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Sample records for recombinant luminescent bacterial

  1. A suite of recombinant luminescent bacterial strains for the quantification of bioavailable heavy metals and toxicity testing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recombinant whole-cell sensors have already proven useful in the assessment of the bioavailability of environmental pollutants like heavy metals and organic compounds. In this work 19 recombinant bacterial strains representing various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria were constructed to express the luminescence encoding genes luxCDABE (from Photorhabdus luminescens) as a response to bioavailable heavy metals ("lights-on" metal sensors containing metal-response elements, 13 strains) or in a constitutive manner ("lights-off" constructs, 6 strains). Results The bioluminescence of all 13 "lights-on" metal sensor strains was expressed as a function of the sub-toxic metal concentrations enabling the quantitative determination of metals bioavailable for these strains. Five sensor strains, constructed for detecting copper and mercury, proved to be target metal specific, whereas eight other sensor strains were simultaneously induced by Cd2+, Hg2+, Zn2+and Pb2+. The lowest limits of determination of the "lights-on" sensor strains for the metals tested in this study were (μg l-1): 0.002 of CH3HgCl, 0.03 of HgCl2, 1.8 of CdCl2, 33 of Pb(NO3)2, 1626 of ZnSO4, 24 of CuSO4 and 340 of AgNO3. In general, the sensitivity of the "lights-on" sensor strains was mostly dependent on the metal-response element used while the selection of host bacterium played a relatively minor role. In contrast, toxicity of metals to the "lights-off" strains was only dependent on the bacterial host so that Gram-positive strains were remarkably more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. Conclusion The constructed battery of 19 recombinant luminescent bacterial strains exhibits several novel aspects as it contains i) metal sensor strains with similar metal-response elements in different host bacteria; ii) metal sensor strains with metal-response elements in different copies and iii) a "lights

  2. A rapid BOD sensing system using luminescent recombinants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Toshifumi; Kitagawa, Kei; Ando, Tomotsugu; Murakami, Yuji; Morita, Yasutaka; Yamamura, Akira; Yokoyama, Kenji; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2003-11-15

    A biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensing system based on bacterial luminescence from recombinant Escherichia coli containing lux A-E genes from Vibrio fischeri has been developed. It was possible to use frozen cells of luminescent recombinants of E. coli as the bacterial reagents for measurement. Steady bioluminescence was observed during the incubation time between 90 and 150 min in the presence of a sole carbon source such as glucose, acetate, L-glutamate and BOD standard solution (GGA solution). This disposable bacterial reagent was applied to measure and detect organic pollution due to biodegradable substances in various wastewaters. The obtained values of this study showed a similar correlation with that of the conventional method for BOD determination (BOD5). Bacterial luminescence that was visualized with an imaging system using a charge coupled device (CCD) camera and a photomulti-counter demonstrated that this method could also be used for multi-sample detection of organic pollution due to biodegradable substances by using a microtiter plate. These results suggested for successful achievement of high-though-put detection of BOD in practical.

  3. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes. PMID:25790500

  4. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes.

  5. Surface Bacterial-Spore Assay Using Tb3+/DPA Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    Equipment and a method for rapidly assaying solid surfaces for contamination by bacterial spores are undergoing development. The method would yield a total (nonviable plus viable) spore count of a surface within minutes and a viable-spore count in about one hour. In this method, spores would be collected from a surface by use of a transparent polymeric tape coated on one side with a polymeric adhesive that would be permeated with one or more reagent(s) for detection of spores by use of visible luminescence. The sticky side of the tape would be pressed against a surface to be assayed, then the tape with captured spores would be placed in a reader that illuminates the sample with ultraviolet light and counts the green luminescence spots under a microscope to quantify the number of bacterial spores per unit area. The visible luminescence spots seen through the microscope would be counted to determine the concentration of spores on the surface. This method is based on the chemical and physical principles of methods described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, including Live/Dead Spore Assay Using DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence (NPO-30444), Vol. 27, No. 3 (March 2003), page 7a. To recapitulate: The basic idea is to exploit the observations that (1) dipicolinic acid (DPA) is present naturally only in bacterial spores; and (2) when bound to Tb3+ ions, DPA triggers intense green luminescence of the ions under ultraviolet excitation; (3) DPA can be released from the viable spores by using L-alanine to make them germinate; and (4) by autoclaving, microwaving, or sonicating the sample, one can cause all the spores (non-viable as well as viable) to release their DPA. One candidate material for use as the adhesive in the present method is polydimethysiloxane (PDMS). In one variant of the method for obtaining counts of all (viable and nonviable) spores the PDMS would be doped with TbCl3. After collection of a sample, the spores immobilized on the sticky tape surface

  6. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    PubMed

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research. PMID:26907777

  7. Recombinant bacterial lipoproteins as vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Chong, Pele

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant bacterial lipoproteins (RLP) with built-in immuno-stimulating properties for novel subunit vaccine development are reviewed. This platform technology offers the following advantages: easily converts antigens into highly immunogenic RLP using a fusion sequence containing lipobox; the lipid moiety of RLP is recognized as the danger signals in the immune system through the Toll-like receptor 2, so both innate and adaptive immune responses can be induced by RLP; serves as an efficient and cost-effective bioprocess for producing RLP in Escherichia coli and the feasibility and safety of this core platform technology has been successfully demonstrated in animal model studies including meningococcal group B subunit vaccine, dengue subunit vaccine, novel subunit vaccine against Clostridium difficile-associated diseases and HPV-based immunotherapeutic vaccines. PMID:26420467

  8. A novel BOD sensor based on bacterial luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, Changkee; Tamiya, Eiichi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Karube, Isao ); Inoue, Noriuki )

    1993-05-01

    A reagent-type BOD sensor with a new principle employing a luminous bacterium, Photobacterium phosphoreum, was developed. The increased intensity of luminescence resulting from the cellular assimilation of organic compounds in wastewater was detected by a photodiode. The BOD response of the bacterial reagent could be obtained within 15 min with [plus minus] 7% error. The temperature condition for optimal BOD response was 18 to 25 C at pH 7 to 8, indicating that it is possible to measure BOD at room temperature without having to stabilize the temperature of the measuring system. For practical use, two procedures for long-term preservation of the bacterial reagent, vacuum drying method and freezing method, are suggested. The metabolic characteristics of employed luminous bacteria were investigated by comparing the BOD values for several pure organic substrates estimated by the BOD sensor with conventional 5-day BOD values. In comparison with the 5-day BOD measurement for some wastewater samples, BOD values estimated by the sensor showed comparatively good agreement with those measured by the 5-day method.

  9. Bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Hg in Soil to Nine Recombinant Luminescent Metal Sensor Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Olesja; Rõlova, Taisia; Kahru, Anne; Ivask, Angela

    2008-01-01

    A set of nine recombinant heavy metal-specific luminescent bacterial sensors belonging to Gram-negative (Escherichia and Pseudomonas) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus and Bacillus) genera and containing various types of recombinant metal-response genetic elements was characterized for heavy metal bioavailability studies. All nine strains were induced by Hg and Cd and five strains also by Zn. As a lowest limit, the sensors were detecting 0.03 μg·L-1 of Hg, 2 μg·L-1 of Cd and 400 μg·L-1 of Zn. Limit of determination of the sensors depended mostly on metal-response element, whereas the toxicity of those metals towards the sensor bacteria was mostly dependent on the type of the host bacterium, with Gram-positive strains being more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. The set of sensors was used to evaluate bioavailability of Hg, Cd and Zn in spiked soils. The bioavailable fraction of Cd and Zn in soil suspension assay (2.6 – 5.1% and 0.32 – 0.61%, of the total Cd and Zn, respectively) was almost comparable for all the sensors, whereas the bioavailability of Hg was about 10-fold higher for Gram-negative sensor cells (30.5% of total Hg), compared to Gram-positive ones (3.2% of the total Hg). For Zn, the bioavailable fraction in soil-water suspensions and respective extracts was comparable (0.37 versus 0.33% of the total Zn). However, in the case of Cd, for all the sensors used and for Hg concerning only Gram-negative sensor strains, the bioavailable fraction in soil-water suspensions exceeded the water-extracted fraction about 14-fold, indicating that upon direct contact, an additional fraction of Cd and Hg was mobilized by those sensor bacteria. Thus, for robust bioavailability studies of heavy metals in soils any type of genetic metal-response elements could be used for the construction of the sensor strains. However, Gram-positive and Gram-negative senor strains should be used in parallel as the bioavailability of heavy metals to those bacterial groups may be

  10. Comparisons of Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium phosphoreum, and recombinant luminescent using Escherichia coli as BOD measurement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Kuo, Jong-Tar; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Liao, Yi-Ru; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2010-01-01

    To shorten the time needed to measure biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in water samples and to provide a rapid feedback of the real condition of water quality, we tested and evaluated the validity and reliability of luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium phosphoreum, and recombinant Escherichia coli as potential indicators of BOD in the domestic wastewaters. The results indicate that the luminescence intensities of these strains are dependent on temperature, pH, and BOD concentration. In comparison to the standard BOD(5) method, the time needed for BOD measurement can be shortened by 90, 120, and 150 min when V. fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and recombinant E. coli, respectively, are used. Recombinant E. coli can be adapted to measure BOD in domestic wastewater containing a wide range of BOD concentrations, V. fischeri is not suitable for measuring diluted wastewater, and P. phosphoreum has only a limited application in measuring concentrated wastewater. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which V. fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and recombinant luminescent E. coli are compared in terms of their potential in BOD measurement systems.

  11. Recombination luminescence in irradiated silicon - Effects of thermal annealing and lithium impurity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. S.; Compton, W. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of luminescence in irradiated silicon to determine the thermal stability of the defects responsible for the recombination. It is found that the defect responsible for the zero-phonon line at 0.97 eV has an annealing behavior similar to that of the divacancy and that the zero-phonon line at 0.79 eV anneals in a manner similar to the G-15 or K-center. Annealing at temperatures up to 500 C generates other defects whose luminescence is distinct from that seen previously. Addition of lithium to the material produces defects with new characteristic luminescence. Of particular importance is a defect with a level at E sub g -1.045 eV.

  12. Recombination luminescence from electron-irradiated Li-diffused Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. S.; Compton, W. D.; Noonan, J. R.; Streetman, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    Lithium doping has a dramatic effect on the low-temperature photoluminescence of electron-irradiated Si. In oxigen-lean Si with Li doping, a new irradiation-dependent luminescence band between 0.75 and 1.05 eV is observed, which is dominated by a zero-phonon peak at 1.045 eV. This band is believed to be due to radiative transitions involving a Li-modified divacancy. This band is present also in oxygen-rich, Li-diffused Si and is accompanied by bands previously related to the Si-G15(K) center and the divacancy. The intensities of the Li-modified divacancy and Si-G15(K) center bands are relatively weak in the oxygen-rich material, apparently due to the formation of lithium-oxygen complexes which reduce the concentration of unassociated interstitial Li and O.

  13. Fluorescence-PCR Assays and Isolation of Luminescent Bacterial Clones Using an Automated Plate Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The genes responsible for luminescence in various species of the marine microorganism "Photobacterium", have been used for many years as a tool by researchers and instructors. In particular, the "lux" operon of "Photobacterium fischeri" has been used by many instructors to teach recombinant DNA techniques. Two methods using an automated plate…

  14. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination.

  15. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination. PMID:27349114

  16. Effect of human serum on bioluminescence of natural and recombinant luminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Deryabin, D G; Polyakov, E G

    2004-09-01

    Biphasic modification of bacterial bioluminescence by human serum was revealed: bioluminescence was inhibited at high concentrations of the serum and stimulated at low concentrations. Effects of temperature and duration of exposure on bioluminescence manifested in stimulation of the inhibitory effect at higher temperature and longer exposure. The degree of inhibition of bioluminescence under in the presence of serum depends on species characteristics of the microorganism and nature of the luminescent system. PMID:15665923

  17. Method bacterial endospore quantification using lanthanide dipicolinate luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor); Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J. (Inventor); Kirby, James Patrick (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A lanthanide is combined with a medium to be tested for endospores. The dipicolinic acid released from the endospores binds the lanthanides, which have distinctive emission (i.e., luminescence) spectra, and are detected using photoluminescence. The concentration of spores is determined by preparing a calibration curve generated from photoluminescence spectra of lanthanide complex mixed with spores of a known concentration. A lanthanide complex is used as the analysis reagent, and is comprised of lanthanide ions bound to multidentate ligands that increase the dipicolinic acid binding constant through a cooperative binding effect with respect to lanthanide chloride. The resulting combined effect of increasing the binding constant and eliminating coordinated water and multiple equilibria increase the sensitivity of the endospore assay by an estimated three to four orders of magnitude over prior art of endospore detection based on lanthanide luminescence.

  18. Comparative and Evolutionary Analysis of the Bacterial Homologous Recombination Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C; Cornet, Emmanuel; Michel, Bénédicte

    2005-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a housekeeping process involved in the maintenance of chromosome integrity and generation of genetic variability. Although detailed biochemical studies have described the mechanism of action of its components in model organisms, there is no recent extensive assessment of this knowledge, using comparative genomics and taking advantage of available experimental data on recombination. Using comparative genomics, we assessed the diversity of recombination processes among bacteria, and simulations suggest that we missed very few homologs. The work included the identification of orthologs and the analysis of their evolutionary history and genomic context. Some genes, for proteins such as RecA, the resolvases, and RecR, were found to be nearly ubiquitous, suggesting that the large majority of bacterial genomes are capable of homologous recombination. Yet many genomes show incomplete sets of presynaptic systems, with RecFOR being more frequent than RecBCD/AddAB. There is a significant pattern of co-occurrence between these systems and antirecombinant proteins such as the ones of mismatch repair and SbcB, but no significant association with nonhomologous end joining, which seems rare in bacteria. Surprisingly, a large number of genomes in which homologous recombination has been reported lack many of the enzymes involved in the presynaptic systems. The lack of obvious correlation between the presence of characterized presynaptic genes and experimental data on the frequency of recombination suggests the existence of still-unknown presynaptic mechanisms in bacteria. It also indicates that, at the moment, the assessment of the intrinsic stability or recombination isolation of bacteria in most cases cannot be inferred from the identification of known recombination proteins in the genomes. PMID:16132081

  19. Genetic manipulation of poxviruses using bacterial artificial chromosome recombineering.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Matthew G

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for genetic manipulation of poxviruses rely on low-frequency natural recombination in virus-infected cells. Although these powerful systems represent the technical foundation of current knowledge and applications of poxviruses, they require long (≥ 500 bp) flanking sequences for homologous recombination, an efficient viral selection method, and burdensome, time-consuming plaque purification. The beginning of the twenty-first century has seen the application of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology to poxviruses as an alternative method for their genetic manipulation, following the invention of a long-sought-after method for deriving a BAC clone of vaccinia virus (VAC-BAC) by Arban Domi and Bernard Moss. The key advantages of the BAC system are the ease and versatility of performing genetic manipulation using bacteriophage λ Red recombination (recombineering), which requires only ∼50 bp homology arms that can be easily created by PCR, and which allows seamless mutations lacking any marker gene without having to perform transient-dominant selection. On the other hand, there are disadvantages, including the significant setup time, the risk of contamination of the cloned genome with bacterial insertion sequences, and the nontrivial issue of removal of the BAC cassette from derived viruses. These must be carefully weighed to decide whether the use of BACs will be advantageous for a particular application, making pox-BAC systems likely to complement, rather than supplant, traditional methods in most laboratories. PMID:22688760

  20. Differential analysis of bactericidal systems of blood serum with recombinant luminescent Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains.

    PubMed

    Deryabin, D G; Karimov, I F; Manukhov, I V; Tolmacheva, N A; Balabanov, V P

    2012-11-01

    Luminescence intensity of recombinant Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains with cloned luxCD(AB)E genes of the natural luminescent microorganism Photobacterium leiognathi was studied under the influence of 30 individual samples of human blood serum of different component composition. A relationship was found between the level of residual bioluminescence and degree of the bactericidal effect. Moreover, the inhibition of E. coli lux+ luminescence was shown to be related to activity of the complement-lysozyme system. The reaction of B. subtilis lux+ primarily depended on the presence of β-lysin in the blood serum. These data provide an experimental substantiation of a new method of differential analysis of humoral factors of nonspecific innate immunity with recombinant luminescent bacteria. PMID:23330091

  1. Live/Dead Bacterial Spore Assay Using DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of measuring the fraction of bacterial spores in a sample that remain viable exploits DPA-triggered luminescence of Tb(3+) and is based partly on the same principles as those described earlier. Unlike prior methods for performing such live/dead assays of bacterial spores, this method does not involve counting colonies formed by cultivation (which can take days), or counting of spores under a microscope, and works whether or not bacterial spores are attached to other small particles (i.e., dust), and can be implemented on a time scale of about 20 minutes.

  2. Recombination gamma-luminescence at the nanometal Li - dielectric LiF interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimova, E. M.; Mussaeva, M. A.; Buzrikov, Sh. N.

    2015-06-01

    Recombination 60Co-gamma-luminescence (GL) was studied experimentally in LiF:K,Cu crystals at the dose rate 406 R/s in the temperature range 273-473 K, when localized charge carriers are released from the hole/electron color center traps and Li vacancies are highly mobile. The crystals were preliminary irradiated in the 60Co gamma-source at 300-320 K to doses 107, 108, 109 R to generate F-aggregate centers and nano-colloids of Li. The intensity of GL bands at 570 nm (F4 centers) and 670 nm (F2+ centers) was shown to increase after 106 R above 370 K due to dominant contribution from radiative recombination of the released carries at the interface of nanometal-Li-dielectric-LiF. These bands can be used for gamma-dose measurements at 107-108 R.

  3. Species Specific Bacterial Spore Detection Using Lateral-Flow Immunoassay with DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of detecting bacterial spores incorporates (1) A method of lateral-flow immunoassay in combination with (2) A method based on the luminescence of Tb3+ ions to which molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) released from the spores have become bound. The present combination of lateral-flow immunoassay and DPA-triggered Tb luminescence was developed as a superior alternative to a prior lateral-flow immunoassay method in which detection involves the visual observation and/or measurement of red light scattered from colloidal gold nanoparticles. The advantage of the present combination method is that it affords both (1) High selectivity for spores of the species of bacteria that one seeks to detect (a characteristic of lateral-flow immunoassay in general) and (2) Detection sensitivity much greater (by virtue of the use of DPA-triggered Tb luminescence instead of gold nanoparticles) than that of the prior lateral-flow immunoassay method

  4. Recombination luminescence of CaSO4:Tb3+ and CaSO4:Gd3+phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtseva, Irina; Lushchik, Aleksandr; Maaroos, Aarne; Azmaganbetova, Zhannur; Nurakhmetov, Turlybek; Salikhoja, Zhussupbek

    2012-08-01

    A comparative study of the excitation of luminescence by VUV radiation as well as of thermally and photostimulated luminescence has been carried out for CaSO4:Tb3+ and CaSO4:Gd3+ phosphors, where Na+ or F- ions are used for charge compensation. The distinction in hole processes for the phosphors with Na+ or F- compensators is determined by the differing thermal stability of the holes localized at/near Tb3+Na+ and Gd3+Na+ (up to 100-160 K) or at/near Tb3+F- V Ca and Gd3+F- V Ca centers involving also a cation vacancy (up to 400-550 K). Tunnel luminescence in the pairs of localized electrons and holes nearby Tb3+ or Gd3+ has been detected. The mechanisms of electron-hole, hole-electron and tunnel recombination luminescence as well as a subsequent released energy transfer to RE3+ ions are considered.

  5. A New, Sensitive Marine Microalgal Recombinant Biosensor Using Luminescence Monitoring for Toxicity Testing of Antifouling Biocides

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie; Leroy, Fanny; Bouget, François-Yves

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we propose the use of the marine green alga Ostreococcus tauri, the smallest free-living eukaryotic cell known to date, as a new luminescent biosensor for toxicity testing in the environment. Diuron and Irgarol 1051, two antifouling biocides commonly encountered in coastal waters, were chosen to test this new biosensor along with two degradation products of diuron. The effects of various concentrations of the antifoulants on four genetic constructs of O. tauri (based on genes involved in photosynthesis, cell cycle, and circadian clock) were compared using 96-well culture microplates and a luminometer to automatically measure luminescence over 3 days. This was compared to growth inhibition of O. tauri wild type under the same conditions. Luminescence appeared to be more sensitive than growth inhibition as an indicator of toxicity. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKA), a protein involved in the cell cycle, fused to luciferase (CDKA-Luc) was found to be the most sensitive of the biosensors, allowing an accurate determination of the 50% effective concentration (EC50) after only 2 days (diuron, 5.65 ± 0.44 μg/liter; Irgarol 1015, 0.76 ± 0.10 μg/liter). The effects of the antifoulants on the CDKA-Luc biosensor were then compared to growth inhibition in natural marine phytoplankton. The effective concentrations of diuron and Irgarol 1051 were found to be similar, indicating that this biosensor would be suitable as a reliable ecotoxicological test. The advantage of this biosensor over cell growth inhibition testing is that the process can be easily automated and could provide a high-throughput laboratory approach to perform short-term toxicity tests. The ability to genetically transform and culture recombinant O. tauri gives it huge potential for screening many other toxic compounds. PMID:23144143

  6. Purification and biological characterization of bacterially expressed recombinant buffalo prolactin.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Manoj; Muralidhar, Kambadur

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant prolactin (PRL) from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) has been cloned and expressed in a prokaryotic expression system. The hormone was also successfully refolded into a biologically active form. Total RNA was purified from buffalo pituitaries and the buPRL cDNA was synthesized using primers designed on bovine PRL sequence. This prolactin cDNA was cloned in a pET 28a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3)pLysS. Most of the expressed protein was present as insoluble inclusion bodies. The inclusion bodies were solubilized and buPRL was purified by Ni-NTA column. The purified protein was refolded by gradually decreasing the concentration of denaturant during dialysis. Total yield of the refolded and soluble prolactin was 22 mg/L from 100 mL bacterial culture in LB medium. The recombinant prolactin was as active as native prolactin in stimulating growth of Nb2 lymphoma cells.

  7. Ratiometric luminescent detection of bacterial spores with terbium chelated semiconducting polymer dots.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Sun, Kai; Chang, Kaiwen; Yu, Jiangbo; Chiu, Daniel T; Wu, Changfeng; Qin, Weiping

    2013-10-01

    We report a ratiometric fluorescent sensor based on semiconducting polymer dots chelated with terbium ions to detect bacterial spores in aqueous solution. Fluorescent polyfluorene (PFO) dots serve as a scaffold to coordinate with lanthanide ions that can be sensitized by calcium dipicolinate (CaDPA), an important biomarker of bacterial spores. The absorption band of PFO dots extends to deep UV region, allowing both the reference and the sensitizer can be excited with a single wavelength (~275 nm). The fluorescence of PFO remains constant as a reference, while the Tb(3+) ions exhibit enhanced luminescence upon binding with DPA. The sharp fluorescence peaks of β-phase PFO dots and the narrow-band emissions of Tb(3+) ions enable ratiometric and sensitive CaDPA detection with a linear response over nanomolar concentration and a detection limit of ~0.2 nM. The Pdots based sensor also show excellent selectivity to CaDPA over other aromatic ligands. Our results indicate that the Tb(3+) chelated Pdots sensor is promising for sensitive and rapid detection of bacterial spores.

  8. Expression vectors for the use of eukaryotic luciferases as bacterial markers with different colors of luminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Cebolla, A; Vázquez, M E; Palomares, A J

    1995-01-01

    An easy way to identify microorganisms is to provide them with gene markers that confer a unique phenotype. Several genetic constructions were developed to use eukaryotic luciferase genes for bacterial tagging. The firefly and click bettle luciferase genes, luc and lucOR, respectively, were cloned under constitutive control and regulated control from different transcriptional units driven by P1, lambda PR, and Ptrc promoters. Comparison of the expression of each gene in Escherichia coli cells from identical promoters showed that bioluminescence produced by luc could be detected luminometrically in a more sensitive manner. In contrast, luminescence from intact lucOR-expressing cells was much more stable and resistant to high temperatures than that from luc-expressing cells. To analyze the behavior of these constructions in other gram-negative bacteria, gene fusions with luc genes were cloned on broad-host-range vectors. Measurements of light emission from Rhizobium meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Pseudomonas putida cells indicated that both luciferases were poorly expressed from P1 in most bacterial hosts. In contrast, the lambda promoter PR yielded constitutively high levels of luciferase expression in all bacterial species tested. PR activity was not regulated by temperature when the thermosensitive repressor cI857 was present in the bacterial species tested, except for E. coli. In contrast, the regulated lacIq-Ptrc::lucOR fusion expression system behaved in a manner similar to that observed in E. coli cells. After IPTG (isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside) induction, this system produced the highest levels of lucOR expression in all bacterial species tested.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7574604

  9. Donor-acceptor pair recombination luminescence from monoclinic Cu{sub 2}SnS{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, Naoya; Tanaka, Kunihiko Uchiki, Hisao; Kanai, Ayaka; Araki, Hideaki

    2015-07-20

    The defect levels in Cu{sub 2}SnS{sub 3} (CTS) were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. A CTS thin film was prepared on a soda-lime glass/molybdenum substrate by thermal co-evaporation and sulfurization. The crystal structure was determined to be monoclinic, and the compositional ratios of Cu/Sn and S/Metal were determined to be 1.8 and 1.2, respectively. The photon energy of the PL spectra observed from the CTS thin film was lower than that previously reported. All fitted PL peaks were associated with defect related luminescence. The PL peaks observed at 0.843 and 0.867 eV were assigned to donor-acceptor pair recombination luminescence, the thermal activation energies of which were determined to be 22.9 and 24.8 meV, respectively.

  10. The Effect of Pre-irradiation Defects on the Recombination Luminescence in Activated Crystals K2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koketai, Temirgaly; Tagayeva, Batima; Tussupbekova, Ainura; Mussenova, Elmira

    The recombinational luminescence of crystals of K2SO4-Mn2+ and K2SO4-Ni2+ is studied in the article. It is established that impurity ions form the radiation induced centers. The cause of changes of the distribution of lightsum on TSL peaks of a matrix is established. It is proposed that it is related to pre-radiation defeсts in crystals. It is established from this effect that ions of Mn2+ and Ni2+ selectively replace cations in a crystal lattice of potassium sulfate.

  11. SimBac: simulation of whole bacterial genomes with homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas; Didelot, Xavier; Wilson, Daniel J.; De Maio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria can exchange genetic material, or acquire genes found in the environment. This process, generally known as bacterial recombination, can have a strong impact on the evolution and phenotype of bacteria, for example causing the spread of antibiotic resistance across clades and species, but can also disrupt phylogenetic and transmission inferences. With the increasing affordability of whole genome sequencing, the need has emerged for an efficient simulator of bacterial evolution to test and compare methods for phylogenetic and population genetic inference, and for simulation-based estimation. We present SimBac, a whole-genome bacterial evolution simulator that is roughly two orders of magnitude faster than previous software and includes a more general model of bacterial evolution, allowing both within- and between-species homologous recombination. Since methods modelling bacterial recombination generally focus on only one of these two modes of recombination, the possibility to simulate both allows for a general and fair benchmarking. SimBac is available from https://github.com/tbrown91/SimBac and is distributed as open source under the terms of the GNU General Public Licence.

  12. Recombination luminescence in irradiated silicon-effects of uniaxial stress and temperature variations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. E.; Compton, W. D.

    1971-01-01

    Demonstration that luminescence in irradiated silicon consists of a spectral group between 0.80 and 1.0 eV which seems to be independent of impurities, while a lower energy group between 0.60 and 0.80 eV is seen only in pulled crystals. The small halfwidth and temperature dependence of the sharp zero-phonon lines observed in these spectra indicate that the luminescence arises from a bound-to-bound transition. A model is proposed for the transition mechanism. Stress data taken on the 0.79-eV zero-phonon line in pulled crystals can be fit by either a tetragonal 100 (in brackets) defect symmetry or by conduction-band splitting effects. It is suggested that the 0.79-eV zero-phonon line and the 0.60- to 0.80-eV spectral group arise from the EPR G-15 center. Stress data on a zero-phonon line at 0.97 eV associated with the 0.80- to 1.0-eV spectral group can be explained by a trigonal 111 (in brackets) defect. The divacancy is tentatively suggested as responsible for this luminescence spectra.

  13. Bacterial expression and purification of recombinant bovine Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Philippa M; Maxwell, Gavin; Campo, M Saveria

    2002-02-01

    We have previously described a recombinant phagemid expression vector, pComBov, designed for the production of native sequence bovine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) generated by antibody phage display. Bovine mAb Fab fragments isolated from libraries constructed using pComBov in Escherichia coli strain XL1-Blue, which is routinely used for antibodies expressed on the surface of phage, were expressed at very low yields. Therefore, a study was undertaken to determine optimal growth conditions for maximal expression of bovine Fab fragments in E. coli. By varying the E. coli strain, and the temperature and length of the culture growth, we were able to substantially increase the yield of soluble Fab fragments. A high yield of Fab fragments was found in the culture growth medium, which enabled us to devise a rapid and simple single-step method for the purification of native (nondenatured) Fabs based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography against a six-histidine amino acid carboxyl-terminal extension of the heavy-chain constant region. Using these methods we were able to express and purify antigen-specific bovine Fab fragments from E. coli. PMID:11812221

  14. Charge recombination processes in minerals studied using optically stimulated luminescence and time-resolved exo-electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Murray, Andrew; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Lapp, Torben

    2010-08-01

    A time-resolved optically stimulated exo-electron (TR-OSE) measurement system has been developed using a Photon Timer attached to a gas-flow semi-proportional pancake electron detector within a Risø TL/OSL reader. The decay rate of the exo-electron emission after the stimulation pulse depends on the probability of (1) escape of electrons into the detector gas from the conduction band by overcoming the work function of the material and (2) thermalization of electrons in the conduction band, and subsequent re-trapping/recombination. Thus, we expect the exo-electron signal to reflect the instantaneous electron concentration in the conduction band. In this study, TR-OSE and time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL) were measured for the first time using quartz, K-feldspar and NaCl by stimulating the samples using pulsed blue LEDs at different temperatures between 50 and 250 °C after beta irradiation and preheating to 280 °C. The majority of TR-OSE signals from all the samples decayed much faster than TR-OSL signals irrespective of the stimulation temperatures. This suggests that the lifetime of OSL in these dosimeters arises mainly from the relaxation of an excited state of the recombination centre, rather than from residence time of an electron in the conduction band.

  15. Essential bacterial helicases that counteract the toxicity of recombination proteins.

    PubMed

    Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ehrlich, Dusko

    2002-06-17

    PcrA, Rep and UvrD are three closely related bacterial helicases with a DExx signature. PcrA is encoded by Gram-positive bacteria and is essential for cell growth. Rep and UvrD are encoded by Gram-negative bacteria, and mutants lacking both helicases are also not viable. To understand the non-viability of the helicase mutants, we characterized spontaneous extragenic suppressors of a Bacillus subtilis pcrA null mutation. Here we report that one of these suppressors maps in recF and that previously isolated mutations in B.subtilis recF, recL, recO and recR, which belong to the same complementation group, all suppress the lethality of a pcrA mutation. Similarly, recF, recO or recR mutations suppress the lethality of the Escherichia coli rep uvrD double mutant. We conclude that RecFOR proteins are toxic in cells devoid of PcrA in Gram-positive bacteria, or Rep and UvrD in Gram-negative bacteria, and propose that the RecFOR proteins interfere with an essential cellular process, possibly replication, when DExx helicases PcrA, or Rep and UvrD are absent. PMID:12065426

  16. Investigations of phagocytosis concerning the immunological defence mechanism of Mytilus edulis using a sublethal luminescent bacterial assay (Photobacterium phosphoreum).

    PubMed

    Hansen, P D; Bock, R; Brauer, F

    1991-01-01

    1. A simple method for the determination of phagocytosis activity using mussel hemocytes by measuring the bioluminescence is presented. 2. The immunological defence activity based on phagocytosis is measured and quantified by a luminescent bacterial assay with Photobacterium phosphoreum. 3. The measuring system allows us to establish the stress of the immunological defence mechanism of organisms exposed to chemicals and polluted rivers or sewage. Results with reference substances and the phagocytosis indices of exposed mussels from Norwegian aquaculture plants compared to those of mussels from the German Wadden Sea are given as examples.

  17. Recombination dynamics of spatially confined electron-hole system in luminescent gold catalyzed silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Demichel, O; Calvo, V; Pauc, N; Besson, A; Noé, P; Oehler, F; Gentile, P; Magnea, N

    2009-07-01

    We study by time-resolved low temperature photoluminescence (PL) experiments of the electronic states of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) grown by gold catalyzed chemical vapor deposition and passivated by thermal SiO(2). The typical recombination line of free carriers in gold-catalyzed SiNWs (Au-SiNWs) is identified and studied by time-resolved experiments. We demonstrate that intrinsic Auger recombination governs the recombination dynamic of the dense e-h plasma generated inside the NW. In a few tens of nanoseconds after the pulsed excitation, the density of the initial electronic system rapidly decreases down to reach that of a stable electron-hole liquid phase. The comparison of the PL intensity decay time of Au-SiNWs with high crystalline quality and purity silicon layer allows us to conclude that the Au-SiNW electronic properties are highly comparable to those of bulk silicon crystal.

  18. Bacterial synthesis of polysialic acid lactosides in recombinant Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Richard, Emeline; Buon, Laurine; Drouillard, Sophie; Fort, Sébastien; Priem, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial polysialyltransferases (PSTs) are processive enzymes involved in the synthesis of polysialic capsular polysaccharides. They can also synthesize polysialic acid in vitro from disialylated and trisialylated lactoside acceptors, which are the carbohydrate moieties of GD3 and GT3 gangliosides, respectively. Here, we engineered a non-pathogenic Escherichia coli strain that overexpresses recombinant sialyltransferases and sialic acid synthesis genes and can convert an exogenous lactoside into polysialyl lactosides. Several PSTs were assayed for their ability to synthesize polysialyl lactosides in the recombinant strains. Fed-batch cultures produced α-2,8 polysialic acid or alternate α-2,8-2,9 polysialic acid in quantities reaching several grams per liter. Bacterial culture in the presence of propargyl-β-lactoside as the exogenous acceptor led to the production of conjugatable polysaccharides by means of copper-assisted click chemistry. PMID:26927318

  19. A sensitive and high throughput bacterial luminescence assay for assessing aquatic toxicity--the BLT-Screen.

    PubMed

    van de Merwe, Jason P; Leusch, Frederic D L

    2015-05-01

    Bioassays using naturally luminescent bacteria are commonly used to assess the toxicity of environmental contaminants, detected by a decrease in luminescence. Typically, this has involved the use of commercial test kits such as Microtox and ToxScreen. These commercial assays, however, have limitations for routine environmental monitoring, including the need for specialized equipment, a low throughput and high on-going costs. There is therefore a need to develop a bacteria bioassay that is sensitive, high-throughput and cost effective. This study presents the development and application of the BLT-Screen (Bacterial Luminescence Toxicity Screen), a 96-well plate bioassay using Photobacterium leiognathi. During development of the method, the concentration of the phosphate buffer in the experimental medium was adjusted to maximize the sensitivity of the assay, and protocols for analyzing both solid-phase extracts and raw water samples were established. A range of organic compounds and metals were analyzed in the assay, as well as extracts of various water samples, including drinking water, wastewater effluent and river water. The IC50 values of the organic compounds and metals tested in the BLT-Screen were comparable to previously published ToxScreen and Microtox data. In addition, the assay was sensitive enough to detect toxicity in all water types tested, and performed equally well for both solid-phase extracts and raw water samples. The BLT-Screen therefore presents a cost-effective, sensitive and high throughput method for testing the toxicity of environmental contaminants in a range of water types that has widespread applications for research, as well as for routine monitoring and operation of wastewater and drinking water plants.

  20. Room temperature electrocompetent bacterial cells improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qiang; Yin, Jia; Fu, Jun; Herrmann, Jennifer; Li, Yuezhong; Yin, Yulong; Stewart, A. Francis; Müller, Rolf; Zhang, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial competent cells are essential for cloning, construction of DNA libraries, and mutagenesis in every molecular biology laboratory. Among various transformation methods, electroporation is found to own the best transformation efficiency. Previous electroporation methods are based on washing and electroporating the bacterial cells in ice-cold condition that make them fragile and prone to death. Here we present simple temperature shift based methods that improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency in E. coli and several other gram-negative bacteria thereby economizing time and cost. Increased transformation efficiency of large DNA molecules is a significant advantage that might facilitate the cloning of large fragments from genomic DNA preparations and metagenomics samples. PMID:27095488

  1. Room temperature electrocompetent bacterial cells improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qiang; Yin, Jia; Fu, Jun; Herrmann, Jennifer; Li, Yuezhong; Yin, Yulong; Stewart, A Francis; Müller, Rolf; Zhang, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial competent cells are essential for cloning, construction of DNA libraries, and mutagenesis in every molecular biology laboratory. Among various transformation methods, electroporation is found to own the best transformation efficiency. Previous electroporation methods are based on washing and electroporating the bacterial cells in ice-cold condition that make them fragile and prone to death. Here we present simple temperature shift based methods that improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency in E. coli and several other gram-negative bacteria thereby economizing time and cost. Increased transformation efficiency of large DNA molecules is a significant advantage that might facilitate the cloning of large fragments from genomic DNA preparations and metagenomics samples. PMID:27095488

  2. De novo generation of infectious prions with bacterially expressed recombinant prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Fei; Wang, Xinhe; Xu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Huaiyi; Yu, Guohua; Yuan, Chonggang; Ma, Jiyan

    2013-12-01

    The prion hypothesis is strongly supported by the fact that prion infectivity and the pathogenic conformer of prion protein (PrP) are simultaneously propagated in vitro by the serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA). However, due to sPMCA's enormous amplification power, whether an infectious prion can be formed de novo with bacterially expressed recombinant PrP (rPrP) remains to be satisfactorily resolved. To address this question, we performed unseeded sPMCA with rPrP in a laboratory that has never been exposed to any native prions. Two types of proteinase K (PK)-resistant and self-perpetuating recombinant PrP conformers (rPrP-res) with PK-resistant cores of 17 or 14 kDa were generated. A bioassay revealed that rPrP-res(17kDa) was highly infectious, causing prion disease in wild-type mice with an average survival time of about 172 d. In contrast, rPrP-res(14kDa) completely failed to induce any disease. Our findings reveal that sPMCA is sufficient to initiate various self-perpetuating PK-resistant rPrP conformers, but not all of them possess in vivo infectivity. Moreover, generating an infectious prion in a prion-free environment establishes that an infectious prion can be formed de novo with bacterially expressed rPrP.

  3. Detection of bioavailable heavy metals in EILATox-Oregon samples using whole-cell luminescent bacterial sensors in suspension or immobilized onto fibre-optic tips.

    PubMed

    Hakkila, Kaisa; Green, Tal; Leskinen, Piia; Ivask, Angela; Marks, Robert; Virta, Marko

    2004-01-01

    At the EILATox-Oregon Workshop, nine luminescent whole-cell bacterial sensors were used for the determination of bioavailable metals in blind samples (17 synthetic and 3 environmental). A non-inducible luminescent control strain was used to determine sample matrix effects and bacterial toxicity. Whole-cell bacterial sensors capable of determining arsenic, inorganic mercury and its organic derivatives, cadmium, lead or copper were used in suspensions and a bacterial sensor for the detection of inorganic mercury was immobilized onto fibre-optic tips using calcium alginate. Bioavailable amounts of metals were estimated using calibration plots, that were constructed to determine the range of metals giving rise to a linear relationship between luminescence and the amount of metals present in the standard solutions. EILATox-Oregon sample 5, which contained 74 mg l(-1) of Hg, gave a significant response with both formats of the mercury sensor. The bioavailable amounts of mercury according to the measurement of bacterial sensor in suspension and immobilized onto a fibre-optic tip were 76 and 93 mg l(-1), respectively. The bacterial sensor for arsenic and copper showed a response with sample 6 (58 mg l(-1) of As) and sample 8 (400 mg l(-1) of metham sodium), respectively. This study showed that the bacterial sensors in suspension or immobilized onto optical fibres are capable of quantifying bioavailable metals from unknown samples. The measurement protocol of bacterial sensors is simple and possible to perform in the field. Moreover, the samples do not need any pretreatment before analysis. Construction and characterization of the strain for the detection of bioavailable copper are described.

  4. Genome-wide survey of codons under diversifying selection in a highly recombining bacterial species, Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Koji; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Morimoto, Shinpei; Kikutake, Chie; Komukai, Sho; Matelska, Dorota; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanisław; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Selection has been a central issue in biology in eukaryotes as well as prokaryotes. Inference of selection in recombining bacterial species, compared with clonal ones, has been a challenge. It is not known how codons under diversifying selection are distributed along the chromosome or among functional categories or how frequently such codons are subject to mutual homologous recombination. Here, we explored these questions by analysing genes present in >90% among 29 genomes of Helicobacter pylori, one of the bacterial species with the highest mutation and recombination rates. By a method for recombining sequences, we identified codons under diversifying selection (dN/dS > 1), which were widely distributed and accounted for ∼0.2% of all the codons of the genome. The codons were enriched in genes of host interaction/cell surface and genome maintenance (DNA replication, recombination, repair, and restriction modification system). The encoded amino acid residues were sometimes found adjacent to critical catalytic/binding residues in protein structures. Furthermore, by estimating the intensity of homologous recombination at a single nucleotide level, we found that these codons appear to be more frequently subject to recombination. We expect that the present study provides a new approach to population genomics of selection in recombining prokaryotes. PMID:26961370

  5. HIGH YIELD SOLUBLE BACTERIAL EXPRESSION AND STREAMLINED PURIFICATION OF RECOMBINANT HUMAN INTERFERON α-2A

    PubMed Central

    Bis, Regina L.; Stauffer, Tara M.; Singh, Surinder M.; Lavoie, Thomas B.; Mallela, Krishna M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon α-2a (IFNA2) is a member of the Type I interferon cytokine family, known for its antiviral and anti-proliferative functions. The role of this family in the innate immune response makes it an attractive candidate for the treatment of many viral and chronic immune-compromised diseases. Recombinant IFNA2 is clinically used to modulate hairy cell leukemia as well as hepatitis c. Historically, IFNA2 has been purified from human leukocytes as well as bacterial expression systems. In most cases, bacterial expression of IFNA2 resulted in inclusion body formation, or required numerous purification steps that decreased the protein yield. Here, we describe an expression and purification scheme for IFNA2 using a pET-SUMO bacterial expression system and a single purification step. Using SUMO protein as the fusion tag achieved high soluble protein expression. The SUMO tag was cleaved with the Ulp1 protease leaving no additional amino acids on the fusion terminus following the cleavage. Mass spectrometry, circular dichroism, 2D heteronuclear NMR, and analytical ultracentrifugation confirmed the amino acid sequence identity, secondary and tertiary protein structures, and the solution behavior of the purified IFNA2. The purified protein also has antiviral and anti-proliferative activities comparable to the WHO International Standard, NIBSC 95/650, and the IFNA2 standard available from PBL Assay Science. Combining the expression and purification protocols developed here to produce IFNA2 on a laboratory scale with the commercial fermenter technology commonly used in pharmaceutical industry may further enhance IFNA2 yields, which will promote the development of interferon-based protein drugs to treat various disorders. PMID:24794500

  6. A novel, sensitive method to evaluate potato germplasm for bacterial wilt resistance using a luminescent Ralstonia solanacearum reporter strain.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andrea Paola Zuluaga; Ferreira, Virginia; Pianzzola, María Julia; Siri, María Inés; Coll, Núria S; Valls, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Several breeding programs are under way to introduce resistance to bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in solanaceous crops. The lack of screening methods allowing easy measurement of pathogen colonization and the inability to detect latent (i.e., symptomless) infections are major limitations when evaluating resistance to this disease in plant germplasm. We describe a new method to study the interaction between R. solanacearum and potato germplasm that overcomes these restrictions. The R. solanacearum UY031 was genetically modified to constitutively generate light from a synthetic luxCDABE operon stably inserted in its chromosome. Colonization of this reporter strain on different potato accessions was followed using life imaging. Bacterial detection in planta by this nondisruptive system correlated with the development of wilting symptoms. In addition, we demonstrated that quantitative detection of the recombinant strain using a luminometer can identify latent infections on symptomless potato plants. We have developed a novel, unsophisticated, and accurate method for high-throughput evaluation of pathogen colonization in plant populations. We applied this method to compare the behavior of potato accessions with contrasting resistance to R. solanacearum. This new system will be especially useful to detect latency in symptomless parental lines before their inclusion in long-term breeding programs for disease resistance.

  7. Enhanced production of ε-caprolactone by coexpression of bacterial hemoglobin gene in recombinant Escherichia coli expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-12-28

    Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in a microbial system expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) can be influenced by not only the efficient regeneration of NADPH but also a sufficient supply of oxygen. In this study, the bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria (vhb) was introduced into the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing CHMO to investigate the effects of an oxygen-carrying protein on microbial BV oxidation of cyclohexanone. Coexpression of Vhb allowed the recombinant E. coli strain to produce a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 15.7 g/l in a fed-batch BV oxidation of cyclohexanone, which corresponded to a 43% improvement compared with the control strain expressing CHMO only under the same conditions.

  8. The effect of bacterial recombination on adaptation on fitness landscapes with limited peak accessibility.

    PubMed

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Engelstädter, Jan

    2012-01-01

    There is ample empirical evidence revealing that fitness landscapes are often complex: the fitness effect of a newly arisen mutation can depend strongly on the allelic state at other loci. However, little is known about the effects of recombination on adaptation on such fitness landscapes. Here, we investigate how recombination influences the rate of adaptation on a special type of complex fitness landscapes. On these landscapes, the mutational trajectories from the least to the most fit genotype are interrupted by genotypes with low relative fitness. We study the dynamics of adapting populations on landscapes with different compositions and numbers of low fitness genotypes, with and without recombination. Our results of the deterministic model (assuming an infinite population size) show that recombination generally decelerates adaptation on these landscapes. However, in finite populations, this deceleration is outweighed by the accelerating Fisher-Muller effect under certain conditions. We conclude that recombination has complex effects on adaptation that are highly dependent on the particular fitness landscape, population size and recombination rate.

  9. Bacterial expression systems for recombinant protein production: E. coli and beyond.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli expression system continues to dominate the bacterial expression systems and remain to be the preferred system for laboratory investigations and initial development in commercial activities or as a useful benchmark for comparison among various expression platforms. Some new developments in overcoming its shortcomings are reviewed in this paper, including antibiotics-free selection plasmids, extracellular production, and posttranslational modifications. The ability for E. coli to make mg glycosylated proteins promises even broader applications of the E. coli system in the future. Significant progresses have also been made over the past few years in alternative bacterial expression systems. Notably, the Lactoccocus lactis system has proven to be a viable choice for membrane proteins. Additionally, several Pseudomonas systems were developed and achieved product titers comparable to E. coli systems. Other bacterial systems such as Streptomyces, coryneform bacteria, and halophilic bacteria offer advantages in some niche areas, providing more choices of bacterial expression systems for recalcitrant proteins.

  10. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012 individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is<107. An argument for high Ne values for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but thismore » diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimate Ne correctly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne ×s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifs is above 10-7 or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9 per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more sophisticated theory considers that bacterial genomes have millions of sites each and selection events on these many sites could interfere with each other, so that only larger effects would be important. However, bacteria can exchange genetic material, and in principle, this exchange could eliminate the interference between the evolution of

  11. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012 individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is<107. An argument for high Ne values for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but this diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimate Ne correctly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne ×s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifs is above 10-7 or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9 per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more

  12. Optimization of Recombinant Expression of Synthetic Bacterial Phytase in Pichia pastoris Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Ali; Dehnavi, Ehsan; Aghaeepoor, Mojtaba; Amani, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli phytase is an acidic histidine phytase with great specific activity. Pichia pastoris is a powerful system for the heterologous expression of active and soluble proteins which can express recombinant proteins in high cell density fermenter without loss of product yield and efficiently secrete heterologous proteins into the media. Recombinant protein expression is influenced by expression conditions such as temperature, concentration of inducer, and pH. By optimization, the yield of expressed proteins can be increase. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been widely used for the optimization and studying of different parameters in biotechnological processes. Objectives: In this study, the expression of synthetic appA gene in P. pastoris was greatly improved by adjusting the expression condition. Materials and Methods: The appA gene with 410 amino acids was synthesized by P. pastoris codon preference and cloned in expression vector pPinkα-HC, under the control of AOX1 promoter, and it was transformed into P. pastoris GS115 by electroporation. Recombinant phytase was expressed in buffered methanol-complex medium (BMMY) and the expression was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and enzymatic assay. To achieve the highest level of expression, methanol concentration, pH and temperature were optimized via RSM. Finally, the optimum pH and temperature for recombinant phytase activity was determined. Results: Escherichia coli phytase was expressed in P. pastoris under different cultivation conditions (post-induction temperature, methanol concentration, and post-induction pH). The optimized conditions by RSM using face centered central composite design were 1% (v/v) methanol, pH = 5.8, and 24.5°C. Under the optimized conditions, appA was successfully expressed in P. pastoris and the maximum phytase activity was 237.2 U/mL after 72 hours of expression. Conclusions: By optimization of recombinant

  13. Lederberg on bacterial recombination, Haldane, and cold war genetics: an interview.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    2014-01-01

    Joshua Lederberg (1925-2008), was one of the pioneers of molecular genetics perhaps best known for his discovery of genetic recombination in bacteria which earned him a Nobel Prize in 1958 (shared with George Beadle and Edward Tatum). Lederberg's interests were broad including the origin of life, exobiology (a term that he coined) and emerging diseases and artificial intelligence in his, later years. This article contains the transcription of an interview in excerpts, docu- menting the interactions between Lederberg and fellow biologist J.B.S. Haldane wlich lasted from 1946 until Haldane's death in Kolkata (then Calcutta) in 1964.

  14. Lederberg on bacterial recombination, Haldane, and cold war genetics: an interview.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    2014-01-01

    Joshua Lederberg (1925-2008), was one of the pioneers of molecular genetics perhaps best known for his discovery of genetic recombination in bacteria which earned him a Nobel Prize in 1958 (shared with George Beadle and Edward Tatum). Lederberg's interests were broad including the origin of life, exobiology (a term that he coined) and emerging diseases and artificial intelligence in his, later years. This article contains the transcription of an interview in excerpts, docu- menting the interactions between Lederberg and fellow biologist J.B.S. Haldane wlich lasted from 1946 until Haldane's death in Kolkata (then Calcutta) in 1964. PMID:25515361

  15. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-08-10

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z.

  16. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed Central

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-01-01

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z. Images PMID:493112

  17. Multilocus sequence analysis of xanthomonads causing bacterial spot of tomato and pepper plants reveals strains generated by recombination among species and recent global spread of Xanthomonas gardneri.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Sujan; Jibrin, Mustafa O; Potnis, Neha; Minsavage, Gerald V; Kebede, Misrak; Schwartz, Allison; Bart, Rebecca; Staskawicz, Brian; Boyer, Claudine; Vallad, Gary E; Pruvost, Olivier; Jones, Jeffrey B; Goss, Erica M

    2015-02-01

    Four Xanthomonas species are known to cause bacterial spot of tomato and pepper, but the global distribution and genetic diversity of these species are not well understood. A collection of bacterial spot-causing strains from the Americas, Africa, Southeast Asia, and New Zealand were characterized for genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships using multilocus sequence analysis of six housekeeping genes. By examining strains from different continents, we found unexpected phylogeographic patterns, including the global distribution of a single multilocus haplotype of X. gardneri, possible regional differentiation in X. vesicatoria, and high species diversity on tomato in Africa. In addition, we found evidence of multiple recombination events between X. euvesicatoria and X. perforans. Our results indicate that there have been shifts in the species composition of bacterial spot pathogen populations due to the global spread of dominant genotypes and that recombination between species has generated genetic diversity in these populations. PMID:25527544

  18. Production of cocktail of polyclonal antibodies using bacterial expressed recombinant protein for multiple virus detection.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Reetika; Mandal, Bikash; Paul, Prabir Kumar; Chigurupati, Phaneendra; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Cocktail of polyclonal antibodies (PAb) were produced that will help in multiple virus detection and overcome the limitation of individual virus purification, protein expression and purification as well as immunization in multiple rabbits. A dual fusion construct was developed using conserved coat protein (CP) sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) in an expression vector, pET-28a(+). The fusion protein (∼40kDa) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Likewise, a triple fusion construct was developed by fusing conserved CP sequences of CMV and PRSV with conserved nucleocapsid protein (N) sequence of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) and expressed as a fusion protein (∼50kDa) in pET-28a(+). PAb made separately to each of these three viruses recognized the double and triple fusion proteins in Western blot indicating retention of desired epitopes for binding with target antibodies. The fusion proteins (∼40kDa and ∼50kDa) were used to produce cocktail of PAb by immunizing rabbits, which simultaneously detected natural infection of CMV and PRSV or CMV, PRSV and GBNV in Cucurbitaceous, Solanaceous and other hosts in DAC-ELISA. This is the first report on production of a cocktail of PAb to recombinant fusion protein of two or three distinct viruses.

  19. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) activity upon recombinant expression and purification of human telomerase in a bacterial system.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Debra T; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Larson, Amy C; Hansen, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase biogenesis is a highly regulated process that solves the DNA end-replication problem. Recombinant expression has so far been accomplished only within a eukaryotic background. Towards structural and functional analyses, we developed bacterial expression of human telomerase. Positive activity by the telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) was identified in cell extracts of Escherichia coli expressing a sequence-optimized hTERT gene, the full-length hTR RNA with a self-splicing hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, and the human heat shock complex of Hsp90, Hsp70, p60/Hop, Hsp40, and p23. The Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin did not affect post-assembly TRAP activity. By various purification methods, TRAP activity was also obtained upon expression of only hTERT and hTR. hTERT was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry in a ∼120 kDa SDS-PAGE fragment from a TRAP-positive purification fraction. TRAP activity was also supported by hTR constructs lacking the box H/ACA small nucleolar RNA domain. End-point TRAP indicated expression levels within 3-fold of that from HeLa carcinoma cells, which is several orders of magnitude below detection by the direct assay. These results represent the first report of TRAP activity from a bacterium and provide a facile system for the investigation of assembly factors and anti-cancer therapeutics independently of a eukaryotic setting. PMID:26965413

  20. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system.

  1. An Appraisal of the Potential for Illegitimate Recombination in Bacterial Genomes and Its Consequences: From Duplications to Genome Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P.C.

    2003-01-01

    An exhaustive search for shortly spaced repeats in 74 bacterial chromosomes reveals that they are much more numerous than is usually acknowledged. These repeats were divided into five classes: close repeats (CRs), tandem repeats (TRs), simple sequence repeats (SSRs), spaced interspersed direct repeats, and “others.” CRs are widespread and constitute the most abundant class, particularly in coding sequences. The other classes are less frequent, but each individual element shows a higher potential for recombination, when the number of repeats and their distances are taken into account. SSRs and TRs are more frequent in pathogens, as expected given their role in contingency loci, but are also widespread in the other bacteria. The analysis of CRs shows that they have an important role in the evolution of genomes, namely by generating duplications and deletions. Several cases compatible with a significant role of small CRs in the formation of large repeats were detected. Also, gene deletion in Buchnera correlates with repeat density, suggesting that CRs may lead to sequence deletion in general and genome reductive evolution of obligatory intracellular bacteria in particular. The assembly of these results indicates that shortly spaced repeats are key players in the dynamics of genome evolution. PMID:12743022

  2. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system. PMID:26428235

  3. Construction of the recombinant broad-host-range plasmids providing their bacterial hosts arsenic resistance and arsenite oxidation ability.

    PubMed

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Ciezkowska, Martyna; Radlinska, Monika; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2015-02-20

    The plasmid pSinA of Sinorhizobium sp. M14 was used as a source of functional phenotypic modules, encoding proteins involved in arsenite oxidation and arsenic resistance, to obtain recombinant broad-host-range plasmids providing their bacterial hosts arsenic resistance and arsenite oxidative ability. An arsenite oxidation module was cloned into pBBR1MCS-2 vector yielding plasmid vector pAIO1, while an arsenic resistance module was cloned into pCM62 vector yielding plasmid pARS1. Both plasmid constructs were introduced (separately and together) into the cells of phylogenetically distant (representing Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria) and physiologically diversified (unable to oxidize arsenite and susceptible/resistant to arsenite and arsenate) bacteria. Functional analysis of the modified strains showed that: (i) the plasmid pARS1 can be used for the construction of strains with an increased resistance to arsenite [up to 20mM of As(III), (ii) the presence of the plasmid pAIO1 in bacteria previously unable to oxidize As(III) to As(V), contributes to the acquisition of arsenite oxidation abilities by these cells, (iii) the highest arsenite utilization rate are observed in the culture of strains harbouring both the plasmids pAIO1 and pARS1, (iv) the strains harbouring the plasmid pAIO1 were able to grow on arsenic-contaminated mine waters (∼ 3.0 mg As L(-1)) without any supplementation.

  4. Luminescence nanothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaque, Daniel; Vetrone, Fiorenzo

    2012-07-01

    The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed.The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed. This work was supported by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (Project S2009/MAT-1756), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia (MAT2010-16161) and by Caja Madrid Foundation.

  5. Cytogenetic mapping with centromeric bacterial artificial chromosomes contigs shows that this recombination-poor region comprises more than half of barley chromosome 3H.

    PubMed

    Aliyeva-Schnorr, Lala; Beier, Sebastian; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Doležel, Jaroslav; Stein, Nils; Houben, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Genetic maps are based on the frequency of recombination and often show different positions of molecular markers in comparison to physical maps, particularly in the centromere that is generally poor in meiotic recombinations. To decipher the position and order of DNA sequences genetically mapped to the centromere of barley (Hordeum vulgare) chromosome 3H, fluorescence in situ hybridization with mitotic metaphase and meiotic pachytene chromosomes was performed with 70 genomic single-copy probes derived from 65 fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) contigs genetically assigned to this recombination cold spot. The total physical distribution of the centromeric 5.5 cM bin of 3H comprises 58% of the mitotic metaphase chromosome length. Mitotic and meiotic chromatin of this recombination-poor region is preferentially marked by a heterochromatin-typical histone mark (H3K9me2), while recombination enriched subterminal chromosome regions are enriched in euchromatin-typical histone marks (H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K27me3) suggesting that the meiotic recombination rate could be influenced by the chromatin landscape.

  6. Removal of bacterial suspension water occupying the intercellular space of detached leaves after agroinfiltration improves the yield of recombinant hemagglutinin in a Nicotiana benthamiana transient gene expression system.

    PubMed

    Fujiuchi, Naomichi; Matsuda, Ryo; Matoba, Nobuyuki; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    The use of detached leaves instead of whole plants provides an alternative means for recombinant protein production based on Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient gene overexpression. However, the process for high-level protein production in detached leaves has not yet been established. In this study, we focused on leaf handling and maintenance conditions immediately after infiltration with Agrobacterium suspension (agroinfiltration) to improve recombinant protein expression in detached Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. We demonstrated that the residual water of bacterial suspension in detached leaves had significant impact on the yield of recombinant influenza hemagglutinin (HA). Immediately after agroinfiltration, detached leaves were stored in a dehumidified chamber to allow bacterial suspension water occupying intercellular space to be removed by transpiration. We varied the duration of this water removal treatment from 0.7 to 4.4 h, which resulted in leaf fresh weights ranging from 0.94 to 1.28 g g(-1) relative to weights measured just before agroinfiltration. We used these relative fresh weights (RFWs) as an indicator of the amount of residual water. The detached leaves were then incubated in humidified chambers for 6 days. We found that the presence of residual water significantly decreased HA yield, with a clear inverse correlation observed between HA yield and RFW. We next compared HA yields in detached leaves with those obtained from intact leaves by whole-plant expression performed at the same time. The maximum HA yield obtained from a detached leaf with a RFW of approximately 1.0, namely, 800 μg gFW(-1), was comparable to the mean HA yield of 846 μg gFW(-1) generated in intact leaves. Our results indicate the necessity of removing bacterial suspension water from agroinfiltrated detached leaves in transient overexpression systems and point to a critical factor enabling the detached-leaf system as a viable recombinant protein factory. PMID

  7. Removal of bacterial suspension water occupying the intercellular space of detached leaves after agroinfiltration improves the yield of recombinant hemagglutinin in a Nicotiana benthamiana transient gene expression system.

    PubMed

    Fujiuchi, Naomichi; Matsuda, Ryo; Matoba, Nobuyuki; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    The use of detached leaves instead of whole plants provides an alternative means for recombinant protein production based on Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient gene overexpression. However, the process for high-level protein production in detached leaves has not yet been established. In this study, we focused on leaf handling and maintenance conditions immediately after infiltration with Agrobacterium suspension (agroinfiltration) to improve recombinant protein expression in detached Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. We demonstrated that the residual water of bacterial suspension in detached leaves had significant impact on the yield of recombinant influenza hemagglutinin (HA). Immediately after agroinfiltration, detached leaves were stored in a dehumidified chamber to allow bacterial suspension water occupying intercellular space to be removed by transpiration. We varied the duration of this water removal treatment from 0.7 to 4.4 h, which resulted in leaf fresh weights ranging from 0.94 to 1.28 g g(-1) relative to weights measured just before agroinfiltration. We used these relative fresh weights (RFWs) as an indicator of the amount of residual water. The detached leaves were then incubated in humidified chambers for 6 days. We found that the presence of residual water significantly decreased HA yield, with a clear inverse correlation observed between HA yield and RFW. We next compared HA yields in detached leaves with those obtained from intact leaves by whole-plant expression performed at the same time. The maximum HA yield obtained from a detached leaf with a RFW of approximately 1.0, namely, 800 μg gFW(-1), was comparable to the mean HA yield of 846 μg gFW(-1) generated in intact leaves. Our results indicate the necessity of removing bacterial suspension water from agroinfiltrated detached leaves in transient overexpression systems and point to a critical factor enabling the detached-leaf system as a viable recombinant protein factory.

  8. The Role of Trap-assisted Recombination in Luminescent Properties of Organometal Halide CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Films and Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Hai-Yu; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Hao, Ya-Wei; Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Bing-Rong; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid metal halide perovskites have been paid enormous attentions in photophysics research, whose excellent performances were attributed to their intriguing charge carriers proprieties. However, it still remains far from satisfaction in the comprehensive understanding of perovskite charge-transport properities, especially about trap-assisted recombination process. In this Letter, through time-resolved transient absorption (TA) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements, we provided a relative comprehensive investigation on the charge carriers recombination dynamics of CH3NH3PbBr3 (MAPbBr3) perovskite films and quantum dots (QDs), especially about trap-assisted recombination. It was found that the integral recombination mode of MAPbBr3 films was highly sensitive to the density distribution of generated charge carriers and trap states. Additional, Trap effects would be gradually weakened with elevated carrier densities. Furthermore, the trap-assisted recombination can be removed from MAPbBr3 QDs through its own surface passivation mechanism and this specialty may render the QDs as a new material in illuminating research. This work provides deeper physical insights into the dynamics processes of MAPbBr3 materials and paves a way toward more light-harvesting applications in future.

  9. The Role of Trap-assisted Recombination in Luminescent Properties of Organometal Halide CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Films and Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Hai-Yu; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Hao, Ya-Wei; Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Bing-Rong; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid metal halide perovskites have been paid enormous attentions in photophysics research, whose excellent performances were attributed to their intriguing charge carriers proprieties. However, it still remains far from satisfaction in the comprehensive understanding of perovskite charge-transport properities, especially about trap-assisted recombination process. In this Letter, through time-resolved transient absorption (TA) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements, we provided a relative comprehensive investigation on the charge carriers recombination dynamics of CH3NH3PbBr3 (MAPbBr3) perovskite films and quantum dots (QDs), especially about trap-assisted recombination. It was found that the integral recombination mode of MAPbBr3 films was highly sensitive to the density distribution of generated charge carriers and trap states. Additional, Trap effects would be gradually weakened with elevated carrier densities. Furthermore, the trap-assisted recombination can be removed from MAPbBr3 QDs through its own surface passivation mechanism and this specialty may render the QDs as a new material in illuminating research. This work provides deeper physical insights into the dynamics processes of MAPbBr3 materials and paves a way toward more light-harvesting applications in future. PMID:27249792

  10. The RecRO pathway of DNA recombinational repair in Helicobacter pylori and its role in bacterial survival in the host.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Lo, Leja F; Maier, Robert J

    2011-04-01

    Two pathways for DNA recombination, AddAB (RecBCD-like) and RecRO, were identified in Helicobacter pylori, a pathogenic bacterium that colonizes human stomachs resulting in a series of gastric diseases. In this study, we examined the physiological roles of H. pylori RecRO pathway in DNA recombinational repair. We characterized H. pylori single mutants in recR and in recO, genes in the putative gap repair recombination pathway, and an addA recO double mutant that is thus deficient in both pathways that initiate DNA recombinational repair. The recR or recO single mutants showed the same level of sensitivity to mitomycin C as the parent strain, suggesting that the RecRO pathway is not responsible for the repair of DNA double strand breaks. However, H. pylori recR and recO mutants are highly sensitive to oxidative stress and separately to acid stress, two major stress conditions that H. pylori encounters in its physiological niche. The complementation of the recR mutant restored the sensitivity to oxidative and acid stress to the wild type level. By measuring DNA transformation frequencies, the recR and recO single mutants were shown to have no effect on inter-genomic recombination, whereas the addA recO double mutant had a greatly (∼12-fold) reduced transformation frequency. On the other hand, the RecRO pathway was shown to play a significant role in intra-genomic recombination with direct repeat sequences. Whereas the recA strain had a deletion frequency 35-fold lower than that of background level, inactivation of recR resulted in a 4-fold decrease in deletion frequency. In a mouse infection model, the three mutant strains displayed a greatly reduced ability to colonize the host stomachs. The geometric means of colonization number for the wild type, recR, recO, and addA recO strains were 6 x 10⁵, 1.6 x 10⁴, 1.4 x 10⁴ and 4 x 10³ CFU/g stomach, respectively. H. pylori RecRO-mediated DNA recombinational repair (intra-genomic recombination) is thus involved in

  11. Bacterial fermentation of recombinant major wasp allergen Antigen 5 using oxygen limiting growth conditions improves yield and quality of inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Kischnick, Stefanie; Weber, Bernhard; Verdino, Petra; Keller, Walter; Sanders, Ernst A; Anspach, F Birger; Fiebig, Helmut; Cromwell, Oliver; Suck, Roland

    2006-06-01

    A process for bacterial expression and purification of the recombinant major wasp allergen Antigen 5 (Ves v 5) was developed to produce protein for diagnostic and therapeutic applications for type 1 allergic diseases. Special attention was focused on medium selection, fermentation conditions, and efficient refolding procedures. A soy based medium was used for fermentation to avoid peptone from animal origin. Animal-derived peptone required the use of isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for the induction of expression. In the case of soy peptone, a constitutive expression was observed, suggesting the presence of a component that mimics IPTG. Batch cultivation at reduced stirrer speed caused a reduced biomass due to oxygen limitation. However, subsequent purification and processing of inclusion bodies yielded significantly higher amount of product. Furthermore, the protein composition of the inclusion bodies differed. Inclusion bodies were denatured and subjected to diafiltration. Detailed monitoring of diafiltration enabled the determination of the transition point. Final purification was conducted using cation-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified recombinant Ves v 5 was analyzed by RP-HPLC, CD-spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and quantification ELISA. Up to 15 mg highly purified Ves v 5 per litre bioreactor volume were obtained, with endotoxin concentrations less than 20 EU mg(-1) protein and high comparability to the natural counterpart. Analytical results confirm the suitability of the recombinant protein for diagnostic and clinical applications. The results clearly demonstrate that not only biomass, but especially growth conditions play a key role in the production of recombinant Ves v 5. This has an influence on inclusion body formation, which in turn influences the renaturation rate and absolute product yield. This might also be true for other recombinant proteins that accumulate as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli.

  12. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  13. Bacterial overexpression of recombinant heteroscorpine-1 (rHS-1), a toxin from Heterometrus laoticus scorpion venom: trends for antibacterial application and antivenom production.

    PubMed

    Uawonggul, Nunthawun; Sukprasert, Sophida; Incamnoi, Paroonkorn; Patramanon, Rina; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Preecharram, Sutthidech; Bunyatratchata, Wandee; Kuaprasert, Buabarn; Daduang, Jureerut; Daduang, Sakda

    2014-12-01

    Heteroscorpine-1 (HS-1) was identified as a member of the scorpine family. HS-1 shows insecticidal activities, exhibiting a low median lethal dose (LD50) in mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L.) and inhibitory activities against Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, a recombinant HS-1 (rHS-1) was produced by overexpression in E. coli. A large yield of product was obtained. The structure of purified rHS-1 was confirmed through mass spectrometry. Both anti-crude venom and anti-rHS-1 antibodies specifically recognized rHS-1, suggesting its structural similarity. Reactivated rHS-1 caused roughening and blebbing of bacterial cell surfaces. It showed higher activity than that of pre-refolded protein. Antisera raised against a partially purified and mis- or unfolded peptide can inhibit relevant bioactivity. PMID:24980735

  14. Measuring Carrier Lifetime in GaAs by Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1986-01-01

    Luminescence proposed as nondestructive technique for measuring Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination lifetime GaAs. Sample irradiated, and luminescence escapes through surface. Measurement requires no mechanical or electrical contact with sample. No ohmic contacts or p/n junctions needed. Sample not scrapped after tested.

  15. Protective efficacies and immune responses induced by recombinant HCD, atpD and gdhA against bacterial cold-water disease in ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis).

    PubMed

    Kato, Goshi; Sakai, Takamitsu; Suzuki, Kyuma; Sano, Natsumi; Takano, Tomokazu; Matsuyama, Tomomasa; Nakayasu, Chihaya

    2014-08-01

    Protective efficacies of three antigenic proteins (3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HCD), ATP synthase beta subunit (atpD), and glutamate dehydrogenase (gdhA)) against Flavobacterium psychrophilum were investigated in ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis). Recombinant proteins of HCD, atpD, and gdhA were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. Ayu were then vaccinated with inactivated cells via the intraperitoneal route. Compared with the empty BL21- and PBS-injected groups, the vaccinated group had a significantly longer survival time after challenge with F. psychrophilum. The antibody titers against each recombinant protein were significantly higher in serum from vaccinated fish, compared with serum from control fish. Results of indirect immunofluorescence assays using serum indicated that the HCD, atpD, and gdhA proteins are located on the surface of F. psychrophilum. These results suggest that these three surface proteins are protective antigens and are good candidates for development of vaccines against bacterial cold-water disease in ayu.

  16. Bacterial expression and antibiotic activities of recombinant variants of human β-defensins on pathogenic bacteria and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Garcia, Ligia; Ortiz, Ernesto; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo

    2013-05-01

    Five variants of human β-defensins (HBDs) were expressed in Escherichia coli using two vector systems (pET28a(+) and pQE30) with inducible expression by IPTG. The last vector has not been previously reported as an expression system for HBDs. The recombinant peptides were different in their lengths and overall charge. The HBDs were expressed as soluble or insoluble proteins depending on the expression system used, and the final protein yields ranged from 0.5 to 1.6 mg of peptide/g of wet weight cells, with purities higher than 90%. The recombinant HBDs demonstrated a direct correlation between antimicrobial activity and the number of basic charged residues; that is, their antimicrobial activity was as follows: HBD3-M-HBD2 > HBD3 = HBD3-M = HB2-KLK > HBD2 when assayed against E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, HBD2 had the best antimicrobial activity against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv (1.5 μM) and the heterologous tandem peptide, HBD3-M-HBD2, had the best minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value (2.7 μM) against a multidrug resistance strain (MDR) of M. tuberculosis, demonstrating the feasibility of the use of HBDs against pathogenic M. tuberculosis reported to be resistant to commercial antibiotics.

  17. Design of a comprehensive biochemistry and molecular biology experiment: phase variation caused by recombinational regulation of bacterial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation, antibody agglutination test, and PCR analysis. Phase variation was observed by baterial motility assay and identified by antibody agglutination test and PCR analysis. This comprehensive experiment can be performed to help students improve their ability to use the knowledge acquired in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Chithambo, Makaiko L.

    2016-09-01

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) from feldspar samples is of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since it provides information on the luminescence mechanism in these materials. In this paper we present new analytical equations which can be used to analyze TR-IRSL signals, both during and after short infrared stimulation pulses. The equations are developed using a recently proposed kinetic model, which describes localized electronic recombination via tunneling between trapped electrons and recombination centers in luminescent materials. Recombination is assumed to take place from the excited state of the trapped electron to the nearest-neighbor center within a random distribution of luminescence recombination centers. Different possibilities are examined within the model, depending on the relative importance of electron de-excitation and recombination. The equations are applied to experimental TR-IRSL data of natural feldspars, and good agreement is found between experimental and modeling results.

  19. Anti-bacterial activity of recombinant human β-defensin-3 secreted in the milk of transgenic goats produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Luo, Yan; Ge, Hengtao; Han, Chengquan; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Quan, Fusheng; Gao, Mingqing; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether recombinant human β-defensin-3 (rHBD3) in the milk of transgenic goats has an anti-bacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) that could cause mastitis. A HBD3 mammary-specific expression vector was transfected by electroporation into goat fetal fibroblasts which were used to produce fourteen healthy transgenic goats by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The expression level of rHBD3 in the milk of the six transgenic goats ranged from 98 to 121 µg/ml at 15 days of lactation, and was maintained at 90-111 µg/ml during the following 2 months. Milk samples from transgenic goats showed an obvious inhibitory activity against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of rHBD3 in milk against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae were 9.5-10.5, 21.8-23.0 and 17.3-18.5 µg/mL, respectively, which was similar to those of the HBD3 standard (P>0.05). The in vivo anti-bacterial activities of rHBD3 in milk were examined by intramammary infusion of viable bacterial inoculums. We observed that 9/10 and 8/10 glands of non-transgenic goats infused with S. aureus and E. coli became infected. The mean numbers of viable bacteria went up to 2.9×10(3) and 95.4×10(3) CFU/ml at 48 h after infusion, respectively; the mean somatic cell counts (SCC) in infected glands reached up to 260.4×10(5) and 622.2×10(5) cells/ml, which were significantly higher than the SCC in uninfected goat glands. In contrast, no bacteria was presented in glands of transgenic goats and PBS-infused controls, and the SSC did not significantly change throughout the period. Moreover, the compositions and protein profiles of milk from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were identical. The present study demonstrated that HBD3 were an effective anti-bacterial protein to enhance the mastitis resistance of dairy animals.

  20. Anti-Bacterial Activity of Recombinant Human β-Defensin-3 Secreted in the Milk of Transgenic Goats Produced by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chengquan; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Quan, Fusheng; Gao, Mingqing; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether recombinant human β-defensin-3 (rHBD3) in the milk of transgenic goats has an anti-bacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) that could cause mastitis. A HBD3 mammary-specific expression vector was transfected by electroporation into goat fetal fibroblasts which were used to produce fourteen healthy transgenic goats by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The expression level of rHBD3 in the milk of the six transgenic goats ranged from 98 to 121 µg/ml at 15 days of lactation, and was maintained at 90–111 µg/ml during the following 2 months. Milk samples from transgenic goats showed an obvious inhibitory activity against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of rHBD3 in milk against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae were 9.5–10.5, 21.8–23.0 and 17.3–18.5 µg/mL, respectively, which was similar to those of the HBD3 standard (P>0.05). The in vivo anti-bacterial activities of rHBD3 in milk were examined by intramammary infusion of viable bacterial inoculums. We observed that 9/10 and 8/10 glands of non-transgenic goats infused with S. aureus and E. coli became infected. The mean numbers of viable bacteria went up to 2.9×103 and 95.4×103 CFU/ml at 48 h after infusion, respectively; the mean somatic cell counts (SCC) in infected glands reached up to 260.4×105 and 622.2×105 cells/ml, which were significantly higher than the SCC in uninfected goat glands. In contrast, no bacteria was presented in glands of transgenic goats and PBS-infused controls, and the SSC did not significantly change throughout the period. Moreover, the compositions and protein profiles of milk from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were identical. The present study demonstrated that HBD3 were an effective anti-bacterial protein to enhance the mastitis resistance of dairy animals. PMID:23799010

  1. Charge Recombination and Protein Dynamics in Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers Entrapped in a Sol-Gel Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kriegl, Jan M.; Forster, Florian K.; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    Many proteins can be immobilized in silica hydrogel matrices without compromising their function, making this a suitable technique for biosensor applications. Immobilization will in general affect protein structure and dynamics. To study these effects, we have measured the P+QA− charge recombination kinetics after laser excitation of QB-depleted wild-type photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides in a tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) sol-gel matrix and, for comparison, also in cryosolvent. The nonexponential electron transfer kinetics observed between 10 and 300 K were analyzed quantitatively using the spin boson model for the intrinsic temperature dependence of the electron transfer and an adiabatic change of the energy gap and electronic coupling caused by protein motions in response to the altered charge distributions. The analysis reveals similarities and differences in the TMOS-matrix and bulk-solvent samples. In both preparations, electron transfer is coupled to the same spectrum of low frequency phonons. As in bulk solvent, charge-solvating protein motions are present in the TMOS matrix. Large-scale conformational changes are arrested in the hydrogel, as evident from the nonexponential kinetics even at room temperature. The altered dynamics is likely responsible for the observed changes in the electronic coupling matrix element. PMID:12944298

  2. Cattle Immunized with a Recombinant Subunit Vaccine Formulation Exhibits a Trend towards Protection against Histophilus somni Bacterial Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Madampage, Claudia Avis; Wilson, Don; Townsend, Hugh; Crockford, Gordon; Rawlyk, Neil; Dent, Donna; Evans, Brock; Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Dorin, Craig; Potter, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Histophilosis, a mucosal and septicemic infection of cattle is caused by the Gram negative pathogen Histophilus somni (H. somni). As existing vaccines against H. somni infection have shown to be of limited efficacy, we used a reverse vaccinology approach to identify new vaccine candidates. Three groups (B, C, D) of cattle were immunized with subunit vaccines and a control group (group A) was vaccinated with adjuvant alone. All four groups were challenged with H. somni. The results demonstrate that there was no significant difference in clinical signs, joint lesions, weight change or rectal temperature between any of the vaccinated groups (B,C,D) vs the control group A. However, the trend to protection was greatest for group C vaccinates. The group C vaccine was a pool of six recombinant proteins. Serum antibody responses determined using ELISA showed significantly higher titers for group C, with P values ranging from < 0.0148 to < 0.0002, than group A. Even though serum antibody titers in group B (5 out of 6 antigens) and group D were significantly higher compared to group A, they exerted less of a trend towards protection. In conclusion, the vaccine used in group C exhibits a trend towards protective immunity in cattle and would be a good candidate for further analysis to determine which proteins were responsible for the trend towards protection. PMID:27501390

  3. Cattle Immunized with a Recombinant Subunit Vaccine Formulation Exhibits a Trend towards Protection against Histophilus somni Bacterial Challenge.

    PubMed

    Madampage, Claudia Avis; Wilson, Don; Townsend, Hugh; Crockford, Gordon; Rawlyk, Neil; Dent, Donna; Evans, Brock; Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Dorin, Craig; Potter, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Histophilosis, a mucosal and septicemic infection of cattle is caused by the Gram negative pathogen Histophilus somni (H. somni). As existing vaccines against H. somni infection have shown to be of limited efficacy, we used a reverse vaccinology approach to identify new vaccine candidates. Three groups (B, C, D) of cattle were immunized with subunit vaccines and a control group (group A) was vaccinated with adjuvant alone. All four groups were challenged with H. somni. The results demonstrate that there was no significant difference in clinical signs, joint lesions, weight change or rectal temperature between any of the vaccinated groups (B,C,D) vs the control group A. However, the trend to protection was greatest for group C vaccinates. The group C vaccine was a pool of six recombinant proteins. Serum antibody responses determined using ELISA showed significantly higher titers for group C, with P values ranging from < 0.0148 to < 0.0002, than group A. Even though serum antibody titers in group B (5 out of 6 antigens) and group D were significantly higher compared to group A, they exerted less of a trend towards protection. In conclusion, the vaccine used in group C exhibits a trend towards protective immunity in cattle and would be a good candidate for further analysis to determine which proteins were responsible for the trend towards protection. PMID:27501390

  4. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  5. Comparative pharmacokinetics of single-dose administration of mammalian and bacterially-derived recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hovgaard, D; Mortensen, B T; Schifter, S; Nissen, N I

    1993-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of recombinant human non-glycosylated bacterially-synthesized (E. coli) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were studied following single intravenous (i.v.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) bolus injection, and compared to equivalent doses of glycosylated mammalian-derived CHO-GM-CSF. Each route of administration gave a different GM-CSF concentration-time profile. The highest peak serum concentrations (Cmax) were observed following i.v. bolus injection. After i.v. administration, a two-phase decline in concentration was noted for both types of GM-CSF with a significantly shorter t1/2 alpha of 7.8 minutes for the E. coli GM-CSF versus 20.0 min for the CHO-GM-CSF, while no significant difference was observed for the terminal phase. Following s.c. administration of equivalent doses, a higher peak serum concentration was observed in the E. coli-treated patients and, again, a faster elimination where pretreatment serum levels were reached after 16-20 h, versus more than 48 h after administration of CHO-GM-CSF. Although the non-glycosylated E. coli GM-CSF thus seems to undergo a faster elimination that the glycosylated CHO-GM-CSF no significant difference could be demonstrated in the in vivo effect of corresponding doses of the two compounds with respect to stimulation of granulopoiesis--with reservation for small patient numbers and a large individual variations in response.

  6. [Research on the recombinant plasmid pDJH2 of L. interrogans serovar lai: sequencing and alignment with other known bacterial Omp sequence].

    PubMed

    Jiang, N; Dai, B; Yan, Z; Yang, W; Li, S; Fang, Z; Zhao, H; Wu, W; Ye, D; Yan, R; Liu, J; Song, S; Yang, Y; Zhang, Y; Liu, F; Tu, Y; Yang, H; Huang, Z; Liang, L; Hu, L; Zhao, M

    1996-12-01

    The Leptospira whole cell vaccine (LWCV) currently used in China is safe and effective, out the immunity following vaccination with two doses of the fluid medium vaccine is of low order. The duration of immunity conferred by this vaccine is rather short, six months or at most one year. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new generation vaccines against Leptospirosis for the developing world. In this paper we report the sequencing of the insert fragment of pDJH2 from genomic DNA of L. interrogans sevovar lai strain 017 and its alignment with other bacterial omp sequences. A genomic library of Leptospira interrogaans serovar lai strain 017 was constructed with the plasmid vector pUC18. A recombinant plasmid designated pJDH2 was screened from the genomic library. Inserted fragment of pDH2 is 1.9 kb by gel electrophoresis. Immunization/protection was studied in BALB/c mice model. The results showed highly significant difference between pDJH2 and pUC18 (control). Inserted fragment of pDJH2 DNA sequencing was performed by Dr Yan Zhengxin (Max-Planck-Institut for Biology. Tubingen, Germany). Insert fragment was cloned into pBluescript II KS-(stratagene) and sequenced by using AB1 (Applied Bio Systems, Model 373A). Two open reading frames of 565 and 662 nucleotides were identified. There were identifiable initiation codons, terminators, Shine-Dalgano ribosome combining site, Pribnow boxes and Sextama boxes within the 2 sequenced regions. Nucleotide sequences were analysed using Gene Work, a suit of computer program developed by Department of Biochemistry St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Memphis. U.S.A. The results of formatted alignment showed the predicted nucleotide sequence of ORF1 of the serovar lai had significant similarity with ORF2 (49.36%). L. kirschneri ompL1 (49.26%), Borrelia burgdoferi omp (48.97%), Treponema phagedenis omp (47.3%); Salmonella typhimurium ompC(46.87%), Yersinia enterocolitica ompH (46.7%), Leptospira borgpeterseni pfap (46.3%), and

  7. Recombinant thermoactive phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and its coupling with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs) for the conversion of CO2 to oxaloacetate.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carginale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-15

    With the continuous increase of atmospheric CO2 in the last decades, efficient methods for carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization are urgently required. The possibility of converting CO2 into useful chemicals could be a good strategy to both decreasing the CO2 concentration and for achieving an efficient exploitation of this cheap carbon source. Recently, several single- and multi-enzyme systems for the catalytic conversion of CO2 mainly to bicarbonate have been implemented. In order to design and construct a catalytic system for the conversion of CO2 to organic molecules, we implemented an in vitro multienzyme system using mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. The system, in fact, was constituted by a recombinant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, in combination with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs), for converting CO2 into oxaloacetate, a compound of potential utility in industrial processes. The catalytic procedure is in two steps: the conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by CA, followed by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate with bicarbonate, catalyzed by PEPC, with formation of oxaloacetate (OAA). All tested CAs, belonging to α-, β-, and γ-CA classes, were able to increase OAA production compared to procedures when only PEPC was used. Interestingly, the efficiency of the CAs tested in OAA production was in good agreement with the kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction of these enzymes. This PEPC also revealed to be thermoactive and thermostable, and when coupled with the extremely thermostable CA from Sulphurhydrogenibium azorense (SazCA) the production of OAA was achieved even if the two enzymes were exposed to temperatures up to 60 °C, suggesting a possible role of the two coupled enzymes in biotechnological processes.

  8. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2016-09-01

    Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  9. The recombination of genetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic recombination is the major mechanism by which new arrangements of genetic elements are produced in all living organisms, from the simplest bacterial viruses to humans. This volume presents an overview of the types of recombination found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  10. Recombinant baculovirus isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2007-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac or BaculoDirect, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Additionally, many systems require a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay. Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  11. Time-resolved measurements of Cooper-pair radiative recombination in InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, S. S.; Nakajima, H.; Kumano, H.; Suemune, I.; Irie, H.; Asano, Y.; Akahane, K.; Sasaki, M.; Murayama, A.

    2015-08-21

    We studied InAs quantum dots (QDs) where electron Cooper pairs penetrate from an adjacent niobium (Nb) superconductor with the proximity effect. With time-resolved luminescence measurements at the wavelength around 1550 nm, we observed luminescence enhancement and reduction of luminescence decay time constants at temperature below the superconducting critical temperature (T{sub C}) of Nb. On the basis of these measurements, we propose a method to determine the contribution of Cooper-pair recombination in InAs QDs. We show that the luminescence enhancement measured below T{sub C} is well explained with our theory including Cooper-pair recombination.

  12. Construction and bacterial expression of a recombinant single-chain antibody fragment against Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 antigen for the diagnosis of lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Kamatchi, R; Charumathi, J; Ravishankaran, R; Kaliraj, P; Meenakshisundaram, S

    2016-01-01

    Global programmes to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (GPELF) require mapping, monitoring and evaluation using filarial antigen diagnostic kits. To meet this objective, a functional single-chain fragment variable (ScFv) specific for filarial Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 (Wb-SXP-1) antigen was constructed for the diagnosis of active filarial infection, an alternative to the production of complete antibodies using hybridomas. The variable heavy chain (VH) and the variable light chain (kappa) (Vκ) genes were amplified from the mouse hybridoma cell line and were linked together with a flexible linker by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The ScFv construct (Vκ-Linker-VH) was expressed as a fusion protein with N-terminal His tag in Escherichia coli and purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) without the addition of reducing agents. Immunoblotting and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to analyse the antigen binding affinity of purified ScFv. The purified ScFv was found to recognize recombinant and native Wb-SXP-1 antigen in microfilariae (Mf)-positive patient sera. The affinity of ScFv was comparable with that of the monoclonal antibody. The development of recombinant ScFv to replace monoclonal antibody for detection of filarial antigen was achieved. The recombinant ScFv was purified, on-column refolded and its detection ability validated using field samples.

  13. Construction and bacterial expression of a recombinant single-chain antibody fragment against Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 antigen for the diagnosis of lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Kamatchi, R; Charumathi, J; Ravishankaran, R; Kaliraj, P; Meenakshisundaram, S

    2016-01-01

    Global programmes to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (GPELF) require mapping, monitoring and evaluation using filarial antigen diagnostic kits. To meet this objective, a functional single-chain fragment variable (ScFv) specific for filarial Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 (Wb-SXP-1) antigen was constructed for the diagnosis of active filarial infection, an alternative to the production of complete antibodies using hybridomas. The variable heavy chain (VH) and the variable light chain (kappa) (Vκ) genes were amplified from the mouse hybridoma cell line and were linked together with a flexible linker by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The ScFv construct (Vκ-Linker-VH) was expressed as a fusion protein with N-terminal His tag in Escherichia coli and purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) without the addition of reducing agents. Immunoblotting and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to analyse the antigen binding affinity of purified ScFv. The purified ScFv was found to recognize recombinant and native Wb-SXP-1 antigen in microfilariae (Mf)-positive patient sera. The affinity of ScFv was comparable with that of the monoclonal antibody. The development of recombinant ScFv to replace monoclonal antibody for detection of filarial antigen was achieved. The recombinant ScFv was purified, on-column refolded and its detection ability validated using field samples. PMID:26693887

  14. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeever, Stephen W. S.

    2001-09-01

    Models and the conceptual framework necessary for an understanding of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) are described. Examples of various OSL readout schemes are described, along with examples of the use of OSL in radiation dosimetry.

  15. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition.

  16. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  17. Pickled luminescent silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukherroub, R.; Morin, S.; Wayner, D. D. M.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    In freshly prepared porous Si, the newly exposed silicon-nanostructure surface is protected with a monolayer of hydrogen, which is very reactive and oxidizes in air leading to a loss of luminescence intensity and a degradation of the electronic properties. We report a surface passivation approach based on organic modification that stabilizes the luminescence. This novel 'pickling' process not only augments the desired optoelectronic properties, but also is adaptable to further chemical modification for integration into chemical and biophysical sensors.

  18. Study of Luminescence Characteristics of Trivalent Terbium in Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Mike S.; Armagan, Guzin; Winfree, William P.

    1995-01-01

    An important use of silicate glasses doped with terbium oxide (Tb2O3) is their use as fiber optic sensors for high-resolution imaging applications requiring the detection of x-rays (e.g. tomography and radiography). The x-ray radiation is absorbed by the glass, producing electron-hole pairs (excitons). The excitons migrate through the glass matrix and then recombine, emitting characteristic Tb(3+) luminescence in the optical wavelength region. This emission is due to forbidden transitions of 4f electrons and therefore has a long decay time. Long decay time is undesirable when imaging transient events since it results in blurring in time of the images. It has been reported elsewhere that in crystals Tb(3+) ions can act both as luminescence centers and as fluorescence traps. These traps can capture excitons and delay their recombination. This delayed fluorescence is seen as a long lived, secondary component to the luminescence decay curve, or afterglow. Such a secondary decay component to the luminescence decay of Tb(3+) has been observed before in soda glass following pulsed optical excitation. In order to determine the conditions under which afterglow occurs, an understanding of the material's luminescent properties is required.

  19. Laser Induced Blue Luminescence Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Haiyong; Duan, Yanmin; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Yaoju; Yang, Fugui

    2011-09-01

    Laser induced strange blue luminescence in several Raman crystals has been investigated. The blue luminescence at about 473 nm has the characteristic of no orientation and only produced in the crystal where the fundament laser oscillated. The experimental results show that the blue luminescence must result from the fundamental laser around 1.0 µm rather than Stokes-shifting. The spectrum detected is similar for different crystals. This blue luminescence is obviously strange and inconsistent with traditional luminescence theories, which maybe a brand-new luminescence theory.

  20. Near-Field Enhanced Negative Luminescent Refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaifeng; Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-08-01

    We consider a near-field enhanced negative luminescent refrigeration system made of a polar material supporting surface-phonon polariton resonances and a narrow-band-gap semiconductor under a reverse bias. We show that in the near-field regime, such a device yields significant cooling power density and a high efficiency close to the Carnot limit. In addition, the performance of our system still persists even in the presence of strong nonidealities such as Auger recombination and sub-band-gap thermal radiation from free carriers.

  1. Sensitivity of detection of bacteria with fluorescent and luminescent phenotypes using different instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovko, Lubov Y.; Griffiths, Mansel W.

    2000-04-01

    The problem of bacterial enumeration in different samples is of great importance in many fields of research. Construction of recombinant fluorescent and luminescent bacteria that can be easily detected by nondestructive instrumental methods proves us with an opportunity to monitor bacteria in a wide variety of clinical, environmental and food samples in real time. Three different labels were employed: Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), Bacterial luciferase (BL) and Firefly Luciferase (FFL). Both plasmid and chromosomal transformants of different strains of E. coli, P. putida and S. enteritidis were used. For the detection of the in vivo GFP the Shimadzu RF 540 spectrofluorimeter, Labsystems FL- 500 plate fluorimeter and Night Owl LB 98 CCD-camera from EG and G Berthold supplied with excitation light source and proper spectral filters both in macroscopic and microscopic mode were used. For the detection of in vivo luminescence of BL and FFL, tube luminometer BG-P from GEM Biomedical Inc., luminometric plate reader from BioOrbit, BIQ Bioview CCD camera from Cambridge Imaging Ltd and Night Owl LB 98 CCD camera both in macroscopic and microscopic mode were used. The expression levels of the labels, their stability, stability of the signal and detection limits of tagged bacteria were investigated. The detection limits for GFP tagged bacteria were 5 X 104 - 6 X 106, for BL tagged bacteria 5 X 102 - 2 X 105, and for FFL tagged bacteria - 4 X 103 - 106 CFU/ml, depending on the instrument used. Single bacteria could be detected with the help of the Night Owl in the microscopic mode.

  2. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  3. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    PubMed Central

    Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry. PMID:26137472

  4. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry. PMID:26137472

  5. Oligonucleotide recombination enabled site-specific mutagenesis in bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombineering refers to a strategy for engineering DNA sequences using a specialized mode of homologous recombination. This technology can be used for rapidly constructing precise changes in bacterial genome sequences in vivo. Oligo recombination is one type of recombineering that uses ssDNA olig...

  6. Cloning, bacterial expression and biological characterization of recombinant human granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 and differential expression of granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 and epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide-78 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Froyen, G; Proost, P; Ronsse, I; Mitera, T; Haelens, A; Wuyts, A; Opdenakker, G; Van Damme, J; Billiau, A

    1997-02-01

    Human osteosarcoma cells secrete a novel C-X-C chemokine called granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2), which was previously identified by amino acid sequencing of the purified natural protein. In order to understand the role of this new protein in inflammatory reactions, we cloned GCP-2 DNA sequences to generate recombinant protein and specific DNA probes and primers. By means of PCR on cloned cDNA of osteosarcoma cells induced by interleukin-1 beta and fibroblasts induced by lipopolysaccharide plus dsRNA, the complete coding domain of GCP-2 was isolated. This sequence was cloned into the bacterial expression vector pHEN1 and, after induction, GCP-2 was secreted into the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Recombinant GCP-2 (rGCP-2) was purified and characterized by SDS/PAGE as a monomeric 6.5-kDa protein and by amino-terminal sequencing. The chemoattractive potency of GCP-2 for neutrophilic granulocytes was about 10-times less than that of interleukin-8 and the minimal effective dose was 10 ng/ml. However, at optimal dose (100 ng/ml) the maximal chemotactic response was comparable with that of interleukin-8. Both characteristics correspond with those of natural GCP-2. In addition, intracellular calcium release in neutrophils by recombinant GCP-2 was achieved with as little as 10 ng/ml. Quantitation studies using reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction revealed higher GCP-2 mRNA production in normal fibroblasts than in tumor cells. When compared with epithelial-cell-derived neutrophil-activating peptide-78 (ENA-78) mRNA, the GCP-2 mRNA levels were higher in all cell lines tested. In addition, GCP-2 and ENA-78 expression seem to be differentially regulated in that phorbol ester and lipopolysaccharide have opposing effects on their mRNA induction in diploid fibroblasts and epithelial cells, respectively. Interleukin-1 was demonstrated to be a general inducer for both chemokines, while interferon-gamma down-regulates their mRNA expression. The

  7. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein.

    PubMed

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98-99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample.

  8. Wireless Luminescence Integrated Sensors (WLIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Sayler, G.S.

    2003-11-10

    The goal of this project was the development of a family of wireless, single-chip, luminescence-sensing devices to solve a number of difficult distributed measurement problems in areas ranging from environmental monitoring and assessment to high-throughput screening of combinatorial chemistry libraries. These wireless luminescence integrated sensors (WLIS) consist of a microluminometer, wireless data transmitter, and RF power input circuit all realized in a standard integrated circuit (IC) process with genetically engineered, whole-cell, bioluminescent bioreporters encapsulated and deposited on the IC. The end product is a family of compact, low-power, rugged, low-cost sensors. As part of this program they developed an integrated photodiode/signal-processing scheme with an rms noise level of 175 electrons/second for a 13-minute integration time, and a quantum efficiency of 66% at the 490-nm bioluminescent wavelength. this performance provided a detection limit of < 1000 photons/second. Although sol-gel has previously been used to encapsulate yeast cells, the reaction conditions necessary for polymerization (primarily low pH) have beforehand proven too harsh for bacterial cell immobilizations. Utilizing sonication methods, they have were able to initiate polymerization under pH conditions conductive to cell survival. both a toluene bioreporter (Pseudomonas putida TVA8) and a naphthalene bioreporter (Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44) were successfully encapsulated in sol-gel and shown to produce a fairly significant bioluminescent response. In addition to the previously developed naphthalene- and toluene-sensitive bioreporters, they developed a yeast-based xenoestrogen reporter. This technology has been licensed by Micro Systems Technologies, a startup company in Dayton, Ohio for applications in environmental containments monitoring, and for detecting weapons of mass destruction (i.e. homeland security).

  9. Lunar luminescence measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of lunar sites obtained in June 1983 have been analyzed for residual luminescence using the spectral line depth technique. The results or three sites each at three wavelengths are presented. The sites observed were Mare Crisium, Kepler, and Aristarchus. In each case, the value quoted was based not only on the strong Fraunhofer line in the spectral range covered but also on from 11 to 21 weaker lines within 80 A of the strongest feature. These data do not support previous observations. The values given do not indicate a greatly reddened spectrum, and the luminescence spectrum of the mare site is not significantly different from the two young crater sites. These observations cannot be adequately explained by thermal luminescence, theories of direct excitation are also unable to explain the strength of the flux.

  10. Luminescent dendrimers. Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Balzani, Vincenzo; Ceroni, Paolo; Maestri, Mauro; Saudan, Christophe; Vicinelli, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    Luminescent dendrimers are currently attracting much attention since coupling luminescence and dendrimer research topics can lead to valuable new functions. Indeed, luminescence is a valuable tool to monitor both basic properties and possible applications (sensors, displays, lasers), and dendrimers are macromolecular compounds exhibiting a well-defined chemical structure with the possibility of containing selected chemical units in predetermined sites and of encapsulating ions or neutral molecules in their internal dynamic cavities. In this paper we will review recent advances in this field focusing our attention on their properties in fluid solution related to light harvesting, changing the "color" of light, sensing with signal amplification, quenching and sensitization processes, shielding effects, elucidation of dendritic structures and superstructures, and investigation of dendrimer rotation in solution. PMID:21132484

  11. Luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Charina L.; Koski, Kristie J.; Olson, Andrew C. K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe-CdS core-shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution. PMID:21098301

  12. Photostimulated Luminescence and Dynamics of AgI and Ag Nanoclusters in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Joly, Alan G.; Roark, Joel

    2002-06-15

    The photoluminescence and photostimulated luminescence of Ag and AgI nanoclusters formed in zeolite-Y are studied using fluorescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectra of AgI nanoclusters show emission from both AgI and Ag nanoclusters, while the in the photostimulated luminescence, only the emission of Ag clusters is observed. While the photoluminescence from both Ag and AgI particles displays both sub-nanosecond and microsecond lifetimes, the emission from photostimulated luminescence shows very short, picosecond lifetimes. A model which ascribes the photostimulated luminescence to recombination of electrons trapped in the zeolite with Ag in close proximity to the trap site is proposed. The appearance of strong photostimulated luminescence with short decays in these systems demonstrates that nanoparticles have potential for digital storage and medical radiology applications.

  13. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1997-02-04

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition. 14 figs.

  14. CCD Luminescence Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom

    1987-01-01

    New diagnostic tool used to understand performance and failures of microelectronic devices. Microscope integrated to low-noise charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera to produce new instrument for analyzing performance and failures of microelectronics devices that emit infrared light during operation. CCD camera also used to indentify very clearly parts that have failed where luminescence typically found.

  15. A broadly applicable function for describing luminescence dose response

    SciTech Connect

    Burbidge, C. I.

    2015-07-28

    The basic form of luminescence dose response is investigated, with the aim of developing a single function to account for the appearance of linear, superlinear, sublinear, and supralinear behaviors and variations in saturation signal level and rate. A function is assembled based on the assumption of first order behavior in different major factors contributing to measured luminescence-dosimetric signals. Different versions of the function are developed for standardized and non-dose-normalized responses. Data generated using a two trap two recombination center model and experimental data for natural quartz are analyzed to compare results obtained using different signals, measurement protocols, pretreatment conditions, and radiation qualities. The function well describes a range of dose dependent behavior, including sublinear, superlinear, supralinear, and non-monotonic responses and relative response to α and β radiation, based on change in relative recombination and trapping probability affecting signals sourced from a single electron trap.

  16. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  17. Luminescence of rutile structured crystalline silicon dioxide (stishovite)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trukhin, A. N.; Smits, K.; Chikvaidze, G.; Dyuzheva, T. I.; Lityagina, L. M.

    2014-07-01

    Luminescence spectrum of synthetic mono-crystalline stishovite comprises a slow blue band at ~400 nm (~3.1 eV) and a fast UV band at ~260 nm (~4.7 eV), as well as some bands in near-infrared range of spectra. The NIR luminescence of stishovite crystal, excited with lasers 532 nm, 248 nm and 193 nm as well as x-ray, possesses several sharp lines. A zero phonon line is situated at 787 nm (1.57 eV) and grows with cooling. An anti-Stokes line is located at 771 nm (1.68 eV). This line disappears with cooling. In a powder sample of stishovite created by shock waves generated by the impact of a 50-m-diameter meteorite in Arizona 50,000 years ago, the PL broad blue band is situated at 425 nm (2.9 eV), the UV band at ~260 nm (~4.7 eV), and the sharp lines, seen only under 193 nm laser, at 689 nm (1.789 eV), 694 nm (1.785 eV) and 706 nm (1.754 eV). We ascribe the fast UV luminescence to singlet-singlet transitions and the slow blue band to triplet-singlet transitions of the same intrinsic defect of stishovite in both types of samples. The blue band in stishovite crystal exhibits delayed luminescence of recombination nature, whereas the blue band of Arizona's powder sample does not exhibit such effect. This difference is explained by different surroundings of luminescence center in those samples. NIR luminescence of mono-crystalline stishovite is ascribed to carbon impurity penetrated in the sample from graphite heater. NIR luminescence of powder from Arizona has not yet found an explanation.

  18. [Comparative Sensitivity of the Luminescent Photobacterium phosphoreum, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis Strains to Toxic Effects of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials and Metal Nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Deryabina, D G; Efremova, L V; Karimov, I F; Manukhov, I V; Gnuchikh, E Yu; Miroshnikov, S A

    2016-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the four commercially available and laboratory luminescent sensor strains to the toxic effect of 10 carbon-based nanomatherials (CBNs) and 10 metal nanoparticles (MNPs) was carried out in this study. The bioluminescence inhibition assays with marine Photobacterium phosphoreum and recombinant Escherichia coli strains were varied in minimal toxic concentrations and EC50 values but led to well correlated biotoxicity evaluation for the most active compounds were ranked as Cu > (MgO, CuO) > (fullerenol, graphene oxide). The novel sensor strain Bacillus subtilis EG 168-1 exhibited the highest sensitivity to CBNs and MNPs that increased significantly number of toxic compounds causing the bacterial bioluminescence inhibition effect. PMID:27476206

  19. Temperature influence on luminescent coupling efficiency in concentrator MJ SCs

    SciTech Connect

    Shvarts, Maxim Emelyanov, Viktor; Mintairov, Mikhail; Evstropov, Valery; Timoshina, Nailya

    2015-09-28

    In the work, presented are the results of investigation of temperature dependencies of the luminescent coupling effectiveness in lattice-matched (LM) GaInP/GaAs/Ge and metamorphic (MM) GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells. The “ordinary” luminescent coupling effectiveness rise has been observed with temperature decrease for GaAs-Ge, GaInP-GaInAs and GaInAs-Ge pairs of subcells, and its limiting values have been defined. A “reverse” behavior of the luminescent coupling effectiveness for the GaInP-GaAs pair has been found, determined emittance potential drop of wideband GaInP p-n junction. It is shown that the established “unusual” behavior of the LC efficiency may be determined by the presence of thermalized centers of non-radiative recombination of charge carriers for the GaInP subcell in GaInP/GaAs/Ge LM structure. Estimation of characteristic parameters for the nonradiative recombination processes in wideband GaInP p-n junction has been carried out, and values for the energy of the nonradiative center thermalization (E{sub nrad2} =79.42meV) and for the activation energy of nonradiative band-to-band recombination (E{sub A}=33.4meV) have been obtained.

  20. Electronic structure and luminescence center of blue luminescent carbon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jigang; Zhou, Xingtai; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang; Ding, Zhifeng; Cutler, Jeffrey; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2009-06-01

    The electronic structure and the origin of luminescence from blue luminescent carbon nanocrystals (CNC) have been investigated with X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES) and X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL). XANES shows that nitrogen has been incorporated into the carbon nanocrystals matrix (dominated by sp 2 carbon). XEOL from CNC is compared with that from natural diamond and previously reported CVD nanodiamond containing N impurities. The results reveal that N doping is almost certainly responsible for the blue luminescence in carbon nanocrystals. The implication of the results is discussed.

  1. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeever, Stephen W.

    1999-02-01

    Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimetry is attractive to the health physics and dosimetry community due to its all-optical character, fast data acquisition and the avoidance of heating the detector. Until recently there was no luminescent material sensitive enough to radiation, and at the same time suitable for stimulation with visible light, for use in this application. However, anion-deficient aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al2O3:C) appears to be not only an extremely sensitive thermoluminescence (TL) material, but is also well-suited to OSL applications. Several OSL readout protocols have been suggested, including cw-OSL, pulsed OSL (POSL), and 'delayed' OSL (DOSL). The paper discusses the physical mechanisms that give rise to the OSL signals and the dependence of these signals upon absorbed dose. Example applications of the use of OSL from Al2O3:C in environmental radiation and ultraviolet-B dosimetry are discussed.

  2. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Erwin, David N.; Kiel, Johnathan L.; Batishko, Charles R.; Stahl, Kurt A.

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  3. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  4. An Introduction to Luminescence in Inorganic Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, John A.

    1980-01-01

    Introduces luminescence by characterizing phosphors, describing phosphor phenomena, presenting a configurational coordinate model of characteristic luminescence, and describing some commercial applications of phosphors. (CS)

  5. Interactions between bicarbonate, potassium, and magnesium, and sulfur-dependent induction of luminescence in Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Yosuke; Era, Mariko; Ogawa, Akane; Morita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    In spite of its central importance in research efforts, the relationship between seawater compounds and bacterial luminescence has not previously been investigated in detail. Thus, in this study, we investigated the effect of cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH(4) (+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) and anions (Cl(-) , HCO(3) (-) , CO(3) (2-) , and NO(3) (-) ) on the induction of both inorganic (sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate) and organic (L-cysteine and L-cystine) sulfur-dependent luminescence in Vibrio fischeri. We found that HCO(3) (-) (bicarbonate) and CO(3) (2-) (carbonate), in the form of various compounds, had a stimulatory effect on sulfur-dependent luminescence. The luminescence induced by bicarbonate was further promoted by the addition of magnesium. Potassium also increased sulfur-dependent luminescence when sulfate or thiosulfate was supplied as the sole sulfur source, but not when sulfite, L-cysteine, or L-cystine was supplied. The positive effect of potassium was accelerated by the addition of magnesium and/or calcium. Furthermore, the additional supply of magnesium improved the induction of sulfite- or L-cysteine-dependent luminescence, but not the l-cystine-dependent type. These results suggest that sulfur-dependent luminescence of V. fischeri under nutrient-starved conditions is mainly controlled by bicarbonate, carbonate, and potassium. In addition, our results indicate that an additional supply of magnesium is effective for increasing V. fischeri luminescence. PMID:21953119

  6. Mediation of surface recombination in a II-VI powder by palladium microislands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1987-04-01

    The recombination mechanisms in a Zn(Cd)S:Ag phosphor powder have been probed by luminescence and flash-photolysis time-resolved dielectric loss techniques. The influence of Pd-microislands chemically deposited thereon, alone, and in conjunction with recombination mediators phenylhydrazine and phenylacetic acid (in xylene solution) on the recombination pathways was studied. The Pd deposit affects recombination by increasing the fraction of the particle volume dominated by the surface processes, by providing a pathway for photoelectrons to reach the (negative) surface to participate in surface recombination, and by providing recombination centers per se. The implications of these results for heterogeneous photocatalysis are discussed.

  7. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed. PMID:24442504

  8. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed.

  9. The nature of unusual luminescence in natural calcite, CaCO3

    SciTech Connect

    Gaft, M.; Nagli, L.; Panczer, G.; Waychunas, G.; Porat, N.

    2008-11-01

    The unusual luminescence of particular varieties of natural pink calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) samples was studied by laser-induced time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy at different temperatures. The luminescence is characterized by intense blue emission under short-wave UV lamp excitation with an extremely long decay time, accompanied by pink-orange luminescence under long wave UV excitation. Our investigation included optical absorption, natural thermostimulated luminescence (NTL) and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) studies. Two luminescence centers were detected: a narrow violet band, with {lambda}{sub max} = 412 nm, {Delta} = 45 nm, two decay components of {tau}{sub 1} = 5 ns and {tau}{sub 2} = 7.2 ms, accompanied by very long afterglow, and an orange emission band with {lambda}{sub max} = 595 nm, {Delta} = 90 nm and {tau} = 5 ns. Both luminescence centers are thermally unstable with the blue emission disappearing after heating at 500 C, and the orange emission disappearing after heating at different temperatures starting from 230 C, although sometimes it is stable up to 500 C in different samples. Both centers have spectral-kinetic properties very unusual for mineral luminescence, which in combination with extremely low impurity concentrations, prevent their identification with specific impurity related emission. The most likely explanation of these observations may be the presence of radiation-induced luminescence centers. The long violet afterglow is evidently connected with trapped charge carrier liberation, with their subsequent migration through the valence band and ultimate recombination with a radiation-induced center responsible for the unusual violet luminescence.

  10. Luminescence properties of lustre decorated majolica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, A.; Martini, M.; Sibilia, E.; Padeletti, G.; Fermo, P.

    Luminescence measurements have been performed on several Italian Renaissance ceramic shards produced in central Italy, as well as on some others from Hispano-Moresque and Fatimid periods. The aim of this study was the characterisation of the raw materials used to manufacture lustre decorated majolica. At first, the thermoluminescence (TL) dating of all ceramic bodies was performed, because the shards lacked sure chronological attribution, having been provided by private collectors, or found during emergency restoration works or archaeological surveys. To characterise the defects and the recombination centers of the different components of the ceramics (ceramic body, glaze, glaze, and lustre), radioluminescence (RL) measurements have been performed on samples representative of each historical period. The dating results are reported, as well as the preliminary RL results.

  11. Are luminescent bacteria suitable for online detection and monitoring of toxic compounds in drinking water and its sources?

    PubMed

    Woutersen, Marjolijn; Belkin, Shimshon; Brouwer, Bram; van Wezel, Annemarie P; Heringa, Minne B

    2011-05-01

    Biosensors based on luminescent bacteria may be valuable tools to monitor the chemical quality and safety of surface and drinking water. In this review, an overview is presented of the recombinant strains available that harbour the bacterial luciferase genes luxCDABE, and which may be used in an online biosensor for water quality monitoring. Many bacterial strains have been described for the detection of a broad range of toxicity parameters, including DNA damage, protein damage, membrane damage, oxidative stress, organic pollutants, and heavy metals. Most lux strains have sensitivities with detection limits ranging from milligrams per litre to micrograms per litre, usually with higher sensitivities in compound-specific strains. Although the sensitivity of lux strains can be enhanced by various molecular manipulations, most reported detection thresholds are still too high to detect levels of individual contaminants as they occur nowadays in European drinking waters. However, lux strains sensing specific toxic effects have the advantage of being able to respond to mixtures of contaminants inducing the same effect, and thus could be used as a sensor for the sum effect, including the effect of compounds that are as yet not identified by chemical analysis. An evaluation of the suitability of lux strains for monitoring surface and drinking water is therefore provided.

  12. Making sense of lanthanide luminescence.

    PubMed

    Werts, Martinus H V

    2005-01-01

    The luminescence of trivalent lanthanide ions has found applications in lighting, lasers, optical telecommunications, medical diagnostics, and various other fields. This introductory review presents the basics of organic and inorganic luminescent materials containing lanthanide ions, their applications, and some recent developments. After a brief history of the discovery, purification and early spectroscopic studies of the lanthanides, the radiative and nonradiative transitions of the 4f electrons in lanthanide ions are discussed. Lanthanide-doped phosphors, glasses and crystals as well as luminescent lanthanide complexes with organic ligands receive attention with respect to their preparation and their applications. Finally, two recent developments in the field of luminescent materials are addressed: near-infrared luminescent lanthanide complexes and lanthanide-doped nano-particles.

  13. Boron clusters in luminescent materials.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Thilagar, Pakkirisamy

    2016-01-21

    In recent times, luminescent materials with tunable emission properties have found applications in almost all aspects of modern material sciences. Any discussion on the recent developments in luminescent materials would be incomplete if one does not account for the versatile photophysical features of boron containing compounds. Apart from triarylboranes and tetra-coordinate borate dyes, luminescent materials consisting of boron clusters have also found immense interest in recent times. Recent studies have unveiled the opportunities hidden within boranes, carboranes and metalloboranes, etc. as active constituents of luminescent materials. From simple illustrations of luminescence, to advanced applications in LASERs, OLEDs and bioimaging, etc., the unique features of such compounds and their promising versatility have already been established. In this review, recent revelations about the excellent photophysical properties of such materials are discussed. PMID:26574714

  14. Boron clusters in luminescent materials.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Thilagar, Pakkirisamy

    2016-01-21

    In recent times, luminescent materials with tunable emission properties have found applications in almost all aspects of modern material sciences. Any discussion on the recent developments in luminescent materials would be incomplete if one does not account for the versatile photophysical features of boron containing compounds. Apart from triarylboranes and tetra-coordinate borate dyes, luminescent materials consisting of boron clusters have also found immense interest in recent times. Recent studies have unveiled the opportunities hidden within boranes, carboranes and metalloboranes, etc. as active constituents of luminescent materials. From simple illustrations of luminescence, to advanced applications in LASERs, OLEDs and bioimaging, etc., the unique features of such compounds and their promising versatility have already been established. In this review, recent revelations about the excellent photophysical properties of such materials are discussed.

  15. Self-trapped exciton and core-valence luminescence in BaF{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Vistovskyy, V. V. Zhyshkovych, A. V.; Chornodolskyy, Ya. M.; Voloshinovskii, A. S.; Myagkota, O. S.; Gloskovskii, A.; Gektin, A. V.; Vasil'ev, A. N.; Rodnyi, P. A.

    2013-11-21

    The influence of the BaF{sub 2} nanoparticle size on the intensity of the self-trapped exciton luminescence and the radiative core-valence transitions is studied by the luminescence spectroscopy methods using synchrotron radiation. The decrease of the self-trapped exciton emission intensity at energies of exciting photons in the range of optical exciton creation (hν ≤ E{sub g}) is less sensitive to the reduction of the nanoparticle sizes than in the case of band-to-band excitation, where excitons are formed by the recombination way. The intensity of the core-valence luminescence shows considerably weaker dependence on the nanoparticle sizes in comparison with the intensity of self-trapped exciton luminescence. The revealed regularities are explained by considering the relationship between nanoparticle size and photoelectron or photohole thermalization length as well as the size of electronic excitations.

  16. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Corneillie, Todd M.; Xu, Jide

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  17. Colloidal luminescent silicon nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaotang; Hessel, Colin M; Yu, Yixuan; Bogart, Timothy D; Korgel, Brian A

    2013-07-10

    Silicon nanorods are grown by trisilane decomposition in hot squalane in the presence of tin (Sn) nanocrystals and dodecylamine. Sn induces solution-liquid-solid nanorod growth with dodecylamine serving as a stabilizing ligand. As-prepared nanorods do not luminesce, but etching with hydrofluoric acid to remove residual surface oxide followed by thermal hydrosilylation with 1-octadecene induces bright photoluminescence with quantum yields of 4-5%. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the ligands prevent surface oxidation for months when stored in air. PMID:23731184

  18. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  19. Characteristics of laser-induced luminescence in poly(paraphenylene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Changqin; Lu, Shaozhe; Su, Xi A.; Liu, Xing J.

    1992-02-01

    Under laser inducement, we have observed steady state photoluminescence from poly(paraphenylene) and transient photoliininescence from PPP in nanosecond time regime for the first time. PPP samples studied were produced using the Kovacic method. The experimental results indicate that the lininescence spectra are well-resolved. The peaks are rather sharp and located at 4340Å(100K), 4332Å(50K), 4318Å(8.5K) (transient state) and 4309Å, 4575Å (steady state). The luminescence spectra have been discussed by using the lattice relaxation process. The lifetime of the luminescence of PPP was measured. The decay curve of PPP is found to have a double exponential form with a lifetime of 7.47 ns and 5.13 ns. The decay kinetics was interpreted by the interchain recombination of photoexcited polaron pairs. The decay kinetics of photoinduced absorption between a few nanoseconds and a few microseconds is mainly due to the interchain recombination of the photoexcited polaron pairs and exhibits the radiative luminescence after relaxation.

  20. Recombinant bacterial amylopullulanases: developments and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2013-01-01

    Pullulanases are endo-acting enzymes capable of hydrolyzing α-1, 6-glycosidic linkages in starch, pullulan, amylopectin, and related oligosaccharides, while amylopullulanases are bifunctional enzymes with an active site capable of cleaving both α-1, 4 and α-1, 6 linkages in starch, amylose and other oligosaccharides, and α-1, 6 linkages in pullulan. The amylopullulanases are classified in GH13 and GH57 family enzymes based on the architecture of catalytic domain and number of conserved sequences. The enzymes with two active sites, one for the hydrolysis of α-1, 4- glycosidic bond and the other for α-1, 6-glycosidic bond, are called α-amylase-pullulanases, while amylopullulanases have only one active site for cleaving both α-1, 4- and α-1, 6-glycosidic bonds. The amylopullulanases produced by bacteria find applications in the starch and baking industries as a catalyst for one step starch liquefaction-saccharification for making various sugar syrups, as antistaling agent in bread and as a detergent additive. PMID:23645215

  1. Enhanced radiation detectors using luminescent materials

    DOEpatents

    Vardeny, Zeev V.; Jeglinski, Stefan A.; Lane, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    A radiation detecting device comprising a radiation sensing element, and a layer of luminescent material to expand the range of wavelengths over which the sensing element can efficiently detect radiation. The luminescent material being selected to absorb radiation at selected wavelengths, causing the luminescent material to luminesce, and the luminescent radiation being detected by the sensing element. Radiation sensing elements include photodiodes (singly and in arrays), CCD arrays, IR detectors and photomultiplier tubes. Luminescent materials include polymers, oligomers, copolymers and porphyrines, Luminescent layers include thin films, thicker layers, and liquid polymers.

  2. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  3. Influence of structure defects upon the luminescence and thermostimulated effects in Gd/sub 3/Ga/sub 5/O/sub 12/ crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Andriichuk, V.A.; Volzhenskaya, L.G.; Zakharko, Ya.M.; Zorenko, Yu.V.

    1988-03-01

    The relationship between the 2.5-eV luminescence and the presence of intrinsic structure defects of gadolinium-gallium garnet (GGG) were studied and the role of the defects in capture and recombination processes of charge carriers were examined. The temperature dependence of the 2.5-eV luminescence yield was shown; the time dependence of the afterglow was studied in pulsed excitation by electrons. Results of research on the luminescence of GGG-V single crystals pointed to the recombination of the 2.5-eV emission band. The liberation of holes from traps during the heating excited GGG-V crystals, and their recombination with F centers lead to the appearance of thermostimulated luminescence.

  4. Luminescence resonance energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Selvin, P.R.; Rana, T.M.; Hearst, J.E. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-29

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), in which a fluorescent donor molecule transfers energy via a nonradiative dipole-dipole interaction to an acceptor molecule (which is usually a fluorescent molecule), is a standard spectroscopic technique for measuring distances in the 10-70 Angstrom range. We have used a luminescent europium chelate as donor and an organic dye, CY-5, as acceptor. This luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) has several advantages over the more conventional FRET. The distance at which 50% of the energy is transferred (R[sub 0]) is large, 70 [angstrom]; the donor lifetime is single exponential and long (0.63 ms in H[sub 2]O; 2.5 ms in D[sub 2]O), making lifetime measurements facile and highly accurate; the orientation dependence (k[sup 2]) of energy transfer is minimized by the donor's multiple electronic transitions and long lifetime, limiting uncertainty in the measured distance due to orientation effects to [+-]12% in the worst case; the sensitized emission of the acceptor can be measured with little or no interfering background, yielding a >50-fold improvement in signal to background over standard donor-acceptor pairs and enabling distances several times R[sub 0] to be measured. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Enhanced Luminescence of Lanthanides: Determination of Europium by Enhanced Luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Amanda L.; Murray, George M.

    1998-02-01

    An experiment has been developed to teach the principles of molecular luminescence spectroscopy. This laboratory experiment is designed for upper-level undergraduates as a less toxic alternative to current fluorescence experiments. It combines elements of physical and inorganic as well as analytical chemistry. The experiment can be performed on a variety of rudimentary fluorescence instrumentation and still give good analytical figures of merit. The object of the experiment is to measure the luminescent enhancement that is achieved when a lanthanide such as Eu(III) or Tb(III) is complexed with appropriate organic ligands, in this case 2,6 pyridinedicarboxylic acid. The importance of pH on metal ion coordination is also explored via luminescence intensity. This approach provides several advantages over current luminescence experiments. These advantages include limited toxicity and flammability of the chemicals involved, a large luminescence linear dynamic range, and low detection limits (parts per trillion). These low detection limits, achieved using modest equipment, allow the determination of the europium concentration in a variety of samples, such as tap water. The narrow lanthanide luminescent bands also permit incorporation of qualitative analysis of a mixture of lanthanides.

  6. Luminescent screen composition and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, E. H.

    1970-01-01

    Ultraviolet light projects photographically produced images on a screen composed of a mixture of linear and nonlinear phosphors whose spectral emissions are different. This allows the display of polychromatic luminescent images, which gives better discrimination of the objects being viewed.

  7. Effects of size restriction on donor-acceptor recombination in AgBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Paul J.; Marchetti, Alfred P.; Fauchet, Philippe M.

    2000-08-01

    The behavior of donor-acceptor (DA) recombination luminescence in quantum confined AgBr has been investigated. The DA luminescence decay, after pulsed excitation, became longer lived as the nanocluster size decreased. This result differs from theoretical expectations and from observations with AgI nanoclusters. The DA lifetime increase with decreasing size is due to an increase in yield and lifetime of ``free'' excitons that slowly dissociate into ``close'' donor-acceptor pairs, giving rise to an ``exciton dribbling'' effect.

  8. An Overview of Genetic Mechanisms in the Bacterial Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Judith; Baumberg, Simon

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the genetic elements found in the bacterial cell which play a role in recombining DNA sequences. Provides a core structure to which the mechanisms occurring in and between bacterial cells can be related. Discusses the practicalities of recombinant DNA techniques. (Author/CW)

  9. An infrared and luminescence study of tritiated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Kosteski, T.; Kherani, N.P.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.; Shmayda, W.

    1997-07-01

    Tritium has been incorporated into amorphous silicon. Infrared spectroscopy shows new infrared vibration modes due to silicon-tritium (Si-T) bonds in the amorphous silicon network. Si-T vibration frequencies are related to Si-H vibration frequencies by simple mass relationships. Inelastic collisions of {beta} particles, produced as a result of tritium decay, with the amorphous silicon network results in the generation of electron-hole pairs. Radiative recombination of these carriers is observed. Dangling bonds associated with the tritium decay reduce luminescence efficiency.

  10. A Novel Universal Detection Agent for Time-Gated Luminescence Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Sayyadi, Nima; Care, Andrew; Connally, Russell E.; Try, Andrew C.; Bergquist, Peter L.; Sunna, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent lanthanide chelates have been used to label antibodies in time-gated luminescence (TGL) bioimaging. However, it is a challenging task to label directly an antibody with lanthanide-binding ligands and achieve control of the target ligand/protein ratios whilst ensuring that affinity and avidity of the antibody remain uncompromised. We report the development of a new indirect detection reagent to label antibodies with detectable luminescence that circumvents this problem by labelling available lysine residues in the linker portion of the recombinant fusion protein Linker-Protein G (LPG). Succinimide-activated lanthanide chelating ligands were attached to lysine residues in LPG and Protein G (without Linker) and the resulting Luminescence-Activating (LA-) conjugates were compared for total incorporation and conjugation efficiency. A higher and more efficient incorporation of ligands at three different molar ratios was observed for LPG and this effect was attributed to the presence of eight readily available lysine residues in the linker region of LPG. These Luminescence-Activating (LA-) complexes were subsequently shown to impart luminescence (upon formation of europium(III) complexes) to cell-specific antibodies within seconds and without the need for any complicated bioconjugation procedures. The potential of this technology was demonstrated by direct labelling of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in TGL bioimaging. PMID:27282464

  11. A Novel Universal Detection Agent for Time-Gated Luminescence Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Sayyadi, Nima; Care, Andrew; Connally, Russell E; Try, Andrew C; Bergquist, Peter L; Sunna, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent lanthanide chelates have been used to label antibodies in time-gated luminescence (TGL) bioimaging. However, it is a challenging task to label directly an antibody with lanthanide-binding ligands and achieve control of the target ligand/protein ratios whilst ensuring that affinity and avidity of the antibody remain uncompromised. We report the development of a new indirect detection reagent to label antibodies with detectable luminescence that circumvents this problem by labelling available lysine residues in the linker portion of the recombinant fusion protein Linker-Protein G (LPG). Succinimide-activated lanthanide chelating ligands were attached to lysine residues in LPG and Protein G (without Linker) and the resulting Luminescence-Activating (LA-) conjugates were compared for total incorporation and conjugation efficiency. A higher and more efficient incorporation of ligands at three different molar ratios was observed for LPG and this effect was attributed to the presence of eight readily available lysine residues in the linker region of LPG. These Luminescence-Activating (LA-) complexes were subsequently shown to impart luminescence (upon formation of europium(III) complexes) to cell-specific antibodies within seconds and without the need for any complicated bioconjugation procedures. The potential of this technology was demonstrated by direct labelling of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in TGL bioimaging. PMID:27282464

  12. Recombinant bacteria for mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Federici, B A; Park, H-W; Bideshi, D K; Wirth, M C; Johnson, J J

    2003-11-01

    Bacterial insecticides have been used for the control of nuisance and vector mosquitoes for more than two decades. Nevertheless, due primarily to their high cost and often only moderate efficacy, these insecticides remain of limited use in tropical countries where mosquito-borne diseases are prevalent. Recently, however, recombinant DNA techniques have been used to improve bacterial insecticide efficacy by markedly increasing the synthesis of mosquitocidal proteins and by enabling new endotoxin combinations from different bacteria to be produced within single strains. These new strains combine mosquitocidal Cry and Cyt proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis with the binary toxin of Bacillus sphaericus, improving efficacy against Culex species by 10-fold and greatly reducing the potential for resistance through the presence of Cyt1A. Moreover, although intensive use of B. sphaericus against Culex populations in the field can result in high levels of resistance, most of this can be suppressed by combining this bacterial species with Cyt1A; the latter enables the binary toxin of this species to enter midgut epithelial cells via the microvillar membrane in the absence of a midgut receptor. The availability of these novel strains and newly discovered mosquitocidal proteins, such as the Mtx toxins of B. sphaericus, offers the potential for constructing a range of recombinant bacterial insecticides for more effective control of the mosquito vectors of filariasis, Dengue fever and malaria. PMID:14506223

  13. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: a matrix including lanthanide ions is provided on the surface containing the bacterial spores; functionalized aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores on the surface; a complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is formed on the surface; the complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence of the complex on the surface; and the bacterial spores exhibiting the luminescence of the complex on the surface are detected and quantified.

  14. Turning on the Light: Lessons from Luminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Patricia B.; Engelson, Carol; St. Peter, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Some of the processes by which light is emitted without a simultaneous change in temperature are discussed and is classified as luminescence or cold light. Luminescent processes include triboluminescence, fluorescence, phosphorescence, chemiluminescence, and bioluminescence.

  15. Utilizing Nanofabrication to Construct Strong, Luminescent Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Huang, Gang; Lu, Hong B.; McCready, David E.; Joly, Alan G.; Bovin, Jan-Olov

    2006-05-28

    Luminescent materials have been utilized widely in applications from lighting to sensing. The new development of technologies based on luminescence properties requires the materials to have high luminescence efficiency and mechanical strength. In this article, we report the fabrication of luminescent materials possessing high mechanical strength by nanofabrication with polyvinyl alcohol used as a stabilizer or coupling agent. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission microscope observations reveal that the nanocomposite sample contains ZnS and ZnO nanoparticles as well as kozoite and sodium nitrate. The mechanical strength and hardness of these nanocomposite materials are higher than polycarbonate and some carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites. Strong luminescence is observed in the new nanocomposites and the luminescence intensity does not degrade following up to 30 minutes of X-ray irradiation. Our results indicate that nanofabrication may provide a good method to improve the mechanical strength of luminescent materials for some applications in which high strength luminescent materials are needed.

  16. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  17. Luminescence study of homeopathic remedies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobyshev, Valentin I.; Tomkevitch, Marie

    2001-06-01

    It was shown in our recent papers that distilled water possesses intrinsic luminescence at wavelength of about 400 nm with excitation wavelength 300 nm, which is very sensitive to small amount of dissolved substances. This phenomena was chosen to study homeopathic remedies. Pronounced difference in the intensity of luminescence between several commercial preparations with the same potency and one preparation with various potencies was obtained. Long scale evolution of the spectra was registered and final result was dependent on preparation and its potency. Systematic study of homeopathic preparations of halit (natural sodium chloride) from 1 to 30 decimal dilution was done. A stepwise dilution with mechanical agitation between the dilution steps, the so-called potentisation, was produced specially by homeopathic company Weleda. Luminescence intensity against concentration (potency) of halit is non monotonous function with several maxima, the main maximum is located at 13-14-th dilution. Evolution of the spectra was registered during several months. The analogous potentisation treatment of water without additional substances results also in changes of the luminescence spectra, depending on the number of potentisation. The obtained differences of luminescence spectra at ultra high dilutions and potentisation show that the collective properties of water are really changed in homeopathic preparations.

  18. Method of measuring luminescence of a material

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Steven D.

    2015-12-15

    A method of measuring luminescence of a material is disclosed. The method includes applying a light source to excite an exposed material. The method also includes amplifying an emission signal of the material. The method further includes measuring a luminescent emission at a fixed time window of about 10 picoseconds to about 10 nanoseconds. The luminescence may be radio photoluminescence (RPL) or optically stimulated luminescence (OSL).

  19. Specificity of aequorin luminescence to calcium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimomura, O.; Johnson, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    The presence of Pb(++), Co(++), Cu(++), and Cd(++), each of which possesses a certain luminescence-triggering activity of aequorin, potentially interferes with the specificity of the aequorin luminescence response to Ca(++). Interference by the above cations can be eliminated, without influencing the sensitivity of the luminescence of aequorin to Ca(++), by adding 1 mM of sodium diethyldithiocarbamate.

  20. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-10-25

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

  1. Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.; Fecht, B.A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of the MEASUREMENT OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  2. Applications of luminescent systems to infectious disease methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Deming, J. W.; Mcgarry, M. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Okrend, H.; Thomas, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The characterization of a clinical sample by a simple, fast, accurate, automatable analytical measurement is important in the management of infectious disease. Luminescence assays offer methods rich with options for these measurements. The instrumentation is common to each assay, and the investment is reasonable. Three general procedures were developed to varying degrees of completeness which measure bacterial levels by measuring their ATP, FMN and iron porphyrins. Bacteriuria detection and antibiograms can be determined within half a day. The characterization of the sample for its soluble ATP, FMN or prophyrins was also performed.

  3. [Mineral salt-dependent inhibition of light emission from the luminescent microorganism Escherichia coli Z9051].

    PubMed

    Boiandin, A N; Popova, L Iu

    2001-01-01

    The influence of some mineral salts on the recombinant strain Escherichia coli Z9051 was investigated. It was shown that the composition (NaCl, Na2SO4, MgCl2 and MgSO4) and concentration (5 and 10%) of the salts substantially affect the expression of genes for the luminescence system of light-emitting bacteria cloned in the plasmid under the control of the lac-promoter. In some cases, the luminescence level of the microorganism in the presence of salts was similar to the luminescence level under catabolite repression by glucose, the more strong influence of the salts exceeding the effect of catabolite repression. The possibility of adaptation of the genetically modified microorganism to the salinity factor is discussed. PMID:11357338

  4. Surface Chemically Switchable Ultraviolet Luminescence from Interfacial Two-Dimensional Electron Gas.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad A; Saldana-Greco, Diomedes; Gu, Zongquan; Wang, Fenggong; Breckenfeld, Eric; Lei, Qingyu; Xu, Ruijuan; Hawley, Christopher J; Xi, X X; Martin, Lane W; Rappe, Andrew M; Spanier, Jonathan E

    2016-01-13

    We report intense, narrow line-width, surface chemisorption-activated and reversible ultraviolet (UV) photoluminescence from radiative recombination of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with photoexcited holes at LaAlO3/SrTiO3. The switchable luminescence arises from an electron transfer-driven modification of the electronic structure via H-chemisorption onto the AlO2-terminated surface of LaAlO3, at least 2 nm away from the interface. The control of the onset of emission and its intensity are functionalities that go beyond the luminescence of compound semiconductor quantum wells. Connections between reversible chemisorption, fast electron transfer, and quantum-well luminescence suggest a new model for surface chemically reconfigurable solid-state UV optoelectronics and molecular sensing. PMID:26675987

  5. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on light emission by various strains of marine luminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Katsev, Andrey M; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Szpilewska, Hanna

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting bacteria are the most abundant and widespread luminescent organisms. Most species of such bacteria live in marine environments. However, until recently, biological role of bacterial luminescence remained unknown. Recent studies indicated that light produced in bacterial cells may stimulate DNA repair. Therefore, it is not surprising that agents that cause DNA damage induce expression of lux genes. Moreover, it was proposed previously that bacterial luciferases may be involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Recently, this hypothesis was confirmed experimentally. Here we investigated effects of hydrogen peroxide on light emission by various strains of luminescent bacteria. We found that luminescence of strains with luciferase of fast kinetics of reaction decreased at considerably lower concentrations of H2O2 than that of strains with luciferase of the slow kinetics. The action (either direct or indirect) of luciferases as anti-oxidants seemed to be independent of activity of catalase, which was found to be different in various strains. Therefore, it seems that luciferases of the slow kinetics are more efficient in detoxification of reactive oxygen species than those of the fast kinetics.

  6. Unraveling the luminescence signatures of chemical defects in polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihua; Tran, Huan Doan; Wang, Chenchen; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2015-09-28

    Chemical defects in polyethylene (PE) can deleteriously downgrade its electrical properties and performance. Although these defects usually leave spectroscopic signatures in terms of characteristic luminescence peaks, it is nontrivial to make unambiguous assignments of the peaks to specific defect types. In this work, we go beyond traditional density functional theory calculations to determine intra-defect state transition and charge recombination process derived emission and absorption energies in PE. By calculating the total energy differences of the neutral defect at excited and ground states, the emission energies from intra-defect state transition are obtained, reasonably explaining the photoluminescence peaks in PE. In order to study the luminescence emitted in charge recombination processes, we characterize PE defect levels in terms of thermodynamic and optical charge transition levels that involve total energy calculations of neutral and charged defects. Calculations are performed at several levels of theory including those involving (semi)local and hybrid electron exchange-correlation functionals, and many-body perturbation theory. With these critical elements, the emission energies are computed and further used to clarify and confirm the origins of the observed electroluminescence and thermoluminescence peaks. PMID:26429041

  7. Unraveling the luminescence signatures of chemical defects in polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lihua; Tran, Huan Doan; Wang, Chenchen; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2015-09-28

    Chemical defects in polyethylene (PE) can deleteriously downgrade its electrical properties and performance. Although these defects usually leave spectroscopic signatures in terms of characteristic luminescence peaks, it is nontrivial to make unambiguous assignments of the peaks to specific defect types. In this work, we go beyond traditional density functional theory calculations to determine intra-defect state transition and charge recombination process derived emission and absorption energies in PE. By calculating the total energy differences of the neutral defect at excited and ground states, the emission energies from intra-defect state transition are obtained, reasonably explaining the photoluminescence peaks in PE. In order to study the luminescence emitted in charge recombination processes, we characterize PE defect levels in terms of thermodynamic and optical charge transition levels that involve total energy calculations of neutral and charged defects. Calculations are performed at several levels of theory including those involving (semi)local and hybrid electron exchange-correlation functionals, and many-body perturbation theory. With these critical elements, the emission energies are computed and further used to clarify and confirm the origins of the observed electroluminescence and thermoluminescence peaks.

  8. Scintillation process in three-component systems: mechanism of the luminescence minimum

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Y.; Lipsky, S.

    1988-04-21

    Three-component systems consisting of a saturated hydrocarbon solvent, C, an aromatic solvent, B, and a fluorescent solute, T, are excited either optically (in the absorption band of C and below its ionization potential) or with 0.67-MeV ..beta../sup -/ particles. The luminescence of T is detected and studied as a function of the B/C concentration ratio. Systems studied are C = cyclohexane, trans-decalin, methylcyclohexane, bicyclohexyl, n-heptane, or 2,3-dimethylbutane; B - benzene or toluene; and T = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylphenylenediamine (TMPD), p-terphenyl, or 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO). The luminescence behavior is observed under both aerated and nitrogenated conditions. For B = benzene, the luminescence of T is depressed by the replacement of C with B, at low B/C concentration ratios. This occurs for both modes of excitation for all C except bicyclohexyl and 2,3-dimethylbutane. At higher B/C concentration ratios, the luminescence of T recovers and ultimately exceeds its intensity in pure C + T. Thus there is observed a luminescence minimum. At low T concentrations the position and depth of the minimum are very sensitive to the presence of O/sub 2/, but at higher concentrations this sensitivity is lost. For B = toluene, the luminescence minimum is only observed under ..beta../sup -/ particle excitation conditions. A mechanism is developed to accommodate these observations. Its analysis indicates that production of S/sub 1/ states of B (i.e., B*) via either energy transfer from C* or via charge transfer from C/sup +/ followed by the geminate recombination B/sup +/ + e/sup -/ ..-->.. B* is intrinsically inefficient in dilute cyclohexane solutions. For B = benzene this inefficiency resides mainly in the electronic energy transfer process and for toluene in the ion-recombination process. Also, the analysis indicates that there must be two states of C that can transfer energy to B and/or T.

  9. Impermanence of bacterial clones

    PubMed Central

    Bobay, Louis-Marie; Traverse, Charles C.; Ochman, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria reproduce asexually and pass on a single genome copied from the parent, a reproductive mode that assures the clonal descent of progeny; however, a truly clonal bacterial species is extremely rare. The signal of clonality can be interrupted by gene uptake and exchange, initiating homologous recombination that results in the unique sequence of one clone being incorporated into another. Because recombination occurs sporadically and on local scales, these events are often difficult to recognize, even when considering large samples of completely sequenced genomes. Moreover, several processes can produce the appearance of clonality in populations that undergo frequent recombination. The rates and consequences of recombination have been studied in Escherichia coli for over 40 y, and, during this time, there have been several shifting views of its clonal status, population structure, and rates of gene exchange. We reexamine the studies and retrace the evolution of the methods that have assessed the extent of DNA flux, largely focusing on its impact on the E. coli genome. PMID:26195749

  10. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  11. Recombinant bacteriophage lysins as antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Mark; Ross, Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; O'Mahony, Jim

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing worldwide prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, bacteriophage endolysins (lysins) represent a very promising novel alternative class of antibacterial in the fight against infectious disease. Lysins are phage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases which, when applied exogenously (as purified recombinant proteins) to Gram-positive bacteria, bring about rapid lysis and death of the bacterial cell. A number of studies have recently demonstrated the strong potential of these enzymes in human and veterinary medicine to control and treat pathogens on mucosal surfaces and in systemic infections. They also have potential in diagnostics and detection, bio-defence, elimination of food pathogens and control of phytopathogens. This review discusses the extensive research on recombinant bacteriophage lysins in the context of antibacterials, and looks forward to future development and potential. PMID:21327123

  12. Plasmon enhancement of luminescence upconversion.

    PubMed

    Park, Wounjhang; Lu, Dawei; Ahn, Sungmo

    2015-05-21

    Frequency conversion has always been an important topic in optics. Nonlinear optics has traditionally focused on frequency conversion based on nonlinear susceptibility but with the recent development of upconversion nanomaterials, luminescence upconversion has begun to receive renewed attention. While upconversion nanomaterials open doors to a wide range of new opportunities, they remain too inefficient for most applications. Incorporating plasmonic nanostructures provides a promising pathway to highly efficient upconversion. Naturally, a plethora of theoretical and experimental studies have been published in recent years, reporting enhancements up to several hundred. It is however difficult to make meaningful comparisons since the plasmonic fields are highly sensitive to the local geometry and excitation condition. Also, many luminescence upconversion processes involve multiple steps via different physical mechanisms and the overall output is often determined by a delicate interplay among them. This review is aimed at offering a comprehensive framework for plasmon enhanced luminescence upconversion. We first present quantum electrodynamics descriptions for all the processes involved in luminescence upconversion, which include absorption, emission, energy transfer and nonradiative transitions. We then present a bird's eye view of published works on plasmon enhanced upconversion, followed by more detailed discussion on comparable classes of nanostructures, the effects of spacer layers and local heating, and the dynamics of the plasmon enhanced upconversion process. Plasmon enhanced upconversion is a challenging and exciting field from the fundamental scientific perspective and also from technological standpoints. It offers an excellent system to study how optical processes are affected by the local photonic environment. This type of research is particularly timely as the plasmonics is placing heavier emphasis on nonlinearity. At the same time, efficient upconversion

  13. Rapid screening for soil ecotoxicity with a battery of luminescent bacteria tests.

    PubMed

    Heinlaan, Margit; Kahru, Anne; Kasemets, Kaja; Kurvet, Imbi; Waterlot, Cristophe; Sepp, Kalev; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Douay, Francis

    2007-03-01

    A bacterial test battery, involving i) Microtox, an aquatic test, ii) the Flash assay, a soil-suspension test (with Vibrio fischeri as the test organism), and iii) the Metal Detector assay, a semi-specific aquatic test for heavy metals (with recombinant luminescent Escherichia coli), was used in a combined toxicological and chemical hazard assessment of Estonian soils sampled from a former Soviet military airfield (13 samples) and from traffic-influenced roadsides (5 samples). The soils showed slightly elevated levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), but not of heavy metals. In most of the samples, the levels of TPH did not exceed the Estonian permitted limit values set for residential areas. Toxicity testing was performed on both fresh and dried soils, after aqueous extraction for 1 hour and 24 hours. The toxicity results obtained with the Microtox test did not significantly differ in all of the sample treatment schemes; however, it appeared that the drying and sieving of the soils increased the bioavailability of toxicants, probably due to an enlarged reactive soil surface area. According to chemical analysis of the soils and the data from the Microtox test and the Metal Detector assay (performed on aqueous elutriates of the soils), these soils would not be considered to be hazardous. In contrast, the Flash assay performed on soil-water suspensions of dried soils, showed that most of the soils were toxic and thus probably contained undetermined particle-bound bioavailable toxicants. The photobacterial toxicity test (the Flash assay) can be recommended for the rapid screening of soils, as it is sensitive, cheap and inexpensive, and provides valuable information on particle-bound bioavailable toxicants, useful for complementing a chemical analysis and for assessing the risks originating from polluted soils. PMID:17411358

  14. Origin of green luminescence in hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Čížek, J. Hruška, P.; Melikhova, O.; Procházka, I.; Valenta, J.; Novotný, M.; Bulíř, J.

    2015-06-22

    Combining photoluminescence and positron annihilation studies of hydrothermally grown ZnO crystals with stoichiometry varied by controlled annealing enabled us to clarify the origin of green luminescence. It was found that green luminescence in ZnO has multiple origins and consists of a band at 2.3(1) eV due to recombination of electrons of the conduction band by zinc vacancy acceptors coupled with hydrogen and a band at 2.47(2) eV related to oxygen vacancies. The as-grown ZnO crystals contain zinc vacancies associated with hydrogen and exhibit a green luminescence at 2.3(1) eV. Annealing in Zn vapor removed zinc vacancies and introduced oxygen vacancies. This led to disappearance of the green luminescence band at 2.3(1) eV and appearance of a green emission at higher energy of 2.47(2) eV. Moreover, the color of the crystal was changed from colorless to dark red. In contrast, annealing of the as-grown crystal in Cd vapor did not remove zinc vacancies and did not cause any significant change of green luminescence nor change in coloration.

  15. Luminescence dynamics of bound exciton of hydrogen doped ZnO nanowires

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Yi, Gyu -Chul; Chon, Bonghwan; Joo, Taiha; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-04-11

    In this study, all-optical camera, converting X-rays into visible photons, is a promising strategy for high-performance X-ray imaging detector requiring high detection efficiency and ultrafast detector response time. Zinc oxide is a suitable material for all-optical camera due to its fast radiative recombination lifetime in sub-nanosecond regime and its radiation hardness. ZnO nanostructures have been considered as proper building blocks for ultrafast detectors with spatial resolution in sub-micrometer scale. To achieve remarkable enhancement of luminescence efficiency n-type doping in ZnO has been employed. However, luminescence dynamics of doped ZnO nanostructures have not been thoroughly investigated whereas undoped ZnO nanostructures havemore » been employed to study their luminescence dynamics. Here we report a study of luminescence dynamics of hydrogen doped ZnO nanowires obtained by hydrogen plasma treatment. Hydrogen doping in ZnO nanowires gives rise to significant increase in the near-band-edge emission of ZnO and decrease in averaged photoluminescence lifetime from 300 to 140 ps at 10 K. The effects of hydrogen doping on the luminescent characteristics of ZnO nanowires were changed by hydrogen doping process variables.« less

  16. Effect of ultrasonic treatment on photoelectric and luminescent properties of ZnSe crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zobov, E. M. Zobov, M. E.; Gabibov, F. S.; Kamilov, I. K.; Manyakhin, F. I.; Naimi, E. K.

    2008-03-15

    The results of the effect of ultrasonic treatment of ZnSe crystals on the structure of the energy spectrum of electronic states of centers with deep levels forming photoelectric and luminescent properties of this compound are presented. It is for the first time proved experimentally that the climb of edge dislocations under the effect of ultrasound leads to regrouping and generation of defects forming deep levels, which manifest themselves in phenomena of photosensitivity and radiative recombination.

  17. Automated bacteriuria screening using the Berthold LB 950 luminescence analyser.

    PubMed

    Curtis, G D; Johnston, H H; Hack, A R

    1987-06-01

    The Berthold LB950 Automatic Luminescence Analyser was used to estimate bacterial adenosine triphosphate in urine. The system provided a rapid (15 min) and fully automated screening test for bacteriuria at the 10(5) CFU/ml level. Bioluminescence results for 1040 urines were compared with viable counts using two reference culture methods and frequency distributions of bacterial counts and adenosine triphosphate levels were calculated. With a specificity of 79% the automated method showed a sensitivity of 84% using a pour plate reference count and 91% using a standard loop reference count. When contaminated urines were excluded the sensitivity improved to 98%. The automated bioluminescence test, though expensive, was shown to work well with good quality specimens.

  18. Interfering with Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Kerstin; Steinbach, Anke; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the exchange of chemical signals in bacterial populations to adjust the bacterial phenotypes according to the density of bacterial cells. This serves to express phenotypes that are advantageous for the group and ensure bacterial survival. To do so, bacterial cells synthesize autoinducer (AI) molecules, release them to the environment, and take them up. Thereby, the AI concentration reflects the cell density. When the AI concentration exceeds a critical threshold in the cells, the AI may activate the expression of virulence-associated genes or of luminescent proteins. It has been argued that targeting the QS system puts less selective pressure on these pathogens and should avoid the development of resistant bacteria. Therefore, the molecular components of QS systems have been suggested as promising targets for developing new anti-infective compounds. Here, we review the QS systems of selected gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, namely, Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and discuss various antivirulence strategies based on blocking different components of the QS machinery. PMID:26819549

  19. Method and Apparatus for Detecting and Quantifying Bacterial Spores on a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: bacterial spores are transferred from a place of origin to a test surface, the test surface comprises lanthanide ions. Aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores; a complex of the lanthanide ions and aromatic molecules is formed on the test surface, the complex is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence on the test surface; the luminescence on the test surface is detected and quantified.

  20. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: bacterial spores are transferred from a place of origin to a test surface, the test surface comprises lanthanide ions. Aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores; a complex of the lanthanide ions and aromatic molecules is formed on the test surface, the complex is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence on the test surface; the luminescence on the test surface is detected and quantified.

  1. Bacterial Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology. PMID:26488274

  2. Biodiversity among luminescent symbionts from squid of the genera Uroteuthis, Loliolus and Euprymna (Mollusca: Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Ferreira, R C; Nishiguchi, M K

    2007-10-01

    Luminescent bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae (Bacteria: γ-Proteobacteria) are commonly found in complex, bilobed light organs of sepiolid and loliginid squids. Although morphology of these organs in both families of squid is similar, the species of bacteria that inhabit each host has yet to be verified. We utilized sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA, luciferase α-subunit (luxA) and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapA) genes to determine phylogenetic relationships between 63 strains of Vibrio bacteria, which included representatives from different environments as well as unidentified luminescent isolates from loliginid and sepiolid squid from Thailand. A combined phylogenetic analysis was used including biochemical data such as carbon use, growth and luminescence. Results demonstrated that certain symbiotic Thai isolates found in the same geographic area were included in a clade containing bacterial species phenotypically suitable to colonize light organs. Moreover, multiple strains isolated from a single squid host were identified as more than one bacteria species in our phylogeny. This research presents evidence of species of luminescent bacteria that have not been previously described as symbiotic strains colonizing light organs of Indo-West Pacific loliginid and sepiolid squids, and supports the hypothesis of a non-species-specific association between certain sepiolid and loliginid squids and marine luminescent bacteria. PMID:22707847

  3. Dating sediments using luminescence signals

    SciTech Connect

    Wintle, A. )

    1993-05-01

    Before siting a nuclear power station or a nuclear waste repository, it is necessary to establish that the area has been free of earthquake activity for a sufficient period of time. Evidence of past earthquake activity is often provided by faults in surface sediments. Age limits for fault formation can be set by obtaining the depositional ages of the sediment unit in which the fault was formed and the overlying sediment. A useful technique would be one that dating could be applied to the mineral grains that make up the sediments and that would give the time that has passed since the grains were blown or washed into position. Luminescence dating techniques, of which the most well known is thermo-luminescence (TL), provide such information. This approach has been successful in dating movement on the Wasatch Fault in Utah. A combination of TL and radiocarbon dates indicated that three faulting events had occurred within the past 5000 years. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Demas, J.N.; Goodwin, P.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Keller, R.A.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, M.

    1998-11-10

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region. 6 figs.

  5. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  6. Material for a luminescent solar concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A material for use in a luminescent solar concentrator, formed by ceramitizing the luminescent ion Cr/sup 3 +/ with a transparent ceramic glass containing mullite. The resultant material has tiny Cr/sup 3 +/-bearing crystallites dispersed uniformly through an amorphous glass. The invention combines the high luminescent efficiency of Cr/sup 3 +/ in the crystalline phase with the practical and economical advantages of glass technology.

  7. A portable luminescence dating instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kook, M. H.; Murray, A. S.; Lapp, T.; Denby, P. H.; Ankjærgaard, C.; Thomsen, K.; Jain, M.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, G. H.

    2011-06-01

    We describe a portable luminescence reader suitable for use in remote localities in the field. The instrument weighs about 8 kg and is based around a 30 mm bialkali photomultiplier detecting signals through a glass filter centered on 340 nm. Stimulation is by 470 nm blue LEDs (24 W in total) operating in both continuous wave and pulsed mode; photon counting can be gated such that it is active only during the pulse off-period. There are also two bleaching light sources (470 nm, 5 W and 940 nm, 3 W), and the luminescence signals can be regenerated using a cold-cathode 30 kV X-ray tube, delivering ˜0.06 Gy.s -1. The three position sampling device has a heating element under each sampling position, able to heat the sample at 3 °C.s -1 up to at least 250 °C. The sampler can be inserted into unconsolidated sediments, and is designed to prevent exposure of the mineral grains to ambient light during sampling. The performance of the instrument in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility is comparable to that of the standard bench-top laboratory TL/OSL Risø reader. We show that the portable luminescence reader is able to measure accurately an ˜20 Gy quartz burial dose in a natural (unpretreated, no mineral separation) sandy sediment. We also show that, because of the configuration of the measurement head, the portable reader can be used to measure radioluminescence at elevated temperature in the presence of stimulation light; this facility is not available on conventional bench-top instruments. It is concluded that the portable luminescence reader can be used to accurately determine the quartz burial dose in loose sandy sediments in the field, without sample preparation or darkroom facilities.

  8. Solid-matrix luminescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtubise, R.J.

    1993-01-15

    Several interactions with lumiphors adsorbed on filter paper were elucidated from experiments with moisture, modulus and heavy-atom salts. The data were interpreted using static and dynamic quenching models, heavy-atom theory, and a theory related to the modulus of paper. With cyclodextrin-salt matrices, it was shown that 10% [alpha]-cyclodextrin/NaCl was very effective for obtaining strong room-temperature fluorescence and moderate room-temperature phosphorescence from adsorbed stereoisomeric tetrols. Extensive photophysical information was obtained for the four tetrols on 10% [alpha]-cyclodextrin/NaCl. The photophysical information acquired was used to develop a method for characterizing two of the tetrols. Work with model compounds adsorbed on deuterated sodium acetate showed that C-H vibrations in the undeuterated sodium acetate were not responsible for the deactivation of the excited triplet state in the model phosphors investigated. A considerable amount of solution luminescence and solid-matrix luminescence data were compared. The most important finding was that in several cases the room-temperature solid-matrix luminescence quantum yields were greater than the solution low-temperature quantum yield values.

  9. Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T.L.; Lee, K.T.

    2009-01-01

    Luminescence is typically described as light emitted by objects at low temperatures, induced by chemical reactions, electrical energy, atomic interactions, or acoustical and mechanical stress. An example is photoluminescence created when photons (electromagnetic radiation) strike a substance and are absorbed, resulting in the emission of a resonant fluorescent or phosphorescent albedo. In planetary science, there exists X-ray fluorescence induced by sunlight absorbed by a regolith a property used to measure some of the chemical composition of the Moon s surface during the Apollo program. However, there exists an equally important phenomenon in planetary science which will be designated here as photon luminescence. It is not conventional photoluminescence because the incoming radiation that strikes the planetary surface is not photons but rather cosmic rays (CRs). Nevertheless, the result is the same: the generation of a photon albedo. In particular, Galactic CRs (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) both induce a photon albedo that radiates from the surface of the Moon. Other particle albedos are generated as well, most of which are hazardous (e.g. neutrons). The photon luminescence or albedo of the lunar surface induced by GCRs and SEPs will be derived here, demonstrating that the Moon literally glows in the dark (when there is no sunlight or Earthshine). This extends earlier work on the same subject [1-4]. A side-by-side comparison of these two albedos and related mitigation measures will also be discussed.

  10. Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2014-09-23

    An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

  11. Luminescent detection of hydrazine and hydrazine derivatives

    DOEpatents

    Swager, Timothy M.; Thomas, III, Samuel W.

    2012-04-17

    The present invention generally relates to methods for modulating the optical properties of a luminescent polymer via interaction with a species (e.g., an analyte). In some cases, the present invention provides methods for determination of an analyte by monitoring a change in an optical signal of a luminescent polymer upon exposure to an analyte. Methods of the present invention may be useful for the vapor phase detection of analytes such as explosives and toxins. The present invention also provides methods for increasing the luminescence intensity of a polymer, such as a polymer that has been photobleached, by exposing the luminescent polymer to a species such as a reducing agent.

  12. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  13. The origin of white luminescence from silicon oxycarbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Nikas, V.; Gallis, S. Huang, M.; Kaloyeros, A. E.; Nguyen, A. P. D.; Stesmans, A.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2014-02-10

    Silicon oxycarbide (SiC{sub x}O{sub y}) is a promising material for achieving strong room-temperature white luminescence. The present work investigated the mechanisms for light emission in the visible/ultraviolet range (1.5–4.0 eV) from chemical vapor deposited amorphous SiC{sub x}O{sub y} thin films, using a combination of optical characterizations and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. Photoluminescence (PL) and EPR studies of samples, with and without post-deposition passivation in an oxygen and forming gas (H{sub 2} 5 at. % and N{sub 2} 95 at. %) ambient, ruled out typical structural defects in oxides, e.g., Si-related neutral oxygen vacancies or non-bridging oxygen hole centers, as the dominant mechanism for white luminescence from SiC{sub x}O{sub y}. The observed intense white luminescence (red, green, and blue emission) is believed to arise from the generation of photo-carriers by optical absorption through C-Si-O related electronic transitions, and the recombination of such carriers between bands and/or at band tail states. This assertion is based on the realization that the PL intensity dramatically increased at an excitation energy coinciding with the E{sub 04} band gaps of the material, as well as by the observed correlation between the Si-O-C bond density and the PL intensity. An additional mechanism for the existence of a blue component of the white emission is also discussed.

  14. Engineering nanoparticles to silence bacterial communication

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kristen P.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Yung-Pin; Pellechia, Perry J.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Decho, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    The alarming spread of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has warranted the study of alternative antimicrobial agents. Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical cell-to-cell communication mechanism utilized by bacteria to coordinate group behaviors and establish infections. QS is integral to bacterial survival, and therefore provides a unique target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, silicon dioxide nanoparticles (Si-NP) were engineered to target the signaling molecules [i.e., acylhomoserine lactones (HSLs)] used for QS in order to halt bacterial communication. Specifically, when Si-NP were surface functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), then added to cultures of bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), whose luminous output depends upon HSL-mediated QS, the cell-to-cell communication was dramatically reduced. Reductions in luminescence were further verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses of luminescence genes. Binding of HSLs to Si-NPs was examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicated that by delivering high concentrations of engineered NPs with associated quenching compounds, the chemical signals were removed from the immediate bacterial environment. In actively-metabolizing cultures, this treatment blocked the ability of bacteria to communicate and regulate QS, effectively silencing and isolating the cells. Si-NPs provide a scaffold and critical stepping-stone for more pointed developments in antimicrobial therapy, especially with regard to QS—a target that will reduce resistance pressures imposed by traditional antibiotics. PMID:25806030

  15. Theoretical study of time-resolved luminescence in semiconductors. III. Trap states in the band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Maiberg, Matthias Hölscher, Torsten; Zahedi-Azad, Setareh; Scheer, Roland

    2015-09-14

    In the third part of this series, we study the influence of trap states in the band gap of semiconductors on the time-resolved luminescence decay (TRL) after a pulsed excitation. The results based on simulations with Synopsys TCAD{sup ®} and analytical approximations are given for p-doped Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} as a working example. We show that a single trap can be mostly described by two parameters which are assigned to minority carrier capture and emission. We analyze their influence on the luminescence decay and study the difference between a single trap and an energetic Gaussian trap distribution. It is found that trap states artificially increase the TRL decay and obscure the recombination dynamics. Thus, there is a demand for experimental methods which can reveal the recombination of minority carriers in a TRL experiment without trapping effect. In this regard, a variation of the device temperature, the excitation frequency, the injection level, as well as a bias illumination may be promising approaches. We study these methods, discuss advantages and disadvantages, and show experimental TRL for prove of concept. At the end, we validate our approach of simulating only band-to-band radiative recombination although photoluminescence spectra often exhibit free-to-bound radiative recombination of charge carriers.

  16. [Determination of antibiotics using luminescent Escherichia coli and serum].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, I I; Asrieli, T V; Gavrilova, E M; Danilov, V S

    2007-01-01

    The methodical bases for detecting antibiotics using a bioluminescent assay and blood serum are briefed. Antibiotics inhibit the luminescence of a genetically engineered Escherichia coli strain. The degree of inhibition depended on the type of antibiotic, its concentration, and the time of cell incubation with antibiotic. The highest cell sensitivity was recorded towards the aminoglycoside antibiotics, which amounted to 85 +/- 10 ng/ml for gentamicin and streptomycin. The sensitivity of this system to a number of antibiotics essentially increased when the cells were previously activated with blood serum. The sensitivity of this method for gentamicin and streptomycin in the presence of blood serum amounted to 2.5 +/- 0.5 ng/ml; for tetracycline, 45 +/- 8 ng/ml. Use of the sera containing specific antibodies to the antibiotic detected provided a high sensitivity of the biosensor tested. Comparison of the luminescences of E. coli cells activated with normal and specific antisera upon incubation with an antibiotic allows the type of antibiotic and its quantitative content in the sample to be determined. Characteristic of the analysis of antibiotics with the help of recombinant E. coli are a high accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, simplicity, and a short time needed for measurement.

  17. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  18. EBIC and luminescence studies of defects in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Breitenstein, O; Bauer, J; Kittler, M; Arguirov, T; Seifert, W

    2008-01-01

    Electron beam-induced current (EBIC) can be used to detect electronic irregularities in solar cells, such as shunts and precipitates, and to perform physical characterization of defects by, e.g. measuring the temperature dependence of their recombination activity. Recently also luminescence methods such as electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) have been shown to provide useful information on crystal defects in solar cells. In this contribution it will be shown that the combined application of EBIC, EL and PL may deliver useful information on the presence and on the physical properties of crystal defects in silicon solar cells. Also pre-breakdown sites in multicrystalline cells can be investigated by reverse-bias EL and by microplasma-type EBIC, in comparison with lock-in thermography investigations.

  19. Spectral Characterization of a Novel Luminescent Organogel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waguespack, Yan; White, Shawn R.

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic-based luminescence experiments were designed to expose the students to various concepts of single-triplet excited states, electron spin, vibrational relaxation, fluorescence-phosphorescence lifetimes and quenching. The students were able to learn about luminescence spectra of the gel and have the experience of synthesizing a…

  20. Bacterial Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... very quickly, and if left untreated, can cause blindness. The bacteria usually responsible for this type of ... to intense ultraviolet radiation exposure, e.g. snow blindness or welder's arc eye). Next Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ...

  1. Luminescent gold nanoparticles for bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen

    Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable and diverse material properties hold great potential as contrast agents for better disease management. Over the past decades, luminescent gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with intrinsic emissions ranging from the visible to the near infrared have been synthesized and emerge as a new class of fluorophores for bioimaging. This dissertation aims to fundamentally understand the structure-property relationships in luminescent AuNPs and apply them as contrast agents to address some critical challenges in bioimaging at both the in vitro and in vivo level. In Chapter 2, we described the synthesized ~20 nm polycrystalline AuNPs (pAuNPs), which successfully integrated and enhanced plasmonic and fluorescence properties into a single AuNP through the grain size effect. The combination of these properties in one NP enabled AuNPs to serve as a multimodal contrast agent for in vitro optical microscopic imaging, making it possible to develop correlative microscopic imaging techniques. In Chapters 3-5, we proposed a feasible approach to optimize the in vivo kinetics and clearance profile of nanoprobes for multimodality in vivo bioimaging applications by using straightforward surface chemistry with luminescent AuNPs as a model. Luminescent glutathione-coated AuNPs of ~2 nm were synthesized. Investigation of the biodistribution showed that these glutathione-coated AuNPs (GS-AuNPs) exhibit stealthiness to the reticuloendothelial system (RES) organs and efficient renal clearance, with only 3.7+/-1.9% and 0.3+/-0.1% accumulating in the liver and spleen, and over 65% of the injection dose cleared out via the urine within the first 72 hours. In addition, ~2.5 nm NIR-emitting radioactive glutathione-coated [198Au]AuNPs (GS-[198Au]AuNPs) were synthesized for further evaluation of the pharmacokinetic profile of GS-AuNPs and potential multimodal imaging. The results showed that the GS-[198Au]AuNPs behave like small-molecule contrast agents in

  2. Bacterial population genetics, evolution and epidemiology.

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, B G; Maiden, M C

    1999-01-01

    Asexual bacterial populations inevitably consist of an assemblage of distinct clonal lineages. However, bacterial populations are not entirely asexual since recombinational exchanges occur, mobilizing small genome segments among lineages and species. The relative contribution of recombination, as opposed to de novo mutation, in the generation of new bacterial genotypes varies among bacterial populations and, as this contribution increases, the clonality of a given population decreases. In consequence, a spectrum of possible population structures exists, with few bacterial species occupying the extremes of highly clonal and completely non-clonal, most containing both clonal and non-clonal elements. The analysis of collections of bacterial isolates, which accurately represent the natural population, by nucleotide sequence determination of multiple housekeeping loci provides data that can be used both to investigate the population structure of bacterial pathogens and for the molecular characterization of bacterial isolates. Understanding the population structure of a given pathogen is important since it impacts on the questions that can be addressed by, and the methods and samples required for, effective molecular epidemiological studies. PMID:10365396

  3. Enhanced photocatalytic activity and persistent luminescence in Zn2GeO4:Mn2+ by Eu3+ doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Wang, Yinhai; Li, Lei; Huang, Haiju; Zhao, Hui; Hu, Zhengfa

    2016-09-01

    Zn2GeO4:Mn2+,Eu3+ and Zn2GeO4:Mn2+ powders were synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the structures and morphologies of the synthesized powders, respectively. The photocatalytic properties and long persistent luminescence performance were improved by Eu3+ doping. Thermoluminescent (TL) curves showed that the trap concentration in the material was increased with Eu3+ doping, which formed trap centers in Zn2GeO4:Mn2+. The trap centers can capture the electrons or holes and subsequently increase the separation of photogenerated electrons and holes by suppressing the recombination of captured electrons and holes; thus, resulting in an improved photocatalytic activity and a prolonged persistent luminescence. The present strategy may be used as a general method to improve the photocatalytic activity and persistent luminescence.

  4. Photoluminescence of Sm doped porous silicon—evidence for light emission through luminescence centers in SiO2 layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Zhang, L. Z.; Huang, Y. M.; Zhang, B. R.; Qin, G. G.

    1994-06-01

    After oxidation promoted by gamma-ray irradiation, in the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Sm doped porous silicon (PS), there are three sharp peaks, superimposed on a broad band, with wavelengths near to those of the Sm doped SiO2 [R. Morimo, T. Mizushima, and H. Okumura, J. Electrochem. Soc. 137, 2340 (1990)]. The experimental results indicate that Sm-related luminescence centers can be created within the oxide of porous silicon, and only in porous silicon with high porosity can the Sm-related luminescence be found in the SiO2 layer. This experimental result can be explained by the fact that the excitation of electron-hole pairs occurs in nanoscale silicon, and the recombination occurs at the Sm-related luminescence centers in SiO2 layers covering nanoscale silicon.

  5. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  6. Acid synthesis of luminescent amine-functionalized or erbium-doped silica spheres for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Enrichi, Francesco; Trave, Enrico; Bersani, Marco

    2008-03-01

    In this work we discuss and investigate the morphological and optical properties of luminescent silica spheres which can have interesting applications in bioimaging and biosensing. The spheres are synthesized following an acid route by the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylortosilicate (TEOS) and can be functionalized by incorporation of aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) during the synthesis, inducing a significant luminescence that can be attributed to a recombination mechanism from localized organic defects related to -NH(2) groups. It is shown that the acid synthesis route produces very regular spherical particles, but their diameter vary in the range of 200-4,000 nm. The luminescence properties have been investigated and optimized by variation of the annealing temperature for the functionalized spheres, obtaining the most efficient PL emission after a thermal treatment of 1 h at 600 degrees C in air. Moreover, the possibility to introduce rare earths like erbium in the spheres was also studied and the corresponding Er(3) luminescence emission at 1.53 microm is reported in terms of intensity and lifetime, pointing out that erbium can be easily and efficiently incorporated during the acid synthesis giving high PL intensity with a good lifetime of 3.9 ms.

  7. Solid-surface luminescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtubise, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    We have characterized several interactions that are very important in solid-matrix luminescence. With silica gel chromatoplates and filter paper, simple equations were derived for calculating the individual contributions to the percent decrease in luminescence due to either moisture or to a quenching gas. For sodium acetate as a solid matrix and p-aminobenzoate as a model compound, it was concluded that p-aminobenzoate was incorporated into the crystal structure of sodium acetate, and the triplet energy was lost be skeletal vibrations in sodium acetate. Also, with the same system is was shown that p-aminobenzoate did not undergo rotational relaxation, and thus rotational processes did not contribute to the deactivation of the triplet state. Several results were obtained from model compounds adsorbed on filter paper under different temperature and humidity conditions and with a variety of heavy atoms present. Fundamental photophysical equations were used in calculating several basic parameters that revealed information on rate processes and how the absorbed energy was distributed in an adsorbed lumiphor. The most important advancement with filter paper was the development of equations that relate phosphorescence parameters of adsorbed phosphors to the Young's modulus of filter paper. These equations are based on a fundamental theory that relates the hydrogen-bonding network of paper to the modulus of paper.

  8. Functional silk: colored and luminescent.

    PubMed

    Tansil, Natalia C; Koh, Leng Duei; Han, Ming-Yong

    2012-03-15

    Silkworm silk is among the most widely used natural fibers for textile and biomedical applications due to its extraordinary mechanical properties and superior biocompatibility. A number of physical and chemical processes have also been developed to reconstruct silk into various forms or to artificially produce silk-like materials. In addition to the direct use and the delicate replication of silk's natural structure and properties, there is a growing interest to introduce more new functionalities into silk while maintaining its advantageous intrinsic properties. In this review we assess various methods and their merits to produce functional silk, specifically those with color and luminescence, through post-processing steps as well as biological approaches. There is a highlight on intrinsically colored and luminescent silk produced directly from silkworms for a wide range of applications, and a discussion on the suitable molecular properties for being incorporated effectively into silk while it is being produced in the silk gland. With these understanding, a new generation of silk containing various functional materials (e.g., drugs, antibiotics and stimuli-sensitive dyes) would be produced for novel applications such as cancer therapy with controlled release feature, wound dressing with monitoring/sensing feature, tissue engineering scaffolds with antibacterial, anticoagulant or anti-inflammatory feature, and many others.

  9. Development of luminescent bacteria as tracers for geological reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    Bioluminescent cultures were acquired and tested for use as biological tracers for reservoir characterization by small independent oil companies. Initially these bacterial cultures were fastidious to work with, but when we finally determined their critical growth parameters simple test variations were developed that could be routinely accomplished. The intensity of their luminescence is easily distinguished by the human eye and requires no sophisticated technical knowledge or instrumentation. Cultures were received from culture banks and collected from marine environments. In our laboratory they were screened using the criteria of optimum growth and luminescence. Three stock cultures proved to grow profusely even when variations were made in nutrient additions, salts, and temperature. These three selected cultures were not inhibited when introduced to formations and formation waters and were not overgrown by other bacteria. Cultures isolated from the Gulf of Mexico were overgrown by indigenous bacteria and therefore, they were eliminated from further screening and adaption. Experiments were performed according to three major task descriptions: 1. Establish growth and luminescencing limitations of selected bacteria in various media, varying salt concentration and temperature. 2. Adapt cultures to formation waters. 3. Determine transport limitations of bioluminescent bacteria through representative reservoir cores. 19 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Bacterial rheotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Marcos; Fu, Henry C.; Powers, Thomas R.; Stocker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    The motility of organisms is often directed in response to environmental stimuli. Rheotaxis is the directed movement resulting from fluid velocity gradients, long studied in fish, aquatic invertebrates, and spermatozoa. Using carefully controlled microfluidic flows, we show that rheotaxis also occurs in bacteria. Excellent quantitative agreement between experiments with Bacillus subtilis and a mathematical model reveals that bacterial rheotaxis is a purely physical phenomenon, in contrast to fish rheotaxis but in the same way as sperm rheotaxis. This previously unrecognized bacterial taxis results from a subtle interplay between velocity gradients and the helical shape of flagella, which together generate a torque that alters a bacterium's swimming direction. Because this torque is independent of the presence of a nearby surface, bacterial rheotaxis is not limited to the immediate neighborhood of liquid–solid interfaces, but also takes place in the bulk fluid. We predict that rheotaxis occurs in a wide range of bacterial habitats, from the natural environment to the human body, and can interfere with chemotaxis, suggesting that the fitness benefit conferred by bacterial motility may be sharply reduced in some hydrodynamic conditions. PMID:22411815

  11. Upconversion luminescence in Yb 3+-doped yttrium aluminum garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Zhao, Zhiwei; Song, Pingxin; Jiang, Benxue; Zhou, Guoqing; Xu, Jun; Deng, Peizhen; Bourdet, Gilbert; Christophe Chanteloup, Jean; Zou, Ji-Ping; Fulop, Annabelle

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we present results on upconversion luminescence performed on Yb 3+-doped yttrium aluminum garnets under 940 nm excitation. The upconversion luminescence was ascribed to Yb 3+ cooperative luminescence and the presence of rare earth impurity ions. The cooperative luminescence spectra as a function of Yb concentration were measured and the emission intensity variation with Yb concentration was discussed. Yb 3+ energy migration quenched the cooperative luminescence of Yb:YAG crystals with doping level over 15 at%.

  12. Studying bacterial quorum-sensing at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino Perez, Pablo; Pelakh, Leslie; Young, Jonathan; Johnson, Elaine; Hagen, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    Like many bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri can detect its own population density through a quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The bacterium releases a signal molecule (AI, autoinducer), which accumulates at high population density and triggers a genetic switch. In V.fischeri this leads to bioluminescence. Little is known about how stochastic gene expression affects QS at the level of single cells. We are imaging the luminescence of individual V.fischeri cells in a flow chamber and directly measuring the intercell variability in AI activation of the QS circuit. Our single-cell luminescence experiments allow us to track cells over time and characterize variations in their response to AI levels. We find heterogeneous response to the external signal: at a given AI concentration some cells may be strongly luminescent while others are virtually dark. The analysis of noise in the individual cell response can eventually lead to a better understanding of how cells use QS to gather information about their environment.

  13. THE RHIC HYDROGEN JET LUMINESCENCE MONITOR.

    SciTech Connect

    RUSSO,T.; BELLAVIA, S.; GASSNER, D.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; TSANG, T.

    2007-06-25

    A hydrogen jet polarimeter was developed for the RHIC accelerator to improve the process of measuring polarization. Particle beams intersecting with gas molecules can produce light by the process known as luminescence. This light can then be focused, collected, and processed giving important information such as size, position, emittance, motion, and other parameters. The RHIC hydrogen jet polarimeter was modified in 2005 with specialized optics, vacuum windows, light transport, and a new camera system making it possible to monitor the luminescence produced by polarized protons intersecting the hydrogen beam. This paper describes the configuration and preliminary measurements taken using the RHIC hydrogen jet polarimeter as a luminescence monitor.

  14. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuto, H. Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.; Musumeci, F.

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  15. Negative luminescence from In1 - xAlxSb and Cdx Hg1 - x Te diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, T.; Elliott, C. T.; Gordon, N. T.; Hall, R. S.; Johnson, A. D.; Pryce, G. J.

    1995-12-01

    Indium aluminium antimonide (In 1- xAl xSb) and cadmium mercury telluride (Cd xHg 1- xTe) heterostructure diodes, which comprise a near intrinsic active region bounded by more highly doped contact regions, exhibit positive or negative luminescence at medium to long infrared wavelengths when forward or reverse biased respectively at room temperature. In reverse bias, the carrier densities in the near intrinsic region are reduced below their equilibrium values by the effects of exclusion and extraction. In consequence, the radiative recombination is reduced and the devices emit less infrared radiation than the thermal equilibrium value. The observed intensity of the negative luminescence is in general agreement with expected values.

  16. Coherent magnetic resonance of nanocrystal quantum-dot luminescence as a window to blinking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    van Schooten, Kipp J; Boehme, Christoph; Lupton, John M

    2014-06-23

    Blinking of colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots, random intermittency in the stream of photons emitted by single particles, has long commanded the curiosity of researchers. Why does the particle suddenly shut off, and what are the pathways to quench emission? Single-particle microscopy is not the only way to approach these fundamental questions on the interaction of light and matter: time-domain sub-ensemble spectroscopies can also yield relevant information on microscopic electronic processes. We illustrate recent advances in pulsed optically detected magnetic resonance and highlight the conceptual relevance to unravelling mechanisms controlling intermittency on the single-particle level. Magnetic resonance reveals two distinct luminescence quenching channels, which appear to be related to those previously surmised from single-particle studies: a trapped charge-separated state in which the exciton is quenched by dissociation and the particle remains neutral; and a charged state of the particle in which spin-dependent Auger recombination quenches luminescence.

  17. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) of Tooth Enamel and its Potential Use in Post-Radiation Exposure Triage

    PubMed Central

    DeWitt, R.; Klein, D. M.; Yukihara, E. G.; Simon, S. L.; McKeever, S. W. S.

    2009-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) properties of dental enamel are discussed with a view to the development of an in-vivo dose assessment technique for medical triage following a radiological/nuclear accident or terrorist event. In the OSL technique, past radiation exposure is assessed by stimulating the sample with light of one wavelength and monitoring the luminescence at another wavelength under the assumption that the luminescence originates from the recombination of radiation-induced charges trapped at metastable defects in the enamel and that the intensity of the luminescence signal is in proportion to the absorbed radiation dose. Several primary findings emerged from this research: (a) sensitivities varied considerably between different teeth and also between fragments of the same tooth, (b) OSL signals were found to decay rapidly during the first 12 hours after irradiation and slower afterwards, (c) the fading rate of the luminescence signal varied between fragments, (d) blue light stimulation yields greater sensitivity than infra-red stimulation, while the OSL signal obtained with a high-intensity pulsed green-light laser was found to be not correlated with the radiation dose. Significant challenges remain to developing a practical in-vivo technique including the development of calibration procedures and lowering minimum detectable doses. PMID:20065717

  18. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  19. Cell probing by delayed luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, Francesco; Ballerini, Monica; Baroni, Giuliana; Costato, Michele; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Milani, Marziale; Scordino, Agata; Triglia, Antonio

    1999-05-01

    Delayed luminescence (D.L.) is a measure that provides important information on biological systems fields, structures and activities, by counting impinging and emitted photons. Many recent experimental works have shown the existence of a close connection, sometimes analytically expressed between the biological state of the system and D.L. parameters. Our investigations aim to show that D.L. is a workable analytical technique covering a large number of disciplinary fields, from agriculture to pollution control and from medical diagnostics to food quality control. The authors have conducted systematic research about D.L. from unicellular alga Acetabularia acetabulum to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cultures and about more complex systems such as Soya seed (Glycine max, L.) and its dependence on sample preparation, history, intracellular signaling, metabolism and pollutant presence. We will discuss the most relevant results together with theoretical considerations on the basic interaction at work between biological systems and electromagnetic fields.

  20. Endoscopic imaging of Cerenkov luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Liu, Hongguang; Liao, Joseph C.; Cheng, Zhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate feasibility of endoscopic imaging of Cerenkov light originated when charged nuclear particles, emitted from radionuclides, travel through a biological tissue of living subjects at superluminal velocity. The endoscopy imaging system consists of conventional optical fiber bundle/ clinical endoscopes, an optical imaging lens system, and a sensitive low-noise charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Our systematic studies using phantom samples show that Cerenkov light from as low as 1 µCi of radioactivity emitted from 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) can be coupled and transmitted through conventional optical fibers and endoscopes. In vivo imaging experiments with tumor bearing mice, intravenously administered with 18F-FDG, further demonstrated that Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy is a promising new tool in the field of endoscopic molecular imaging. PMID:22741069

  1. Luminescent iron clusters in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Nirmal; Baksi, Ananya; Giri, Anupam; Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Basu, Gautam; Pradeep, Thalappil; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Metal clusters, composed of a few atoms at the core, exhibit unique properties and have potential applications. Although atomically precise clusters of noble metals have been synthesized, analogous systems of reactive metals, such as iron, have not been realized in solution due to high reactivity. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of novel iron clusters in the hemoglobin matrix that are highly luminescent (quantum yield 10% at 565 nm). The super-paramagnetic iron clusters, after successful ligand exchange from protein and phase transfer from water to chloroform using tri-octylphosphineoxide (TOPO), were detected as [Fe10(TOPO)3(H2O)3]+, [Fe13(TOPO)2(H2O)]+ and [Fe8(TOPO)(H2O)2]+ by mass spectrometry. This study lays the groundwork for exploiting unique properties of soluble iron clusters.Metal clusters, composed of a few atoms at the core, exhibit unique properties and have potential applications. Although atomically precise clusters of noble metals have been synthesized, analogous systems of reactive metals, such as iron, have not been realized in solution due to high reactivity. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of novel iron clusters in the hemoglobin matrix that are highly luminescent (quantum yield 10% at 565 nm). The super-paramagnetic iron clusters, after successful ligand exchange from protein and phase transfer from water to chloroform using tri-octylphosphineoxide (TOPO), were detected as [Fe10(TOPO)3(H2O)3]+, [Fe13(TOPO)2(H2O)]+ and [Fe8(TOPO)(H2O)2]+ by mass spectrometry. This study lays the groundwork for exploiting unique properties of soluble iron clusters. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05784d

  2. Orbital surveys of solar stimulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemphill, W. R.; Theisen, A. F.; Tyson, R. M.; Granata, J. S.

    The Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) is an electro-optical device for imaging natural and manmade materials which have been stimulated to luminesce by the sun. An airborne FLD has been used to detect geochemically stressed vegetation, drought-stressed agricultural crops, industrial and residential pollution effluents, marine oil seeps, phosphate rock, uranium-bearing sandstone, and bioluminescent ocean plankton. Three-dimensional perspective plots of excitation and emission spectra, measured with a laboratory spectrometer, graphically depict similarities and differences in luminescence properties between sample materials. The laboratory data also include luminescence intensities at six Fraunhofer lines in the visible and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Both the airborne and laboratory data suggest the feasibility of delineating and monitoring at least some of these luminescing materials from orbital altitude, such as a test flight aboard the Space Shuttle using an improved third-generation FLD.

  3. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  4. Persistent luminescence in Ba{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl:Eu{sup 2+},R{sup 3+} (R = Y, La, Ce, Gd, Tb and Lu)

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Guifang; Hu, Yihua Chen, Li; Wang, Xiaojuan; Mu, Zhongfei

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The persistent luminescence in Ba{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl:Eu{sup 2+},R{sup 3+} was reported. • The influences of auxiliary codopants was discussed. • The concentration quenching of persistent luminescence was discussed. - Abstract: We investigated the persistent luminescence in europium-doped barium chloroapatite upon codoping with auxiliary rare earth ions. Luminescence properties of the phosphors, including photoluminescence, luminescence decay, and thermoluminescence are systematically studied. We formulated a model of persistent luminescence on the basis of the experimental results. In our model, some Eu{sup 2+} ions are oxidized to Eu{sup 3+} under short UV excitation, and the released electrons are trapped at the positive defect. The persistent luminescence arises from the recombination of these trapped electrons with the photo-ionized Eu{sup 3+} ions. The influence of auxiliary codopants was discussed in terms of ionic potential and ionic radius. Eventually, the concentration quenching of persistent luminescence was reported and discussed.

  5. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Jin, Dayong; Piper, James; Vallarino, Lidia M.; Williams, John W.; Yang, Sean; Zucker, Robert M.

    2008-02-01

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including microscopes. Methods: 0.5, 3, and 5 micron (µm) beads containing a luminescent europium-complex were manufactured and the luminescence distribution of the 5 µm beads was measured with a time-delayed luminescence flow cytometer and a timedelayed digital microscope. The distribution of the luminescence intensity from the europium-complex in individual beads was determined on optical sections by confocal microscopy. The emission spectra of the beads under UV excitation were determined with a PARISS® spectrophotometer. The kinetics of the luminescence bleaching caused by UV irradiation were measured under LED excitation with a fluorescence microscope. Results: The kinetics of UV bleaching were very similar for the 0.5, 3, and 5 µm beads. Emission peaks were found at 592, 616, and 685 nanometers (nm). The width of the principal peak at half-maximum (616 nm) was 9.9 nm. The luminescence lifetimes in water and in air were 340 and 460 microseconds (µs), respectively. The distribution of the europium- complex in the beads was homogeneous. Conclusions: The 5 µm beads can be used for spectral calibration of microscopes equipped with a spectrograph, as test particles for time-delayed luminescence flow cytometers, and possibly as labels for macromolecules and cells.

  6. Luminescence conversion of blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlotter, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN/6HSiC chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white emitting LEDs. The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence down-conversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic luminescent dye molecules. A white emitting LED, using an inorganic converter, Y3Al5O12:Ce3+( ), has also been realized.

  7. Luminescence dating of quaternary sediments: recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duller, G. A. T.

    2004-02-01

    Luminescence dating is unique amongst geochronological methods in dating the deposition of sediments based upon the properties of the constituent minerals. For Quaternary sediments the event being dated is the last exposure of the grains to daylight, and an implicit assumption is that this exposure was sufficient to remove any pre-existing signal. Until recently it has been difficult to test this assumption, other than by dating samples from a given depositional context with an age that is known from independent methods. There have been a series of technological and methodological developments in the past 5-10 yr that make it possible to undertake many replicate measurements of the luminescence from a single sample and hence to explicitly test whether for a specific sample all the grains had their luminescence signal reset at deposition. This allows the reliability of the luminescence age to be assessed. Where all the grains in a sample were not exposed to sufficient daylight to reset their luminescence signal, the apparent age will be an average value of the luminescence from all the grains measured at one time. Where many grains are measured simultaneously, this will overestimate the depositional age. The distribution of apparent age can be made clear by reducing the number of grains being measured in a given experiment, ultimately to the point of measuring individual sand-sized mineral grains. Copyright

  8. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  9. Genetic Analysis of Fusion Recombinants in Bacillus Subtilis: Function of the Rece Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ftouhi, N.; Guillen, N.

    1990-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis protoplast fusion allows the study of the genetic recombination of an entire procaryotic genome. Protoplasts from bacterial strains marked genetically by chromosomal mutations were fused using polyethylene glycol and the regenerated cells analyzed. Recombinants represent 19.3% of heterozygotic cells; they are haploids. Individual characterization of clones show a unique particular phenotype in each colony suggesting that recombination takes place immediately after fusion, probably before the first cellular division. Recombination occurs in the whole chromosome; in one-third of the cases both reciprocal recombinants could be shown in the colony. The genetic interval that includes the chromosome replication origin shows the highest recombination level. Our results suggest that the RecE protein accounts for most of the fused protoplast recombination; however, some ``replication origin-specific'' recombination events were independent of the recE gene product. PMID:2123461

  10. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  11. Recombination and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Hawkins, Michelle; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The links between recombination and replication have been appreciated for decades and it is now generally accepted that these two fundamental aspects of DNA metabolism are inseparable: Homologous recombination is essential for completion of DNA replication and vice versa. This review focuses on the roles that recombination enzymes play in underpinning genome duplication, aiding replication fork movement in the face of the many replisome barriers that challenge genome stability. These links have many conserved features across all domains of life, reflecting the conserved nature of the substrate for these reactions, DNA. PMID:25341919

  12. The Landscape of Realized Homologous Recombination in Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Koji; Didelot, Xavier; Jolley, Keith A.; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Maiden, Martin C.J.; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Falush, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Recombination enhances the adaptive potential of organisms by allowing genetic variants to be tested on multiple genomic backgrounds. Its distribution in the genome can provide insight into the evolutionary forces that underlie traits, such as the emergence of pathogenicity. Here, we examined landscapes of realized homologous recombination of 500 genomes from ten bacterial species and found all species have “hot” regions with elevated rates relative to the genome average. We examined the size, gene content, and chromosomal features associated with these regions and the correlations between closely related species. The recombination landscape is variable and evolves rapidly. For example in Salmonella, only short regions of around 1 kb in length are hot whereas in the closely related species Escherichia coli, some hot regions exceed 100 kb, spanning many genes. Only Streptococcus pyogenes shows evidence for the positive correlation between GC content and recombination that has been reported for several eukaryotes. Genes with function related to the cell surface/membrane are often found in recombination hot regions but E. coli is the only species where genes annotated as “virulence associated” are consistently hotter. There is also evidence that some genes with “housekeeping” functions tend to be overrepresented in cold regions. For example, ribosomal proteins showed low recombination in all of the species. Among specific genes, transferrin-binding proteins are recombination hot in all three of the species in which they were found, and are subject to interspecies recombination. PMID:26516092

  13. Monitoring Temperatures of Tires Using Luminescent Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J

    2006-01-01

    A method of noncontact, optical monitoring of the surface temperature of a tire has been devised to enable the use of local temperature rise as an indication of potential or impending failures. The method involves the use of temperature-sensitive paint (or filler): Temperature-sensitive luminescent dye molecules or other luminescent particles are incorporated into a thin, flexible material coating the tire surface of interest. (Alternatively, in principle, the luminescent material could be incorporated directly into the tire rubber, though this approach has not yet been tested.) The coated surface is illuminated with shorter-wavelength light to excite longer-wavelength luminescence, which is observed by use of a charge-coupled-device camera or a photodetector (see Figure 1). If temporally constant illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the intensity response of the luminescence. If pulsed illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the time or frequency response of the luminescence. If sinusoidally varying illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the phase response of the luminescence. Unlike a prior method of monitoring the temperature at a fixed spot on a tire by use of a thermocouple, this method is not restricted to one spot and can, therefore, yield information on the spatial distribution of temperature: in particular, it enables the discovery of newly forming hot spots where damage may be starting. Also unlike in the thermocouple method, the measurements in this method are not vulnerable to breakage of wires in repeated flexing of the tire. Moreover, unlike in another method in which infrared radiation is monitored as an indication of surface temperature, the luminescence measurements in this method are not significantly affected by changes in infrared emissivity. This method has been

  14. Bioluminescent microassay of various metabolites using bacterial luciferase co-immobilized with multienzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Ugarova, N N; Lebedeva, O V; Frumkina, I G

    1988-09-01

    Co-immobilization methods have been developed for a bienzymatic system of luminescent Beneckea harveyi bacteria with formate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglucomutase. Bioluminescent assays have been devised for NADH, NAD, FMN, glucose 6-phosphate, and glucose 1-phosphate using the co-immobilized enzyme preparation. The lowest detection limits were in the picomole range with the bacterial extract and in the femtomole range with the partially purified enzymes, bacterial luciferase, and NADH:FMN oxidoreductase. PMID:3263818

  15. Recombinant protein blends: silk beyond natural design.

    PubMed

    Dinjaski, Nina; Kaplan, David L

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant DNA technology and new material concepts are shaping future directions in biomaterial science for the design and production of the next-generation biomaterial platforms. Aside from conventionally used synthetic polymers, numerous natural biopolymers (e.g., silk, elastin, collagen, gelatin, alginate, cellulose, keratin, chitin, polyhydroxyalkanoates) have been investigated for properties and manipulation via bioengineering. Genetic engineering provides a path to increase structural and functional complexity of these biopolymers, and thereby expand the catalog of available biomaterials beyond that which exists in nature. In addition, the integration of experimental approaches with computational modeling to analyze sequence-structure-function relationships is starting to have an impact in the field by establishing predictive frameworks for determining material properties. Herein, we review advances in recombinant DNA-mediated protein production and functionalization approaches, with a focus on hybrids or combinations of proteins; recombinant protein blends or 'recombinamers'. We highlight the potential biomedical applications of fibrous protein recombinamers, such as Silk-Elastin Like Polypeptides (SELPs) and Silk-Bacterial Collagens (SBCs). We also discuss the possibility for the rationale design of fibrous proteins to build smart, stimuli-responsive biomaterials for diverse applications. We underline current limitations with production systems for these proteins and discuss the main trends in systems/synthetic biology that may improve recombinant fibrous protein design and production. PMID:26686863

  16. Defects and Luminescence in Lithium FLUORIDE:MAGNESIUM, Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shulin Sam

    This research investigated the characteristics of the defect centers produced by ionizing radiation in LiF:Mg,Ti and the mechanism of the luminescence associated with the defect centers. Experimental methods used in this work include the measurement of the optical absorption of the defect centers (produced by gamma ray irradiation) under thermal annealing treatment and optical bleaching treatment, the photoluminescence (after irradiation with gamma rays and/or neutrons) and the thermoluminescence (after irradiation with gamma rays and/or beta particles) related to the defect centers. It has been concluded that both Mg^{+2} ions and Ti^{+4} ions act as electron traps in LiF. Upon ionizing irradiation, a Mg ^{+2} ion can trap two electrons to form a Mg^{0} center absorbing at 3.25 eV in LiF and one electron to form a Mg^{+} center which absorbs at 3.5 eV, and a Mg^{+} center in a vacancy complex environment absorbs at 4.0 eV, in contrast to the Z center model and the Mg ^{+2}{rm V}_{ rm c}^{-} pair/trimer model. The absorption band near 5.5 eV in LiF:Mg,Ti produced by ionizing radiation at room temperature is attributed to Ti^{+3} ions (formed by Ti^{+4} ion's trapping of one electron) related charge transfer absorption. It could also be a result of the optical absorption of Z _3 centers and/or Mg^{+2 }{rm V}_{rm c} ^{-} dimers, trimers produced by thermal annealing and optical bleaching following irradiation. The mechanism of the luminescence spectra associated with these defect centers upon either optical excitation or thermal stimulation is concluded to be due to an electron-hole recombination process with the perturbation of vacancies and/or impurities. During the electron-hole recombination process, electrons originate from all electron traps (F center and its aggregates, Mg^{+2} ion and Ti^{+4} ion related defect centers) while hole centers are only V_3 centers if irradiated at room temperature, and include both V_{rm K} centers and V_3 center if irradiated at

  17. Detection of Bacterial Spores with Lanthanide-Macrocycle Binary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Morgan L.; Kirby, James P.; Levine, Dana J.; Manary, Micah J.; Gray, Harry B.; Ponce, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The detection of bacterial spores via dipicolinate-triggered lanthanide luminescence has been improved in terms of detection limit, stability, and susceptibility to interferents by use of lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes. Specifically, we compared the effectiveness of Sm, Eu, Tb and Dy complexes with the macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetate (DO2A) to the corresponding lanthanide aquo ions. The Ln(DO2A)+ binary complexes bind dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major constituent of bacterial spores, with greater affinity and demonstrate significant improvement in bacterial spore detection. Of the four luminescent lanthanides studied, the terbium complex exhibits the greatest dipicolinate binding affinity (100-fold greater than Tb3+ alone, and 10-fold greater than other Ln(DO2A)+ complexes) and highest quantum yield. Moreover, the inclusion of DO2A extends the pH range over which Tb-DPA coordination is stable, reduces the interference of calcium ions nearly 5-fold, and mitigates phosphate interference 1000-fold compared to free terbium alone. In addition, detection of Bacillus atrophaeus bacterial spores was improved by the use of Tb(DO2A)+, yielding a 3-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio over Tb3+. Out of the eight cases investigated, the Tb(DO2A)+ binary complex is best for the detection of bacterial spores. PMID:19537757

  18. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  19. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  20. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  1. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  2. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  3. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  4. Luminescent Mycena: new and noteworthy species.

    PubMed

    Desjardin, Dennis E; Perry, Brian A; Lodge, D Jean; Stevani, Cassius V; Nagasawa, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    Seven species of Mycena are reported as luminescent, representing specimens collected in Belize, Brazil, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Japan (Bonin Islands), Malaysia (Borneo) and Puerto Rico. Four of them represent new species (Mycena luxaeterna, M. luxarboricola, M. luxperpetua, M. silvaelucens) and three represent new reports of luminescence in previously described species (M. aff. abieticola, M. aspratilis, M. margarita). Mycena subepipterygia is synonymized with M. margarita, and M. chlorinosma is proposed as a possible synonym. Comprehensive descriptions, illustrations, photographs and comparisons with phenetically similar species are provided. A redescription of M. chlorophos, based on analyses of type specimens and recently collected topotypical material, is provided. The addition of these seven new or newly reported luminescent species of Mycena brings the total to 71 known bioluminescent species of fungi.

  5. Luminescence blinking of a reacting quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Routzahn, Aaron L; Jain, Prashant K

    2015-04-01

    Luminescence blinking is an inherent feature of optical emission from individual fluorescent molecules and quantum dots. There have been intense efforts, although not with complete resolution, toward the understanding of the mechanistic origin of blinking and also its mitigation in quantum dots. As an advance in our microscopic view of blinking, we show that the luminescence blinking of a quantum dot becomes unusually heavy in the temporal vicinity of a reactive transformation. This stage of heavy blinking is a result of defects/dopants formed within the quantum dot on its path to conversion. The evolution of blinking behavior along the reaction path allows us to measure the lifetime of the critical dopant-related intermediate in the reaction. This work establishes luminescence blinking as a single-nanocrystal level probe of catalytic, photocatalytic, and electrochemical events occurring in the solid-state or on semiconductor surfaces.

  6. Luminescence of europium (III) complexes for visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolontaeva, Olga A.; Pozharov, Mikhail V.; Korolovich, Vladimir F.; Khokhlova, Anastasia R.; Kirdyanova, Anna N.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.; Zakharova, Tamara V.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-04-01

    With the purpose to develop bright non-toxic luminescent label for theranostic application we have studied complexation of lanthanide dipicolinates (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylates) by sodium alginate and effect of thermal exposure of synthesized micro-capsules on their luminescent properties. Synthesized micro-capsules are stable in acidic medium but dissolve at pH ~ 4 due to transformation of cationic europium dipicolinate complex to anionic. Luminescence studies have shown that emission spectra of europium(III)-alginate complexes (both chloride and dipicolinate) contain two intensive bands characteristic to Eu3+ ion (5D0 --> 7F1 (590 nm) and 5D0 --> 7F1 (612 nm)). We have also found that at 160ºC europium(III)- alginate micro-capsules decompose to black, soot-like substance, therefore, their thermal treatment must be performed in closed environment (i.e., sealed ampoules).

  7. Spectral luminescence analysis of amniotic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Kasko, Leonid P.; Mamontova, Marina V.; Chernitsky, Eugene A.

    1997-12-01

    It is shown that the amniotic fluid has intensive ultra-violet luminescence caused by proteins. Along with it amniotic fluid radiated in the field of 380 - 650 nm with maxima at 430 - 450 nm and 520 - 560 nm. The first peak of luminescence ((lambda) exc equals 350 nm; (lambda) em equals 430 - 440 nm) is caused (most probably) by the presence in amniotic fluid of some hormones, NADH2 and NADPH2. A more long-wave component ((lambda) exc equals 460 nm; (lambda) em equals 520 - 560 nm) is most likely connected with the presence in amniotic fluid pigments (bilirubin connected with protein and other). It is shown that intensity and maximum of ultra-violet luminescence spectra of amniotic fluid in normality and at pathology are identical. However both emission spectra and excitation spectra of long-wave ((lambda) greater than 450 nm) luminescence of amniotic fluid from pregnant women with such prenatal abnormal developments of a fetus as anencephaly and spina bifida are too long-wave region in comparison with the norm. Results of research testify that spectral luminescent analysis of amniotic fluid can be used for screening of malformations of the neural tube. It is very difficult for a practical obstetrician to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of the fetus. Apart from ultrasonic examination, cytogenetic examination of amniotic fluid and defumination of concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein and acetylcholin-esterases in the amniotic fluid and blood plasma are the most widely used diagnostic approaches. However, biochemical and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are time-consuming. In the present work spectral luminescence properties of the amniotic fluid are investigated to determine spectral parameters that can be used to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of their offsprings.

  8. Luminescence of apollo 11 lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Greenman, N N; Gross, H G

    1970-01-30

    Luminescence measurements were made of four lunar rocks, two terrestrial rocks (granite and gabbro), and one terrestrial mineral (willemite) by comparing the spectral curves with the curve of a barium sulfate standard. Efficiencies with 3000 angstrom excitation were < 6 x 10(-5) for the lunar samples, < 8 x 10(-5) for gabbro of very similar composition to the lunar samples, approximately 10(-4) for granite, and approximately 2 X 10(-2) for willemite. If these are typical values for other ultraviolet excitation wavelengths, the Apollo 11 site appears to contribute little to the observed lunar luminescence.

  9. Luminescence of apollo 11 lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Greenman, N N; Gross, H G

    1970-01-30

    Luminescence measurements were made of four lunar rocks, two terrestrial rocks (granite and gabbro), and one terrestrial mineral (willemite) by comparing the spectral curves with the curve of a barium sulfate standard. Efficiencies with 3000 angstrom excitation were < 6 x 10(-5) for the lunar samples, < 8 x 10(-5) for gabbro of very similar composition to the lunar samples, approximately 10(-4) for granite, and approximately 2 X 10(-2) for willemite. If these are typical values for other ultraviolet excitation wavelengths, the Apollo 11 site appears to contribute little to the observed lunar luminescence. PMID:17781561

  10. Simultaneous Luminescence Pressure and Temperature Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simultaneous luminescence pressure and temperature mapping system is developed including improved dye application techniques for surface temperature and pressure measurements from 5 torr to 1000 torr with possible upgrade to from 0.5 torr to several atmospheres with improved camera resolution. Adsorbed perylene dye on slip-cast silica is pressure (oxygen) sensitive and reusable to relatively high temperatures (approximately 150 C). Adsorbed luminescence has an approximately linear color shift with temperature, which can be used for independent temperature mapping and brightness pressure calibration with temperature.

  11. Simultaneous Luminescence Pressure and Temperature Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A simultaneous luminescence pressure and temperature mapping system is developed including improved dye application techniques for surface temperature and pressure measurements from 5 torr to 1000 torr with possible upgrade to from 0.5 torr to several atmospheres with improved camera resolution. Adsorbed perylene dye on slip-cast silica is pressure (oxygen) sensitive and reusable to relatively high temperatures (-150 C). Adsorbed luminescence has an approximately linear color shift with temperature, which can be used for independent temperature mapping and brightness pressure calibration with temperature.

  12. Purification of recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant ovalbumin expressed in bacterial host is essentially free from post-translational modifications and can be useful in understanding the structure-function relationship of the protein. In this study, ovalbumin was expressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. Ovalbumin inclusion bodies were solubilized using urea and refolded by decreasing the urea concentration by dilution. Refolded protein was purified by anion exchange chromatography. Overall recovery of purified recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies was about 30% with 98% purity. Purified recombinant ovalbumin was characterized by mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Recombinant ovalbumin was shown to be resistant to trypsin using protease resistance assay. This indicated proper refolding of ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of E. coli. This method provides a simple way of producing ovalbumin free of post-translational modifications.

  13. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  14. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    2001-07-01

    The septic arthritis literature of 2000 revisited several topics previously examined in some detail. These include septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatic manifestations of bacterial endocarditis, and infectious complications of prosthetic joints. The trend in antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent late infections in total joint replacement is to narrow the targeted hosts to those most at risk, to define the procedures associated with the greatest risk of bacteremia, and to simplify the antibiotic regimen. The diagnoses of septic arthritis of the lumbar facet joint and septic arthritis caused by direct inoculation of bacteria by a foreign object penetrating the joint are facilitated by noninvasive imaging technologies. Septic arthritis caused by uncommon microorganisms and septic arthritis in immunocompromised hosts are other noteworthy topics in this year's literature. PMID:11555734

  15. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Colosimo, A M; Anwand, W; Boatner, L A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, T T; Liedke, M O; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F A

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials. PMID:27550235

  16. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials. PMID:27550235

  17. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Colosimo, A M; Anwand, W; Boatner, L A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, T T; Liedke, M O; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F A

    2016-08-23

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  18. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-08-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  19. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Krawiec, S; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction between a large plasmid and a second chromosome is discussed. Recent information on repeated sequences and chromosomal rearrangements is presented. The growing understanding of limitations on the rearrangements that can be tolerated by bacteria and those that cannot is summarized, and the sensitive region flanking the terminator loci is described. Sources and types of genetic variation in bacteria are listed, from simple single nucleotide mutations to intragenic and intergenic recombinations. A model depicting the dynamics of the evolution and genetic activity of the bacterial chromosome is described which entails acquisition by recombination of clonal segments within the chromosome. The model is consistent with the existence of only a few genetic types of E. coli worldwide. Finally, there is a summary of recent reports on lateral genetic exchange across great taxonomic distances, yet another source of genetic variation and innovation. PMID:2087223

  20. Radiative Recombination in Strained SiGe-BASED Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukatsu, Susumu

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * INDIRECT-GAP RECOMBINATION * Introduction * Indirect Recombination in the Bulk * No-Phonon Transition * Influence of Quantum Confinement * STRAINED SiGe/Si AND GROUP-IV QUANTUM STRUCTURES * Si1-xGex/Si * Growth * Band gap * Band structure * Band alignment * Luminescence * Ge1-xSix/Ge * Si1-xCx * Si1-x-yGexCy * Si1-xSnx * Ge1-xCx * Low-Dimensional (Quantum) Structures * Quantum wires * Quantum dots * Quantum wells * SELECTED TOPICS OF INDIRECT-GAP RECOMBINATION * Absence of Quantum Confined Stark Shift * Introduction * Indirect exciton state * Indirect exciton in a transverse electric field * Obscured quantum confined Stark shift * Oscillator Strength Modulation in Superlattices * Introduction * Disordered superlattice * Oscillator strength shrinkage * Weak localization of the electron * Spontaneous modulation of oscillator strength in ordered superlattices * Suppression of Phonon Replica * Introduction * Modifying the ěc{k}-selection rule * Phononless indirect-gap recombination in a Si/Ge type-II quantum dot * SUMMARY * REFERENCES

  1. [Enzymatic control of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli cells and hyper-recombination].

    PubMed

    Bakhlanova, I V; Dudkina, A V; Baĭtin, D M

    2013-01-01

    The RecA protein is a major enzyme of homologous recombination in bacterial cell. Forming a right-handed helical filament on ssDNA, it provides a homology search between two DNA molecules and homologous strand exchange. The RecA protein not only defends the cell from exposure to ionizing radiation and UV-irradiation, but also ensures the recombination process in the course of normal cell growth. A number of wild-type or mutant RecA proteins demonstrate increased recombinogenic properties in vitro and in vivo as compared with the wild-type RecA protein from Escherichia coli, which leads to hyper-recombination. The hyper-rec activity of RecA proteins during the recombination process in many depends on the filamentation dynamics on ssDNA and DNA-transferase properties. Changes in filamentation and DNA-transferase abilities of RecA protein may be the result of not only specific amino-acid substitutions, but also the functioning of the cell enzymatic apparatus, including such proteins as RecO, RecR, RecF, RecX, DinI, SSB, PsiB. To date, the function of each of these proteins is identified at the molecular level. However, the role of some of them in the cell metabolism remains to be seen. Increase in recombination in vivo is not always useful for a cell and faces various limitations. Moreover, in the bacterial cell some mechanisms are activated, that cause genomic reorganization, directed to suppress the expression of hyper-active RecA protein. The ways of hyper-active RecA protein regulation are very interesting, and they are studied in different model systems. PMID:23808153

  2. Enhancements in luminescence measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Bøtter-Jensen, L; Bulur, E; Murray, A S; Poolton, N R J

    2002-01-01

    New developments in the Risø TL/OSL system includes a software controlled heater fitted underneath the beta source to enable irradiation of samples at an elevated temperature. This allows investigations of competition effects from thermally shallow traps and centres. Significant additional software developments include the facility to vary linearly the stimulation power during stimulation (linearly modulated OSL). The elevated temperature irradiator facility has been further expanded to allow the measurement of radioluminescence (RL) during beta irradiation. This additional facility allows the measurement of TL, OSL and RL in the same software controlled automatic sequence. This paper provides a description of the capabilities of the new combined automatic TL/OSL/RL reader, and illustrates the application of the elevated temperature irradiator facility, and the RL unit. The new measurement facilities have provided preliminary information about possible trap competition during storage, and changes in recombination processes. PMID:12382719

  3. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  4. X-ray luminescence spectra of graded-gap Al xGa 1- xAs structures irradiated by alpha particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šilėnas, A.; Požela, J.; Požela, K.; Jucienė, V.; Dapkus, L.

    2011-12-01

    The influence of 241Am alpha particle irradiation on X-ray luminescence spectra of the graded-gap AlxGa1-xAs structures of different thicknesses is investigated. It is observed that the integral X-ray luminescence intensity of nonirradiated thin (15 μm) structure is 1.4 times less than that in the thick (32 μm) structure, and this difference increases to 3 times after 3×1010 cm-2 dose of irradiation by alpha particle. The X-ray luminescence intensity of the energy hν<1.5 eV of thin nonirradiated structure is about 7 times less than that in thick one. The internal graded-gap electric field Fgg is responsible of that large difference, because it shifts the X-ray generated carriers to the narrow-gap surface with great nonradiative surface recombination rate. The alpha particle irradiation increases nonradiative recombination rate and causes a decrease of the X-ray luminescence intensity of all spectra lines in the thin (15 μm) detector. The most significant drop in X-ray luminescence efficiency is observed from the region at narrow-gap surface after the initial stage (109 cm-2 dose) of alpha particle irradiation. In the 32 μm thick detector, the luminescence intensity of the energy hν=1.8 eV does not change up to 2×1010 cm-2 of alpha particle irradiation dose. That means the high irradiation hardness of the thick graded-gap X-ray detector with optical response.

  5. Designed coiled coils promote folding of a recombinant bacterial collagen.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Fletcher, Jordan M; Yu, Zhuoxin; Persikov, Anton V; Bartlett, Gail J; Boyle, Aimee L; Vincent, Thomas L; Woolfson, Derek N; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-05-20

    Collagen triple helices fold slowly and inefficiently, often requiring adjacent globular domains to assist this process. In the Streptococcus pyogenes collagen-like protein Scl2, a V domain predicted to be largely α-helical, occurs N-terminal to the collagen triple helix (CL). Here, we replace this natural trimerization domain with a de novo designed, hyperstable, parallel, three-stranded, α-helical coiled coil (CC), either at the N terminus (CC-CL) or the C terminus (CL-CC) of the collagen domain. CD spectra of the constructs are consistent with additivity of independently and fully folded CC and CL domains, and the proteins retain their distinctive thermal stabilities, CL at ∼37 °C and CC at >90 °C. Heating the hybrid proteins to 50 °C unfolds CL, leaving CC intact, and upon cooling, the rate of CL refolding is somewhat faster for CL-CC than for CC-CL. A construct with coiled coils on both ends, CC-CL-CC, retains the ∼37 °C thermal stability for CL but shows less triple helix at low temperature and less denaturation at 50 °C. Most strikingly however, in CC-CL-CC, the CL refolds slower than in either CC-CL or CL-CC by almost two orders of magnitude. We propose that a single CC promotes folding of the CL domain via nucleation and in-register growth from one end, whereas initiation and growth from both ends in CC-CL-CC results in mismatched registers that frustrate folding. Bioinformatics analysis of natural collagens lends support to this because, where present, there is generally only one coiled-coil domain close to the triple helix, and it is nearly always N-terminal to the collagen repeat.

  6. MICROFLUIDIC MODULES FOR ISOLATION OF RECOMBINANT CYTOKINE FROM BACTERIAL LYSATES

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2014-01-01

    The portability and personalization of health-care diagnostics and treatments benefits from advancements and applications of micro and nanotechnology. Modularization and miniaturization of standardized biochemical processes and tests facilitates the advancement and customization of analyte detection and diagnosis on-chip. The goal of our work here is to develop modular platforms for on-chip biochemical processing of synthesized biologics for a range of on-demand applications. Our report focuses on the initial development, characterization and application of microfluidic size exclusion/gel filtration and ion exchange protein concentration modules for cytokine isolation from spiked cell extracts.

  7. Designed coiled coils promote folding of a recombinant bacterial collagen.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Fletcher, Jordan M; Yu, Zhuoxin; Persikov, Anton V; Bartlett, Gail J; Boyle, Aimee L; Vincent, Thomas L; Woolfson, Derek N; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-05-20

    Collagen triple helices fold slowly and inefficiently, often requiring adjacent globular domains to assist this process. In the Streptococcus pyogenes collagen-like protein Scl2, a V domain predicted to be largely α-helical, occurs N-terminal to the collagen triple helix (CL). Here, we replace this natural trimerization domain with a de novo designed, hyperstable, parallel, three-stranded, α-helical coiled coil (CC), either at the N terminus (CC-CL) or the C terminus (CL-CC) of the collagen domain. CD spectra of the constructs are consistent with additivity of independently and fully folded CC and CL domains, and the proteins retain their distinctive thermal stabilities, CL at ∼37 °C and CC at >90 °C. Heating the hybrid proteins to 50 °C unfolds CL, leaving CC intact, and upon cooling, the rate of CL refolding is somewhat faster for CL-CC than for CC-CL. A construct with coiled coils on both ends, CC-CL-CC, retains the ∼37 °C thermal stability for CL but shows less triple helix at low temperature and less denaturation at 50 °C. Most strikingly however, in CC-CL-CC, the CL refolds slower than in either CC-CL or CL-CC by almost two orders of magnitude. We propose that a single CC promotes folding of the CL domain via nucleation and in-register growth from one end, whereas initiation and growth from both ends in CC-CL-CC results in mismatched registers that frustrate folding. Bioinformatics analysis of natural collagens lends support to this because, where present, there is generally only one coiled-coil domain close to the triple helix, and it is nearly always N-terminal to the collagen repeat. PMID:21454493

  8. Fabrication of luminescent porous silicon with stain etches and evidence that luminescence originates in amorphous layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Lin, T. L.; Pike, W. T.; Vasquez, R. P.; Wu, Z.-C.

    1992-01-01

    Simple immersion of Si in stain etches of HF:HNO3:H2O or NaNO2 in aqueous HF was used to produce films exhibiting luminescence in the visible similar to that of anodically-etched porous Si. All of the luminescent samples consist of amorphous porous Si in at least the near surface region. No evidence was found for small crystalline regions within these amorphous layers.

  9. Enhancing and quenching luminescence with gold nanoparticle films: the influence of substrate on the luminescent properties.

    PubMed

    Guidelli, Eder José; Ramos, Ana Paula; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) films were sputtered over glass and aluminum substrates to enhance optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), a luminescent technique employed for radiation detection, from x-ray irradiated NaCl nanocrystals. The AuNP films deposited over glass led to enhanced-OSL emission, whereas the AuNP films deposited on aluminum substrates quenched the OSL emission. The enhanced-OSL intensity is proportional to the optical density of the film's plasmon resonance band at the stimulation wavelength. For the case of the AuNP/aluminum films, the luminescence quenching diminishes, and OSL intensity partially recovers upon increasing the distance between the AuNPs and the aluminum substrates, and between the luminescent nanocrystals and the AuNP films. These results suggest that plasmonic interactions between the emitter nanocrystals, the localized surface plasmons (LSP) of the AuNPs, and the substrate are responsible for the OSL enhancement and quenching. In this sense, the substrate dictates whether LSP relaxation occurs by radiative or non-radiative transisitions, leading to enhanced or quenched OSL, respectively. Therefore, besides showing that AuNP films can enhance and/or tune the sensitivity of luminescent radiation detectors, and demonstrating OSL as a new technique to investigate mechanisms of plasmon-enhanced luminescence, these results bring insights on how substrates strongly modify the optical properties of AuNP films. PMID:26606392

  10. Optimized readout system for cooled optically stimulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Eschbach, P. A.

    1990-09-01

    Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) in CaF2:Mn is an ionizing radiation dosimetry method recently developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In this method CaF2:Mn crystals irradiated by gamma radiation at room temperature are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), stimulated by ultraviolet laser light at 326 nm, and allowed to warm to room temperature. Light emission proportional to the gamma exposure occurs as the TLD warms from liquid nitrogen temperature to room temperature. The new method is an example of a highly sensitive phototransfer technique which could form the basis for future radiation dosimetry applications. Measurements to date have shown high potential for measuring gamma exposures in the range of 10 microR. The high sensitivity of the COSL technique is due in part to the larger quantum efficiency of radiative recombination at low temperatures and to the complete absence of the incandescent background associated with conventional thermoluminescent readout methods. Along with the potential for a system which is more sensitive than thermoluminescent readers, multiple COSL readouts can be performed with minimal reduction in the COSL intensity. The multiple readout capability can serve as a possible permanent dosimetry record, thus allowing the reanalysis of a questionable reading. In an attempt to optimize the sensitivity of the COSL method, a new readout system is being developed.

  11. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  12. Modeling Light Propagation in Luminescent Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Derya

    This study presents physical, computational and analytical modeling approaches for light propagation in luminescent random media. Two different approaches are used, namely (i) a statistical approach: Monte-Carlo simulations for photon transport and (ii) a deterministic approach: radiative transport theory. Both approaches account accurately for the multiple absorption and reemission of light at different wavelengths and for anisotropic luminescence. The deterministic approach is a generalization of radiative transport theory for solving inelastic scattering problems in random media. We use the radiative transport theory to study light propagation in luminescent media. Based on this theory, we also study the optically thick medium. Using perturbation methods, a corrected diffusion approximation with asymptotically accurate boundary conditions and a boundary layer solution are derived. The accuracy and the efficacy of this approach is verified for a plane-parallel slab problem. In particular, we apply these two approaches (MC and radiative transport theory) to model light propagation in semiconductor-based luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). The computational results for both approaches are compared with each other and found to agree. The results of this dissertation present practical and reliable techniques to use for solving forward/inverse inelastic scattering problems arising in various research areas such as optics, biomedical engineering, nuclear engineering, solar science and material science.

  13. The mensuration of delayed luminescence on ginseng

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Fenghua; Bai, Hua; Tang, Guoqing

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, the delayed luminescence of ginseng produced from two different areas was determined with the self built bioluminescence detecting system. And the attenuation curve of bioluminescence of the experimental samples were studied, before and after the samples extracted by 58% alcohol. We primarily gave out the parameters describing emitting characteristic. Using the method of optic induced bioluminescence, we also determined the weak luminescence emitting from the ginseng tuber, and find the intensity and decay time having obvious difference from skin and core, with these data we can distinguish the producing area and feature of the ginseng. In the experiment, the light-induce luminescence of the sample was menstruated, which has been infused by water and 58% alcohol; the difference between two kinds of samples which were infused and not infused has been delivered. In order to investigate the effect of excitation-light spectrum component to delayed luminescence of ginseng, a light filter witch allow a wavelength scope of 225nm~420nm pass through was installed between the light source and sample, keeping other work condition unchanged, the bioluminescence was also determined. For investigating the effect of extracting to emitting, the absorption spectrum of above samples ware studied, and the time-sequence of absorption spectrum was obtained. Based on the data obtained from our experiment, we analyzed the radiation mechanism of ginseng slice and tuber.

  14. Exciton luminescence of 8-azasteroid microcrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhrem, A. A.; Borisevich, N. A.; Gulyakevich, O. V.; Knyukshto, V. N.; Mikhal'Chuk, A. L.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.

    1999-05-01

    Luminescence of microcrystals of 2,3-methoxy-8-azagon-1,3,5(10),13-tetraene-12,17-dion of the class of molecules of biologically active steroids is detected at room temperature (293 K). It represents fast fluorescence of free and self-localized excitons and prolonged phosphorescence of triplet excitons.

  15. Meiotic recombination mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized cell division at the origin of the haploid cells that eventually develop into the gametes. It therefore lies at the heart of Mendelian heredity. Recombination and redistribution of the homologous chromosomes arising during meiosis constitute an important source of genetic diversity, conferring to meiosis a particularly important place in the evolution and the diversification of the species. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing meiotic recombination has considerably progressed these last decades, benefiting from complementary approaches led on various model species. An overview of these mechanisms will be provided as well as a discussion on the implications of these recent discoveries. PMID:27180110

  16. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  17. Quenching methods for background reduction in luminescence-based probe-target binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Hong; Goodwin, Peter M; Keller, Richard A.; Nolan, Rhiannon L.

    2007-04-10

    Background luminescence is reduced from a solution containing unbound luminescent probes, each having a first molecule that attaches to a target molecule and having an attached luminescent moiety, and luminescent probe/target adducts. Quenching capture reagent molecules are formed that are capable of forming an adduct with the unbound luminescent probes and having an attached quencher material effective to quench luminescence of the luminescent moiety. The quencher material of the capture reagent molecules is added to a solution of the luminescent probe/target adducts and binds in a proximity to the luminescent moiety of the unbound luminescent probes to quench luminescence from the luminescent moiety when the luminescent moiety is exposed to exciting illumination. The quencher capture reagent does not bind to probe molecules that are bound to target molecules and the probe/target adduct emission is not quenched.

  18. A direct evidence of allocating yellow luminescence band in undoped GaN by two-wavelength excited photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Julkarnain, M. E-mail: jnain.apee@ru.ac.bd; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.; Arakawa, Y.

    2015-11-23

    The behavior of below-gap luminescence of undoped GaN grown by MOCVD has been studied by the scheme of two-wavelength-excited photoluminescence. The emission intensity of shallow donor to valence band transition (I{sub OX}) increased while intensities of donor-acceptor pair transition and the Yellow Luminescence band (YLB) decreased after the irradiation of a below-gap excitation source of 1.17 eV. The conventional energy schemes and recombination models have been considered to explain our experimental result but only one model in which YLB is the transition of a shallow donor to a deep state placed at ∼1 eV above the valence band maximum satisfies our result. The defect related parameters that give a qualitative insight in the samples have been evaluated by systematically solving the rate equations and fitting the result with the experiment.

  19. Paper-based biodetection using luminescent nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ju, Qiang; Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-05-10

    Point-of-care and in-field technologies for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of molecular biomarkers have attracted much interest. Rugged bioassay technology capable of fast detection of markers for pathogens and genetic diseases would in particular impact the quality of health care in the developing world, but would also make possible more extensive screening in developed countries to tackle problems such as those associated with water and food quality, and tracking of infectious organisms in hospitals and clinics. Literature trends indicate an increasing interest in the use of nanomaterials, and in particular luminescent nanoparticles, for assay development. These materials may offer attributes for development of assays and sensors that could achieve improvements in analytical figures of merit, and provide practical advantages in sensitivity and stability. There is opportunity for cost-efficiency and technical simplicity by implementation of luminescent nanomaterials as the basis for transduction technology, when combined with the use of paper substrates, and the ubiquitous availability of cell phone cameras and associated infrastructure for optical detection and transmission of results. Luminescent nanoparticles have been described for a broad range of bioanalytical targets including small molecules, oligonucleotides, peptides, proteins, saccharides and whole cells (e.g., cancer diagnostics). The luminescent nanomaterials that are described herein for paper-based bioassays include metal nanoparticles, quantum dots and lanthanide-doped nanocrystals. These nanomaterials often have broad and strong absorption and narrow emission bands that improve opportunity for multiplexed analysis, and can be designed to provide emission at wavelengths that are efficiently processed by conventional digital cameras. Luminescent nanoparticles can be embedded in paper substrates that are designed to direct fluid flow, and the resulting combination of technologies can offer

  20. Paper-based biodetection using luminescent nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ju, Qiang; Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-05-10

    Point-of-care and in-field technologies for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of molecular biomarkers have attracted much interest. Rugged bioassay technology capable of fast detection of markers for pathogens and genetic diseases would in particular impact the quality of health care in the developing world, but would also make possible more extensive screening in developed countries to tackle problems such as those associated with water and food quality, and tracking of infectious organisms in hospitals and clinics. Literature trends indicate an increasing interest in the use of nanomaterials, and in particular luminescent nanoparticles, for assay development. These materials may offer attributes for development of assays and sensors that could achieve improvements in analytical figures of merit, and provide practical advantages in sensitivity and stability. There is opportunity for cost-efficiency and technical simplicity by implementation of luminescent nanomaterials as the basis for transduction technology, when combined with the use of paper substrates, and the ubiquitous availability of cell phone cameras and associated infrastructure for optical detection and transmission of results. Luminescent nanoparticles have been described for a broad range of bioanalytical targets including small molecules, oligonucleotides, peptides, proteins, saccharides and whole cells (e.g., cancer diagnostics). The luminescent nanomaterials that are described herein for paper-based bioassays include metal nanoparticles, quantum dots and lanthanide-doped nanocrystals. These nanomaterials often have broad and strong absorption and narrow emission bands that improve opportunity for multiplexed analysis, and can be designed to provide emission at wavelengths that are efficiently processed by conventional digital cameras. Luminescent nanoparticles can be embedded in paper substrates that are designed to direct fluid flow, and the resulting combination of technologies can offer

  1. Bacterial concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Venkataswamy; Ramesh, K. P.; Bang, S. S.

    2001-04-01

    Cracks in concrete are inevitable and are one of the inherent weaknesses of concrete. Water and other salts seep through these cracks, corrosion initiates, and thus reduces the life of concrete. So there was a need to develop an inherent biomaterial, a self-repairing material which can remediate the cracks and fissures in concrete. Bacterial concrete is a material, which can successfully remediate cracks in concrete. This technique is highly desirable because the mineral precipitation induced as a result of microbial activities is pollution free and natural. As the cell wall of bacteria is anionic, metal accumulation (calcite) on the surface of the wall is substantial, thus the entire cell becomes crystalline and they eventually plug the pores and cracks in concrete. This paper discusses the plugging of artificially cracked cement mortar using Bacillus Pasteurii and Sporosarcina bacteria combined with sand as a filling material in artificially made cuts in cement mortar which was cured in urea and CaCl2 medium. The effect on the compressive strength and stiffness of the cement mortar cubes due to the mixing of bacteria is also discussed in this paper. It was found that use of bacteria improves the stiffness and compressive strength of concrete. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to document the role of bacteria in microbiologically induced mineral precipitation. Rod like impressions were found on the face of calcite crystals indicating the presence of bacteria in those places. Energy- dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectra of the microbial precipitation on the surface of the crack indicated the abundance of calcium and the precipitation was inferred to be calcite (CaCO3).

  2. Screening for soil toxicity and mutagenicity using luminescent bacteria--a case study of the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT).

    PubMed

    Frische, Tobias

    2002-02-01

    The presented study explored the suitability of aquatic bioassays based on the marine luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri as screening indicators for soil toxicity and mutagenicity. The study consists of two parts: (i) determination of the bacterial toxicity and mutagenicity of the single substance 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its primary reduced metabolites using three different luminescent bacteria assays and (ii) determination of the water-extractable toxicity and mutagenicity of soil samples taken at a former production plant for TNT showing complex contamination (TNT, metabolites of TNT, PAHs, and heavy metals). Resulting data indicate TNT to be predominantly responsible for the observed biological effects of soil leachates. A strategy for soil toxicity screening based on luminescent bacteria is proposed which may especially be applicable for the case of bioremediation of TNT-contaminated soils. Potentials and restrictions of this approach to soil toxicity assessment are discussed.

  3. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  4. Recombineering Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  5. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  6. The nonmonotonic dose dependence of optically stimulated luminescence in Al2O3:C: Analytical and numerical simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Pagonis, V.; Lawless, J. L.

    2006-02-01

    Nonmonotonic dose dependence of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) has been reported in a number of materials including Al2O3:C which is one of the main dosimetric materials. In a recent work, the nonmonotonic effect has been shown to result, under certain circumstances, from the competition either during excitation or during readout between trapping states or recombination centers. In the present work, we report on a study of the effect in a more concrete framework of two trapping states and two kinds of recombination centers involved in the luminescence processes in Al2O3:C. Using sets of trapping parameters, based on available experimental data, previously utilized to explain the nonmonotonic dose dependence of thermoluminescence including nonzero initial occupancies of recombination centers (F+ centers), the OSL along with the occupancies of the relevant traps and centers are simulated numerically. The connection between these different resulting quantities is discussed, giving a better insight as to the ranges of the increase and decrease of the integral OSL as a function of dose, as well as the constant equilibrium value occurring at high doses.

  7. The Contribution of Genetic Recombination to CRISPR Array Evolution.

    PubMed

    Kupczok, Anne; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2015-06-16

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a microbial immune system against foreign DNA. Recognition sequences (spacers) encoded within the CRISPR array mediate the immune reaction in a sequence-specific manner. The known mechanisms for the evolution of CRISPR arrays include spacer acquisition from foreign DNA elements at the time of invasion and array erosion through spacer deletion. Here, we consider the contribution of genetic recombination between homologous CRISPR arrays to the evolution of spacer repertoire. Acquisition of spacers from exogenic arrays via recombination may confer the recipient with immunity against unencountered antagonists. For this purpose, we develop a novel method for the detection of recombination in CRISPR arrays by modeling the spacer order in arrays from multiple strains from the same species. Because the evolutionary signal of spacer recombination may be similar to that of pervasive spacer deletions or independent spacer acquisition, our method entails a robustness analysis of the recombination inference by a statistical comparison to resampled and perturbed data sets. We analyze CRISPR data sets from four bacterial species: two Gammaproteobacteria species harboring CRISPR type I and two Streptococcus species harboring CRISPR type II loci. We find that CRISPR array evolution in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus agalactiae can be explained solely by vertical inheritance and differential spacer deletion. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we find an excess of single spacers potentially incorporated into the CRISPR locus during independent acquisition events. In Streptococcus thermophilus, evidence for spacer acquisition by recombination is present in 5 out of 70 strains. Genetic recombination has been proposed to accelerate adaptation by combining beneficial mutations that arose in independent lineages. However, for most species under study, we find that CRISPR evolution is shaped mainly by spacer acquisition and

  8. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  9. Recombination and metastability in amorphous silicon and silicon-germanium alloys. Final subcontract report, 1 February 1991--31 January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, M.; Han, D.X.; Wang, K.D.; Kemp, M.

    1994-07-01

    Electroluminescence-spectra- and transient-current measurements were taken before and after light-soaking a-Si:H p-i-n structures. For the first time, we were able to distinguish between bulk- and junction-controlled recombination. We found that in buffered p-b-i-n structures, the main-band luminescence was more pronounced than that in simple p-i-n structures. The enhancement of the main-band luminescence relates with an increase of the open-circuit voltage. This is evidence that the recombination takes place near the p-i interface, and the quality of the p-i interface is very important in solar cell performance. We also found that for thick p-i-n cells ({ge}2 {mu}m), the luminescence contains more high-energy photons (1.1--1.2 eV) than does that for thin cells. Furthermore, the high-energy recombination is more efficient in creating metastable defects than is the low-energy recombination. Consequently, the thinner the i-layer, the less the light-induced effects. The results of repetition rate and reverse bias effects on forward-bias current imply that the junctions recover faster than the bulk when subjected to excess carriers caused by the bias. By including the coulomb interaction, we made progress on a microscopic model for radiative recombination.

  10. Materials for luminescent greenhouse solar collectors.

    PubMed

    Levitt, J A; Weber, W H

    1977-10-01

    Luminescent greenhouse solar collectors are potentially useful for concentrating sunlight onto photovoltaic power cells. Measurements of the performance of small-scale collectors made of two commercially available materials (Owens-Illinois ED2 neodymium-doped laser glass and rhodamine 6G-doped plastic) are presented. The results are encouraging, but they indicate a need for further spectral sensitization and for reduced matrix loss coefficient. The measurements with monochromatic illumination agree with the predictions of a mathematical model developed to take account of reemission following the absorption of luminescence. Under solar illumination, the model predicts photon flux concentrations of about 15 for optimized full-scale collectors made of the materials studied and concentrations of 110 for reasonably improved glass.

  11. Neutron dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Eschbach, P. A.

    1991-06-01

    The addition of thermoluminescent (TL) materials within hydrogenous matrices to detect neutron induced proton recoils for radiation dosimetry is a well known concept. Previous attempts to implement this technique have met with limited success, primarily due to the high temperatures required for TL readout and the low melting temperatures of hydrogen-rich plastics. Research in recent years PNL has produced a new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technique known as the Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) that offers, for the first time, the capability of performing extremely sensitive radiation dosimetry at low temperatures. In addition to its extreme sensitivity, the COSL technique offers multiple readout capability, limited fading in a one year period, and the capability of analyzing single grains within a hydrogenous matrix.

  12. Luminescent lanthanide chelates and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Selvin, Paul R.; Hearst, John

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides lanthanide chelates capable of intense luminescence. The celates comprise a lanthanide chelator covalently joined to a coumarin-like or quinolone-like sensitizer. Exemplary sensitzers include 2- or 4-quinolones, 2- or 4-coumarins, or derivatives thereof e.g. carbostyril 124 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-quinolone), coumarin 120 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-coumarin), coumarin 124 (7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-coumarin), aminomethyltrimethylpsoralen, etc. The chelates form high affinity complexes with lanthanides, such as terbium or europium, through chelator groups, such as DTPA. The chelates may be coupled to a wide variety of compounds to create specific labels, probes, diagnostic and/or therapeutic reagents, etc. The chelates find particular use in resonance energy transfer between chelate-lanthanide complexes and another luminescent agent, often a fluorescent non-metal based resonance energy acceptor. The methods provide useful information about the structure, conformation, relative location and/or interactions of macromolecules.

  13. Neutron dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.D.; Eschbach, P.A.

    1991-06-01

    The addition of thermoluminescent (TL) materials within hydrogenous matrices to detect neutron-induced proton recoils for radiation dosimetry is a well-known concept. Previous attempts to implement this technique have met with limited success, primarily due to the high temperatures required for TL readout and the low melting temperatures of hydrogen-rich plastics. Research in recent years at Pacific Northwest laboratories (PNL) has produced a new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technique known as the Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) that offers, for the first time, the capability of performing extremely sensitive radiation dosimetry at low temperatures. In addition to its extreme sensitivity, the COSL technique offers multiple readout capability, limited fading in a one-year period, and the capability of analyzing single grains within a hydrogenous matrix. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Tunable lifetime multiplexing using luminescent nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiqing; Zhao, Jiangbo; Zhang, Run; Liu, Yujia; Liu, Deming; Goldys, Ewa M.; Yang, Xusan; Xi, Peng; Sunna, Anwar; Lu, Jie; Shi, Yu; Leif, Robert C.; Huo, Yujing; Shen, Jian; Piper, James A.; Robinson, J. Paul; Jin, Dayong

    2014-01-01

    Optical multiplexing plays an important role in applications such as optical data storage, document security, molecular probes and bead assays for personalized medicine. Conventional fluorescent colour coding is limited by spectral overlap and background interference, restricting the number of distinguishable identities. Here, we show that tunable luminescent lifetimes τ in the microsecond region can be exploited to code individual upconversion nanocrystals. In a single colour band, one can generate more than ten nanocrystal populations with distinct lifetimes ranging from 25.6 µs to 662.4 µs and decode their well-separated lifetime identities, which are independent of both colour and intensity. Such `τ-dots' potentially suit multichannel bioimaging, high-throughput cytometry quantification, high-density data storage, as well as security codes to combat counterfeiting. This demonstration extends the optical multiplexing capability by adding the temporal dimension of luminescent signals, opening new opportunities in the life sciences, medicine and data security.

  15. Luminescence of Pr 3+ in minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaft, Michael; Reisfeld, Renata; Panczer, Gerard; Uspensky, Eugene; Varrel, Bernard; Boulon, Georges

    1999-10-01

    Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy coupled with selective excitation allows one to identify and assign the emission transitions of Pr 3+ in natural apatite, scheelite and anhydrite. Under steady state conditions they are hidden by the stronger bands and lines of Eu 2+, (WO 4) 2-, (MoO 4) 2-, Sm 3+ and Dy 3+. Of special interest are the transitions from the 1S 0 level emitting in the UV part of the spectrum. These transitions make Pr 3+ doped oxyapatite and anhydrite potential materials for UV laser. The long-lived luminescence of Pr 3+ in the visible range in apatite in the presence of uranyl and in scheelite may be ascribed to the participation of the 1S 0 level which serves as a trap of the excitation.

  16. Luminescence properties of silicon-cellulose nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikulev, Vitaly; Loginova, Svetlana; Gurtov, Valery

    2012-07-01

    We have characterized the structure and luminescence properties for two-component material composed of nanocrystalline cellulose and nanocrystalline (less to 100 nm) silicon powder. An efficient and stable photoluminescence of nanocomposite, resistant to the influence of gas-phase oxidants, has been found. The obtained material has electret-like properties and demonstrates the possibility of multiple-recharging in an electric field near 5·103 V/cm at temperatures ranging from -70°C to 100°C. The presence of the electric field, as well as ozone or low-temperature plasma treatment, does not change the luminescence spectrum due to quantum size properties of silicon nanoparticles. We believe that these particles may appear in two states: both embedded in a cellulose matrix and in the form of mechanical mixture.

  17. Bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L; Agabian-Keshishian, N; Bendis, I

    1971-09-01

    technique can be used to select for mutants blocked in the various stages of morphogenesis. 3) Temperature-sensitive mutants of Caulobacter that are restricted in macromolecular synthesis and development at elevated temperatures have been isolated. 4) Genetic exchange in the Calflobacter genus has been demonstrated and is now being defined. Two questions related to control processes can now readily be approached experimentally. (i) Is the temporal progression of events occurring during bacterial differentiation controlled by regulator gene products? (ii) Is the differentiation cycle like a biosynthetic pathway where one event must follow another? The availability of temperature-sensitive mutants blocked at various stages of development permits access to both questions. An interesting feature of the differentiation cycle is that the polar organelle may represent a special segregated unit which is operative in the control of the differentiation process. Perhaps the sequential morphogenic changes exhibited by Caulobacter are dependent on the initial synthesis of this organelle. Because the ultimate expression of cell changes are dependent on selective protein synthesis, specific messenger RNA production-either from DNA present in an organelle or from the chromosome-may prove to be a controlling factor in cell differentiation. We have begun studies with RNA polymerase purified from Caulobacter crescentus to determine whether cell factors or alterations in the enzyme structure serve to change the specificity of transcription during the cell cycle. Control of sequential cell changes at the level of transcription has long been postulated and has recently been substantiated in the case of Bacillus sporulation (6). The Caulobacter bacteria now present another system in which direct analysis of these control mechanisms is feasible. PMID:5572165

  18. SR-excited luminescence of corundum with native defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syurdo, A. I.; Kortov, V. S.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Sharafutdinov, F. F.; Zinin, E. I.

    1998-02-01

    Using synchrotron radiation (SR), radiation relaxation of electron excitations in nominally pure and anion-imperfect corundum crystals subject to irradiation with fast electrons and neutrons was studied. It was found that the luminescence decay time of F + centers depends on the surrounding defects. New data were obtained on the luminescence decay kinetics at 290, 380 and 400 nm, the luminescence being due to exciton-like bodies and complex F aggregate centers.

  19. Method and apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  20. Method and apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Demas, J.N.; Goodwin, P.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Keller, R.A.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, M.

    1998-10-27

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region. 6 figs.

  1. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  2. Luminescence of erbium ions in tellurite glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Savikin, Alexander P.; Grishin, Igor A.; Sharkov, Valery V.; Budruev, Andrei V.

    2013-11-15

    Optical characteristics of new generation of tellurite glasses having high stability against crystallization have been studied. As the initial reagents for the glasses synthesis on the base of tellurium oxide (TeO{sub 2}) there were used such oxides as WO{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, ZnO—Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and active components such as high purity Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ErF{sub 3} and YbF{sub 3}. Intensities of luminescence at 1.53 µm of the erbium ions were determined after excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. - Graphical abstract: In contrast to the case of ZBLAN glass the TeO{sub 2}–WO{sub 3} (Er{sup 3+}) glass has bright intensity of luminescence at 1.53 µm for erbium ions that should be caused by excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. Display Omitted - Highlights: • We examined changes in growth of luminescence in doubly-doped tellurite glasses. • We found that luminescence grows in two orders by using Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} at 1.53 μm. • We see possibility to use those glasses as active elements for integrated optics.

  3. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  4. Tuning luminescence and reducing reabsorption of CdSe quantum disks for luminescent solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huichuan; Xie, Peng; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Baojun

    2015-08-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum disks (QDs) have been synthesized for application in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). Luminescence tuning and reabsorption reduction of the QDs were achieved by controlling their size using a hot injection method. The overlap of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared CdSe QDs was negligible. The as-prepared CdSe QDs were incorporated into polymethylmethacrylate without aggregation and luminescence quenching. The obtained highly transparent composites with non-affecting light-emitting properties were used as LSCs. The placement of a CdSe QDs doped LSC prototype (10 × 1 × 0.1 cm) on a Si-cell resulted in a 201% increase in the electrical power output of the Si-cell compared with that of the bare Si-cell.

  5. The recombination epoch revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons.

  6. Dislocation luminescence in GaN single crystals under nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Xu, Ke; Fan, Ying Min; Wang, Jian Feng; Zhang, Ji Cai; Ren, Guo Qiang

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study on the dislocation luminescence in GaN by nanoindentation, cathodoluminescence, and Raman. The dislocation luminescence peaking at 3.12 eV exhibits a series of special properties in the cathodoluminescence measurements, and it completely disappears after annealing at 500°C. Raman spectroscopy shows evidence for existence of vacancies in the indented region. A comprehensive investigation encompassing cathodoluminescence, Raman, and annealing experiments allow the assignment of dislocation luminescence to conduction-band-acceptor transition involving Ga vacancies. The nanoscale plasticity of GaN can be better understood by considering the dislocation luminescence mechanism.

  7. Luminescence color as a characteristic for selection in poultry eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalova, Natalya B.; Vasiljeva, Ludmilia T.; Zamorskaja, Tatjana; Bychajev, Al.

    1996-12-01

    This work concerns luminescence of egg shell and chick down and livability and egg production of hens. It was established that the best layers showed orange color of egg shell luminescence at the beginning of the laying period. Yellow color of chick down luminescence indicates on the chicken's good development especially concerning its digestive and circulatory systems, and connects with its future high livability and egg production. So the use of the color of luminescence is advisable as an additional characteristic providing good possibility to forecast the development of a chicken, its resistance for stressors, its livability and egg production afterwards.

  8. Bacterial histone-like proteins: roles in stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Maier, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Histone-like proteins (HLPs) are small and basic bacterial proteins that are associated with a nucleoid and play roles in maintaining DNA architecture and regulating DNA transactions such as replication, recombination/repair and transcription. The studies on HLPs from a variety of bacterial species in recent years are summarized in this mini-review. A recent study reported a novel DNA-binding protein (HP119) in Helicobacter pylori that shows some HLP features. It plays a large role in aiding bacterial stress resistance. We provide herein additional evidence that HP119 is a nucleoid-associated protein, and present some perspectives for future study.

  9. Recombination dynamics in aerotaxy-grown Zn-doped GaAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Fangfang; Messing, Maria E.; Mergenthaler, Kilian; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Deppert, Knut; Samuelson, Lars; Magnusson, Martin H.; Yartsev, Arkady

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we have investigated the dynamics of photo-generated charge carriers in a series of aerotaxy-grown GaAs nanowires (NWs) with different levels of Zn doping. Time-resolved photo-induced luminescence and transient absorption have been employed to investigate radiative (band edge transition) and non-radiative charge recombination processes, respectively. We find that the photo-luminescence (PL) lifetime of intrinsic GaAs NWs is significantly increased after growing an AlGaAs shell over them, indicating that an AlGaAs shell can effectively passivate the surface of aerotaxy-grown GaAs NWs. We observe that PL decay time as well as PL intensity decrease with increasing Zn doping, which can be attributed to thermally activated electron trapping with the trap density increased due to the Zn doping level.

  10. Genome engineering and gene expression control for bacterial strain development.

    PubMed

    Song, Chan Woo; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of techniques and tools have been developed for genome engineering and gene expression control to achieve desired phenotypes of various bacteria. Here we review and discuss the recent advances in bacterial genome manipulation and gene expression control techniques, and their actual uses with accompanying examples. Genome engineering has been commonly performed based on homologous recombination. During such genome manipulation, the counterselection systems employing SacB or nucleases have mainly been used for the efficient selection of desired engineered strains. The recombineering technology enables simple and more rapid manipulation of the bacterial genome. The group II intron-mediated genome engineering technology is another option for some bacteria that are difficult to be engineered by homologous recombination. Due to the increasing demands on high-throughput screening of bacterial strains having the desired phenotypes, several multiplex genome engineering techniques have recently been developed and validated in some bacteria. Another approach to achieve desired bacterial phenotypes is the repression of target gene expression without the modification of genome sequences. This can be performed by expressing antisense RNA, small regulatory RNA, or CRISPR RNA to repress target gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. All of these techniques allow efficient and rapid development and screening of bacterial strains having desired phenotypes, and more advanced techniques are expected to be seen.

  11. Dielectronic recombination theory

    SciTech Connect

    LaGattuta, K.J.

    1991-12-31

    A theory now in wide use for the calculation of dielectronic recombination cross sections ({sigma}{sup DR}) and rate coefficients ({alpha}{sup DR}) was one introduced originally by Feshbach for nuclear physics applications, and then later adapted for atomic scattering problems by Hahn. In the following, we briefly review this theory in a very general form, which allows one to account for the effects of overlapping and interacting resonances, as well as continuum-continuum coupling. An extension of our notation will then also allow for the inclusion of the effects of direct radiative recombination, along with a treatment of the interference between radiative and dielectronic recombination. Other approaches to the calculation of {sigma}{sup DR} have been described by Fano and by Seaton. We will not consider those theories here. Calculations of {alpha}{sup DR} have progressed considerably over the last 25 years, since the early work of Burgess. Advances in the reliability of theoretical predictions have also been promoted recently b a variety of direct laboratory measurements of {sigma}{sup DR}. While the measurements of {sigma}{sup DR} for {delta}n {ne} 0 excitations have tended to agree very well with calculations, the case of {delta}n = 0 has been much problematic. However, by invoking a mechanism originally proposed by Jacobs, which takes into account the effect of stray electric fields on high Rydberg states (HRS) participating in the DR process, new calculations have improved the agreement between theory and experiment for these cases. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies still remain.

  12. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  13. Innovation by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, Devin L; Smith, Matthew A; Arnold, Frances H

    2013-12-01

    Swapping fragments among protein homologs can produce chimeric proteins with a wide range of properties, including properties not exhibited by the parents. Computational methods that use information from structures and sequence alignments have been used to design highly functional chimeras and chimera libraries. Recombination has generated proteins with diverse thermostability and mechanical stability, enzyme substrate specificity, and optogenetic properties. Linear regression, Gaussian processes, and support vector machine learning have been used to model sequence-function relationships and predict useful chimeras. These approaches enable engineering of protein chimeras with desired functions, as well as elucidation of the structural basis for these functions.

  14. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... Most of the time, the small intestine does not have a high number ... in the small intestine may use up the nutrients needed by the ...

  15. Ag/ZnO hybrid systems studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy-based luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascua, Leandro; Stavale, Fernando; Nilius, Niklas; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Coupled metal/oxide systems are prepared by depositing and embedding Ag nanoparticles into crystalline ZnO films grown on Au(111) supports. The morphology and optical properties of the compounds are investigated by topographic imaging and luminescence spectroscopy performed in a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). The luminescence of bare ZnO is governed by the band-recombination and a Zn-vacancy related peak. After Ag deposition, two additional maxima are detected that are assigned to the in-plane and out-of-plane plasmon in Ag nanoparticles and have energies below and slightly above the oxide band-gap, respectively. Upon coating the particles with additional ZnO, the out-of-plane plasmon redshifts and loses intensity, indicating strong coupling to the oxide electronic system, while the in-plane mode broadens but remains detectable. The original situation can be restored by gently heating the sample, which drives the silver back to the surface. However, the optical response of pristine ZnO is not recovered even after silver evaporation at high temperature. Small discrepancies are explained with changes in the ZnO defect landscape, e.g., due to silver incorporation. Our experiments demonstrate how energy-transfer processes can be investigated in well-defined metal/oxide systems by means of STM-based spectroscopic techniques.

  16. Laser-induced generation of micrometer-sized luminescent patterns on rare-earth-doped amorphous films

    SciTech Connect

    Zanatta, A.R.; Ribeiro, C.T.M.

    2004-12-01

    Room-temperature photoluminescence has been achieved from rare-earth-doped amorphous (a-) GeN films. The samples were prepared by the radio-frequency-sputtering method, and light emission from the rare-earth (RE) centers was obtained after irradiating the films with a highly focused laser beam. As a result of this laser annealing procedure, almost circular holes with approximately 1-{mu}m diameter were produced on the surface of the a-GeN films. The area nearby these holes correspond to crystalline Ge and coincide with the regions, where relatively strong RE-related luminescence takes place. These laser-annealed areas can be easily and conveniently managed in order to generate different microscopic luminescent patterns. Depending on the RE ion employed, visible and near-infrared light emission were obtained from the patterns so produced. The development of these micrometer-sized luminescent centers, as well as their probable mechanisms of excitation-recombination, will be presented and discussed. The importance of the current experimental results to future technological applications such as microdevices, for example, will also be outlined.

  17. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, x-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy"

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, C; Colosimo, A; Anwand, W; Boatner, Lynn A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, t t; Liedke, m o; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence and scintillation in ZnO single crystals were measured by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL). XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. The origin of green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials or the surroundings. The measurements showed the absence of positron traps in the crystals and yielded a bulk positron lifetime value that is in complete agreement with the predicted theoretical value = thereby confirming the advantage of the GIPS method. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE.

  18. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, x-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy"

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ji, C; Colosimo, A; Anwand, W; Boatner, Lynn A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, t t; Liedke, m o; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; et al

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence and scintillation in ZnO single crystals were measured by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL). XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. The origin of green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials or the surroundings. The measurements showed the absence of positron traps in the crystalsmore » and yielded a bulk positron lifetime value that is in complete agreement with the predicted theoretical value = thereby confirming the advantage of the GIPS method. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE.« less

  19. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlationmore » between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.« less

  20. Luminescence and electrical properties of single ZnO/MgO core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Grinblat, Gustavo; Comedi, David; Bern, Francis; Barzola-Quiquia, José; Esquinazi, Pablo; Tirado, Mónica

    2014-03-10

    To neutralise the influence of the surface of ZnO nanowires for photonics and optoelectronic applications, we have covered them with insulating MgO film and individually contacted them for electrical characterisation. We show that such a metal-insulator-semiconductor-type nanodevice exhibits a high diode ideality factor of 3.4 below 1 V. MgO shell passivates ZnO surface states and provides confining barriers to electrons and holes within the ZnO core, favouring excitonic ultraviolet radiative recombination, while suppressing defect-related luminescence in the visible and improving electrical conductivity. The results indicate the potential use of ZnO/MgO nanowires as a convenient building block for nano-optoelectronic devices.

  1. The morphology, microstructure, and luminescent properties of CdS/CdTe films

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Jassim, M.M.; Dhere, R.G.; Jones, K.M.; Hasoon, F.S.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the characterization of CdS/CdTe polycrystalline thin films for solar cells. The morphology, microstructure, and luminescent properties are studied by a powerful array of characterization techniques. The presence of pinholes in 100-nm thick CdS is observed. The microstructure of CdS and CdTe films is shown to be heavily faulted polycrystalline. The effect of deposition temperature on the grain size and the microstructure is investigated. The interdiffusion of sulfur and tellurium at the CdS/CdTe interface is studied for the first time by a nanoprobe technique. Considerable amount of sulfur is detected in CdTe in the vicinity of the interface of samples deposited at 625 C. The recombination behavior of grain boundaries and intragrain defects is investigated in as-deposited and heat-treated samples.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of photosynthesis by delayed luminescence in Arabidopsis in Petri dishes.

    PubMed

    Chuenwarin, Paweena; Shimazaki, Azumi; Shimizu, Masanori; Kobayashi, Yuko; Katsumata, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation of photosynthesis is a valuable tool in the field and laboratory. Delayed luminescence (DL) can reflect charge recombination through the backflow of electrons. However, DL detection has not yet been adapted for whole plants in Petri dishes. To compensate for differences in DL decay between sibling Arabidopsis plants grown under the same conditions, we developed a time-sequential double measurement method. Using this method, we examined the influence of photosynthetic electron flow inhibitors, and differences in the DL decay curves were categorized by considering the initial and late phases of the decay curves, as well as their intermediate slopes. The appearance of concavity and convexity in DL curves in Arabidopsis was different from unicellular algae, suggesting complexity in the photosynthetic machinery of higher plants. This detection method should be invaluable for evaluating photosynthetic defects in higher plants under sterile conditions without interrupting plant culture. PMID:26559425

  3. Nondestructive evaluation of photosynthesis by delayed luminescence in Arabidopsis in Petri dishes.

    PubMed

    Chuenwarin, Paweena; Shimazaki, Azumi; Shimizu, Masanori; Kobayashi, Yuko; Katsumata, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation of photosynthesis is a valuable tool in the field and laboratory. Delayed luminescence (DL) can reflect charge recombination through the backflow of electrons. However, DL detection has not yet been adapted for whole plants in Petri dishes. To compensate for differences in DL decay between sibling Arabidopsis plants grown under the same conditions, we developed a time-sequential double measurement method. Using this method, we examined the influence of photosynthetic electron flow inhibitors, and differences in the DL decay curves were categorized by considering the initial and late phases of the decay curves, as well as their intermediate slopes. The appearance of concavity and convexity in DL curves in Arabidopsis was different from unicellular algae, suggesting complexity in the photosynthetic machinery of higher plants. This detection method should be invaluable for evaluating photosynthetic defects in higher plants under sterile conditions without interrupting plant culture.

  4. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlation between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.

  5. Doped luminescent materials and particle discrimination using same

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick; Allendorf, Mark D; Feng, Patrick L

    2014-10-07

    Doped luminescent materials are provided for converting excited triplet states to radiative hybrid states. The doped materials may be used to conduct pulse shape discrimination (PSD) using luminescence generated by harvested excited triplet states. The doped materials may also be used to detect particles using spectral shape discrimination (SSD).

  6. Ultrashort pulse laser microsurgery system with plasma luminescence feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrow, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-11-10

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue during ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) micro-spinal surgery. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  7. Luminescent Processes Elucidated by Simple Experiments on ZnS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwankner, R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes some impurity-related optical properties of semiconductors, with special emphasis on the luminescence of zinc sulfide (ZnS). Presents and interprets five experiments using a ZnS screen, ultraviolet lamp, transparent Dewar liquid nitrogen, and a helium/neon gas base. Includes application of luminescence measurements to archaeology. (SK)

  8. Electroluminescent apparatus having a structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus

    2008-09-02

    An apparatus such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer disposed on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains color-changing and non-color-changing regions arranged in a particular pattern.

  9. Method for altering the luminescence of a semiconductor

    DOEpatents

    Barbour, J. Charles; Dimos, Duane B.

    1999-01-01

    A method is described for altering the luminescence of a light emitting semiconductor (LES) device. In particular, a method is described whereby a silicon LES device can be selectively irradiated with a radiation source effective for altering the intensity of luminescence of the irradiated region.

  10. Method for altering the luminescence of a semiconductor

    DOEpatents

    Barbour, J.C.; Dimos, D.B.

    1999-01-12

    A method is described for altering the luminescence of a light emitting semiconductor (LES) device. In particular, a method is described whereby a silicon LES device can be selectively irradiated with a radiation source effective for altering the intensity of luminescence of the irradiated region. 4 figs.

  11. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  12. Recombinant electric storage battery

    SciTech Connect

    Flicker, R.P.; Fenstermacher, S.

    1989-10-10

    This patent describes a recombinant storage battery. It comprises: a plurality of positive plates containing about 2 to 4 percent of antimony based upon the total weight of the alloy and positive active material, and essentially antimony free negative plates in a closed case; a fibrous sheet plate separator between adjacent ones of the plates, and a body of an electrolyte to which the sheet separators are inert absorbed by each of the separators and maintained in contact with each of the adjacent ones of the plates. Each of the separator sheets comprising first fibers which impart to the sheet a given absorbency greater than 90 percent relative to the electrolyte and second fibers which impart to the sheet a different absorbency less than 80 percent relative to the electrolyte. The first and second fibers being present in such proportions that each of the sheet separators has an absorbency with respect to the electrolyte of from 75 to 95 percent and the second fibers being present in such proportions that the battery has a recombination rate adequate to compensate for gassing.

  13. Photostimulated luminescence properties of Eu2+ -doped barium aluminate phosphor.

    PubMed

    He, Quanlong; Qiu, Guangyu; Xu, Xuhui; Qiu, Jianbei; Yu, Xue

    2015-03-01

    An intense green photostimulated luminescence in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor was prepared. The thermoluminescence results indicate that there are at least three types of traps (T1 , T2 , T3 ) with different trap depths in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor according to the bands located at 327, 361 and 555 K, respectively, which are closely associated with the phosphor's long persistent luminescence and photostimulated luminescence properties. In addition, as a novel optical read-out form, a photostimulated persistent luminescence signal can be repeatedly obtained in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor. This shows that re-trapping of the electron released from a deep trap plays an important role in photostimulated persistent luminescence.

  14. Magnetic-luminescent spherical particles synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Norma L.; Flores, Dora L.; Hirata, Gustavo A.

    2015-07-01

    The combination of magnetic and luminescent properties in a single particle system, opens-up a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. In this work, we performed the synthesis of magnetic-luminescent Gd2O3:Eu3+@Fe2O3 particles by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis performed in a tubular furnace. In order to achieve the composite formation, commercial superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a luminescent Eu3+-doped Gd2O3 shell in a low-cost one-step process. The spray pyrolysis method yields deagglomerated spherical shape magneto/luminescent particles. The photoluminescence spectra under UV excitation (λExc = 265 nm) of the magnetic Gd2O3:Eu3+@Fe2O3 compound showed the characteristic red emission of Eu3+ (λEm = 612 nm). This magneto/luminescent system will find applications in biomedicine and biotechnology.

  15. Luminescence of erbium-doped bismuth borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprea, Isabella-Ioana; Hesse, Hartmut; Betzler, Klaus

    2006-07-01

    Absorption and luminescence properties of erbium ions in the binary glass system bismuth oxide (Bi 2O 3)-boric oxide (B 2O 3) are measured for the composition range 25-65 mol% Bi 2O 3. A Judd-Ofelt analysis of the typical erbium bands in the absorption spectra reveals comparably high Judd-Ofelt coefficients. This indicates a substantial mixing of other electronic configuration into the 4f N configuration by the random crystal fields in the glasses. All coefficients are decreasing with increasing Bi 2O 3 content, this effect being most pronounced with Ω2. Luminescence decay times and radiative efficiencies show an expressed dependence on the glass composition. Radiative efficiencies of all luminescence bands increase with increasing Bi 2O 3 content—accompanied, however, by a slight narrowing of the bands. Except the common luminescence bands of erbium, upconversion luminescence at a wavelength of 0.54 μm could be detected.

  16. Analysis of the luminescent centers in silicon rich silicon nitride light-emitting capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabañas-Tay, S. A.; Palacios-Huerta, L.; Luna-López, J. A.; Aceves-Mijares, M.; Alcántara-Iniesta, S.; Pérez-García, S. A.; Morales-Sánchez, A.

    2015-06-01

    An analysis of the luminescent center and its effect on the optical, electrical and electro-optical properties of silicon rich silicon nitride (SRN) films deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition is reported. As-deposited SRN films emit a broad photoluminescence (PL) spectrum in the visible range where the maximum peak shifts from ∼490 to ∼590 nm as the silicon excess increases. After thermal annealing, a PL blue-shift is observed and it is ascribed to a compositional-dependent change in the concentration of defect states within the films. A correlation between the PL peak energy with the optical band-gap indicates that the luminescence is related to the band tail carrier recombination in the SRN films. Light emitting capacitors (LECs) based on fluor-doped tin oxide SnO2:F (FTO)/SRN active layer/n-Si substrate emit a broad electroluminescent spectra where the maximum emission peak blue-shifts when the polarity is changed from reverse to forward bias. In the reverse bias, the electroluminescence (EL) is related to the states of valence band tail and Si dangling bonds (K0 centers), while in the forward bias the EL is originated from electronic transitions from the conduction band minimum to K0 centers. A model based on the trap assisted tunneling carrier transport is correlated with the proposed EL radiative recombination process in the FTO/SRN/n-Si structures. A discussion of the differences between the PL and EL spectra is reported. The results open new alternatives toward the development of Si-based light emitters where two different EL spectra can be obtained changing the polarity.

  17. Luminescent Magneto-Optical Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, A. M.; Khartsev, S. I.

    2012-03-01

    We compare luminescent properties of several Er-doped garnet films as building blocks in all-garnet heteroepitaxial magneto-optical photonic crystals: La3Ga5O12, Gd3Ga5O12, Y3Fe5O12, Bi3Fe5O12, and Bi2.97Er0.03Fe4Al0.5Ga0.5O12. Er substituents on the dodecahedral lattice sites do not decrease giant Faraday rotation in Bi3Fe5O12 garnet; meanwhile providing intense room temperature C-band photoluminescence (PL). Fe3+ ion works as a sensitizer for Er resulting in fivefold PL enhancement in iron garnets compared to gallium ones. PL lifetime in gallium garnets is in millisecond range reaching 6 ms in Gd2.9Er0.1Ga5O12. The first luminescent one-dimensional heteroepitaxial all-garnet magneto-optical (MO) photonic crystal was composed from diamagnetic Sm3Ga5O12 and MO-active Bi2.97Er0.03Al0.5Ga0.5O12 garnet layers by rf-magnetron sputtering on Gd3Ga5O12(111) substrate. Substitution of ferric ions by aluminum and gallium improved transparency and induced perpendicular anisotropy in pure Bi3Fe5O12. Photonic crystals owned a record high magneto-optical quality and a latching type (magnetic remnant) Faraday rotation (FR). At the resonance wavelength 775 nm, specific FR θF = - 14.1 deg/μm and MO-quality factor Q = 99.3 deg represent the highest MO performance achieved so far. Long-lived near-IR luminescence in Er substituted gallium and iron garnet layers used both as Bragg mirrors and microcavities promises magneto-optical photonic crystals to become an active lasing medium.

  18. Recombination shapes the structure of an environmental Vibrio cholerae population.

    PubMed

    Keymer, Daniel P; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae consists of pathogenic strains that cause sporadic gastrointestinal illness or epidemic cholera disease and nonpathogenic strains that grow and persist in coastal aquatic ecosystems. Previous studies of disease-causing strains have shown V. cholerae to be a primarily clonal bacterial species, but isolates analyzed have been strongly biased toward pathogenic genotypes, while representing only a small sample of the vast diversity in environmental strains. In this study, we characterized homologous recombination and structure among 152 environmental V. cholerae isolates and 13 other putative Vibrio isolates from coastal waters and sediments in central California, as well as four clinical V. cholerae isolates, using multilocus sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes. Recombinant regions were identified by at least three detection methods in 72% of our V. cholerae isolates. Despite frequent recombination, significant linkage disequilibrium was still detected among the V. cholerae sequence types. Incongruent but nonrandom associations were observed for maximum likelihood topologies from the individual loci. Overall, our estimated recombination rate in V. cholerae of 6.5 times the mutation rate is similar to those of other sexual bacteria and appears frequently enough to restrict selection from purging much of the neutral intraspecies diversity. These data suggest that frequent recombination among V. cholerae may hinder the identification of ecotypes in this bacterioplankton population. PMID:21075874

  19. Novel Heterotypic Rox Sites for Combinatorial Dre Recombination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Katherine; Nguyen, Eileen; Sergeev, Yuri; Badea, Tudor C.

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific recombinases (SSRs) such as Cre are widely used in gene targeting and genetic approaches for cell labeling and manipulation. They mediate DNA strand exchange between two DNA molecules at dedicated recognition sites. Precise understanding of the Cre recombination mechanism, including the role of individual base pairs in its loxP target site, guided the generation of mutant lox sites that specifically recombine with themselves but not with the wild type loxP. This has led to the development of a variety of combinatorial Cre-dependent genetic strategies, such as multicolor reporters, irreversible inversions, or recombination-mediated cassette exchange. Dre, a Cre-related phage integrase that recognizes roxP sites, does not cross-react with the Cre-loxP system, but has similar recombination efficiency. We have previously described intersectional genetic strategies combining Dre and Cre. We now report a mutagenesis screen aimed at identifying roxP base pairs critical for self-recognition. We describe several rox variant sites that are incompatible with roxP, but are able to efficiently recombine with themselves in either purified systems or bacterial and eukaryotic tissue culture systems. These newly identified rox sites are not recognized by Cre, thus enabling potential combinatorial strategies involving Cre, Dre, and target loci including multiple loxP and roxP variants. PMID:26715092

  20. Optical Receiver Based On Luminescent Light Trapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Joseph W.; Cole, Terry; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    1991-01-01

    Experiment demonstrates feasibility of optical-communication receiver based on luminescent light trapping. Light-gathering element plate of transparent material impregnated with laser dye. Light from distant laser transmitter falls on plate and absorbed by dye molecules, which become excited and reradiate. Reradiated light confined within plate by total internal reflection as it propagates toward edge of plate. Light arriving at edge escapes from plate and detected by small, high-speed, high-gain photomultiplier tubes or other photosensitive devices. Simple, inexpensive, and accepts light from almost any angle. Receiver of this configuration supports reception of data at rate of 13 MHz and higher.

  1. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Simple Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Muller, Gilles; Ortiz, María J; de la Moya, Santiago

    2015-09-21

    This article aims to show the identity of "circularly polarized luminescent active simple organic molecules" as a new concept in organic chemistry due to the potential interest of these molecules, as availed by the exponentially growing number of research articles related to them. In particular, it describes and highlights the interest and difficulty in developing chiral simple (small and non-aggregated) organic molecules able to emit left- or right-circularly polarized light efficiently, the efforts realized up to now to reach this challenging objective, and the most significant milestones achieved to date. General guidelines for the preparation of these interesting molecules are also presented.

  2. Synchronous luminescence spectroscopy of human breast tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S. K.; Gupta, P. K.

    1998-06-01

    We report, to our knowledge, the first use of synchronous luminescence (SL) spectroscopy for autofluorescence diagnosis of cancer. The spectral narrowing effect of the SL spectroscopy led to an easier identification of the different fluorophores present in human breast tissues and provided relative estimate of their concentration in qualitative agreement with the estimates obtained from conventional excitation and emission spectroscopy. Further, the SL spectra from human breast tissues could discriminate cancerous tissues from benign tumors and normal tissues with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in a study involving 34 patients with breast tumor (19 ductal carcinomas and 15 fibroadenomas).

  3. Development of novel edible luminescent nanoparticle sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalalian, Sanaz

    This project has developed a novel class of edible hydrocolloid food nanosensors which are doped with luminescent chromophores and investigated whether they can be used to provide information about the local food matrix - temperature, oxygen concentration, and the presence of food-borne pathogens. The luminescence properties of the probes such as phosphorescence and fluorescence provide the sensor sensitivity to the food properties. Hydrocolloid nanoparticles were made from gelatin and starch with diameters ranging from 50 to ˜200 nm and labeled with food grade luminescent probes. The chromophore was covalently and non-covalently attached to the nanoparticle and the photophysical properties of the probe in the food system were studied. Temperature sensors were developed by using the phosphorescence sensitivity of a chromophore to temperature. Experiments with two different probes, namely erythrosine B labeled gelatin nanoparticles and phloxine B labeled gelatin nanoparticles have demonstrated that both probes can be effectively used as temperature sensors in liquid and solid food. The Van't Hoff plots of ln(IDF/IP) versus 1/T vary monotonically over a relatively wide temperature range and thus provide a basis for estimating temperature from measurements of phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence. The tests indicated that the presence of some ingredients such as tannin and anthocyanins in the composition of the food may prohibit the use of gelatin nanoparticle probes due to precipitation of gelatin nanoparticles. The luminescence quenching of the probe by oxygen was used to develop a nanoparticle sensor for oxygen. The results of experiments on liquid and solid food samples indicate that erythrosine B labeled gelatin nanoparticles can be used as a probe to detect the presence or absence of oxygen in some liquid foods. Precise control of oxygen concentration in solutions will pose a challenge as has been observed in this study. The probe did not work as an

  4. High pressure luminescence probes in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    High pressure luminescence has proved to be a very powerful tool for characterizing crystalline solids and liquids. Two problems involving glassy polymers are analyzed. In the first problem the excited states of azulene and its derivatives are used to probe intermolecular interactions in PMMA and PS. In the second problem the change in emission intensity with pressure from two excimer states of polyvinylcarbazole as a pure polymer and in dilute solution in polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyisoliutylene (PIB) is studied. The relative emission from the two states depends strongly on the possibility for motion of polymer segments. The observations are related to the proximity to the glass transition.

  5. Luminescent solar concentrators with fiber geometry.

    PubMed

    Edelenbosch, Oreane Y; Fisher, Martyn; Patrignani, Luca; van Sark, Wilfried G J H M; Chatten, Amanda J

    2013-05-01

    The potential of a fibre luminescent solar concentrator has been explored by means of both analytical and ray-tracing techniques. Coated fibres have been found to be more efficient than homogeneously doped fibres, at low absorption. For practical fibres concentration is predicted to be linear with fibre length. A 1 m long, radius 1 mm, fibre LSC doped with Lumogen Red 305 is predicted to concentrate the AM1.5 g spectrum up to 1100 nm at normal incidence by ~35 x. The collection efficiency under diffuse and direct irradiance in London has been analysed showing that, even under clear sky conditions, in winter the diffuse contribution equals the direct.

  6. Single layer multi-color luminescent display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, James B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a multi-color luminescent display comprising an insulator substrate and a single layer of host material which may be a phosphor deposited thereon that hosts one or more differential impurities, therein forming a pattern of selected and distinctly colored phosphors such as blue, green, and red phosphors in a single layer of host material. Transparent electrical conductor means may be provided for subjecting selected portions of the pattern of colored phosphors to an electric field thereby forming a multi-color, single layer electroluminescent display.

  7. Luminescence quenching of conductive Si nanocrystals via “Linkage emission”: Hopping-like propagation of infrared-excited Auger electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Masashi; Crowe, Iain F.; Halsall, Matthew P.; Hamilton, Bruce; Knights, Andrew P.; Gwilliam, Russell M.

    2014-08-14

    Phosphorus (P) is an n-type dopant for conductive silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc's), the electrical activation of which may be monitored through a non-radiative Auger recombination process that quenches the Si-nc luminescence. We investigated this quenching mechanism through electrical measurements of Si-nc's. Infrared-excited Auger electron emission as the non-radiative process was directly probed and the dynamics of the process are determined from a frequency response analysis. To explain the dynamics, we propose a model in which Auger electrons with a low kinetic energy establish a local inter-nanocrystal conductance and the repetition of this local conductance results in a constant photocurrent (“linkage emission”). This emission becomes significant by electron filling in the Si-nc's owing to the electrical activation of P, which is consistent with observed luminescence quenching behavior. We found that the IR photo-excited emission is distinct from the thermally induced hopping conduction and show that confined, rather than trapped, charges are the source of the Auger electrons. Thus, the process consumes both confined charges and the recombination energy for Auger emission, which explains the luminescence quenching mechanism of Si-nc:P.

  8. Ad 2.0: a novel recombineering platform for high-throughput generation of tailored adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Mück-Häusl, Martin; Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses containing a double-stranded DNA genome of 26–45 kb were broadly explored in basic virology, for vaccination purposes, for treatment of tumors based on oncolytic virotherapy, or simply as a tool for efficient gene transfer. However, the majority of recombinant adenoviral vectors (AdVs) is based on a small fraction of adenovirus types and their genetic modification. Recombineering techniques provide powerful tools for arbitrary engineering of recombinant DNA. Here, we adopted a seamless recombineering technology for high-throughput and arbitrary genetic engineering of recombinant adenoviral DNA molecules. Our cloning platform which also includes a novel recombination pipeline is based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). It enables generation of novel recombinant adenoviruses from different sources and switching between commonly used early generation AdVs and the last generation high-capacity AdVs lacking all viral coding sequences making them attractive candidates for clinical use. In combination with a novel recombination pipeline allowing cloning of AdVs containing large and complex transgenes and the possibility to generate arbitrary chimeric capsid-modified adenoviruses, these techniques allow generation of tailored AdVs with distinct features. Our technologies will pave the way toward broader applications of AdVs in molecular medicine including gene therapy and vaccination studies. PMID:25609697

  9. Unraveling recombination rate evolution using ancestral recombination maps

    PubMed Central

    Munch, Kasper; Schierup, Mikkel H; Mailund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recombination maps of ancestral species can be constructed from comparative analyses of genomes from closely related species, exemplified by a recently published map of the human-chimpanzee ancestor. Such maps resolve differences in recombination rate between species into changes along individual branches in the speciation tree, and allow identification of associated changes in the genomic sequences. We describe how coalescent hidden Markov models are able to call individual recombination events in ancestral species through inference of incomplete lineage sorting along a genomic alignment. In the great apes, speciation events are sufficiently close in time that a map can be inferred for the ancestral species at each internal branch - allowing evolution of recombination rate to be tracked over evolutionary time scales from speciation event to speciation event. We see this approach as a way of characterizing the evolution of recombination rate and the genomic properties that influence it. PMID:25043668

  10. Primordial magnetogenesis before recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, Ophélia; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2016-04-01

    The origin of large magnetic fields in the Universe remains currently unknown. We investigate here a mechanism before recombination based on known physics. The source of the vorticity is due to the changes in the photon distribution function caused by the fluctuations in the background photons. We show that the magnetic field generated in the MHD limit, due to the Coulomb scattering, is of the order 10-49 G on a coherence scale of 10 kpc. We explicitly show that the magnetic fields generated from this process are sustainable and are not erased by resistive diffusion. We compare the results with current observations and discuss the implications. Our seed magnetic fields are generated on small scales whereas the main mechanisms studied in the literature are on scale bigger than 1 Mpc. However, compared to more exotic theories generating seed magnetic fields on similar scales, the strength of our fields are generally smaller.

  11. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Claudia; Späte, Kira; Krampe, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still unsatisfactory and essentially non-existing for the progressive course of the disease. Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) may be a promising neuroprotective/neuroregenerative treatment of MS. In the nervous system, EPO acts anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic and plasticity-modulating. Beneficial effects have been shown in animal models of various neurological and psychiatric diseases, including different models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. EPO is also effective in human brain disease, as shown in double-blind placebo-controlled clinical studies on ischemic stroke and chronic schizophrenia. An exploratory study on chronic progressive MS yielded lasting improvement in motor and cognitive performance upon high-dose long-term EPO treatment. PMID:21180577

  12. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  13. Carrier decay and luminescence characteristics in hadron irradiated MOCVD GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Ceponis, T.; Pavlov, J.; Jasiunas, A.; Jonkus, V.; Meskauskaite, D.; Tekorius, A.

    2014-12-01

    Crystalline GaN is a promising material for producing of the radiation hard particle detectors of different types capable to operate in harsh areas of particle accelerators. Moreover, GaN crystals show rather efficient luminescence properties in several spectral bands under excitation by high energy radiation. Thereby, GaN material can be employed for fabrication of a combined device which is able to operate both as scintillating and charge collecting detector. However, the efficiency of such detectors and their functionality has insufficiently been investigated. This work is addressed to study the evolution of the efficiency of photon and hadron induced luminescence. To evaluate the density of excess carriers induced by the high energy protons, a correlation between the microwave probed photoconductivity transients and the proton induced luminescence intensity has been examined using 1.6 MeV protons to produce a nearly homogeneous and rather strong excitation in 2.6 μm thick MOCVD grown GaN epi-layers. To estimate the radiation hardness of such material, the evolution of the photoconductivity transients and of the proton induced photoluminescence characteristics has been studied by in situ measurements of the changes of luminescence intensity and photoconductivity decay rate during the exposure to a proton beam reaching fluences up to 1015 cm-2. The production rate of radiation defects, determined from in situ and post-irradiation examination of the changes of radiative and non-radiative recombination have been examined by combining penetrative hadron (nuclear reactor neutrons and 24 GeV/c protons) irradiations with those of the 1.6 MeV protons. The parameters of the efficiency κP of carrier pair generation by a single proton of κP = nP/NP cong 1.3 × 107 cm-3 per proton and κPApr = 40 carrier pairs per a micrometer of layer depth per proton have been estimated. The production rate of radiation defects is estimated to be KP cong 0.6 cm-1 for both penetrative

  14. Luminescent DNA- and agar-based membranes.

    PubMed

    Leones, R; Fernandes, M; Ferreira, R A S; Cesarino, I; Lima, J F; Carlos, L D; Bermudez, V de Zea; Magon, C J; Donoso, J P; Silva, M M; Pawlicka, A

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent materials containing europium ions are investigated for different optical applications. They can be obtained using bio-macromolecules, which are promising alternatives to synthetic polymers based on the decreasing oil resources. This paper describes studies of the DNA- and Agar-europium triflate luminescent membranes and its potential technological applications are expanded to electroluminescent devices. Polarized optical microscopy demonstrated that the samples are birefringent with submicrometer anisotropy. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominantly amorphous nature of the samples and the atomic force microscopy images showed a roughness of the membranes of 409.0 and 136.1 nm for the samples of DNA10Eu and Agar1.11Eu, respectively. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the DNA(n)Eu membranes with the principal lines at g ≈ 2.0 and g ≈ 4.8 confirmed uniform distribution of rare earth ions in a disordered matrix. Moreover, these strong and narrow resonance lines for the samples of DNA(n)Eu when compared to the Agar(n)Eu suggested a presence of paramagnetic radicals arising from the DNA matrix. The emission spectra suggested that the Eu3+ ions occupy a single local environment in both matrices and the excitation spectra monitored around the Eu emission lines pointed out that the Eu3+ ions in the Agar host were mainly excited via the broad band component rather than by direct intra-4f(6) excitation, whereas the opposite case occurred for the DNA-based sample.

  15. Measuring chronic toxicity using luminescent bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, H.; Bulich, A.

    1994-12-31

    Bioassays using luminescent bacteria are routinely used to assess the acute toxicity of environmental samples. Two physiological characteristics of these test organisms, a short division cycle and the inducible luciferase pathway, provide functional attributes for measuring chronic toxicity. Freeze-dried luminescent bacteria, following inoculation into appropriate growth medium, initiate a series of reproductive cycles while inducing a complex series of metabolic pathways resulting in production of bioluminescence. Toxic chemicals or samples which inhibit any aspect of this reproductive cycle or induction of light production are detected in low concentrations. The development of this bioassay is based upon a detailed understanding of the growth requirements and biochemistry of this organism and the genetics of luciferase induction. A defined growth medium was developed which supports the necessary cell growth and luciferase induction, yet which does not mask the presence of toxic substances. To perform the assay, the test organisms are inoculated into a series of cuvettes containing growth medium and dilutions of the sample. After 18 hrs incubation at 27 C, control cuvettes show high light levels while sample dilutions containing toxic materials show decreasing light levels. Details of the test protocol and reproducibility are presented. Sensitivity data from this chronic toxicity test are summarized and compared with the Microtox{reg_sign} acute test and the Ceriodaphnia dubia chronic toxicity test method. This test method is about 20 times more sensitive than Microtox and exhibits sensitivity similar to C. dubia for tested metals and organic compounds.

  16. Luminescent Quantum Dots as Ultrasensitive Biological Labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shuming

    2000-03-01

    Highly luminescent semiconductor quantum dots have been covalently coupled to biological molecules for use in ultrasensitive biological detection. This new class of luminescent labels is considerably brighter and more resistant againt photobleaching in comparison with organic dyes. Quantum dots labeled with the protein transferrin undergo receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) in cultured HeLa cells, and those dots that were conjugated to immunomolecules recognize specific antibodies or antigens. In addition, we show that DNA functionalized quantum dots can be used to target specific genes by hybridization. We expect that quantum dot bioconjugates will have a broad range of biological applications, such as ligand-receptor interactions, real-time monitoring of molecular trafficking inside living cells, multicolor fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), high-sensitivity detection in miniaturized devices (e.g., DNA chips), and fluorescent tagging of combinatorial chemical libraries. A potential clinical application is the use of quantum dots for ultrasensitive viral RNA detection, in which as low as 100 copies of hepatitis C and HIV viruses per ml blood should be detected.

  17. Quantitative Characterization of Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Ruby

    An optical imaging modality for small animal cancer studies using Cerenkov radiation is currently being developed in the Cherry lab at the University of California, Davis. Cerenkov radiation is a well-known phenomenon, in which optical photons are emitted when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a medium. This emerging modality is referred to as Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging. The significance of this work is that it enables imaging on widely available small animal optical imaging systems of radionuclides being developed for therapeutic applications and positron emitting radiotracers developed for diagnostic purposes. A Monte Carlo based simulation was performed to predict the number of photons expected for a given radionuclide decay. The simulations calculated Cerenkov light intensity produced by radionuclides of interest for nuclear imaging and radionuclide therapy treatments. A quantitative understanding of Cerenkov light levels using parameters that are representative of situations encountered in vivo will help guide future applications and possible clinical implementation of Cerenkov luminescence imaging.

  18. Luminescent films for chemo- and biosensing.

    PubMed

    Guan, Weijiang; Zhou, Wenjuan; Lu, Jun; Lu, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Luminescent films have received great interest for chemo-/bio-sensing applications due to their distinct advantages over solution-based probes, such as good stability and portability, tunable shape and size, non-invasion, real-time detection, extensive suitability in gas/vapor sensing, and recycling. On the other hand, they can achieve selective and sensitive detection of chemical/biological species using special luminophores with a recognition moiety or the assembly of common luminophores and functional materials. Nowadays, the extensively used assembly techniques include drop-casting/spin-coating, Langmuir-Blodgett (LB), self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), layer-by-layer (LBL), and electrospinning. Therefore, this review summarizes the recent advances in luminescent films with these assembly techniques and their applications in chemo-/bio-sensing. We mainly focused on the discussion of the relationship between the sensing properties of the films and their architecture. Furthermore, we discussed some critical challenges existing in this field and possible solutions that have been or are being developed to overcome these challenges.

  19. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  20. A Simple Luminescent Adenylate-Cyclase Functional Assay for Evaluation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Israeli, Ma’ayan; Rotem, Shahar; Elia, Uri; Bar-Haim, Erez; Cohen, Ofer; Chitlaru, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF), the toxic sub-unit of the Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase whose detrimental activity in the infected host results in severe edema. EF is therefore a major virulence factor of B. anthracis. We describe a simple, rapid and reliable functional adenylate-cyclase assay based on inhibition of a luciferase-mediated luminescence reaction. The assay exploits the efficient adenylate cyclase-mediated depletion of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), and the strict dependence on ATP of the light-emitting luciferase-catalyzed luciferin-conversion to oxyluciferin, which can be easily visualized. The assay exhibits a robust EF-dose response decrease in luminescence, which may be specifically reverted by anti-EF antibodies. The application of the assay is exemplified in: (a) determining the presence of EF in B. anthracis cultures, or its absence in cultures of EF-defective strains; (b) evaluating the anti-EF humoral response in experimental animals infected/vaccinated with B. anthracis; and (c) rapid discrimination between EF producing and non-producing bacterial colonies. Furthermore, the assay may be amenable with high-throughput screening for EF inhibitory molecules. PMID:27548219

  1. Bimolecular recombination in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Girish; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    The recombination of electrons and holes is a major loss mechanism in photovoltaic devices that controls their performance. We review scientific literature on bimolecular recombination (BR) in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices to bring forward existing ideas on the origin and nature of BR and highlight both experimental and theoretical work done to quantify its extent. For these systems, Langevin theory fails to explain BR, and recombination dynamics turns out to be dependent on mobility, temperature, electric field, charge carrier concentration, and trapped charges. Relationships among the photocurrent, open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and morphology are discussed. Finally, we highlight the recent emergence of a molecular-level picture of recombination, taking into account the spin and delocalization of charges. Together with the macroscopic picture of recombination, these new insights allow for a comprehensive understanding of BR and provide design principles for future materials and devices.

  2. Luminescent chiral lanthanide(III) complexes as potential molecular probes

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    This perspective gives an introduction into the design of luminescent lanthanide(III)-containing complexes possessing chiral properties and used to probe biological materials. The first part briefly describes general principles, focusing on the optical aspect (i.e. lanthanide luminescence, sensitization processes) of the most emissive trivalent lanthanide ions, europium and terbium, incorporated into molecular luminescent edifices. This is followed by a short discussion on the importance of chirality in the biological and pharmaceutical fields. The second part is devoted to the assessment of the chiroptical spectroscopic tools available (typically circular dichroism and circularly polarized luminescence) and the strategies used to introduce a chiral feature into luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes (chiral structure resulting from a chiral arrangement of the ligand molecules surrounding the luminescent center or presence of chiral centers in the ligand molecules). Finally, the last part illustrates these fundamental principles with recent selected examples of such chiral luminescent lanthanide-based compounds used as potential probes of biomolecular substrates. PMID:19885510

  3. Retroviral recombination during reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, D W; Duesberg, P H

    1990-03-01

    After mixed infection, up to half of related retroviruses are recombinants. During infection, retroviral RNA genomes are first converted to complementary DNA (cDNA) and then to double-stranded DNA. Thus recombination could occur during reverse transcription, by RNA template switching, or after reverse transcription, by breakage and reunion of DNA. It has not been possible to distinguish between these two potential mechanisms of recombination because both single-stranded cDNA and double-stranded proviral DNA exist in infected cells during the eclipse period. Therefore we have analyzed for recombinant molecules among cDNA products transcribed in vitro from RNA of disrupted virions. Since recombinants from allelic parents can only be distinguished from parental genomes by point mutations, we have examined the cDNAs from virions with distinct genetic structures for recombinant-specific size and sequence markers. The parents share a common internal allele that allows homology-directed recombination, but each contains specific flanking sequences. One parent is a synthetically altered Harvey murine sarcoma virus RNA that lacks a retroviral 3' terminus but carries a Moloney murine retrovirus-derived envelope gene (env) fragment 3' of its transforming ras gene. The other parent is intact Moloney virus. Using a Harvey-specific 5' primer and a Moloney-specific 3' primer, we have found recombinant cDNAs with the polymerase chain reaction, proving directly that retroviruses can recombine during reverse transcription unassisted by cellular enzymes, probably by template switching during cDNA synthesis. The recombinants that were obtained in vitro were identical with those obtained in parallel experiments in vivo.

  4. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  5. Linearly working low-light-level imaging method for luminescence applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braeuer, Reinhard; Helma, Hans; Ochs, Rainer

    1994-05-01

    We propose a two-stage linearly working integration method for low light level imaging systems. The influence of integration and background substraction on the signal to noise ratio is discussed in the paper. The introduced linear approach avoids thresholding and creates images with enhanced spatial resolution. After 5 minutes integration time the system reaches a sensitivity of 0.6 Photons/(Pixel X second). The linearity of the system can be checked with a suitable calibration device. We propose an electronic light standard with a pulsed LED, that allows us to cover a wide range of brightness by variation of the pulse frequency. Very low light intensities of luminescence can be produced in a stable and reproducible manner. The system has powerful software functions for bioluminescence applications like bacterial cloning as well as measurement functions for chemiluminescence applications within the DNA or protein blotting. Utilities for documentation, image printing, and data export to spreadsheet or graphics programs are also provided.

  6. A luminescence endotoxin biosensor prepared by the sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hreniak, A.; Maruszewski, K.; Rybka, J.; Gamian, A.; Czyżewski, J.

    2004-07-01

    Silicate thin films with terminal amino groups were prepared via the sol-gel technique and selected biological molecules labeled with luminophores were covalently attached to their surfaces. The obtained thin films with covalently bound Concanavalin-A (Con-A) labeled with fluorescein (FITC) were immersed in a buffer and polarized emission spectra were measured. In the next step, the samples were incubated with a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Hafnia alvei PCM 1186 bacterial strain and the emission spectra were collected again. The influence of LPS binding to Con-A on the luminescence depolarization has been proven. The system based on the this effect can be employed as an optical sensor for detection of certain types of bacteria.

  7. Surface pressure measurement by oxygen quenching of luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouterman, Martin P. (Inventor); Kavandi, Janet L. (Inventor); Gallery, Jean (Inventor); Callis, James B. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Methods and compositions for measuring the pressure of an oxygen-containing gas on an aerodynamic surface, by oxygen-quenching of luminescence of molecular sensors is disclosed. Objects are coated with luminescent films containing a first sensor and at least one of two additional sensors, each of the sensors having luminescences that have different dependencies on temperature and oxygen pressure. Methods and compositions are also provided for improving pressure measurements (qualitative or quantitive) on surfaces coated with a film having one or more types of sensor.

  8. Surface pressure measurement by oxygen quenching of luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouterman, Martin P. (Inventor); Kavandi, Janet L. (Inventor); Gallery, Jean (Inventor); Callis, James B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Methods and compositions for measuring the pressure of an oxygen-containing gas on an aerodynamic surface, by oxygen-quenching of luminescence of molecular sensors is disclosed. Objects are coated with luminescent films containing a first sensor and at least one of two additional sensors, each of the sensors having luminescences that have different dependencies on temperature and oxygen pressure. Methods and compositions are also provided for improving pressure measurements (qualitative or quantitive) on surfaces coated with a film having one or more types of sensor.

  9. Control of luminescence from lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) photophores.

    PubMed

    Claes, Julien M; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2011-05-01

    The velvet belly lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) is a common deep-sea shark that has been used, in the recent years, as a model for experimental studies on physiological control of shark luminescence. These studies demonstrated that, unlike any other luminous organism, the luminescence of this shark was under a dual control of hormones and neurotransmitters (or neuromodulators). This paper, by making a short review of histological and pharmacological results from these studies, aims to propose a first model of luminescence control in E. spinax.

  10. Luminescent Solar Concentrators--a review of recent results.

    PubMed

    van Sark, Wilfried G J H M; Barnham, Keith W J; Slooff, Lenneke H; Chatten, Amanda J; Büchtemann, Andreas; Meyer, Andreas; McCormack, Sarah J; Koole, Rolf; Farrell, Daniel J; Bose, Rahul; Bende, Evert E; Burgers, Antonius R; Budel, Tristram; Quilitz, Jana; Kennedy, Manus; Meyer, Toby; Donegá, C De Mello; Meijerink, Andries; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel

    2008-12-22

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species. Incident sunlight is absorbed by the luminescent species and emitted with high quantum efficiency, such that emitted light is trapped in the sheet and travels to the edges where it can be collected by solar cells. LSCs offer potentially lower cost per Wp. This paper reviews results mainly obtained within the framework of the Full-spectrum project. Two modeling approaches are presented, i.e., a thermodynamic and a ray-trace one, as well as experimental results, with a focus on LSC stability.

  11. PEG functionalized luminescent lipid particles for cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Suman; Barick, K. C.; Shetake, Neena G.; Verma, Gunjan; Aswal, V. K.; Panicker, Lata; Pandey, B. N.; Hassan, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    We report here the synthesis, characterization and cellular uptake of luminescent micelle-like particles with phospholipid core and non-ionic PEG based surfactant polysorbate 80 shell. The adsorption of polysorbate 80 at the interface of lipid containing microemulsion droplets and its solidification upon removal of solvent leads to anchoring of PEG chain to the lipid particles. Hydrophobic partitioning of luminescent molecules, sodium 3-hydroxynaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid to the phospholipid core offers additional functionality to these particles. Thus, the cooperative assembly of lipid, non-ionic amphiphile and organic luminescent probe leads to the formation of multifunctional biocompatible particles which are useful for simultaneous imaging and therapy.

  12. Quantification of the luminescence intensity of natural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. D.; Hessin, T. D.; Hemphill, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Review of some of the results of an evaluation of the use of an airborne Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) for the detection of sun-stimulated luminescence emitted by rhodamine WT dye and some other materials. Rhodamine dye is reported to have been detected by airborne FDL in sea water in concentrations of less than 2 ppb. Experiments with a fluorescence spectrometer in the laboratory indicate that luminescence of some samples of crude and refined petroleum exceeds the luminescence intensity of rhodamine dye in concentrations of 10 ppm.

  13. Luminescence dating of the Wabar meteorite craters, Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, J.R.; Robertson, G.B.; Shoemaker, C.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Wynn, J.

    2004-01-01

    Luminescence dating has been used to find the age of meteorite impact craters at Wabar (Al Hadida) in Saudi Arabia. The luminescence characteristics of the shocked material were determined. Using a variety of luminescence dating techniques applied to impactite formed by the meteorite, and to the underlying sand, the age is found to be 290 ± 38 years. A comparison is made with two possible historically recorded ages. An impact as young as this has implications for the assessment of hazards from the impact on Earth of small meteorites.

  14. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: A new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2015-03-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461 nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68 μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20 μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed.

  15. Container Verification Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Jennifer E.; Miller, Steven D.; Conrady, Matthew M.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Tinker, Michael R.

    2008-10-01

    Containment verification is a high priority for safeguards containment and surveillance. Nuclear material containers, safeguards equipment cabinets, camera housings, and detector cable conduit are all vulnerable to tampering. Even with a high security seal on a lid or door, custom-built hinges and interfaces, and special colors and types of finishes, the surfaces of enclosures can be tampered with and any penetrations repaired and covered over. With today’s technology, these repairs would not be detected during a simple visual inspection. Several suggested solutions have been to develop complicated networks of wires, fiber-optic cables, lasers or other sensors that line the inside of a container and alarm when the network is disturbed. This results in an active system with real time evidence of tampering but is probably not practical for most safeguards applications. A more practical solution would be to use a passive approach where an additional security feature was added to surfaces which would consist of a special coating or paint applied to the container or enclosure. One type of coating would incorporate optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) material. OSL materials are phosphors that luminesce in proportion to the ionizing radiation dose when stimulated with the appropriate optical wavelengths. The OSL fluoresces at a very specific wavelength when illuminated at another, very specific wavelength. The presence of the pre-irradiated OSL material in the coating is confirmed using a device that interrogates the surface of the enclosure using the appropriate optical wavelength and then reads the resulting luminescence. The presence of the OSL indicates that the integrity of the surface is intact. The coating itself could be transparent which would allow the appearance of the container to remain unchanged or the OSL material could be incorporated into certain paints or epoxies used on various types of containers. The coating could be applied during manufacturing

  16. Recombination Does Not Hinder Formation or Detection of Ecological Species of Synechococcus Inhabiting a Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Mat.

    PubMed

    Melendrez, Melanie C; Becraft, Eric D; Wood, Jason M; Olsen, Millie T; Bryant, Donald A; Heidelberg, John F; Rusch, Douglas B; Cohan, Frederick M; Ward, David M

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of bacterial speciation have claimed to support the biological species concept-that reduced recombination is required for bacterial populations to diverge into species. This conclusion has been reached from the discovery that ecologically distinct clades show lower rates of recombination than that which occurs among closest relatives. However, these previous studies did not attempt to determine whether the more-rapidly recombining close relatives within the clades studied may also have diversified ecologically, without benefit of sexual isolation. Here we have measured the impact of recombination on ecological diversification within and between two ecologically distinct clades (A and B') of Synechococcus in a hot spring microbial mat in Yellowstone National Park, using a cultivation-free, multi-locus approach. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries were constructed from mat samples collected at 60°C and 65°C. Analysis of multiple linked loci near Synechococcus 16S rRNA genes showed little evidence of recombination between the A and B' lineages, but a record of recombination was apparent within each lineage. Recombination and mutation rates within each lineage were of similar magnitude, but recombination had a somewhat greater impact on sequence diversity than mutation, as also seen in many other bacteria and archaea. Despite recombination within the A and B' lineages, there was evidence of ecological diversification within each lineage. The algorithm Ecotype Simulation identified sequence clusters consistent with ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes), and several hypothesized ecotypes were distinct in their habitat associations and in their adaptations to different microenvironments. We conclude that sexual isolation is more likely to follow ecological divergence than to precede it. Thus, an ecology-based model of speciation appears more appropriate than the biological species concept for bacterial and archaeal diversification.

  17. Recombination Does Not Hinder Formation or Detection of Ecological Species of Synechococcus Inhabiting a Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Mat.

    PubMed

    Melendrez, Melanie C; Becraft, Eric D; Wood, Jason M; Olsen, Millie T; Bryant, Donald A; Heidelberg, John F; Rusch, Douglas B; Cohan, Frederick M; Ward, David M

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of bacterial speciation have claimed to support the biological species concept-that reduced recombination is required for bacterial populations to diverge into species. This conclusion has been reached from the discovery that ecologically distinct clades show lower rates of recombination than that which occurs among closest relatives. However, these previous studies did not attempt to determine whether the more-rapidly recombining close relatives within the clades studied may also have diversified ecologically, without benefit of sexual isolation. Here we have measured the impact of recombination on ecological diversification within and between two ecologically distinct clades (A and B') of Synechococcus in a hot spring microbial mat in Yellowstone National Park, using a cultivation-free, multi-locus approach. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries were constructed from mat samples collected at 60°C and 65°C. Analysis of multiple linked loci near Synechococcus 16S rRNA genes showed little evidence of recombination between the A and B' lineages, but a record of recombination was apparent within each lineage. Recombination and mutation rates within each lineage were of similar magnitude, but recombination had a somewhat greater impact on sequence diversity than mutation, as also seen in many other bacteria and archaea. Despite recombination within the A and B' lineages, there was evidence of ecological diversification within each lineage. The algorithm Ecotype Simulation identified sequence clusters consistent with ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes), and several hypothesized ecotypes were distinct in their habitat associations and in their adaptations to different microenvironments. We conclude that sexual isolation is more likely to follow ecological divergence than to precede it. Thus, an ecology-based model of speciation appears more appropriate than the biological species concept for bacterial and archaeal diversification. PMID

  18. Recombination Does Not Hinder Formation or Detection of Ecological Species of Synechococcus Inhabiting a Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Mat

    PubMed Central

    Melendrez, Melanie C.; Becraft, Eric D.; Wood, Jason M.; Olsen, Millie T.; Bryant, Donald A.; Heidelberg, John F.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Cohan, Frederick M.; Ward, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of bacterial speciation have claimed to support the biological species concept—that reduced recombination is required for bacterial populations to diverge into species. This conclusion has been reached from the discovery that ecologically distinct clades show lower rates of recombination than that which occurs among closest relatives. However, these previous studies did not attempt to determine whether the more-rapidly recombining close relatives within the clades studied may also have diversified ecologically, without benefit of sexual isolation. Here we have measured the impact of recombination on ecological diversification within and between two ecologically distinct clades (A and B') of Synechococcus in a hot spring microbial mat in Yellowstone National Park, using a cultivation-free, multi-locus approach. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries were constructed from mat samples collected at 60°C and 65°C. Analysis of multiple linked loci near Synechococcus 16S rRNA genes showed little evidence of recombination between the A and B' lineages, but a record of recombination was apparent within each lineage. Recombination and mutation rates within each lineage were of similar magnitude, but recombination had a somewhat greater impact on sequence diversity than mutation, as also seen in many other bacteria and archaea. Despite recombination within the A and B' lineages, there was evidence of ecological diversification within each lineage. The algorithm Ecotype Simulation identified sequence clusters consistent with ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes), and several hypothesized ecotypes were distinct in their habitat associations and in their adaptations to different microenvironments. We conclude that sexual isolation is more likely to follow ecological divergence than to precede it. Thus, an ecology-based model of speciation appears more appropriate than the biological species concept for bacterial and archaeal diversification

  19. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  20. Analysis of interchromosomal mitotic recombination.

    PubMed

    McGill, C B; Shafer, B K; Higgins, D R; Strathern, J N

    1990-07-01

    A novel synthetic locus is described that provides a simple assay system for characterizing mitotic recombinants. The locus consists of the TRP1 and HIS3 genes inserted into chromosome III of S. cerevisiae between the CRY1 and MAT loci. Defined trp1 and his3 alleles have been generated that allow the selection of interchromosomal recombinants in this interval. Trp+ or His+ recombinants can be divided into several classes based on coupling of the other alleles in the interval. The tight linkage of the CRY1 and MAT loci, combined with the drug resistance and cell type phenotypes that they respectively control, facilitates the classification of the recombinants without resorting to tetrad dissection. We present the distribution of spontaneous recombinants among the classes defined by this analysis. The data suggest that the recombination intermediate can have regions of symmetric strand exchange and that co-conversion tracts can extend over 1-3 kb. Continuous conversion tracts are favored over discontinuous tracts. The distribution among the classes defined by this analysis is altered in recombinants induced by UV irradiation.

  1. Genomic islands are dynamic, ancient integrative elements in bacterial evolution.

    PubMed

    Boyd, E Fidelma; Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Parent, Michelle A

    2009-02-01

    Acquisition of genomic islands plays a central part in bacterial evolution as a mechanism of diversification and adaptation. Genomic islands are non-self-mobilizing integrative and excisive elements that encode diverse functional characteristics but all contain a recombination module comprised of an integrase, associated attachment sites and, in some cases, a recombination directionality factor. Here, we discuss how a group of related genomic islands are evolutionarily ancient elements unrelated to plasmids, phages, integrons and integrative conjugative elements. In addition, we explore the diversity of genomic islands and their insertion sites among Gram-negative bacteria and discuss why they integrate at a limited number of tRNA genes.

  2. Genomic islands are dynamic, ancient integrative elements in bacterial evolution.

    PubMed

    Boyd, E Fidelma; Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Parent, Michelle A

    2009-02-01

    Acquisition of genomic islands plays a central part in bacterial evolution as a mechanism of diversification and adaptation. Genomic islands are non-self-mobilizing integrative and excisive elements that encode diverse functional characteristics but all contain a recombination module comprised of an integrase, associated attachment sites and, in some cases, a recombination directionality factor. Here, we discuss how a group of related genomic islands are evolutionarily ancient elements unrelated to plasmids, phages, integrons and integrative conjugative elements. In addition, we explore the diversity of genomic islands and their insertion sites among Gram-negative bacteria and discuss why they integrate at a limited number of tRNA genes. PMID:19162481

  3. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  4. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Kaplan, David L; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-26

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities.

  5. Protective efficacy of a recombinant BAC clone of Marek's disease virus containing REV-LTR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) long-terminal repeat (LTR) into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of a very virulent strain of Marek’s disease (MD) virus (MDV), Md5 (Kim et al, 2011) rendered the resultant recombinant virus termed rMd5 REV-LTR BAC fully attenuated at passa...

  6. Heterogeneous Charge Carrier Dynamics in Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Materials: Nanoscale Lateral and Depth-Dependent Variation of Recombination Rates in Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskite Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Bischak, Connor G; Sanehira, Erin M; Precht, Jake T; Luther, Joseph M; Ginsberg, Naomi S

    2015-07-01

    We reveal substantial luminescence yield heterogeneity among individual subdiffraction grains of high-performing methylammonium lead halide perovskite films by using high-resolution cathodoluminescence microscopy. Using considerably lower accelerating voltages than is conventional in scanning electron microscopy, we image the electron beam-induced luminescence of the films and statistically characterize the depth-dependent role of defects that promote nonradiative recombination losses. The highest variability in the luminescence intensity is observed at the exposed grain surfaces, which we attribute to surface defects. By probing deeper into the film, it appears that bulk defects are more homogeneously distributed. By identifying the origin and variability of a surface-specific loss mechanism that deleteriously impacts device efficiency, we suggest that producing films homogeneously composed of the highest-luminescence grains found in this study could result in a dramatic improvement of overall device efficiency. We also show that although cathodoluminescence microscopy is generally used only to image inorganic materials it can be a powerful tool to investigate radiative and nonradiative charge carrier recombination on the nanoscale in organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

  7. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  8. Luminescence enhancement by energy transfer in melamine-Y2O3:Tb3+ nanohybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagi, Luigi; Chiriu, Daniele; Ardu, Andrea; Cannas, Carla; Carbonaro, Carlo M.; Ricci, Pier Carlo

    2015-09-01

    The phenomenon of luminescence enhancement was studied in melamine-Y2O3:Tb hybrids. Terbium doped Y2O3 mesoporous nanowires were synthesized by hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman scattering spectra testified the realization of a cubic crystal phase. Organic-inorganic melamine-Y2O3:Tb3+ hybrid system was successfully obtained by vapour deposition method. Vibration Raman active modes of the organic counterpart were investigated in order to verify the achievement of hybrid system. Photoluminescence excitation and photoluminescence spectra, preformed in the region between 250 and 350 nm, suggest a strong interaction among melamine and Terbium ions. In particular, a remarkable improvement of 5D4→ FJ Rare Earth emission (at about 542 nm) of about 102 fold was observed and attributed to an efficient organic-Tb energy transfer. The energy transfer mechanism was studied by the use of time resolved photoluminescence measurements. The melamine lifetime undergoes to a significant decrease when adsorbed to oxide surfaces and it was connected to a sensitization mechanism. The detailed analysis of time decay profile of Terbium radiative recombination shows a variation of double exponential law toward a single exponential one. Its correlation with surface defects and non-radiative recombination was thus discussed.

  9. Yellow luminescence band in undoped GaN revealed by two-wavelength excited photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julkarnain, M.; Kamata, N.; Fukuda, T.; Arakawa, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The below-gap emission components including yellow luminescence (YL) band of an MOCVD grown undoped GaN have been studied by the two-wavelength-excited photoluminescence (TWEPL). The nature of each emission line has been investigated by using an intermittent below-gap excitation (BGE) light of 1.17 eV on an above-gap excitation (AGE) light of 3.49 eV. The intensity of DAP and the YL decreased while it increased for IOX after irradiation of the BGE. The intensity change in PL after addition of the BGE implies the presence of defect levels in the energy position corresponding to the photon energy of the BGE. Possible recombination models are listed and examined. Only the recombination model in which the YL corresponds to the transition from a shallow donor to a deep state at about 1 eV above the valence band maximum satisfies our experimental result. The possible origin of this defect state is discussed.

  10. Recombineering: using drug cassettes to knock out genes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sawitzke, James A; Thomason, Lynn C; Bubunenko, Mikhail; Li, Xintian; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2013-01-01

    A 'gene knockout' or 'knockout' is a mutation that inactivates a gene function. These mutations are very useful for classical genetic studies as well as for modern techniques including functional genomics. In the past, knockouts of bacterial genes were often made by transposon mutagenesis. In this case, laborious screens are required to find a knockout in the gene of interest. Knockouts of other organisms have traditionally been made by first using in vitro genetic engineering to modify genes contained on plasmids or bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and later moving these modified constructs to the organism of interest by cell culture techniques. Other methods utilizing a combination of genetic engineering and in vivo homologous recombination were inefficient at best. Recombineering provides a new way to generate knockout mutations directly on the bacterial chromosome or to modify any plasmid or BAC in vivo as a prelude to making knockouts in other organisms. The constructs are designed to the base pair and are not dependent on suitable restriction sites. A drug cassette can be placed anywhere within a gene or the open reading frame of the gene can be replaced with the drug cassette. Either way, the desired construct is selected for.

  11. Radiative recombination kinetics in electroluminescent spin cast pristine α-4T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Hamed, Zied; Kouki, Fayçal; Bouchriha, Habib; Mejatty, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Many experimental studies have established the substantial impact of the sound structure of the organic thin films on optoelectronic device performances. This study is a collection of experimental and theoretical investigation of the radiative recombination kinetics in an organic light emitting diode based on spin cast α-4T. The structural properties of the organic thin films (α-4T) deposited by the spin coating technique are discussed. The electrical characterization of the diode-like samples (ITO/α-4T/Al) have revealed a very low effective mobility of charge carriers in the spin cast α-4Tand the radiative recombination current was extracted. The luminescence-current characterization of the diode-like samples (ITO/α-4T/Al) was investigated and modeled.

  12. Aspergillus: sex and recombination.

    PubMed

    Varga, János; Szigeti, Gyöngyi; Baranyi, Nikolett; Kocsubé, Sándor; O'Gorman, Céline M; Dyer, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    The genus Aspergillus is one of the most widespread groups of fungi on Earth, comprised of about 300-350 species with very diverse lifestyles. Most species produce asexual propagula (conidia) on conidial heads. Despite their ubiquity, a sexual cycle has not yet been identified for most of the aspergilli. Where sexual reproduction is present, species exhibit either homothallic (self fertile) or heterothallic (obligate outcrossing) breeding systems. A parasexual cycle has also been described in some Aspergillus species. As in other fungi, sexual reproduction is governed by mating-type (MAT) genes, which determine sexual identity and are involved in regulating later stages of sexual development. Previous population genetic studies have indicated that some supposedly asexual aspergilli exhibit evidence of a recombining population structure, suggesting the presence of a cryptic sexual cycle. In addition, genome analyses have revealed networks of genes necessary for sexual reproduction in several Aspergillus species, again consistent with latent sexuality in these fungi. Knowledge of MAT gene presence has then successfully been applied to induce sexual reproduction between MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isolates of certain supposedly asexual aspergilli. Recent progress in understanding the extent and significance of sexual reproduction is described here, with special emphasis on findings that are relevant to clinically important aspergilli.

  13. Aspergillus: sex and recombination.

    PubMed

    Varga, János; Szigeti, Gyöngyi; Baranyi, Nikolett; Kocsubé, Sándor; O'Gorman, Céline M; Dyer, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    The genus Aspergillus is one of the most widespread groups of fungi on Earth, comprised of about 300-350 species with very diverse lifestyles. Most species produce asexual propagula (conidia) on conidial heads. Despite their ubiquity, a sexual cycle has not yet been identified for most of the aspergilli. Where sexual reproduction is present, species exhibit either homothallic (self fertile) or heterothallic (obligate outcrossing) breeding systems. A parasexual cycle has also been described in some Aspergillus species. As in other fungi, sexual reproduction is governed by mating-type (MAT) genes, which determine sexual identity and are involved in regulating later stages of sexual development. Previous population genetic studies have indicated that some supposedly asexual aspergilli exhibit evidence of a recombining population structure, suggesting the presence of a cryptic sexual cycle. In addition, genome analyses have revealed networks of genes necessary for sexual reproduction in several Aspergillus species, again consistent with latent sexuality in these fungi. Knowledge of MAT gene presence has then successfully been applied to induce sexual reproduction between MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isolates of certain supposedly asexual aspergilli. Recent progress in understanding the extent and significance of sexual reproduction is described here, with special emphasis on findings that are relevant to clinically important aspergilli. PMID:25118872

  14. Luminescent solar concentrator improvement by stimulated emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Argyros, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) offer the prospect of reducing the cost of solar energy, and are a promising candidate for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, the realization of commercially viable efficiency of LSCs is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. In this work, a method is introduced for reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire length of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption, and directed by the seed laser towards a small target PV cell. A mathematical model of such a system is presented which identifies different physical parameters responsible for the power conversion efficiency and gives the net effective output power.

  15. Thermal luminescence spectroscopy chemical imaging sensor.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Arthur H; Buican, Tudor N; Roese, Erik S; Sutter, James; Samuels, Alan C

    2012-10-01

    The authors present a pseudo-active chemical imaging sensor model embodying irradiative transient heating, temperature nonequilibrium thermal luminescence spectroscopy, differential hyperspectral imaging, and artificial neural network technologies integrated together. We elaborate on various optimizations, simulations, and animations of the integrated sensor design and apply it to the terrestrial chemical contamination problem, where the interstitial contaminant compounds of detection interest (analytes) comprise liquid chemical warfare agents, their various derivative condensed phase compounds, and other material of a life-threatening nature. The sensor must measure and process a dynamic pattern of absorptive-emissive middle infrared molecular signature spectra of subject analytes to perform its chemical imaging and standoff detection functions successfully. PMID:23033092

  16. Photostimulated luminescence properties of neutron image plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. I.; Zimmermann, J.; McIntyre, G. J.; Wilkinson, C.

    2016-09-01

    The luminescence properties of two commercial neutron-sensitive image-plates based on Gd2O3-doped BaFBr:Eu2+ storage phosphors are examined. These are white Fuji plates and blue Fuji plates (BAS-ND) with Gd2O3 content by weight of 34% and 50%, respectively. Both plates show two maxima in the photostimulation spectrum near 500 nm and 600 nm, with the ratio of the peak responses (I600 nm/I500 nm) 1.39 and 0.53 for the white and blue plates respectively. The optimum wavelengths for photostimulation for the two phosphors are therefore different. The response of the blue plate is only 25% that of the white plate, if each is stimulated at its optimum wavelength.

  17. Irradiated Shellfish: Identification by Photostimulated Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Di Schiavi, Maria Teresa; Falconi, Grazia; Verità, Francesca Della; Cavallina, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    The irradiation of food is a technology used in the industry to prevent the deterioration of foodstuff in some countries. The European Community legislation states that each Member State must carry out annual checks on the products during commercialisation. The Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle regioni Lazio e Toscana (Rome, Italy) has developed and validated the screening method of photostimulated luminescence UNI EN 13751:2009 to identify irradiated shellfish. A total of 30 tests of shellfish samples, consisting of 22 certified as irradiated and 8 not-irradiated samples, were performed. The validation procedure was based on sensitivity and specificity; the compatibility between the screening method and the reference standard EN 13751:2009 was evaluated. Data were processed: 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity were obtained. Results obtained in our laboratory were perfectly compatible with the reference standard. For this reason, the method has been validated and proved to be suitable for its intended use. PMID:27800335

  18. Luminescent solar concentrators utilizing stimulated emission.

    PubMed

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W; Schmidt, Timothy W; Argyros, Alexander

    2016-03-21

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are an emerging technology that aims primarily to reduce the cost of solar energy, with great potential for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, realizing LSCs with commercially viable efficiency is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. Here, we introduce an approach to reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire area of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption to allow net gain in the system, and directed towards a small PV cell. A mathematical model, taking into account thermodynamic considerations, of such a system is presented which identifies key parameters and allows evaluation in terms of net effective output power. PMID:27136870

  19. Luminescent solar concentrators utilizing stimulated emission.

    PubMed

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W; Schmidt, Timothy W; Argyros, Alexander

    2016-03-21

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are an emerging technology that aims primarily to reduce the cost of solar energy, with great potential for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, realizing LSCs with commercially viable efficiency is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. Here, we introduce an approach to reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire area of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption to allow net gain in the system, and directed towards a small PV cell. A mathematical model, taking into account thermodynamic considerations, of such a system is presented which identifies key parameters and allows evaluation in terms of net effective output power.

  20. Recombinant transfer in the basic genome of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Purushottam D; Pang, Tin Yau; Studier, F William; Maslov, Sergei

    2015-07-21

    An approximation to the ∼4-Mbp basic genome shared by 32 strains of Escherichia coli representing six evolutionary groups has been derived and analyzed computationally. A multiple alignment of the 32 complete genome sequences was filtered to remove mobile elements and identify the most reliable ∼90% of the aligned length of each of the resulting 496 basic-genome pairs. Patterns of single base-pair mutations (SNPs) in aligned pairs distinguish clonally inherited regions from regions where either genome has acquired DNA fragments from diverged genomes by homologous recombination since their last common ancestor. Such recombinant transfer is pervasive across the basic genome, mostly between genomes in the same evolutionary group, and generates many unique mosaic patterns. The six least-diverged genome pairs have one or two recombinant transfers of length ∼40-115 kbp (and few if any other transfers), each containing one or more gene clusters known to confer strong selective advantage in some environments. Moderately diverged genome pairs (0.4-1% SNPs) show mosaic patterns of interspersed clonal and recombinant regions of varying lengths throughout the basic genome, whereas more highly diverged pairs within an evolutionary group or pairs between evolutionary groups having >1.3% SNPs have few clonal matches longer than a few kilobase pairs. Many recombinant transfers appear to incorporate fragments of the entering DNA produced by restriction systems of the recipient cell. A simple computational model can closely fit the data. Most recombinant transfers seem likely to be due to generalized transduction by coevolving populations of phages, which could efficiently distribute variability throughout bacterial genomes.

  1. Recombinant transfer in the basic genome of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Purushottam D.; Pang, Tin Yau; Studier, F. William; Maslov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    An approximation to the ∼4-Mbp basic genome shared by 32 strains of Escherichia coli representing six evolutionary groups has been derived and analyzed computationally. A multiple alignment of the 32 complete genome sequences was filtered to remove mobile elements and identify the most reliable ∼90% of the aligned length of each of the resulting 496 basic-genome pairs. Patterns of single base-pair mutations (SNPs) in aligned pairs distinguish clonally inherited regions from regions where either genome has acquired DNA fragments from diverged genomes by homologous recombination since their last common ancestor. Such recombinant transfer is pervasive across the basic genome, mostly between genomes in the same evolutionary group, and generates many unique mosaic patterns. The six least-diverged genome pairs have one or two recombinant transfers of length ∼40–115 kbp (and few if any other transfers), each containing one or more gene clusters known to confer strong selective advantage in some environments. Moderately diverged genome pairs (0.4–1% SNPs) show mosaic patterns of interspersed clonal and recombinant regions of varying lengths throughout the basic genome, whereas more highly diverged pairs within an evolutionary group or pairs between evolutionary groups having >1.3% SNPs have few clonal matches longer than a few kilobase pairs. Many recombinant transfers appear to incorporate fragments of the entering DNA produced by restriction systems of the recipient cell. A simple computational model can closely fit the data. Most recombinant transfers seem likely to be due to generalized transduction by coevolving populations of phages, which could efficiently distribute variability throughout bacterial genomes. PMID:26153419

  2. Luminescence in crosslinked polyethylene at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamji, S. S.; Bulinski, A. T.; Suzuki, H.; Matsuki, M.; Iwata, Z.

    1993-10-01

    Electrical treeing is often responsible for the breakdown of insulating materials used in power apparatus such as high-voltage transformers, cables, and capacitors. Insulation, such as crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE), used in underground high-voltage cables usually operates at temperatures above ambient. This paper describes the characteristics of luminescence, emitted prior to electrical tree inception, at a crosslinked polyethylene-semiconducting material (XLPE-semicon) interface held above room temperature. Use of a sensitive light detection system showed that XLPE subjected to elevated temperatures emits luminescence even without voltage application. This light was attributed to thermoluminescence which decreased with the decrease in the concentration of the crosslinking by-products present in the polymer. The spectra of thermoluminescence were only in the visible range. On the other hand, electroluminescence occurred when the XLPE-semicon interface was held above room temperature and subjected to high electric stress. This light did not depend on the concentration of the crosslinking by-products and the spectra of electroluminescence were in the visible and the ultraviolet ranges. It is proposed that XLPE-semicon interface held at elevated temperature and subjected to long-term voltage application initially emits both thermoluminescence and electroluminescence. As the crosslinking by-products exude out of the polymer, thermoluminescence decreases with time and ultimately ceases, but electroluminescence occurs as long as the voltage is applied to the polymer. Although the intensity of electroluminescence emitted at high temperature was lower than that emitted at ambient, sufficient ultraviolet radiation was emitted. The ultraviolet radiation could photodegrade the polymer and lead to electrical tree inception.

  3. Topaz and Kyanite Luminescence Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, E. F., III; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    The luminescence spectra of Cr3+ in heat-treated topaz Al2SiO4(OH,F)2 and natural kyanite Al2SiO5 were measured from 650 - 800 nm in a hydrostatic environment up to pressures of 15 GPa. The R1 and R2 peaks of topaz shift at average rates of 0.30 nm/GPa and 0.22 nm/GPa, respectively, implying that the deformation of the Cr3+ octahedra increases with pressure. Three peaks are fit under each R line of topaz at both room and high pressure, and these peaks are associated with different Al sites into which the Cr substitutes. The shift of the R lines in topaz under pressure is remarkably linear, which appears to be a general feature of many Cr3+-bearing oxides: the underlying cause of this linearity may lie in anharmonic coupling with lattice vibrations. In this context, we also characterize the frequency shifts of two vibronic peaks within topaz. The R1 and R2 peaks of kyanite shift at 0.37 nm/GPa and 0.88 nm/GPa respectively. Two peaks are fit under R1 and three peaks are fit under R2 of kyanite at both room and high pressure; this result is also consistent with three different Cr3+ sites in this material. The R lines in kyanite are notably optically anisotropic, depending strongly on crystallographic orientation: this is most strongly manifested in the R2 peak. The Cr3+ luminescence in these materials provides a sensitive probe of pressure-dependent shifts in the local geometry of the Al-sites in these materials, which are analyzed in the context of previous single-crystal x-ray diffraction measurements.

  4. Luminescent DNA- and agar-based membranes.

    PubMed

    Leones, R; Fernandes, M; Ferreira, R A S; Cesarino, I; Lima, J F; Carlos, L D; Bermudez, V de Zea; Magon, C J; Donoso, J P; Silva, M M; Pawlicka, A

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent materials containing europium ions are investigated for different optical applications. They can be obtained using bio-macromolecules, which are promising alternatives to synthetic polymers based on the decreasing oil resources. This paper describes studies of the DNA- and Agar-europium triflate luminescent membranes and its potential technological applications are expanded to electroluminescent devices. Polarized optical microscopy demonstrated that the samples are birefringent with submicrometer anisotropy. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominantly amorphous nature of the samples and the atomic force microscopy images showed a roughness of the membranes of 409.0 and 136.1 nm for the samples of DNA10Eu and Agar1.11Eu, respectively. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the DNA(n)Eu membranes with the principal lines at g ≈ 2.0 and g ≈ 4.8 confirmed uniform distribution of rare earth ions in a disordered matrix. Moreover, these strong and narrow resonance lines for the samples of DNA(n)Eu when compared to the Agar(n)Eu suggested a presence of paramagnetic radicals arising from the DNA matrix. The emission spectra suggested that the Eu3+ ions occupy a single local environment in both matrices and the excitation spectra monitored around the Eu emission lines pointed out that the Eu3+ ions in the Agar host were mainly excited via the broad band component rather than by direct intra-4f(6) excitation, whereas the opposite case occurred for the DNA-based sample. PMID:25924317

  5. Synthesizing a Cellulase like Chimeric Protein by Recombinant Molecular Biology Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Hirendra Nath; Krauss, Christopher; Smith, Valerie; Mahaffey, Kelly; Boston, Ava

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet the Renewable Fuels Standard demands for 30 billion gallons of biofuels by the end of 2020, new technologies for generation of cellulosic ethanol must be exploited. Breaking down cellulose by cellulase enzyme is very important for this purpose but this is not thermostable and degrades at higher temperatures in bioreactors. Towards creation of a more ecologically friendly method of rendering bioethanol from cellulosic waste, we attempted to produce recombinant higher temperature resistant cellulases for use in bioreactors. The project involved molecular cloning of genes for cellulose-degrading enzymes based on bacterial source, expressing the recombinant proteins in E. coli and optimizing enzymatic activity. We were able to generate in vitro bacterial expression systems to produce recombinant His-tag purified protein which showed cellulase like activity. PMID:27468362

  6. A general method of protein purification for recombinant unstructured non-acidic proteins.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Guillén, Gabriel; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2011-11-01

    Typical late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate in response to water deficit imposed by the environment or by plant developmental programs. Because of their physicochemical properties, they can be considered as hydrophilins and as a paradigm of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs) in plants. To study their biophysical and biochemical characteristics large quantities of highly purified protein are required. In this work, we report a fast and simple purification method for non-acidic recombinant LEA proteins that does not need the addition of tags and that preserves their in vitro protective activity. The method is based on the enrichment of the protein of interest by boiling the bacterial protein extract, followed by a differential precipitation with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Using this procedure we have obtained highly pure recombinant LEA proteins of groups 1, 3, and 4 and one recombinant bacterial hydrophilin. This protocol will facilitate the purification of this type of IUPs, and could be particularly useful in proteomic projects/analyses.

  7. Sensitive, Rapid Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chen, Fei; Pickett, Molly; Matsuyama, Asahi

    2009-01-01

    A method of sensitive detection of bacterial spores within delays of no more than a few hours has been developed to provide an alternative to a prior three-day NASA standard culture-based assay. A capability for relatively rapid detection of bacterial spores would be beneficial for many endeavors, a few examples being agriculture, medicine, public health, defense against biowarfare, water supply, sanitation, hygiene, and the food-packaging and medical-equipment industries. The method involves the use of a commercial rapid microbial detection system (RMDS) that utilizes a combination of membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and analysis of luminescence images detected by a charge-coupled-device camera. This RMDS has been demonstrated to be highly sensitive in enumerating microbes (it can detect as little as one colony-forming unit per sample) and has been found to yield data in excellent correlation with those of culture-based methods. What makes the present method necessary is that the specific RMDS and the original protocols for its use are not designed for discriminating between bacterial spores and other microbes. In this method, a heat-shock procedure is added prior to an incubation procedure that is specified in the original RMDS protocols. In this heat-shock procedure (which was also described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article on enumerating sporeforming bacteria), a sample is exposed to a temperature of 80 C for 15 minutes. Spores can survive the heat shock, but nonspore- forming bacteria and spore-forming bacteria that are not in spore form cannot survive. Therefore, any colonies that grow during incubation after the heat shock are deemed to have originated as spores.

  8. Renewable energy: Better luminescent solar panels in prospect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debije, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Devices known as luminescent solar concentrators could find use as renewable-energy generators, but have so far been plagued by a major light-reabsorption effect. A new study offers a promising route to tackling this problem.

  9. Luminescent Metal-Containing Polymers for White Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheuk-Lam; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2016-10-01

    This chapter focuses on the recent developments in luminescent metallopolymers. Synthetic routes to these polymers are briefly described and their applications in polymer white light-emitting diodes are discussed.

  10. Luminescent Metal-Containing Polymers for White Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheuk-Lam; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2016-10-01

    This chapter focuses on the recent developments in luminescent metallopolymers. Synthetic routes to these polymers are briefly described and their applications in polymer white light-emitting diodes are discussed. PMID:27573506

  11. Optically stimulated luminescence in Cu+ doped lithium orthophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barve, R. A.; Patil, R. R.; Moharil, S. V.; Bhatt, B. C.; Kulkarni, M. S.

    2015-02-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in Cu+ doped Li3PO4 synthesized by co-precipitation technique using different phosphorus precursors was studied. Changes in the luminescent properties were observed with change in the phosphorus precursors. All the synthesized phosphors showed intense fading but the OSL sensitivity was comparable to that of the commercially available Al2O3:C (Landauer Inc.). In general, BSL (blue stimulated luminescence) decay was very fast but the GSL (green stimulated luminescence) decay was comparable to that of Al2O3:C phosphor. Phosphors with fast decay, good sensitivity and intense fading are suitable for real-time dosimetry. Therefore, Cu-doped Li3PO4 could be developed for real-time dosimetry using a fiber optic based OSL reader system.

  12. Enhancing the efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, M. Khalaji; Hanaei, H.; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Saidur, R.; Bakhoda, Shokoufeh; Bashiri, Robabeh; Moayedfar, M.

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in the endeavor to enhance the efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are presented in this paper along with an analysis of LSC devices. In recent years, several experimental and numerical research works have been carried out to improve the performance of LSCs in different ways. LSCs date back to the 1970s and comprise an extremely interesting notion of solar cells for various reasons. First, LSCs are cost-competitive and function in diffuse light, and as such, it is not necessary to use expensive solar tracking devices. Second, luminescence facilitates the cells to gather only cold light, which results in higher PV efficiency. LSCs generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species. The luminescent species absorb incident sunlight and emit it with high quantum efficiency, such that the emitted light is trapped in the sheet and travels to the edges where the solar cells can collect it.

  13. Near-Infrared Quantum Cutting Long Persistent Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zehua; Feng, Lin; Cao, Cheng; Zhang, Jiachi; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    By combining the unique features of the quantum cutting luminescence and long persistent luminescence, we design a new concept called "near-infrared quantum cutting long persistent luminescence (NQPL)", which makes it possible for us to obtain highly efficient (>100%) near-infrared long persistent luminescence in theory. Guided by the NQPL concept, we fabricate the first NQPL phosphor Ca2Ga2GeO7:Pr(3+),Yb(3+). It reveals that both the two-step energy transfer of model (I) and the one-step energy transfer of model (IV) occur in (3)P0 levels of Pr(3+). Although the actual efficiency is not sufficient for the practical application at this primitive stage, this discovery and the associated materials are still expected to have important implications for several fields such as crystalline Si solar cells and bio-medical imaging. PMID:27143282

  14. Near-Infrared Quantum Cutting Long Persistent Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zehua; Feng, Lin; Cao, Cheng; Zhang, Jiachi; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    By combining the unique features of the quantum cutting luminescence and long persistent luminescence, we design a new concept called “near-infrared quantum cutting long persistent luminescence (NQPL)”, which makes it possible for us to obtain highly efficient (>100%) near-infrared long persistent luminescence in theory. Guided by the NQPL concept, we fabricate the first NQPL phosphor Ca2Ga2GeO7:Pr3+,Yb3+. It reveals that both the two-step energy transfer of model (I) and the one-step energy transfer of model (IV) occur in 3P0 levels of Pr3+. Although the actual efficiency is not sufficient for the practical application at this primitive stage, this discovery and the associated materials are still expected to have important implications for several fields such as crystalline Si solar cells and bio-medical imaging. PMID:27143282

  15. Luminescent coupling in planar opto-electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Matthew Valdivia, Christopher E.; Gabr, Ahmed M.; Hinzer, Karin; Masson, Denis; Fafard, Simon

    2015-10-14

    Effects of luminescent coupling are observed in monolithic 5 V, five-junction GaAs phototransducers. Power conversion efficiency was measured at 61.6% ± 3% under the continuous, monochromatic illumination for which they were designed. Modeling shows that photon recycling can account for up to 350 mV of photovoltage in these devices. Drift-diffusion based simulations including a luminescent coupling term in the continuity equation show a broadening of the internal quantum efficiency curve which agrees well with experimental measurements. Luminescent coupling is shown to expand the spectral bandwidth of the phototransducer by a factor of at least 3.5 for devices with three or more junctions, even in cases where multiple absorption/emission events are required to transfer excess carriers into the limiting junction. We present a detailed description of the novel luminescent coupling modeling technique used to predict these performance enhancements.

  16. Biocompatible luminescent silicon quantum dots for imaging of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Erogbogbo, Folarin; Yong, Ken-Tye; Roy, Indrajit; Xu, Gaixia; Prasad, Paras N; Swihart, Mark T

    2008-05-01

    Luminescent silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) have great potential for use in biological imaging and diagnostic applications. To exploit this potential, they must remain luminescent and stably dispersed in water and biological fluids over a wide range of pH and salt concentration. There have been many challenges in creating such stable water-dispersible Si QDs, including instability of photoluminescence due their fast oxidation in aqueous environments and the difficulty of attaching hydrophilic molecules to Si QD surfaces. In this paper, we report the preparation of highly stable aqueous suspensions of Si QDs using phospholipid micelles, in which the optical properties of Si nanocrystals are retained. These luminescent micelle-encapsulated Si QDs were used as luminescent labels for pancreatic cancer cells. This paves the way for silicon quantum dots to be a valuable optical probe in biomedical diagnostics.

  17. No Evidence that Infection Alters Global Recombination Rate in House Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Beth L.; Devlin, Amy A.; Truempy, Dana M.; Miller, Jennifer C.; Singh, Nadia D.

    2015-01-01

    Recombination rate is a complex trait, with genetic and environmental factors shaping observed patterns of variation. Although recent studies have begun to unravel the genetic basis of recombination rate differences between organisms, less attention has focused on the environmental determinants of crossover rates. Here, we test the effect of one ubiquitous environmental pressure–bacterial infection–on global recombination frequency in mammals. We applied MLH1 mapping to assay global crossover rates in male mice infected with the pathogenic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme Disease, and uninfected control animals. Despite ample statistical power to identify biologically relevant differences between infected and uninfected animals, we find no evidence for a global recombination rate response to bacterial infection. Moreover, broad-scale patterns of crossover distribution, including the number of achiasmate bivalents, are not affected by infection status. Although pathogen exposure can plastically increase recombination in some species, our findings suggest that recombination rates in house mice may be resilient to at least some forms of infection stress. This negative result motivates future experiments with alternative house mouse pathogens to evaluate the generality of this conclusion. PMID:26550833

  18. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments. PMID:26021569

  19. Luminescence in Li2BaP2O7.

    PubMed

    Hatwar, L R; Wankhede, S P; Moharil, S V; Muthal, P L; Dhopte, S M

    2015-09-01

    The photo-, thermo- and optically stimulated luminescence in Li2BaP2O7 activated with Eu(2+) /Cu(+) are reported. Strong thermoluminescence, which is about two times greater than LiF-TLD 100 was observed in the Eu(2+) -activated sample. It also exhibited optically stimulated luminescence sensitivity of ~20% that of commercial Al2O3:C phosphor. PMID:25351563

  20. Luminescence-based optical sensor systems for monitoring water parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobnik, Aleksandra; Turel, Matejka; Korent, Špela Mojca

    2007-06-01

    Lanthanide-sensitized luminescence is very attractive because the intramolecular energy transfers between the absorbing ligand and the luminescent ion results in strong narrow-band fluorescence with a large Stokes' shift and long decay times. We will report about several sensor systems based either on sol-gel materials or lanthanide chelates for monitoring and controlling water parameters, such as heavy metals, amines, phosphates.

  1. Herpes simplex virus type 1-derived recombinant and amplicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Fraefel, Cornel; Marconi, Peggy; Epstein, Alberto L

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153 kbp double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes (1) the two approaches most commonly used to prepare recombinant vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria, and (2) the two methodologies currently used to generate helper-free amplicon vectors, either using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based approach or a Cre/loxP site-specific recombination strategy.

  2. The insecticidal activity of recombinant garlic lectins towards aphids.

    PubMed

    Fitches, Elaine; Wiles, Duncan; Douglas, Angela E; Hinchliffe, Gareth; Audsley, Neil; Gatehouse, John A

    2008-10-01

    The heterodimeric and homodimeric garlic lectins ASAI and ASAII were produced as recombinant proteins in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The proteins were purified as functional dimeric lectins, but underwent post-translational proteolysis. Recombinant ASAII was a single homogenous polypeptide which had undergone C-terminal processing similar to that occurring in planta. The recombinant ASAI was glycosylated and subject to variable and heterogenous proteolysis. Both lectins showed insecticidal effects when fed to pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) in artificial diet, ASAII being more toxic than ASAI at the same concentration. Acute toxicity (mortality at < or =48 h exposure; similar timescale to starvation) was only apparent at the highest lectin concentrations tested (2.0 mg ml(-)1), but dose-dependent chronic toxicity (mortality at >3d exposure) was observed over the concentration range 0.125-2.0 mg ml(-1). The recombinant lectins caused mortality in both symbiotic and antibiotic-treated aphids, showing that toxicity is not dependent on the presence of the bacterial symbiont (Buchnera aphidicola), or on interaction with symbiont proteins, such as the previously identified lectin "receptor" symbionin. A pull-down assay coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting identified two abundant membrane-associated aphid gut proteins, alanyl aminopeptidase N and sucrase, as "receptors" for lectin binding. PMID:18707000

  3. Controlled release from recombinant polymers.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-09-28

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed.

  4. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  5. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  6. Recombinant DNA means and method

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, B.L.; Mao, J.I.; Moir, D.T.; Taunton-Rigby, A.; Vovis, G.F.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes a transformed living cell selected from the group consisting of fungi, yeast and bacteria, and containing genetic material derived from recombinant DNA material and coding for bovine rennin.

  7. Recombination system for storage batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Bopp, B.; Ledjeff, K.; Winsel, A.

    1983-03-29

    A recombination system for catalytic oxidation of hydrogen in storage battery gases includes a gas supply duct which makes it possible for the combustible gas flowing through it to aspirate from the ambient the necessary combustion air, following the principle of a bunsen burner, and to entrain it to the recombination catalyst. In case of over-supply of gas, an acid separator positioned in the gas supply pipe counteracts the gas aspiration by means of its flow impedance and thereby makes the recombination system safe from overload. It can also be connected following a conventional recombiner, thereby increasing its effectiveness, by receiving the excess hydrogen from same and reacting it with the aid of the air aspiration.

  8. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  9. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Helmut; Ledjeff, Konstantin

    1985-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive he discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  10. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, H.; Ledjeff, K.

    1984-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive the discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  11. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  12. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  13. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  14. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  15. Vaccinia virus vectors: new strategies for producing recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Hruby, D E

    1990-01-01

    The development and continued refinement of techniques for the efficient insertion and expression of heterologous DNA sequences from within the genomic context of infectious vaccinia virus recombinants are among the most promising current approaches towards effective immunoprophylaxis against a variety of protozoan, viral, and bacterial human pathogens. Because of its medical relevance, this area is the subject of intense research interest and has evolved rapidly during the past several years. This review (i) provides an updated overview of the technology that exists for assembling recombinant vaccinia virus strains, (ii) discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches, (iii) outlines the areas of outgoing research directed towards overcoming the limitations of current techniques, and (iv) provides some insight (i.e., speculation) about probable future refinements in the use of vaccinia virus as a vector. PMID:2187593

  16. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tim N.; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  17. Synthesis of cytocompatible luminescent titania/fluorescein hybrid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Tagaya, Motohiro; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2014-05-14

    Luminescent titania-fluorescein (FS) hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) were successfully synthesized by a sol-gel reaction of titanium alkoxide in the presence of octadecylamine using a fluidic reactor with a Y-type channel. The molar ratio of FS/Ti ratio was varied in the range from 1/1000 to 1/100 in order to obtain the hybrid NPs with the different luminescent behavior. The shape of the NPs is spherical and their sizes are 400 nm which is almost the same irrespective of the FS content, suggesting the different FS molecular states in one NP. We also demonstrated that the hybrid NPs exhibited a characteristic luminescence; the NPs with the higher and lower FS contents exhibited an enhanced luminescence in PBS and air, respectively, indicating that the FS states responded to the molecular environment. Through cytocompatible experiments using the NPs, it turned out that they had a high compatibility for fibroblasts. Therefore, the preparation of a series of the luminescent NPs with a tunable luminescence property was achieved. The results will lead to a guideline to determine a proper combination between material composition and an environment where they are used, being useful for biomedical applications.

  18. Flight testing of a luminescent surface pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclachlan, B. G.; Bell, J. H.; Espina, J.; Gallery, J.; Gouterman, M.; Demandante, C. G. N.; Bjarke, L.

    1992-01-01

    NASA ARC has conducted flight tests of a new type of aerodynamic pressure sensor based on a luminescent surface coating. Flights were conducted at the NASA ARC-Dryden Flight Research Facility. The luminescent pressure sensor is based on a surface coating which, when illuminated with ultraviolet light, emits visible light with an intensity dependent on the local air pressure on the surface. This technique makes it possible to obtain pressure data over the entire surface of an aircraft, as opposed to conventional instrumentation, which can only make measurements at pre-selected points. The objective of the flight tests was to evaluate the effectiveness and practicality of a luminescent pressure sensor in the actual flight environment. A luminescent pressure sensor was installed on a fin, the Flight Test Fixture (FTF), that is attached to the underside of an F-104 aircraft. The response of one particular surface coating was evaluated at low supersonic Mach numbers (M = 1.0-1.6) in order to provide an initial estimate of the sensor's capabilities. This memo describes the test approach, the techniques used, and the pressure sensor's behavior under flight conditions. A direct comparison between data provided by the luminescent pressure sensor and that produced by conventional pressure instrumentation shows that the luminescent sensor can provide quantitative data under flight conditions. However, the test results also show that the sensor has a number of limitations which must be addressed if this technique is to prove useful in the flight environment.

  19. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes. PMID:22179333

  20. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes.

  1. Bacterial toxicity assessment of drinking water treatment residue (DWTR) and lake sediment amended with DWTR.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Nannan; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2016-11-01

    Drinking water treatment residue (DWTR) seems to be very promising for controlling lake sediment pollution. Logically, acquisition of the potential toxicity of DWTR will be beneficial for its applications. In this study, the toxicity of DWTR and sediments amended with DWTR to Aliivibrio fischeri was evaluated based on the Microtox(®) solid and leachate phase assays, in combination with flow cytometry analyses and the kinetic luminescent bacteria test. The results showed that both solid particles and aqueous/organic extracts of DWTR exhibited no toxicity to the bacterial luminescence and growth. The solid particles of DWTR even promoted bacterial luminescence, possibly because DWTR particles could act as a microbial carrier and provide nutrients for bacteria growth. Bacterial toxicity (either luminescence or growth) was observed from the solid phase and aqueous/organic extracts of sediments with or without DWTR addition. Further analysis showed that the solid phase toxicity was determined to be related mainly to the fixation of bacteria to fine particles and/or organic matter, and all of the observed inhibition resulting from aqueous/organic extracts was identified as non-significant. Moreover, DWTR addition not only had no adverse effect on the aqueous/organic extract toxicity of the sediment but also reduced the solid phase toxicity of the sediment. Overall, in practical application, the solid particles, the water-soluble substances transferred to surface water or the organic substances in DWTR had no toxicity or any delayed effect on bacteria in lakes, and DWTR can therefore be considered as a non-hazardous material. PMID:27454093

  2. Bacterial toxicity assessment of drinking water treatment residue (DWTR) and lake sediment amended with DWTR.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Nannan; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2016-11-01

    Drinking water treatment residue (DWTR) seems to be very promising for controlling lake sediment pollution. Logically, acquisition of the potential toxicity of DWTR will be beneficial for its applications. In this study, the toxicity of DWTR and sediments amended with DWTR to Aliivibrio fischeri was evaluated based on the Microtox(®) solid and leachate phase assays, in combination with flow cytometry analyses and the kinetic luminescent bacteria test. The results showed that both solid particles and aqueous/organic extracts of DWTR exhibited no toxicity to the bacterial luminescence and growth. The solid particles of DWTR even promoted bacterial luminescence, possibly because DWTR particles could act as a microbial carrier and provide nutrients for bacteria growth. Bacterial toxicity (either luminescence or growth) was observed from the solid phase and aqueous/organic extracts of sediments with or without DWTR addition. Further analysis showed that the solid phase toxicity was determined to be related mainly to the fixation of bacteria to fine particles and/or organic matter, and all of the observed inhibition resulting from aqueous/organic extracts was identified as non-significant. Moreover, DWTR addition not only had no adverse effect on the aqueous/organic extract toxicity of the sediment but also reduced the solid phase toxicity of the sediment. Overall, in practical application, the solid particles, the water-soluble substances transferred to surface water or the organic substances in DWTR had no toxicity or any delayed effect on bacteria in lakes, and DWTR can therefore be considered as a non-hazardous material.

  3. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  4. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  5. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  6. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  7. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Bean, Rachel; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, ns, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z*=1078±11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1σ to R=1.734±0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: γα<0.39 and γi<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  8. Synthesis and study of the luminescent properties of europium-doped yttrium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, A. Yu.; Mozharov, A. M.; Trofimov, A. N.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    A method of synthesis of single-phase europium-doped yttrium niobate powders without using additional fluxes is developed. Using this method, a series of samples with different europium concentrations are synthesized. The phase composition, grain size, and luminescent properties of the synthesized powders are studied. The optimal dopant concentration corresponding to the maximum luminescence intensity is determined. It is shown that the decay time of the most intense luminescence line of europium decreases with increasing europium concentration. Comparative analysis of the luminescent properties of calcium tungstate and the luminescent properties of a synthesized sample with the highest luminescence intensity is performed.

  9. Bacterial Cellular Engineering by Genome Editing and Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Nobutaka; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing is an important technology for bacterial cellular engineering, which is commonly conducted by homologous recombination-based procedures, including gene knockout (disruption), knock-in (insertion), and allelic exchange. In addition, some new recombination-independent approaches have emerged that utilize catalytic RNAs, artificial nucleases, nucleic acid analogs, and peptide nucleic acids. Apart from these methods, which directly modify the genomic structure, an alternative approach is to conditionally modify the gene expression profile at the posttranscriptional level without altering the genomes. This is performed by expressing antisense RNAs to knock down (silence) target mRNAs in vivo. This review describes the features and recent advances on methods used in genomic engineering and silencing technologies that are advantageously used for bacterial cellular engineering. PMID:24552876

  10. Characterization of phenotype variations of luminescent and non-luminescent variants of Vibrio harveyi wild type and quorum sensing mutants.

    PubMed

    Hong, N T X; Baruah, K; Vanrompay, D; Bossier, P

    2016-03-01

    Vibrio harveyi, a luminescent Gram-negative motile marine bacterium, is an important pathogen responsible for causing severe diseases in shrimp, finfish and molluscs leading to severe economic losses. Non-luminescent V. harveyi obtained by culturing luminescent strains under static and dark condition were reported to alter the levels of virulence factors and metalloprotease gene and luxR expression when compared to their luminescent variants. Presently, we conducted an in vitro study aiming at the characterization of virulence-related phenotypic traits of the wild-type V. harveyi BB120 strain and its isogenic quorum sensing mutants before and after switching to the non-luminescent status. We measured the production of caseinase, haemolysin and elastase and examined swimming motility and biofilm formation. Our results showed that switching from the bioluminescent to the non-luminescent state changed the phenotypic physiology or behaviour of V. harveyi resulting in alterations in caseinase and haemolytic activities, swimming motility and biofilm formation. The switching capacity was to a large extent independent from the quorum sensing status, in that quorum sensing mutants were equally capable of making the phenotypic switch.

  11. Carboxyl-Functionalized Ionic Liquid Assisted Preparation of Flexible, Transparent, and Luminescent Chitosan Films as Vapor Luminescent Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Daqing; Wang, Yige; He, Liang; Li, Huanrong

    2016-08-01

    Herein we present a novel method to synthesize flexible self-standing films consisting of europium(III) complexes in nanoclay and chitosan, which are transparent and luminescent. Preparation takes place under aqueous conditions assisted by a carboxyl-functionalized ionic liquid (IL). The latter is used not only as a replacement for acetic acid to dissolve chitosan but, surprisingly, also to enhance the luminescence efficiency of the final films. A brighter luminescence is observed for the films prepared assisted with the ionic liquids compared to those by using acetic acid. The reason is that the ionic liquid used to dissolve chitosan can decrease proton strength on embedded platelets primarily through ion-exchange process and thus can increase the coordination number of europium(III) complexes. Exposure of the films to Et3N vapors can cause a further remarkable luminescence enhancement, while significant luminescence quenching occurred upon exposure to HCl vapors. The films are promising for applications in areas such as optoelectronics and vapor-sensitive luminescent sensors. PMID:27424528

  12. Quenching of the luminescence intensity of GaN nanowires under electron beam exposure: impact of C adsorption on the exciton lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lähnemann, Jonas; Flissikowski, Timur; Wölz, Martin; Geelhaar, Lutz; Grahn, Holger T.; Brandt, Oliver; Jahn, Uwe

    2016-11-01

    Electron irradiation of GaN nanowires in a scanning electron microscope strongly reduces their luminous efficiency as shown by cathodoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy. We demonstrate that this luminescence quenching originates from a combination of charge trapping at already existing surface states and the formation of new surface states induced by the adsorption of C on the nanowire sidewalls. The interplay of these effects leads to a complex temporal evolution of the quenching, which strongly depends on the incident electron dose per area. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on electron-irradiated samples reveal that the carbonaceous adlayer affects both the nonradiative and the radiative recombination dynamics.

  13. Carrier transport and luminescence properties of nanocomposites of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethyl hexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] and dehydrated nanotubes titanic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Ran; Teng, Feng; Wang, Yongsheng; Xu, Xurong

    2007-12-01

    The carrier transport capability and luminescence efficiency of poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethyl hexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) films are enhanced by doping with dehydrated nanotubed titanic acid (DNTA). MEH-PPV molecules, either wrapped on the outer surface of or encapsulated into DNTA pores, have a more open, straighter conformation than undoped molecules, which induces a longer conjugated backbone and stronger interchain interactions, thereby, enhancing carrier mobility. MEH-PPV molecules within DNTA pores have higher exciton recombination efficiency owing to quantum confinement and the antenna effect.

  14. Influence of dehydrated nanotubed titanic acid on charge transport and luminescent properties of polymer light-emitting diodes with fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Lei; Bera, Debasis; Jin, Zhen-Sheng; Du, Zu-Liang; Xu, Zheng; Teng, Feng; Liu, Wei

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss the influence of dehydrated nanotubed titanic acid (DNTA) on charge transport and luminescent properties of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) doped with fluorescent dye. Photoluminescence results confirm the efficient energy transfer from PVK to 4-(dicyanom-ethylene)-2- t-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) and tris-(8-hydroxtquinoline) aluminum (Alq 3) in a DNTA-doped device. The device showed lower turn-on voltages and higher charge current by doping with DNTA, which also caused a shift in the exciton's recombination region.

  15. Inhibition of electrochemically controlled bioluminescence of bacterial luciferase by n-alkyl alcohols.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Yamada, Shuto; Takehara, Kô

    2011-01-01

    An electrochemical system has been developed in order to assay the effect of hydrophobic molecules on the bioluminescence of bacterial luciferase (BL). The inhibition of BL luminescence by the long-chain n-alkyl alcohol has been examined using this system. The 1-heptanol, 1-octanol, 1-nonanol, 1-decanol, 1-undecanol and 1-dodecanol inhibited the BL reaction in a dose-dependent manner. The IC(50) value, that is, the inhibitor concentration required to decrease the luminescence intensity by half, of these alcohols decreased with increasing the alkyl chain-length of the alcohols. In contrast, the shorter chain 1-hexanol did not inhibit the BL luminescence at all in the examined concentration range. These results indicate that the molecular size and hydrophobicity of the n-alkyl alcohol are the key factors to the inhibitory potency of the BL reaction. The IC(50) values are in agreement with values obtained for the bioluminescence of the firefly luciferase system. The proposed electrochemical BL luminescence system will be used for an inhibitory assay of hydrophobic drugs, such as general anesthetics on protein functions.

  16. Luminescence dating of ancient Darhad basin, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheul Kim, Jin; Yi, Sangheon; Lim, Jaesoo; Kim, Ju-Yong

    2016-04-01

    . Thus, age control on existing 14C ages from this site is limited, chronological interpretation based on the 14C ages is still incomplete in Hodon outcrop sediments. OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence) is an alternative method for dating to overcome the problems associated with 14C methods. OSL has been extensively used for dating arctic sediments (Thomas et al., 2006; more). Previous optical ages on Darhad paleolake sediments obtained using IRSL (Infrared-stimulated luminescence) on feldspars (Gillespie et al., 2008; Batbaatar et al., 2009). Feldspar has much brighter luminescence than quartz, while the OSL signal of feldspars bleaches at least one order of magnitude slower than the OSL signal of quartz (Godfrey-Smith et al., 1988; Huntly and Lamothe, 2001; Mauz and Bungenstock, 2007; Kim et al., 2012). In glaciofluvial, glaciolacustrine environments, inadequate bleaching of the OSL signal is known to be a potential problem of burial ages (Thomas et al., 2006). OSL dating of permafrost deposits may also involve uncertainty about the inhomogeneous radiation field surrounding the dosimeter and the absorption of ionizing energy alternately by water and ice in a not-constant pore volume (Haeberli et al., 2003). In this study, we test the applicability of quartz OSL dating for the uppermost paleolake sediments in the Hodon outcrop of the Darhad basin. The OSL results were systematically compared with additional radiocarbon ages from wood fragments to conclude the reliability of the OSL dates and to construct intensive chronology for Late-Pleistocene Darhad paleolake. To evaluate the time of recent expansion of the paleolake, the northern piedmont (Talyn outcrop) of the basin was dated by OSL.

  17. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  18. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  19. Human cytomegalovirus: bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cloning and genetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Anne M; Yu, Dong

    2012-02-01

    The understanding of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) biology was long hindered by the inability to perform efficient viral genetic analysis. This hurdle was recently overcome when the genomes of multiple HCMV strains were cloned as infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The BAC system takes advantage of the single-copy F plasmid of E. coli that can stably carry large pieces of foreign DNA. In this system, a recombinant HCMV virus carrying a modified F plasmid is first generated in eukaryotic cells. Recombinant viral genomes are then isolated and recovered in E. coli as BAC clones. BAC-captured viral genomes can be manipulated using prokaryotic genetics, and recombinant virus can be reconstituted from BAC transfection in eukaryotic cells. The BAC reverse genetic system provides a reliable and efficient method to introduce genetic alterations into the viral genome in E.coli and subsequently analyze their effects on virus biology in eukaryotic cells. PMID:22307551

  20. Human Cytomegalovirus: Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Cloning and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Anne M.; Yu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) biology was long hindered by the inability to perform efficient viral genetic analysis. This hurdle was recently overcome when the genomes of multiple HCMV strains were cloned as infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The BAC system takes advantage of the single-copy F plasmid of E. coli that can stably carry large pieces of foreign DNA. In this system, a recombinant HCMV virus carrying a modified F plasmid is first generated in eukaryotic cells. Recombinant viral genomes are then isolated and recovered in E. coli as BAC clones. BAC-captured viral genomes can be manipulated using prokaryotic genetics, and recombinant virus can be reconstituted from BAC transfection in eukaryotic cells. The BAC reverse genetic system provides a reliable and efficient method to introduce genetic alterations into the viral genome in E.coli and subsequently analyze their effects on virus biology in eukaryotic cells. PMID:22307551

  1. Ideal Diode Equation for Organic Heterojunctions. II. The Role of Polaron Pair Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, Noel C; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Wasielewski, Michael R; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2010-10-04

    In paper I [N. C. Giebink, G. P. Wiederrecht, M. R. Wasielewski, and S. R. Forrest, Phys. Rev. B 82, 155305 (2010)], we proposed that current transport in a donor-acceptor heterojunction (HJ) depends on the balance of polaron pair (PP) dissociation and recombination. Here, we directly investigate these processes in archetype planar copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/C{sub 60} and boron subpthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/C{sub 60} HJs. Using intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) along with emission from interfacial Pc/C{sub 60} exciplex states, we monitor the geminate PP density at the HJ as a function of bias and illumination intensity. We find that the SubPc/C{sub 60} PP density is limited by the dynamics of dissociation, where it increases from short circuit, and peaks at open circuit. In contrast, that of CuPc/C{sub 60} is dominated by faster recombination kinetics and declines monotonically over the same voltage domain. We conclude that the PP recombination rate depends on electric field, and propose a simple expression that qualitatively explains the observed exciplex luminescence and IMPS behavior for these HJs. Our results provide insight into polaron pair recombination, which governs the current-voltage characteristics of organic heterojunctions in the dark and under illumination.

  2. Ideal diode equation for organic heterojunctions. II. The role of polaron pair recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, Noel C; Lassiter, Brian E; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Wasielewski, Michael R; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2010-10-04

    In paper I [N. C. Giebink, G. P. Wiederrecht, M. R. Wasielewski, and S. R. Forrest, Phys. Rev. B 82, 155305 (2010)], we proposed that current transport in a donor-acceptor heterojunction (HJ) depends on the balance of polaron pair (PP) dissociation and recombination. Here, we directly investigate these processes in archetype planar copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/C{sub 60} and boron subpthalocyanine chloride (SubPc)/C{sub 60} HJs. Using intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) along with emission from interfacial Pc/C{sub 60} exciplex states, we monitor the geminate PP density at the HJ as a function of bias and illumination intensity. We find that the SubPc/C{sub 60} PP density is limited by the dynamics of dissociation, where it increases from short circuit, and peaks at open circuit. In contrast, that of CuPc/C{sub 60} is dominated by faster recombination kinetics and declines monotonically over the same voltage domain. We conclude that the PP recombination rate depends on electric field, and propose a simple expression that qualitatively explains the observed exciplex luminescence and IMPS behavior for these HJs. Our results provide insight into polaron pair recombination, which governs the current-voltage characteristics of organic heterojunctions in the dark and under illumination.

  3. Synchronized cycles of bacterial lysis for in vivo delivery.

    PubMed

    Din, M Omar; Danino, Tal; Prindle, Arthur; Skalak, Matt; Selimkhanov, Jangir; Allen, Kaitlin; Julio, Ellixis; Atolia, Eta; Tsimring, Lev S; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Hasty, Jeff

    2016-08-01

    The widespread view of bacteria as strictly pathogenic has given way to an appreciation of the prevalence of some beneficial microbes within the human body. It is perhaps inevitable that some bacteria would evolve to preferentially grow in environments that harbor disease and thus provide a natural platform for the development of engineered therapies. Such therapies could benefit from bacteria that are programmed to limit bacterial growth while continually producing and releasing cytotoxic agents in situ. Here we engineer a clinically relevant bacterium to lyse synchronously ata threshold population density and to release genetically encoded cargo. Following quorum lysis, a small number of surviving bacteria reseed the growing population, thus leading to pulsatile delivery cycles. We used microfluidic devices to characterize the engineered lysis strain and we demonstrate its potential as a drug delivery platform via co-culture with human cancer cells in vitro. Asa proof of principle, we tracked the bacterial population dynamics in ectopic syngeneic colorectal tumours in mice via a luminescent reporter. The lysis strain exhibits pulsatile population dynamics in vivo, with mean bacterial luminescence that remained two orders of magnitude lower than an unmodified strain. Finally, guided by previous findings that certain bacteria can enhance the efficacy of standard therapies, we orally administered the lysis strain alone or in combination with a clinical chemotherapeutic to a syngeneic mouse transplantation model of hepatic colorectal metastases. We found that the combination of both circuit-engineered bacteria and chemotherapy leads to a notable reduction of tumour activity along with a marked survival benefit over either therapy alone.Our approach establishes a methodology for leveraging the tools of synthetic biology to exploit the natural propensity for certain bacteria to colonize disease sites. PMID:27437587

  4. Mechanisms of bacterial pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J; Schurr, M; LeBlanc, C; Ramamurthy, R; Buchanan, K; Nickerson, C

    2002-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilise a number of mechanisms to cause disease in human hosts. Bacterial pathogens express a wide range of molecules that bind host cell targets to facilitate a variety of different host responses. The molecular strategies used by bacteria to interact with the host can be unique to specific pathogens or conserved across several different species. A key to fighting bacterial disease is the identification and characterisation of all these different strategies. The availability of complete genome sequences for several bacterial pathogens coupled with bioinformatics will lead to significant advances toward this goal. PMID:11930024

  5. Bacterial challenges in food

    PubMed Central

    Collee, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of bacterial challenges that might be encountered in food are discussed with reference to recognized and relatively unrecognized hazards. Mechanisms of pathogenicity are reviewed and the populations at risk are noted. The bacterial content of food as it is served at table merits more study. The challenge of prevention by education is discussed. Indirect bacterial challenges in our food are considered. The real challenge of diagnosis depends upon an awareness of a complex range of conditions; the importance of effective communication with efficient laboratory and epidemiological services is stressed. There is an increasing need for care in the preparation and distribution of food. PMID:4467860

  6. Luminescence modulations of rhenium tricarbonyl complexes induced by structural variations.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Hélène C; Clède, Sylvain; Guillot, Régis; Lambert, François; Policar, Clotilde

    2014-06-16

    Octahedral d(6) low-spin Re(I) tricarbonyl complexes are of considerable interest as noninvasive imaging probes and have been deeply studied owing to their biological stability, low toxicity, large Stokes shifts, and long luminescence lifetimes. We reported recently the bimodal IR and luminescence imaging of a Re(I) tricarbonyl complex with a Pyta ligand (4-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,3-triazole) in cells and labeled such metal-carbonyl complexes SCoMPIs for single-core multimodal probes for imaging. Re(I) tricarbonyl complexes have unique photophysical properties allowing for their unequivocal detection in cells but also present some weaknesses such as a very low luminescence quantum yield in aqueous medium. Further optimizations would thus be desirable. We therefore developed new Re(I) tricarbonyl complexes prepared from different ancillary ligands. Complexes with benzothiadiazole-triazole ligands show interesting luminescent quantum yields in acetonitrile and may constitute valuable luminescent metal complexes in organic media. A series of complexes with bidentate 1-(2-quinolinyl)-1,2,3-triazole (Taquin) and 1-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,3-triazole (Tapy) ligands bearing various 4-substituted alkyl side chains has been designed and synthesized with efficient procedures. Their photophysical properties have been characterized in acetonitrile and in a H2O/DMSO (98/2) mixture and compared with those of the parent Quinta- and Pyta-based complexes. Tapy complexes bearing long alkyl chains show impressive enhancement of their luminescent properties relative to the parent Pyta complex. Theoretical calculations have been performed to further characterize this new class of rhenium tricarbonyl complexes. Preliminary cellular imaging studies in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells reveal a strong increase in the luminescence signal in cells incubated with the Tapy complex substituted with a C12 alkyl chain. This study points out the interesting potential of the Tapy ligand in coordination chemistry

  7. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  8. Progenitors of Recombining Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  9. Electron-Beam Recombination Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoades, Robert Lewis

    1992-01-01

    The first known instance of electron-beam pumping of the 546.1 nm mercury laser is reported. This has been achieved using high-energy electrons to create intense ionization in a coaxial diode chamber containing a mixture of noble gases with a small amount of mercury vapor. Also reported are the results of a study of the 585.3 nm neon laser in He:Ne:Ar mixtures under similar experimental conditions. Both of these lasers are believed to be predominantly pumped by recombination. For the mercury laser, kinetic processes in the partially ionized plasma following the excitation pulse of high-energy electrons should favor the production of atomic mercury ions and molecular ions containing mercury. Subsequent recombination with electrons heavily favors the production of the 7^3S and 6^3 D states of Hg, of which 7^3S is the upper level of the reported laser. For the neon laser, the dominant recombining ion has been previously shown to be Ne_2^{+}. One of the dominant roles of helium in recombination lasers is inferred from the data for the neon laser at low helium concentrations. Helium appears to be necessary for the rapid relaxation of the electron energy which then increases the reaction rates for all known recombination processes thus increasing the pump rate into the upper state.

  10. Imaging β-Galactosidase Activity In Vivo Using Sequential Reporter-Enzyme Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    von Degenfeld, Georges; Wehrman, Tom S.; Blau, Helen M.

    2010-01-01

    Bioluminescence using the reporter enzyme firefly luciferase (Fluc) and the substrate luciferin enables noninvasive optical imaging of living animals with extremely high sensitivity. This type of analysis enables studies of gene expression, tumor growth, and cell migration over time in live animals that were previously not possible. However, a major limitation of this system is that Fluc activity is restricted to the intracellular environment, which precludes important applications of in vivo imaging such as antibody labeling, or serum protein monitoring. In order to expand the application of bioluminescence imaging to other enzymes, we characterized a sequential reporter-enzyme luminescence (SRL) technology for the in vivo detection of β-galactosidase (β-gal) activity. The substrate is a “caged” D-luciferin conjugate that must first be cleaved by β-gal before it can be catalyzed by Fluc in the final, light-emitting step. Hence, luminescence is dependent on and correlates with β-gal activity. A variety of experiments were performed in order to validate the system and explore potential new applications. We were able to visualize non-invasively over time constitutive β-gal activity in engineered cells, as well as inducible tissue-specific β-gal expression in transgenic mice. Since β-gal, unlike Fluc, retains full activity outside of cells, we were able to show that antibodies conjugated to the recombinant β-gal enzyme could be used to detect and localize endogenous cells and extracellular antigens in vivo. In addition, we developed a low-affinity β-gal complementation system that enables inducible, reversible protein interactions to be monitored in real time in vivo, for example, sequential responses to agonists and antagonists of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Thus, using SRL, the exquisite luminescent properties of Fluc can be combined with the advantages of another enzyme. Other substrates have been described that extend the scope to endogenous

  11. Gated Luminescence Imaging of Silicon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jinmyoung; Liu, Xiangyou; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Nam, Yoonkey; Sailor, Michael J

    2015-06-23

    The luminescence lifetime of nanocrystalline silicon is typically on the order of microseconds, significantly longer than the nanosecond lifetimes exhibited by fluorescent molecules naturally present in cells and tissues. Time-gated imaging, where the image is acquired at a time after termination of an excitation pulse, allows discrimination of a silicon nanoparticle probe from these endogenous signals. Because of the microsecond time scale for silicon emission, time-gated imaging is relatively simple to implement for this biocompatible and nontoxic probe. Here a time-gated system with ∼10 ns resolution is described, using an intensified CCD camera and pulsed LED or laser excitation sources. The method is demonstrated by tracking the fate of mesoporous silicon nanoparticles containing the tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, administered by retro-orbital injection into live mice. Imaging of such systemically administered nanoparticles in vivo is particularly challenging because of the low concentration of probe in the targeted tissues and relatively high background signals from tissue autofluorescence. Contrast improvements of >100-fold (relative to steady-state imaging) is demonstrated in the targeted tissues.

  12. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications.

  13. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications. PMID:27666663

  14. Luminescent Solar Concentrators in the Algal Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellier, Katie; Corrado, Carley; Carter, Sue; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    Today's industry for renewable energy sources and highly efficient energy management systems is rapidly increasing. Development of increased efficiency Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) has brought about new applications for commercial interests, including greenhouses for agricultural crops. This project is taking first steps to explore the potential of LSCs to enhance production and reduce costs for algae and cyanobacteria used in biofuels and nutraceuticals. This pilot phase uses LSC filtered light for algal growth trials in greenhouses and laboratory experiments, creating specific wavelength combinations to determine effects of discrete solar light regimes on algal growth and the reduction of heating and water loss in the system. Enhancing the optimal spectra for specific algae will not only increase production, but has the potential to lessen contamination of large scale production due to competition from other algae and bacteria. Providing LSC filtered light will reduce evaporation and heating in regions with limited water supply, while the increased energy output from photovoltaic cells will reduce costs of heating and mixing cultures, thus creating a more efficient and cost effective production system.

  15. Luminescent Silica Nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Montalti, Marco; Petrizza, Luca; Rampazzo, Enrico; Zaccheroni, Nelsi; Marchiò, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging techniques are becoming essential in preclinical investigations, and the research of suitable tools for in vivo measurements is gaining more and more importance and attention. Nanotechnology entered the field to try to find solutions for many limitation at the state of the art, and luminescent nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most promising materials proposed for future diagnostic implementation. NPs constitute also a versatile platform that can allow facile multi-functionalization to perform multimodal imaging or theranostic (simultaneous diagnosis and therapy). In this contribution we have focussed our attention only on dye doped silica or silica-based NPs conjugated with targeting moieties to enable specific cancer cells imaging and differentiation, even if also a few non targeted systems have been cited and discussed for completeness. We have summarized common synthetic approaches to these materials and then surveyed the most recent imaging applications of silica-based nanoparticles in cancer. The field of theranostic is so important and stimulating that, even if it is not the central topic of this paper, we have included some significant examples. We have then concluded with short hints on systems already in clinical trials and examples of specific applications in children tumours. This review tries to describe and discuss, through focussed examples, the great potentialities of these materials in the medical field, with the aim to encourage further research to implement applications that are still rare. PMID:23458621

  16. Gated Luminescence Imaging of Silicon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jinmyoung; Liu, Xiangyou; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Nam, Yoonkey; Sailor, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence lifetime of nanocrystalline silicon is typically on the order of microseconds, significantly longer than the nanosecond lifetimes exhibited by fluorescent molecules naturally present in cells and tissues. Time-gated imaging, where the image is acquired at a time after termination of an excitation pulse, allows discrimination of a silicon nanoparticle probe from these endogenous signals. Because of the microsecond time scale for silicon emission, time-gated imaging is relatively simple to implement for this biocompatible and nontoxic probe. Here a time-gated system with ~10 ns resolution is described, using an intensified CCD camera and pulsed LED or laser excitation sources. The method is demonstrated by tracking the fate of mesoporous silicon nanoparticles containing the tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, administered by retro-orbital injection into live mice. Imaging of such systemically administered nanoparticles in vivo is particularly challenging because of the low concentration of probe in the targeted tissues and relatively high background signals from tissue autofluorescence. Contrast improvements of >100-fold (relative to steady-state imaging) is demonstrated in the targeted tissues. PMID:26034817

  17. Luminescence of some airborne plant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satterwhite, Melvin B.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the excitation- emission spectra of seed pubescence, pollen and spores, and senesced plant materials that could be carried in the air column. Reference samples were a mature green-colored corn leaf, green-, yellow- and brown-colored soybean leaves, cellulose, commercial grade cotton batting and a soil. Spectral luminescence signatures were collected over the 300 to 800 nanometer region using a scanning spectrofluorometer. The excitation-emission spectra were broadband emission centroids in the 400-nm to 600-nm spectrum. Emission maxima were associated with the 440-nm, 470-nm and 370-nm excitation bands and the 455-nm to 590-nm emission bands. The coma of milkweed, silkvine, cotton (raw), cottonwood seeds and yellow- colored pollen and spores were highly fluorescent. The pappus of thistles, dandelion and goat's beard seeds and newly senesced grass leaves and glumes had moderate to high fluorescence. Dark brown-colored mushroom spores and weathered, senesced plant materials had low fluorescence. The emission spectra resembled that of regent, microcrystalline cellulose although impurities incorporated within the plant materials altered their emission intensities from that of cellulose. Moderate to low emissions were from tan- to dark brown-colored materials, whereas the white-colored or light, tan-colored materials had high emissions.

  18. Dynamics of polydots: Soft luminescent polymeric nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maskey, Sabina; Osti, Naresh C.; Grest, Gary S.; Perahia, Dvora

    2016-03-04

    The conformation and dynamics of luminescent polymers collapsed into nanoparticles or polydots were studied using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, providing a first insight into their internal dynamics. Controlling the conformation and dynamics of confined polymers is essential for realization of the full potential of polydots in nanomedicine and biotechnology. Specifically, the shape and internal dynamics of polydots that consist of highly rigid dialkyl p-phenylene ethynylene (PPE) are probed as a function of temperature. At room temperature, the polydots are spherical without any correlations between the aromatic rings on the PPE backbone. With increasing temperature, they expand and becomemore » slightly aspherical; however, the polymers remain confined. The coherent dynamic structure factor reveals that the internal motion of the polymer backbone is arrested, and the side chains dominate the internal dynamics of the polydots. Lastly, these new soft nanoparticles retain their overall shape and dynamics over an extended temperature range, and their conformation is tunable via their degree of expansion.« less

  19. Nonimaging optics in luminescent solar concentration.

    PubMed

    Markman, B D; Ranade, R R; Giebink, N C

    2012-09-10

    Light trapped within luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) is naturally limited in angular extent by the total internal reflection critical angle, θcrit, and hence the principles of nonimaging optics can be leveraged to increase LSC concentration ratio by appropriately reshaping the edges. Here, we use rigorous ray-tracing simulations to explore the potential of this concept for realistic LSCs with compound parabolic concentrator (CPC)-tapered edges and show that, when applied to a single edge, the concentration ratio is increased by 23% while maintaining >90% of the original LSC optical efficiency. Importantly, we find that CPC-tapering all of the edges enables a significantly greater intensity enhancement up to 35% at >90% of the original optical efficiency, effectively enabling two-dimensional concentration through a cooperative, ray-recycling effect in which rays rejected by one CPC are accepted by another. These results open up a significant opportunity to improve LSC performance at virtually no added manufacturing cost by incorporating nonimaging optics into their design. PMID:23037529

  20. Luminescence characteristics of caffeine and theophylline1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andino, M. M.; De Lima, C. G.; Winefordner, J. D.

    The luminescence properties of solutions of caffeine and theophylline in methanol are observed. The effects of the solvent pH, the presence of a heavy atom and the matrix or substrate on the fluorescence and phosphorescence properties of the compounds are evaluated. Caffeine and theophylline fluorescence can be observed at room temperature from dilute methanolic solutions and strong phosphorescence is observed at low temperature when the matrix is in a polycrystalline state. Acidic and basic media cause spectral changes and reduce the intensity of the low temperature phosphorescence. Iodide is a good heavy-atom enhancer of both the low temperature and room temperature phosphorescence of caffeine and theophylline. The intensity of the phosphorescence at room temperature and when spotted on filter paper depends on the type of filter paper and the pH of the spotting solution and/or the pH of the wet surface at the moment of spotting. Theophylline is more sensitive than caffeine to the microenvironment. Under the appropriate experimental conditions, both low temperature and room temperature phosphorescence could be used as analytical tools for the determination of caffeine and theophylline.

  1. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  2. Bacterial surface adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  3. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in people who work in the health care industry. Chronic paronychia is most common in adult women and those who work in places where their hands are kept moist, such as food handlers. Signs and Symptoms Bacterial nail infection most ...

  4. [Expression, refolding and biological activity of recombinant type-I metalloproteinase acutolysin a from Agkistrodon acutus].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kai-Jun; Yu, Hong-Xiu; Zou, Chun-Sen; Yuan, Pei-Hua; Liu, Jing

    2002-09-01

    Type-I snake venom metalloproteinase acutolysin A gene was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pBAD/gIIIA and the resulting recombinant plasmid pDS was obtained. By the induction with 0.02% L-(+)-arabinose, the recombinant metalloproteinase was expressed in insoluble inclusion body in E. coli TOP10 and reached up to 5%--10% of total bacterial proteins. The recombinant metalloproteinase has an additional sequence of N-terminal 22 amino acids and C-terminal 8 amino acids (housing 6 histidines), both of which derived from the vector. The purified inclusion body was solubilized by 8 mol/L urea or 6 mol/L guanidine-HCl and the denatured soluble recombinant metalloproteinase was allowed to refold in vitro. Western blotting and ELISA obviously showed that the renatured recombinant metalloproteinase possessed strong immune reactivity very closely related to natural acutolysin A. Animal experiments showed that the refolded recombinant metalloproteinase had an obvious hemorrhagic activity. Except PMSF, 1 mmol/L EDTA, 1 mmol/L EGTA, and 3 mmol/L imidazole could inhibit the hemorrhagic activity of the recombinant and the natural metalloproteinases to different extent. Based on the investigations of others and our experimental results, the hemorrhagic mechanism of snake metalloproteinases was discussed.

  5. A Gateway recombination herpesvirus cloning system with negative selection that produces vectorless progeny.

    PubMed

    Kunec, Dusan; van Haren, Sandra; Burgess, Shane C; Hanson, Larry A

    2009-01-01

    Crossover recombination based on the lambda phage integration/excision functions enables insertion of a gene of interest into a specific locus by a simple one-step in vitro recombination reaction. Recently, a highly efficient recombination system for targeted mutagenesis, which utilizes lambda phage crossover recombination cloning, has been described for a human herpesvirus 2 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). The disadvantages of the system are that it allows only neutral selection (loss of green fluorescent protein) of desired recombinants and that it regenerates herpesvirus progeny containing the BAC sequence inserted in the herpesvirus genome. In this study, the existing channel catfish herpesvirus (CCV) infectious clone (in the form of overlapping fragments) was modified to allow introduction of foreign genes by modified lambda phage crossover recombination cloning. This novel system enables negative and neutral selection and regenerates vectorless herpesvirus progeny. Construction of two CCV mutants expressing lacZ, one from the native CCV ORF5 promoter and the other from the immediate-early cytomegalovirus promoter, demonstrated the efficiency and reliability of this system. This novel cloning system enables rapid incorporation, direct delivery and high-level expression of foreign genes by a herpesvirus. This system has broad utility and could be used to facilitate development of recombinant viruses, viral vectors and better vaccines. PMID:18948138

  6. FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF IHSS HUMIC SUBSTANCES: TOTAL LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA WITH ABSORBANCE CORRECTION. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to d...

  7. A REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS OF LUMINESCENCE TO MONITORING OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recent analytical literature on the application of luminescence techniques to the measurement of various classes of environmentally significant chemicals has been reviewed. Luminescent spectroscopy based methods are compared to other current techniques. Also, examples of rece...

  8. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase purified from an alkaline-stressed bacterial culture.

    PubMed

    Rety, Stephane; Deschamps, Patrick; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Tryptophanase is a bacterial enzyme involved in the degradation of tryptophan to indole, pyruvate and ammonia, which are compounds that are essential for bacterial survival. Tryptophanase is often overexpressed in stressed cultures. Large amounts of endogenous tryptophanase were purified from Escherichia coli BL21 strain overexpressing another recombinant protein. Tryptophanase was crystallized in space group P6522 in the apo form without pyridoxal 5'-phosphate bound in the active site.

  9. Bistability and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Malka, Roy; Shochat, Eliezer; Rom-Kedar, Vered

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infections occur when the natural host defenses are overwhelmed by invading bacteria. The main component of the host defense is impaired when neutrophil count or function is too low, putting the host at great risk of developing an acute infection. In people with intact immune systems, neutrophil count increases during bacterial infection. However, there are two important clinical cases in which they remain constant: a) in patients with neutropenic-associated conditions, such as those undergoing chemotherapy at the nadir (the minimum clinically observable neutrophil level); b) in ex vivo examination of the patient's neutrophil bactericidal activity. Here we study bacterial population dynamics under fixed neutrophil levels by mathematical modelling. We show that under reasonable biological assumptions, there are only two possible scenarios: 1) Bacterial behavior is monostable: it always converges to a stable equilibrium of bacterial concentration which only depends, in a gradual manner, on the neutrophil level (and not on the initial bacterial level). We call such a behavior type I dynamics. 2) The bacterial dynamics is bistable for some range of neutrophil levels. We call such a behavior type II dynamics. In the bistable case (type II), one equilibrium corresponds to a healthy state whereas the other corresponds to a fulminant bacterial infection. We demonstrate that published data of in vitro Staphylococcus epidermidis bactericidal experiments are inconsistent with both the type I dynamics and the commonly used linear model and are consistent with type II dynamics. We argue that type II dynamics is a plausible mechanism for the development of a fulminant infection. PMID:20463954

  10. Luminescent instabilities and nonradiative processes in rare earth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, Shawn Michael

    This research is an outgrowth of earlier experiments that demonstrated bistable luminescence in heavy metal halide crystals doped with trivalent ytterbium ions. This type of instability has importance as a fundamentally new physical phenomenon with a potential application for fast all-optical switching as well as a limitation on compact solid state laser performance. In this thesis, the investigation of luminescent instabilities is extended to bistable energy transfer processes in crystals and to the observation of "bistable" blackbody emission in rare earth nanopowders. High resolution laser spectroscopy was used to study bistable luminescence and energy transfer in Yb,Er:CsCdBr3 crystals at cryogenic temperatures. For the first time, it was found that bistable behavior associated with Yb 3+ ions was transferred to Er3+ through resonant energy transfer. Bistability of the resulting sensitized luminescence caused sufficiently dramatic changes in the crystal dynamics so as to change the color of emission from yellow to green. This color changing phenomenon is fully explained in the present work and is referred to as "chromatic switching." Temperature is a critical variable that is known to govern luminescent instabilities in all current theories. Therefore, in a search for new systems with luminescent instabilities at high temperatures, materials with extreme thermal properties were investigated as part of this research. Yb,Er:Y 2O3 nanopowders were selected for this purpose. Nanopowders exhibit greatly reduced thermal conductivity and were verified during the course of this work to cause enhanced absorption as the result of multiple scattering. Significant spectral differences between Yb,Er:Y2O 3 nanopowders and single crystals also emerged. Measurements of erbium upconversion luminescence versus pump intensity in resonance with the ytterbium absorption transition revealed striking new optical phenomena: strong luminescent quenching, intense "bistable" blackbody

  11. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  12. DNA recombination: the replication connection.

    PubMed

    Haber, J E

    1999-07-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise after exposure to ionizing radiation or enzymatic cleavage, but especially during the process of DNA replication itself. Homologous recombination plays a critical role in repair of such DSBs. There has been significant progress in our understanding of two processes that occur in DSB repair: gene conversion and recombination-dependent DNA replication. Recent evidence suggests that gene conversion and break-induced replication are related processes that both begin with the establishment of a replication fork in which both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis occur. There has also been much progress in characterization of the biochemical roles of recombination proteins that are highly conserved from yeast to humans.

  13. The Dissociative Recombination of OH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum chemical calculations of the cross sections and rates for the dissociative recombination of the upsilon = 0 level of the ground state of OH(+) show that recombination occurs primarily along the 2 (2)Pi diabatic route. The products are 0((1)D) and a hot H atom with 6.1 eV kinetic energy. The coupling to the resonances is very small and the indirect recombination mechanism plays only a minor role. The recommended value for the rate coefficient is (6.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp -9)x (T(e)/1300)(exp -0.48) cu.cm/s for 10 less than T(e) less than 1000 K.

  14. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need for additional cofactors, but does not discriminate non-carboxylated prothrombin from biologically active γ-carboxylated prothrombin. Here we report that recombinant trocarin and oscutarin could not efficiently generate thrombin without additional protein co-factors. We confirm that both trocarin and oscutarin are similar to human coagulation Factor X (FX), explaining the need for additional cofactors. Sequencing of a genomic fragment containing 7 out of the 8 exons coding for oscutarin further confirmed the similarity to human FX. PMID:23111318

  15. User guide for luminescence sampling in archaeological and geological contexts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Michelle S.; Gray, Harrison J.; Johnson, Jack A.; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Feathers, James K.; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence dating provides a direct age estimate of the time of last exposure of quartz or feldspar minerals to light or heat and has been successfully applied to deposits, rock surfaces, and fired materials in a number of archaeological and geological settings. Sampling strategies are diverse and can be customized depending on local circumstances, although all sediment samples need to include a light-safe sample and material for dose-rate determination. The accuracy and precision of luminescence dating results are directly related to the type and quality of the material sampled and sample collection methods in the field. Selection of target material for dating should include considerations of adequacy of resetting of the luminescence signal (optical and thermal bleaching), the ability to characterize the radioactive environment surrounding the sample (dose rate), and the lack of evidence for post-depositional mixing (bioturbation in soils and sediment). Sample strategies for collection of samples from sedimentary settings and fired materials are discussed. This paper should be used as a guide for luminescence sampling and is meant to provide essential background information on how to properly collect samples and on the types of materials suitable for luminescence dating.

  16. Recent Advances on Luminescent Enhancement-Based Porous Silicon Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Plush, Sally E; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2016-10-01

    Luminescence-based detection paradigms have key advantages over other optical platforms such as absorbance, reflectance or interferometric based detection. However, autofluorescence, low quantum yield and lack of photostability of the fluorophore or emitting molecule are still performance-limiting factors. Recent research has shown the need for enhanced luminescence-based detection to overcome these drawbacks while at the same time improving the sensitivity, selectivity and reducing the detection limits of optical sensors and biosensors. Nanostructures have been reported to significantly improve the spectral properties of the emitting molecules. These structures offer unique electrical, optic and magnetic properties which may be used to tailor the surrounding electrical field of the emitter. Here, the main principles behind luminescence and luminescence enhancement-based detections are reviewed, with an emphasis on europium complexes as the emitting molecule. An overview of the optical porous silicon microcavity (pSiMC) as a biosensing platform and recent proof-of-concept examples on enhanced luminescence-based detection using pSiMCs are provided and discussed.

  17. Occurrence and Expression of Luminescence in Vibrio cholerae▿

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Christopher J.; Taviani, Elisa; Alam, Munirul; Huq, Anwar; Sack, R. Bradley; Colwell, Rita R.

    2008-01-01

    Several species of the genus Vibrio, including Vibrio cholerae, are bioluminescent or contain bioluminescent strains. Previous studies have reported that only 10% of V. cholerae strains are luminescent. Analysis of 224 isolates of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae collected from Chesapeake Bay, MD, revealed that 52% (116/224) were luminescent when an improved assay method was employed and 58% (130/224) of isolates harbored the luxA gene. In contrast, 334 non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae strains isolated from two rural provinces in Bangladesh yielded only 21 (6.3%) luminescent and 35 (10.5%) luxA+ isolates. An additional 270 clinical and environmental isolates of V. cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 were tested, and none were luminescent or harbored luxA. These results indicate that bioluminescence may be a trait specific for non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae strains that frequently occur in certain environments. Luminescence expression patterns of V. cholerae were also investigated, and isolates could be grouped based on expression level. Several strains with defective expression of the lux operon, including natural K variants, were identified. PMID:18065611

  18. Luminescent Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals Containing Copper: Synthesis, Photophysics, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Kathryn E; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Kilburn, Troy B; Marchioro, Arianna; Nelson, Heidi D; Whitham, Patrick J; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-09-28

    Copper-doped semiconductors are classic phosphor materials that have been used in a variety of applications for many decades. Colloidal copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals have recently attracted a great deal of interest because they combine the solution processability and spectral tunability of colloidal nanocrystals with the unique photoluminescence properties of copper-doped semiconductor phosphors. Although ternary and quaternary semiconductors containing copper, such as CuInS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have been studied primarily in the context of their photovoltaic applications, when synthesized as colloidal nanocrystals, these materials have photoluminescence properties that are remarkably similar to those of copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals. This review focuses on the luminescent properties of colloidal copper-doped, copper-based, and related copper-containing semiconductor nanocrystals. Fundamental investigations into the luminescence of copper-containing colloidal nanocrystals are reviewed in the context of the well-established luminescence mechanisms of bulk copper-doped semiconductors and copper(I) molecular coordination complexes. The use of colloidal copper-containing nanocrystals in applications that take advantage of their luminescent properties, such as bioimaging, solid-state lighting, and luminescent solar concentrators, is also discussed.

  19. Water-triggered luminescent "nano-bombs" based on supra-(carbon nanodots).

    PubMed

    Lou, Qing; Qu, Songnan; Jing, Pengtao; Ji, Wenyu; Li, Di; Cao, Junsheng; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Jialong; Shen, Dezhen

    2015-02-25

    Novel luminescent "nano-bombs" based on a self-assembled system of carbon-nanodots, termed supra-CDs, are developed. The luminescence of these luminescent "nano-bombs" depends strongly on water contact; they show weak emission in toluene and decompose in contact with water, resulting in strong photoluminescence. Paper coated with these "nano-bombs" is successfully applied for water-jet printing of luminescence patterns and the mapping of human sweat-pore patterns.

  20. Crystal structures and optical properties of new quaternary strontium europium aluminate luminescent nanoribbons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xufan; Budai, John D.; Liu, Feng; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Howe, Jane Y.; Sun, Chengjun; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Meltzer, Richard; Pan, Zhengwei

    2014-11-12

    We report the synthesis and characterizations of three series of quaternary strontium europium aluminate (Sr-Eu-Al-O; SEAO) luminescent nanoribbons that show blue, green, and yellow luminescence from localized Eu2+ luminescent centers. These three series of SEAO nanoribbons are: blue luminescent, tetragonal Sr1-xEuxAl6O10 (01-xEuxAl2O4 (01-xEuxAl2O4 (0