as the sole sulfur source, but not when sulfite, L-cysteine, or L-cystine was supplied. The positive effect of potassium was accelerated by the addition of magnesium and/or calcium. Furthermore, the additional supply of magnesium improved the induction of sulfite- or L-cysteine-dependent luminescence, but not the l-cystine-dependent type. These results suggest that sulfur-dependent luminescence of V. fischeri under nutrient-starved conditions is mainly controlled by bicarbonate, carbonate, and potassium. In addition, our results indicate that an additional supply of magnesium is effective for increasing V. fischeri luminescence.

  12. Oligonucleotide recombination in gram negative bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes several key aspects of a novel form of RecA-independent homologous recombination. We found that synthetic single stranded DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced into bacteria by transformation can site-specifically recombine with bacterial chromosomes in the absence of any a...

  13. Oligo Recombination in Gram Negative Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homologous recombination is important for bacterial survival because it simultaneously provides genomic stability as well as genomic plasticity. Of the mechanistic pathways for homologous recombination, those mediated by RecA are the most thoroughly characterized and are understood to be structural...

  14. The nature of unusual luminescence in natural calcite, CaCO3

    SciTech Connect

    Gaft, M.; Nagli, L.; Panczer, G.; Waychunas, G.; Porat, N.

    2008-11-01

    The unusual luminescence of particular varieties of natural pink calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) samples was studied by laser-induced time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy at different temperatures. The luminescence is characterized by intense blue emission under short-wave UV lamp excitation with an extremely long decay time, accompanied by pink-orange luminescence under long wave UV excitation. Our investigation included optical absorption, natural thermostimulated luminescence (NTL) and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) studies. Two luminescence centers were detected: a narrow violet band, with {lambda}{sub max} = 412 nm, {Delta} = 45 nm, two decay components of {tau}{sub 1} = 5 ns and {tau}{sub 2} = 7.2 ms, accompanied by very long afterglow, and an orange emission band with {lambda}{sub max} = 595 nm, {Delta} = 90 nm and {tau} = 5 ns. Both luminescence centers are thermally unstable with the blue emission disappearing after heating at 500 C, and the orange emission disappearing after heating at different temperatures starting from 230 C, although sometimes it is stable up to 500 C in different samples. Both centers have spectral-kinetic properties very unusual for mineral luminescence, which in combination with extremely low impurity concentrations, prevent their identification with specific impurity related emission. The most likely explanation of these observations may be the presence of radiation-induced luminescence centers. The long violet afterglow is evidently connected with trapped charge carrier liberation, with their subsequent migration through the valence band and ultimate recombination with a radiation-induced center responsible for the unusual violet luminescence.

  15. Luminescence nanocrystals for solar cell enhancement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Man; Chen, Wei; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2010-03-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) prepared by wet-chemical routes have been proposed as an attractive candidate for fabrication of the third-generation thin-film solar cells due to their quantum confinement effects and excellent dispersion ability in polymer films. However, to date, a solar cell incorporating semiconductor NCs in the photoactive layer still has rather low efficiency due to the low carrier mobility of the non-continued NC phase and the possible radiative recombination in NCs. To avoid these disadvantages, NCs have been proposed and applied as a luminescent species in a passive photon converting layer to modify the solar spectrum before the light enters the photovoltaic device. Photon conversion processes, including up-conversion, down-conversion, and down-shifting, have been observed in various colloidal NC samples and have great potential to enhance photovoltaic performance when applied to the existing single-junction solar cells or narrow-band molecular-based devices.

  16. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N [Berkeley, CA; Corneillie, Todd M [Campbell, CA; Xu, Jide [Berkeley, CA

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  17. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  18. Self-trapped exciton and core-valence luminescence in BaF{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Vistovskyy, V. V. Zhyshkovych, A. V.; Chornodolskyy, Ya. M.; Voloshinovskii, A. S.; Myagkota, O. S.; Gloskovskii, A.; Gektin, A. V.; Vasil'ev, A. N.; Rodnyi, P. A.

    2013-11-21

    The influence of the BaF{sub 2} nanoparticle size on the intensity of the self-trapped exciton luminescence and the radiative core-valence transitions is studied by the luminescence spectroscopy methods using synchrotron radiation. The decrease of the self-trapped exciton emission intensity at energies of exciting photons in the range of optical exciton creation (hν ≤ E{sub g}) is less sensitive to the reduction of the nanoparticle sizes than in the case of band-to-band excitation, where excitons are formed by the recombination way. The intensity of the core-valence luminescence shows considerably weaker dependence on the nanoparticle sizes in comparison with the intensity of self-trapped exciton luminescence. The revealed regularities are explained by considering the relationship between nanoparticle size and photoelectron or photohole thermalization length as well as the size of electronic excitations.

  19. Are luminescent bacteria suitable for online detection and monitoring of toxic compounds in drinking water and its sources?

    PubMed

    Woutersen, Marjolijn; Belkin, Shimshon; Brouwer, Bram; van Wezel, Annemarie P; Heringa, Minne B

    2011-05-01

    Biosensors based on luminescent bacteria may be valuable tools to monitor the chemical quality and safety of surface and drinking water. In this review, an overview is presented of the recombinant strains available that harbour the bacterial luciferase genes luxCDABE, and which may be used in an online biosensor for water quality monitoring. Many bacterial strains have been described for the detection of a broad range of toxicity parameters, including DNA damage, protein damage, membrane damage, oxidative stress, organic pollutants, and heavy metals. Most lux strains have sensitivities with detection limits ranging from milligrams per litre to micrograms per litre, usually with higher sensitivities in compound-specific strains. Although the sensitivity of lux strains can be enhanced by various molecular manipulations, most reported detection thresholds are still too high to detect levels of individual contaminants as they occur nowadays in European drinking waters. However, lux strains sensing specific toxic effects have the advantage of being able to respond to mixtures of contaminants inducing the same effect, and thus could be used as a sensor for the sum effect, including the effect of compounds that are as yet not identified by chemical analysis. An evaluation of the suitability of lux strains for monitoring surface and drinking water is therefore provided.

  20. Enhanced radiation detectors using luminescent materials

    DOEpatents

    Vardeny, Zeev V.; Jeglinski, Stefan A.; Lane, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    A radiation detecting device comprising a radiation sensing element, and a layer of luminescent material to expand the range of wavelengths over which the sensing element can efficiently detect radiation. The luminescent material being selected to absorb radiation at selected wavelengths, causing the luminescent material to luminesce, and the luminescent radiation being detected by the sensing element. Radiation sensing elements include photodiodes (singly and in arrays), CCD arrays, IR detectors and photomultiplier tubes. Luminescent materials include polymers, oligomers, copolymers and porphyrines, Luminescent layers include thin films, thicker layers, and liquid polymers.

  1. The mechanism of electronic excitation in the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtseva, E. V.; Kudryasheva, N. S.

    2007-01-01

    The current state of the problem of formation of the electron-excited product in the chemiluminescent reaction that underlies the bacterial luminescence is analysed. Various schemes of chemical transformations capable of producing a bacterial bioluminescence emitter are presented. The problem of excitation of secondary emitters is considered; two possible mechanisms of their excitation are analysed.

  2. Luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Smalley, J S T; Vallini, F; Montoya, S A; Ferrari, L; Shahin, S; Riley, C T; Kanté, B; Fullerton, E E; Liu, Z; Fainman, Y

    2017-01-09

    When engineered on scales much smaller than the operating wavelength, metal-semiconductor nanostructures exhibit properties unobtainable in nature. Namely, a uniaxial optical metamaterial described by a hyperbolic dispersion relation can simultaneously behave as a reflective metal and an absorptive or emissive semiconductor for electromagnetic waves with orthogonal linear polarization states. Using an unconventional multilayer architecture, we demonstrate luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces, wherein distributed semiconducting quantum wells display extreme absorption and emission polarization anisotropy. Through normally incident micro-photoluminescence measurements, we observe absorption anisotropies greater than a factor of 10 and degree-of-linear polarization of emission >0.9. We observe the modification of emission spectra and, by incorporating wavelength-scale gratings, show a controlled reduction of polarization anisotropy. We verify hyperbolic dispersion with numerical simulations that model the metasurface as a composite nanoscale structure and according to the effective medium approximation. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate >350% emission intensity enhancement relative to the bare semiconducting quantum wells.

  3. Luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, J. S. T.; Vallini, F.; Montoya, S. A.; Ferrari, L.; Shahin, S.; Riley, C. T.; Kanté, B.; Fullerton, E. E.; Liu, Z.; Fainman, Y.

    2017-01-01

    When engineered on scales much smaller than the operating wavelength, metal-semiconductor nanostructures exhibit properties unobtainable in nature. Namely, a uniaxial optical metamaterial described by a hyperbolic dispersion relation can simultaneously behave as a reflective metal and an absorptive or emissive semiconductor for electromagnetic waves with orthogonal linear polarization states. Using an unconventional multilayer architecture, we demonstrate luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces, wherein distributed semiconducting quantum wells display extreme absorption and emission polarization anisotropy. Through normally incident micro-photoluminescence measurements, we observe absorption anisotropies greater than a factor of 10 and degree-of-linear polarization of emission >0.9. We observe the modification of emission spectra and, by incorporating wavelength-scale gratings, show a controlled reduction of polarization anisotropy. We verify hyperbolic dispersion with numerical simulations that model the metasurface as a composite nanoscale structure and according to the effective medium approximation. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate >350% emission intensity enhancement relative to the bare semiconducting quantum wells.

  4. Recombinant allergens

    PubMed Central

    Jutel, Marek; Solarewicz-Madejek, Katarzyna; Smolinska, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only known causative treatment of allergic diseases. Recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies arose from a strong need to both to improve safety and enhance efficacy of SIT. In addition, new vaccines can be effective in allergies including food allergy or atopic dermatitis, which poorly respond to the current treatment with allergen extracts. A number of successful clinical studies with both wild-type and hypoallergenic derivatives of recombinant allergens vaccines have been reported for the last decade. They showed high efficacy and safety profile as well as very strong modulation of T and B cell responses to specific allergens. PMID:23095874

  5. Lanthanide-based luminescence biolabelling.

    PubMed

    Sy, Mohamadou; Nonat, Aline; Hildebrandt, Niko; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2016-04-14

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes display unrivalled spectroscopic properties, which place them in a special category in the luminescent toolbox. Their long-lived line-like emission spectra are the cornerstones of numerous analytical applications ranging from ultrasensitive homogeneous fluoroimmunoassays to the study of molecular interactions in living cells with multiplexed microscopy. However, achieving such minor miracles is a result of years of synthetic efforts and spectroscopic studies to understand and gather all the necessary requirements for the labels to be efficient. This feature article intends to survey these criteria and to discuss some of the most important examples reported in the literature, before explaining in detail some of the applications of luminescent lanthanide labels to bioanalysis and luminescence microscopy. Finally, the emphasis will be put on some recent applications that hold great potential for future biosensing.

  6. Luminescent solar concentrators: Semiconductor solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debije, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Reabsorption losses have long been holding back the commercial viability of luminescent solar concentrators. Now, non-toxic silicon-based quantum dots with enhanced Stokes shift may enable the technology to enjoy practical implementation.

  7. Magnetic field effects on the solute luminescence of alkane solutions irradiated with heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    LaVerne, J.A.; Brocklehurst, B.

    1996-02-01

    The effects of track structure on the luminescence decays in cyclohexane and in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isoocatane) solutions of 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) have been determined in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field. Irradiations were performed with protons of 1-15 MeV and with helium ions of 2-20 MeV energy. Companion studies were performed with {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y {Beta}-radiolysis. The magnetic field effect is due to the hyperfine interaction of nuclear spins in the geminate pair of solvent radical ions produced. In both solvents, the effect of the magnetic field on luminescence decreases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET) from about 40% for {Beta}-particles to only a few percent with helium ions. Magnetic field effects with protons decrease in time whereas they are constant with {Beta}-particles. This result is attributed to the overlap of initially isolated spurs during the evolution of the proton track; the probability of nongeminate recombination increases with the number of neighboring ion pairs. The total luminescence intensity per incident particle remains constant with proton energy but increases slightly with increasing helium ion energy. At a given particle energy, the intensity is greater in cyclohexane than in isoocatane. The pulse shapes of the luminescence decays reflect the distributions in ion recombination times, and very little variation in luminescence decay rates is observed with increasing LET. 37 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Recombinant gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Lathi, R B; Milki, A A

    2001-10-01

    Recombinant DNA technology makes it possible to produce large amounts of human gene products for pharmacologic applications, supplanting the need for human tissues. The genes for the alpha and beta subunits of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) have been characterized and cloned. Recombinant FSH (rFSH) has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of fertility disorders. In comparison with the urinary gonadotropin products, human menopausal gonadotropins (HMG), and urinary follitropins (uFSH), rFSH is more potent and better tolerated by patients. Recombinant HCG appears to be as efficacious as urinary HCG with the benefit of improved local tolerance. Recombinant LH (rLH) is likely to be recommended as a supplement to rFSH for ovulation induction in hypogonadotropic women. It may also benefit in vitro fertilization patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with rFSH combined with pituitary suppression, with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or antagonist.

  9. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  10. A recombinant single-chain human class II MHC molecule (HLA-DR1) as a covalently linked heterotrimer of alpha chain, beta chain, and antigenic peptide, with immunogenicity in vitro and reduced affinity for bacterial superantigens.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Bavari, S; Ulrich, R; Sadegh-Nasseri, S; Ferrone, S; McHugh, L; Mage, M

    1997-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules bind to numerous peptides and display these on the cell surface for T cell recognition. In a given immune response, receptors on T cells recognize antigenic peptides that are a minor population of MHC class II-bound peptides. To control which peptides are presented to T cells, it may be desirable to use recombinant MHC molecules with covalently bound antigenic peptides. To study T cell responses to such homogeneous peptide-MHC complexes, we engineered an HLA-DR1 cDNA coding for influenza hemagglutinin, influenza matrix, or HIV p24 gag peptides covalently attached via a peptide spacer to the N terminus of the DR1 beta chain. Co-transfection with DR alpha cDNA into mouse L cells resulted in surface expression of HLA-DR1 molecules that reacted with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for correctly folded HLA-DR epitopes. This suggested that the spacer and peptide did not alter expression or folding of the molecule. We then engineered an additional peptide spacer between the C terminus of a truncated beta chain (without transmembrane or cytoplasmic domains) and the N terminus of full-length DR alpha chain. Transfection of this cDNA into mouse L cells resulted in surface expression of the entire covalently linked heterotrimer of peptide, beta chain, and alpha chain with the expected molecular mass of approximately 66 kDa. These single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules reacted with mAb specific for correctly folded HLA-DR epitopes, and identified one mAb with [MHC + peptide] specificity. Affinity-purified soluble secreted single-chain molecules with truncated alpha chain moved in electrophoresis as compact class II MHC dimers. Cell surface two-chain or single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules with a covalent HA peptide stimulated HLA-DR1-restricted HA-specific T cells. They were immunogenic in vitro for peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The two-chain and single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules with covalent HA peptide had reduced binding

  11. A Novel Universal Detection Agent for Time-Gated Luminescence Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Sayyadi, Nima; Care, Andrew; Connally, Russell E.; Try, Andrew C.; Bergquist, Peter L.; Sunna, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent lanthanide chelates have been used to label antibodies in time-gated luminescence (TGL) bioimaging. However, it is a challenging task to label directly an antibody with lanthanide-binding ligands and achieve control of the target ligand/protein ratios whilst ensuring that affinity and avidity of the antibody remain uncompromised. We report the development of a new indirect detection reagent to label antibodies with detectable luminescence that circumvents this problem by labelling available lysine residues in the linker portion of the recombinant fusion protein Linker-Protein G (LPG). Succinimide-activated lanthanide chelating ligands were attached to lysine residues in LPG and Protein G (without Linker) and the resulting Luminescence-Activating (LA-) conjugates were compared for total incorporation and conjugation efficiency. A higher and more efficient incorporation of ligands at three different molar ratios was observed for LPG and this effect was attributed to the presence of eight readily available lysine residues in the linker region of LPG. These Luminescence-Activating (LA-) complexes were subsequently shown to impart luminescence (upon formation of europium(III) complexes) to cell-specific antibodies within seconds and without the need for any complicated bioconjugation procedures. The potential of this technology was demonstrated by direct labelling of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in TGL bioimaging. PMID:27282464

  12. Rapid homogeneous immunoassay for cardiac troponin I using switchable lanthanide luminescence.

    PubMed

    Päkkilä, Henna; Malmi, Eeva; Lahtinen, Satu; Soukka, Tero

    2014-12-15

    Homogeneous assays are advantageous because of their simplicity and rapid kinetics but typically their performance is severely compromised compared to heterogeneous assay formats. Here, we report a homogeneous immunoassay utilizing switchable lanthanide luminescence for detection and site-specifically labeled recombinant antibody fragments as binders to improve the assay performance. Switchable lanthanide luminescence enabled elimination of assay background due to division of the luminescent lanthanide chelate into two non-luminescent label moieties. Simultaneous biomolecular recognition of model analyte cardiac troponin I by two antibody fragments brought the label moieties together and resulted in self-assembly of luminescent mixed chelate complex. The assay was very rapid as maximal signal-to-background ratios were achieved already after 6 min of incubation. Additionally, the limit of detection was 0.38 ng/mL (16 pM), which was comparable to the limit of detection for the heterogeneous reference assay based on the same binders (0.26 ng/mL or 11 pM). This is the first study to apply switchable lanthanide luminescence in immunoassays and demonstrates the versatile potential of the technology for rapid and sensitive homogeneous assays.

  13. Enhancement of Luminescence of Colloidal Ag2S Quantum Dots by Thionine Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, O. V.; Grevtseva, I. G.; Kondratenko, T. S.; Smirnov, M. S.; Evtukhova, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Enhancement of IR luminescence (1205 nm) of colloidal Ag2S quantum dots (QDs) with an average size of 2.5 ± 0.3 nm was detected upon excitation in the absorption band of thionine dye molecules (530-610 nm). It is found that the observed effect occurs during a hybrid association of Ag2S QDs with monomers of the cationic thionine (Th + ) molecule. It is concluded that the photosensitization of IR luminescence of colloidal Ag2S QDs is realized due to a resonance nonradiative transfer of electronic excitation energy directly to the centers of radiative recombination from the excited Th + molecules.

  14. Utilizing Nanofabrication to Construct Strong, Luminescent Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Huang, Gang; Lu, Hong B.; McCready, David E.; Joly, Alan G.; Bovin, Jan-Olov

    2006-05-28

    Luminescent materials have been utilized widely in applications from lighting to sensing. The new development of technologies based on luminescence properties requires the materials to have high luminescence efficiency and mechanical strength. In this article, we report the fabrication of luminescent materials possessing high mechanical strength by nanofabrication with polyvinyl alcohol used as a stabilizer or coupling agent. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission microscope observations reveal that the nanocomposite sample contains ZnS and ZnO nanoparticles as well as kozoite and sodium nitrate. The mechanical strength and hardness of these nanocomposite materials are higher than polycarbonate and some carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites. Strong luminescence is observed in the new nanocomposites and the luminescence intensity does not degrade following up to 30 minutes of X-ray irradiation. Our results indicate that nanofabrication may provide a good method to improve the mechanical strength of luminescent materials for some applications in which high strength luminescent materials are needed.

  15. Turning on the Light: Lessons from Luminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Patricia B.; Engelson, Carol; St. Peter, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Some of the processes by which light is emitted without a simultaneous change in temperature are discussed and is classified as luminescence or cold light. Luminescent processes include triboluminescence, fluorescence, phosphorescence, chemiluminescence, and bioluminescence.

  16. An Overview of Genetic Mechanisms in the Bacterial Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Judith; Baumberg, Simon

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the genetic elements found in the bacterial cell which play a role in recombining DNA sequences. Provides a core structure to which the mechanisms occurring in and between bacterial cells can be related. Discusses the practicalities of recombinant DNA techniques. (Author/CW)

  17. Method of measuring luminescence of a material

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Steven D.

    2015-12-15

    A method of measuring luminescence of a material is disclosed. The method includes applying a light source to excite an exposed material. The method also includes amplifying an emission signal of the material. The method further includes measuring a luminescent emission at a fixed time window of about 10 picoseconds to about 10 nanoseconds. The luminescence may be radio photoluminescence (RPL) or optically stimulated luminescence (OSL).

  18. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: a matrix including lanthanide ions is provided on the surface containing the bacterial spores; functionalized aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores on the surface; a complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is formed on the surface; the complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence of the complex on the surface; and the bacterial spores exhibiting the luminescence of the complex on the surface are detected and quantified.

  19. Specificity of aequorin luminescence to calcium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimomura, O.; Johnson, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    The presence of Pb(++), Co(++), Cu(++), and Cd(++), each of which possesses a certain luminescence-triggering activity of aequorin, potentially interferes with the specificity of the aequorin luminescence response to Ca(++). Interference by the above cations can be eliminated, without influencing the sensitivity of the luminescence of aequorin to Ca(++), by adding 1 mM of sodium diethyldithiocarbamate.

  20. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-10-25

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

  1. Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.; Fecht, B.A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of the MEASUREMENT OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  2. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishko, C. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Fecht, B. A.

    The goal of the Measurement of Chemiluminescence project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  3. Multi-junction-solar-cell designs and characterizations based on detailed-balance principle and luminescence yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Hidefumi; Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Kim, Changsu; Chen, Shaoqiang; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-03-01

    We developed a straightforward method based on detailed balance relations to analyze individual subcells in multi-junction solar cells via measuring absolute electroluminescence quantum yields. This method was applied to characterization of a InGaP/GaAs/Ge 3-junction solar cell for satellite use. In addition to subcell I-V characteristics and internal luminescence yields, we derived balance sheets of energy and carriers, which revealed respective subcell contributions of radiative and nonradiative recombination losses, junction loss, and luminescence coupling. These results provide important diagnosis and feedback to fabrications. We calculated conversion-efficiency limit and optimized bandgap energy in 2-, 3-, and 4-junction tandem solar cells, including finite values of sub-cell internal luminescence quantum yields to account for realistic material qualities in sub-cells. With reference to the measured internal luminescence quantum yields, the theoretical results provide realistic targets of efficiency limits and improved design principles of practical tandem solar cells.

  4. Detection of Metal and Organometallic Compounds with Bioluminescent Bacterial Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Durand, M J; Hua, A; Jouanneau, S; Cregut, M; Thouand, G

    2015-10-17

    Chemical detection of metal and organometallic compounds is very specific and sensitive, but these techniques are time consuming and expensive. Although these techniques provide information about the concentrations of compounds, they fail to inform us about the toxicity of a sample. Because the toxic effects of metals and organometallic compounds are influenced by a multitude of environmental factors, such as pH, the presence of chelating agents, speciation, and organic matter, bioassays have been developed for ecotoxicological studies. Among these bioassays, recombinant luminescent bacteria have been developed over the past 20 years, and many of them are specific for the detection of metals and metalloids. These bioassays are simple to use, are inexpensive, and provide information on the bioavailable fraction of metals and organometals. Thus, they are an essential complementary tool for providing information beyond chemical analysis. In this chapter, we propose to investigate the detection of metals and organometallic compounds with bioluminescent bacterial bioassays and the applications of these bioassays to environmental samples. Graphical Abstract.

  5. Applications of luminescent systems to infectious disease methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Deming, J. W.; Mcgarry, M. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Okrend, H.; Thomas, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The characterization of a clinical sample by a simple, fast, accurate, automatable analytical measurement is important in the management of infectious disease. Luminescence assays offer methods rich with options for these measurements. The instrumentation is common to each assay, and the investment is reasonable. Three general procedures were developed to varying degrees of completeness which measure bacterial levels by measuring their ATP, FMN and iron porphyrins. Bacteriuria detection and antibiograms can be determined within half a day. The characterization of the sample for its soluble ATP, FMN or prophyrins was also performed.

  6. Defect luminescence in films containing Ge and GeO{sub 2} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, M.; Atherton, S.J.; Fauchet, P.M.

    1997-07-01

    Amorphous SiO{sub x} alloys containing Ge or GeO{sub 2} nanocrystals are produced by dc-magnetron sputtering and controlled crystallization. The samples are investigated by Raman scattering, transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence and excitation spectroscopy. Under UV excitation, both types of films luminesce around 3.1 eV, with identical PL line shapes and subnanosecond PL dynamics. The strongest PL intensity is found for the films containing FeO{sub 2} crystals and for the largest nanocrystals. These results are a clear indication that although the blue luminescence is without a doubt correlated with the formation of Ge (or GeO{sub 2}) nanocrystals, it is not produced by the radiative recombination of excitons confined in the nanocrystals. Possible mechanisms for the luminescence are discussed, including defects at the nanocrystal/matric interface or in the matrix itself.

  7. Mechanically driven luminescence in a ZnS:Cu-PDMS composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Kee-Sun; Timilsina, Suman; Singh, Satendra Pal; Choi, Taekjib; Kim, Ji Sik

    2016-10-01

    The conventional mechanoluminescence (ML) mechanism of phosphors such as SrAl2O4:Eu and ZnS:Mn is known to utilize carrier trapping at shallow traps followed by stress (or strain)-induced detrapping, which leads to activator recombination in association with local piezoelectric fields. However, such a conventional ML mechanism was found to be invalid for the ZnS:Cu-embedded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite, due to the absence of luminescence with a rigid matrix and a negligibly small value of the piezoelectric coefficient (d33) of the composite. An alternative mechanism, namely, the triboelectricity-induced luminescence has been proposed for the mechanically driven luminescence of a ZnS:Cu-PDMS composite.

  8. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on light emission by various strains of marine luminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Katsev, Andrey M; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Szpilewska, Hanna

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting bacteria are the most abundant and widespread luminescent organisms. Most species of such bacteria live in marine environments. However, until recently, biological role of bacterial luminescence remained unknown. Recent studies indicated that light produced in bacterial cells may stimulate DNA repair. Therefore, it is not surprising that agents that cause DNA damage induce expression of lux genes. Moreover, it was proposed previously that bacterial luciferases may be involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Recently, this hypothesis was confirmed experimentally. Here we investigated effects of hydrogen peroxide on light emission by various strains of luminescent bacteria. We found that luminescence of strains with luciferase of fast kinetics of reaction decreased at considerably lower concentrations of H2O2 than that of strains with luciferase of the slow kinetics. The action (either direct or indirect) of luciferases as anti-oxidants seemed to be independent of activity of catalase, which was found to be different in various strains. Therefore, it seems that luciferases of the slow kinetics are more efficient in detoxification of reactive oxygen species than those of the fast kinetics.

  9. Unraveling the luminescence signatures of chemical defects in polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lihua; Tran, Huan Doan; Wang, Chenchen; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2015-09-28

    Chemical defects in polyethylene (PE) can deleteriously downgrade its electrical properties and performance. Although these defects usually leave spectroscopic signatures in terms of characteristic luminescence peaks, it is nontrivial to make unambiguous assignments of the peaks to specific defect types. In this work, we go beyond traditional density functional theory calculations to determine intra-defect state transition and charge recombination process derived emission and absorption energies in PE. By calculating the total energy differences of the neutral defect at excited and ground states, the emission energies from intra-defect state transition are obtained, reasonably explaining the photoluminescence peaks in PE. In order to study the luminescence emitted in charge recombination processes, we characterize PE defect levels in terms of thermodynamic and optical charge transition levels that involve total energy calculations of neutral and charged defects. Calculations are performed at several levels of theory including those involving (semi)local and hybrid electron exchange-correlation functionals, and many-body perturbation theory. With these critical elements, the emission energies are computed and further used to clarify and confirm the origins of the observed electroluminescence and thermoluminescence peaks.

  10. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  11. Luminescence dynamics of bound exciton of hydrogen doped ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Yi, Gyu -Chul; Chon, Bonghwan; Joo, Taiha; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-04-11

    In this study, all-optical camera, converting X-rays into visible photons, is a promising strategy for high-performance X-ray imaging detector requiring high detection efficiency and ultrafast detector response time. Zinc oxide is a suitable material for all-optical camera due to its fast radiative recombination lifetime in sub-nanosecond regime and its radiation hardness. ZnO nanostructures have been considered as proper building blocks for ultrafast detectors with spatial resolution in sub-micrometer scale. To achieve remarkable enhancement of luminescence efficiency n-type doping in ZnO has been employed. However, luminescence dynamics of doped ZnO nanostructures have not been thoroughly investigated whereas undoped ZnO nanostructures have been employed to study their luminescence dynamics. Here we report a study of luminescence dynamics of hydrogen doped ZnO nanowires obtained by hydrogen plasma treatment. Hydrogen doping in ZnO nanowires gives rise to significant increase in the near-band-edge emission of ZnO and decrease in averaged photoluminescence lifetime from 300 to 140 ps at 10 K. The effects of hydrogen doping on the luminescent characteristics of ZnO nanowires were changed by hydrogen doping process variables.

  12. Luminescence dynamics of bound exciton of hydrogen doped ZnO nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Yi, Gyu -Chul; Chon, Bonghwan; ...

    2016-04-11

    In this study, all-optical camera, converting X-rays into visible photons, is a promising strategy for high-performance X-ray imaging detector requiring high detection efficiency and ultrafast detector response time. Zinc oxide is a suitable material for all-optical camera due to its fast radiative recombination lifetime in sub-nanosecond regime and its radiation hardness. ZnO nanostructures have been considered as proper building blocks for ultrafast detectors with spatial resolution in sub-micrometer scale. To achieve remarkable enhancement of luminescence efficiency n-type doping in ZnO has been employed. However, luminescence dynamics of doped ZnO nanostructures have not been thoroughly investigated whereas undoped ZnO nanostructures havemore » been employed to study their luminescence dynamics. Here we report a study of luminescence dynamics of hydrogen doped ZnO nanowires obtained by hydrogen plasma treatment. Hydrogen doping in ZnO nanowires gives rise to significant increase in the near-band-edge emission of ZnO and decrease in averaged photoluminescence lifetime from 300 to 140 ps at 10 K. The effects of hydrogen doping on the luminescent characteristics of ZnO nanowires were changed by hydrogen doping process variables.« less

  13. Radiation-induced luminescence in magnesium aluminate spinel crystals and ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyna, V. T.; Kazarinov, Yu. G.; Kobyakov, V. A.; Reimanis, I. E.

    2006-09-01

    Radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) in spinel crystals and ceramics were investigated to elucidate the radiation-induced electronic processes in single crystals grown by Verneuil and Czochralski methods as well as transparent and translucent ceramics. Both RL and TL spectra demonstrate a UV-band related to electron-hole recombination luminescence at intrinsic defects; green and red luminescence are identified with emission of Mn 2+- and Cr 3+-ions, respectively. The kinetics of growth of different RL luminescence bands depending on dose at the prolonged X-irradiation shows the competitive character of charge and energy transfer between defects and impurity ions. The dependence of RL intensity on the temperature of the sample was measured in the range of 300-750 K and compared with TL for different emission bands. The variety of maxima in the temperature dependence of RL and in the glow curves of TL measured for different luminescence bands in spinels of different origins and crystalline forms is used to show that charge carrier traps and luminescence centers are not isolated defects but are complexes of defects and impurities. The formation, structure and properties of these complexes depend on the processing conditions.

  14. Origin of green luminescence in hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Čížek, J. Hruška, P.; Melikhova, O.; Procházka, I.; Valenta, J.; Novotný, M.; Bulíř, J.

    2015-06-22

    Combining photoluminescence and positron annihilation studies of hydrothermally grown ZnO crystals with stoichiometry varied by controlled annealing enabled us to clarify the origin of green luminescence. It was found that green luminescence in ZnO has multiple origins and consists of a band at 2.3(1) eV due to recombination of electrons of the conduction band by zinc vacancy acceptors coupled with hydrogen and a band at 2.47(2) eV related to oxygen vacancies. The as-grown ZnO crystals contain zinc vacancies associated with hydrogen and exhibit a green luminescence at 2.3(1) eV. Annealing in Zn vapor removed zinc vacancies and introduced oxygen vacancies. This led to disappearance of the green luminescence band at 2.3(1) eV and appearance of a green emission at higher energy of 2.47(2) eV. Moreover, the color of the crystal was changed from colorless to dark red. In contrast, annealing of the as-grown crystal in Cd vapor did not remove zinc vacancies and did not cause any significant change of green luminescence nor change in coloration.

  15. Luminescence evolution from alumina ceramic surface before flashover under direct and alternating current voltage in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Yi-Bo; Song, Bai-Peng; Mu, Hai-Bao; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Li, Feng; Wang, Meng

    2016-06-01

    The luminescence evolution phenomena from alumina ceramic surface in vacuum under high voltage of direct and alternating current are reported, with the voltage covering a large range from far below to close to the flashover voltage. Its time resolved and spatial distributed behaviors are examined by a photon counting system and an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) together with a digital camera, respectively. The luminescence before flashover exhibits two stages as voltage increasing, i.e., under a relative low voltage (Stage A), the luminescence is ascribed to radiative recombination of hetero-charges injected into the sample surface layer by Schottky effect; under a higher voltage (Stage B), a stable secondary electron emission process, resulting from the Fowler-Nordheim emission at the cathode triple junction (CTJ), is responsible for the luminescence. Spectrum analysis implies that inner secondary electrons within the surface layer of alumina generated during the SSEE process also participate in the luminescence of Stage B. A comprehensive interpretation of the flashover process is formulated, which might promote a better understanding of flashover issue in vacuum.

  16. Rapid screening for soil ecotoxicity with a battery of luminescent bacteria tests.

    PubMed

    Heinlaan, Margit; Kahru, Anne; Kasemets, Kaja; Kurvet, Imbi; Waterlot, Cristophe; Sepp, Kalev; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Douay, Francis

    2007-03-01

    A bacterial test battery, involving i) Microtox, an aquatic test, ii) the Flash assay, a soil-suspension test (with Vibrio fischeri as the test organism), and iii) the Metal Detector assay, a semi-specific aquatic test for heavy metals (with recombinant luminescent Escherichia coli), was used in a combined toxicological and chemical hazard assessment of Estonian soils sampled from a former Soviet military airfield (13 samples) and from traffic-influenced roadsides (5 samples). The soils showed slightly elevated levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), but not of heavy metals. In most of the samples, the levels of TPH did not exceed the Estonian permitted limit values set for residential areas. Toxicity testing was performed on both fresh and dried soils, after aqueous extraction for 1 hour and 24 hours. The toxicity results obtained with the Microtox test did not significantly differ in all of the sample treatment schemes; however, it appeared that the drying and sieving of the soils increased the bioavailability of toxicants, probably due to an enlarged reactive soil surface area. According to chemical analysis of the soils and the data from the Microtox test and the Metal Detector assay (performed on aqueous elutriates of the soils), these soils would not be considered to be hazardous. In contrast, the Flash assay performed on soil-water suspensions of dried soils, showed that most of the soils were toxic and thus probably contained undetermined particle-bound bioavailable toxicants. The photobacterial toxicity test (the Flash assay) can be recommended for the rapid screening of soils, as it is sensitive, cheap and inexpensive, and provides valuable information on particle-bound bioavailable toxicants, useful for complementing a chemical analysis and for assessing the risks originating from polluted soils.

  17. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  18. Effect of ultrasonic treatment on photoelectric and luminescent properties of ZnSe crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zobov, E. M. Zobov, M. E.; Gabibov, F. S.; Kamilov, I. K.; Manyakhin, F. I.; Naimi, E. K.

    2008-03-15

    The results of the effect of ultrasonic treatment of ZnSe crystals on the structure of the energy spectrum of electronic states of centers with deep levels forming photoelectric and luminescent properties of this compound are presented. It is for the first time proved experimentally that the climb of edge dislocations under the effect of ultrasound leads to regrouping and generation of defects forming deep levels, which manifest themselves in phenomena of photosensitivity and radiative recombination.

  19. Interfering with Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Kerstin; Steinbach, Anke; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the exchange of chemical signals in bacterial populations to adjust the bacterial phenotypes according to the density of bacterial cells. This serves to express phenotypes that are advantageous for the group and ensure bacterial survival. To do so, bacterial cells synthesize autoinducer (AI) molecules, release them to the environment, and take them up. Thereby, the AI concentration reflects the cell density. When the AI concentration exceeds a critical threshold in the cells, the AI may activate the expression of virulence-associated genes or of luminescent proteins. It has been argued that targeting the QS system puts less selective pressure on these pathogens and should avoid the development of resistant bacteria. Therefore, the molecular components of QS systems have been suggested as promising targets for developing new anti-infective compounds. Here, we review the QS systems of selected gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, namely, Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and discuss various antivirulence strategies based on blocking different components of the QS machinery. PMID:26819549

  20. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: bacterial spores are transferred from a place of origin to a test surface, the test surface comprises lanthanide ions. Aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores; a complex of the lanthanide ions and aromatic molecules is formed on the test surface, the complex is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence on the test surface; the luminescence on the test surface is detected and quantified.

  1. Method and Apparatus for Detecting and Quantifying Bacterial Spores on a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: bacterial spores are transferred from a place of origin to a test surface, the test surface comprises lanthanide ions. Aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores; a complex of the lanthanide ions and aromatic molecules is formed on the test surface, the complex is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence on the test surface; the luminescence on the test surface is detected and quantified.

  2. Dating sediments using luminescence signals

    SciTech Connect

    Wintle, A. )

    1993-05-01

    Before siting a nuclear power station or a nuclear waste repository, it is necessary to establish that the area has been free of earthquake activity for a sufficient period of time. Evidence of past earthquake activity is often provided by faults in surface sediments. Age limits for fault formation can be set by obtaining the depositional ages of the sediment unit in which the fault was formed and the overlying sediment. A useful technique would be one that dating could be applied to the mineral grains that make up the sediments and that would give the time that has passed since the grains were blown or washed into position. Luminescence dating techniques, of which the most well known is thermo-luminescence (TL), provide such information. This approach has been successful in dating movement on the Wasatch Fault in Utah. A combination of TL and radiocarbon dates indicated that three faulting events had occurred within the past 5000 years. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  4. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Demas, J.N.; Goodwin, P.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Keller, R.A.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, M.

    1998-11-10

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region. 6 figs.

  5. Material for a luminescent solar concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A material for use in a luminescent solar concentrator, formed by ceramitizing the luminescent ion Cr/sup 3 +/ with a transparent ceramic glass containing mullite. The resultant material has tiny Cr/sup 3 +/-bearing crystallites dispersed uniformly through an amorphous glass. The invention combines the high luminescent efficiency of Cr/sup 3 +/ in the crystalline phase with the practical and economical advantages of glass technology.

  6. Biodiversity among luminescent symbionts from squid of the genera Uroteuthis, Loliolus and Euprymna (Mollusca: Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Ferreira, R C; Nishiguchi, M K

    2007-10-01

    Luminescent bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae (Bacteria: γ-Proteobacteria) are commonly found in complex, bilobed light organs of sepiolid and loliginid squids. Although morphology of these organs in both families of squid is similar, the species of bacteria that inhabit each host has yet to be verified. We utilized sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA, luciferase α-subunit (luxA) and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapA) genes to determine phylogenetic relationships between 63 strains of Vibrio bacteria, which included representatives from different environments as well as unidentified luminescent isolates from loliginid and sepiolid squid from Thailand. A combined phylogenetic analysis was used including biochemical data such as carbon use, growth and luminescence. Results demonstrated that certain symbiotic Thai isolates found in the same geographic area were included in a clade containing bacterial species phenotypically suitable to colonize light organs. Moreover, multiple strains isolated from a single squid host were identified as more than one bacteria species in our phylogeny. This research presents evidence of species of luminescent bacteria that have not been previously described as symbiotic strains colonizing light organs of Indo-West Pacific loliginid and sepiolid squids, and supports the hypothesis of a non-species-specific association between certain sepiolid and loliginid squids and marine luminescent bacteria.

  7. Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T.L.; Lee, K.T.

    2009-01-01

    Luminescence is typically described as light emitted by objects at low temperatures, induced by chemical reactions, electrical energy, atomic interactions, or acoustical and mechanical stress. An example is photoluminescence created when photons (electromagnetic radiation) strike a substance and are absorbed, resulting in the emission of a resonant fluorescent or phosphorescent albedo. In planetary science, there exists X-ray fluorescence induced by sunlight absorbed by a regolith a property used to measure some of the chemical composition of the Moon s surface during the Apollo program. However, there exists an equally important phenomenon in planetary science which will be designated here as photon luminescence. It is not conventional photoluminescence because the incoming radiation that strikes the planetary surface is not photons but rather cosmic rays (CRs). Nevertheless, the result is the same: the generation of a photon albedo. In particular, Galactic CRs (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) both induce a photon albedo that radiates from the surface of the Moon. Other particle albedos are generated as well, most of which are hazardous (e.g. neutrons). The photon luminescence or albedo of the lunar surface induced by GCRs and SEPs will be derived here, demonstrating that the Moon literally glows in the dark (when there is no sunlight or Earthshine). This extends earlier work on the same subject [1-4]. A side-by-side comparison of these two albedos and related mitigation measures will also be discussed.

  8. Luminescent barometry in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavandi, Janet; Callis, James; Gouterman, Martin; Khalil, Gamal; Wright, Daniel; Green, Edmond; Burns, David; Mclachlan, Blair

    1990-01-01

    A flexible and relatively inexpensive method and apparatus are described for continuous pressure mapping of aerodynamic surfaces using photoluminescence and imaging techniques. Platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) has a phosphorescence known to be quenched by oxygen. When dissolved in a silicone matrix, PtOEP may be distributed over a surface as a thin, uniform film. When the film is irradiated with ultraviolet light, the luminescence intensity provides a readily detectable, qualitative surface flow visualization. Moreover, since the luminescence intensity is found to be inversely proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen, a quantitative measure of pressure change may be obtained using a silicon target vidicon or a charge-coupled device video sensor to measure intensity. Luminescent images are captured by a commercial frame buffer board. Images taken in wind tunnels during airflow are ratioed to images taken under ambient 'wind-off' conditions. The resulting intensity ratio information is converted to pressure using calibration curves of I0/I vs p/p0, where I0 is the intensity at ambient pressure p0 and I is the intensity at any other pressure p.

  9. Luminescent detection of hydrazine and hydrazine derivatives

    DOEpatents

    Swager, Timothy M [Newton, MA; Thomas, III, Samuel W.

    2012-04-17

    The present invention generally relates to methods for modulating the optical properties of a luminescent polymer via interaction with a species (e.g., an analyte). In some cases, the present invention provides methods for determination of an analyte by monitoring a change in an optical signal of a luminescent polymer upon exposure to an analyte. Methods of the present invention may be useful for the vapor phase detection of analytes such as explosives and toxins. The present invention also provides methods for increasing the luminescence intensity of a polymer, such as a polymer that has been photobleached, by exposing the luminescent polymer to a species such as a reducing agent.

  10. Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2014-09-23

    An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

  11. Luminescence properties of a Fibonacci photonic quasicrystal.

    PubMed

    Passias, V; Valappil, N V; Shi, Z; Deych, L; Lisyansky, A A; Menon, V M

    2009-04-13

    An active one-dimensional Fibonacci photonic quasi-crystal is realized via spin coating. Luminescence properties of an organic dye embedded in the quasi-crystal are studied experimentally and compared to theoretical simulations. The luminescence occurs via the pseudo-bandedge mode and follows the dispersion properties of the Fibonacci crystal. Time resolved luminescence measurement of the active structure shows faster spontaneous emission rate, indicating the effect of the large photon densities available at the bandedge due to the presence of critically localized states. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations for steady-state luminescence spectra.

  12. Improving baculovirus recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuguang; Chapman, David A. G.; Jones, Ian M.

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses have established themselves as a favoured technology for the high-level expression of recombinant proteins. The construction of recombinant viruses, however, is a time consuming step that restricts consideration of the technology for high throughput developments. Here we use a targeted gene knockout technology to inactivate an essential viral gene that lies adjacent to the locus used for recombination. Viral DNA prepared from the knockout fails to initiate an infection unless rescued by recombination with a baculovirus transfer vector. Modified viral DNA allows 100% recombinant virus formation, obviates the need for further virus purification and offers an efficient means of mass parallel recombinant formation. PMID:12527795

  13. Detection of Bacillus endospores using total luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clint B.; Anderson, John E.; Webb, Stanley R.

    2004-09-01

    Detection and analysis of bacteria from environmental samples (e.g. water, air, and food) are usually accomplished by standard culture techniques or by analyses that target specific DNA sequences, antigens or chemicals. For large cell numbers in aqueous suspensions, an alternative technique that has proven useful is total luminescence spectroscopy (TLS). TLS is the acquisition of fluorescence data that records the unique excitation-emission matrix (EEM) of compound fluorophores. Past work has shown that one type of bacterial endospore, Bacillus megaterium, possessed a distinct EEM pattern useful for differentiating it in complex biological fluids and suspensions. The work described here extends those observations to establish some limits on the sensitivity and specificity of TLS for the detection and analysis of bacterial endospores versus (bacterial) vegetative cells in aqueous culture. Our findings show Bacillus endospores exhibit a dramatic blue shift of 130 nm in excitation and a smaller shift of 50 nm in emission when compared to ancillary endospore and non-endospore forming bacterial cells.

  14. The origin of white luminescence from silicon oxycarbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Nikas, V.; Gallis, S. Huang, M.; Kaloyeros, A. E.; Nguyen, A. P. D.; Stesmans, A.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2014-02-10

    Silicon oxycarbide (SiC{sub x}O{sub y}) is a promising material for achieving strong room-temperature white luminescence. The present work investigated the mechanisms for light emission in the visible/ultraviolet range (1.5–4.0 eV) from chemical vapor deposited amorphous SiC{sub x}O{sub y} thin films, using a combination of optical characterizations and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. Photoluminescence (PL) and EPR studies of samples, with and without post-deposition passivation in an oxygen and forming gas (H{sub 2} 5 at. % and N{sub 2} 95 at. %) ambient, ruled out typical structural defects in oxides, e.g., Si-related neutral oxygen vacancies or non-bridging oxygen hole centers, as the dominant mechanism for white luminescence from SiC{sub x}O{sub y}. The observed intense white luminescence (red, green, and blue emission) is believed to arise from the generation of photo-carriers by optical absorption through C-Si-O related electronic transitions, and the recombination of such carriers between bands and/or at band tail states. This assertion is based on the realization that the PL intensity dramatically increased at an excitation energy coinciding with the E{sub 04} band gaps of the material, as well as by the observed correlation between the Si-O-C bond density and the PL intensity. An additional mechanism for the existence of a blue component of the white emission is also discussed.

  15. Infrared negative luminescent devices and higher operating temperature detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, G. R.; Gordon, N. T.; Hall, D. J.; Ashby, M. K.; Little, J. C.; Masterton, G.; Hails, J. E.; Giess, J.; Haworth, L.; Emeny, M. T.; Ashley, T.

    2004-01-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a ‘source’ of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for, and non-uniformity correction of, high sensitivity staring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, infrared (IR) detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We present results on negative luminescence in the mid- and long-IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1 cm×1 cm. We also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very high-performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  16. Infrared negative luminescent devices and higher operating temperature detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Geoff R.; Gordon, Neil T.; Hall, David J.; Little, J. Chris; Masterton, G.; Hails, J. E.; Giess, J.; Haworth, L.; Emeny, Martin T.; Ashley, Tim

    2004-02-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a ‘source" of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for and non-uniformity correction of high sensitivity starring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, IR detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We will present results on negative luminescence in the mid and long IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1cm x 1cm. We will also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very higher performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  17. Infrared Negative Luminescent Devices and Higher Operating Temperature Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Tim

    2003-03-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a source' of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for and non-uniformity correction of high sensitivity starring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, IR detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We will present results on negative luminescence in the mid and long IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1cm x 1cm. We will also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very high performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  18. Spectral Characterization of a Novel Luminescent Organogel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waguespack, Yan; White, Shawn R.

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic-based luminescence experiments were designed to expose the students to various concepts of single-triplet excited states, electron spin, vibrational relaxation, fluorescence-phosphorescence lifetimes and quenching. The students were able to learn about luminescence spectra of the gel and have the experience of synthesizing a…

  19. Theoretical study of time-resolved luminescence in semiconductors. III. Trap states in the band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Maiberg, Matthias Hölscher, Torsten; Zahedi-Azad, Setareh; Scheer, Roland

    2015-09-14

    In the third part of this series, we study the influence of trap states in the band gap of semiconductors on the time-resolved luminescence decay (TRL) after a pulsed excitation. The results based on simulations with Synopsys TCAD{sup ®} and analytical approximations are given for p-doped Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} as a working example. We show that a single trap can be mostly described by two parameters which are assigned to minority carrier capture and emission. We analyze their influence on the luminescence decay and study the difference between a single trap and an energetic Gaussian trap distribution. It is found that trap states artificially increase the TRL decay and obscure the recombination dynamics. Thus, there is a demand for experimental methods which can reveal the recombination of minority carriers in a TRL experiment without trapping effect. In this regard, a variation of the device temperature, the excitation frequency, the injection level, as well as a bias illumination may be promising approaches. We study these methods, discuss advantages and disadvantages, and show experimental TRL for prove of concept. At the end, we validate our approach of simulating only band-to-band radiative recombination although photoluminescence spectra often exhibit free-to-bound radiative recombination of charge carriers.

  20. Luminescence of thermally altered human skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Krap, Tristan; Nota, Kevin; Wilk, Leah S; van de Goot, Franklin R W; Ruijter, Jan M; Duijst, Wilma; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2017-02-23

    Literature on luminescent properties of thermally altered human remains is scarce and contradictory. Therefore, the luminescence of heated bone was systemically reinvestigated. A heating experiment was conducted on fresh human bone, in two different media, and cremated human remains were recovered from a modern crematory. Luminescence was excited with light sources within the range of 350 to 560 nm. The excitation light was filtered out by using different long pass filters, and the luminescence was analysed by means of a scoring method. The results show that temperature, duration and surrounding medium determine the observed emission intensity and bandwidth. It is concluded that the luminescent characteristic of bone can be useful for identifying thermally altered human remains in a difficult context as well as yield information on the perimortem and postmortem events.

  1. Engineering nanoparticles to silence bacterial communication

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kristen P.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Yung-Pin; Pellechia, Perry J.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Decho, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    The alarming spread of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has warranted the study of alternative antimicrobial agents. Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical cell-to-cell communication mechanism utilized by bacteria to coordinate group behaviors and establish infections. QS is integral to bacterial survival, and therefore provides a unique target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, silicon dioxide nanoparticles (Si-NP) were engineered to target the signaling molecules [i.e., acylhomoserine lactones (HSLs)] used for QS in order to halt bacterial communication. Specifically, when Si-NP were surface functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), then added to cultures of bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), whose luminous output depends upon HSL-mediated QS, the cell-to-cell communication was dramatically reduced. Reductions in luminescence were further verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses of luminescence genes. Binding of HSLs to Si-NPs was examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicated that by delivering high concentrations of engineered NPs with associated quenching compounds, the chemical signals were removed from the immediate bacterial environment. In actively-metabolizing cultures, this treatment blocked the ability of bacteria to communicate and regulate QS, effectively silencing and isolating the cells. Si-NPs provide a scaffold and critical stepping-stone for more pointed developments in antimicrobial therapy, especially with regard to QS—a target that will reduce resistance pressures imposed by traditional antibiotics. PMID:25806030

  2. Luminescent gold nanoparticles for bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen

    Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable and diverse material properties hold great potential as contrast agents for better disease management. Over the past decades, luminescent gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with intrinsic emissions ranging from the visible to the near infrared have been synthesized and emerge as a new class of fluorophores for bioimaging. This dissertation aims to fundamentally understand the structure-property relationships in luminescent AuNPs and apply them as contrast agents to address some critical challenges in bioimaging at both the in vitro and in vivo level. In Chapter 2, we described the synthesized ~20 nm polycrystalline AuNPs (pAuNPs), which successfully integrated and enhanced plasmonic and fluorescence properties into a single AuNP through the grain size effect. The combination of these properties in one NP enabled AuNPs to serve as a multimodal contrast agent for in vitro optical microscopic imaging, making it possible to develop correlative microscopic imaging techniques. In Chapters 3-5, we proposed a feasible approach to optimize the in vivo kinetics and clearance profile of nanoprobes for multimodality in vivo bioimaging applications by using straightforward surface chemistry with luminescent AuNPs as a model. Luminescent glutathione-coated AuNPs of ~2 nm were synthesized. Investigation of the biodistribution showed that these glutathione-coated AuNPs (GS-AuNPs) exhibit stealthiness to the reticuloendothelial system (RES) organs and efficient renal clearance, with only 3.7+/-1.9% and 0.3+/-0.1% accumulating in the liver and spleen, and over 65% of the injection dose cleared out via the urine within the first 72 hours. In addition, ~2.5 nm NIR-emitting radioactive glutathione-coated [198Au]AuNPs (GS-[198Au]AuNPs) were synthesized for further evaluation of the pharmacokinetic profile of GS-AuNPs and potential multimodal imaging. The results showed that the GS-[198Au]AuNPs behave like small-molecule contrast agents in

  3. Enhanced photocatalytic activity and persistent luminescence in Zn2GeO4:Mn2+ by Eu3+ doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Wang, Yinhai; Li, Lei; Huang, Haiju; Zhao, Hui; Hu, Zhengfa

    2016-09-01

    Zn2GeO4:Mn2+,Eu3+ and Zn2GeO4:Mn2+ powders were synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the structures and morphologies of the synthesized powders, respectively. The photocatalytic properties and long persistent luminescence performance were improved by Eu3+ doping. Thermoluminescent (TL) curves showed that the trap concentration in the material was increased with Eu3+ doping, which formed trap centers in Zn2GeO4:Mn2+. The trap centers can capture the electrons or holes and subsequently increase the separation of photogenerated electrons and holes by suppressing the recombination of captured electrons and holes; thus, resulting in an improved photocatalytic activity and a prolonged persistent luminescence. The present strategy may be used as a general method to improve the photocatalytic activity and persistent luminescence.

  4. Acid synthesis of luminescent amine-functionalized or erbium-doped silica spheres for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Enrichi, Francesco; Trave, Enrico; Bersani, Marco

    2008-03-01

    In this work we discuss and investigate the morphological and optical properties of luminescent silica spheres which can have interesting applications in bioimaging and biosensing. The spheres are synthesized following an acid route by the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylortosilicate (TEOS) and can be functionalized by incorporation of aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) during the synthesis, inducing a significant luminescence that can be attributed to a recombination mechanism from localized organic defects related to -NH(2) groups. It is shown that the acid synthesis route produces very regular spherical particles, but their diameter vary in the range of 200-4,000 nm. The luminescence properties have been investigated and optimized by variation of the annealing temperature for the functionalized spheres, obtaining the most efficient PL emission after a thermal treatment of 1 h at 600 degrees C in air. Moreover, the possibility to introduce rare earths like erbium in the spheres was also studied and the corresponding Er(3) luminescence emission at 1.53 microm is reported in terms of intensity and lifetime, pointing out that erbium can be easily and efficiently incorporated during the acid synthesis giving high PL intensity with a good lifetime of 3.9 ms.

  5. Luminescent proteins from Aequorea victoria: applications in drug discovery and in high throughput analysis.

    PubMed

    Deo, S K; Daunert, S

    2001-02-01

    Recent progress in generating a vast number of drug targets through genomics and large compound libraries through combinatorial chemistry have stimulated advancements in drug discovery through the development of new high throughput screening (HTS) methods. Automation and HTS techniques are also highly desired in fields such as clinical diagnostics. Luminescence-based assays have emerged as an alternative to radiolabel-based assays in HTS as they approach the sensitivity of radioactive detection along with ease of operation, which makes them amenable to miniaturization. Luminescent proteins provide the advantage of reduced reagent and operating costs because they can be produced in unlimited amounts through the use of genetic engineering tools. In that regard, the use of two naturally occurring and recombinantly produced luminescent proteins from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, namely, aequorin and the green fluorescent protein (GFP), has attracted attention in a number of analytical applications in diverse research areas. Aequorin is naturally bioluminescent and has therefore, virtually no associated background signal, which allows its detection down to attomole levels. GFP has become the reporter of choice in a variety of applications given that it is an autofluorescent protein that does not require addition of any co-factors for fluorescence emission. Furthermore, the generation of various mutants of GFP with differing luminescent and spectral properties has spurred additional interest in this protein. In this review, we focus on the use of aequorin and GFP in the development of highly sensitive assays that find applications in drug discovery and in high throughput analysis.

  6. Bacterial Tracheitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a complication of croup (see Croup ) or endotracheal intubation (insertion of a plastic breathing tube through the ... irregularities that distinguish bacterial tracheitis from croup. Treatment Endotracheal intubation Antibiotics With treatment, most children recover completely. Very ...

  7. Uranocircite: luminescence and crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Matkovskiy, A.O.; Sidorenko, G.A.; Tarashchan, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    A study on the determination of the complex structure of the electron-vibration spectra and the elucidation of their relation to crystallochemical factors in uranocircite is presented. The work was performed on samples from zones of a single crystal of the same natural meta-uranocircite, differing in color, and also on other specimens from various Soviet and foreign deposits. Of the 15 meta-uranocircite specimens investigated, in 14 cases the luminescence spectra were homoypic and were a series of equidistant groups of lines of the fine structure; the spectral position of which was practically constant for all the specimens. The degree of hydration was found to have practically no influence on the luminescence of the meta-uranocircite. The investigation supports the supposition that there are marked differences in the structures of minerals of the uran-mica group, although in the authors' opinion, the mechanism itself of multi-center radiation is universal and manifested for all secondary uranium minerals. (JMT)

  8. [Luminescence characteristics of PVK doped with Ir(ppy)3].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao-Peng; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Zhao, Su-Ling; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Yang, Ya-Ru; Li, Qing; Pang, Xue-Xia

    2008-03-01

    With the increasing development of organic light emitting devices (OLED), interest in the mechanisms of charge carrier photogeneration, separation, transport and recombination continues to grow. Electromodulation of photoluminescence has been used as an efficient probe to investigate the evolution of primary excitation in all electric field. This method can provide useful information on carrier photogeneration, the formation and dissociation of excitons, energy transfer, and exciton recombination in the presence of electric field. The operation of OLED brings electrons and holes from opposite electrodes and generates singlet and triplet excitons. However, triplet excitons are wasted because a radiative transition from triplets is spin-forbidden. Spin statistics predicts that singlet-to-triplet ratio is 1 : 3 in organic semiconductors. One way to harvest light from triplet excitons is to use phosphorescent materials. These materials incorporate a heavy metal atom to mix singlet and triplet states by the strong spin-orbit coupling. As a result, a spin forbidden transition may occur allowing an enhanced triplet emission. Among phosphorescent materials, Ir(ppy)3 has attracted much attention because of its short triplet lifetime to minimize the triplet-triplet annihilation. High quantum efficiencies have been obtained by doping organic molecules and in polymers with Ir(ppy)3. In the present paper, the photoluminescence and electroluminescence spectra of Ir(ppy)3 doped PVK film are measured at room temperature. The device structure is ITO/PEDOT : PSS/PVK Ir(ppy)3/BCP/Alq3/Al. The results show that the luminescence capabilities of devices are different when the concentration of Ir(ppy)3 is different. When the concentration of Ir(ppy)3 is suitable, the luminescence of PVK is lower but that of Ir(ppy)3 is stronger relatively, indicating that the energy transfer from the host materials to the guest materials is sufficient. It is concluded that the device with 5% of Ir(ppy)3

  9. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  10. Development of luminescent bacteria as tracers for geological reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    Bioluminescent cultures were acquired and tested for use as biological tracers for reservoir characterization by small independent oil companies. Initially these bacterial cultures were fastidious to work with, but when we finally determined their critical growth parameters simple test variations were developed that could be routinely accomplished. The intensity of their luminescence is easily distinguished by the human eye and requires no sophisticated technical knowledge or instrumentation. Cultures were received from culture banks and collected from marine environments. In our laboratory they were screened using the criteria of optimum growth and luminescence. Three stock cultures proved to grow profusely even when variations were made in nutrient additions, salts, and temperature. These three selected cultures were not inhibited when introduced to formations and formation waters and were not overgrown by other bacteria. Cultures isolated from the Gulf of Mexico were overgrown by indigenous bacteria and therefore, they were eliminated from further screening and adaption. Experiments were performed according to three major task descriptions: 1. Establish growth and luminescencing limitations of selected bacteria in various media, varying salt concentration and temperature. 2. Adapt cultures to formation waters. 3. Determine transport limitations of bioluminescent bacteria through representative reservoir cores. 19 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Luminescent spectroscopy of dry tailings urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyi, Olexander; Bordun, Oleg; Yarynovska, Ivanna

    2006-05-01

    In the work the results of research of luminescent spectrums by photo excitation in the interval of waves lengths 250 - 550 nm and ofluminescent spectrums by the nitric laser (337,1 mn) excitation ofdiy tailings urinaryby the temperature of 300 °K are represented. In the spectral interval of 400 - 800 nm a wide bar of luminescence, intensity of which depends on the type of excitation. was observed. It is set, that presence of salts with oxalate, urate and phosphatic compositions in urine results in the move of maximum of luniinescent spectrums in the long-wave region of spectrum and changes the intensity of luminescence. The possible mechanisms of the observed changes in the spectrums of luminescence of dry urine tailings are examined in the work. The model of recombrnational processes which describe the looked luminescent processes is offered. Possible explanations of the looked features in the spectrums of luminescence combine with luminescence of nanobiological complexes, inorganic salts, urea and natural proteins enter in composition of which.

  12. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  13. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuto, H. Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.; Musumeci, F.

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  14. Energy conversion modeling of the intrinsic persistent luminescence of solids via energy transfer paths between transition levels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bolong; Sun, Mingzi

    2017-04-05

    An energy conversion model has been established for the intrinsic persistent luminescence in solids related to the native point defect levels, formations, and transitions. In this study, we showed how the recombination of charge carriers between different defect levels along the zero phonon line (ZPL) can lead to energy conversions supporting the intrinsic persistent phosphorescence in solids. This suggests that the key driving force for this optical phenomenon is the pair of electrons hopping between different charged defects with negative-Ueff. Such a negative correlation energy will provide a sustainable energy source for electron-holes to further recombine in a new cycle with a specific quantum yield. This will help us to understand the intrinsic persistent luminescence with respect to native point defect levels as well as the correlations of electronics and energetics.

  15. Bacterial rheotaxis.

    PubMed

    Marcos; Fu, Henry C; Powers, Thomas R; Stocker, Roman

    2012-03-27

    The motility of organisms is often directed in response to environmental stimuli. Rheotaxis is the directed movement resulting from fluid velocity gradients, long studied in fish, aquatic invertebrates, and spermatozoa. Using carefully controlled microfluidic flows, we show that rheotaxis also occurs in bacteria. Excellent quantitative agreement between experiments with Bacillus subtilis and a mathematical model reveals that bacterial rheotaxis is a purely physical phenomenon, in contrast to fish rheotaxis but in the same way as sperm rheotaxis. This previously unrecognized bacterial taxis results from a subtle interplay between velocity gradients and the helical shape of flagella, which together generate a torque that alters a bacterium's swimming direction. Because this torque is independent of the presence of a nearby surface, bacterial rheotaxis is not limited to the immediate neighborhood of liquid-solid interfaces, but also takes place in the bulk fluid. We predict that rheotaxis occurs in a wide range of bacterial habitats, from the natural environment to the human body, and can interfere with chemotaxis, suggesting that the fitness benefit conferred by bacterial motility may be sharply reduced in some hydrodynamic conditions.

  16. Studying bacterial quorum-sensing at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino Perez, Pablo; Pelakh, Leslie; Young, Jonathan; Johnson, Elaine; Hagen, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    Like many bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri can detect its own population density through a quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The bacterium releases a signal molecule (AI, autoinducer), which accumulates at high population density and triggers a genetic switch. In V.fischeri this leads to bioluminescence. Little is known about how stochastic gene expression affects QS at the level of single cells. We are imaging the luminescence of individual V.fischeri cells in a flow chamber and directly measuring the intercell variability in AI activation of the QS circuit. Our single-cell luminescence experiments allow us to track cells over time and characterize variations in their response to AI levels. We find heterogeneous response to the external signal: at a given AI concentration some cells may be strongly luminescent while others are virtually dark. The analysis of noise in the individual cell response can eventually lead to a better understanding of how cells use QS to gather information about their environment.

  17. Experimental setup for camera-based measurements of electrically and optically stimulated luminescence of silicon solar cells and wafers.

    PubMed

    Hinken, David; Schinke, Carsten; Herlufsen, Sandra; Schmidt, Arne; Bothe, Karsten; Brendel, Rolf

    2011-03-01

    We report in detail on the luminescence imaging setup developed within the last years in our laboratory. In this setup, the luminescence emission of silicon solar cells or silicon wafers is analyzed quantitatively. Charge carriers are excited electrically (electroluminescence) using a power supply for carrier injection or optically (photoluminescence) using a laser as illumination source. The luminescence emission arising from the radiative recombination of the stimulated charge carriers is measured spatially resolved using a camera. We give details of the various components including cameras, optical filters for electro- and photo-luminescence, the semiconductor laser and the four-quadrant power supply. We compare a silicon charged-coupled device (CCD) camera with a back-illuminated silicon CCD camera comprising an electron multiplier gain and a complementary metal oxide semiconductor indium gallium arsenide camera. For the detection of the luminescence emission of silicon we analyze the dominant noise sources along with the signal-to-noise ratio of all three cameras at different operation conditions.

  18. Cell probing by delayed luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, Francesco; Ballerini, Monica; Baroni, Giuliana; Costato, Michele; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Milani, Marziale; Scordino, Agata; Triglia, Antonio

    1999-05-01

    Delayed luminescence (D.L.) is a measure that provides important information on biological systems fields, structures and activities, by counting impinging and emitted photons. Many recent experimental works have shown the existence of a close connection, sometimes analytically expressed between the biological state of the system and D.L. parameters. Our investigations aim to show that D.L. is a workable analytical technique covering a large number of disciplinary fields, from agriculture to pollution control and from medical diagnostics to food quality control. The authors have conducted systematic research about D.L. from unicellular alga Acetabularia acetabulum to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cultures and about more complex systems such as Soya seed (Glycine max, L.) and its dependence on sample preparation, history, intracellular signaling, metabolism and pollutant presence. We will discuss the most relevant results together with theoretical considerations on the basic interaction at work between biological systems and electromagnetic fields.

  19. Nanocrystals for luminescent solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Liam R; Knowles, Kathryn E; McDowall, Stephen; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-02-11

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) harvest sunlight over large areas and concentrate this energy onto photovoltaics or for other uses by transporting photons through macroscopic waveguides. Although attractive for lowering solar energy costs, LSCs remain severely limited by luminophore reabsorption losses. Here, we report a quantitative comparison of four types of nanocrystal (NC) phosphors recently proposed to minimize reabsorption in large-scale LSCs: two nanocrystal heterostructures and two doped nanocrystals. Experimental and numerical analyses both show that even the small core absorption of the leading NC heterostructures causes major reabsorption losses at relatively short transport lengths. Doped NCs outperform the heterostructures substantially in this critical property. A new LSC phosphor is introduced, nanocrystalline Cd(1-x)Cu(x)Se, that outperforms all other leading NCs by a significant margin in both small- and large-scale LSCs under full-spectrum conditions.

  20. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  1. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  2. Highly sensitive nonlinear luminescent ceramics for volumetric and multilayer data carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Martynovich, E F; Dresvyanskiy, V P; Voitovich, A P; Bagayev, S N

    2015-10-31

    The interaction of optical ceramics based on wide-bandgap crystals with near-IR femtosecond laser radiation is studied experimentally. The formation of luminescent centres in LiF and MgF{sub 2} ceramics under the action of single laser pulses is considered. Two interaction regimes are used. In the regime of low-aperture focusing of laser radiation (800 nm, 30 fs, 0.3 mJ), multiple selffocusing and filamentation in the samples are observed. The luminescent centres are formed in thin channels induced by light filaments. The average effective self-focusing length is ∼100 μm; the formation of luminescent centres begins at this length and ceases at a wavelength of about 380 mm. The luminescent trace (spur) induced by a single laser filament was ∼30 μm long and 1.3 μm in diameter. The second regime of light interaction with the sample was based on high-aperture focusing with a simultaneous decrease in the laser pulse energy. This led to the formation of single pits with a diameter smaller than the optical diffraction limit. The luminescent centres induced by the laser radiation were aggregated colour centres. The mechanism of their creation included the highly-nonlinear generation of electron – hole pairs in the filamentation region, their recombination with the formation of anion excitons and the decay of excitons into Fresnel defects by the Lushchik – Vitol – Hersh – Pooley mechanism, as well as their recharging, migration and aggregation. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Automated Sample Deoxygenation for Improved Luminescence Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-25

    fET-AY4 732 AUTOMATED SAMPLE DEOXYGENATION FOR IMPROVED LUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS U) EMORY UNIV RTLANTA GA DEPT OF CHEMISTRY M E ROLLIE ET AL 25 NOV... Deoxygenation for Improved Luminescence Measurements 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) | ,Rollie, M.E.; Patonay, Gabor; and Warner, Isiah M. A .3a. TYPE OF REPORT...GROUP ISU*GRO P ,,,uminescence Spectroscopy; Fluorescence Analysis,* Room *f Temperature Phosphorescence; Deoxygenation ; Quenching ISTRACT (Continue on

  4. Luminescence conversion of blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlotter, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN/6HSiC chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white emitting LEDs. The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence down-conversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic luminescent dye molecules. A white emitting LED, using an inorganic converter, Y3Al5O12:Ce3+( ), has also been realized.

  5. Persistent luminescence in Ba{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl:Eu{sup 2+},R{sup 3+} (R = Y, La, Ce, Gd, Tb and Lu)

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Guifang; Hu, Yihua Chen, Li; Wang, Xiaojuan; Mu, Zhongfei

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The persistent luminescence in Ba{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl:Eu{sup 2+},R{sup 3+} was reported. • The influences of auxiliary codopants was discussed. • The concentration quenching of persistent luminescence was discussed. - Abstract: We investigated the persistent luminescence in europium-doped barium chloroapatite upon codoping with auxiliary rare earth ions. Luminescence properties of the phosphors, including photoluminescence, luminescence decay, and thermoluminescence are systematically studied. We formulated a model of persistent luminescence on the basis of the experimental results. In our model, some Eu{sup 2+} ions are oxidized to Eu{sup 3+} under short UV excitation, and the released electrons are trapped at the positive defect. The persistent luminescence arises from the recombination of these trapped electrons with the photo-ionized Eu{sup 3+} ions. The influence of auxiliary codopants was discussed in terms of ionic potential and ionic radius. Eventually, the concentration quenching of persistent luminescence was reported and discussed.

  6. Selected topics from classical bacterial genetics.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, Elisabeth A; Elbing, Karen; Brent, Roger

    2002-08-01

    Current cloning technology exploits many facts learned from classical bacterial genetics. This unit covers those that are critical to understanding the techniques described in this book. Topics include antibiotics, the LAC operon, the F factor, nonsense suppressors, genetic markers, genotype and phenotype, DNA restriction, modification and methylation and recombination.

  7. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-08-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 {+-} 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO{sub 4} at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. Studies on the effect of added LiNO{sub 3} or Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF{sub 6} content of WF{sub 6} gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF{sub 6}.

  8. A biosensor for environmental genotoxin screening based on an SOS lux assay in recombinant Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Ptitsyn, L R; Horneck, G; Komova, O; Kozubek, S; Krasavin, E A; Bonev, M; Rettberg, P

    1997-11-01

    A genetically controlled luminescent bacterial reporter assay, the SOS lux test, was developed for rapid detection of environmental genotoxins. The bioassay is based on the recombinant plasmid pPLS-1, which was constructed as a derivative of pBR322, carrying the promoterless luxCDABFE genes of Photobacterium leiognathi downstream of a truncated cda gene from ColD with a strong SOS promoter. E. coli recA+ strains containing this construction are inducible to high levels of light production in the presence of substances or agents that cause damage to the DNA of the cells. The light signal, reflecting the SOS-inducing potency, is recorded from the growing culture within 1 s, and the test results are available within 1 to 2 h. Induction of bioluminescence was demonstrated by treatment of E. coli C600(pPLS-1) with 6 genotoxic chemicals (mitomycin C, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, nalidixic acid, dimethylsulfate, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde) and with UV and gamma radiation. A clear dose-response relationship was established for all eight genotoxins. The sensitivity of the SOS lux test is similar to that of other bioassays for genotoxicity or mutagenicity, such as the SOS chromotest, umu test, and Ames mutatest. These results indicate that the SOS lux test is potentially useful for the in situ and continuous detection of genotoxins.

  9. A biosensor for environmental genotoxin screening based on an SOS lux assay in recombinant Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ptitsyn, L R; Horneck, G; Komova, O; Kozubek, S; Krasavin, E A; Bonev, M; Rettberg, P

    1997-01-01

    A genetically controlled luminescent bacterial reporter assay, the SOS lux test, was developed for rapid detection of environmental genotoxins. The bioassay is based on the recombinant plasmid pPLS-1, which was constructed as a derivative of pBR322, carrying the promoterless luxCDABFE genes of Photobacterium leiognathi downstream of a truncated cda gene from ColD with a strong SOS promoter. E. coli recA+ strains containing this construction are inducible to high levels of light production in the presence of substances or agents that cause damage to the DNA of the cells. The light signal, reflecting the SOS-inducing potency, is recorded from the growing culture within 1 s, and the test results are available within 1 to 2 h. Induction of bioluminescence was demonstrated by treatment of E. coli C600(pPLS-1) with 6 genotoxic chemicals (mitomycin C, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, nalidixic acid, dimethylsulfate, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde) and with UV and gamma radiation. A clear dose-response relationship was established for all eight genotoxins. The sensitivity of the SOS lux test is similar to that of other bioassays for genotoxicity or mutagenicity, such as the SOS chromotest, umu test, and Ames mutatest. These results indicate that the SOS lux test is potentially useful for the in situ and continuous detection of genotoxins. PMID:9361425

  10. Recombination Dynamics in Quantum Well Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquet, Julie Elizabeth

    Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence as a function of excitation energy density have been observed in order to study recombination dynamics in GaAs/Al(,x)Ga(,1 -x)As quantum well structures. The study of room temperature photoluminescence from the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) -grown multiple quantum well structure and photoluminescence peak energy as a function of tem- perature shows that room temperature recombination at excitation densities above the low 10('16) cm('-3) level is due to free carriers, not excitons. This is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of impurities in quantum wells; data taken at different emission wave- lengths at low temperatures shows that the impurity-related states at photon energies lower than the free exciton peaks luminesce much more slowly than the free exciton states. Results from a similar structure grown by metal -organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) are explained by saturation of traps. An unusual increase in decay rate observed tens of nanoseconds after excitation is probably due to carriers falling out of the trap states. Since this is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of MOCVD-grown quantum well structures, this unusual behavior may be realted to the MOCVD growth process. Further investigations indi- cate that the traps are not active at low temperatures; they become active at approximately 150 K. The traps are probably associated with the (hetero)interfaces rather than the bulk Al(,x)Ga(,1-x)As material. The 34 K photoluminescence spectrum of this sample revealed a peak shifted down by approximately 36 meV from the main peak. Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence results here show that this peak is not a stimulated phonon emission sideband, but rather is an due to an acceptor impurity, probably carbon. Photo- luminescence for excitation above and below the barrier bandgap shows that carriers are efficiently collected in the wells in both single and multiple

  11. Bacterial Inclusion Bodies: Discovering Their Better Half.

    PubMed

    Rinas, Ursula; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Corchero, José Luis; Vázquez, Esther; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Villaverde, Antonio

    2017-02-26

    Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) are functional, non-toxic amyloids occurring in recombinant bacteria showing analogies with secretory granules of the mammalian endocrine system. The scientific interest in these mesoscale protein aggregates has been historically masked by their status as a hurdle in recombinant protein production. However, progressive understanding of how the cell handles the quality of recombinant polypeptides and the main features of their intriguing molecular organization has stimulated the interest in inclusion bodies and spurred their use in diverse technological fields. The engineering and tailoring of IBs as functional protein particles for materials science and biomedicine is a good example of how formerly undesired bacterial byproducts can be rediscovered as promising functional materials for a broad spectrum of applications.

  12. Direct facile screening of recombinant DNA vector constructs.

    PubMed

    Winnard, Paul T; Challa, Rushi; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Raman, Venu

    2014-04-01

    Direct efficient facile screening of bacterial transformants with the goal of selecting, retrieving, and using recombinant DNA is exemplified by simple visual-based colorimetric inspections or fluorescent protein-based assays. We describe pRedScript, which introduces the constitutive expression of a very bright red fluorescent protein into transformants. On agar plates, red colonies are simply visualized in ambient white light in stark contrast to recombinant transformants that are white. In addition, the bright red fluorescence of the reporter protein can also be harnessed as a sensitive signal for screening bacterial promoters during the development of optimized fermentation conditions.

  13. A thermo-responsive supramolecular organogel: dual luminescence properties and luminescence conversion induced by Cd(2+).

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinxian; Zhang, Jinjin; Tang, Ning; Wu, Jincai

    2014-12-14

    A simple dual luminescent acylhydrazone-functionalized benzimidazole derivative (L) was blended with ethylene glycol affording a thermo-responsive green-light-emitting supramolecular gel (G-gel). This G-gel can convert to a blue-light-emitting gel (B-gel) by strongly increasing the luminescence of the benzimidazole moiety upon addition of one equivalent of Cd(2+).

  14. An activatable, polarity dependent, dual-luminescent imaging agent with a long luminescence lifetime.

    PubMed

    Rood, Marcus T M; Oikonomou, Maria; Buckle, Tessa; Raspe, Marcel; Urano, Yasuteru; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2014-09-04

    In this proof-of-concept study, a new activatable imaging agent based on two luminophores and two different quenching mechanisms is reported. Both partial and total activation of the luminescence signal can be achieved, either in solution or in vitro. Bond cleavage makes the compound suitable for luminescence lifetime imaging.

  15. Zn vacancy induced green luminescence on non-polar surfaces in ZnO nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, F.; Villani, M.; Catellani, A.; Calzolari, A.; Cicero, G.; Calestani, D.; Calestani, G.; Zappettini, A.; Dierre, B.; Sekiguchi, T.; Salviati, G.

    2014-01-01

    Although generally ascribed to the presence of defects, an ultimate assignment of the different contributions to the emission spectrum in terms of surface states and deep levels in ZnO nanostructures is still lacking. In this work we unambiguously give first evidence that zinc vacancies at the (1010) nonpolar surfaces are responsible for the green luminescence of ZnO nanostructures. The result is obtained by performing an exhaustive comparison between spatially resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and imaging and ab initio simulations. Our findings are crucial to control undesired recombinations in nanostructured devices. PMID:24894901

  16. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  17. Natural competence and recombination in the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Kung, Stephanie H; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2011-08-01

    Homologous recombination is one of many forces contributing to the diversity, adaptation, and emergence of pathogens. For naturally competent bacteria, transformation is one possible route for the acquisition of novel genetic material. This study demonstrates that Xylella fastidiosa, a generalist bacterial plant pathogen responsible for many emerging plant diseases, is naturally competent and able to homologously recombine exogenous DNA into its genome. Several factors that affect transformation and recombination efficiencies, such as nutrient availability, growth stage, and methylation of transforming DNA, were identified. Recombination was observed in at least one out of every 10(6) cells when exogenous plasmid DNA was supplied and one out of every 10(7) cells when different strains were grown together in vitro. Based on previous genomic studies and experimental data presented here, there is mounting evidence that recombination can occur at relatively high rates and could play a large role in shaping the genetic diversity of X. fastidiosa.

  18. Luminescent tetrametallic complexes of ruthenium

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.R. Jr.; Brewer, K.J.; Gettliffe, G.; Petersen, J.D. )

    1989-01-11

    Tetrametallic complexes constructed around the metal core Ru(dpp){sub 3}{sup 2+} (where dpp = 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine) have been prepared and characterized. The complexes, which have the general formula Ru((dpp)ML{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup n+}, where ML{sub 2} = Ru{sup II}(bpy){sub 2} (n = 8), Ru{sup II}(phen){sub 2} (n = 8), and Ru{sup II}(tpy)Cl (n = 5) and bpy = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, and tpy = 2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double prime}-terpyridine, are prepared from the reaction of Ru(dpp){sub 3}{sup 2+} with ML{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} in ethanol/water. The tetrametallic complexes luminesce at room temperature in acetonitrile with emissions characteristic of a single ruthenium center with excited-state lifetimes in the 100-ns range. Electrochemically, the most facile reductions occur at the dpp ligand, and the lower energy oxidation is a single peak associated with the three peripheral ruthenium centers. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Monitoring Temperatures of Tires Using Luminescent Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J

    2006-01-01

    A method of noncontact, optical monitoring of the surface temperature of a tire has been devised to enable the use of local temperature rise as an indication of potential or impending failures. The method involves the use of temperature-sensitive paint (or filler): Temperature-sensitive luminescent dye molecules or other luminescent particles are incorporated into a thin, flexible material coating the tire surface of interest. (Alternatively, in principle, the luminescent material could be incorporated directly into the tire rubber, though this approach has not yet been tested.) The coated surface is illuminated with shorter-wavelength light to excite longer-wavelength luminescence, which is observed by use of a charge-coupled-device camera or a photodetector (see Figure 1). If temporally constant illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the intensity response of the luminescence. If pulsed illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the time or frequency response of the luminescence. If sinusoidally varying illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the phase response of the luminescence. Unlike a prior method of monitoring the temperature at a fixed spot on a tire by use of a thermocouple, this method is not restricted to one spot and can, therefore, yield information on the spatial distribution of temperature: in particular, it enables the discovery of newly forming hot spots where damage may be starting. Also unlike in the thermocouple method, the measurements in this method are not vulnerable to breakage of wires in repeated flexing of the tire. Moreover, unlike in another method in which infrared radiation is monitored as an indication of surface temperature, the luminescence measurements in this method are not significantly affected by changes in infrared emissivity. This method has been

  20. An improved recombineering approach by adding RecA to lambda Red recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Sarov, Mihail; Rientjes, Jeanette; Fu, Jun; Hollak, Heike; Kranz, Harald; Xie, Wei; Stewart, A Francis; Zhang, Youming

    2006-01-01

    Recombineering is the use of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli for DNA engineering. Of several approaches, use of the lambda phage Red operon is emerging as the most reliable and flexible. The Red operon includes three components: Redalpha, a 5' to 3' exonuclease, Redbeta, an annealing protein, and Redgamma, an inhibitor of the major E. coli exonuclease and recombination complex, RecBCD. Most E. coli cloning hosts are recA deficient to eliminate recombination and therefore enhance the stability of cloned DNAs. However, loss of RecA also impairs general cellular integrity. Here we report that transient RecA co-expression enhances the total number of successful recombinations in bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), mostly because the E. coli host is more able to survive the stresses of DNA transformation procedures. We combined this practical improvement with the advantages of a temperature-sensitive version of the low copy pSC101 plasmid to develop a protocol that is convenient and more efficient than any recombineering procedure, for use of either double- or single-stranded DNA, published to date.

  1. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  2. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  3. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  4. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  5. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  6. Effect of irradiation and thermal annealing on quartz materials luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovkin, M. V.; Ananyeva, L. G.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray and gamma-quanta irradiation of radiation-resistant quartz materials including natural and synthetic quartz crystals and high-purity quartzite causes the luminescence in the ultraviolet range (365 nm), thermally stimulated luminescence and radiofrequency electromagnetic emission. Preliminary radiation and thermal annealing improves luminescence properties of quartz materials.

  7. Order and disorder around Cr(3+) in chromium doped persistent luminescent AB2O4 spinels.

    PubMed

    Basavaraju, Neelima; Priolkar, Kaustubh R; Gourier, Didier; Bessière, Aurélie; Viana, Bruno

    2015-04-28

    The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy technique is used to better understand the charging and decharging processes of the persistent luminescence in the Cr(3+)doped AB2O4 spinels (A = Zn, Mg and B = Ga and Al) with low photon energy excitation by visible light. Cr K edge XANES spectra have been simulated for different near neighbour environments around the Cr(3+) recombination centres and compared with the experimental curve. In the Cr(3+):ZnGa2O4 compound, the Cr(3+) local structure corresponds mostly to that of a normal spinel (∼70%), while the rest comprises of a distorted octahedral environment arising from cationic site inversion and a contribution from chromium clustering. This local structure is considerably different in Cr(3+):MgGa2O4 and Cr(3+):ZnAl2O4, where, for both cases, chromium clustering represents the main contribution. The strong correlation between the intensity of persistent luminescence and the percentage of Cr in clusters leads us to infer that the presence of Cr clusters is responsible for the decrease of the intensity of the visible light induced persistent luminescence in the Cr(3+) doped AB2O4 spinels.

  8. Luminescence of europium (III) complexes for visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolontaeva, Olga A.; Pozharov, Mikhail V.; Korolovich, Vladimir F.; Khokhlova, Anastasia R.; Kirdyanova, Anna N.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.; Zakharova, Tamara V.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-04-01

    With the purpose to develop bright non-toxic luminescent label for theranostic application we have studied complexation of lanthanide dipicolinates (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylates) by sodium alginate and effect of thermal exposure of synthesized micro-capsules on their luminescent properties. Synthesized micro-capsules are stable in acidic medium but dissolve at pH ~ 4 due to transformation of cationic europium dipicolinate complex to anionic. Luminescence studies have shown that emission spectra of europium(III)-alginate complexes (both chloride and dipicolinate) contain two intensive bands characteristic to Eu3+ ion (5D0 --> 7F1 (590 nm) and 5D0 --> 7F1 (612 nm)). We have also found that at 160ºC europium(III)- alginate micro-capsules decompose to black, soot-like substance, therefore, their thermal treatment must be performed in closed environment (i.e., sealed ampoules).

  9. Dual Luminescence Imaging for Two Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaue, Hirotaka; Morita, Katsuaki

    2016-11-01

    Dual luminescence imaging gives time-resolved information of fluid dynamic phenomena. It uses two luminescent probes; one is sensitive to the detecting medium and the other as a reference. It is a non-intrusive technique, and both luminescent outputs are captured by a high-speed color camera as color-filtered images. By taking a ratio of the two images at the same time frame, this imaging technique can give time-resolved information. It is suitable for a moving and free surface objects. It is also suitable for a measurement where a target is small to mount a conventional thermocouple and pressure probes. Some of the applications of this imaging are described in the presentation, such as icing and boiling phenomena.

  10. [Synthesis of reserve polyhydroxyalkanoates by luminescent bacteria].

    PubMed

    Boiandin, A N; Kalacheva, G S; Rodicheva, E K; Volova, T G

    2008-01-01

    The ability of marine luminescent bacteria to synthesize polyesters of hydroxycarboxylic acids (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA) as reserve macromolecules was studied. Twenty strains from the collection of the luminescent bacteria CCIBSO (WDSM839) of the Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, assigned to different taxa (Photobacterium leiognathi, Ph. phosphoreum, Vibrio harveyi, and V. fischeri) were analyzed. The most productive strains were identified, and the conditions ensuring high polymer yields in batch culture (40-70% of the cell dry mass weight) were determined. The capacity of synthesizing two- and three-component polymers containing hydroxybutyric acid as the main monomer and hydroxyvaleric and hydroxyhexanoic acids was revealed in Ph. leiognathi and V. harveyi strains. The results allow luminescent microorganisms to be regarded as new producers of multicomponent polyhydroxyalkanoates.

  11. Luminescent aryl-group eleven metal complexes.

    PubMed

    López-de-Luzuriaga, José M; Monge, Miguel; Olmos, M Elena

    2017-02-14

    Among the coinage metal complexes displaying luminescent properties, those bearing C-donor aryl ligands have an increasing part in the chemistry of these metals. These types of ligands confer a high kinetic and thermodynamic stability on the complexes, but they can also be involved in the photoluminescent behaviour of the complexes. The development of new aryl-containing complexes of group eleven metals, the study of their photoluminescent properties and their related properties and applications are discussed in this perspective. Among these, luminescent gold(i) and gold(iii) compounds are being intensively used for the development of new properties with potential applications such as, for instance, electroluminescence, triboluminescence, mechanochromism, aggregated induced emissions, quenching, luminescent liquid crystals, low molecular weight gelators and photocatalysts, among others.

  12. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation

    PubMed Central

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung BK; Laub, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly one millimeter long, or approximately 1000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length-scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  13. Homologous recombination drives both sequence diversity and gene content variation in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying; Ma, Jennifer H; Warren, Keisha; Tsang, Raymond S W; Low, Donald E; Jamieson, Frances B; Alexander, David C; Hao, Weilong

    2013-01-01

    The study of genetic and phenotypic variation is fundamental for understanding the dynamics of bacterial genome evolution and untangling the evolution and epidemiology of bacterial pathogens. Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is among the most intriguing bacterial pathogens in genomic studies due to its dynamic population structure and complex forms of pathogenicity. Extensive genomic variation within identical clonal complexes (CCs) in Nm has been recently reported and suggested to be the result of homologous recombination, but the extent to which recombination contributes to genomic variation within identical CCs has remained unclear. In this study, we sequenced two Nm strains of identical serogroup (C) and multi-locus sequence type (ST60), and conducted a systematic analysis with an additional 34 Nm genomes. Our results revealed that all gene content variation between the two ST60 genomes was introduced by homologous recombination at the conserved flanking genes, and 94.25% or more of sequence divergence was caused by homologous recombination. Recombination was found in genes associated with virulence factors, antigenic outer membrane proteins, and vaccine targets, suggesting an important role of homologous recombination in rapidly altering the pathogenicity and antigenicity of Nm. Recombination was also evident in genes of the restriction and modification systems, which may undermine barriers to DNA exchange. In conclusion, homologous recombination can drive both gene content variation and sequence divergence in Nm. These findings shed new light on the understanding of the rapid pathoadaptive evolution of Nm and other recombinogenic bacterial pathogens.

  14. Spectral luminescence analysis of amniotic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Kasko, Leonid P.; Mamontova, Marina V.; Chernitsky, Eugene A.

    1997-12-01

    It is shown that the amniotic fluid has intensive ultra-violet luminescence caused by proteins. Along with it amniotic fluid radiated in the field of 380 - 650 nm with maxima at 430 - 450 nm and 520 - 560 nm. The first peak of luminescence ((lambda) exc equals 350 nm; (lambda) em equals 430 - 440 nm) is caused (most probably) by the presence in amniotic fluid of some hormones, NADH2 and NADPH2. A more long-wave component ((lambda) exc equals 460 nm; (lambda) em equals 520 - 560 nm) is most likely connected with the presence in amniotic fluid pigments (bilirubin connected with protein and other). It is shown that intensity and maximum of ultra-violet luminescence spectra of amniotic fluid in normality and at pathology are identical. However both emission spectra and excitation spectra of long-wave ((lambda) greater than 450 nm) luminescence of amniotic fluid from pregnant women with such prenatal abnormal developments of a fetus as anencephaly and spina bifida are too long-wave region in comparison with the norm. Results of research testify that spectral luminescent analysis of amniotic fluid can be used for screening of malformations of the neural tube. It is very difficult for a practical obstetrician to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of the fetus. Apart from ultrasonic examination, cytogenetic examination of amniotic fluid and defumination of concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein and acetylcholin-esterases in the amniotic fluid and blood plasma are the most widely used diagnostic approaches. However, biochemical and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are time-consuming. In the present work spectral luminescence properties of the amniotic fluid are investigated to determine spectral parameters that can be used to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of their offsprings.

  15. Detection of Bacterial Spores with Lanthanide-Macrocycle Binary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Morgan L.; Kirby, James P.; Levine, Dana J.; Manary, Micah J.; Gray, Harry B.; Ponce, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The detection of bacterial spores via dipicolinate-triggered lanthanide luminescence has been improved in terms of detection limit, stability, and susceptibility to interferents by use of lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes. Specifically, we compared the effectiveness of Sm, Eu, Tb and Dy complexes with the macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetate (DO2A) to the corresponding lanthanide aquo ions. The Ln(DO2A)+ binary complexes bind dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major constituent of bacterial spores, with greater affinity and demonstrate significant improvement in bacterial spore detection. Of the four luminescent lanthanides studied, the terbium complex exhibits the greatest dipicolinate binding affinity (100-fold greater than Tb3+ alone, and 10-fold greater than other Ln(DO2A)+ complexes) and highest quantum yield. Moreover, the inclusion of DO2A extends the pH range over which Tb-DPA coordination is stable, reduces the interference of calcium ions nearly 5-fold, and mitigates phosphate interference 1000-fold compared to free terbium alone. In addition, detection of Bacillus atrophaeus bacterial spores was improved by the use of Tb(DO2A)+, yielding a 3-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio over Tb3+. Out of the eight cases investigated, the Tb(DO2A)+ binary complex is best for the detection of bacterial spores. PMID:19537757

  16. Detection of bacterial spores with lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes.

    PubMed

    Cable, Morgan L; Kirby, James P; Levine, Dana J; Manary, Micah J; Gray, Harry B; Ponce, Adrian

    2009-07-15

    The detection of bacterial spores via dipicolinate-triggered lanthanide luminescence has been improved in terms of detection limit, stability, and susceptibility to interferents by use of lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes. Specifically, we compared the effectiveness of Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy complexes with the macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetate (DO2A) to the corresponding lanthanide aquo ions. The Ln(DO2A)(+) binary complexes bind dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major constituent of bacterial spores, with greater affinity and demonstrate significant improvement in bacterial spore detection. Of the four luminescent lanthanides studied, the terbium complex exhibits the greatest dipicolinate binding affinity (100-fold greater than Tb(3+) alone, and 10-fold greater than other Ln(DO2A)(+) complexes) and highest quantum yield. Moreover, the inclusion of DO2A extends the pH range over which Tb-DPA coordination is stable, reduces the interference of calcium ions nearly 5-fold, and mitigates phosphate interference 1000-fold compared to free terbium alone. In addition, detection of Bacillus atrophaeus bacterial spores was improved by the use of Tb(DO2A)(+), yielding a 3-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio over Tb(3+). Out of the eight cases investigated, the Tb(DO2A)(+) binary complex is best for the detection of bacterial spores.

  17. Photoacoustic effect induced by negative luminescence device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, T.; Peura, J.; Matveev, B. A.; Remennyy, M. A.; Stus', N. M.

    2010-07-01

    The cantilever enhanced photoacoustic trace gas detection technique has been combined with mid-infrared light emitting diodes (LEDs) producing significant negative luminescence at a reverse bias. In contrast to normal positive photoacoustic phenomenon the negative luminescence of the LED creates wavelength specific cooling of the gas under study and pressure drop in the photoacoustic sample cell, which can be detected by a cantilever microphone. In experiments a LED operating at 5.5 μm wavelength range was used to detect acetone vapor.

  18. Luminescence of apollo 11 lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Greenman, N N; Gross, H G

    1970-01-30

    Luminescence measurements were made of four lunar rocks, two terrestrial rocks (granite and gabbro), and one terrestrial mineral (willemite) by comparing the spectral curves with the curve of a barium sulfate standard. Efficiencies with 3000 angstrom excitation were < 6 x 10(-5) for the lunar samples, < 8 x 10(-5) for gabbro of very similar composition to the lunar samples, approximately 10(-4) for granite, and approximately 2 X 10(-2) for willemite. If these are typical values for other ultraviolet excitation wavelengths, the Apollo 11 site appears to contribute little to the observed lunar luminescence.

  19. Simultaneous Luminescence Pressure and Temperature Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A simultaneous luminescence pressure and temperature mapping system is developed including improved dye application techniques for surface temperature and pressure measurements from 5 torr to 1000 torr with possible upgrade to from 0.5 torr to several atmospheres with improved camera resolution. Adsorbed perylene dye on slip-cast silica is pressure (oxygen) sensitive and reusable to relatively high temperatures (-150 C). Adsorbed luminescence has an approximately linear color shift with temperature, which can be used for independent temperature mapping and brightness pressure calibration with temperature.

  20. Simultaneous Luminescence Pressure and Temperature Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simultaneous luminescence pressure and temperature mapping system is developed including improved dye application techniques for surface temperature and pressure measurements from 5 torr to 1000 torr with possible upgrade to from 0.5 torr to several atmospheres with improved camera resolution. Adsorbed perylene dye on slip-cast silica is pressure (oxygen) sensitive and reusable to relatively high temperatures (approximately 150 C). Adsorbed luminescence has an approximately linear color shift with temperature, which can be used for independent temperature mapping and brightness pressure calibration with temperature.

  1. Toxicity on the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri (Beijerinck). I: QSAR equation for narcotics and polar narcotics.

    PubMed

    Vighi, Marco; Migliorati, Sonia; Monti, Gianna Serafina

    2009-01-01

    Toxicity data on chemicals, supposed to have a narcotic or polar narcotic toxicological mode of action, have been produced on the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri using the Microtox test procedure. Advanced statistical methods have been used to calculate statistically sound values for ecotoxicological endpoints. Simple quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) equations were developed for narcotics and polar narcotics. These equations were compared with those proposed by the European Technical Guidance Document on Risk Assessment for other aquatic organisms (algae, Daphnia, and fish). Similarities and differences are discussed. The need for including the bacterial component in the ecotoxicological risk assessment for aquatic ecosystems is highlighted.

  2. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-08-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  3. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials. PMID:27550235

  4. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Colosimo, A M; Anwand, W; Boatner, L A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, T T; Liedke, M O; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F A

    2016-08-23

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  5. Lanthanide luminescence for functional materials and bio-sciences.

    PubMed

    Eliseeva, Svetlana V; Bünzli, Jean-Claude G

    2010-01-01

    Recent startling interest for lanthanide luminescence is stimulated by the continuously expanding need for luminescent materials meeting the stringent requirements of telecommunication, lighting, electroluminescent devices, (bio-)analytical sensors and bio-imaging set-ups. This critical review describes the latest developments in (i) the sensitization of near-infrared luminescence, (ii) "soft" luminescent materials (liquid crystals, ionic liquids, ionogels), (iii) electroluminescent materials for organic light emitting diodes, with emphasis on white light generation, and (iv) applications in luminescent bio-sensing and bio-imaging based on time-resolved detection and multiphoton excitation (500 references).

  6. Low-temperature luminescence and thermoluminescence from BeO:Zn single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikov, I. N.; Petrenko, M. D.; Ivanov, V. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    Low-temperature luminescence and thermoluminescence (TL) of BeO:Zn single crystals have been studied in the temperature range of 6-380 K and energy ranges of 1.2-6.5 eV (emission spectra) and 3.7-20 eV (luminescence excitation and reflection spectra). The introduction of zinc impurity ions (0.05 at. %) into BeO host lattice leads to the creation of both the trapped electron and hole centers: Zn+ and Zn2+ O-. These two new centers are responsible for two TL glow peaks at 307 and 145 K with activation energies of 0.96 and 0.40 eV, and two emission bands at 6.0 and 1.9-2.6 eV. The first emission band is attributed to radiative annihilation of the Zn-impurity bound excitons, and the second one is associated with the intracenter electronic transitions in the defect complex comprising zinc impurity ion. The 6.0 eV luminescence center can be excited at 9.6 eV, the low-energy tail of the BeO host absorption, but below the first excitonic maximum (10.45 eV). The 1.9-2.6 eV luminescence center can be excited at the BeO optical transparency band. Both emission bands in BeO:Zn appear in the X-ray induced luminescence spectra at T = 6 K. This indicates that not only these luminescence centers are excited during band-to-band transitions, but they participate in recombination processes as well. The low-temperature (T0 = 6 K) TL study of BeO:Zn single crystals was made for the first time. Analysis of the low-temperature TL glow curves allowed us not only to experimentally determine the energy characteristics of the Zn impurity states in BeO:Zn, but reveal an extremely strong influence of the isovalent zinc impurity on fluctuation rearrangement of BeO host lattice. Note, the fluctuation rearrangement of BeO host lattice, which occurs in the temperature range of self-trapped exciton transformation (80-180 K), was previously known only for undoped BeO and BeO crystals with heterovalent impurities [I. N. Ogorodnikov and A. V. Kruzhalov, Proc. SPIE 2967 (1997) 42].

  7. The Landscape of Realized Homologous Recombination in Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Koji; Didelot, Xavier; Jolley, Keith A; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Maiden, Martin C J; Sheppard, Samuel K; Falush, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Recombination enhances the adaptive potential of organisms by allowing genetic variants to be tested on multiple genomic backgrounds. Its distribution in the genome can provide insight into the evolutionary forces that underlie traits, such as the emergence of pathogenicity. Here, we examined landscapes of realized homologous recombination of 500 genomes from ten bacterial species and found all species have "hot" regions with elevated rates relative to the genome average. We examined the size, gene content, and chromosomal features associated with these regions and the correlations between closely related species. The recombination landscape is variable and evolves rapidly. For example in Salmonella, only short regions of around 1 kb in length are hot whereas in the closely related species Escherichia coli, some hot regions exceed 100 kb, spanning many genes. Only Streptococcus pyogenes shows evidence for the positive correlation between GC content and recombination that has been reported for several eukaryotes. Genes with function related to the cell surface/membrane are often found in recombination hot regions but E. coli is the only species where genes annotated as "virulence associated" are consistently hotter. There is also evidence that some genes with "housekeeping" functions tend to be overrepresented in cold regions. For example, ribosomal proteins showed low recombination in all of the species. Among specific genes, transferrin-binding proteins are recombination hot in all three of the species in which they were found, and are subject to interspecies recombination.

  8. Dissociative recombination in aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of dissociative recombination in planetary aeronomy is summarized, and two examples are discussed. The first is the role of dissociative recombination of N2(+) in the escape of nitrogen from Mars. A previous model is updated to reflect new experimental data on the electronic states of N produced in this process. Second, the intensity of the atomic oxygen green line on the nightside of Venus is modeled. Use is made of theoretical rate coefficients for production of O (1S) in dissociative recombination from different vibrational levels of O2(+).

  9. Monitoring of recombinant protein production using bioluminescence in a semiautomated fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Trezzani, I; Nadri, M; Dorel, C; Lejeune, P; Bellalou, J; Lieto, J; Hammouri, H; Longin, R; Dhurjati, P

    2003-01-01

    On-line optimization of fermentation processes can be greatly aided by the availability of information on the physiological state of the cell. The goal of our "BioLux" research project was to design a recombinant cell capable of intracellular monitoring of product synthesis and to use it as part of an automated fermentation system. A recombinant plasmid was constructed containing an inducible promoter that controls the gene coding for a model protein and the genes necessary for bioluminescence. The cells were cultured in microfermenters equipped with an on-line turbidity sensor and a specially designed on-line light sensor capable of continuous measurement of bioluminescence. Initial studies were done under simple culture conditions, and a linear correlation between luminescence and protein production was obtained. Such specially designed recombinant bioluminescent cells can potentially be applied for model-based inference of intracellular product formation, as well as for optimization and control of recombinant fermentation processes.

  10. Fabrication of luminescent porous silicon with stain etches and evidence that luminescence originates in amorphous layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Lin, T. L.; Pike, W. T.; Vasquez, R. P.; Wu, Z.-C.

    1992-01-01

    Simple immersion of Si in stain etches of HF:HNO3:H2O or NaNO2 in aqueous HF was used to produce films exhibiting luminescence in the visible similar to that of anodically-etched porous Si. All of the luminescent samples consist of amorphous porous Si in at least the near surface region. No evidence was found for small crystalline regions within these amorphous layers.

  11. Recombination and microdiversity in coastal marine cyanophages.

    PubMed

    Marston, Marcia F; Amrich, Christopher G

    2009-11-01

    Genetic exchange is an important process in bacteriophage evolution. Here, we examine the role of homologous recombination in the divergence of closely related cyanophage isolates from natural marine populations. Four core-viral genes (coliphage T4 homologues g20, g23, g43 and a putative tail fibre gene) and four viral-encoded bacterial-derived genes (psbA, psbD, cobS and phoH) were analysed for 60 cyanophage isolates belonging to five Rhode Island Myovirus (RIM) strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the 60 concatenated sequences revealed well-resolved sequence clusters corresponding to the RIM strain designations. Viral isolates within a strain shared an average nucleotide identity of 99.3-99.8%. Nevertheless, extensive microdiversity was observed within each cyanophage strain; only three of the 60 isolates shared the same nucleotide haplotype. Microdiversity was generated by point mutations, homologous recombination within a strain, and intragenic recombination between RIM strains. Intragenic recombination events between distinct RIM strains were detected most often in host-derived photosystem II psbA and psbD genes, but were also identified in some major capsid protein g23 genes. Within a strain, more variability was observed at the psbA locus than at any of the other seven loci. Although most of the microdiversity within a strain was neutral, some amino acid substitutions were identified, and thus microdiversity within strains has the potential to influence the population dynamics of viral-host interactions.

  12. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  13. Acute toxicity assessment of explosive-contaminated soil extracting solution by luminescent bacteria assays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenjie; Jiang, Zhenming; Zhao, Quanlin; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Su, Hongping; Gao, Xuewen; Ye, Zhengfang

    2016-11-01

    Explosive-contaminated soil is harmful to people's health and the local ecosystem. The acute toxicity of its extracting solution was tested by bacterial luminescence assay using three kinds of luminescent bacteria to characterize the toxicity of the soil. An orthogonal test L 16 (4(5)) was designed to optimize the soil extracting conditions. The optimum extracting conditions were obtained when the ultrasonic extraction time, ultrasonic extraction temperature, and the extraction repeat times were 6 h, 40 °C, and three, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed that the main components of the contaminated soil's extracting solution were 2,4-dinitrotoluene-3-sulfonate (2,4-DNT-3-SO3(-)); 2,4-dinitrotoluene-5-sulfonate (2,4-DNT-5-SO3(-)); and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT). Compared with Photobacterium phosphoreum and Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov. is more suitable for assessing the soil extracting solution's acute toxicity. Soil washing can remove most of the contaminants toxic to luminescent bacterium Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov., suggesting that it may be a potential effective remediation method for explosive-contaminated soil.

  14. Intrinsic radiative recombination from quantum states in GaAs-Aℓ xGa 1-xAs multi-quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, C.; Miller, R. C.; Dingle, R.; Gossard, A. C.; Wiegman, W.

    1981-01-01

    From absorption, emission, luminescence excitation and electron spin orientation studies of undoped GaAs-Aℓ xGa 1-xAs superlattices we demonstrate the intrinsic nature of the radiative recombination process. This is in direct contrast to recombination observed in similar purity thick GaAs material. Moreover, our results do not support a recent suggestion that enhanced LO phonon-electron coupling should occur in such superlattice structures.

  15. Enhancing and quenching luminescence with gold nanoparticle films: the influence of substrate on the luminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Guidelli, Eder; Ramos, Ana Paula; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) films were sputtered over glass and aluminum substrates to enhance optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), a luminescent technique employed for radiation detection, from x-ray irradiated NaCl nanocrystals. The AuNP films deposited over glass led to enhanced-OSL emission, whereas the AuNP films deposited on aluminum substrates quenched the OSL emission. The enhanced-OSL intensity is proportional to the optical density of the film's plasmon resonance band at the stimulation wavelength. For the case of the AuNP/aluminum films, the luminescence quenching diminishes, and OSL intensity partially recovers upon increasing the distance between the AuNPs and the aluminum substrates, and between the luminescent nanocrystals and the AuNP films. These results suggest that plasmonic interactions between the emitter nanocrystals, the localized surface plasmons (LSP) of the AuNPs, and the substrate are responsible for the OSL enhancement and quenching. In this sense, the substrate dictates whether LSP relaxation occurs by radiative or non-radiative transisitions, leading to enhanced or quenched OSL, respectively. Therefore, besides showing that AuNP films can enhance and/or tune the sensitivity of luminescent radiation detectors, and demonstrating OSL as a new technique to investigate mechanisms of plasmon-enhanced luminescence, these results bring insights on how substrates strongly modify the optical properties of AuNP films.

  16. Structural changes and relaxations monitored by luminescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Yang, B; Townsend, P D

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence data have often been used to study imperfections and to characterize lattice distortions because the signals are sensitive to changes of structure and composition. Previous studies have included intentionally added probe ions such as rare earth ions to sense distortions in local crystal fields caused by modified structural environments. An under-exploited extension of this approach was to use luminescence to monitor crystalline phase changes. A current overview of this new and powerful technique shows that continuous scanning of the sample temperatures immediately offered at least three types of signatures for phase transitions. Because of high sensitivity, luminescence signals were equally responsive to structural changes from inclusions and nanoparticles. These coupled to the host material via long-range interactions and modified the host signals. Two frequently observed examples that are normally overlooked are from nanoparticle inclusions of water and CO2. Examples also indicated that phase transitions were detected in more diverse materials such as superconductors and fullerenes. Finally, luminescence studies have shown that in some crystalline examples, high dose ion implantation of surface layers could induce relaxations and/or structural changes of the entire underlying bulk material. This was an unexpected result and therefore such a possibility has not previously been explored. However, the implications for ion implication are significant and could be far more general than the examples mentioned here.

  17. The mensuration of delayed luminescence on ginseng

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Fenghua; Bai, Hua; Tang, Guoqing

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, the delayed luminescence of ginseng produced from two different areas was determined with the self built bioluminescence detecting system. And the attenuation curve of bioluminescence of the experimental samples were studied, before and after the samples extracted by 58% alcohol. We primarily gave out the parameters describing emitting characteristic. Using the method of optic induced bioluminescence, we also determined the weak luminescence emitting from the ginseng tuber, and find the intensity and decay time having obvious difference from skin and core, with these data we can distinguish the producing area and feature of the ginseng. In the experiment, the light-induce luminescence of the sample was menstruated, which has been infused by water and 58% alcohol; the difference between two kinds of samples which were infused and not infused has been delivered. In order to investigate the effect of excitation-light spectrum component to delayed luminescence of ginseng, a light filter witch allow a wavelength scope of 225nm~420nm pass through was installed between the light source and sample, keeping other work condition unchanged, the bioluminescence was also determined. For investigating the effect of extracting to emitting, the absorption spectrum of above samples ware studied, and the time-sequence of absorption spectrum was obtained. Based on the data obtained from our experiment, we analyzed the radiation mechanism of ginseng slice and tuber.

  18. Luminescence from Erbium Oxide Grown on Silicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    H9.14 Luminescence from erbium oxide grown on silicon E. Nogales’, B. Mrndez , J.Piqueras’, R.Plugaru2 , J. A. Garcfa3 and T. J. Tate4 ’ Universidad ... Complutense de Madrid, Dpto. Ffsica de Materiales, 28040 Madrid, Spain.2Inst. of Microtechnology, Bucharest, Romania.3Universidad del Pais Vasco, Dpto

  19. Modeling Light Propagation in Luminescent Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Derya

    This study presents physical, computational and analytical modeling approaches for light propagation in luminescent random media. Two different approaches are used, namely (i) a statistical approach: Monte-Carlo simulations for photon transport and (ii) a deterministic approach: radiative transport theory. Both approaches account accurately for the multiple absorption and reemission of light at different wavelengths and for anisotropic luminescence. The deterministic approach is a generalization of radiative transport theory for solving inelastic scattering problems in random media. We use the radiative transport theory to study light propagation in luminescent media. Based on this theory, we also study the optically thick medium. Using perturbation methods, a corrected diffusion approximation with asymptotically accurate boundary conditions and a boundary layer solution are derived. The accuracy and the efficacy of this approach is verified for a plane-parallel slab problem. In particular, we apply these two approaches (MC and radiative transport theory) to model light propagation in semiconductor-based luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). The computational results for both approaches are compared with each other and found to agree. The results of this dissertation present practical and reliable techniques to use for solving forward/inverse inelastic scattering problems arising in various research areas such as optics, biomedical engineering, nuclear engineering, solar science and material science.

  20. Luminescence Originating in an Optical Fiber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-28

    TIME COVERED /1 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year Month, Oay) S.PAGE COUNT Technical FROM TO_ _ 28 October 1988 12 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION Applied ... Spectroscopy 17. COSATI CODES18. SUB Eg.TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIED OUPU Optical Fibers, Luminescence, Sensors

  1. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  2. Increasing the luminescence of lanthanide complexes.

    PubMed

    Leif, Robert C; Vallarino, Lidia M; Becker, Margie C; Yang, Sean

    2006-08-01

    This review compares the chemical and physical properties of lanthanide ion complexes and of other narrow-emitting species that can be used as labels for cytometry. A series of luminescent lanthanide ion macrocyclic complexes, Quantum Dyes, which do not release or exchange their central lanthanide ion, do accept energy transfer from ligands, and are capable of covalent binding to macromolecules, including proteins and nucleic acids, is described and their properties are discussed. Two methods are described for increasing the luminescence intensity of lanthanide ion complexes, which intrinsically is not as high as that of standard fluorophores or quantum dots. One method consists of adding a complex of a second lanthanide ion in a micellar solution (columinescence); the other method produces dry preparations by evaporation of a homogeneous solution containing an added complex of a second lanthanide ion or an excess of an unbound antenna ligand. Both methods involve the Resonance Energy Transfer Enhanced Luminescence, RETEL, effect as the mechanism for the luminescence enhancement.

  3. Optimized readout system for cooled optically stimulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Eschbach, P. A.

    1990-09-01

    Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) in CaF2:Mn is an ionizing radiation dosimetry method recently developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In this method CaF2:Mn crystals irradiated by gamma radiation at room temperature are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), stimulated by ultraviolet laser light at 326 nm, and allowed to warm to room temperature. Light emission proportional to the gamma exposure occurs as the TLD warms from liquid nitrogen temperature to room temperature. The new method is an example of a highly sensitive phototransfer technique which could form the basis for future radiation dosimetry applications. Measurements to date have shown high potential for measuring gamma exposures in the range of 10 microR. The high sensitivity of the COSL technique is due in part to the larger quantum efficiency of radiative recombination at low temperatures and to the complete absence of the incandescent background associated with conventional thermoluminescent readout methods. Along with the potential for a system which is more sensitive than thermoluminescent readers, multiple COSL readouts can be performed with minimal reduction in the COSL intensity. The multiple readout capability can serve as a possible permanent dosimetry record, thus allowing the reanalysis of a questionable reading. In an attempt to optimize the sensitivity of the COSL method, a new readout system is being developed.

  4. Blue luminescence of Au nanoclusters embedded in silica matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dhara, S.; Chandra, Sharat; Magudapathy, P.; Kalavathi, S.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Nair, K.G.M.; Sastry, V.S.; Hsu, C.W.; Wu, C.T.; Chen, K.H.; Chen, L.C.

    2004-12-22

    Photoluminescence study using the 325 nm He-Cd excitation is reported for the Au nanoclusters embedded in SiO{sub 2} matrix. Au clusters are grown by ion beam mixing with 100 KeV Ar{sup +} irradiation on Au [40 nm]/SiO{sub 2} at various fluences and subsequent annealing at high temperature. The blue bands above {approx}3 eV match closely with reported values for colloidal Au nanoclusters and supported Au nanoislands. Radiative recombination of sp electrons above Fermi level to occupied d-band holes are assigned for observed luminescence peaks. Peaks at 3.1 and 3.4 eV are correlated to energy gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points, respectively, with possible involvement of relaxation mechanism. The blueshift of peak positions at 3.4 eV with decreasing cluster size is reported to be due to the compressive strain in small clusters. A first principle calculation based on density functional theory using the full potential linear augmented plane wave plus local orbitals formalism with generalized gradient approximation for the exchange correlation energy is used to estimate the band gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points by calculating the band structures and joint density of states for different strain values in order to explain the blueshift of {approx}0.1 eV with decreasing cluster size around L-symmetry point.

  5. Blue luminescence of Au nanoclusters embedded in silica matrix.

    PubMed

    Dhara, S; Chandra, Sharat; Magudapathy, P; Kalavathi, S; Panigrahi, B K; Nair, K G M; Sastry, V S; Hsu, C W; Wu, C T; Chen, K H; Chen, L C

    2004-12-22

    Photoluminescence study using the 325 nm He-Cd excitation is reported for the Au nanoclusters embedded in SiO(2) matrix. Au clusters are grown by ion beam mixing with 100 KeV Ar(+) irradiation on Au [40 nm]/SiO(2) at various fluences and subsequent annealing at high temperature. The blue bands above approximately 3 eV match closely with reported values for colloidal Au nanoclusters and supported Au nanoislands. Radiative recombination of sp electrons above Fermi level to occupied d-band holes are assigned for observed luminescence peaks. Peaks at 3.1 and 3.4 eV are correlated to energy gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points, respectively, with possible involvement of relaxation mechanism. The blueshift of peak positions at 3.4 eV with decreasing cluster size is reported to be due to the compressive strain in small clusters. A first principle calculation based on density functional theory using the full potential linear augmented plane wave plus local orbitals formalism with generalized gradient approximation for the exchange correlation energy is used to estimate the band gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points by calculating the band structures and joint density of states for different strain values in order to explain the blueshift of approximately 0.1 eV with decreasing cluster size around L-symmetry point.

  6. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  7. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  8. Multiphoton Assisted Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, E. S.; Jones, R. R.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    We have observed multiphoton assisted recombination in the presence of a 38.8 GHz microwave field. Stimulated emission of up to ten microwave photons results in energy transfer from continuum electrons, enabling recombination. The maximum electron energy loss is far greater than the 2Up predicted by the standard “simpleman’s” model. The data are well reproduced by both an approximate analytic expression and numerical simulations in which the combined Coulomb and radiation fields are taken into account.

  9. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Krawiec, S; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction between a large plasmid and a second chromosome is discussed. Recent information on repeated sequences and chromosomal rearrangements is presented. The growing understanding of limitations on the rearrangements that can be tolerated by bacteria and those that cannot is summarized, and the sensitive region flanking the terminator loci is described. Sources and types of genetic variation in bacteria are listed, from simple single nucleotide mutations to intragenic and intergenic recombinations. A model depicting the dynamics of the evolution and genetic activity of the bacterial chromosome is described which entails acquisition by recombination of clonal segments within the chromosome. The model is consistent with the existence of only a few genetic types of E. coli worldwide. Finally, there is a summary of recent reports on lateral genetic exchange across great taxonomic distances, yet another source of genetic variation and innovation. PMID:2087223

  10. Quenching methods for background reduction in luminescence-based probe-target binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Hong; Goodwin, Peter M; Keller, Richard A.; Nolan, Rhiannon L.

    2007-04-10

    Background luminescence is reduced from a solution containing unbound luminescent probes, each having a first molecule that attaches to a target molecule and having an attached luminescent moiety, and luminescent probe/target adducts. Quenching capture reagent molecules are formed that are capable of forming an adduct with the unbound luminescent probes and having an attached quencher material effective to quench luminescence of the luminescent moiety. The quencher material of the capture reagent molecules is added to a solution of the luminescent probe/target adducts and binds in a proximity to the luminescent moiety of the unbound luminescent probes to quench luminescence from the luminescent moiety when the luminescent moiety is exposed to exciting illumination. The quencher capture reagent does not bind to probe molecules that are bound to target molecules and the probe/target adduct emission is not quenched.

  11. Paper-based biodetection using luminescent nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ju, Qiang; Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-05-10

    Point-of-care and in-field technologies for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of molecular biomarkers have attracted much interest. Rugged bioassay technology capable of fast detection of markers for pathogens and genetic diseases would in particular impact the quality of health care in the developing world, but would also make possible more extensive screening in developed countries to tackle problems such as those associated with water and food quality, and tracking of infectious organisms in hospitals and clinics. Literature trends indicate an increasing interest in the use of nanomaterials, and in particular luminescent nanoparticles, for assay development. These materials may offer attributes for development of assays and sensors that could achieve improvements in analytical figures of merit, and provide practical advantages in sensitivity and stability. There is opportunity for cost-efficiency and technical simplicity by implementation of luminescent nanomaterials as the basis for transduction technology, when combined with the use of paper substrates, and the ubiquitous availability of cell phone cameras and associated infrastructure for optical detection and transmission of results. Luminescent nanoparticles have been described for a broad range of bioanalytical targets including small molecules, oligonucleotides, peptides, proteins, saccharides and whole cells (e.g., cancer diagnostics). The luminescent nanomaterials that are described herein for paper-based bioassays include metal nanoparticles, quantum dots and lanthanide-doped nanocrystals. These nanomaterials often have broad and strong absorption and narrow emission bands that improve opportunity for multiplexed analysis, and can be designed to provide emission at wavelengths that are efficiently processed by conventional digital cameras. Luminescent nanoparticles can be embedded in paper substrates that are designed to direct fluid flow, and the resulting combination of technologies can offer

  12. Image analysis applied to luminescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Eric; Lelievre-Berna, Eddy; Fafeur, Veronique; Vandenbunder, Bernard

    1998-04-01

    We have developed a novel approach to study luminescent light emission during migration of living cells by low-light imaging techniques. The equipment consists in an anti-vibration table with a hole for a direct output under the frame of an inverted microscope. The image is directly captured by an ultra low- light level photon-counting camera equipped with an image intensifier coupled by an optical fiber to a CCD sensor. This installation is dedicated to measure in a dynamic manner the effect of SF/HGF (Scatter Factor/Hepatocyte Growth Factor) both on activation of gene promoter elements and on cell motility. Epithelial cells were stably transfected with promoter elements containing Ets transcription factor-binding sites driving a luciferase reporter gene. Luminescent light emitted by individual cells was measured by image analysis. Images of luminescent spots were acquired with a high aperture objective and time exposure of 10 - 30 min in photon-counting mode. The sensitivity of the camera was adjusted to a high value which required the use of a segmentation algorithm dedicated to eliminate the background noise. Hence, image segmentation and treatments by mathematical morphology were particularly indicated in these experimental conditions. In order to estimate the orientation of cells during their migration, we used a dedicated skeleton algorithm applied to the oblong spots of variable intensities emitted by the cells. Kinetic changes of luminescent sources, distance and speed of migration were recorded and then correlated with cellular morphological changes for each spot. Our results highlight the usefulness of the mathematical morphology to quantify kinetic changes in luminescence microscopy.

  13. A direct evidence of allocating yellow luminescence band in undoped GaN by two-wavelength excited photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Julkarnain, M. E-mail: jnain.apee@ru.ac.bd; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.; Arakawa, Y.

    2015-11-23

    The behavior of below-gap luminescence of undoped GaN grown by MOCVD has been studied by the scheme of two-wavelength-excited photoluminescence. The emission intensity of shallow donor to valence band transition (I{sub OX}) increased while intensities of donor-acceptor pair transition and the Yellow Luminescence band (YLB) decreased after the irradiation of a below-gap excitation source of 1.17 eV. The conventional energy schemes and recombination models have been considered to explain our experimental result but only one model in which YLB is the transition of a shallow donor to a deep state placed at ∼1 eV above the valence band maximum satisfies our result. The defect related parameters that give a qualitative insight in the samples have been evaluated by systematically solving the rate equations and fitting the result with the experiment.

  14. Purification of recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant ovalbumin expressed in bacterial host is essentially free from post-translational modifications and can be useful in understanding the structure-function relationship of the protein. In this study, ovalbumin was expressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. Ovalbumin inclusion bodies were solubilized using urea and refolded by decreasing the urea concentration by dilution. Refolded protein was purified by anion exchange chromatography. Overall recovery of purified recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies was about 30% with 98% purity. Purified recombinant ovalbumin was characterized by mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Recombinant ovalbumin was shown to be resistant to trypsin using protease resistance assay. This indicated proper refolding of ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of E. coli. This method provides a simple way of producing ovalbumin free of post-translational modifications.

  15. MICROFLUIDIC MODULES FOR ISOLATION OF RECOMBINANT CYTOKINE FROM BACTERIAL LYSATES

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2014-01-01

    The portability and personalization of health-care diagnostics and treatments benefits from advancements and applications of micro and nanotechnology. Modularization and miniaturization of standardized biochemical processes and tests facilitates the advancement and customization of analyte detection and diagnosis on-chip. The goal of our work here is to develop modular platforms for on-chip biochemical processing of synthesized biologics for a range of on-demand applications. Our report focuses on the initial development, characterization and application of microfluidic size exclusion/gel filtration and ion exchange protein concentration modules for cytokine isolation from spiked cell extracts.

  16. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  17. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... intestine does not have a high number of bacteria. Excess bacteria in the small intestine may use ...

  18. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  19. Atom Recombination on Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Chai

    Upon high speed re-entry of the Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO) through the earth's atmosphere, oxygen and nitrogen atoms produced in the shock wave in front of the SSO recombine on the surface of the SSO, releasing heat. To minimize the rise of surface temperature due to the reaction, surface material of the SSO should have a low recombination probability, gamma, of atoms impinging on it. To design such material, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of atom recombination. With this in mind, gamma values were measured for recombination of O, N, and H atoms in a diffusion tube reactor between 700 and 1250 K (HT), 300 and 700 K (MT), and at 194 K (LT) on silica. The rate of recombination was first order with respect to the atom concentration from LT to HT. The Arrhenius plots, gamma vs. 1/T, were very complex. All observations are explained by assuming a surface with a small fraction of active sites that irreversibly bind chemisorbed atoms. Everything happens as if the active sites were surrounded by collection zones within which all atoms striking the surface are adsorbed reversibly with an assumed sticking probability of unity. These atoms then diffuse on the surface. Some of them reach the active sites where they can recombine with the chemisorbed atoms. At LT, all atoms striking the surface reach the active sites. As a result of desorption at MT, the collection zones shrink with increasing temperature. At HT, only atoms striking active sites directly from the gas phase lead to recombination. An analytical solution of the diffusion-reaction problem obtained for a model where the active sites are distributed uniformly fits with the experimental data from LT to HT. The two novel features of this work are the identification of the active sites on silica for recombination of H on silica at HT as surface OH groups and the suggestion that another kind of active site is responsible for recombination of O and N atoms at HT as well as for H atoms at LT and MT. Although

  20. Detection of Ciprofloxacin in Urine through Sensitized Lanthanide Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Subhankar; Ahn, Kyo Han

    2016-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, is widely used for the treatment of bacterial infection in humans due to its broad antibacterial spectrum. An excessive use or overdose of ciprofloxacin on the other hand can cause several adverse effects not only to humans but also to microorganisms. Unabsorbed ciprofloxacin in the body is mostly excreted through urine and finally goes to the environment, providing a drug resistance pressure on bacteria. Hence a simple and efficient detection method of ciprofloxacin is necessary, which, for example, can be used to analyze ciprofloxacin content in urine. Although ciprofloxacin itself shows inherent fluorescence, direct fluorescent detection of ciprofloxacin in raw urine sample is difficult due to autofluorescence of urine by other components. Herein we report that a Tb(III) complex of DO3A (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid) can be efficiently sensitized by ciprofloxacin to emit luminescence separately from the urine autofluorescence wavelength region. Tb-DO3A shows excellent sensitivity with a detection limit of three parts per billion in aqueous buffer solution. Further, Tb-DO3A is used to detect ciprofloxacin with high sensitivity and selectivity in a raw urine sample without any purification or separation procedures in the concentrations ranging from 1 µg·mL−1 to 50 µg·mL−1. The direct measurement of ciprofloxacin excreted in urine may be used to control overdose of the drug. PMID:27929396

  1. Anti-Stokes shift luminescent materials for bio-applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingjun; Su, Qianqian; Feng, Wei; Li, Fuyou

    2017-02-20

    Anti-Stokes shift luminescence is a special optical process, which converts long-wavelength excitation to short-wavelength emission. This unique ability is especially helpful for bio-applications, because the longer-wavelength light source, usually referring to near infrared light, has a larger penetration depth offering a longer working distance for in vivo applications. The anti-Stokes shift luminescence signal can also be distinguished from the auto-fluorescence of biological tissues, thus reducing background interference during bioimaging. Herein, we summarize recent advances in anti-Stokes shift luminescent materials, including lanthanide and triplet-triplet-annihilation-based upconversion nanomaterials, and newly improved hot-band absorption-based luminescent materials. We focus on the synthetic strategies, optical optimization and biological applications as well as present comparative discussions on the luminescence mechanisms and characteristics of these three types of luminescent materials.

  2. Luminescence quenching of Dy3+ ions in lead bismuthate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarski, Wojciech A.; Pisarska, Joanna; Lisiecki, Radosław; Dominiak-Dzik, Grażyna; Ryba-Romanowski, Witold

    2012-04-01

    Luminescence of lead bismuthate glasses PbO-Bi2O3-Ga2O3 containing Dy3+ ions has been studied. Two overlapping luminescence bands corresponding to 3P1-1S0 transition of Bi3+ and 4F9/2 -6H13/2 transition of Dy3+ were detected under 480 nm excitation. Comparison of luminescence features for the system under study to those reported for dysprosium-doped lead borate glass PbO-B2O3-Ga2O3 indicates that the luminescence of Dy3+ is efficiently quenched by Bi3+ ions. Analysis of luminescence dynamics implies that the excitation energy transfer from Dy3+ to Bi3+ is nonradiative. The theoretical calculations using Inokuti-Hirayama model confirm strong luminescence of Dy3+ ions in lead bismuthate glasses.

  3. A statistical model for bacterial speciation triggered by lateral gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, Sunjeet; Peng, Wequin

    2006-03-01

    The process of bacterial speciation has been a major unresolved issue in the study of bacterial evolution. It has been proposed that lateral gene transfer and homologous recombination play critical and complementary roles in speciation. We introduce a statistical model, of a population, for the evolution under lateral gene transfer and local homologous recombination. We examine the evolutionary dynamics and its dependence on various evolutionary operators. J. G. Lawrence, Theor. Popul. Biol. 61, 449(2002).

  4. Promising Biological Indicator of Heavy Metal Pollution: Bioluminescent Bacterial Strains Isolated and Characterized from Marine Niches of Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Thakre, Neha A; Shanware, Arti S

    2015-09-01

    In present study, several marine water samples collected from the North Goa Beaches, India for isolation of luminescent bacterial species. Isolates obtained labelled as DP1-5 and AB1-6. Molecular characterization including identification of a microbial culture using 16S rRNA gene based molecular technique and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that DP3 & AB1 isolates were Vibrio harveyi. All of the isolates demonstrated multiple metal resistances in terms of growth, with altered luminescence with variable metal concentration. Present investigations were an attempt towards exploring and reporting an updated diversity of bioluminescent bacterial species from various sites around the Goa, India which would be explored in future for constructing luminescence based biosensor for efficiently monitoring the level of hazardous metals in the environment.

  5. Neutron dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Eschbach, P. A.

    1991-06-01

    The addition of thermoluminescent (TL) materials within hydrogenous matrices to detect neutron induced proton recoils for radiation dosimetry is a well known concept. Previous attempts to implement this technique have met with limited success, primarily due to the high temperatures required for TL readout and the low melting temperatures of hydrogen-rich plastics. Research in recent years PNL has produced a new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technique known as the Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) that offers, for the first time, the capability of performing extremely sensitive radiation dosimetry at low temperatures. In addition to its extreme sensitivity, the COSL technique offers multiple readout capability, limited fading in a one year period, and the capability of analyzing single grains within a hydrogenous matrix.

  6. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay.

  7. Luminescent lanthanide chelates and methods of use

    SciTech Connect

    Selvin, Paul R.; Hearst, John

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides lanthanide chelates capable of intense luminescence. The celates comprise a lanthanide chelator covalently joined to a coumarin-like or quinolone-like sensitizer. Exemplary sensitzers include 2- or 4-quinolones, 2- or 4-coumarins, or derivatives thereof e.g. carbostyril 124 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-quinolone), coumarin 120 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-coumarin), coumarin 124 (7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-coumarin), aminomethyltrimethylpsoralen, etc. The chelates form high affinity complexes with lanthanides, such as terbium or europium, through chelator groups, such as DTPA. The chelates may be coupled to a wide variety of compounds to create specific labels, probes, diagnostic and/or therapeutic reagents, etc. The chelates find particular use in resonance energy transfer between chelate-lanthanide complexes and another luminescent agent, often a fluorescent non-metal based resonance energy acceptor. The methods provide useful information about the structure, conformation, relative location and/or interactions of macromolecules.

  8. Luminescence properties of silicon-cellulose nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikulev, Vitaly; Loginova, Svetlana; Gurtov, Valery

    2012-07-01

    We have characterized the structure and luminescence properties for two-component material composed of nanocrystalline cellulose and nanocrystalline (less to 100 nm) silicon powder. An efficient and stable photoluminescence of nanocomposite, resistant to the influence of gas-phase oxidants, has been found. The obtained material has electret-like properties and demonstrates the possibility of multiple-recharging in an electric field near 5·103 V/cm at temperatures ranging from -70°C to 100°C. The presence of the electric field, as well as ozone or low-temperature plasma treatment, does not change the luminescence spectrum due to quantum size properties of silicon nanoparticles. We believe that these particles may appear in two states: both embedded in a cellulose matrix and in the form of mechanical mixture.

  9. Anomalous enhancement of nanodiamond luminescence upon heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomich, A. A.; Kudryavtsev, O. S.; Dolenko, T. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Fisenko, A. V.; Konov, V. I.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristic photoluminescence (PL) of nanodiamonds (ND) of different origin (detonation, HPHT, extracted from meteorite) was studied in situ at high temperatures in the range 20-450 °C. Luminescence was excited using 473 nm laser and recorded in the range 500-800 nm. In contrast to decrease of point defect PL in bulk diamond with temperature, we found that the ND luminescence related to ND surface defects increases almost an order of magnitude upon heating to 200-250 °C. The observed effect reveals that water adsorbed on ND surfaces efficiently quenches PL; water desorption on heating leads to dramatic increase of the radiative de-excitation.

  10. Method and apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  11. Method and apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Demas, J.N.; Goodwin, P.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Keller, R.A.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, M.

    1998-10-27

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region. 6 figs.

  12. Thermally stimulated luminescence of urine salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordun, O.; Drobchak, O.

    2008-05-01

    The thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) of normal and pathological urine was studied. The presence of pathological salts leads to extinguishing of TSL intensity and to the appearance of additional stripes with maxima nearly 118 and 205K, except of characteristic stripes with the maxima nearly 173 and 260K. TSL stripes depend on urine constituents. The comparison of TSL intensity of normal and pathological urine is carried out and energies of thermal activation are determined for most intensive TSL stripes.

  13. Thermal History Using Microparticle Trap Luminescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    RESULTS 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 Thermoluminescence Testing and Apparatus Samples Materials Synthesis Equipment Modeling the Effect of...Testing of Luminescent Particles in Explosions Pulsed Thermoluminescence 5. CONCLUSIONS HDTRA1-07-1 -0016 University of Minnesota (Twin Cities...arbitrary profiles. Among the successfu l concept demonstrations was one using Mg2Si04:Tb,Co particles with two thermoluminescent peaks heated over

  14. Luminescence of erbium ions in tellurite glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Savikin, Alexander P.; Grishin, Igor A.; Sharkov, Valery V.; Budruev, Andrei V.

    2013-11-15

    Optical characteristics of new generation of tellurite glasses having high stability against crystallization have been studied. As the initial reagents for the glasses synthesis on the base of tellurium oxide (TeO{sub 2}) there were used such oxides as WO{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, ZnO—Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and active components such as high purity Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ErF{sub 3} and YbF{sub 3}. Intensities of luminescence at 1.53 µm of the erbium ions were determined after excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. - Graphical abstract: In contrast to the case of ZBLAN glass the TeO{sub 2}–WO{sub 3} (Er{sup 3+}) glass has bright intensity of luminescence at 1.53 µm for erbium ions that should be caused by excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. Display Omitted - Highlights: • We examined changes in growth of luminescence in doubly-doped tellurite glasses. • We found that luminescence grows in two orders by using Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} at 1.53 μm. • We see possibility to use those glasses as active elements for integrated optics.

  15. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  16. Dislocation luminescence in GaN single crystals under nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study on the dislocation luminescence in GaN by nanoindentation, cathodoluminescence, and Raman. The dislocation luminescence peaking at 3.12 eV exhibits a series of special properties in the cathodoluminescence measurements, and it completely disappears after annealing at 500°C. Raman spectroscopy shows evidence for existence of vacancies in the indented region. A comprehensive investigation encompassing cathodoluminescence, Raman, and annealing experiments allow the assignment of dislocation luminescence to conduction-band-acceptor transition involving Ga vacancies. The nanoscale plasticity of GaN can be better understood by considering the dislocation luminescence mechanism. PMID:25593548

  17. Tuning luminescence and reducing reabsorption of CdSe quantum disks for luminescent solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huichuan; Xie, Peng; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Baojun

    2015-08-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum disks (QDs) have been synthesized for application in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). Luminescence tuning and reabsorption reduction of the QDs were achieved by controlling their size using a hot injection method. The overlap of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared CdSe QDs was negligible. The as-prepared CdSe QDs were incorporated into polymethylmethacrylate without aggregation and luminescence quenching. The obtained highly transparent composites with non-affecting light-emitting properties were used as LSCs. The placement of a CdSe QDs doped LSC prototype (10 × 1 × 0.1 cm) on a Si-cell resulted in a 201% increase in the electrical power output of the Si-cell compared with that of the bare Si-cell.

  18. Features of laser-induced luminescence and photoconductivity of layered Cu3In5S9 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, A. G.; Kyazym-zade, A. G.; Salmanov, V. M.; Mamedov, R. M.; Salmanova, A. A.; Gasanova, L. G.; Mahammadov, A. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Luminescence and photoconductivity of layered Cu3In5S9 crystals at high levels of optical excitation are studied experimentally. A pulsed nanosecond Nd:YAG laser with built-in second and third harmonic generators to generate 1064-, 532-, and 355-nm radiation is used as a light source. It is found that the photoluminescence spectra exhibit two emission bands due to zone-acceptor level and impurity donor-impurity acceptor transitions. It is shown that the photoconductivity in Cu3In5S9 is monopolar. The waveform of the photoconductivity consists of fast and slow components associated with two channels of recombination.

  19. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  20. The dissociative recombination of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubé, S.; Lehfaoui, L.; Rowe, B. R.; Mitchell, J. B. A.

    1998-09-01

    The dissociative recombination rate coefficient for 0953-4075/31/18/016/img2 has been measured at 300 K using a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe-mass spectrometer apparatus. A value of 0953-4075/31/18/016/img3 has been found.

  1. Introduction to dissociative recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.; Mitchell, J. Brian A.

    1989-01-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions with electrons has important consequences in many areas of physical science. Ab-initio calculations coupled with resonant scattering theory and multichannel quantum defect studies have produced detailed results illuminating the role of ion vibrational excitation, the quantum yields of the DR products, and the role of Rydberg states. The theoretical and experimental results are discussed.

  2. Recombineering linear BACs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingwen; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Recombineering is a powerful genetic engineering technique based on homologous recombination that can be used to accurately modify DNA independent of its sequence or size. One novel application of recombineering is the assembly of linear BACs in E. coli that can replicate autonomously as linear plasmids. A circular BAC is inserted with a short telomeric sequence from phage N15, which is subsequently cut and rejoined by the phage protelomerase enzyme to generate a linear BAC with terminal hairpin telomeres. Telomere-capped linear BACs are protected against exonuclease attack both in vitro and in vivo in E. coli cells and can replicate stably. Here we describe step-by-step protocols to linearize any BAC clone by recombineering, including inserting and screening for presence of the N15 telomeric sequence, linearizing BACs in vivo in E. coli, extracting linear BACs, and verifying the presence of hairpin telomere structures. Linear BACs may be useful for functional expression of genomic loci in cells, maintenance of linear viral genomes in their natural conformation, and for constructing innovative artificial chromosome structures for applications in mammalian and plant cells.

  3. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  4. Heterogeneity in the Frequency and Characteristics of Homologous Recombination in Pneumococcal Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hanage, William P.; Harris, Simon R.; Bentley, Stephen; Fraser, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is one of the most important human bacterial pathogens, and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pneumococcus is also known for undergoing extensive homologous recombination via transformation with exogenous DNA. It has been shown that recombination has a major impact on the evolution of the pathogen, including acquisition of antibiotic resistance and serotype-switching. Nevertheless, the mechanism and the rates of recombination in an epidemiological context remain poorly understood. Here, we proposed several mathematical models to describe the rate and size of recombination in the evolutionary history of two very distinct pneumococcal lineages, PMEN1 and CC180. We found that, in both lineages, the process of homologous recombination was best described by a heterogeneous model of recombination with single, short, frequent replacements, which we call micro-recombinations, and rarer, multi-fragment, saltational replacements, which we call macro-recombinations. Macro-recombination was associated with major phenotypic changes, including serotype-switching events, and thus was a major driver of the diversification of the pathogen. We critically evaluate biological and epidemiological processes that could give rise to the micro-recombination and macro-recombination processes. PMID:24786281

  5. Heterogeneity in the frequency and characteristics of homologous recombination in pneumococcal evolution.

    PubMed

    Mostowy, Rafal; Croucher, Nicholas J; Hanage, William P; Harris, Simon R; Bentley, Stephen; Fraser, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is one of the most important human bacterial pathogens, and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pneumococcus is also known for undergoing extensive homologous recombination via transformation with exogenous DNA. It has been shown that recombination has a major impact on the evolution of the pathogen, including acquisition of antibiotic resistance and serotype-switching. Nevertheless, the mechanism and the rates of recombination in an epidemiological context remain poorly understood. Here, we proposed several mathematical models to describe the rate and size of recombination in the evolutionary history of two very distinct pneumococcal lineages, PMEN1 and CC180. We found that, in both lineages, the process of homologous recombination was best described by a heterogeneous model of recombination with single, short, frequent replacements, which we call micro-recombinations, and rarer, multi-fragment, saltational replacements, which we call macro-recombinations. Macro-recombination was associated with major phenotypic changes, including serotype-switching events, and thus was a major driver of the diversification of the pathogen. We critically evaluate biological and epidemiological processes that could give rise to the micro-recombination and macro-recombination processes.

  6. The Contribution of Genetic Recombination to CRISPR Array Evolution.

    PubMed

    Kupczok, Anne; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2015-06-16

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a microbial immune system against foreign DNA. Recognition sequences (spacers) encoded within the CRISPR array mediate the immune reaction in a sequence-specific manner. The known mechanisms for the evolution of CRISPR arrays include spacer acquisition from foreign DNA elements at the time of invasion and array erosion through spacer deletion. Here, we consider the contribution of genetic recombination between homologous CRISPR arrays to the evolution of spacer repertoire. Acquisition of spacers from exogenic arrays via recombination may confer the recipient with immunity against unencountered antagonists. For this purpose, we develop a novel method for the detection of recombination in CRISPR arrays by modeling the spacer order in arrays from multiple strains from the same species. Because the evolutionary signal of spacer recombination may be similar to that of pervasive spacer deletions or independent spacer acquisition, our method entails a robustness analysis of the recombination inference by a statistical comparison to resampled and perturbed data sets. We analyze CRISPR data sets from four bacterial species: two Gammaproteobacteria species harboring CRISPR type I and two Streptococcus species harboring CRISPR type II loci. We find that CRISPR array evolution in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus agalactiae can be explained solely by vertical inheritance and differential spacer deletion. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we find an excess of single spacers potentially incorporated into the CRISPR locus during independent acquisition events. In Streptococcus thermophilus, evidence for spacer acquisition by recombination is present in 5 out of 70 strains. Genetic recombination has been proposed to accelerate adaptation by combining beneficial mutations that arose in independent lineages. However, for most species under study, we find that CRISPR evolution is shaped mainly by spacer acquisition and

  7. Plasmid transfer by conjugation as a possible route of horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Xylella fastidiosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important component of evolution and adaptation of bacterial species. Xylella fastidiosa has the ability to incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome by homologous recombination at relatively high rates. This genetic recombination is believed to play a role in adaptati...

  8. Identification of genes and gene products necessary for bacterial bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1984-07-01

    Expression of luminescence in Escherichia coli was recently achieved by cloning genes from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. One DNA fragment on a hybrid plasmid encoded regulatory functions and enzymatic activities necessary for light production. We report the results of a genetic analysis to identify the luminescence genes (lux) that reside on this recombinant plasmid. lux gene mutations were generated by hydroxylamine treatment, and these mutations were ordered on a linear map by complementation in trans with a series of polar transposon insertions on other plasmids. lux genes were defined by complementation of lux gene defects on pairs of plasmids in trans in E. coli. Hybrid plasmids were also used to direct the synthesis of polypeptides in the E. coli minicell system. Seven lux genes and the corresponding gene products were identified from the complementation analysis and the minicell programing experiments. These genes, in the order of their position on a linear map, and the apparent molecular weights of the gene products are luxR (27,000), luxI (25,000), luxC (53,000), luxD (33,000), luxA (40,000), luxB (38,000), and luxE (42,000). From the luminescence phenotypes of E. coli containing mutant plasmids, functions were assigned to these genes: luxA, luxB, luxC, luxD, and luxE encode enzymes for light production and luxR and luxI encode regulatory functions.

  9. Electroluminescent apparatus having a structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus

    2008-09-02

    An apparatus such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer disposed on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains color-changing and non-color-changing regions arranged in a particular pattern.

  10. Wide-range thermochromic luminescence of organoboronium complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xuepeng; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-01-04

    Alkyl-substituted tetra-coordinate organoboronium bisdiketone complexes exhibit dramatic luminescence thermochromism in organic solvents. In glass-forming alcohols, these complexes exhibit a reversible aqua blue to orange-red to greenish yellow luminescence emission colour change upon cooling.

  11. Ultrashort pulse laser microsurgery system with plasma luminescence feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrow, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-11-10

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue during ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) micro-spinal surgery. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  12. Luminescent Processes Elucidated by Simple Experiments on ZnS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwankner, R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes some impurity-related optical properties of semiconductors, with special emphasis on the luminescence of zinc sulfide (ZnS). Presents and interprets five experiments using a ZnS screen, ultraviolet lamp, transparent Dewar liquid nitrogen, and a helium/neon gas base. Includes application of luminescence measurements to archaeology. (SK)

  13. Method for altering the luminescence of a semiconductor

    DOEpatents

    Barbour, J. Charles; Dimos, Duane B.

    1999-01-01

    A method is described for altering the luminescence of a light emitting semiconductor (LES) device. In particular, a method is described whereby a silicon LES device can be selectively irradiated with a radiation source effective for altering the intensity of luminescence of the irradiated region.

  14. Doped luminescent materials and particle discrimination using same

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick; Allendorf, Mark D; Feng, Patrick L

    2014-10-07

    Doped luminescent materials are provided for converting excited triplet states to radiative hybrid states. The doped materials may be used to conduct pulse shape discrimination (PSD) using luminescence generated by harvested excited triplet states. The doped materials may also be used to detect particles using spectral shape discrimination (SSD).

  15. Method for altering the luminescence of a semiconductor

    DOEpatents

    Barbour, J.C.; Dimos, D.B.

    1999-01-12

    A method is described for altering the luminescence of a light emitting semiconductor (LES) device. In particular, a method is described whereby a silicon LES device can be selectively irradiated with a radiation source effective for altering the intensity of luminescence of the irradiated region. 4 figs.

  16. Luminescence sensitivity changes in natural quartz induced by high temperature annealing: a high frequency EPR and OSL study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poolton, N. R. J.; Smith, G. M.; Riedi, P. C.; Bulur, E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A. S.; Adrian, M.

    2000-04-01

    Quartz undergoes very significant luminescence sensitivity changes after high temperature annealing (0-1200 °C), with particular enhancement occurring between the phase transition temperatures 573 and 870 °C. In order to understand why this occurs, high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), operating at 90 GHz, has been used to monitor the structure and population of defects in natural sedimentary quartz, following annealing and icons/Journals/Common/gamma" ALT="gamma" ALIGN="TOP"/> -irradiation. The results are compared with the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data of the same samples. It is shown that: (i) the structure and population of the dominant [AlO4 ]0 recombination centres are largely unaffected by the annealing process; (ii) the oxygen vacancy E´ centres are destroyed when annealed at temperatures between the phase transitions and; (iii) the numbers of both [TiO4 /H+ ]0 and [TiO4 /Li+ ]0 donors increase between 400 and 700 °C. Photo-EPR spectra are presented, providing evidence that both the Ti associated donors and Al acceptors are directly involved in the OSL process. The heat-induced changes in the population of these EPR defects is mirrored in part by the change in the luminescence sensitivity of several OSL components. Evidence is also presented suggesting that E´ may act as non-radiative centres competing in the OSL process.

  17. Exciton luminescence from Cu2SnS3 bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Naoya; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Tanaka, Kunihiko

    2016-02-01

    The optical properties of Cu2SnS3 (CTS) bulk crystals grown by chemical vapor transport were studied by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The PL spectra from the CTS bulk crystals were analyzed as a function of excitation power and temperature. The main phase of the as-grown samples was determined to be monoclinic CTS by Raman spectroscopy. The observed PL spectra from the CTS bulk crystals were composed of peaks corresponding to free-exciton, two bound-excitons, and donor-acceptor pair recombination luminescence. The peak energies for the free-exciton and two bound-exciton emissions were 0.9317, 0.9291, and 0.9260 eV, respectively, at temperature of 4.2 K. The bound-exciton luminescence was not observed above 30 K. The thermal activation energies for the free-exciton and two bound-exciton emissions were 6.5, 4.8, and 5.2 meV, respectively. The fundamental band gap in the CTS bulk crystals was expected to be ca. 0.94 eV.

  18. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  19. Thermal degradation of luminescence in inorganic perovskite CsPbBr3 nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xi; Hou, Xuemin; Li, Ji; Qu, Chaoqun; Zhang, Wenjin; Zhao, Jialong; Li, Haibo

    2017-03-29

    The luminescence properties of inorganic perovskite CsPbBr3 nanocrystals (NCs) with emissions of 492 and 517 nm under thermal annealing treatment were studied by temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The CsPbBr3 NCs were annealed in vacuum at various temperatures. It was found that the NCs exhibited significant thermal degradation of PL at thermal annealing temperatures above 320 K. The transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and PL spectroscopy demonstrated that the size of NCs almost kept constant at thermal annealing temperatures below 360 K while it significantly enlarged at higher thermal temperatures above 380 K. The PL intensities, peak energies and linewidths of the annealed NCs, as a function of temperature, are discussed in detail. The PL degradation of the NCs was related to the formation of nonradiative recombination centers due to the loss of ligands and growth of NCs under thermal annealing.

  20. Luminescence and electrical properties of single ZnO/MgO core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Grinblat, Gustavo; Comedi, David; Bern, Francis; Barzola-Quiquia, José; Esquinazi, Pablo; Tirado, Mónica

    2014-03-10

    To neutralise the influence of the surface of ZnO nanowires for photonics and optoelectronic applications, we have covered them with insulating MgO film and individually contacted them for electrical characterisation. We show that such a metal-insulator-semiconductor-type nanodevice exhibits a high diode ideality factor of 3.4 below 1 V. MgO shell passivates ZnO surface states and provides confining barriers to electrons and holes within the ZnO core, favouring excitonic ultraviolet radiative recombination, while suppressing defect-related luminescence in the visible and improving electrical conductivity. The results indicate the potential use of ZnO/MgO nanowires as a convenient building block for nano-optoelectronic devices.

  1. The morphology, microstructure, and luminescent properties of CdS/CdTe films

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Jassim, M.M.; Dhere, R.G.; Jones, K.M.; Hasoon, F.S.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the characterization of CdS/CdTe polycrystalline thin films for solar cells. The morphology, microstructure, and luminescent properties are studied by a powerful array of characterization techniques. The presence of pinholes in 100-nm thick CdS is observed. The microstructure of CdS and CdTe films is shown to be heavily faulted polycrystalline. The effect of deposition temperature on the grain size and the microstructure is investigated. The interdiffusion of sulfur and tellurium at the CdS/CdTe interface is studied for the first time by a nanoprobe technique. Considerable amount of sulfur is detected in CdTe in the vicinity of the interface of samples deposited at 625 C. The recombination behavior of grain boundaries and intragrain defects is investigated in as-deposited and heat-treated samples.

  2. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlationmore » between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.« less

  3. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlation between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.

  4. Visible luminescence of dysprosium ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Pisarska, Joanna; Żur, Lidia; Pisarski, Wojciech A

    2011-08-15

    Visible luminescence of Dy(3+) ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses was examined. Luminescence spectra show two intense bands at 480 nm and 573 nm due to (4)F(9/2)→(6)H(15/2) (blue) and (4)F(9/2)→(6)H(13/2) (yellow) transitions of Dy(3+). Luminescence decays from (4)F(9/2) state and yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratios (Y/B) were analysed with PbX(2) (X=F, Cl) content. An introduction of PbX(2) to the borate glass results in the increasing of (4)F(9/2) lifetime and the decreasing of yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratio, which is due to reduction of covalency between Dy(3+) and O(2-)/X(-) ions.

  5. Photostimulated luminescence properties of Eu2+ -doped barium aluminate phosphor.

    PubMed

    He, Quanlong; Qiu, Guangyu; Xu, Xuhui; Qiu, Jianbei; Yu, Xue

    2015-03-01

    An intense green photostimulated luminescence in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor was prepared. The thermoluminescence results indicate that there are at least three types of traps (T1 , T2 , T3 ) with different trap depths in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor according to the bands located at 327, 361 and 555 K, respectively, which are closely associated with the phosphor's long persistent luminescence and photostimulated luminescence properties. In addition, as a novel optical read-out form, a photostimulated persistent luminescence signal can be repeatedly obtained in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor. This shows that re-trapping of the electron released from a deep trap plays an important role in photostimulated persistent luminescence.

  6. Evanescent wave excited luminescence from levitated quantum dot modified colloids.

    PubMed

    Everett, W Neil; Beckham, Richard E; Meissner, Kenith; Bevan, Michael A

    2007-08-14

    Evanescent wave excited luminescence of quantum dot modified polystyrene (QDPS) colloids is investigated to measure potential energy profiles of QDPS colloids electrostatically levitated above a planar glass surface. Luminescence is characterized for three different-sized PS colloids modified with three different-sized QDs using confocal microscopy, emission spectra, flow cytometry, and temporal measurements of levitated and deposited colloids. Colloid-surface potential energy profiles constructed from scattering and luminescence intensity data display excellent agreement with each other, theoretical predictions, and independently measured parameters. QDPS luminescence intensity is indirectly confirmed to have an exponential dependence on height similar to conventional colloidal evanescent wave scattering. Our findings indicate that evanescent wave excited QDPS luminescence could enable total internal reflection microscopy measurements of index-matched hard spheres, multiple specific biomolecular interactions via spectral multiplexing, enhanced morphology-dependent resonance modes, and integrated evanescent wave-video-confocal microscopy experiments not possible with scattering.

  7. Dependence of sonochemical luminescence on various sound fields

    PubMed

    Yanagida; Masubuchi; Minagawa; Takimoto; Ogata; Koyama

    2000-03-01

    To understand the effect of the sound field on sonochemical luminescence, the exact sound pressure must be determined in each field. In this study it was determined by the Shlieren method, which measures the sound pressure without mixing the sound fields. We compared the efficiency of the sonochemical luminescence in three different ways: changing the diameter of the transducer, combining two transducers to obtain crossed propagating directions and surrounding the sound field by a glass cylinder. In the last case cylinders with various sizes were studied. We found that (i) at the same sound pressure, the larger transducer induces stronger luminescence per unit volume, (ii) driving two transducers produces stronger luminescence than the sum of each transducer and (iii) a glass cylinder surrounding the sound field induces stronger luminescence.

  8. Luminescence and white-light emitting luminescent sensor of tetrafluoroterephthalate-lanthanide metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Han, Yongqiang; Yan, Pengfei; Sun, Jingwen; An, Guanghui; Yao, Xu; Li, Yuxin; Li, Guangming

    2017-03-22

    Two types of sixteen complexes 1-16, namely, {[Ln(TFBDC)1.5(H2O)]·2H2O}n [Ln = Pr (1) and Nd (2)] and {[Ln(TFBDC)1.5(H2O)2]·H2O}n [Ln = Ce (3), Pr (4), Nd (5), Sm (6), Eu (7), Gd (8), Tb (9), Dy (10), Ho (11), Er (12), Yb (13) and Lu (14)], {[Dy0.281Eu0.719(TFBDC)1.5(H2O)2]·H2O}n (15) and {[Gd0.871Eu0.103Tb0.026(TFBDC)1.5(H2O)2]·H2O}n (16), were isolated by the reaction of LnCl3·6H2O with 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoroterephthalic acid (H2TFBDC). X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that 1 and 2 exhibit 3D network structures and complexes 3-14 feature 2D network structures formed via three different coordination modes of the ligand. Luminescence spectra revealed that these complexes exhibit broad-spectrum luminescence from the visible to the near-infrared (NIR) region. Unexpectedly, complex 1 exhibits a unique NIR luminescence pattern and the longest lifetime among reported molecular praseodymium complexes. White-light emission was realized via three approaches using the single-component complex 6 (Sm), the two-component complex 15 (Eu and Dy) and the three-component complex 16 (Eu, Tb and Gd). Complex 9 exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity in its luminescence response to benzaldehyde, which provides a promising luminescent sensor for the detection of benzaldehyde.

  9. The recombination epoch revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons.

  10. Cell biology of mitotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-03-02

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect to capacity of homologous recombination.

  11. Cell Biology of Mitotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect to capacity of homologous recombination. PMID:25731763

  12. Spectroscopic characteristic of conical bubble luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi-Dai; Fu, Li-Min; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Long

    2005-04-01

    The conical bubble sonoluminescence (CBSL) from the collapse of the bubble was observed in an improved U-tube apparatus. The emitted light energy of a single CBSL flash was measured to be ~ 1.4mJ. The pulse width was about 100μs. The spectra of luminescence were continuum superimposed with the spectral bands from the excited-state C2, CN and CH. The CBSL provides a link between the light emission of the single-bubble and the multi-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL and MBSL).

  13. Thermally stimulated luminescence of urine salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordun, O. M.; Drobchak, O. Z.

    2007-07-01

    We investigated thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) of urine salts in the normal state and with oxalate, urate, and phosphate salts. We found that the presence of pathological salts leads to a decrease of TSL intensity and to the appearance of additional TLS bands with maxima at 118 and 205 K in addition to the characteristic bands at 173 and 260 K. The TLS bands are related to the urine components. The TSL intensities of urine salts of different chemical composition are compared. The thermal activation energy of the strongest TSL bands is determined.

  14. Image registration for luminescent paint applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.; Mclachlan, Blair G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of pressure sensitive luminescent paints is a viable technique for the measurement of surface pressure on wind tunnel models. This technique requires data reduction of images obtained under known as well as test conditions and spatial transformation of the images. A general transform which registers images to subpixel accuracy is presented and the general characteristics of transforms for image registration and their derivation are discussed. Image resection and its applications are described. The mapping of pressure data to the three dimensional model surface for small wind tunnel models to a spatial accuracy of 0.5 percent of the model length is demonstrated.

  15. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Simple Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Muller, Gilles; Ortiz, María J; de la Moya, Santiago

    2015-09-21

    This article aims to show the identity of "circularly polarized luminescent active simple organic molecules" as a new concept in organic chemistry due to the potential interest of these molecules, as availed by the exponentially growing number of research articles related to them. In particular, it describes and highlights the interest and difficulty in developing chiral simple (small and non-aggregated) organic molecules able to emit left- or right-circularly polarized light efficiently, the efforts realized up to now to reach this challenging objective, and the most significant milestones achieved to date. General guidelines for the preparation of these interesting molecules are also presented.

  16. High pressure luminescence probes in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    High pressure luminescence has proved to be a very powerful tool for characterizing crystalline solids and liquids. Two problems involving glassy polymers are analyzed. In the first problem the excited states of azulene and its derivatives are used to probe intermolecular interactions in PMMA and PS. In the second problem the change in emission intensity with pressure from two excimer states of polyvinylcarbazole as a pure polymer and in dilute solution in polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyisoliutylene (PIB) is studied. The relative emission from the two states depends strongly on the possibility for motion of polymer segments. The observations are related to the proximity to the glass transition.

  17. Eu(2+) luminescence in strontium aluminates.

    PubMed

    Dutczak, D; Jüstel, T; Ronda, C; Meijerink, A

    2015-06-21

    The luminescence properties of Eu(2+) doped strontium aluminates are reported and reviewed for a variety of aluminates, viz. SrAl12O19, SrAl4O7, Sr4Al14O25, SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al2O6. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of local coordination and covalency of the aluminate host lattice, related to the Sr/Al ratio, on the optical properties of the Eu(2+) ion. The UV and VUV excited luminescence spectra as well as luminescence decay curves were recorded to characterize the luminescence properties of the investigated aluminates. The emission of Eu(2+) ions varies over a wide spectral range, from ultraviolet (UV) to red, for the series of aluminates. The variation in emission color can be related to the crystal-field splitting of the 5d levels and the covalent interaction with the surrounding oxygen anions. In the least covalent material, viz. SrAl12O19:Eu(2+), narrow line emission due to the (6)P7/2-(8)S7/2 transition occurs at 4 K, indicating that the 4f(6)5d excited state is situated above the (6)P7/2(4f(7)) excited state around 360 nm. The most alkaline material, viz. Sr3Al2O6:Eu(2+) is the most covalent host and exhibits several d-f emission bands in the yellow to red spectral range due to the Eu(2+) ions located on different crystallographic Sr(2+) sites. The Eu(2+) emission spectra in the other aluminates confirm the trend that with increasing Sr/Al ratio the Eu(2+) emission shifts to longer wavelengths. Interesting differences are observed for the Eu(2+) from different crystallographic sites which cannot always be related with apparent differences in the first oxygen coordination sphere. The discussion gives insight into how in a similar class of materials, strontium aluminates, the emission color of Eu(2+) can be tuned over a wide spectral region.

  18. Luminescence studies of individual quantum dot photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Amirav, Lilac; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2013-09-04

    Using far-field optical microscopy we report the first measurements of photoluminescence from single nanoparticle photocatalysts. Fluence-dependent luminescence is investigated from metal-semiconductor heterojunction quantum dot catalysts exposed to a variety of environments, ranging from gaseous argon to liquid water containing a selection of hole scavengers. The catalysts each exhibit characteristic nonlinear fluence dependence. From these structurally and environmentally sensitive trends, we disentangle the separate rate-determining steps in each particle across the very wide range of time scales, which follow the initial light absorption process. This information will significantly benefit the design of effective artificial photocatalytic systems for renewable direct solar-to-fuel energy conversion.

  19. Polyethylene terephthalate thin films; a luminescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona-Téllez, S.; Alarcón-Flores, G.; Meza-Rocha, A.; Zaleta-Alejandre, E.; Aguilar-Futis, M.; Murrieta S, H.; Falcony, C.

    2015-04-01

    Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) films doped with Rare Earths (RE3+) have been deposited on glass by spray pyrolysis technique at 240 °C, using recycled PET and (RE3+) chlorides as precursors. Cerium, terbium, dysprosium and europium were used as dopants materials, these dopants normally produce luminescent emissions at 450, 545, 573 and 612 nm respectively; the doped films also have light emissions at blue, green, yellow and red respectively. All RE3+ characteristic emissions were observed at naked eyes. Every deposited films show a high transmission in the visible range (close 80% T), films surfaces are pretty soft and homogeneous. Films thickness is around 3 μm.

  20. Optical Receiver Based On Luminescent Light Trapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Joseph W.; Cole, Terry; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    1991-01-01

    Experiment demonstrates feasibility of optical-communication receiver based on luminescent light trapping. Light-gathering element plate of transparent material impregnated with laser dye. Light from distant laser transmitter falls on plate and absorbed by dye molecules, which become excited and reradiate. Reradiated light confined within plate by total internal reflection as it propagates toward edge of plate. Light arriving at edge escapes from plate and detected by small, high-speed, high-gain photomultiplier tubes or other photosensitive devices. Simple, inexpensive, and accepts light from almost any angle. Receiver of this configuration supports reception of data at rate of 13 MHz and higher.

  1. Single layer multi-color luminescent display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, James B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a multi-color luminescent display comprising an insulator substrate and a single layer of host material which may be a phosphor deposited thereon that hosts one or more differential impurities, therein forming a pattern of selected and distinctly colored phosphors such as blue, green, and red phosphors in a single layer of host material. Transparent electrical conductor means may be provided for subjecting selected portions of the pattern of colored phosphors to an electric field thereby forming a multi-color, single layer electroluminescent display.

  2. Chemically engineered persistent luminescence nanoprobes for bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Lécuyer, Thomas; Teston, Eliott; Ramirez-Garcia, Gonzalo; Maldiney, Thomas; Viana, Bruno; Seguin, Johanne; Mignet, Nathalie; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Imaging nanoprobes are a group of nanosized agents developed for providing improved contrast for bioimaging. Among various imaging probes, optical sensors capable of following biological events or progresses at the cellular and molecular levels are actually actively developed for early detection, accurate diagnosis, and monitoring of the treatment of diseases. The optical activities of nanoprobes can be tuned on demand by chemists by engineering their composition, size and surface nature. This review will focus on researches devoted to the conception of nanoprobes with particular optical properties, called persistent luminescence, and their use as new powerful bioimaging agents in preclinical assays. PMID:27877248

  3. Development of novel edible luminescent nanoparticle sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalalian, Sanaz

    This project has developed a novel class of edible hydrocolloid food nanosensors which are doped with luminescent chromophores and investigated whether they can be used to provide information about the local food matrix - temperature, oxygen concentration, and the presence of food-borne pathogens. The luminescence properties of the probes such as phosphorescence and fluorescence provide the sensor sensitivity to the food properties. Hydrocolloid nanoparticles were made from gelatin and starch with diameters ranging from 50 to ˜200 nm and labeled with food grade luminescent probes. The chromophore was covalently and non-covalently attached to the nanoparticle and the photophysical properties of the probe in the food system were studied. Temperature sensors were developed by using the phosphorescence sensitivity of a chromophore to temperature. Experiments with two different probes, namely erythrosine B labeled gelatin nanoparticles and phloxine B labeled gelatin nanoparticles have demonstrated that both probes can be effectively used as temperature sensors in liquid and solid food. The Van't Hoff plots of ln(IDF/IP) versus 1/T vary monotonically over a relatively wide temperature range and thus provide a basis for estimating temperature from measurements of phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence. The tests indicated that the presence of some ingredients such as tannin and anthocyanins in the composition of the food may prohibit the use of gelatin nanoparticle probes due to precipitation of gelatin nanoparticles. The luminescence quenching of the probe by oxygen was used to develop a nanoparticle sensor for oxygen. The results of experiments on liquid and solid food samples indicate that erythrosine B labeled gelatin nanoparticles can be used as a probe to detect the presence or absence of oxygen in some liquid foods. Precise control of oxygen concentration in solutions will pose a challenge as has been observed in this study. The probe did not work as an

  4. Chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay using ProteinA-bacterial magnetite complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Tadashi; Sato, Rika; Kamiya, Shinji; Tanaka, Tsuyosi; Takeyama, Haruko

    1999-04-01

    Bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) which have ProteinA expressed on their surface were constructed using magA which is a key gene in BMP biosynthesis in the magnetic bacterium Magnetospirillum sp. AMB-1. Homogenous chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay using antibody bound ProteinA-BMP complexes was developed for detection of human IgG. A good correlation between the luminescence yield and the concentration of human IgG was obtained in the range of 1-10 3 ng/ml.

  5. Use of luminescent Leptospira interrogans for enumeration in biological assays.

    PubMed

    Murray, Gerald L; King, Amy M; Srikram, Amporn; Sermswan, Rasana W; Adler, Ben

    2010-06-01

    Rapid and reliable in vitro methods for the detection of pathogenic leptospires, such as Leptospira interrogans, are lacking. The present study investigated the use of luminescence to replace the existing enumeration techniques. Transposon TnSC189 was modified to incorporate the luxCDABE cassette from Photorhabdus luminescens and was used to construct luminescent Leptospira spp. There was a linear relationship between luminescence and cell number, with the theoretical detection limit being less than 10(4) leptospires. A comparison of enumeration by a standard method (counting by dark-field microscopy) and enumeration by luminescence was conducted with luminescent L. interrogans. There was a good correlation between the two methods of enumeration (R(2) = 0.766), although variation in the luminescence early and late in growth phase reduced the degree of correlation. To demonstrate the utility of luminescence as a viability and cell number reporter, in vitro assays, including MIC determination, an extracellular matrix binding experiment, and a complement killing experiment, were conducted. In each case, the results obtained by luminescence matched those obtained by traditional means with high correlations (binding assay R(2) = 0.916, complement killing assay R(2) = 0.988). A strain expressing the luxCDABE transposon retained virulence in the hamster model of infection. Despite some variation in luminescence as a result of the growth phase or the particular assay conditions, enumeration by luminescence was found to be a quick, reliable, and highly sensitive method for the in vitro detection of leptospires that has the potential to replace more time-consuming methods of enumeration.

  6. Analysis of the luminescent centers in silicon rich silicon nitride light-emitting capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabañas-Tay, S. A.; Palacios-Huerta, L.; Luna-López, J. A.; Aceves-Mijares, M.; Alcántara-Iniesta, S.; Pérez-García, S. A.; Morales-Sánchez, A.

    2015-06-01

    An analysis of the luminescent center and its effect on the optical, electrical and electro-optical properties of silicon rich silicon nitride (SRN) films deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition is reported. As-deposited SRN films emit a broad photoluminescence (PL) spectrum in the visible range where the maximum peak shifts from ∼490 to ∼590 nm as the silicon excess increases. After thermal annealing, a PL blue-shift is observed and it is ascribed to a compositional-dependent change in the concentration of defect states within the films. A correlation between the PL peak energy with the optical band-gap indicates that the luminescence is related to the band tail carrier recombination in the SRN films. Light emitting capacitors (LECs) based on fluor-doped tin oxide SnO2:F (FTO)/SRN active layer/n-Si substrate emit a broad electroluminescent spectra where the maximum emission peak blue-shifts when the polarity is changed from reverse to forward bias. In the reverse bias, the electroluminescence (EL) is related to the states of valence band tail and Si dangling bonds (K0 centers), while in the forward bias the EL is originated from electronic transitions from the conduction band minimum to K0 centers. A model based on the trap assisted tunneling carrier transport is correlated with the proposed EL radiative recombination process in the FTO/SRN/n-Si structures. A discussion of the differences between the PL and EL spectra is reported. The results open new alternatives toward the development of Si-based light emitters where two different EL spectra can be obtained changing the polarity.

  7. Genome engineering and gene expression control for bacterial strain development.

    PubMed

    Song, Chan Woo; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of techniques and tools have been developed for genome engineering and gene expression control to achieve desired phenotypes of various bacteria. Here we review and discuss the recent advances in bacterial genome manipulation and gene expression control techniques, and their actual uses with accompanying examples. Genome engineering has been commonly performed based on homologous recombination. During such genome manipulation, the counterselection systems employing SacB or nucleases have mainly been used for the efficient selection of desired engineered strains. The recombineering technology enables simple and more rapid manipulation of the bacterial genome. The group II intron-mediated genome engineering technology is another option for some bacteria that are difficult to be engineered by homologous recombination. Due to the increasing demands on high-throughput screening of bacterial strains having the desired phenotypes, several multiplex genome engineering techniques have recently been developed and validated in some bacteria. Another approach to achieve desired bacterial phenotypes is the repression of target gene expression without the modification of genome sequences. This can be performed by expressing antisense RNA, small regulatory RNA, or CRISPR RNA to repress target gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. All of these techniques allow efficient and rapid development and screening of bacterial strains having desired phenotypes, and more advanced techniques are expected to be seen.

  8. Deviation of Time-Resolved Luminescence Dynamics in MWIR Semiconductor Materials from Carrier Recombination Theory Predictions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    l data po in t ∗/ int l o g s c a l e ; /∗ search the con f i g space on a l o g s c a l e i f ==1 ∗/ int datapo int s ; /∗ number o f da tapo in t s...in the f i l e ∗/ int r a t i o ; /∗ number o f c a l c u l a t e d data po in t s between expmtl da tapo in t s . . . must be between 1 and 6 ∗/ int...bins ; /∗ i n t e g r a t i o n time fo r each da tapo in t ∗/ Listing D.3 Main function for the fitting program /∗ Peter Johnson , AFIT Masters

  9. Luminescence quenching of conductive Si nanocrystals via “Linkage emission”: Hopping-like propagation of infrared-excited Auger electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Masashi; Crowe, Iain F.; Halsall, Matthew P.; Hamilton, Bruce; Knights, Andrew P.; Gwilliam, Russell M.

    2014-08-14

    Phosphorus (P) is an n-type dopant for conductive silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc's), the electrical activation of which may be monitored through a non-radiative Auger recombination process that quenches the Si-nc luminescence. We investigated this quenching mechanism through electrical measurements of Si-nc's. Infrared-excited Auger electron emission as the non-radiative process was directly probed and the dynamics of the process are determined from a frequency response analysis. To explain the dynamics, we propose a model in which Auger electrons with a low kinetic energy establish a local inter-nanocrystal conductance and the repetition of this local conductance results in a constant photocurrent (“linkage emission”). This emission becomes significant by electron filling in the Si-nc's owing to the electrical activation of P, which is consistent with observed luminescence quenching behavior. We found that the IR photo-excited emission is distinct from the thermally induced hopping conduction and show that confined, rather than trapped, charges are the source of the Auger electrons. Thus, the process consumes both confined charges and the recombination energy for Auger emission, which explains the luminescence quenching mechanism of Si-nc:P.

  10. The detection of inherent homologous recombination between repeat sequences in H. pylori 26695 by the PCR-based method.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yajuan; Zepeda-Gurrola, Reyna Cristina; Aguilar-Gutiérrez, Germán Rubén; Lara-Ramírez, Edgar E; De Luna-Santillana, Erick J; Rodríguez-Luna, Isabel Cristina; Sánchez-Varela, Alejandro; Carreño-López, Ricardo; Moreno-Medina, Víctor Ricardo; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Guo, Xianwu

    2014-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than half of the world's population, making it the most widespread infection of bacteria. It has high genetic diversity and has been considered as one of the most variable bacterial species. In the present study, a PCR-based method was used to detect the presence and the relative frequency of homologous recombination between repeat sequences (>500 bp) in H. pylori 26695. All the recombinant structures have been confirmed by sequencing. The inversion generated between inverted repeats showed distinct features from the recombination for duplication or deletion between direct repeats. Meanwhile, we gave the mathematic reasoning of a general formula for the calculation of relative recombination frequency and indicated the conditions for its application. This formula could be extensively applied to detect the frequency of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and other types of predictable recombination. Our results should be helpful for better understanding the genome evolution and adaptation of bacteria.

  11. X-ray luminescence based spectrometer for investigation of scintillation properties

    SciTech Connect

    Varney, C. R.; Khamehchi, M. A.; Ji, Jianfeng; Selim, F. A.

    2012-10-15

    A new x-ray luminescence based spectrometer was developed and installed to examine the scintillation properties of materials while revealing the origins of luminescence and investigating trapping defects. Measurements were performed on a number of undoped and Ce doped yttrium aluminum garnet crystals and various luminescence centers were characterized. The measured x-ray luminescence spectra provide information about the spectral range and the scintillation efficiency and linearity. The efficiency of charge-carriers production due to x ray, their energy transfer to the luminescence centers, and the efficiency of luminescence are all reflected in the efficiency of x-ray luminescence.

  12. Novel luminescent nanoparticles for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ling; Yang, Zhihua; Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Yanyu; Wang, Lun; Wang, Leyu

    2010-05-01

    Highly luminescent LaF 3:Ce 3+/Tb 3+ nanocrystals were successfully prepared and surface functionalized via Layer-by-Layer technology. These as-prepared nanocrystals are highly resistant to photobleaching and pretty dispersible in aqueous solution. Due to the efficient luminescence quenching of the nanocrystals by nucleic acids, a facile fluorescence quenching method was developed for the detection of trace amount of nucleic acids. Under optimal conditions, the fluorescence intensity was proportional to the DNA concentration over the range of 0.60-25.0 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and 0.60-30.0 μg mL -1 for herring sperm DNA (hs-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limit is 0.21 μg mL -1 for ct-DNA and 0.31 μg mL -1 for hs-DNA, respectively. The results indicated that the reported method is simple and rapid with wide linear range. Also, the recovery and relative standard deviation of this method are reasonable and satisfactory.

  13. Luminescent ruthenium complexes for theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Carolina R; Lima, Márcia V S; Cheleski, Juliana; Peterson, Erica J; Venâncio, Tiago; Farrell, Nicholas P; Carlos, Rose M

    2014-06-12

    The water-soluble and visible luminescent complexes cis-[Ru(L-L)2(L)2](2+) where L-L = 2,2-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline and L= imidazole, 1-methylimidazole, and histamine have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic techniques. Spectroscopic (circular dichroism, saturation transfer difference NMR, and diffusion ordered spectroscopy NMR) and isothermal titration calorimetry studies indicate binding of cis-[Ru(phen)2(ImH)2](2+) and human serum albumin occurs via noncovalent interactions with K(b) = 9.8 × 10(4) mol(-1) L, ΔH = -11.5 ± 0.1 kcal mol(-1), and TΔS = -4.46 ± 0.3 kcal mol(-1). High uptake of the complex into HCT116 cells was detected by luminescent confocal microscopy. Cytotoxicity of cis-[Ru(phen)2(ImH)2](2+) against proliferation of HCT116p53(+/+) and HCT116p53(-/-) shows IC50 values of 0.1 and 0.7 μmol L(-1). Flow cytometry and western blot indicate RuphenImH mediates cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in both cells and is more prominent in p53(+/+). The complex activates proapoptotic PARP in p53(-/-), but not in p53(+/+). A cytostatic mechanism based on quantification of the number of cells during the time period of incubation is suggested.

  14. Decreasing luminescence lifetime of evaporating phosphorescent droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, D. D.; Dam, N. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van de Water, W.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence has been used extensively to study spray dynamics. It is important to understand the influence of droplet evaporation in the interpretation of such measurements, as it increases luminescence quenching. By suspending a single evaporating n-heptane droplet in an acoustic levitator, the properties of lanthanide-complex europium-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-trioctylphosphine oxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) phosphorescence are determined through high-speed imaging. A decrease was found in the measured phosphorescence decay coefficient (780 → 200 μs) with decreasing droplet volumes (10-9 → 10-11 m3) corresponding to increasing concentrations (10-4 → 10-2 M). This decrease continues up to the point of shell-formation at supersaturated concentrations. The diminished luminescence is shown not to be attributable to triplet-triplet annihilation, quenching between excited triplet-state molecules. Instead, the pure exponential decays found in the measurements show that a non-phosphorescent quencher, such as free TTA/TOPO, can be attributable to this decay. The concentration dependence of the phosphorescence lifetime can therefore be used as a diagnostic of evaporation in sprays.

  15. Analysis of thermally stimulated luminescence and conductivity without quasi-equilibrium approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opanowicz, A.

    2007-08-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and conductivity (TSC) are considered using the classical insulator model that assumes one kind of active trap, one kind of inactive deep trap and one kind of recombination centre. Kinetic equations describing the model are solved numerically without and with the use of quasi-equilibrium (QE) approximation. The QE state is characterized by the parameter qI = (dnc/dt)/Ie, where dnc/dt is the rate of change of free electron density, and Ie is the TSL intensity. The QE state parameter qI, the relative recombination probability γ = Ie/(Ie + It) (It is the trapping intensity) and a new parameter called a quasi-stationary (QS) state parameter q* = qIγ = (dnc/dt)/(Ie + It) are used for the analysis of the TSL and TSC. The QE and QS states are determined by conditions |qI| Lt 1 and, respectively, |q*| Lt 1. The TSL and TSC curves and the temperature dependences of qI, q*, γ the recombination lifetime and the occupancies of active traps and recombination centres are numerically calculated for five sets of kinetic parameters and different heating rates. These calculation results show that (1) the upper limit of the heating rate for the presence of the QS state appears at a higher heating rate than that for the QE state when the retrapping process is present, and (2) the TSL (TSC) curves in the QS state have properties similar to those for the TSL (TSC) curves in the QE state. Approximate formulae for calculation of the parameters qI and q* in the initial range of the TSL and TSC curves are derived and used in the heating-rate methods, proposed in this work, for determination of those parameters from the calculated TSL curves.

  16. Orientation Dependence in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K.; Takahashi, N.; Fujitani, Y.; Yoshikura, H.; Kobayashi, I.

    1996-01-01

    Homologous recombination was investigated in Escherichia coli with two plasmids, each carrying the homologous region (two defective neo genes, one with an amino-end deletion and the other with a carboxyl-end deletion) in either direct or inverted orientation. Recombination efficiency was measured in recBC sbcBC and recBC sbcA strains in three ways. First, we measured the frequency of cells carrying neo(+) recombinant plasmids in stationary phase. Recombination between direct repeats was much more frequent than between inverted repeats in the recBC sbcBC strain but was equally frequent in the two substrates in the recBC sbcA strain. Second, the fluctuation test was used to exclude bias by a rate difference between the recombinant and parental plasmids and led to the same conclusion. Third, direct selection for recombinants just after transformation with or without substrate double-strand breaks yielded essentially the same results. Double-strand breaks elevated recombination in both the strains and in both substrates. These results are consistant with our previous findings that the major route of recombination in recBC sbcBC strains generates only one recombinant DNA from two DNAs and in recBC sbcA strains generates two recombinant DNAs from two DNAs. PMID:8722759

  17. A Simple Luminescent Adenylate-Cyclase Functional Assay for Evaluation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Israeli, Ma’ayan; Rotem, Shahar; Elia, Uri; Bar-Haim, Erez; Cohen, Ofer; Chitlaru, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF), the toxic sub-unit of the Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase whose detrimental activity in the infected host results in severe edema. EF is therefore a major virulence factor of B. anthracis. We describe a simple, rapid and reliable functional adenylate-cyclase assay based on inhibition of a luciferase-mediated luminescence reaction. The assay exploits the efficient adenylate cyclase-mediated depletion of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), and the strict dependence on ATP of the light-emitting luciferase-catalyzed luciferin-conversion to oxyluciferin, which can be easily visualized. The assay exhibits a robust EF-dose response decrease in luminescence, which may be specifically reverted by anti-EF antibodies. The application of the assay is exemplified in: (a) determining the presence of EF in B. anthracis cultures, or its absence in cultures of EF-defective strains; (b) evaluating the anti-EF humoral response in experimental animals infected/vaccinated with B. anthracis; and (c) rapid discrimination between EF producing and non-producing bacterial colonies. Furthermore, the assay may be amenable with high-throughput screening for EF inhibitory molecules. PMID:27548219

  18. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  19. Luminescent chiral lanthanide(III) complexes as potential molecular probes

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    This perspective gives an introduction into the design of luminescent lanthanide(III)-containing complexes possessing chiral properties and used to probe biological materials. The first part briefly describes general principles, focusing on the optical aspect (i.e. lanthanide luminescence, sensitization processes) of the most emissive trivalent lanthanide ions, europium and terbium, incorporated into molecular luminescent edifices. This is followed by a short discussion on the importance of chirality in the biological and pharmaceutical fields. The second part is devoted to the assessment of the chiroptical spectroscopic tools available (typically circular dichroism and circularly polarized luminescence) and the strategies used to introduce a chiral feature into luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes (chiral structure resulting from a chiral arrangement of the ligand molecules surrounding the luminescent center or presence of chiral centers in the ligand molecules). Finally, the last part illustrates these fundamental principles with recent selected examples of such chiral luminescent lanthanide-based compounds used as potential probes of biomolecular substrates. PMID:19885510

  20. Persistent luminescence properties of SrMg2(PO4)2:Eu2+,Tb3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Guifang; Hu, Yihua; Chen, Li; Wang, Xiaojuan; Hung, Lihua

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the persistent luminescence in europium-doped SrMg2(PO4)2 upon codoping with auxiliary terbium. Luminescence properties of the phosphors, including photoluminescence, luminescence decay and thermoluminescence, are systematically studied. SrMg2(PO4)2:Eu2+ shows only a weak persistent luminescence, and codoping with Tb3+ is necessary to obtain considerable persistent luminescence. An energy level scheme is constructed to convey reasonable trapping and detrapping processes in the material.

  1. A 5' Noncoding Exon Containing Engineered Intron Enhances Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV Vectors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiamiao; Williams, James A; Luke, Jeremy; Zhang, Feijie; Chu, Kirk; Kay, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) expression system in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within a universal 5' UTR noncoding exon. Like minicircle DNA plasmids (devoid of bacterial backbone sequences), MIP plasmids overcome transcriptional silencing of the transgene. However, in addition MIP plasmids increase transgene expression by 2 and often >10 times higher than minicircle vectors in vivo and in vitro. Based on these findings, we examined the effects of the MIP intronic sequences in a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector system. Recombinant AAV vectors containing an intron with a bacterial replication origin and bacterial selectable marker increased transgene expression by 40 to 100 times in vivo when compared with conventional AAV vectors. Therefore, inclusion of this noncoding exon/intron sequence upstream of the coding region can substantially enhance AAV-mediated gene expression in vivo.

  2. Sensitivity of dark mutants of various strains of luminescent bacteria to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lyzeń, Robert; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies indicated that bioluminescence of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi may both stimulate DNA repair and contribute to detoxification of deleterious oxygen derivatives. Therefore, it was also proposed that these reactions can be considered biological roles of bacterial luminescence and might act as evolutionary drives in development of luminous systems. However, experimental evidence for the physiological role of luciferase in protection of cells against oxidative stress has been demonstrated only in one bacterial species, raising the question whether this is a specific or a more general phenomenon. Here we demonstrate that in the presence of various oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, cumene hydroperoxide, t-butyl hydroperoxide and ferrous ions) growth of dark mutants of different strains of Vibrio fischeri and Photobacterium leiognathi is impaired relative to wild-type bacteria, though to various extents. Deleterious effects of oxidants on the mutants could be reduced (with different efficiency) by addition of antioxidants, A-TEMPO or 4OH-TEMPO. These results support the hypotheses that (1) activities of bacterial luciferases may detoxify deleterious oxygen derivatives, and (2) significantly different efficiencies of this reaction are characteristic for various luciferases.

  3. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  4. Interference effects in luminescence studies of thin films.

    PubMed

    Holm, R T; McKnight, S W; Palik, E D; Lukosz, W

    1982-07-15

    Interference effects, including multiple-beam and wide-angle, associated with luminescence from within a thin film are described. A simple geometrical model is used to calculate the s- and p-polarized luminescent light assuming electric-dipole radiation. The luminescence exhibits fringes when measured both as a function of the film thickness and as a function of the wavelength of the light. In the latter case the fringes can also show a beating effect. The model is applied to several experimental examples of cathodoluminescence in SiO(2) and an example of photoluminescence in a-Si.

  5. Luminescence dating of the Wabar meteorite craters, Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, J.R.; Robertson, G.B.; Shoemaker, C.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Wynn, J.

    2004-01-01

    Luminescence dating has been used to find the age of meteorite impact craters at Wabar (Al Hadida) in Saudi Arabia. The luminescence characteristics of the shocked material were determined. Using a variety of luminescence dating techniques applied to impactite formed by the meteorite, and to the underlying sand, the age is found to be 290 ± 38 years. A comparison is made with two possible historically recorded ages. An impact as young as this has implications for the assessment of hazards from the impact on Earth of small meteorites.

  6. Surface pressure measurement by oxygen quenching of luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouterman, Martin P. (Inventor); Kavandi, Janet L. (Inventor); Gallery, Jean (Inventor); Callis, James B. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Methods and compositions for measuring the pressure of an oxygen-containing gas on an aerodynamic surface, by oxygen-quenching of luminescence of molecular sensors is disclosed. Objects are coated with luminescent films containing a first sensor and at least one of two additional sensors, each of the sensors having luminescences that have different dependencies on temperature and oxygen pressure. Methods and compositions are also provided for improving pressure measurements (qualitative or quantitive) on surfaces coated with a film having one or more types of sensor.

  7. Surface pressure measurement by oxygen quenching of luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouterman, Martin P. (Inventor); Kavandi, Janet L. (Inventor); Gallery, Jean (Inventor); Callis, James B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Methods and compositions for measuring the pressure of an oxygen-containing gas on an aerodynamic surface, by oxygen-quenching of luminescence of molecular sensors is disclosed. Objects are coated with luminescent films containing a first sensor and at least one of two additional sensors, each of the sensors having luminescences that have different dependencies on temperature and oxygen pressure. Methods and compositions are also provided for improving pressure measurements (qualitative or quantitive) on surfaces coated with a film having one or more types of sensor.

  8. Luminescence, electron paramagnetic resonance, and optical properties of lunar material.

    PubMed

    Geake, J E; Dollfus, A; Garlick, G F; Lamb, W; Walker, C; Steigmann, G A; Titulaer, C

    1970-01-30

    Dust samples have been found to luminesce weakly under proton excitation, but not under ultraviolet. Damage, recovery, and heating effects have been investigated. Chips of breccia show luminescence, from white inclusions only, under ultraviolet and protons. Some rock chips show general luminescence, mainly from plagioclase. No natural or excited thermoluminescence has been found for dust or chips. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum shows the same broad Fe(3+) dipole resonance for dust and for some chips; other chips show no response. The polarization characteristics of dust are found to be identical to those of the Sea of Tranquillity, independently of proton damage. Chips show characteristics unlike any part of the lunar surface.

  9. New cross-linking quinoline- and quinolone-based luminescent lanthanide probes for sensitive labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Shyamala; Wirpsza, Laura; Kozlov, Maxim; Marras, Salvatore A. E.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Mustaev, Arkady

    2012-03-01

    New luminescent lanthanide chelates containing thiol-, amine-, and click-reactive groups in antenna-fluorophore moieties were synthesized. The chelates include diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) coupled to two types of chromophores: 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2(1H) quinolinone, and 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-alkoxyquinoline. The synthesized compounds were characterized using NMR, light absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescent spectroscopy. Some of the compounds displayed high brightness with Tb3+, Eu3+, and Dy3+. Obtained reactive lanthanide chelates can be easily attached to biological molecules. The probes demonstrated high performance in molecular beaconbased DNA hybridization assays (sub-pico molar detection limit), in bacterial proteome labeling, and in live cell imaging.

  10. A luminescence endotoxin biosensor prepared by the sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hreniak, A.; Maruszewski, K.; Rybka, J.; Gamian, A.; Czyżewski, J.

    2004-07-01

    Silicate thin films with terminal amino groups were prepared via the sol-gel technique and selected biological molecules labeled with luminophores were covalently attached to their surfaces. The obtained thin films with covalently bound Concanavalin-A (Con-A) labeled with fluorescein (FITC) were immersed in a buffer and polarized emission spectra were measured. In the next step, the samples were incubated with a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Hafnia alvei PCM 1186 bacterial strain and the emission spectra were collected again. The influence of LPS binding to Con-A on the luminescence depolarization has been proven. The system based on the this effect can be employed as an optical sensor for detection of certain types of bacteria.

  11. Novel Heterotypic Rox Sites for Combinatorial Dre Recombination Strategies.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Katherine; Nguyen, Eileen; Sergeev, Yuri; Badea, Tudor C

    2015-12-29

    Site-specific recombinases (SSRs) such as Cre are widely used in gene targeting and genetic approaches for cell labeling and manipulation. They mediate DNA strand exchange between two DNA molecules at dedicated recognition sites. Precise understanding of the Cre recombination mechanism, including the role of individual base pairs in its loxP target site, guided the generation of mutant lox sites that specifically recombine with themselves but not with the wild type loxP. This has led to the development of a variety of combinatorial Cre-dependent genetic strategies, such as multicolor reporters, irreversible inversions, or recombination-mediated cassette exchange. Dre, a Cre-related phage integrase that recognizes roxP sites, does not cross-react with the Cre-loxP system, but has similar recombination efficiency. We have previously described intersectional genetic strategies combining Dre and Cre. We now report a mutagenesis screen aimed at identifying roxP base pairs critical for self-recognition. We describe several rox variant sites that are incompatible with roxP, but are able to efficiently recombine with themselves in either purified systems or bacterial and eukaryotic tissue culture systems. These newly identified rox sites are not recognized by Cre, thus enabling potential combinatorial strategies involving Cre, Dre, and target loci including multiple loxP and roxP variants.

  12. Novel Heterotypic Rox Sites for Combinatorial Dre Recombination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Katherine; Nguyen, Eileen; Sergeev, Yuri; Badea, Tudor C.

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific recombinases (SSRs) such as Cre are widely used in gene targeting and genetic approaches for cell labeling and manipulation. They mediate DNA strand exchange between two DNA molecules at dedicated recognition sites. Precise understanding of the Cre recombination mechanism, including the role of individual base pairs in its loxP target site, guided the generation of mutant lox sites that specifically recombine with themselves but not with the wild type loxP. This has led to the development of a variety of combinatorial Cre-dependent genetic strategies, such as multicolor reporters, irreversible inversions, or recombination-mediated cassette exchange. Dre, a Cre-related phage integrase that recognizes roxP sites, does not cross-react with the Cre-loxP system, but has similar recombination efficiency. We have previously described intersectional genetic strategies combining Dre and Cre. We now report a mutagenesis screen aimed at identifying roxP base pairs critical for self-recognition. We describe several rox variant sites that are incompatible with roxP, but are able to efficiently recombine with themselves in either purified systems or bacterial and eukaryotic tissue culture systems. These newly identified rox sites are not recognized by Cre, thus enabling potential combinatorial strategies involving Cre, Dre, and target loci including multiple loxP and roxP variants. PMID:26715092

  13. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  14. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  15. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: a new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S; Joseph, M; Sankaran, K

    2015-03-05

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed.

  16. Recent advances in recombinant protein production

    PubMed Central

    Kunert, Renate; Casanova, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Designing appropriate expression vectors is one of the critical steps in the generation of stable cell lines for recombinant protein production. Conventional expression vectors are severely affected by the chromatin environment surrounding their integration site into the host genome, resulting in low expression levels and transgene silencing. In the past, a new generation of expression vectors and different strategies was developed to overcome the chromatin effects. Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are cloning vectors capable of accommodating up to 350 Kb. Thus, BACs can carry a whole eukaryotic locus with all the elements controlling the expression of a gene; therefore, BACs harbor their own chromatin environment. Expression vectors based on BACs containing open/permissive chromatin loci are not affected by the chromatin surrounding their integration site in the host cell genome. Consequently, BAC-based expression vectors containing the appropriate loci confer predictable and high levels of expression over time. These properties make BAC-based expression vectors a very attractive tool applied to the recombinant protein production field. PMID:23680894

  17. Lipopolysaccharide induced conversion of recombinant prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Fozia; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Ladner, Carol L; Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Ametaj, Burim N; Wishart, David S

    2014-01-01

    The conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to the β-rich infectious isoform PrPSc is considered a critical and central feature in prion pathology. Although PrPSc is the critical component of the infectious agent, as proposed in the “protein-only” prion hypothesis, cellular components have been identified as important cofactors in triggering and enhancing the conversion of PrPC to proteinase K resistant PrPSc. A number of in vitro systems using various chemical and/or physical agents such as guanidine hydrochloride, urea, SDS, high temperature, and low pH, have been developed that cause PrPC conversion, their amplification, and amyloid fibril formation often under non-physiological conditions. In our ongoing efforts to look for endogenous and exogenous chemical mediators that might initiate, influence, or result in the natural conversion of PrPC to PrPSc, we discovered that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacterial membranes interacts with recombinant prion proteins and induces conversion to an isoform richer in β sheet at near physiological conditions as long as the LPS concentration remains above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). More significant was the LPS mediated conversion that was observed even at sub-molar ratios of LPS to recombinant ShPrP (90–232). PMID:24819168

  18. Vaxvec: The first web-based recombinant vaccine vector database and its data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shunzhou; Martin, Carly; Patil, Rasika; Zhu, Felix; Zhao, Bin; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2015-01-01

    A recombinant vector vaccine uses an attenuated virus, bacterium, or parasite as the carrier to express a heterologous antigen(s). Many recombinant vaccine vectors and related vaccines have been developed and extensively investigated. To compare and better understand recombinant vectors and vaccines, we have generated Vaxvec (http://www.violinet.org/vaxvec), the first web-based database that stores various recombinant vaccine vectors and those experimentally verified vaccines that use these vectors. Vaxvec has now included 59 vaccine vectors that have been used in 196 recombinant vector vaccines against 66 pathogens and cancers. These vectors are classified to 41 viral vectors, 15 bacterial vectors, 1 parasitic vector, and 1 fungal vector. The most commonly used viral vaccine vectors are double-stranded DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, adenoviruses, and poxviruses. For example, Vaxvec includes 63 poxvirus-based recombinant vaccines for over 20 pathogens and cancers. Vaxvec collects 30 recombinant vector influenza vaccines that use 17 recombinant vectors and were experimentally tested in 7 animal models. In addition, over 60 protective antigens used in recombinant vector vaccines are annotated and analyzed. User-friendly web-interfaces are available for querying various data in Vaxvec. To support data exchange, the information of vaccine vectors, vaccines, and related information is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO). Vaxvec is a timely and vital source of vaccine vector database and facilitates efficient vaccine vector research and development. PMID:26403370

  19. Vaxvec: The first web-based recombinant vaccine vector database and its data analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shunzhou; Martin, Carly; Patil, Rasika; Zhu, Felix; Zhao, Bin; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2015-11-27

    A recombinant vector vaccine uses an attenuated virus, bacterium, or parasite as the carrier to express a heterologous antigen(s). Many recombinant vaccine vectors and related vaccines have been developed and extensively investigated. To compare and better understand recombinant vectors and vaccines, we have generated Vaxvec (http://www.violinet.org/vaxvec), the first web-based database that stores various recombinant vaccine vectors and those experimentally verified vaccines that use these vectors. Vaxvec has now included 59 vaccine vectors that have been used in 196 recombinant vector vaccines against 66 pathogens and cancers. These vectors are classified to 41 viral vectors, 15 bacterial vectors, 1 parasitic vector, and 1 fungal vector. The most commonly used viral vaccine vectors are double-stranded DNA viruses, including herpesviruses, adenoviruses, and poxviruses. For example, Vaxvec includes 63 poxvirus-based recombinant vaccines for over 20 pathogens and cancers. Vaxvec collects 30 recombinant vector influenza vaccines that use 17 recombinant vectors and were experimentally tested in 7 animal models. In addition, over 60 protective antigens used in recombinant vector vaccines are annotated and analyzed. User-friendly web-interfaces are available for querying various data in Vaxvec. To support data exchange, the information of vaccine vectors, vaccines, and related information is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO). Vaxvec is a timely and vital source of vaccine vector database and facilitates efficient vaccine vector research and development.

  20. Dominant short repeated sequences in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Avershina, Ekaterina; Rudi, Knut

    2015-03-01

    We use a novel multidimensional searching approach to present the first exhaustive search for all possible repeated sequences in 166 genomes selected to cover the bacterial domain. We found an overrepresentation of repeated sequences in all but one of the genomes. The most prevalent repeats by far were related to interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)—conferring bacterial adaptive immunity. We identified a deep branching clade of thermophilic Firmicutes containing the highest number of CRISPR repeats. We also identified a high prevalence of tandem repeated heptamers. In addition, we identified GC-rich repeats that could potentially be involved in recombination events. Finally, we identified repeats in a 16322 amino acid mega protein (involved in biofilm formation) and inverted repeats flanking miniature transposable elements (MITEs). In conclusion, the exhaustive search for repeated sequences identified new elements and distribution of these, which has implications for understanding both the ecology and evolution of bacteria.

  1. Luminescent solar concentrators utilizing stimulated emission.

    PubMed

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W; Schmidt, Timothy W; Argyros, Alexander

    2016-03-21

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are an emerging technology that aims primarily to reduce the cost of solar energy, with great potential for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, realizing LSCs with commercially viable efficiency is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. Here, we introduce an approach to reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire area of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption to allow net gain in the system, and directed towards a small PV cell. A mathematical model, taking into account thermodynamic considerations, of such a system is presented which identifies key parameters and allows evaluation in terms of net effective output power.

  2. Biosensing with Luminescent Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Sapsford, Kim E.; Pons, Thomas; Medintz, Igor L.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2006-01-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are a recently developed class of nanomaterial whose unique photophysical properties are helping to create a new generation of robust fluorescent biosensors. QD properties of interest for biosensing include high quantum yields, broad absorption spectra coupled to narrow size-tunable photoluminescent emissions and exceptional resistance to both photobleaching and chemical degradation. In this review, we examine the progress in adapting QDs for several predominantly in vitro biosensing applications including use in immunoassays, as generalized probes, in nucleic acid detection and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) - based sensing. We also describe several important considerations when working with QDs mainly centered on the choice of material(s) and appropriate strategies for attaching biomolecules to the QDs.

  3. Luminescent solar concentrator improvement by stimulated emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Argyros, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) offer the prospect of reducing the cost of solar energy, and are a promising candidate for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, the realization of commercially viable efficiency of LSCs is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. In this work, a method is introduced for reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire length of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption, and directed by the seed laser towards a small target PV cell. A mathematical model of such a system is presented which identifies different physical parameters responsible for the power conversion efficiency and gives the net effective output power.

  4. Towards an optoelectronic luminescent sensing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitry B.; Ponomarev, Gely V.; Ogurtsov, Vladimir I.; Dvornikov, Alexey A.

    1994-02-01

    The new dye which has improved spectral characteristics synthesized on the basis of platinum complex of the porphyrin-like compound was studied with the view of its application to oxygen sensing. It resulted in a new solid-state oxygen-sensitive material with advanced working characteristics which is highly compatible with excitation with yellow LEDs. This new sensing material makes it possible to develop simple fiber-optoelectronic devices -- prototype oxygen sensors. One of the embodiments was constructed which utilizes powerful yellow LED as a light source, silicone photodiode as a photodetector, and has a fiber-optic output terminated with an active element (oxygen membrane). The electronic scheme of the device provides modulation of LED at a kilohertz range frequency and is capable of measuring specific luminescent signal. The system is now under improvement and optimization with emphasis to lifetime measurements performed by phase method.

  5. Irradiated Shellfish: Identification by Photostimulated Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Di Schiavi, Maria Teresa; Falconi, Grazia; Verità, Francesca Della; Cavallina, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    The irradiation of food is a technology used in the industry to prevent the deterioration of foodstuff in some countries. The European Community legislation states that each Member State must carry out annual checks on the products during commercialisation. The Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle regioni Lazio e Toscana (Rome, Italy) has developed and validated the screening method of photostimulated luminescence UNI EN 13751:2009 to identify irradiated shellfish. A total of 30 tests of shellfish samples, consisting of 22 certified as irradiated and 8 not-irradiated samples, were performed. The validation procedure was based on sensitivity and specificity; the compatibility between the screening method and the reference standard EN 13751:2009 was evaluated. Data were processed: 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity were obtained. Results obtained in our laboratory were perfectly compatible with the reference standard. For this reason, the method has been validated and proved to be suitable for its intended use. PMID:27800335

  6. Video luminescent barometry - The induction period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uibel, Rory H.; Khalil, Gamal; Gouterman, Martin; Gallery, Jean; Callis, James B.

    1993-01-01

    Video monitoring of oxygen quenching of the photoluminescence of platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) in silicone polymer resin may be used to measure pressure distribution over an airfoil. A continuous increase of the luminescence intensity of PtOEP on exposure to the exciting light is known as the induction effect. The effect of several factors on PtOEP photoluminescence and the induction effect was investigated. The experimental apparatus is described and results are presented. It was observed that the relative induction amplitude and induction time increase at higher oxygen pressure and with thicker films. These observations may be explained if the singlet oxygen produced by oxygen quenching is consumed by the polymer and is therefore unavailable for further quenching. Researchers using this method for measuring pressure distribution on airfoil surfaces should be aware of the induction effect and its implications.

  7. Luminescence Rings in Quantum Well Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denev, S.; Liu, Y.; Snoke, D.; Rapaport, R.; Chen, Gang; Simon, S.; Pfeiffer, L.; West, K.

    2004-03-01

    An unique ring-shaped luminescence pattern with size of hundreds of microns to millimeters has been observed in GaAs-based quantum well structures excited by weak laser light [1]. The ring persists up to high temperatures, and its size can be manipulated by the laser power, electric field, external stress or magnetic field. We give a detailed description of the effect and discuss various proposed explanations including an optical effect, diffusion and excitonic superfluidity. A realistic explanation based on a simple, nonlinear model of charge separation is proposed, and numerical results from the model are compared to the experiment. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation under grant No. DMR-0102457 and by the Department of Energy under grant No. DE-FG0299ER45780 [1] D. Snoke, S. Denev, Y. Liu, L. Pfeiffer, and K. West, "Long-range Transport in Excitonic Dark States in Coupled Quantum Wells," Nature 418, 754 (2002).

  8. Developing luminescent silver nanodots for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungmoon; Dickson, Robert M; Yu, Junhua

    2012-03-07

    Though creation and characterization of water soluble luminescent silver nanodots were achieved only in the past decade, a large variety of emitters in diverse scaffolds have been reported. Photophysical properties approach those of semiconductor quantum dots, but relatively small sizes are retained. Because of these properties, silver nanodots are finding ever-expanding roles as probes and biolabels. In this critical review we revisit the studies on silver nanodots in inert environments and in aqueous solutions. The recent advances detailing their chemical and physical properties of silver nanodots are highlighted with an effort to decipher the relations between their chemical/photophysical properties and their structures. The primary results about their biological applications are discussed here as well, especially relating to their chemical and photophysical behaviours in biological environments (216 references).

  9. Luminescence of erbium ions in tellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikin, Alexander P.; Grishin, Igor A.; Sharkov, Valery V.; Budruev, Andrei V.

    2013-11-01

    Optical characteristics of new generation of tellurite glasses having high stability against crystallization have been studied. As the initial reagents for the glasses synthesis on the base of tellurium oxide (TeO2) there were used such oxides as WO3, MoO3, La2O3, Li2CO3, ZnO—Bi2O2CO3 and active components such as high purity Er2O3, Yb2O3, ErF3 and YbF3. Intensities of luminescence at 1.53 µm of the erbium ions were determined after excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er3+ and Yb3+ as active elements for fiber and integrated optics.

  10. Dynamics of polydots: Soft luminescent polymeric nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Maskey, Sabina; Osti, Naresh C.; Grest, Gary S.; Perahia, Dvora

    2016-03-04

    The conformation and dynamics of luminescent polymers collapsed into nanoparticles or polydots were studied using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, providing a first insight into their internal dynamics. Controlling the conformation and dynamics of confined polymers is essential for realization of the full potential of polydots in nanomedicine and biotechnology. Specifically, the shape and internal dynamics of polydots that consist of highly rigid dialkyl p-phenylene ethynylene (PPE) are probed as a function of temperature. At room temperature, the polydots are spherical without any correlations between the aromatic rings on the PPE backbone. With increasing temperature, they expand and become slightly aspherical; however, the polymers remain confined. The coherent dynamic structure factor reveals that the internal motion of the polymer backbone is arrested, and the side chains dominate the internal dynamics of the polydots. Lastly, these new soft nanoparticles retain their overall shape and dynamics over an extended temperature range, and their conformation is tunable via their degree of expansion.

  11. Luminescence enhancement by energy transfer in melamine-Y2O3:Tb3+ nanohybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagi, Luigi; Chiriu, Daniele; Ardu, Andrea; Cannas, Carla; Carbonaro, Carlo M.; Ricci, Pier Carlo

    2015-09-01

    The phenomenon of luminescence enhancement was studied in melamine-Y2O3:Tb hybrids. Terbium doped Y2O3 mesoporous nanowires were synthesized by hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman scattering spectra testified the realization of a cubic crystal phase. Organic-inorganic melamine-Y2O3:Tb3+ hybrid system was successfully obtained by vapour deposition method. Vibration Raman active modes of the organic counterpart were investigated in order to verify the achievement of hybrid system. Photoluminescence excitation and photoluminescence spectra, preformed in the region between 250 and 350 nm, suggest a strong interaction among melamine and Terbium ions. In particular, a remarkable improvement of 5D4→ FJ Rare Earth emission (at about 542 nm) of about 102 fold was observed and attributed to an efficient organic-Tb energy transfer. The energy transfer mechanism was studied by the use of time resolved photoluminescence measurements. The melamine lifetime undergoes to a significant decrease when adsorbed to oxide surfaces and it was connected to a sensitization mechanism. The detailed analysis of time decay profile of Terbium radiative recombination shows a variation of double exponential law toward a single exponential one. Its correlation with surface defects and non-radiative recombination was thus discussed.

  12. Surface passivated silicon nanocrystals with stable luminescence synthesized by femtosecond laser ablation in solution.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dezhi; Ma, Zhijun; Xu, Beibei; Dai, Ye; Ma, Guohong; He, Min; Jin, Zuanming; Qiu, Jianrong

    2011-12-07

    We report the synthesis of silicon nanocrystals via a one-step route, namely, femtosecond laser ablation in 1-hexene under ambient conditions. The size of these silicon nanocrystals is 2.37 ± 0.56 nm as determined by transmission electron microscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate that the surface of the silicon nanocrystals is passivated by organic molecules and is also partially oxidized by O(2) and H(2)O dissolved in the solution. These silicon nanocrystals emit stable and bright blue photoluminescence. We suggest that the photoluminescence originates from the radiative recombination of electron-hole pairs through the oxide-related centers on the surface of the silicon nanocrystals. The decay rate of the oxide-related surface recombination can be comparable to that of the direct band gap transition. In the excitation and emission spectra, a vibrational structure with nearly constant spacings (0.18 eV) is observed. We propose that the strong electron-phonon coupling between excitons and the longitudinal optical (LO) phonons of the Si-C vibration is responsible for this vibrational structure. The fluctuations in the peak resolution, about ±0.01 eV, are ascribed to the size distribution and presence of Si-O vibrations. These silicon nanocrystals offer stable luminescence and are synthesized through a "green" and simple route. They may find important applications in many fields, such as bioimaging and environmental science.

  13. Effect of structure, size and copper doping on the luminescence properties of ZnS

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, Ch. Satya; Mishra, R.K.; Patel, Dinesh K.; Rao, K. Ramachandra; Sudarsan, V.; Vatsa, R.K.

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Blue and green emission intensity form ZnS is sensitive to crystallographic form. • For ZnS nanoparticles, emission characteristics are not affected by copper doping. • Cu solubility poor in ZnS nanoparticles compared to corresponding bulk. - Abstract: Luminescence properties of wurtzite and cubic forms of bulk ZnS have been investigated in detail and compared with that of ZnS nanoparticles. Blue emission observed in both hexagonal and cubic forms of undoped bulk ZnS is explained based on electron–hole recombination involving electron in conduction band and hole trapped in Zn{sup 2+} vacancies where as green emission arises due to electron hole recombination from Zn{sup 2+} and S{sup 2−} vacancies. Conversion of wurtzite form to cubic form is associated with relative increase in intensity of green emission due to increased defect concentration brought about by high temperature heat treatment. Copper doping in ZnS, initially leads to formation of both Cu{sub Zn} and Cu{sub i} (interstitial copper) centers, and latter to mainly Cu{sub Zn} centers as revealed by variation in relative intensities of blue and green emission from the samples.

  14. Yellow luminescence band in undoped GaN revealed by two-wavelength excited photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julkarnain, M.; Kamata, N.; Fukuda, T.; Arakawa, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The below-gap emission components including yellow luminescence (YL) band of an MOCVD grown undoped GaN have been studied by the two-wavelength-excited photoluminescence (TWEPL). The nature of each emission line has been investigated by using an intermittent below-gap excitation (BGE) light of 1.17 eV on an above-gap excitation (AGE) light of 3.49 eV. The intensity of DAP and the YL decreased while it increased for IOX after irradiation of the BGE. The intensity change in PL after addition of the BGE implies the presence of defect levels in the energy position corresponding to the photon energy of the BGE. Possible recombination models are listed and examined. Only the recombination model in which the YL corresponds to the transition from a shallow donor to a deep state at about 1 eV above the valence band maximum satisfies our experimental result. The possible origin of this defect state is discussed.

  15. Energy Transfer and Luminescence in Manganese - Crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danko, Joseph John

    An investigation, directed toward an understanding of the concentration-dependent characteristics of the Mn -Mn energy transfer, has been carried out in RbMn(,x)Mg(,1 -x)F(,3) via a detailed luminescence study in the temperature range, 4-120K. The emission of RbMn(,x)Mg(,1-x)F(,3), down to a concentration of 40% Mn, consists of two distinct Mn bands which are featureless except in the case of the stoichiometric system. The dominant sharp-line structure of this latter system spans the spectral range, 5515-5960(ANGSTROM), and is found to exhibit multi-magnon characteristics. The emission bands of RbMn(,x)Mg(,1-x)F(,3) are attributed to phonon-assisted transitions from two impurity-induced Mn traps. The variations of spectra and of the decay patterns with temperature are used to model the deexcitation mechanism in RbMn(,x)Mg(,1-x)F(,3) and result in the determination of the rate of energy transfer to the shallow luminescence trap. This work is prefaced by an introduction to the theory of collective electronic and magnetic excitations and by a comprehensive review of the various electronic, magnetic and optical properties of stoichiometric Mn-based crystals. As a secondary research effort, the 10488(ANGSTROM) line of Nd in RbMnF(,3):Nd was studied as a function of temperature. The strength of such a line is a direct consequence of the ability of Mn to efficiently transfer its excitation to the Nd centers. The lineshift with change in temperature is due to the continual absorption and emission of virtual phonons; the thermal line broadening is due to a Raman scattering of phonons.

  16. Genetically engineered luminescent proteins in biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Laura; Ensor, Mark; Scott, Daniel; Deo, Sapna; Daunert, Sylvia

    2006-02-01

    Luminescent proteins originally isolated from marine or terrestrial organisms have played a key role in the development of several biosensing systems. These proteins have been used in a variety of applications including, immunoassays, binding assays, cell-based sensing, high throughput screening, optical imaging, etc. Among the luminescent proteins isolated, the bioluminescent protein aequorin has been one of the proteins at the forefront in terms of its use in a vast number of biosensing systems. In our laboratory, we have employed aequorin as a label in the development of highly sensitive assays through chemical and genetic modifications from single step analysis of physiologically important molecules in biological fluids. An important aspect of optimizing these assays for clinical use involves understanding the stability of the various aequorin variants that are available. To this end we have designed several stability studies involving three important aequorin mutants, Mutant S, Mutant 5, and Mutant 53. The cysteine free aequorin, Mutant S, has been the most ubiquitously used aequorin variant in our laboratory because of its increased stability and activity as compared to native aequorin. Mutant 5 and Mutant 53 contain a single cyteine residue at position 5 and 53 in the protein, respectively. Because of the presence of a single cysteine residue, Mutant 5 and Mutant 53 both can be site-specifically conjugated. This site specific conjugation capability gives Mutant 5 and Mutant 53 an advantage over native aequorin when developing assays. Additional studies optimizing the expression, purification, and charging of aequorin Mutant S were also performed. A thorough understanding of the efficient expression, purification, and storage of these aequorin mutants will allow for the more practical utilization of these mutants in the development of future biosensing systems.

  17. Topaz and Kyanite Luminescence Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, E. F., III; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    The luminescence spectra of Cr3+ in heat-treated topaz Al2SiO4(OH,F)2 and natural kyanite Al2SiO5 were measured from 650 - 800 nm in a hydrostatic environment up to pressures of 15 GPa. The R1 and R2 peaks of topaz shift at average rates of 0.30 nm/GPa and 0.22 nm/GPa, respectively, implying that the deformation of the Cr3+ octahedra increases with pressure. Three peaks are fit under each R line of topaz at both room and high pressure, and these peaks are associated with different Al sites into which the Cr substitutes. The shift of the R lines in topaz under pressure is remarkably linear, which appears to be a general feature of many Cr3+-bearing oxides: the underlying cause of this linearity may lie in anharmonic coupling with lattice vibrations. In this context, we also characterize the frequency shifts of two vibronic peaks within topaz. The R1 and R2 peaks of kyanite shift at 0.37 nm/GPa and 0.88 nm/GPa respectively. Two peaks are fit under R1 and three peaks are fit under R2 of kyanite at both room and high pressure; this result is also consistent with three different Cr3+ sites in this material. The R lines in kyanite are notably optically anisotropic, depending strongly on crystallographic orientation: this is most strongly manifested in the R2 peak. The Cr3+ luminescence in these materials provides a sensitive probe of pressure-dependent shifts in the local geometry of the Al-sites in these materials, which are analyzed in the context of previous single-crystal x-ray diffraction measurements.

  18. Near-Infrared Quantum Cutting Long Persistent Luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zehua; Feng, Lin; Cao, Cheng; Zhang, Jiachi; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-05-01

    By combining the unique features of the quantum cutting luminescence and long persistent luminescence, we design a new concept called “near-infrared quantum cutting long persistent luminescence (NQPL)”, which makes it possible for us to obtain highly efficient (>100%) near-infrared long persistent luminescence in theory. Guided by the NQPL concept, we fabricate the first NQPL phosphor Ca2Ga2GeO7:Pr3+,Yb3+. It reveals that both the two-step energy transfer of model (I) and the one-step energy transfer of model (IV) occur in 3P0 levels of Pr3+. Although the actual efficiency is not sufficient for the practical application at this primitive stage, this discovery and the associated materials are still expected to have important implications for several fields such as crystalline Si solar cells and bio-medical imaging.

  19. Near-Infrared Quantum Cutting Long Persistent Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zehua; Feng, Lin; Cao, Cheng; Zhang, Jiachi; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    By combining the unique features of the quantum cutting luminescence and long persistent luminescence, we design a new concept called “near-infrared quantum cutting long persistent luminescence (NQPL)”, which makes it possible for us to obtain highly efficient (>100%) near-infrared long persistent luminescence in theory. Guided by the NQPL concept, we fabricate the first NQPL phosphor Ca2Ga2GeO7:Pr3+,Yb3+. It reveals that both the two-step energy transfer of model (I) and the one-step energy transfer of model (IV) occur in 3P0 levels of Pr3+. Although the actual efficiency is not sufficient for the practical application at this primitive stage, this discovery and the associated materials are still expected to have important implications for several fields such as crystalline Si solar cells and bio-medical imaging. PMID:27143282

  20. Luminescent coupling in planar opto-electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Matthew Valdivia, Christopher E.; Gabr, Ahmed M.; Hinzer, Karin; Masson, Denis; Fafard, Simon

    2015-10-14

    Effects of luminescent coupling are observed in monolithic 5 V, five-junction GaAs phototransducers. Power conversion efficiency was measured at 61.6% ± 3% under the continuous, monochromatic illumination for which they were designed. Modeling shows that photon recycling can account for up to 350 mV of photovoltage in these devices. Drift-diffusion based simulations including a luminescent coupling term in the continuity equation show a broadening of the internal quantum efficiency curve which agrees well with experimental measurements. Luminescent coupling is shown to expand the spectral bandwidth of the phototransducer by a factor of at least 3.5 for devices with three or more junctions, even in cases where multiple absorption/emission events are required to transfer excess carriers into the limiting junction. We present a detailed description of the novel luminescent coupling modeling technique used to predict these performance enhancements.

  1. Fundamental and applied aspects of luminescence of colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razumov, V. F.

    2017-03-01

    The spectral luminescent characteristics of colloidal quantum dots as a new class of luminophores are discussed and state-of-the-art investigations, problems, and prospects for their applications are considered.

  2. Enhancing the efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, M. Khalaji; Hanaei, H.; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Saidur, R.; Bakhoda, Shokoufeh; Bashiri, Robabeh; Moayedfar, M.

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in the endeavor to enhance the efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are presented in this paper along with an analysis of LSC devices. In recent years, several experimental and numerical research works have been carried out to improve the performance of LSCs in different ways. LSCs date back to the 1970s and comprise an extremely interesting notion of solar cells for various reasons. First, LSCs are cost-competitive and function in diffuse light, and as such, it is not necessary to use expensive solar tracking devices. Second, luminescence facilitates the cells to gather only cold light, which results in higher PV efficiency. LSCs generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species. The luminescent species absorb incident sunlight and emit it with high quantum efficiency, such that the emitted light is trapped in the sheet and travels to the edges where the solar cells can collect it.

  3. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  4. Can subglacial processes reset the luminescence of basal sediment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Darrel; Bateman, Mark; Piotrowski, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Analysis of the natural luminescence of basal sediment from Haut Glacier d'Arolla, Switzerland (Swift et al., under revision) has revived speculation that erosion and/or sediment transport in the subglacial environment may constitute effective luminescence resetting mechanisms. The plausibility of these resetting mechanisms rests on the presumption that luminescence signals can be reset if sediment grains are exposed to sufficient stress. The ice-bedrock contact zone of active glacial systems and the shear zones of active fault systems have been cited as environments where shearing has the potential to reset luminescence; however, laboratory studies that have investigated the effects of shearing on luminescence have produced conflicting results. We present the first results from a laboratory-based project that aims to determine the efficacy of resetting in the subglacial environment by shearing sediment under conditions representative of the ice-bedrock contact zone of active glacial systems. Preliminary luminescence data will be shown from an initial experiment that aims to quantify the effect of shearing on the luminescence of quartz. Homogenous medium-sand was obtained for the experiment from relict dune systems that possess substantial natural luminescence (we anticipate that glacial sediments with a wider range of grain sizes will be used in later experiments). Shearing was conducted using a state-of-the-art ring-shear apparatus using an imposed normal stress of 50 kPa at a shearing rate of 1 mm per minute for a distance of ~ 1200 mm, with samples for luminescence analyses taken from the shearing zone at pre-defined intervals. It is anticipated that further experiments using a range of imposed normal stresses and further analyses of changes in the luminescence and surface microtexture of grains in specific grain-size fractions will elucidate and quantify the specific nature of the resetting mechanism. Swift, D.A., Sanderson, D.C.W., Nienow, P.W., Bingham, R

  5. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  6. Luminescence dates for the Paleoindian site of Pedra Pintada, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michab, M.; Feathers, J. K.; Joron, J.-L.; Mercier, N.; Selo, M.; Valladas, H.; Valladas, G.; Reyss, J.-L.; Roosevelt, A. C.

    Dates are presented for the Paleoindian levels of Pedra Pintada cave in Brazil, based on the thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) study of ten specimens of heated siliceous stones and three of sand, respectively. Also discussed are the details of preliminary mineralogical, radiographic, and analytical work done on the lithic specimens in France and the OSL work done on the sediments in the US. The luminescence dates are in agreement with radiocarbon dates for the same strata.

  7. Influence of excitonic effects on luminescence quantum yield in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachenko, A. V.; Kostylyov, V. P.; Vlasiuk, V. M.; Sokolovskyi, I. O.; Evstigneev, M.

    2017-03-01

    Nonradiative exciton lifetime in silicon is determined by comparison of the experimental and theoretical curves of bulk minority charge carriers lifetime on doping and excitation levels. This value is used to analyze the influence of excitonic effects on internal luminescence quantum yield at room temperature, taking into account both nonradiative and radiative exciton lifetimes. A range of Shockley-Hall-Reed lifetimes is found, where excitonic effects lead to an increase of internal luminescence quantum yield.

  8. Luminescence-based optical sensor systems for monitoring water parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobnik, Aleksandra; Turel, Matejka; Korent, Špela Mojca

    2007-06-01

    Lanthanide-sensitized luminescence is very attractive because the intramolecular energy transfers between the absorbing ligand and the luminescent ion results in strong narrow-band fluorescence with a large Stokes' shift and long decay times. We will report about several sensor systems based either on sol-gel materials or lanthanide chelates for monitoring and controlling water parameters, such as heavy metals, amines, phosphates.

  9. Luminescent properties of cadmium selenide quantum dots in fluorophosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatova, Zh. O.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Babkina, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    The optical properties of fluorophosphate glasses with CdSe quantum dots are studied. Secondary heat treatment at a temperature exceeding the glass transition temperature resulted in the formation of quantum dots with sizes of 3.7-6.2 nm. The influence of the semiconductor component concentration on the spectral-luminescent characteristics of glasses is shown. It is experimentally demonstrated that glasses with a lower CdSe concentration have a higher absolute luminescence quantum yield.

  10. Polarization Effects in the Luminescence of Cadmium Selenide Electrodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-29

    UWIS/DC/TR-83/3 Polarization Effects in the Luminescence of Cadmium Selenide Electrodes by Holger H. Streckert, Hal Van Ryswyk, Richard N. Biagioni...the Luminescence of Cadmium Selenide Electrodes______________ S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUT,4OR(e) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER~q) Holger H...Continue an reverse aide if necieemy arid Identify, by block number) Cadmium selenide electrodes, photoluminescence, electroluminescence, polarized

  11. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  12. Auger recombination in sodium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Andrew; Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Åberg, Daniel; Schleife, André

    2014-03-01

    Scintillators are an important tool used to detect high energy radiation - both in the interest of national security and in medicine. However, scintillator detectors currently suffer from lower energy resolutions than expected from basic counting statistics. This has been attributed to non-proportional light yield compared to incoming radiation, but the specific mechanism for this non-proportionality has not been identified. Auger recombination is a non-radiative process that could be contributing to the non-proportionality of scintillating materials. Auger recombination comes in two types - direct and phonon-assisted. We have used first-principles calculations to study Auger recombination in sodium iodide, a well characterized scintillating material. Our findings indicate that phonon-assisted Auger recombination is stronger in sodium iodide than direct Auger recombination. Computational resources provided by LLNL and NERSC. Funding provided by NA-22.

  13. Lanthanide luminescence enhancements in porous silicon resonant microcavities.

    PubMed

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Pace, Stephanie; Sciacca, Beniamino; Brooks, Robert D; Plush, Sally E; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-08-13

    In this paper, the covalent immobilization and luminescence enhancement of a europium (Eu(III)) complex in a porous silicon (pSi) layer with a microcavity (pSiMC) structure are demonstrated. The alkyne-pendant arm of the Eu(III) complex was covalently immobilized on the azide-modified surface via ligand-assisted "click" chemistry. The design parameters of the microcavity were optimized to obtain an efficient luminescence-enhancing device. Luminescence enhancements by a factor of 9.5 and 3.0 were observed for Eu(III) complex bound inside the pSiMC as compared to a single layer and Bragg reflector of identical thickness, respectively, confirming the increased interaction between the immobilized molecules and the electric field in the spacer of the microcavity. When comparing pSiMCs with different resonance wavelength position, luminescence was enhanced when the resonance wavelength overlapped with the maximum emission wavelength of the Eu(III) complex at 614 nm, allowing for effective coupling between the confined light and the emitting molecules. The pSiMC also improved the spectral color purity of the Eu(III) complex luminescence. The ability of a pSiMC to act as an efficient Eu(III) luminescence enhancer, combined with the resulting sharp linelike emission, can be exploited for the development of ultrasensitive optical biosensors.

  14. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes.

  15. Flight testing of a luminescent surface pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclachlan, B. G.; Bell, J. H.; Espina, J.; Gallery, J.; Gouterman, M.; Demandante, C. G. N.; Bjarke, L.

    1992-01-01

    NASA ARC has conducted flight tests of a new type of aerodynamic pressure sensor based on a luminescent surface coating. Flights were conducted at the NASA ARC-Dryden Flight Research Facility. The luminescent pressure sensor is based on a surface coating which, when illuminated with ultraviolet light, emits visible light with an intensity dependent on the local air pressure on the surface. This technique makes it possible to obtain pressure data over the entire surface of an aircraft, as opposed to conventional instrumentation, which can only make measurements at pre-selected points. The objective of the flight tests was to evaluate the effectiveness and practicality of a luminescent pressure sensor in the actual flight environment. A luminescent pressure sensor was installed on a fin, the Flight Test Fixture (FTF), that is attached to the underside of an F-104 aircraft. The response of one particular surface coating was evaluated at low supersonic Mach numbers (M = 1.0-1.6) in order to provide an initial estimate of the sensor's capabilities. This memo describes the test approach, the techniques used, and the pressure sensor's behavior under flight conditions. A direct comparison between data provided by the luminescent pressure sensor and that produced by conventional pressure instrumentation shows that the luminescent sensor can provide quantitative data under flight conditions. However, the test results also show that the sensor has a number of limitations which must be addressed if this technique is to prove useful in the flight environment.

  16. Sensitive, Rapid Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chen, Fei; Pickett, Molly; Matsuyama, Asahi

    2009-01-01

    A method of sensitive detection of bacterial spores within delays of no more than a few hours has been developed to provide an alternative to a prior three-day NASA standard culture-based assay. A capability for relatively rapid detection of bacterial spores would be beneficial for many endeavors, a few examples being agriculture, medicine, public health, defense against biowarfare, water supply, sanitation, hygiene, and the food-packaging and medical-equipment industries. The method involves the use of a commercial rapid microbial detection system (RMDS) that utilizes a combination of membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and analysis of luminescence images detected by a charge-coupled-device camera. This RMDS has been demonstrated to be highly sensitive in enumerating microbes (it can detect as little as one colony-forming unit per sample) and has been found to yield data in excellent correlation with those of culture-based methods. What makes the present method necessary is that the specific RMDS and the original protocols for its use are not designed for discriminating between bacterial spores and other microbes. In this method, a heat-shock procedure is added prior to an incubation procedure that is specified in the original RMDS protocols. In this heat-shock procedure (which was also described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article on enumerating sporeforming bacteria), a sample is exposed to a temperature of 80 C for 15 minutes. Spores can survive the heat shock, but nonspore- forming bacteria and spore-forming bacteria that are not in spore form cannot survive. Therefore, any colonies that grow during incubation after the heat shock are deemed to have originated as spores.

  17. Structure of REC2, a recombinational repair gene of Ustilago maydis, and its function in homologous recombination between plasmid and chromosomal sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, B P; Ferguson, D O; Holloman, W K

    1994-01-01

    Mutation in the REC2 gene of Ustilago maydis leads to defects in DNA repair, recombination, and meiosis. Analysis of the primary sequence of the Rec2 protein reveals a region with significant homology to bacterial RecA protein and to the yeast recombination proteins Dmc1, Rad51, and Rad57. This homologous region in the U. maydis Rec2 protein was found to be functionally sensitive to mutation, lending support to the hypothesis that Rec2 has a functional RecA-like domain essential for activity in recombination and repair. Homologous recombination between plasmid and chromosomal DNA sequences is reduced substantially in the rec2 mutant following transformation. The frequency can be restored to a level approaching, but not exceeding, that observed in the wild-type strain if transformation is performed with cells containing multiple copies of REC2. Images PMID:8065360

  18. Production of recombinant TRAIL and TRAIL receptor: Fc chimeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Schneider, P

    2000-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)/TNF receptor (TNFR) families of ligands and receptors are implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes and regulate cellular functions as diverse as proliferation, differentiation, and death. Recombinant forms of these ligands and receptors can act to agonize or antagonize these functions and are therefore useful for laboratory studies and may have clinical applications. A protocol is presented for the expression and purification of dimeric soluble receptors fused to the Fc portion of human IgG1 and of soluble, N-terminally Flag-tagged ligands. Soluble recombinant proteins are easier to handle than membrane-bound proteins and the use of tags greatly facilitates their detection and purification. In addition, some tags may provide enhanced biological activity to the recombinant proteins (mainly by oligomerization and stabilization effects) and facilitate their functional characterization. Expression in bacterial (for selected ligands) and eukaryotic expression systems (for ligands and receptors) was performed using M15 pREP4 bacteria and human embryonic kidney 293 cells, respectively. The yield of purified protein is about 1 mg/liter for the mammalian expression system and several milligrams per liter for the bacterial expression system. Protocols are given for a specific ligand-receptor pair, namely TRAIL (Apo-2L) and TRAIL receptor 2 (DR5), but can be applied to other ligands and receptors of the TNF family.

  19. Recombination Does Not Hinder Formation or Detection of Ecological Species of Synechococcus Inhabiting a Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Mat

    PubMed Central

    Melendrez, Melanie C.; Becraft, Eric D.; Wood, Jason M.; Olsen, Millie T.; Bryant, Donald A.; Heidelberg, John F.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Cohan, Frederick M.; Ward, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of bacterial speciation have claimed to support the biological species concept—that reduced recombination is required for bacterial populations to diverge into species. This conclusion has been reached from the discovery that ecologically distinct clades show lower rates of recombination than that which occurs among closest relatives. However, these previous studies did not attempt to determine whether the more-rapidly recombining close relatives within the clades studied may also have diversified ecologically, without benefit of sexual isolation. Here we have measured the impact of recombination on ecological diversification within and between two ecologically distinct clades (A and B') of Synechococcus in a hot spring microbial mat in Yellowstone National Park, using a cultivation-free, multi-locus approach. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries were constructed from mat samples collected at 60°C and 65°C. Analysis of multiple linked loci near Synechococcus 16S rRNA genes showed little evidence of recombination between the A and B' lineages, but a record of recombination was apparent within each lineage. Recombination and mutation rates within each lineage were of similar magnitude, but recombination had a somewhat greater impact on sequence diversity than mutation, as also seen in many other bacteria and archaea. Despite recombination within the A and B' lineages, there was evidence of ecological diversification within each lineage. The algorithm Ecotype Simulation identified sequence clusters consistent with ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes), and several hypothesized ecotypes were distinct in their habitat associations and in their adaptations to different microenvironments. We conclude that sexual isolation is more likely to follow ecological divergence than to precede it. Thus, an ecology-based model of speciation appears more appropriate than the biological species concept for bacterial and archaeal diversification

  20. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Kaplan, David L; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-26

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities.

  1. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  2. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tim N.; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  3. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  4. Luminescence dating of ancient Darhad basin, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheul Kim, Jin; Yi, Sangheon; Lim, Jaesoo; Kim, Ju-Yong

    2016-04-01

    . Thus, age control on existing 14C ages from this site is limited, chronological interpretation based on the 14C ages is still incomplete in Hodon outcrop sediments. OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence) is an alternative method for dating to overcome the problems associated with 14C methods. OSL has been extensively used for dating arctic sediments (Thomas et al., 2006; more). Previous optical ages on Darhad paleolake sediments obtained using IRSL (Infrared-stimulated luminescence) on feldspars (Gillespie et al., 2008; Batbaatar et al., 2009). Feldspar has much brighter luminescence than quartz, while the OSL signal of feldspars bleaches at least one order of magnitude slower than the OSL signal of quartz (Godfrey-Smith et al., 1988; Huntly and Lamothe, 2001; Mauz and Bungenstock, 2007; Kim et al., 2012). In glaciofluvial, glaciolacustrine environments, inadequate bleaching of the OSL signal is known to be a potential problem of burial ages (Thomas et al., 2006). OSL dating of permafrost deposits may also involve uncertainty about the inhomogeneous radiation field surrounding the dosimeter and the absorption of ionizing energy alternately by water and ice in a not-constant pore volume (Haeberli et al., 2003). In this study, we test the applicability of quartz OSL dating for the uppermost paleolake sediments in the Hodon outcrop of the Darhad basin. The OSL results were systematically compared with additional radiocarbon ages from wood fragments to conclude the reliability of the OSL dates and to construct intensive chronology for Late-Pleistocene Darhad paleolake. To evaluate the time of recent expansion of the paleolake, the northern piedmont (Talyn outcrop) of the basin was dated by OSL.

  5. Quenching of the luminescence intensity of GaN nanowires under electron beam exposure: impact of C adsorption on the exciton lifetime.

    PubMed

    Lähnemann, Jonas; Flissikowski, Timur; Wölz, Martin; Geelhaar, Lutz; Grahn, Holger T; Brandt, Oliver; Jahn, Uwe

    2016-11-11

    Electron irradiation of GaN nanowires in a scanning electron microscope strongly reduces their luminous efficiency as shown by cathodoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy. We demonstrate that this luminescence quenching originates from a combination of charge trapping at already existing surface states and the formation of new surface states induced by the adsorption of C on the nanowire sidewalls. The interplay of these effects leads to a complex temporal evolution of the quenching, which strongly depends on the incident electron dose per area. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on electron-irradiated samples reveal that the carbonaceous adlayer affects both the nonradiative and the radiative recombination dynamics.

  6. Influence of dehydrated nanotubed titanic acid on charge transport and luminescent properties of polymer light-emitting diodes with fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Lei; Bera, Debasis; Jin, Zhen-Sheng; Du, Zu-Liang; Xu, Zheng; Teng, Feng; Liu, Wei

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss the influence of dehydrated nanotubed titanic acid (DNTA) on charge transport and luminescent properties of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) doped with fluorescent dye. Photoluminescence results confirm the efficient energy transfer from PVK to 4-(dicyanom-ethylene)-2- t-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) and tris-(8-hydroxtquinoline) aluminum (Alq 3) in a DNTA-doped device. The device showed lower turn-on voltages and higher charge current by doping with DNTA, which also caused a shift in the exciton's recombination region.

  7. Carrier transport and luminescence properties of nanocomposites of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethyl hexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] and dehydrated nanotubes titanic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Ran; Teng, Feng; Wang, Yongsheng; Xu, Xurong

    2007-12-01

    The carrier transport capability and luminescence efficiency of poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethyl hexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) films are enhanced by doping with dehydrated nanotubed titanic acid (DNTA). MEH-PPV molecules, either wrapped on the outer surface of or encapsulated into DNTA pores, have a more open, straighter conformation than undoped molecules, which induces a longer conjugated backbone and stronger interchain interactions, thereby, enhancing carrier mobility. MEH-PPV molecules within DNTA pores have higher exciton recombination efficiency owing to quantum confinement and the antenna effect.

  8. Septins and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Torraca, Vincenzo; Mostowy, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Septins, a unique cytoskeletal component associated with cellular membranes, are increasingly recognized as having important roles in host defense against bacterial infection. A role for septins during invasion of Listeria monocytogenes into host cells was first proposed in 2002. Since then, work has shown that septins assemble in response to a wide variety of invasive bacterial pathogens, and septin assemblies can have different roles during the bacterial infection process. Here we review the interplay between septins and bacterial pathogens, highlighting septins as a structural determinant of host defense. We also discuss how investigation of septin assembly in response to bacterial infection can yield insight into basic cellular processes including phagocytosis, autophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:27891501

  9. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification.

  10. Xer Site Specific Recombination: Double and Single Recombinase Systems

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Fabio; Benmohamed, Amal; Szatmari, George

    2017-01-01

    The separation and segregation of newly replicated bacterial chromosomes can be constrained by the formation of circular chromosome dimers caused by crossing over during homologous recombination events. In Escherichia coli and most bacteria, dimers are resolved to monomers by site-specific recombination, a process performed by two Chromosomally Encoded tyrosine Recombinases (XerC and XerD). XerCD recombinases act at a 28 bp recombination site dif, which is located at the replication terminus region of the chromosome. The septal protein FtsK controls the initiation of the dimer resolution reaction, so that recombination occurs at the right time (immediately prior to cell division) and at the right place (cell division septum). XerCD and FtsK have been detected in nearly all sequenced eubacterial genomes including Proteobacteria, Archaea, and Firmicutes. However, in Streptococci and Lactococci, an alternative system has been found, composed of a single recombinase (XerS) genetically linked to an atypical 31 bp recombination site (difSL). A similar recombination system has also been found in 𝜀-proteobacteria such as Campylobacter and Helicobacter, where a single recombinase (XerH) acts at a resolution site called difH. Most Archaea contain a recombinase called XerA that acts on a highly conserved 28 bp sequence dif, which appears to act independently of FtsK. Additionally, several mobile elements have been found to exploit the dif/Xer system to integrate their genomes into the host chromosome in Vibrio cholerae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Enterobacter cloacae. This review highlights the versatility of dif/Xer recombinase systems in prokaryotes and summarizes our current understanding of homologs of dif/Xer machineries. PMID:28373867

  11. A general method of protein purification for recombinant unstructured non-acidic proteins.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Guillén, Gabriel; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2011-11-01

    Typical late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate in response to water deficit imposed by the environment or by plant developmental programs. Because of their physicochemical properties, they can be considered as hydrophilins and as a paradigm of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs) in plants. To study their biophysical and biochemical characteristics large quantities of highly purified protein are required. In this work, we report a fast and simple purification method for non-acidic recombinant LEA proteins that does not need the addition of tags and that preserves their in vitro protective activity. The method is based on the enrichment of the protein of interest by boiling the bacterial protein extract, followed by a differential precipitation with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Using this procedure we have obtained highly pure recombinant LEA proteins of groups 1, 3, and 4 and one recombinant bacterial hydrophilin. This protocol will facilitate the purification of this type of IUPs, and could be particularly useful in proteomic projects/analyses.

  12. Physical and functional maps of the luminescence gene cluster in an autoinducer-deficient Vibrio fischeri strain isolated from a squid light organ.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, K M; Greenberg, E P

    1992-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri ES114 is an isolate representing the specific bacterial light organ symbiont of the squid Euprymna scolopes. An interesting feature of this strain of V. fischeri is that it is visibly luminous within the light organ of the squid host but is nonluminous when grown under standard laboratory conditions. Luminescence can be restored in laboratory culture, however, by the addition of autoinducer, a species-specific inducer of the V. fischeri luminescence (lux) genes. Most other isolates of V. fischeri produce autoinducer in sufficient quantities to induce luminescence in laboratory culture. We have cloned an 8.8-kb DNA fragment from V. fischeri ES114 that encodes all of the functions necessary for luminescence in Escherichia coli in the absence of exogenous autoinducer. This DNA contains both of the recognized V. fischeri lux regulatory genes, one of which (luxI) directs E. coli to synthesize autoinducer. The organization of the individual lux genes within this DNA fragment appears to be the same as that in the other strains of V. fischeri studied; the restriction map of the V. fischeri ES114 lux DNA has diverged substantially, however, from the largely conserved maps of V. fischeri MJ1 and ATCC 7744. Although E. coli containing the V. fischeri ES114 lux DNA synthesizes considerable amounts of autoinducer, V. fischeri ES114 synthesizes autoinducer only in small amounts, even when transcription of the lux genes, including luxI, is activated by the addition of exogenous autoinducer. Nonetheless, transconjugants of V. fischeri ES114 that contain multicopy plasmids bearing the ES114 lux genes synthesize sufficient autoinducer to induce luminescence. These results suggest that V. fischeri ES11r does not lack a functional luxl, nor is it deficient in the ability to synthesize metabolic precursors for autoinducer synthesis. PMID:1624432

  13. Testing for recombinant erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Bollen, Mathieu; Beullens, Monique

    2008-03-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is a glycoprotein hormone that promotes the production of red blood cells. Recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) is illicitly used to improve performance in endurance sports. Doping in sports is discouraged by the screening of athletes for rhEpo. Both direct tests (indicating the presence of exogeneous Epo isoforms) and indirect tests (indicating hematological changes induced by exogenous Epo administration) can be used for Epo detection. At present, the test adopted by the World Anti Doping Agency is based on a combination of isoelectric focusing and double immunoblotting, and distinguishes between endogenous and rhEpo. However, the adopted monoclonal anti-Epo antibodies are not monospecific. Therefore, the test can occasionally lead to the false-positive detection of rhEpo (epoetin-beta) in post-exercise, protein-rich urine, or in case of contamination of the sample with microorganisms. An improved preanalytical care may counteract a lot of these problems. Adaptation of the criteria may be helpful to further refine direct Epo testing. Indirect tests have the disadvantage that they require blood instead of urine samples, but they can be applied to detect a broader range of performance improving techniques which are illicitly used in sports.

  14. Control of luminescence from pygmy shark (Squaliolus aliae) photophores.

    PubMed

    Claes, Julien M; Ho, Hsuan-Ching; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2012-05-15

    The smalleye pygmy shark (Squaliolus aliae) is a dwarf pelagic shark from the Dalatiidae family that harbours thousands of tiny photophores. In this work, we studied the organisation and physiological control of these photogenic organs. Results show that they are mainly situated on the ventral side of the shark, forming a homogeneous ventral photogenic area that appears well suited for counterillumination, a well-known camouflage technique of pelagic organisms. Isolated ventral skin patches containing photophores did not respond to classical neurotransmitters and nitric oxide but produced light after melatonin (MT) application. Prolactin and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone inhibited this hormonally induced luminescence as well as the spontaneous luminescence from the photogenic tissue. The action of MT seems to be mediated by binding to the MT(2) receptor subtype, as the MT(2) receptor agonist 4P-PDOT inhibited the luminescence induced by this hormone. Binding to this receptor probably decreases the intracellular cAMP concentration because forskolin inhibited spontaneous and MT-induced luminescence. In addition, a GABA inhibitory tonus seems to be present in the photogenic tissue as well, as GABA inhibited MT-induced luminescence and the application of bicuculline provoked luminescence from S. aliae photophores. Similarly to what has been found in Etmopteridae, the other luminous shark family, the main target of the luminescence control appears to be the melanophores covering the photocytes. Results suggest that bioluminescence first appeared in Dalatiidae when they adopted a pelagic style at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary, and was modified by Etmopteridae when they started to colonize deep-water niches and rely on this light for intraspecific behaviours.

  15. Luminescence modulations of rhenium tricarbonyl complexes induced by structural variations.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Hélène C; Clède, Sylvain; Guillot, Régis; Lambert, François; Policar, Clotilde

    2014-06-16

    Octahedral d(6) low-spin Re(I) tricarbonyl complexes are of considerable interest as noninvasive imaging probes and have been deeply studied owing to their biological stability, low toxicity, large Stokes shifts, and long luminescence lifetimes. We reported recently the bimodal IR and luminescence imaging of a Re(I) tricarbonyl complex with a Pyta ligand (4-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,3-triazole) in cells and labeled such metal-carbonyl complexes SCoMPIs for single-core multimodal probes for imaging. Re(I) tricarbonyl complexes have unique photophysical properties allowing for their unequivocal detection in cells but also present some weaknesses such as a very low luminescence quantum yield in aqueous medium. Further optimizations would thus be desirable. We therefore developed new Re(I) tricarbonyl complexes prepared from different ancillary ligands. Complexes with benzothiadiazole-triazole ligands show interesting luminescent quantum yields in acetonitrile and may constitute valuable luminescent metal complexes in organic media. A series of complexes with bidentate 1-(2-quinolinyl)-1,2,3-triazole (Taquin) and 1-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,3-triazole (Tapy) ligands bearing various 4-substituted alkyl side chains has been designed and synthesized with efficient procedures. Their photophysical properties have been characterized in acetonitrile and in a H2O/DMSO (98/2) mixture and compared with those of the parent Quinta- and Pyta-based complexes. Tapy complexes bearing long alkyl chains show impressive enhancement of their luminescent properties relative to the parent Pyta complex. Theoretical calculations have been performed to further characterize this new class of rhenium tricarbonyl complexes. Preliminary cellular imaging studies in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells reveal a strong increase in the luminescence signal in cells incubated with the Tapy complex substituted with a C12 alkyl chain. This study points out the interesting potential of the Tapy ligand in coordination chemistry

  16. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments.

  17. No Evidence that Infection Alters Global Recombination Rate in House Mice.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Beth L; Devlin, Amy A; Truempy, Dana M; Miller, Jennifer C; Singh, Nadia D

    2015-01-01

    Recombination rate is a complex trait, with genetic and environmental factors shaping observed patterns of variation. Although recent studies have begun to unravel the genetic basis of recombination rate differences between organisms, less attention has focused on the environmental determinants of crossover rates. Here, we test the effect of one ubiquitous environmental pressure-bacterial infection-on global recombination frequency in mammals. We applied MLH1 mapping to assay global crossover rates in male mice infected with the pathogenic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme Disease, and uninfected control animals. Despite ample statistical power to identify biologically relevant differences between infected and uninfected animals, we find no evidence for a global recombination rate response to bacterial infection. Moreover, broad-scale patterns of crossover distribution, including the number of achiasmate bivalents, are not affected by infection status. Although pathogen exposure can plastically increase recombination in some species, our findings suggest that recombination rates in house mice may be resilient to at least some forms of infection stress. This negative result motivates future experiments with alternative house mouse pathogens to evaluate the generality of this conclusion.

  18. No Evidence that Infection Alters Global Recombination Rate in House Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Beth L.; Devlin, Amy A.; Truempy, Dana M.; Miller, Jennifer C.; Singh, Nadia D.

    2015-01-01

    Recombination rate is a complex trait, with genetic and environmental factors shaping observed patterns of variation. Although recent studies have begun to unravel the genetic basis of recombination rate differences between organisms, less attention has focused on the environmental determinants of crossover rates. Here, we test the effect of one ubiquitous environmental pressure–bacterial infection–on global recombination frequency in mammals. We applied MLH1 mapping to assay global crossover rates in male mice infected with the pathogenic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme Disease, and uninfected control animals. Despite ample statistical power to identify biologically relevant differences between infected and uninfected animals, we find no evidence for a global recombination rate response to bacterial infection. Moreover, broad-scale patterns of crossover distribution, including the number of achiasmate bivalents, are not affected by infection status. Although pathogen exposure can plastically increase recombination in some species, our findings suggest that recombination rates in house mice may be resilient to at least some forms of infection stress. This negative result motivates future experiments with alternative house mouse pathogens to evaluate the generality of this conclusion. PMID:26550833

  19. I am what I eat and I eat what I am: acquisition of bacterial genes by giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Filée, Jonathan; Siguier, Patricia; Chandler, Mick

    2007-01-01

    Giant viruses are nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs) that infect algae (phycodnaviruses) and amoebae (Mimivirus). We report an unexpected abundance in these giant viruses of islands of bacterial-type genes, including apparently intact prokaryotic mobile genetic elements, and hypothesize that NCLDV genomes undergo successive accretions of bacterial genes. The viruses could acquire bacterial genes within their bacteria-feeding eukaryotic hosts, and we suggest that such acquisition is driven by the intimate coupling of recombination and replication in NCLDVs.

  20. Herpes simplex virus type 1-derived recombinant and amplicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Fraefel, Cornel; Marconi, Peggy; Epstein, Alberto L

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153 kbp double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes (1) the two approaches most commonly used to prepare recombinant vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria, and (2) the two methodologies currently used to generate helper-free amplicon vectors, either using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based approach or a Cre/loxP site-specific recombination strategy.

  1. Expression, Solubilization, and Purification of Bacterial Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Constance J

    2016-02-02

    Bacterial integral membrane proteins play many important roles, including sensing changes in the environment, transporting molecules into and out of the cell, and in the case of commensal or pathogenic bacteria, interacting with the host organism. Working with membrane proteins in the lab can be more challenging than working with soluble proteins because of difficulties in their recombinant expression and purification. This protocol describes a standard method to express, solubilize, and purify bacterial integral membrane proteins. The recombinant protein of interest with a 6His affinity tag is expressed in E. coli. After harvesting the cultures and isolating cellular membranes, mild detergents are used to solubilize the membrane proteins. Protein-detergent complexes are then purified using IMAC column chromatography. Support protocols are included to help select a detergent for protein solubilization and for use of gel filtration chromatography for further purification.

  2. Bacterial Cellular Engineering by Genome Editing and Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Nobutaka; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing is an important technology for bacterial cellular engineering, which is commonly conducted by homologous recombination-based procedures, including gene knockout (disruption), knock-in (insertion), and allelic exchange. In addition, some new recombination-independent approaches have emerged that utilize catalytic RNAs, artificial nucleases, nucleic acid analogs, and peptide nucleic acids. Apart from these methods, which directly modify the genomic structure, an alternative approach is to conditionally modify the gene expression profile at the posttranscriptional level without altering the genomes. This is performed by expressing antisense RNAs to knock down (silence) target mRNAs in vivo. This review describes the features and recent advances on methods used in genomic engineering and silencing technologies that are advantageously used for bacterial cellular engineering. PMID:24552876

  3. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  4. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  5. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  6. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  7. Vaccinia virus vectors: new strategies for producing recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Hruby, D E

    1990-01-01

    The development and continued refinement of techniques for the efficient insertion and expression of heterologous DNA sequences from within the genomic context of infectious vaccinia virus recombinants are among the most promising current approaches towards effective immunoprophylaxis against a variety of protozoan, viral, and bacterial human pathogens. Because of its medical relevance, this area is the subject of intense research interest and has evolved rapidly during the past several years. This review (i) provides an updated overview of the technology that exists for assembling recombinant vaccinia virus strains, (ii) discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches, (iii) outlines the areas of outgoing research directed towards overcoming the limitations of current techniques, and (iv) provides some insight (i.e., speculation) about probable future refinements in the use of vaccinia virus as a vector. PMID:2187593

  8. Luminescence of some airborne plant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satterwhite, Melvin B.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the excitation- emission spectra of seed pubescence, pollen and spores, and senesced plant materials that could be carried in the air column. Reference samples were a mature green-colored corn leaf, green-, yellow- and brown-colored soybean leaves, cellulose, commercial grade cotton batting and a soil. Spectral luminescence signatures were collected over the 300 to 800 nanometer region using a scanning spectrofluorometer. The excitation-emission spectra were broadband emission centroids in the 400-nm to 600-nm spectrum. Emission maxima were associated with the 440-nm, 470-nm and 370-nm excitation bands and the 455-nm to 590-nm emission bands. The coma of milkweed, silkvine, cotton (raw), cottonwood seeds and yellow- colored pollen and spores were highly fluorescent. The pappus of thistles, dandelion and goat's beard seeds and newly senesced grass leaves and glumes had moderate to high fluorescence. Dark brown-colored mushroom spores and weathered, senesced plant materials had low fluorescence. The emission spectra resembled that of regent, microcrystalline cellulose although impurities incorporated within the plant materials altered their emission intensities from that of cellulose. Moderate to low emissions were from tan- to dark brown-colored materials, whereas the white-colored or light, tan-colored materials had high emissions.

  9. Gated Luminescence Imaging of Silicon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jinmyoung; Liu, Xiangyou; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Nam, Yoonkey; Sailor, Michael J

    2015-06-23

    The luminescence lifetime of nanocrystalline silicon is typically on the order of microseconds, significantly longer than the nanosecond lifetimes exhibited by fluorescent molecules naturally present in cells and tissues. Time-gated imaging, where the image is acquired at a time after termination of an excitation pulse, allows discrimination of a silicon nanoparticle probe from these endogenous signals. Because of the microsecond time scale for silicon emission, time-gated imaging is relatively simple to implement for this biocompatible and nontoxic probe. Here a time-gated system with ∼10 ns resolution is described, using an intensified CCD camera and pulsed LED or laser excitation sources. The method is demonstrated by tracking the fate of mesoporous silicon nanoparticles containing the tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, administered by retro-orbital injection into live mice. Imaging of such systemically administered nanoparticles in vivo is particularly challenging because of the low concentration of probe in the targeted tissues and relatively high background signals from tissue autofluorescence. Contrast improvements of >100-fold (relative to steady-state imaging) is demonstrated in the targeted tissues.

  10. Luminescent lanthanide complexes for advanced photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puntus, Lada N.; Sergeeva, Elena V.; Antonov, Dmitrii Y.; Lyssenko, Konstantin A.; Kajzar, Francois

    2010-10-01

    The lanthanide compounds containing unsymmetrical β-diketone with [2.2]paracyclophane moiety in particular the europium complex with three [1-(4-[2.2]paracyclophanyl)]-3-phenylpropane-1,3-dione and 1,10-phenanthroline has been synthesized for the first time. The optical properties of [2.2]paracyclophane-derived ligands (symmetrical β-diketones and their respective N-phenylimines) as well as those of the europium complex were studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectroscopy. The diastereomers (racemic chiral, (R*,R*)- and achiral meso, (R,S)-) of the β-diketones and their respective N-phenylimines exhibit quite identical absorption spectra with intense broad band centered at 360 and 380 nm, respectively. The designed blue-emitting unsymmetrical β-diketone acts as a very efficient sensitizer of the EuIII emission and does so in the near-UV region. The introduction of [2.2]paracyclophane moiety in the β-diketones allows to expand the excitation wavelength of the lanthanide complex up to 500 nm and to obtain the relatively high overall quantum yield for the europium ion.

  11. Luminescent Solar Concentrators in the Algal Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellier, Katie; Corrado, Carley; Carter, Sue; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    Today's industry for renewable energy sources and highly efficient energy management systems is rapidly increasing. Development of increased efficiency Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) has brought about new applications for commercial interests, including greenhouses for agricultural crops. This project is taking first steps to explore the potential of LSCs to enhance production and reduce costs for algae and cyanobacteria used in biofuels and nutraceuticals. This pilot phase uses LSC filtered light for algal growth trials in greenhouses and laboratory experiments, creating specific wavelength combinations to determine effects of discrete solar light regimes on algal growth and the reduction of heating and water loss in the system. Enhancing the optimal spectra for specific algae will not only increase production, but has the potential to lessen contamination of large scale production due to competition from other algae and bacteria. Providing LSC filtered light will reduce evaporation and heating in regions with limited water supply, while the increased energy output from photovoltaic cells will reduce costs of heating and mixing cultures, thus creating a more efficient and cost effective production system.

  12. Gated Luminescence Imaging of Silicon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jinmyoung; Liu, Xiangyou; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Nam, Yoonkey; Sailor, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence lifetime of nanocrystalline silicon is typically on the order of microseconds, significantly longer than the nanosecond lifetimes exhibited by fluorescent molecules naturally present in cells and tissues. Time-gated imaging, where the image is acquired at a time after termination of an excitation pulse, allows discrimination of a silicon nanoparticle probe from these endogenous signals. Because of the microsecond time scale for silicon emission, time-gated imaging is relatively simple to implement for this biocompatible and nontoxic probe. Here a time-gated system with ~10 ns resolution is described, using an intensified CCD camera and pulsed LED or laser excitation sources. The method is demonstrated by tracking the fate of mesoporous silicon nanoparticles containing the tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, administered by retro-orbital injection into live mice. Imaging of such systemically administered nanoparticles in vivo is particularly challenging because of the low concentration of probe in the targeted tissues and relatively high background signals from tissue autofluorescence. Contrast improvements of >100-fold (relative to steady-state imaging) is demonstrated in the targeted tissues. PMID:26034817

  13. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications.

  14. Dynamics of polydots: Soft luminescent polymeric nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Maskey, Sabina; Osti, Naresh C.; Grest, Gary S.; ...

    2016-03-04

    The conformation and dynamics of luminescent polymers collapsed into nanoparticles or polydots were studied using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, providing a first insight into their internal dynamics. Controlling the conformation and dynamics of confined polymers is essential for realization of the full potential of polydots in nanomedicine and biotechnology. Specifically, the shape and internal dynamics of polydots that consist of highly rigid dialkyl p-phenylene ethynylene (PPE) are probed as a function of temperature. At room temperature, the polydots are spherical without any correlations between the aromatic rings on the PPE backbone. With increasing temperature, they expand and becomemore » slightly aspherical; however, the polymers remain confined. The coherent dynamic structure factor reveals that the internal motion of the polymer backbone is arrested, and the side chains dominate the internal dynamics of the polydots. Lastly, these new soft nanoparticles retain their overall shape and dynamics over an extended temperature range, and their conformation is tunable via their degree of expansion.« less

  15. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications. PMID:27666663

  16. Luminescent Silica Nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Montalti, Marco; Petrizza, Luca; Rampazzo, Enrico; Zaccheroni, Nelsi; Marchiò, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging techniques are becoming essential in preclinical investigations, and the research of suitable tools for in vivo measurements is gaining more and more importance and attention. Nanotechnology entered the field to try to find solutions for many limitation at the state of the art, and luminescent nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most promising materials proposed for future diagnostic implementation. NPs constitute also a versatile platform that can allow facile multi-functionalization to perform multimodal imaging or theranostic (simultaneous diagnosis and therapy). In this contribution we have focussed our attention only on dye doped silica or silica-based NPs conjugated with targeting moieties to enable specific cancer cells imaging and differentiation, even if also a few non targeted systems have been cited and discussed for completeness. We have summarized common synthetic approaches to these materials and then surveyed the most recent imaging applications of silica-based nanoparticles in cancer. The field of theranostic is so important and stimulating that, even if it is not the central topic of this paper, we have included some significant examples. We have then concluded with short hints on systems already in clinical trials and examples of specific applications in children tumours. This review tries to describe and discuss, through focussed examples, the great potentialities of these materials in the medical field, with the aim to encourage further research to implement applications that are still rare. PMID:23458621

  17. A REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS OF LUMINESCENCE TO MONITORING OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent analytical literature on the application of luminescence techniques to the measurement of various classes of environmentally significant chemicals has been reviewed. Luminescent spectroscopy based methods are compared to other current techniques. Also, examples of rece...

  18. FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF IHSS HUMIC SUBSTANCES: TOTAL LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA WITH ABSORBANCE CORRECTION. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to d...

  19. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  20. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  1. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, H.; Ledjeff, K.

    1984-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive the discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  2. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Helmut; Ledjeff, Konstantin

    1985-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive he discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  3. Perovskite photovoltaics: Slow recombination unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Jacques-E.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most salient features of hybrid lead halide perovskites is the extended lifetime of their photogenerated charge carriers. This property has now been shown experimentally to originate from a slow, thermally activated recombination process.

  4. Controlled release from recombinant polymers.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-09-28

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed.

  5. Stable recombination hotspots in birds.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sonal; Leffler, Ellen M; Sannareddy, Keerthi; Turner, Isaac; Venn, Oliver; Hooper, Daniel M; Strand, Alva I; Li, Qiye; Raney, Brian; Balakrishnan, Christopher N; Griffith, Simon C; McVean, Gil; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-11-20

    The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but it appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking the gene that encodes PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species: the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, and the long-tailed finch, Poephila acuticauda. We found that both species have recombination hotspots, which are enriched near functional genomic elements. Unlike in mice and apes, most hotspots are shared between the two species, and their conservation seems to extend over tens of millions of years. These observations suggest that in the absence of PRDM9, recombination targets functional features that both enable access to the genome and constrain its evolution.

  6. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  7. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  8. Combinatorics in Recombinational Population Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, Laxmi

    The work that I will discuss is motivated by the need for understanding, and processing, the manifestations of recombination events in chromosome sequences. In this talk, we focus on two related problems. First, we explore the very general problem of reconstructability of pedigree history. How plausible is it to unravel the history of a complete unit (chromosome) of inheritance? The second problem deals with reconstructing the recombinational history of a collection of chromosomes.

  9. Enumeration of bacterial cell numbers by amplified firefly bioluminescence without cultivation.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Tatsuya; Murakami, Seiji; Imai, Kazuhiro

    2003-01-01

    We recently developed a novel bioluminescent enzymatic cycling assay for ATP and AMP with the concomitant use of firefly luciferase and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK), where AMP and pyrophosphate produced from ATP by firefly luciferase were converted back into ATP by PPDK. Background luminescence derived from contaminating ATP and AMP in the reagent was reduced using adenosine phosphate deaminase which degrades ATP, ADP, and AMP, resulting in constant and highly amplified bioluminescence with low background luminescence. To detect bacterial cells without cultivation, we applied the above bioluminescent enzymatic cycling reagent to rapid microbe detection system. ATP spots (0.31-5.0 amol/spot) at the level of a single bacterial cell were detected with 5 min signal integration, signifying that integrated luminescence was amplified 43 times in comparison to traditional ATP bioluminescence. Consequently, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Lactobacillus brevis in beer were detected without cultivation. Significant correlation was observed between the number of signal spots obtained using this novel system and the colony-forming units observed with the conventional colony-counting method (R(2)=0.973).

  10. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  11. User guide for luminescence sampling in archaeological and geological contexts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Michelle S.; Gray, Harrison J.; Johnson, Jack A.; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Feathers, James K.; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence dating provides a direct age estimate of the time of last exposure of quartz or feldspar minerals to light or heat and has been successfully applied to deposits, rock surfaces, and fired materials in a number of archaeological and geological settings. Sampling strategies are diverse and can be customized depending on local circumstances, although all sediment samples need to include a light-safe sample and material for dose-rate determination. The accuracy and precision of luminescence dating results are directly related to the type and quality of the material sampled and sample collection methods in the field. Selection of target material for dating should include considerations of adequacy of resetting of the luminescence signal (optical and thermal bleaching), the ability to characterize the radioactive environment surrounding the sample (dose rate), and the lack of evidence for post-depositional mixing (bioturbation in soils and sediment). Sample strategies for collection of samples from sedimentary settings and fired materials are discussed. This paper should be used as a guide for luminescence sampling and is meant to provide essential background information on how to properly collect samples and on the types of materials suitable for luminescence dating.

  12. Zero-reabsorption doped-nanocrystal luminescent solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Christian S; Bradshaw, Liam R; McDowall, Stephen; Gilbertson, John D; Gamelin, Daniel R; Patrick, David L

    2014-04-22

    Optical concentration can lower the cost of solar energy conversion by reducing photovoltaic cell area and increasing photovoltaic efficiency. Luminescent solar concentrators offer an attractive approach to combined spectral and spatial concentration of both specular and diffuse light without tracking, but they have been plagued by luminophore self-absorption losses when employed on practical size scales. Here, we introduce doped semiconductor nanocrystals as a new class of phosphors for use in luminescent solar concentrators. In proof-of-concept experiments, visibly transparent, ultraviolet-selective luminescent solar concentrators have been prepared using colloidal Mn(2+)-doped ZnSe nanocrystals that show no luminescence reabsorption. Optical quantum efficiencies of 37% are measured, yielding a maximum projected energy concentration of ∼6× and flux gain for a-Si photovoltaics of 15.6 in the large-area limit, for the first time bounded not by luminophore self-absorption but by the transparency of the waveguide itself. Future directions in the use of colloidal doped nanocrystals as robust, processable spectrum-shifting phosphors for luminescent solar concentration on the large scales required for practical application of this technology are discussed.

  13. Occurrence and Expression of Luminescence in Vibrio cholerae▿

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Christopher J.; Taviani, Elisa; Alam, Munirul; Huq, Anwar; Sack, R. Bradley; Colwell, Rita R.

    2008-01-01

    Several species of the genus Vibrio, including Vibrio cholerae, are bioluminescent or contain bioluminescent strains. Previous studies have reported that only 10% of V. cholerae strains are luminescent. Analysis of 224 isolates of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae collected from Chesapeake Bay, MD, revealed that 52% (116/224) were luminescent when an improved assay method was employed and 58% (130/224) of isolates harbored the luxA gene. In contrast, 334 non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae strains isolated from two rural provinces in Bangladesh yielded only 21 (6.3%) luminescent and 35 (10.5%) luxA+ isolates. An additional 270 clinical and environmental isolates of V. cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 were tested, and none were luminescent or harbored luxA. These results indicate that bioluminescence may be a trait specific for non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae strains that frequently occur in certain environments. Luminescence expression patterns of V. cholerae were also investigated, and isolates could be grouped based on expression level. Several strains with defective expression of the lux operon, including natural K variants, were identified. PMID:18065611

  14. Luminescent Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals Containing Copper: Synthesis, Photophysics, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Kathryn E; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Kilburn, Troy B; Marchioro, Arianna; Nelson, Heidi D; Whitham, Patrick J; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-09-28

    Copper-doped semiconductors are classic phosphor materials that have been used in a variety of applications for many decades. Colloidal copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals have recently attracted a great deal of interest because they combine the solution processability and spectral tunability of colloidal nanocrystals with the unique photoluminescence properties of copper-doped semiconductor phosphors. Although ternary and quaternary semiconductors containing copper, such as CuInS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have been studied primarily in the context of their photovoltaic applications, when synthesized as colloidal nanocrystals, these materials have photoluminescence properties that are remarkably similar to those of copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals. This review focuses on the luminescent properties of colloidal copper-doped, copper-based, and related copper-containing semiconductor nanocrystals. Fundamental investigations into the luminescence of copper-containing colloidal nanocrystals are reviewed in the context of the well-established luminescence mechanisms of bulk copper-doped semiconductors and copper(I) molecular coordination complexes. The use of colloidal copper-containing nanocrystals in applications that take advantage of their luminescent properties, such as bioimaging, solid-state lighting, and luminescent solar concentrators, is also discussed.

  15. MutS2 Promotes Homologous Recombination in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Burby, Peter E; Simmons, Lyle A

    2017-01-15

    Bacterial MutS proteins are subdivided into two families, MutS1 and MutS2. MutS1 family members recognize DNA replication errors during their participation in the well-characterized mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. In contrast to the well-described function of MutS1, the function of MutS2 in bacteria has remained less clear. In Helicobacter pylori and Thermus thermophilus, MutS2 has been shown to suppress homologous recombination. The role of MutS2 is unknown in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis In this work, we investigated the contribution of MutS2 to maintaining genome integrity in B. subtilis We found that deletion of mutS2 renders B. subtilis sensitive to the natural antibiotic mitomycin C (MMC), which requires homologous recombination for repair. We demonstrate that the C-terminal small MutS-related (Smr) domain is necessary but not sufficient for tolerance to MMC. Further, we developed a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system to test if the inducible prophage PBSX was the underlying cause of the observed MMC sensitivity. Genetic analysis revealed that MMC sensitivity was dependent on recombination and not on nucleotide excision repair or a symptom of prophage PBSX replication and cell lysis. We found that deletion of mutS2 resulted in decreased transformation efficiency using both plasmid and chromosomal DNA. Further, deletion of mutS2 in a strain lacking the Holliday junction endonuclease gene recU resulted in increased MMC sensitivity and decreased transformation efficiency, suggesting that MutS2 could function redundantly with RecU. Together, our results support a model where B. subtilis MutS2 helps to promote homologous recombination, demonstrating a new function for bacterial MutS2.

  16. Recombinant protein expression in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Davis, Keith R; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant protein pharmaceuticals are now widely used in treatment of chronic diseases, and several recombinant protein subunit vaccines are approved for human and veterinary use. With growing demand for complex protein pharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, manufacturing capacity is becoming limited. There is increasing need for safe, scalable, and economical alternatives to mammalian cell culture-based manufacturing systems, which require substantial capital investment for new manufacturing facilities. Since a seminal paper reporting immunoglobulin expression in transgenic plants was published in 1989, there have been many technological advances in plant expression systems to the present time where production of proteins in leaf tissues of nonfood crops such as Nicotiana species is considered a viable alternative. In particular, transient expression systems derived from recombinant plant viral vectors offer opportunities for rapid expression screening, construct optimization, and expression scale-up. Extraction of recombinant proteins from Nicotiana leaf tissues can be achieved by collection of secreted protein fractions, or from a total protein extract after grinding the leaves with buffer. After separation from solids, the major purification challenge is contamination with elements of the photosynthetic complex, which can be solved by application of a variety of facile and proven strategies. In conclusion, the technologies required for safe, efficient, scalable manufacture of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana leaf tissues have matured to the point where several products have already been tested in phase I clinical trials and will soon be followed by a rich pipeline of recombinant vaccines, microbicides, and therapeutic proteins.

  17. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  18. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  19. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  20. Water-triggered luminescent "nano-bombs" based on supra-(carbon nanodots).

    PubMed

    Lou, Qing; Qu, Songnan; Jing, Pengtao; Ji, Wenyu; Li, Di; Cao, Junsheng; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Jialong; Shen, Dezhen

    2015-02-25

    Novel luminescent "nano-bombs" based on a self-assembled system of carbon-nanodots, termed supra-CDs, are developed. The luminescence of these luminescent "nano-bombs" depends strongly on water contact; they show weak emission in toluene and decompose in contact with water, resulting in strong photoluminescence. Paper coated with these "nano-bombs" is successfully applied for water-jet printing of luminescence patterns and the mapping of human sweat-pore patterns.