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Sample records for recombinant luminescent bacterial

  1. [Effect of salts on luminescence of natural and recombinant luminescent bacterial biosensors].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, D G; Aleshina, E S

    2008-01-01

    Effect of cations K+, Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ and anions SO4(2-), HCO3(-), and CO3(2-) on the luminescence intensity of the marine luminescent bacterium Photobacterium phorphoreum (Microbiosensor B-17 677f) and the recombinant strain Escherichia coli with cloned lux operon of P. leiognathi (Ekolyum-9). It is found that small concentrations of chlorides and sulfates of the cations studied had a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect on bacterial bioluminescence; as the concentration of agents increased, activation was succeeded by quenching. The strength of the inhibitory effect, which is characterized by EC50, decreased in the series Ca2+ > Na+ > Mg2+ > K+. Carbonates and hydrocarbonates had a pronounced inhibitory effect on the bioluminescence intensity, determined by an increase in pH. We showed that some types of highly mineralized water with a high hydrocarbonate content have a marked inhibitory effect on the luminescence intensity of microbial luminescent biosensors, mimicking the effect of chemical pollutants.

  2. Analysis of bioavailable phenols from natural samples by recombinant luminescent bacterial sensors.

    PubMed

    Leedjärv, Anu; Ivask, Angela; Virta, Marko; Kahru, Anne

    2006-09-01

    A whole-cell recombinant bacterial sensor for the detection of phenolic compounds was constructed and used for the analysis of bioavailable phenols in natural samples. The sensor Pseudomonas fluorescens OS8(pDNdmpRlux) contains luxCDABE operon as a reporter under the control of phenol-inducible Po promoter from Pseudomonas sp. CF600. Expression of lux genes from the Po promoter, and thus the production of bioluminescence is controlled by the transcriptional activator DmpR, which initiates transcription in the presence of phenolic compounds. To take into account possible quenching (turbidity, toxicity) and/or stimulating effects of the environmental samples on the bacterial luminescence, control bacteria comparable to the sensors but lacking the phenol recognising elements were constructed and used in parallel in assays. The sensor bacteria were inducible with phenol, methylphenols, 2,3-, 2,4-, 2,6- and 3,4-dimethylphenol, resorcinol and 5-methylresorcinol but not with 2,5-dimethylresorcinol. The detection limits for different phenols varied from 0.03 mg/l (2-methylphenol) to 42.7 mg/l (5-methylresorcinol), being 0.08 mg/l for phenol, the most abundant phenolic contaminant in the environment. Different phenolic compounds had an additive effect on the inducibility of the sensor. The constructed sensor bacteria were applied on groundwaters and semi-coke leachates to estimate the bioavailable fraction of phenols. The sensor-determined amount of phenols in different samples varied from 6% to 95% of total phenol content depending on the nature of the sample. As the phenol-recognising unit in the sensor originates from a natural phenol biodegradation pathway, the sensor-determined amount of phenols corresponds to the biodegradable amount of phenolic pollutants in the samples and therefore this sensor could be used to estimate the natural biodegradation potential of phenolic compounds in the complex environmental mixtures and matrixes.

  3. A suite of recombinant luminescent bacterial strains for the quantification of bioavailable heavy metals and toxicity testing

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recombinant whole-cell sensors have already proven useful in the assessment of the bioavailability of environmental pollutants like heavy metals and organic compounds. In this work 19 recombinant bacterial strains representing various Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria were constructed to express the luminescence encoding genes luxCDABE (from Photorhabdus luminescens) as a response to bioavailable heavy metals ("lights-on" metal sensors containing metal-response elements, 13 strains) or in a constitutive manner ("lights-off" constructs, 6 strains). Results The bioluminescence of all 13 "lights-on" metal sensor strains was expressed as a function of the sub-toxic metal concentrations enabling the quantitative determination of metals bioavailable for these strains. Five sensor strains, constructed for detecting copper and mercury, proved to be target metal specific, whereas eight other sensor strains were simultaneously induced by Cd2+, Hg2+, Zn2+and Pb2+. The lowest limits of determination of the "lights-on" sensor strains for the metals tested in this study were (μg l-1): 0.002 of CH3HgCl, 0.03 of HgCl2, 1.8 of CdCl2, 33 of Pb(NO3)2, 1626 of ZnSO4, 24 of CuSO4 and 340 of AgNO3. In general, the sensitivity of the "lights-on" sensor strains was mostly dependent on the metal-response element used while the selection of host bacterium played a relatively minor role. In contrast, toxicity of metals to the "lights-off" strains was only dependent on the bacterial host so that Gram-positive strains were remarkably more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. Conclusion The constructed battery of 19 recombinant luminescent bacterial strains exhibits several novel aspects as it contains i) metal sensor strains with similar metal-response elements in different host bacteria; ii) metal sensor strains with metal-response elements in different copies and iii) a "lights

  4. [Conditions that influence bacterial luminescence in the presence of blood serum].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, D G; Poliakov, E G

    2005-01-01

    Conditions that influence the luminescence of natural and recombinant luminescent bacteria in the presence of blood serum were studied. In general, blood serum quenched the luminescence of the marine Photobacterium phosphoreum and the recombinant Escherichia coli strains harboring the luminescent system genes of Photobacterium leiognathi, but enhanced the luminescence of the soil bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens Zm1 and the recombinant E. coli strain harboring the lux operon of P. luminescens Zm1. The quenching effect of blood serum increased with its concentration and the time and temperature of incubation. The components of blood serum that determine the degree and specificity of its action on bacterial luminescence were identified.

  5. [Biotests for mineral waters with natural and recombinant luminescent microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, D G; Aleshina, E S

    2008-01-01

    We have developed methods of biotesting mineral waters involving use of natural or recombinant luminescent strains with elimination of the effect of salt concentration and pH. To overcome the adverse effect of high salt concentrations, disguising the action of chemical pollutants, a special method of mineral water sample preparation is proposed. In this method, the marine luminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum (Microbiosensor B17 677f) is used as a test object. Samples to be analyzed are supplemented with NaCl depending on their natural salt concentration to adjust it to 3 g/l. Another approach, more universal and efficient, involves pH adjustment in the samples to 7.5. This value is suitable for application of both Microbiosensor B17 677f and the recombinant Escherichia coli strain harboring the cloned lux operon of P. leiognathi (Ecolum 9). It has been shown that this treatment, retaining the natural luminescence level of the bacterial biosensors, allows bioluminescent detection of exogenous pollutants added to the samples, including benzene and Cr(VI).

  6. Extended recombinant bacterial ghost system.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, W; Witte, A; Eko, F O; Kamal, M; Jechlinger, W; Brand, E; Marchart, J; Haidinger, W; Huter, V; Felnerova, D; Stralis-Alves, N; Lechleitner, S; Melzer, H; Szostak, M P; Resch, S; Mader, H; Kuen, B; Mayr, B; Mayrhofer, P; Geretschläger, R; Haslberger, A; Hensel, A

    1999-08-20

    Controlled expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts from a variety of bacteria are used as non-living candidate vaccines. In the recombinant ghost system, foreign proteins are attached on the inside of the inner membrane as fusions with specific anchor sequences. Ghosts have a sealed periplasmic space and the export of proteins into this space vastly extends the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts to function as carriers of foreign antigens. In addition, S-layer proteins forming shell-like self assembly structures can be expressed in candidate vaccine strains prior to E-mediated lysis. Such recombinant S-layer proteins carrying foreign epitopes further extend the possibilities of ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes. As ghosts have inherent adjuvant properties, they can be used as adjuvants in combination with subunit vaccines. Subunits or other ligands can also be coupled to matrixes like dextran which are used to fill the internal lumen of ghosts. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral immunization of experimental animals with recombinant ghosts induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in this production. This fact explains the superior quality of ghosts when compared to other inactivated vaccines. The endotoxic component of the outer membrane does not limit the use of ghosts as vaccine candidates but triggers the release of several potent immunoregulatory cytokines. As carriers, there is no limitation in the size of foreign antigens that can be inserted in the membrane and the capacity of all spaces including the membranes, peri

  7. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes.

  8. Homologous recombination using bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cary; Fischer, Tobias; Munroe, Elizabeth

    2015-02-02

    This protocol introduces the technique of homologous recombination in bacteria to insert a linear DNA fragment into bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). Homologous recombination allows the modification of large DNA molecules, in contrast with conventional restriction endonuclease-based strategies, which cleave large DNAs into numerous fragments and are unlikely to permit the precise targeting afforded by recombination-based approaches. The method uses a phage lambda-derived recombination system (using exo, beta, and gam) as well as other enzymatic activities provided by the host (Escherichia coli). In the method described here, a DNA fragment encoding enhanced cyan fluorescent protein is inserted immediately after the start codon of the gene encoding choline acetyltransferase ("ChAT"), the final enzyme in acetylcholine biosynthesis, using homologous recombination between sequences that are present both on the introduced DNA fragment and in the target BAC. The desired recombination products are identified via positive selection for resistance to kanamycin. In principle, the resulting modified BAC could be used to produce transgenic mice that express this fluorescent protein in cholinergic neurons. The approach described here could be used to insert any DNA fragment.

  9. Surface Bacterial-Spore Assay Using Tb3+/DPA Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    Equipment and a method for rapidly assaying solid surfaces for contamination by bacterial spores are undergoing development. The method would yield a total (nonviable plus viable) spore count of a surface within minutes and a viable-spore count in about one hour. In this method, spores would be collected from a surface by use of a transparent polymeric tape coated on one side with a polymeric adhesive that would be permeated with one or more reagent(s) for detection of spores by use of visible luminescence. The sticky side of the tape would be pressed against a surface to be assayed, then the tape with captured spores would be placed in a reader that illuminates the sample with ultraviolet light and counts the green luminescence spots under a microscope to quantify the number of bacterial spores per unit area. The visible luminescence spots seen through the microscope would be counted to determine the concentration of spores on the surface. This method is based on the chemical and physical principles of methods described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, including Live/Dead Spore Assay Using DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence (NPO-30444), Vol. 27, No. 3 (March 2003), page 7a. To recapitulate: The basic idea is to exploit the observations that (1) dipicolinic acid (DPA) is present naturally only in bacterial spores; and (2) when bound to Tb3+ ions, DPA triggers intense green luminescence of the ions under ultraviolet excitation; (3) DPA can be released from the viable spores by using L-alanine to make them germinate; and (4) by autoclaving, microwaving, or sonicating the sample, one can cause all the spores (non-viable as well as viable) to release their DPA. One candidate material for use as the adhesive in the present method is polydimethysiloxane (PDMS). In one variant of the method for obtaining counts of all (viable and nonviable) spores the PDMS would be doped with TbCl3. After collection of a sample, the spores immobilized on the sticky tape surface

  10. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    PubMed

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research.

  11. Recombinant bacterial lipoproteins as vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Chong, Pele

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant bacterial lipoproteins (RLP) with built-in immuno-stimulating properties for novel subunit vaccine development are reviewed. This platform technology offers the following advantages: easily converts antigens into highly immunogenic RLP using a fusion sequence containing lipobox; the lipid moiety of RLP is recognized as the danger signals in the immune system through the Toll-like receptor 2, so both innate and adaptive immune responses can be induced by RLP; serves as an efficient and cost-effective bioprocess for producing RLP in Escherichia coli and the feasibility and safety of this core platform technology has been successfully demonstrated in animal model studies including meningococcal group B subunit vaccine, dengue subunit vaccine, novel subunit vaccine against Clostridium difficile-associated diseases and HPV-based immunotherapeutic vaccines.

  12. Cyanide detoxification by recombinant bacterial rhodanese.

    PubMed

    Cipollone, Rita; Ascenzi, Paolo; Frangipani, Emanuela; Visca, Paolo

    2006-05-01

    Cyanide is a major environmental pollutant of the chemical and metallurgical industries. Although extremely toxic, cyanide can enzymatically be converted to the less toxic thiocyanate by rhodaneses (thiosulfate:cyanide sulfurtransferases, EC 2.8.1.1). We engineered a genetic system to express high levels of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhodanese (r-RhdA) in Escherichia coli, and used this organism to test the role of r-RhdA in cyanide detoxification. Inducible expression of the rhdA gene under the control of the hybrid T7-lacO promoter yielded active r-RhdA over a 4-h period, though r-RhdA-expressing E. coli showed decreased viability starting from 1 h post-induction. At this time, Western blot analysis and enzymatic assay showed r-RhdA partition between the cytoplasm (95%) and the periplasm (5%). The accessibility of thiosulfate to r-RhdA was a limiting step for the sulfur transfer reaction in the cellular system, but cyanide conversion to thiocyanate could be increased upon permeabilization of the bacterial membrane. Specific r-RhdA activity was higher in the whole-cell assay than in the in vitro assay with pure enzyme (2154 vs. 816 micromol min-1 mg-1 r-RhdA, respectively), likely reflecting enzyme stability. The r-RhdA-dependent cyanide detoxification resulted in increased resistance of r-RhdA overexpressing E. coli to 5 mM cyanide. Bacterial survival was paralleled by release of thiocyanate into the medium. Our results indicate that cyanide detoxification by engineered E. coli cells is feasible under laboratory conditions, and suggest that microbial rhodaneses may contribute to cyanide transformation in natural environments.

  13. Comparisons of Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium phosphoreum, and recombinant luminescent using Escherichia coli as BOD measurement.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Kuo, Jong-Tar; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Liao, Yi-Ru; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2010-01-01

    To shorten the time needed to measure biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in water samples and to provide a rapid feedback of the real condition of water quality, we tested and evaluated the validity and reliability of luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium phosphoreum, and recombinant Escherichia coli as potential indicators of BOD in the domestic wastewaters. The results indicate that the luminescence intensities of these strains are dependent on temperature, pH, and BOD concentration. In comparison to the standard BOD(5) method, the time needed for BOD measurement can be shortened by 90, 120, and 150 min when V. fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and recombinant E. coli, respectively, are used. Recombinant E. coli can be adapted to measure BOD in domestic wastewater containing a wide range of BOD concentrations, V. fischeri is not suitable for measuring diluted wastewater, and P. phosphoreum has only a limited application in measuring concentrated wastewater. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which V. fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and recombinant luminescent E. coli are compared in terms of their potential in BOD measurement systems.

  14. Bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Hg in Soil to Nine Recombinant Luminescent Metal Sensor Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Olesja; Rõlova, Taisia; Kahru, Anne; Ivask, Angela

    2008-11-04

    A set of nine recombinant heavy metal-specific luminescent bacterial sensors belonging to Gram-negative (Escherichia and Pseudomonas) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus and Bacillus) genera and containing various types of recombinant metalresponse genetic elements was characterized for heavy metal bioavailability studies. All nine strains were induced by Hg and Cd and five strains also by Zn. As a lowest limit, the sensors were detecting 0.03 μg·L(-1) of Hg, 2 μg·L(-1) of Cd and 400 μg·L(-1) of Zn. Limit of determination of the sensors depended mostly on metal-response element, whereas the toxicity of those metals towards the sensor bacteria was mostly dependent on the type of the host bacterium, with Gram-positive strains being more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. The set of sensors was used to evaluate bioavailability of Hg, Cd and Zn in spiked soils. The bioavailable fraction of Cd and Zn in soil suspension assay (2.6 - 5.1% and 0.32 - 0.61%, of the total Cd and Zn, respectively) was almost comparable for all the sensors, whereas the bioavailability of Hg was about 10-fold higher for Gram-negative sensor cells (30.5% of total Hg), compared to Gram-positive ones (3.2% of the total Hg). For Zn, the bioavailable fraction in soil-water suspensions and respective extracts was comparable (0.37 versus 0.33% of the total Zn). However, in the case of Cd, for all the sensors used and for Hg concerning only Gram-negative sensor strains, the bioavailable fraction in soilwater suspensions exceeded the water-extracted fraction about 14-fold, indicating that upon direct contact, an additional fraction of Cd and Hg was mobilized by those sensor bacteria. Thus, for robust bioavailability studies of heavy metals in soils any type of genetic metal-response elements could be used for the construction of the sensor strains. However, Gram-positive and Gram-negative senor strains should be used in parallel as the bioavailability of heavy metals to those bacterial groups may be

  15. Bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Hg in Soil to Nine Recombinant Luminescent Metal Sensor Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Olesja; Rõlova, Taisia; Kahru, Anne; Ivask, Angela

    2008-01-01

    A set of nine recombinant heavy metal-specific luminescent bacterial sensors belonging to Gram-negative (Escherichia and Pseudomonas) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus and Bacillus) genera and containing various types of recombinant metal-response genetic elements was characterized for heavy metal bioavailability studies. All nine strains were induced by Hg and Cd and five strains also by Zn. As a lowest limit, the sensors were detecting 0.03 μg·L-1 of Hg, 2 μg·L-1 of Cd and 400 μg·L-1 of Zn. Limit of determination of the sensors depended mostly on metal-response element, whereas the toxicity of those metals towards the sensor bacteria was mostly dependent on the type of the host bacterium, with Gram-positive strains being more sensitive than Gram-negative ones. The set of sensors was used to evaluate bioavailability of Hg, Cd and Zn in spiked soils. The bioavailable fraction of Cd and Zn in soil suspension assay (2.6 – 5.1% and 0.32 – 0.61%, of the total Cd and Zn, respectively) was almost comparable for all the sensors, whereas the bioavailability of Hg was about 10-fold higher for Gram-negative sensor cells (30.5% of total Hg), compared to Gram-positive ones (3.2% of the total Hg). For Zn, the bioavailable fraction in soil-water suspensions and respective extracts was comparable (0.37 versus 0.33% of the total Zn). However, in the case of Cd, for all the sensors used and for Hg concerning only Gram-negative sensor strains, the bioavailable fraction in soil-water suspensions exceeded the water-extracted fraction about 14-fold, indicating that upon direct contact, an additional fraction of Cd and Hg was mobilized by those sensor bacteria. Thus, for robust bioavailability studies of heavy metals in soils any type of genetic metal-response elements could be used for the construction of the sensor strains. However, Gram-positive and Gram-negative senor strains should be used in parallel as the bioavailability of heavy metals to those bacterial groups may be

  16. Recombination luminescence in irradiated silicon - Effects of thermal annealing and lithium impurity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. S.; Compton, W. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of luminescence in irradiated silicon to determine the thermal stability of the defects responsible for the recombination. It is found that the defect responsible for the zero-phonon line at 0.97 eV has an annealing behavior similar to that of the divacancy and that the zero-phonon line at 0.79 eV anneals in a manner similar to the G-15 or K-center. Annealing at temperatures up to 500 C generates other defects whose luminescence is distinct from that seen previously. Addition of lithium to the material produces defects with new characteristic luminescence. Of particular importance is a defect with a level at E sub g -1.045 eV.

  17. Luminescence, radiative recombination, and current voltage characteristics in sensitized TiO2 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smestad, Greg P.

    1992-12-01

    A connection is made between the luminescence or radiative recombination in an absorber material and the current voltage characteristics of a quantum converter of light. A relationship between luminescence and voltage is derived, using detailed balance and the chemical potential of the excitation, which is similar to that obtained using the techniques of Shockley and Queisser or R. T. Ross. This model relates the absorptivity and photoluminescence efficiency of the light absorber to the I V curve. In this way both thermodynamic properties, or voltage, and the kinetics, or charge transfer and current, can be combined in order to optimize materials and configurations. The model is applied to dye sensitized Ti02 solar cells, and compared with preliminary experimental data for Ru based charge transfer dyes and inorganic compounds. The luminescence model is found to be applicable to dye sensitized converters, as well as to standard silicon solar cells, light detectors, and LEDs.

  18. Recombination luminescence from electron-irradiated Li-diffused Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. S.; Compton, W. D.; Noonan, J. R.; Streetman, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    Lithium doping has a dramatic effect on the low-temperature photoluminescence of electron-irradiated Si. In oxigen-lean Si with Li doping, a new irradiation-dependent luminescence band between 0.75 and 1.05 eV is observed, which is dominated by a zero-phonon peak at 1.045 eV. This band is believed to be due to radiative transitions involving a Li-modified divacancy. This band is present also in oxygen-rich, Li-diffused Si and is accompanied by bands previously related to the Si-G15(K) center and the divacancy. The intensities of the Li-modified divacancy and Si-G15(K) center bands are relatively weak in the oxygen-rich material, apparently due to the formation of lithium-oxygen complexes which reduce the concentration of unassociated interstitial Li and O.

  19. Recombination luminescence from electron-irradiated Li-diffused Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. S.; Compton, W. D.; Noonan, J. R.; Streetman, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    Lithium doping has a dramatic effect on the low-temperature photoluminescence of electron-irradiated Si. In oxigen-lean Si with Li doping, a new irradiation-dependent luminescence band between 0.75 and 1.05 eV is observed, which is dominated by a zero-phonon peak at 1.045 eV. This band is believed to be due to radiative transitions involving a Li-modified divacancy. This band is present also in oxygen-rich, Li-diffused Si and is accompanied by bands previously related to the Si-G15(K) center and the divacancy. The intensities of the Li-modified divacancy and Si-G15(K) center bands are relatively weak in the oxygen-rich material, apparently due to the formation of lithium-oxygen complexes which reduce the concentration of unassociated interstitial Li and O.

  20. Fluorescence-PCR Assays and Isolation of Luminescent Bacterial Clones Using an Automated Plate Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The genes responsible for luminescence in various species of the marine microorganism "Photobacterium", have been used for many years as a tool by researchers and instructors. In particular, the "lux" operon of "Photobacterium fischeri" has been used by many instructors to teach recombinant DNA techniques. Two methods using an automated plate…

  1. Fluorescence-PCR Assays and Isolation of Luminescent Bacterial Clones Using an Automated Plate Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The genes responsible for luminescence in various species of the marine microorganism "Photobacterium", have been used for many years as a tool by researchers and instructors. In particular, the "lux" operon of "Photobacterium fischeri" has been used by many instructors to teach recombinant DNA techniques. Two methods using an automated plate…

  2. Inferring Ancestral Recombination Graphs from Bacterial Genomic Data.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Timothy G; Welch, David; Drummond, Alexei J; Biggs, Patrick J; George, Tessy; French, Nigel P

    2017-02-01

    Homologous recombination is a central feature of bacterial evolution, yet it confounds traditional phylogenetic methods. While a number of methods specific to bacterial evolution have been developed, none of these permit joint inference of a bacterial recombination graph and associated parameters. In this article, we present a new method which addresses this shortcoming. Our method uses a novel Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to perform phylogenetic inference under the ClonalOrigin model. We demonstrate the utility of our method by applying it to ribosomal multilocus sequence typing data sequenced from pathogenic and nonpathogenic Escherichia coli serotype O157 and O26 isolates collected in rural New Zealand. The method is implemented as an open source BEAST 2 package, Bacter, which is available via the project web page at http://tgvaughan.github.io/bacter. Copyright © 2017 Vaughan et al.

  3. Inferring Ancestral Recombination Graphs from Bacterial Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Timothy G.; Welch, David; Drummond, Alexei J.; Biggs, Patrick J.; George, Tessy; French, Nigel P.

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a central feature of bacterial evolution, yet it confounds traditional phylogenetic methods. While a number of methods specific to bacterial evolution have been developed, none of these permit joint inference of a bacterial recombination graph and associated parameters. In this article, we present a new method which addresses this shortcoming. Our method uses a novel Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to perform phylogenetic inference under the ClonalOrigin model. We demonstrate the utility of our method by applying it to ribosomal multilocus sequence typing data sequenced from pathogenic and nonpathogenic Escherichia coli serotype O157 and O26 isolates collected in rural New Zealand. The method is implemented as an open source BEAST 2 package, Bacter, which is available via the project web page at http://tgvaughan.github.io/bacter. PMID:28007885

  4. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination.

  5. Method bacterial endospore quantification using lanthanide dipicolinate luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor); Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J. (Inventor); Kirby, James Patrick (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A lanthanide is combined with a medium to be tested for endospores. The dipicolinic acid released from the endospores binds the lanthanides, which have distinctive emission (i.e., luminescence) spectra, and are detected using photoluminescence. The concentration of spores is determined by preparing a calibration curve generated from photoluminescence spectra of lanthanide complex mixed with spores of a known concentration. A lanthanide complex is used as the analysis reagent, and is comprised of lanthanide ions bound to multidentate ligands that increase the dipicolinic acid binding constant through a cooperative binding effect with respect to lanthanide chloride. The resulting combined effect of increasing the binding constant and eliminating coordinated water and multiple equilibria increase the sensitivity of the endospore assay by an estimated three to four orders of magnitude over prior art of endospore detection based on lanthanide luminescence.

  6. Correlated Mutations and Homologous Recombination Within Bacterial Populations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mingzhi; Kussell, Edo

    2017-02-01

    Inferring the rate of homologous recombination within a bacterial population remains a key challenge in quantifying the basic parameters of bacterial evolution. Due to the high sequence similarity within a clonal population, and unique aspects of bacterial DNA transfer processes, detecting recombination events based on phylogenetic reconstruction is often difficult, and estimating recombination rates using coalescent model-based methods is computationally expensive, and often infeasible for large sequencing data sets. Here, we present an efficient solution by introducing a set of mutational correlation functions computed using pairwise sequence comparison, which characterize various facets of bacterial recombination. We provide analytical expressions for these functions, which precisely recapitulate simulation results of neutral and adapting populations under different coalescent models. We used these to fit correlation functions measured at synonymous substitutions using whole-genome data on Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae populations. We calculated and corrected for the effect of sample selection bias, i.e., the uneven sampling of individuals from natural microbial populations that exists in most datasets. Our method is fast and efficient, and does not employ phylogenetic inference or other computationally intensive numerics. By simply fitting analytical forms to measurements from sequence data, we show that recombination rates can be inferred, and the relative ages of different samples can be estimated. Our approach, which is based on population genetic modeling, is broadly applicable to a wide variety of data, and its computational efficiency makes it particularly attractive for use in the analysis of large sequencing datasets. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  7. Differential analysis of bactericidal systems of blood serum with recombinant luminescent Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains.

    PubMed

    Deryabin, D G; Karimov, I F; Manukhov, I V; Tolmacheva, N A; Balabanov, V P

    2012-11-01

    Luminescence intensity of recombinant Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains with cloned luxCD(AB)E genes of the natural luminescent microorganism Photobacterium leiognathi was studied under the influence of 30 individual samples of human blood serum of different component composition. A relationship was found between the level of residual bioluminescence and degree of the bactericidal effect. Moreover, the inhibition of E. coli lux+ luminescence was shown to be related to activity of the complement-lysozyme system. The reaction of B. subtilis lux+ primarily depended on the presence of β-lysin in the blood serum. These data provide an experimental substantiation of a new method of differential analysis of humoral factors of nonspecific innate immunity with recombinant luminescent bacteria.

  8. Live/Dead Bacterial Spore Assay Using DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of measuring the fraction of bacterial spores in a sample that remain viable exploits DPA-triggered luminescence of Tb(3+) and is based partly on the same principles as those described earlier. Unlike prior methods for performing such live/dead assays of bacterial spores, this method does not involve counting colonies formed by cultivation (which can take days), or counting of spores under a microscope, and works whether or not bacterial spores are attached to other small particles (i.e., dust), and can be implemented on a time scale of about 20 minutes.

  9. Genetic manipulation of poxviruses using bacterial artificial chromosome recombineering.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, Matthew G

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for genetic manipulation of poxviruses rely on low-frequency natural recombination in virus-infected cells. Although these powerful systems represent the technical foundation of current knowledge and applications of poxviruses, they require long (≥ 500 bp) flanking sequences for homologous recombination, an efficient viral selection method, and burdensome, time-consuming plaque purification. The beginning of the twenty-first century has seen the application of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology to poxviruses as an alternative method for their genetic manipulation, following the invention of a long-sought-after method for deriving a BAC clone of vaccinia virus (VAC-BAC) by Arban Domi and Bernard Moss. The key advantages of the BAC system are the ease and versatility of performing genetic manipulation using bacteriophage λ Red recombination (recombineering), which requires only ∼50 bp homology arms that can be easily created by PCR, and which allows seamless mutations lacking any marker gene without having to perform transient-dominant selection. On the other hand, there are disadvantages, including the significant setup time, the risk of contamination of the cloned genome with bacterial insertion sequences, and the nontrivial issue of removal of the BAC cassette from derived viruses. These must be carefully weighed to decide whether the use of BACs will be advantageous for a particular application, making pox-BAC systems likely to complement, rather than supplant, traditional methods in most laboratories.

  10. Species Specific Bacterial Spore Detection Using Lateral-Flow Immunoassay with DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of detecting bacterial spores incorporates (1) A method of lateral-flow immunoassay in combination with (2) A method based on the luminescence of Tb3+ ions to which molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) released from the spores have become bound. The present combination of lateral-flow immunoassay and DPA-triggered Tb luminescence was developed as a superior alternative to a prior lateral-flow immunoassay method in which detection involves the visual observation and/or measurement of red light scattered from colloidal gold nanoparticles. The advantage of the present combination method is that it affords both (1) High selectivity for spores of the species of bacteria that one seeks to detect (a characteristic of lateral-flow immunoassay in general) and (2) Detection sensitivity much greater (by virtue of the use of DPA-triggered Tb luminescence instead of gold nanoparticles) than that of the prior lateral-flow immunoassay method

  11. [Construction of recombinate luminescence bacteria vector to evaluate the genetoxic of environment pollutant].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin-Xin; He, Miao; Shi, Han-Chang; Cai, Qiang

    2008-11-01

    Recombinate luminescence bacteria have the important role in evaluating water toxicity. Two recombinate luminescence bacteria vectors PUCD-uvrA and PUCD-alkA were constructed to investigate the impaired mechanism of pollutant genetic toxicity. The genes of uvrA and alkA were amplified by PCR from E. coli W3110, sequenced after ligated with pGEM-T easy vector. The PCR products and PUCD615 vector were all digested with BamH I, EcoR I, then be linked and imported into JM109 with electrotransformation. Several clones were selected and identificated by PCR and sequencing. The results reviewed that the length of the uvrA and the alkA fragments were 237 bp, 326 bp. When they were sequenced and blasted in GenBank, the homology of sequences reached 99% indicated the amplified results correct. The results of sequencing ligated with PUCD615 reviewed that the fragments of uvrA and alkA had been inserted into the multiple clone site correctly, the insert direction and reading frame were also exactly. Optimizing the condition of ligation and transformation, the large fragment of PUCD615 and the short inserted sequences can been ligated successfully.

  12. Recombination luminescence of CaSO4:Tb3+ and CaSO4:Gd3+phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtseva, Irina; Lushchik, Aleksandr; Maaroos, Aarne; Azmaganbetova, Zhannur; Nurakhmetov, Turlybek; Salikhoja, Zhussupbek

    2012-08-01

    A comparative study of the excitation of luminescence by VUV radiation as well as of thermally and photostimulated luminescence has been carried out for CaSO4:Tb3+ and CaSO4:Gd3+ phosphors, where Na+ or F- ions are used for charge compensation. The distinction in hole processes for the phosphors with Na+ or F- compensators is determined by the differing thermal stability of the holes localized at/near Tb3+Na+ and Gd3+Na+ (up to 100-160 K) or at/near Tb3+F- V Ca and Gd3+F- V Ca centers involving also a cation vacancy (up to 400-550 K). Tunnel luminescence in the pairs of localized electrons and holes nearby Tb3+ or Gd3+ has been detected. The mechanisms of electron-hole, hole-electron and tunnel recombination luminescence as well as a subsequent released energy transfer to RE3+ ions are considered.

  13. A New, Sensitive Marine Microalgal Recombinant Biosensor Using Luminescence Monitoring for Toxicity Testing of Antifouling Biocides

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie; Leroy, Fanny; Bouget, François-Yves

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we propose the use of the marine green alga Ostreococcus tauri, the smallest free-living eukaryotic cell known to date, as a new luminescent biosensor for toxicity testing in the environment. Diuron and Irgarol 1051, two antifouling biocides commonly encountered in coastal waters, were chosen to test this new biosensor along with two degradation products of diuron. The effects of various concentrations of the antifoulants on four genetic constructs of O. tauri (based on genes involved in photosynthesis, cell cycle, and circadian clock) were compared using 96-well culture microplates and a luminometer to automatically measure luminescence over 3 days. This was compared to growth inhibition of O. tauri wild type under the same conditions. Luminescence appeared to be more sensitive than growth inhibition as an indicator of toxicity. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKA), a protein involved in the cell cycle, fused to luciferase (CDKA-Luc) was found to be the most sensitive of the biosensors, allowing an accurate determination of the 50% effective concentration (EC50) after only 2 days (diuron, 5.65 ± 0.44 μg/liter; Irgarol 1015, 0.76 ± 0.10 μg/liter). The effects of the antifoulants on the CDKA-Luc biosensor were then compared to growth inhibition in natural marine phytoplankton. The effective concentrations of diuron and Irgarol 1051 were found to be similar, indicating that this biosensor would be suitable as a reliable ecotoxicological test. The advantage of this biosensor over cell growth inhibition testing is that the process can be easily automated and could provide a high-throughput laboratory approach to perform short-term toxicity tests. The ability to genetically transform and culture recombinant O. tauri gives it huge potential for screening many other toxic compounds. PMID:23144143

  14. An efficient depyrogenation method for recombinant bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Basto, Afonso P; Morais, Joana; Marcelino, Eduardo; Leitão, Alexandre; Santos, Dulce M

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins are anchored in the outer membrane lipid layer in close association with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and with other hydrophobic membrane proteins, making their purification technically challenging. We have previously shown that a thorough delipidation of outer membrane preparations from the Escherichia coli expression host is an important step to eliminate contaminant proteins when purifying recombinant antigens expressed in fusion with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprI lipoprotein. Here we report the cloning and expression of three antigens in fusion with OprI (ovalbumin, eGFP and BbPDI) and our efforts to deal with the variable LPS contamination levels observed in different batches of purified lipoproteins. The use of polymyxin B columns or endotoxin removal polycationic magnetic beads for depyrogenation of purified lipoproteins resulted in high protein losses and the use of Triton X-114 or sodium deoxycholate during the course of affinity chromatography showed to be ineffective to reduce LPS contamination. Instead, performing a hot phenol/water LPS extraction from outer membrane preparations prior to metal affinity chromatography allowed the purification of the recombinant fusion lipoproteins with LPS contents below 0.02EU/μg of protein. The purified recombinant lipoproteins retain their capacity to stimulate bone marrow-derived dendritic cells allowing for the study of their immunomodulatory properties through TLR2/1. This is a simple and easy to scale up method that can also be considered for the purification of other outer membrane lipoproteins.

  15. LuxG is a functioning flavin reductase for bacterial luminescence.

    PubMed

    Nijvipakul, Sarayut; Wongratana, Janewit; Suadee, Chutintorn; Entsch, Barrie; Ballou, David P; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2008-03-01

    The luxG gene is part of the lux operon of marine luminous bacteria. luxG has been proposed to be a flavin reductase that supplies reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMN) for bacterial luminescence. However, this role has never been established because the gene product has not been successfully expressed and characterized. In this study, luxG from Photobacterium leiognathi TH1 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli in both native and C-terminal His6-tagged forms. Sequence analysis indicates that the protein consists of 237 amino acids, corresponding to a subunit molecular mass of 26.3 kDa. Both expressed forms of LuxG were purified to homogeneity, and their biochemical properties were characterized. Purified LuxG is homodimeric and has no bound prosthetic group. The enzyme can catalyze oxidation of NADH in the presence of free flavin, indicating that it can function as a flavin reductase in luminous bacteria. NADPH can also be used as a reducing substrate for the LuxG reaction, but with much less efficiency than NADH. With NADH and FMN as substrates, a Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed a series of convergent lines characteristic of a ternary-complex kinetic model. From steady-state kinetics data at 4 degrees C pH 8.0, Km for NADH, Km for FMN, and kcat were calculated to be 15.1 microM, 2.7 microM, and 1.7 s(-1), respectively. Coupled assays between LuxG and luciferases from P. leiognathi TH1 and Vibrio campbellii also showed that LuxG could supply FMNH- for light emission in vitro. A luxG gene knockout mutant of P. leiognathi TH1 exhibited a much dimmer luminescent phenotype compared to the native P. leiognathi TH1, implying that LuxG is the most significant source of FMNH- for the luminescence reaction in vivo.

  16. Development of luminescent pH sensor films for monitoring bacterial growth through tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenglin; Raval, Yash; Chen, Hongyu; Tzeng, Tzuen-Rong J; DesJardins, John D; Anker, Jeffrey N

    2014-02-01

    Although implanted medical devices (IMDs) offer many benefits, they are susceptible to bacterial colonization and infections. Such infections are difficult to treat because bacteria could form biofilms on the implant surface, which reduce antibiotics penetration and generate local dormant regions with low pH and low oxygen. In addition, these infections are hard to detect early because biofilms are often localized on the surface. Herein, an optical sensor film is developed to detect local acidosis on an implanted surface. The film contains both upconverting particles (UCPs) that serve as a light source and a pH indicator that alters the luminescence spectrum. When irradiated with 980 nm light, the UCPs produce deeply penetrating red light emission, while generating negligible autofluorescence in the tissue. The basic form of the pH indicator absorbs more of upconversion luminescence at 661 nm than at 671 nm and consequently the spectral ratio indicates pH. Implanting this pH sensor film beneath 6-7 mm of porcine tissue does not substantially affect the calibration curve because the peaks are closely spaced. Furthermore, growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis on the sensor surface causes a local pH decrease that can be detected non-invasively through the tissue. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Registration of radical anions of Al, Ga, In tris-8-oxyquinolinates by magnetosensitive and spectrally resolved recombination luminescence in benzene solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergey, N. V.; Verkhovlyuk, V. N.; Kalneus, E. V.; Korolev, V. V.; Melnikov, A. R.; Burdukov, A. B.; Stass, D. V.; Molin, Yu. N.

    2012-11-01

    Formation and recombination of transient radical anions of Al, Ga, and In tris-8-oxyquinolinates (Alq3, Gaq3, and Inq3), the key species in certain organic electroluminescing devices, was studied in X-irradiated benzene solution. The spectra of recombination luminescence were obtained and effective yields of recombination luminescence referred to Alq3 were estimated as 0.3 (Gaq3) and 0.15 (Inq3). Magnetic field effects in recombination luminescence involving the radical anions of the three oxyquinolinates were obtained, from which hyperfine coupling constants at the central ions were estimated as 0.45 (IAl = 5/2), 0.8 (IGa = 3/2), and 0.6 (IIn = 9/2) mT for radical anions of Alq3, Gaq3, and Inq3, respectively.

  18. Ratiometric luminescent detection of bacterial spores with terbium chelated semiconducting polymer dots.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Sun, Kai; Chang, Kaiwen; Yu, Jiangbo; Chiu, Daniel T; Wu, Changfeng; Qin, Weiping

    2013-10-01

    We report a ratiometric fluorescent sensor based on semiconducting polymer dots chelated with terbium ions to detect bacterial spores in aqueous solution. Fluorescent polyfluorene (PFO) dots serve as a scaffold to coordinate with lanthanide ions that can be sensitized by calcium dipicolinate (CaDPA), an important biomarker of bacterial spores. The absorption band of PFO dots extends to deep UV region, allowing both the reference and the sensitizer can be excited with a single wavelength (~275 nm). The fluorescence of PFO remains constant as a reference, while the Tb(3+) ions exhibit enhanced luminescence upon binding with DPA. The sharp fluorescence peaks of β-phase PFO dots and the narrow-band emissions of Tb(3+) ions enable ratiometric and sensitive CaDPA detection with a linear response over nanomolar concentration and a detection limit of ~0.2 nM. The Pdots based sensor also show excellent selectivity to CaDPA over other aromatic ligands. Our results indicate that the Tb(3+) chelated Pdots sensor is promising for sensitive and rapid detection of bacterial spores.

  19. Effect of concentrating and exposing the bioluminescent bacteria to the non-luminescent allo-bacterial extracellular products on their luminescence.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, J; Geetha Priya, G; Kannapiran, E

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a biochemical process occurring in many organisms. Bacterial bioluminescence has been investigated extensively that lead to many applications of such knowledge. Quorum sensing in the bioluminescent bacteria is a chemical signal process to recognize the strength of its own population to start luminescence in harmony. There is a mechanism in these bacteria to also recognize inter-species strength. When there is a higher number of these bacteria, the possibility and frequency of cell-cell physical contact will be high. In this study, the physical proximity was artificially enhanced between cells and the effect on luminescence in the concentrated cells in the normal culture medium and in the presence of other non-bacterial cell-free supernatants was investigated. The role of such physical contact in the quorum sensing in the bioluminescence is not known. Increase in the luminescence of V. fischeri when concentrated shows that the presence of physical proximity facilitates the quorum sensing for their bioluminescence. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Donor-acceptor pair recombination luminescence from monoclinic Cu{sub 2}SnS{sub 3} thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, Naoya; Tanaka, Kunihiko Uchiki, Hisao; Kanai, Ayaka; Araki, Hideaki

    2015-07-20

    The defect levels in Cu{sub 2}SnS{sub 3} (CTS) were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. A CTS thin film was prepared on a soda-lime glass/molybdenum substrate by thermal co-evaporation and sulfurization. The crystal structure was determined to be monoclinic, and the compositional ratios of Cu/Sn and S/Metal were determined to be 1.8 and 1.2, respectively. The photon energy of the PL spectra observed from the CTS thin film was lower than that previously reported. All fitted PL peaks were associated with defect related luminescence. The PL peaks observed at 0.843 and 0.867 eV were assigned to donor-acceptor pair recombination luminescence, the thermal activation energies of which were determined to be 22.9 and 24.8 meV, respectively.

  1. Bacterial-based Systems for Expression and Purification of Recombinant Lassa Virus Proteins of Immunological Relevance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-06

    Biowarfare potential further jus- tifies the development of countermeasures against this highly virulent class of viruses . Methods Virus , cells, plasmids...BioMed CentralVirology Journal ssOpen AcceResearch Bacterial-based systems for expression and purification of recombinant Lassa virus proteins of...recombinant Lassa virus (LASV) proteins may serve as valuable tools in diverse antiviral applications. Bacterial-based systems were engineered for

  2. Is bacterial luminescence response to low-dose radiation associated with mutagenicity?

    PubMed

    Rozhko, T V; Guseynov, O A; Guseynova, V E; Bondar, A A; Devyatlovskaya, A N; Kudryasheva, N S

    2017-10-01

    Luminous marine bacteria are widely used in bioassays with luminescence intensity being a physiological parameter tested. The purpose of the study was to determine whether bacterial genetic alteration is responsible for bioluminescence kinetics change under low-dose radiation exposure. The alpha-emitting radionuclide (241)Am and beta-emitting radionuclide (3)H were used as the sources of low-dose ionizing radiation. Changes of bioluminescence kinetics of Photobacterium phosphoreum in solutions of (241)Am(NO3)3, 7 kBq/L, and tritiated water, 100 MBq/L, were studied; bioluminescence kinetics stages (absence of effect, activation, and inhibition) were determined. Bacterial suspension was sampled at different stages of the bioluminescent kinetics; the doses accumulated by the samples were close or a little higher than a tentative limit of a low-dose interval: 0.10 and 0.85 Gy for (241)Am, or 0.11 and 0.18 Gy for (3)H. Sequence analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene did not reveal a mutagenic effect of low-dose alpha and beta radiation in the bacterial samples. Previous results on bacterial DNA exposed to low-dose gamma radiation (0.25 Gy) were analyzed and compared to those for alpha and beta irradiation. It is concluded that bioluminescence activation and/or inhibition under the applied conditions of low-dose alpha, beta and gamma radioactive exposure is not associated with DNA mutations in the gene sequences tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Effect of Pre-irradiation Defects on the Recombination Luminescence in Activated Crystals K2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koketai, Temirgaly; Tagayeva, Batima; Tussupbekova, Ainura; Mussenova, Elmira

    The recombinational luminescence of crystals of K2SO4-Mn2+ and K2SO4-Ni2+ is studied in the article. It is established that impurity ions form the radiation induced centers. The cause of changes of the distribution of lightsum on TSL peaks of a matrix is established. It is proposed that it is related to pre-radiation defeсts in crystals. It is established from this effect that ions of Mn2+ and Ni2+ selectively replace cations in a crystal lattice of potassium sulfate.

  4. Bacterial recombination promotes the evolution of multi-drug-resistance in functionally diverse populations

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Gabriel G.; Lee, Alexander E. G.; Wang, Yun; Huang, Wei E.; Barraclough, Timothy G.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial recombination is believed to be a major factor explaining the prevalence of multi-drug-resistance (MDR) among pathogenic bacteria. Despite extensive evidence for exchange of resistance genes from retrospective sequence analyses, experimental evidence for the evolutionary benefits of bacterial recombination is scarce. We compared the evolution of MDR between populations of Acinetobacter baylyi in which we manipulated both the recombination rate and the initial diversity of strains with resistance to single drugs. In populations lacking recombination, the initial presence of multiple strains resistant to different antibiotics inhibits the evolution of MDR. However, in populations with recombination, the inhibitory effect of standing diversity is alleviated and MDR evolves rapidly. Moreover, only the presence of DNA harbouring resistance genes promotes the evolution of resistance, ruling out other proposed benefits for recombination. Together, these results provide direct evidence for the fitness benefits of bacterial recombination and show that this occurs by mitigation of functional interference between genotypes resistant to single antibiotics. Although analogous to previously described mechanisms of clonal interference among alternative beneficial mutations, our results actually highlight a different mechanism by which interactions among co-occurring strains determine the benefits of recombination for bacterial evolution. PMID:22048956

  5. X-Ray Excited Luminescence Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Growth on Surfaces Implanted in Tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenglin; Raval, Yash; Tzeng, Tzuen-Rong J; Anker, Jeffrey N

    2015-04-22

    A pH sensor film is developed that can be coated on an implant surface and imaged using a combination of X-ray excitation and visible spectroscopy to monitor bacterial infection and treatment of implanted medical devices (IMDs) through tissue. X-ray scintillators in the pH sensor film generate light when an X-ray beam irradiates them. This light first passes through a layer containing pH indicator that alters the spectrum according to pH, then passes through and out of the tissue where it is detected by a spectrometer. A reference region on the film is used to account for spectral distortion from wavelength-dependent absorption and scattering in the tissue. pH images are acquired by moving the sample relative to the X-ray beam and collecting a spectrum at each location, with a spatial resolution limited by the X-ray beam width. Using this X-ray excited luminescence chemical imaging (XELCI) to map pH through ex vivo porcine tissue, a pH drop is detected during normal bacterial growth on the sensor surface, and a restoration of the pH to the bulk value during antibiotic treatment over the course of hours with milli-meter resolution. Overall, XELCI provides a novel approach to noninvasively image surface pH for studying implant infections and treatments. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Genome-Wide Survey of Mutual Homologous Recombination in a Highly Sexual Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Koji; Kawai, Mikihiko; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Noriko; Handa, Naofumi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi; Hattori, Masahira; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2012-01-01

    The nature of a species remains a fundamental and controversial question. The era of genome/metagenome sequencing has intensified the debate in prokaryotes because of extensive horizontal gene transfer. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide survey of outcrossing homologous recombination in the highly sexual bacterial species Helicobacter pylori. We conducted multiple genome alignment and analyzed the entire data set of one-to-one orthologous genes for its global strains. We detected mosaic structures due to repeated recombination events and discordant phylogenies throughout the genomes of this species. Most of these genes including the “core” set of genes and horizontally transferred genes showed at least one recombination event. Taking into account the relationship between the nucleotide diversity and the minimum number of recombination events per nucleotide, we evaluated the recombination rate in every gene. The rate appears constant across the genome, but genes with a particularly high or low recombination rate were detected. Interestingly, genes with high recombination included those for DNA transformation and for basic cellular functions, such as biosynthesis and metabolism. Several highly divergent genes with a high recombination rate included those for host interaction, such as outer membrane proteins and lipopolysaccharide synthesis. These results provide a global picture of genome-wide distribution of outcrossing homologous recombination in a bacterial species for the first time, to our knowledge, and illustrate how a species can be shaped by mutual homologous recombination. PMID:22534164

  7. Yeast plasmid 2-micron circle promotes recombination within bacterial transposon Tn5.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, M; Broach, J R

    1983-01-01

    The site-specific recombination system (FLP) encoded by the yeast plasmid 2-micron circle can also act in yeast on the inverted repeats of the bacterial transposon Tn5. The efficiency of this recombination is dependent on the location of Tn5 within the 2-micron circle genome but can be as high as that observed for 2-micron circle itself. Comparison of the DNA sequences between the Tn5 repeat and the 2-micron circle recombination region reveals certain strikingly similar structural features that might be important in the recombination reaction. Images PMID:6316350

  8. Recombination luminescence of LaPO4-Eu and LaPO4-Pr nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyy, T. S.; Vistovskyy, V. V.; Khapko, Z. A.; Pushak, A. S.; Mitina, N. E.; Zaichenko, A. S.; Gektin, A. V.; Voloshinovskii, A. S.

    2013-06-01

    The study of the spectral-luminescence parameters of LaPO4-Eu and LaPO4-Pr nanoparticles upon excitation by the synchrotron radiation with photon energies 4-40 eV was performed. The differences of the luminescence intensity dependence on the size for LaPO4-Eu and LaPO4-Pr nanoparticles excited at the range of matrix transparency, the range of band-to-band transitions, and the range of electronic excitation multiplication were revealed. The observed regularities are explained in terms of the electron-phonon and electron-electron scattering, surface losses, and exciton diffusion. The ratio between the length of thermalization and electron mean free path and the size of nanoparticle is determinative for the luminescence intensity upon excitation in the range of fundamental absorption of matrix and X-ray excitation.

  9. Random mutagenesis of bacterial luciferase: critical role of Glu175 in the control of luminescence decay

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial luciferases (LuxAB) can be readily classed as slow or fast decay luciferases based on their rates of luminescence decay in a single turnover assay. Luciferases from Vibrio harveyi and Xenorhabdus (Photorhabdus) luminescens have slow decay rates, and those from the Photobacterium genus, such as Photobacterium fisheri, P. phosphoreum and P. leiognathi, have rapid decay rates. By substitution of a 67-amino-acid stretch of P. phosphoreum LuxA in the central region of the LuxA subunit, the ‘slow’ X. luminescens luciferase was converted into a chimaeric luciferase with a significantly more rapid decay rate [Valkova, Szittner and Meighen (1999) Biochemistry 38, 13820–13828]. To understand better the role of specific residues in the classification of luciferases as slow and fast decay, we have conducted random mutagenesis on this region. One of the mutants generated by a single mutation on LuxA at position 175 [E175G (Glu175→Gly)] resulted in the ‘slow decay’ X. luminescens luciferase being converted into a luciferase with a significantly more rapid decay rate. These results indicate the importance of Glu175 in LuxA as a critical residue for differentiating between ‘slow’ and ‘fast’ luciferases and show that this distinction is primarily due to differences in aldehyde affinity and in the decomposition of the luciferase–flavin–oxygen intermediate. PMID:15352872

  10. [Glycosides of hydroxylamine derivatives. I. phase transfer synthesis and study of isatine-3-oximes glucosaminides influence on bacterial luminescence].

    PubMed

    Kur'ianov, V O; Chupakhina, T A; Shapovalova, A A; Katsev, A M; Chirva, V Ia

    2011-01-01

    In the phase transfer system solid calcium carbonate-acetonitrile, per acetate alpha-D-glucosaminilchloride glycosilate easily deprotoned isatine-3-oximes hydroxyl groups. It was found that the presence in the reaction mixture a catalytic amounts of 15-crown-5 accelerated the process twice. Obtained O-beta-D-glucosaminides were identified with 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Features of synthesized compound's NMR spectra are discussed in comparison with those of another N-acetylglucosamine 1-O-derivatives. The biological activity of the some oximes with different substituents in isatin residuum has been studied in a test of inhibition of bioluminescence of marine luminescent bacteria Photobacterium leiognathi Sh12. The nature of N-substituent of isatin fragment and 5-substituent of isatin main structure is compared with glycosides ability to suppress bacterial luminescence.

  11. Ectopic mitotic recombination in Drosophila probed with bacterial beta-galactosidase gene-based reporter transgenes.

    PubMed Central

    Bärtsch, S; Dücker, K; Würgler, F E; Sengstag, C

    1997-01-01

    Plasmids were constructed to investigate homologous mitotic recombination in Drosophila cells. Heteroalleles containing truncated but overlapping segments of the bacterial beta-galactosidase gene (lacZ) were positioned either on separate plasmids or as direct repeats on the same chromosome. Recombination reconstituted a functional lacZgene leading to expression of LacZ+activity detectable by histochemical staining. High extrachromosomal recombination (ECR) frequencies between unlinked heteroalleles were observed upon transient co-transfection into Drosophila melanogaster Schneider line 2 (S2) cells. Stably transfected cells containing the lacZ heteroalleles linked on a chromosome exhibited intrachromosomal recombination (ICR) frequencies two orders of magnitude lower than ECR frequencies. Recombination was inducible by exposing the cells to ethyl methanesulphonate or mitomycin C. Recombination products were characterized by multiplex PCR analysis and unequal sister chromatid recombination was found as the predominant mechanism reconstituting the lacZ gene. To investigate recombination in vivo imaginal disc cells from transgenic larvae carrying the reporter gene on the X chromosome were isolated and stained for LacZ+ activity. The presence of a few LacZ+ clones indicated that mitotic recombination events occurred at frequencies two orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding event in cultured cells and late during larval development. PMID:9380517

  12. Recombination luminescence in irradiated silicon-effects of uniaxial stress and temperature variations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. E.; Compton, W. D.

    1971-01-01

    Demonstration that luminescence in irradiated silicon consists of a spectral group between 0.80 and 1.0 eV which seems to be independent of impurities, while a lower energy group between 0.60 and 0.80 eV is seen only in pulled crystals. The small halfwidth and temperature dependence of the sharp zero-phonon lines observed in these spectra indicate that the luminescence arises from a bound-to-bound transition. A model is proposed for the transition mechanism. Stress data taken on the 0.79-eV zero-phonon line in pulled crystals can be fit by either a tetragonal 100 (in brackets) defect symmetry or by conduction-band splitting effects. It is suggested that the 0.79-eV zero-phonon line and the 0.60- to 0.80-eV spectral group arise from the EPR G-15 center. Stress data on a zero-phonon line at 0.97 eV associated with the 0.80- to 1.0-eV spectral group can be explained by a trigonal 111 (in brackets) defect. The divacancy is tentatively suggested as responsible for this luminescence spectra.

  13. Recombination luminescence and EPR of Mn doped Li2B4O7 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romet, I.; Buryi, M.; Corradi, G.; Feldbach, E.; Laguta, V.; Tichy-Rács, É.; Nagirnyi, V.

    2017-08-01

    Manganese doped Li2B4O7 (LTB) crystals have been studied using luminescence and EPR spectroscopy, extending the investigations for the first time from the X band to the Q band for higher resolution. Mn2+ ions are shown to substitute dominantly at lithium sites charge compensated by a nearby lithium vacancy. Excitation spectra of the Mn2+ ion emission have been studied in the energy range of 2.5-20 eV. Weak excitation bands up to 5.5 eV are ascribed to specific transitions within the same 3d5 electronic configuration according to the Tanabe-Sugano diagram. A doublet of intense excitation bands in the 7-8 eV region is assigned to electronic transitions to the Mn2+6D term split by crystal field into two sub-bands. Thermostimulated luminescence (TSL) curves were studied in the temperature range 5-600 K. Based on the EPR studies and the comparison of TSL spectra of irradiated crystals with spectra of photostimulated luminescence, models of TSL processes are proposed. Emission and TSL processes are shown to be strongly influenced by local lattice relaxation and the mobility of Li vacancies participating in complexes with three different charge states of the Mn dopant.

  14. Bacterial expression and purification of recombinant bovine Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Philippa M; Maxwell, Gavin; Campo, M Saveria

    2002-02-01

    We have previously described a recombinant phagemid expression vector, pComBov, designed for the production of native sequence bovine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) generated by antibody phage display. Bovine mAb Fab fragments isolated from libraries constructed using pComBov in Escherichia coli strain XL1-Blue, which is routinely used for antibodies expressed on the surface of phage, were expressed at very low yields. Therefore, a study was undertaken to determine optimal growth conditions for maximal expression of bovine Fab fragments in E. coli. By varying the E. coli strain, and the temperature and length of the culture growth, we were able to substantially increase the yield of soluble Fab fragments. A high yield of Fab fragments was found in the culture growth medium, which enabled us to devise a rapid and simple single-step method for the purification of native (nondenatured) Fabs based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography against a six-histidine amino acid carboxyl-terminal extension of the heavy-chain constant region. Using these methods we were able to express and purify antigen-specific bovine Fab fragments from E. coli. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  15. Essential bacterial helicases that counteract the toxicity of recombination proteins

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ehrlich, Dusko

    2002-01-01

    PcrA, Rep and UvrD are three closely related bacterial helicases with a DExx signature. PcrA is encoded by Gram-positive bacteria and is essential for cell growth. Rep and UvrD are encoded by Gram-negative bacteria, and mutants lacking both helicases are also not viable. To understand the non-viability of the helicase mutants, we characterized spontaneous extragenic suppressors of a Bacillus subtilis pcrA null mutation. Here we report that one of these suppressors maps in recF and that previously isolated mutations in B.subtilis recF, recL, recO and recR, which belong to the same complementation group, all suppress the lethality of a pcrA mutation. Similarly, recF, recO or recR mutations suppress the lethality of the Escherichia coli rep uvrD double mutant. We conclude that RecFOR proteins are toxic in cells devoid of PcrA in Gram-positive bacteria, or Rep and UvrD in Gram-negative bacteria, and propose that the RecFOR proteins interfere with an essential cellular process, possibly replication, when DExx helicases PcrA, or Rep and UvrD are absent. PMID:12065426

  16. Recovery of recombinant bacterial plasmids from E. coli transformed with DNA from microinjected mouse cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, P J; Bowman, A H; Huberman, M H; Sanders-Haigh, L; Killos, L; Anderson, W F

    1981-01-01

    We have previously described the isolation of thymidine kinase positive (TK+), human beta-globin gene-containing colonies following co-microinjection of mouse TK- L cells with two recombinant pBR322 plasmids, one containing the TK gene of herpes simplex virus type I (plasmid pXl), and the second containing a human genomic DNA fragment within which is the human beta-globin gene (plasmid pRKl). DNA isolated from one such clone was used in bacterial transformation experiments with a selection for tetracycline-resistant colonies (that is, for cells containing pRKl). A total of forty-two tetracycline-resistant colonies were isolated, thirty of which contained circular pRK1 molecules identical to those originally injected. The remaining twelve colonies contained unique plasmids that were grouped into five different classes of recombinant molecules. All five of these unique recombinant classes appear to contain a common deletion endpoint occurring at a specific region of the pBR322 segment of pRKl. Four of the unique recombinant classes appear to have arisen from the deletion of a segment of a pRKl trimer or dimer molecule, while the fifth class appears to have resulted from recombination between pRKl and pXl followed by a deletion event within this recombinant. It is uncertain whether these deletions are occurring within the eukaryotic cell or upon subsequent transformation of the bacterial cell. If the latter, then the passage of the plasmid DNA through the eukaryotic cell alters a specific site of the pBR322 DNA in such a way that deletions can occur at a high frequency in this region when the plasmid DNA is introduced back into a bacterial cell. Thus, we have established a prokaryote-eukaryote-prokaryote DNA transfer and recovery system which should be useful in studies on DNA replication and the regulation of gene expression in higher eukaryotes. Images PMID:6273826

  17. Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constants of Charge Recombination Reactions in Bacterial Reaction Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy, T. T.; Yen, V. T. H.; Thao, T. T.; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    The bacterial reaction center couples light-induced electron transfer via a tightly bound ubiquinone (QA) to a mobile ubiquinone (QB). Based on the electron transfer theory by Marcus, we have investigated the rate of charge recombination reactions from Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, by mean of finding an approximation formula. The results obtained are verified for not only at high and low temperature as the previous works but also at the medium temperature range.

  18. ClonalFrameML: Efficient Inference of Recombination in Whole Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Didelot, Xavier; Wilson, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Recombination is an important evolutionary force in bacteria, but it remains challenging to reconstruct the imports that occurred in the ancestry of a genomic sample. Here we present ClonalFrameML, which uses maximum likelihood inference to simultaneously detect recombination in bacterial genomes and account for it in phylogenetic reconstruction. ClonalFrameML can analyse hundreds of genomes in a matter of hours, and we demonstrate its usefulness on simulated and real datasets. We find evidence for recombination hotspots associated with mobile elements in Clostridium difficile ST6 and a previously undescribed 310kb chromosomal replacement in Staphylococcus aureus ST582. ClonalFrameML is freely available at http://clonalframeml.googlecode.com/. PMID:25675341

  19. Recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Gurkan, Cemal; Ellar, David J

    2005-01-01

    The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris is a popular heterologous expression host for the recombinant production of a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins. The rapid emergence of P. pastoris as a robust heterologous expression host was facilitated by the ease with which it can be manipulated and propagated, which is comparable to that of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. P. pastoris offers further advantages such as the tightly-regulated alcohol oxidase promoter that is particularly suitable for heterologous expression of foreign genes. While recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives is highly desirable, attempts at their heterologous expression using the traditional E. coli expression system can be problematic due to the formation of inclusion bodies that often severely limit the final yields of biologically active products. However, recent literature now suggests that P. pastoris may be an attractive alternative host for the heterologous production of bacterial toxins, such as those from the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, and Corynebacterium, as well as their more complex derivatives. Here, we review the recombinant production of bacterial toxins and their derivatives in P. pastoris with special emphasis on their potential clinical applications. Considering that de novo design and construction of synthetic toxin genes have often been necessary to achieve optimal heterologous expression in P. pastoris, we also present general guidelines to this end based on our experience with the P. pastoris expression of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa1 toxin. PMID:16336647

  20. New strategies for combination vaccines based on the extended recombinant bacterial ghost system.

    PubMed

    Eko, F O; Witte, A; Huter, V; Kuen, B; Fürst-Ladani, S; Haslberger, A; Katinger, A; Hensel, A; Szostak, M P; Resch, S; Mader, H; Raza, P; Brand, E; Marchart, J; Jechlinger, W; Haidinger, W; Lubitz, W

    1999-03-26

    Controlled expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts have been produced from a great variety of bacteria and are used as non-living candidate vaccines. In the recombinant ghost system, foreign proteins are attached on the inside of the inner membrane as fusions with specific anchor sequences. Ghosts have a sealed periplasmic space and the export of proteins into this space vastly extents the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts to function as carriers of foreign antigens, immunomodulators or other substances. In addition, S-layer proteins forming shell-like self assembly structures can be expressed in bacterial candidate vaccine strains prior to E-mediated lysis. Such recombinant S-layer proteins carrying inserts of foreign epitopes of up to 600 amino acids within the flexible surface loop areas of the S-layer further extend the possibilities of ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes. As ghosts do not need the addition of adjuvants to induce immunity in experimental animals they can also be used as carriers or targeting vehicles or as adjuvants in combination with subunit vaccines. Matrixes like dextran which can be used to fill the internal lumen of ghosts can be substituted with various ligands to bind the subunit or other materials of interest. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral immunization of experimental animals with recombinant ghosts induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of ghosts and recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in the production of ghosts. This fact explains the superior quality of ghosts when compared to other inactivated vaccines. As carriers of foreign

  1. [Characteristics of the response of natural and recombinant luminescent microorganisms in the presence of Fe2+ ions].

    PubMed

    Deriabin, D G; Karimov, I F

    2010-01-01

    It was found that divalent iron ions have alternative effects on the bioluminescence of the natural marine microorganism Photobacterium phosphoreum and the recombinant Escherichia coli strain with a cloned lux operon of P. leiognathi. In the presence of 0.25-5.0 mM FeSO4, the bioluminescence intensity of the former and the latter increased and decreased, respectively. To establish the causes of these differences, we studied the characteristics of the fatty acid composition of the compared microorganisms. The fatty acid profile of E. coli was characterized by a high proportion of unsaturated 11-octadecenoic (vaccenic) acid. A study of this acid in a cell-free enzyme system used for bioluminescence generation showed that it is a potent inhibitor of bacterial bioluminescence. It was found that such effects are enhanced if 11-octadecenoid acid is preincubated with Fe2+.

  2. Measurements of Ca²⁺ concentration with recombinant targeted luminescent probes.

    PubMed

    Ottolini, Denis; Calì, Tito; Brini, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades the study of Ca(2+) homeostasis in living cells has been enhanced by the explosive development of genetically encoded Ca(2+)-indicators. The cloning of the Ca(2+)-sensitive photoprotein aequorin and of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria has been enormously advantageous. As polypeptides, aequorin and GFP allow their endogenous production in cell systems as diverse as bacteria, yeast, slime molds, plants, and mammalian cells. Moreover, it is possible to specifically localize them within the cell by including defined targeting signals in the amino acid sequence. These two proteins have been extensively engineered to obtain several recombinant probes for different biological parameters, among which Ca(2+) concentration reporters are probably the most relevant. The GFP-based Ca(2+) probes and aequorin are widely employed in the study of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. The new generation of bioluminescent probes that couple the Ca(2+) sensitivity of aequorin to GFP fluorescence emission allows real-time measurements of subcellular Ca(2+) changes in single cell imaging experiments and the video-imaging of Ca(2+) concentrations changes in live transgenic animals that express GFP-aequorin bifunctional probes.

  3. Rapid phylogenetic analysis of large samples of recombinant bacterial whole genome sequences using Gubbins

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Nicholas J.; Page, Andrew J.; Connor, Thomas R.; Delaney, Aidan J.; Keane, Jacqueline A.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Parkhill, Julian; Harris, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of new sequencing technologies has facilitated the use of bacterial whole genome alignments for evolutionary studies and outbreak analyses. These datasets, of increasing size, often include examples of multiple different mechanisms of horizontal sequence transfer resulting in substantial alterations to prokaryotic chromosomes. The impact of these processes demands rapid and flexible approaches able to account for recombination when reconstructing isolates’ recent diversification. Gubbins is an iterative algorithm that uses spatial scanning statistics to identify loci containing elevated densities of base substitutions suggestive of horizontal sequence transfer while concurrently constructing a maximum likelihood phylogeny based on the putative point mutations outside these regions of high sequence diversity. Simulations demonstrate the algorithm generates highly accurate reconstructions under realistically parameterized models of bacterial evolution, and achieves convergence in only a few hours on alignments of hundreds of bacterial genome sequences. Gubbins is appropriate for reconstructing the recent evolutionary history of a variety of haploid genotype alignments, as it makes no assumptions about the underlying mechanism of recombination. The software is freely available for download at github.com/sanger-pathogens/Gubbins, implemented in Python and C and supported on Linux and Mac OS X. PMID:25414349

  4. [Dual promoters enhance heterologous enzyme production from bacterial phage based recombinant Bacillus subtilis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Yan; Xing, Miao

    2006-03-01

    The effect of dual promoters on recombinant protein production from bacterial phage based Bacillus subtilis expression system was investigated. Alpha amylase (from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens) and penicillin acylase (from Bacillus megaterium) were selected as the indicating enzymes. Both the promoterless genes and the promoter-bearing genes were isolated through PCR amplification with properly designed primers, and were inserted into plasmid pSG703 that contains the lacZ-cat expression cartridge. The lysogenic B. subtilis (phi105 MU331) was transformed with the resultant recombinant plasmids, and the heterologous genes were thereby integrated into the chromosommal DNA of B. subtilis via homologous recombination. The transformants were designated as B. subtilis AMY1, B. subtilis AMY2, B. subtilis PA1, and B. subtilis PA2, respectively. In the recombinant B. subtilis strains, the inserted sequences were located down stream of a strong phage promoter that could be activated by thermal induction. In B. subtilis AMY1 and B. subtilis PA1, transcription of the heterologous genes was only initiated by the phage promoter after heat shock, whereas in B. subtilis AMY2 and B. subtilis PA2, transcription of the heterologous genes was initiated by dual promoters, the phage promoter and the native promoter. The application of dual promoters increased the productivity of both enzymes, with 133% enhancement for alpha-amylase production and 113% enhancement for penicillin acylase production.

  5. Recombinant bacterial expression and purification of human fragile X mental retardation protein isoform 1.

    PubMed

    Evans, Timothy L; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2010-12-01

    The loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) leads to fragile X syndrome. FMRP has two types of RNA binding domains, two K-homology domains and an arginine-glycine-glycine box domain, and it is proposed to act as a translation regulator of specific messenger RNA. The interest to produce sufficient quantities of pure recombinant FMRP for biochemical and biophysical studies is high. However, the recombinant bacterial expression of FMRP has had limited success, and subsequent recombinant eukaryotic and in vitro expression has also resulted in limited success. In addition, the in vitro and eukaryotic expression systems may produce FMRP which is posttranslationally modified, as phosphorylation and arginine methylation have been shown to occur on FMRP. In this study, we have successfully isolated the conditions for recombinant expression, purification and long-term storage of FMRP using Escherichia coli, with a high yield. The expression of FMRP using E. coli renders the protein devoid of the posttranslational modifications of phosphorylation and arginine methylation, allowing the study of the direct effects of these modifications individually and simultaneously. In order to assure that FMRP retained activity throughout the process, we used fluorescence spectroscopy to assay the binding activity of the FMRP arginine-glycine-glycine box for the semaphorin 3F mRNA and confirmed that FMRP remained active.

  6. Color Control of Pr(3+) Luminescence by Electron-Hole Recombination Energy Transfer in CaTiO3 and CaZrO3.

    PubMed

    Barandiarán, Zoila; Bettinelli, Marco; Seijo, Luis

    2017-07-06

    Controlling luminescence in phosphors able to produce several emissions from different stable excited states determines their use in optical devices. We investigate the color control mechanism that quenches the greenish-blue emission in favor of the red one in the archetype phosphor CaTiO3:Pr(3+). State-of-the-art ab initio calculations indicate that direct host-to-dopant energy transfer (released by electron-hole recombination following the interband excitation and structural reorganization) selectively populates the (1)D2 red luminescent state of Pr(3+) and bypasses the (3)P0 greenish-blue emitter. Local defects can modulate the electron-hole recombination energy and therefore increase the red emission efficiency, as experimentally observed. The selection of red emission does not happen in CaZrO3:Pr(3+) because the electron-hole recombination energy is much higher. The calculations could not support the widely accepted color control mechanism based on metal-to-metal charge transfer states. The conclusion sets new points of view for the color control of lanthanide activated inorganic phosphors.

  7. Luminescent-activated transfected killer cells to monitor leukocyte trafficking during systemic bacterial and fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Baquir, Beverlie; Palosaari, Andrew; Spellberg, Brad

    2012-01-15

    Activated transfected killer (ATAK) cells are immortal phagocytes transfected with a luminescence reporter that effectively treat lethal infections in neutropenic mice. Their in vivo trafficking, lifespan, and immunogenicity are unknown. Mice were made neutropenic; infected or not with Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Candida albicans, or Aspergillus fumigatus; and treated intraperitoneally with ATAK cells. Cell trafficking and lifespan were assessed by in vivo imaging and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In uninfected neutropenic mice, ATAK cells spread from the mesentery into visceral organs on days 1-3. Splenic accumulation of ATAK cells increased at day 1 after infection with S. aureus and A. baumannii, and kidney accumulation increased in mice infected with C. albicans. Lung accumulation was seen at day 3 in mice infected by inhalation with A. fumigatus. By day 8, coincident with increasing anti-ATAK antibodies, luminescence signal was lost and there was no detectable mRNA transcription from ATAK cells. ATAK cells accumulated in target organs with distinct profiles, depending on the microbial etiology of infection. Finally, generation of an anti-ATAK immune response may provide an important safety mechanism that helps clear the cells from the host as the marrow recovers.

  8. Luminescent-Activated Transfected Killer Cells to Monitor Leukocyte Trafficking During Systemic Bacterial and Fungal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Baquir, Beverlie; Palosaari, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Background. Activated transfected killer (ATAK) cells are immortal phagocytes transfected with a luminescence reporter that effectively treat lethal infections in neutropenic mice. Their in vivo trafficking, lifespan, and immunogenicity are unknown. Methods. Mice were made neutropenic; infected or not with Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Candida albicans, or Aspergillus fumigatus; and treated intraperitoneally with ATAK cells. Cell trafficking and lifespan were assessed by in vivo imaging and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Results. In uninfected neutropenic mice, ATAK cells spread from the mesentery into visceral organs on days 1–3. Splenic accumulation of ATAK cells increased at day 1 after infection with S. aureus and A. baumannii, and kidney accumulation increased in mice infected with C. albicans. Lung accumulation was seen at day 3 in mice infected by inhalation with A. fumigatus. By day 8, coincident with increasing anti-ATAK antibodies, luminescence signal was lost and there was no detectable mRNA transcription from ATAK cells. Conclusions. ATAK cells accumulated in target organs with distinct profiles, depending on the microbial etiology of infection. Finally, generation of an anti-ATAK immune response may provide an important safety mechanism that helps clear the cells from the host as the marrow recovers. PMID:22124127

  9. Room temperature electrocompetent bacterial cells improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qiang; Yin, Jia; Fu, Jun; Herrmann, Jennifer; Li, Yuezhong; Yin, Yulong; Stewart, A. Francis; Müller, Rolf; Zhang, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial competent cells are essential for cloning, construction of DNA libraries, and mutagenesis in every molecular biology laboratory. Among various transformation methods, electroporation is found to own the best transformation efficiency. Previous electroporation methods are based on washing and electroporating the bacterial cells in ice-cold condition that make them fragile and prone to death. Here we present simple temperature shift based methods that improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency in E. coli and several other gram-negative bacteria thereby economizing time and cost. Increased transformation efficiency of large DNA molecules is a significant advantage that might facilitate the cloning of large fragments from genomic DNA preparations and metagenomics samples. PMID:27095488

  10. Large-scale recoding of a bacterial genome by iterative recombineering of synthetic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Yu Heng; Stirling, Finn; Kuo, James; Karrenbelt, Michiel A. P.; Chan, Yujia A.; Riesselman, Adam; Horton, Connor A.; Schäfer, Elena; Lips, David; Weinstock, Matthew T.; Gibson, Daniel G.; Way, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The ability to rewrite large stretches of genomic DNA enables the creation of new organisms with customized functions. However, few methods currently exist for accumulating such widespread genomic changes in a single organism. In this study, we demonstrate a rapid approach for rewriting bacterial genomes with modified synthetic DNA. We recode 200 kb of the Salmonella typhimurium LT2 genome through a process we term SIRCAS (stepwise integration of rolling circle amplified segments), towards constructing an attenuated and genetically isolated bacterial chassis. The SIRCAS process involves direct iterative recombineering of 10–25 kb synthetic DNA constructs which are assembled in yeast and amplified by rolling circle amplification. Using SIRCAS, we create a Salmonella with 1557 synonymous leucine codon replacements across 176 genes, the largest number of cumulative recoding changes in a single bacterial strain to date. We demonstrate reproducibility over sixteen two-day cycles of integration and parallelization for hierarchical construction of a synthetic genome by conjugation. The resulting recoded strain grows at a similar rate to the wild-type strain and does not exhibit any major growth defects. This work is the first instance of synthetic bacterial recoding beyond the Escherichia coli genome, and reveals that Salmonella is remarkably amenable to genome-scale modification. PMID:28499033

  11. De novo generation of infectious prions with bacterially expressed recombinant prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Fei; Wang, Xinhe; Xu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Huaiyi; Yu, Guohua; Yuan, Chonggang; Ma, Jiyan

    2013-12-01

    The prion hypothesis is strongly supported by the fact that prion infectivity and the pathogenic conformer of prion protein (PrP) are simultaneously propagated in vitro by the serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA). However, due to sPMCA's enormous amplification power, whether an infectious prion can be formed de novo with bacterially expressed recombinant PrP (rPrP) remains to be satisfactorily resolved. To address this question, we performed unseeded sPMCA with rPrP in a laboratory that has never been exposed to any native prions. Two types of proteinase K (PK)-resistant and self-perpetuating recombinant PrP conformers (rPrP-res) with PK-resistant cores of 17 or 14 kDa were generated. A bioassay revealed that rPrP-res(17kDa) was highly infectious, causing prion disease in wild-type mice with an average survival time of about 172 d. In contrast, rPrP-res(14kDa) completely failed to induce any disease. Our findings reveal that sPMCA is sufficient to initiate various self-perpetuating PK-resistant rPrP conformers, but not all of them possess in vivo infectivity. Moreover, generating an infectious prion in a prion-free environment establishes that an infectious prion can be formed de novo with bacterially expressed rPrP.

  12. Recombination-prone bacterial strains form a reservoir from which epidemic clones emerge in agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Merda, Déborah; Bonneau, Sophie; Guimbaud, Jean-François; Durand, Karine; Brin, Chrystelle; Boureau, Tristan; Lemaire, Christophe; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Fischer-Le Saux, Marion

    2016-04-05

    The acquisition of virulence-related genes through horizontal gene transfer can modify the pathogenic profiles of strains and lead to the emergence of new diseases. Xanthomonas arboricola is a bacterial species largely known for the damage it causes to stone and nut fruit trees worldwide. In addition to these host-specific populations called pathovars, many nonpathogenic strains have been identified in this species. Their evolutionary significance in the context of pathogen emergence is unknown. We looked at seven housekeeping genes amplified from 187 pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains isolated from various plants worldwide to analyze population genetics and recombination dynamics. We also examined the dynamics of the gains and losses of genes associated with life history traits (LHTs) during X. arboricola evolution. We discovered that X. arboricola presents an epidemic population structure. Successful pathovars of trees (i.e., pruni, corylina, and juglandis) are epidemic clones whose emergence appears to be linked to the acquisition of eight genes coding for Type III effectors. The other strains of this species are part of a recombinant network, within which LHT-associated genes might have been lost. We suggest that nonpathogenic strains, because of their high genetic diversity and propensity for recombination, may promote the emergence of pathogenic strains. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Genome-wide survey of codons under diversifying selection in a highly recombining bacterial species, Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Koji; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Morimoto, Shinpei; Kikutake, Chie; Komukai, Sho; Matelska, Dorota; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanisław; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Selection has been a central issue in biology in eukaryotes as well as prokaryotes. Inference of selection in recombining bacterial species, compared with clonal ones, has been a challenge. It is not known how codons under diversifying selection are distributed along the chromosome or among functional categories or how frequently such codons are subject to mutual homologous recombination. Here, we explored these questions by analysing genes present in >90% among 29 genomes of Helicobacter pylori, one of the bacterial species with the highest mutation and recombination rates. By a method for recombining sequences, we identified codons under diversifying selection (dN/dS > 1), which were widely distributed and accounted for ∼0.2% of all the codons of the genome. The codons were enriched in genes of host interaction/cell surface and genome maintenance (DNA replication, recombination, repair, and restriction modification system). The encoded amino acid residues were sometimes found adjacent to critical catalytic/binding residues in protein structures. Furthermore, by estimating the intensity of homologous recombination at a single nucleotide level, we found that these codons appear to be more frequently subject to recombination. We expect that the present study provides a new approach to population genomics of selection in recombining prokaryotes. PMID:26961370

  14. Use of recombination-mediated genetic engineering for construction of rescue human cytomegalovirus bacterial artificial chromosome clones.

    PubMed

    Dulal, Kalpana; Silver, Benjamin; Zhu, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology has contributed immensely to manipulation of larger genomes in many organisms including large DNA viruses like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The HCMV BAC clone propagated and maintained inside E. coli allows for accurate recombinant virus generation. Using this system, we have generated a panel of HCMV deletion mutants and their rescue clones. In this paper, we describe the construction of HCMV BAC mutants using a homologous recombination system. A gene capture method, or gap repair cloning, to seize large fragments of DNA from the virus BAC in order to generate rescue viruses, is described in detail. Construction of rescue clones using gap repair cloning is highly efficient and provides a novel use of the homologous recombination-based method in E. coli for molecular cloning, known colloquially as recombineering, when rescuing large BAC deletions. This method of excising large fragments of DNA provides important prospects for in vitro homologous recombination for genetic cloning.

  15. Synthesis of the milk oligosaccharide 2'-fucosyllactose using recombinant bacterial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Albermann, C; Piepersberg, W; Wehmeier, U F

    2001-08-23

    The enzymatic synthesis of GDP-beta-L-fucose and its enzymatic transfer reaction using recombinant enzymes from bacterial sources was examined. The GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase and the GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose 3,5-epimerase-4-reductase from Escherichia coli K-12, respectively, were used to catalyse the conversion of GDP-alpha-D-mannose to GDP-beta-L-fucose with 78% yield. For the transfer of the L-fucose to an acceptor, we cloned and overproduced the alpha-(1-->2)-fucosyltransferase (FucT2) protein from Helicobacter pylori. We were able to synthesise 2'-fucosyllactose using the overproduced FucT2 enzyme, enzymatically synthesised GDP-L-fucose and lactose. The isolation of 2'-fucosyllactose was accomplished by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration to give 65% yield.

  16. Functional morphology of the luminescence system of Siphamia versicolor (Perciformes: Apogonidae), a bacterially luminous coral reef fish.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Paul V; Nakamura, Masaru

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies of the luminescence system of Siphamia versicolor (Perciformes: Apogonidae) identified a ventral light organ, reflector, lens, duct, and a ventral diffuser extending from the throat to the caudal peduncle. The control and function of luminescence in this and other species of Siphamia, however, have not been defined. Morphological examination of fresh and preserved specimens identified additional components of the luminescence system involved in control and ventral emission of luminescence, including a retractable shutter over the ventral face of the light organ, contiguity of the ventral diffuser from the caudal peduncle to near the chin, and transparency of the bones and other tissues of the lower jaw. The shutter halves retract laterally, allowing the ventral release of light, and relax medially, blocking ventral light emission; topical application of norepinephrine to the exposed light organ resulted in retraction of the shutter halves, which suggests that operation of the shutter is under neuromuscular control. The extension of the diffuser to near the chin and transparency of the lower jaw allow a uniform emission of luminescence over the entire ventrum of the fish. The live aquarium-held fish were found to readily and consistently display ventral luminescence. At twilight, the fish left the protective association with their longspine sea urchin, Diadema setosum, and began to emit ventral luminescence and to feed on zooplankton. Ventral luminescence illuminated a zone below and around the fish, which typically swam close to the substrate. Shortly after complete darkness, the fish stopped feeding and emitting luminescence. These observations suggest that S. versicolor uses ventral luminescence to attract and feed on zooplankton from the reef benthos at twilight. Ventral luminescence may allow S. versicolor to exploit for feeding the gap at twilight in the presence of potential predators as the reef transitions from diurnally active to

  17. Bacterial-based systems for expression and purification of recombinant Lassa virus proteins of immunological relevance

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Luis M; Matschiner, Alex; Fair, Joseph N; Goba, Augustine; Sampey, Darryl B; Ferro, Philip J; Cashman, Kathleen A; Schoepp, Randal J; Tesh, Robert B; Bausch, Daniel G; Garry, Robert F; Guttieri, Mary C

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a significant requirement for the development and acquisition of reagents that will facilitate effective diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Lassa fever. In this regard, recombinant Lassa virus (LASV) proteins may serve as valuable tools in diverse antiviral applications. Bacterial-based systems were engineered for expression and purification of recombinant LASV nucleoprotein (NP), glycoprotein 1 (GP1), and glycoprotein 2 (GP2). Results Full-length NP and the ectodomains of GP1 and GP2 were generated as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusions in the Rosetta strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli) using pMAL-c2x vectors. Average fusion protein yields per liter of culture for MBP-NP, MBP-GP1, and MBP-GP2 were 10 mg, 9 mg, and 9 mg, respectively. Each protein was captured from cell lysates using amylose resin, cleaved with Factor Xa, and purified using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Fermentation cultures resulted in average yields per liter of 1.6 mg, 1.5 mg, and 0.7 mg of purified NP, GP1 and GP2, respectively. LASV-specific antibodies in human convalescent sera specifically detected each of the purified recombinant LASV proteins, highlighting their utility in diagnostic applications. In addition, mouse hyperimmune ascitic fluids (MHAF) against a panel of Old and New World arenaviruses demonstrated selective cross reactivity with LASV proteins in Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Conclusion These results demonstrate the potential for developing broadly reactive immunological assays that employ all three arenaviral proteins individually and in combination. PMID:18538016

  18. Recombination produces coherent bacterial species clusters in both core and accessory genomes

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Nicholas J.; Gutmann, Michael U.; Corander, Jukka; Hanage, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Population samples show bacterial genomes can be divided into a core of ubiquitous genes and accessory genes that are present in a fraction of isolates. The ecological significance of this variation in gene content remains unclear. However, microbiologists agree that a bacterial species should be ‘genomically coherent’, even though there is no consensus on how this should be determined. Results: We use a parsimonious model combining diversification in both the core and accessory genome, including mutation, homologous recombination (HR) and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) introducing new loci, to produce a population of interacting clusters of strains with varying genome content. New loci introduced by HGT may then be transferred on by HR. The model fits well to a systematic population sample of 616 pneumococcal genomes, capturing the major features of the population structure with parameter values that agree well with empirical estimates. Conclusions: The model does not include explicit selection on individual genes, suggesting that crude comparisons of gene content may be a poor predictor of ecological function. We identify a clearly divergent subpopulation of pneumococci that are inconsistent with the model and may be considered genomically incoherent with the rest of the population. These strains have a distinct disease tropism and may be rationally defined as a separate species. We also find deviations from the model that may be explained by recent population bottlenecks or spatial structure.

  19. Recombination luminescence and trap levels in undoped and Al-doped ZnO thin films on quartz and GaSe (0 0 0 1) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Evtodiev, I.; Caraman, I.; Leontie, L.; Rusu, D.-I.; Dafinei, A.; Nedeff, V.; Lazar, G.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO films on GaSe create electron trapping states and PL recombination levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn and Al diffusion in GaSe produces low-energy widening of its PL emission. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO:Al films on GaSe lamellas are suitable for gas-discharge lamp applications. -- Abstract: Photoluminescence spectra of ZnO and ZnO:Al (1.00, 2.00 and 5.00 at.%) films on GaSe (0 0 0 1) lamellas and amorphous quartz substrates, obtained by annealing, at 700 K, of undoped and Al-doped metal films, are investigated. For all samples, the nonequilibrium charge carriers recombine by radiative band-to-band transitions with energy of 3.27 eV, via recombination levels created by the monoionized oxygen atoms, forming the impurity band laying in the region 2.00 - 2.70 eV. Al doping induces an additional recombination level at 1.13 eV above the top of the valence band of ZnO films on GaSe substrates. As a result of thermal diffusion of Zn and Al into the GaSe interface layer from ZnO:Al/GaSe heterojunction, electron trap levels located at 0.22 eV and 0.26 eV below the conduction band edge of GaSe, as well as a deep recombination level, responsible for the luminescent emission in the region 1.10 - 1.40 eV, are created.

  20. A novel, sensitive method to evaluate potato germplasm for bacterial wilt resistance using a luminescent Ralstonia solanacearum reporter strain.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andrea Paola Zuluaga; Ferreira, Virginia; Pianzzola, María Julia; Siri, María Inés; Coll, Núria S; Valls, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Several breeding programs are under way to introduce resistance to bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in solanaceous crops. The lack of screening methods allowing easy measurement of pathogen colonization and the inability to detect latent (i.e., symptomless) infections are major limitations when evaluating resistance to this disease in plant germplasm. We describe a new method to study the interaction between R. solanacearum and potato germplasm that overcomes these restrictions. The R. solanacearum UY031 was genetically modified to constitutively generate light from a synthetic luxCDABE operon stably inserted in its chromosome. Colonization of this reporter strain on different potato accessions was followed using life imaging. Bacterial detection in planta by this nondisruptive system correlated with the development of wilting symptoms. In addition, we demonstrated that quantitative detection of the recombinant strain using a luminometer can identify latent infections on symptomless potato plants. We have developed a novel, unsophisticated, and accurate method for high-throughput evaluation of pathogen colonization in plant populations. We applied this method to compare the behavior of potato accessions with contrasting resistance to R. solanacearum. This new system will be especially useful to detect latency in symptomless parental lines before their inclusion in long-term breeding programs for disease resistance.

  1. Effective non-denaturing purification method for improving the solubility of recombinant actin-binding proteins produced by bacterial expression.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jeong Min; Lee, Sangmin; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial expression is commonly used to produce recombinant and truncated mutant eukaryotic proteins. However, heterologous protein expression may render synthesized proteins insoluble. The conventional method used to express a poorly soluble protein, which involves denaturation and refolding, is time-consuming and inefficient. There are several non-denaturing approaches that can increase the solubility of recombinant proteins that include using different bacterial cell strains, altering the time of induction, lowering the incubation temperature, and employing different detergents for purification. In this study, we compared several non-denaturing protocols to express and purify two insoluble 34 kDa actin-bundling protein mutants. The solubility of the mutant proteins was not affected by any of the approaches except for treatment with the detergent sarkosyl. These results indicate that sarkosyl can effectively improve the solubility of insoluble proteins during bacterial expression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Enhanced resistance of mice to bacterial infection induced by recombinant human interleukin-1a.

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Y; Ohashi, T; Minami, A; Nakamura, S

    1987-01-01

    The effect of recombinant human interleukin-1a on the survival rate of Std-ddY male mice systemically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa 12 or Klebsiella pneumoniae P-5709 was evaluated. In P. aeruginosa infection, interleukin-1a given intramuscularly twice, 3 days and 1 day before inoculation of bacteria, most effectively protected animals from death due to infection. The effect was dose dependent, with a maximum survival rate of 92.5% at 10 micrograms per mouse, while only 8.3% of the control group survived until the end of the observation period. The 50% effective dose of interleukin-1a was 0.261 microgram per mouse. In K. pneumoniae infection, interleukin-1a given intramuscularly twice, simultaneously with and 1 day after the inoculation of bacteria, was most effective. The protective effect of interleukin-1a was again dose dependent and was generally more marked than in P. aeruginosa infection. The 50% effective dose was 0.034 microgram per mouse. In both infections, there was no significant increase in the survival rates of animals injected with human albumin or heat-inactivated interleukin-1a. These observations raise the possibility that human interleukin-1a could serve as a therapeutic tool for patients with bacterial infections. Images PMID:3553002

  3. Exploitation of bacterial N-linked glycosylation to develop a novel recombinant glycoconjugate vaccine against Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Cuccui, Jon; Thomas, Rebecca M.; Moule, Madeleine G.; D'Elia, Riccardo V.; Laws, Thomas R.; Mills, Dominic C.; Williamson, Diane; Atkins, Timothy P.; Prior, Joann L.; Wren, Brendan W.

    2013-01-01

    Glycoconjugate-based vaccines have proved to be effective at producing long-lasting protection against numerous pathogens. Here, we describe the application of bacterial protein glycan coupling technology (PGCT) to generate a novel recombinant glycoconjugate vaccine. We demonstrate the conjugation of the Francisella tularensis O-antigen to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrier protein exotoxin A using the Campylobacter jejuni PglB oligosaccharyltransferase. The resultant recombinant F. tularensis glycoconjugate vaccine is expressed in Escherichia coli where yields of 3 mg l−1 of culture were routinely produced in a single-step purification process. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with the purified glycoconjugate boosted IgG levels and significantly increased the time to death upon subsequent challenge with F. tularensis subsp. holarctica. PGCT allows different polysaccharide and protein combinations to be produced recombinantly and could be easily applicable for the production of diverse glycoconjugate vaccines. PMID:23697804

  4. Site-specific recombination system based on actinophage TG1 integrase for gene integration into bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Nobutaka; Muroi, Tetsurou; Kihara, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Hideo; Haruki, Mitsuru

    2011-03-01

    Phage integrases are enzymes that catalyze unidirectional site-specific recombination between the attachment sites of phage and host bacteria, attP and attB, respectively. We recently developed an in vivo intra-molecular site-specific recombination system based on actinophage TG1 serine-type integrase that efficiently acts between attP and attB on a single plasmid DNA in heterologous Escherichia coli cells. Here, we developed an in vivo inter-molecular site-specific recombination system that efficiently acted between the att site on exogenous non-replicative plasmid DNA and the corresponding att site on endogenous plasmid or genomic DNA in E. coli cells, and the recombination efficiencies increased by a factor of ~10(1-3) in cells expressing TG1 integrase over those without. Moreover, integration of attB-containing incoming plasmid DNA into attP-inserted E. coli genome was more efficient than that of the reverse substrate configuration. Together with our previous result that purified TG1 integrase functions efficiently without auxiliary host factors in vitro, these in vivo results indicate that TG1 integrase may be able to introduce attB-containing circular DNAs efficiently into attP-inserted genomes of many bacterial species in a site-specific and unidirectional manner. This system thus may be beneficial to genome engineering for a wide variety of bacterial species.

  5. Production and covalent immobilisation of the recombinant bacterial carbonic anhydrase (SspCA) onto magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Perfetto, Rosa; Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; Sansone, Giovanni; Barone, Carmela M A; Rossi, Mosè; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2017-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs; EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes with a pivotal potential role in the biomimetic CO2 capture process (CCP) because these biocatalysts catalyse the simple but physiologically crucial reaction of carbon dioxide hydration to bicarbonate and protons in all life kingdoms. The CAs are among the fastest known enzymes, with kcat values of up to 10(6) s(-1) for some members of the superfamily, providing thus advantages when compared with other CCP methods, as they are specific for CO2. Thermostable CAs might be used in CCP technology because of their ability to perform catalysis in operatively hard conditions, typical of the industrial processes. Moreover, the improvement of the enzyme stability and its reuse are important for lowering the costs. These aspects can be overcome by immobilising the enzyme on a specific support. We report in this article that the recombinant thermostable SspCA (α-CA) from the thermophilic bacterium Sulfurihydrogenibium yellowstonense can been heterologously produced by a high-density fermentation of Escherichia coli cultures, and covalently immobilised onto the surface of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNP) via carbodiimide activation reactions. Our results demonstrate that using a benchtop bioprocess station and strategies for optimising the bacterial growth, it is possible to produce at low cost a large amount SspCA. Furthermore, the enzyme stability and storage greatly increased through the immobilisation, as SspCA bound to MNP could be recovered from the reaction mixture by simply using a magnet or an electromagnetic field, due to the strong ferromagnetic properties of Fe3O4.

  6. Highly Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Homologous Recombination Promotes the Rapid Generation of Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes of Pseudorabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jin-Chao; Tang, Yan-Dong; Zhao, Kuan; Wang, Tong-Yun; Liu, Ji-Ting; Gao, Jia-Cong; Chang, Xiao-Bo; Cui, Hong-Yu; Tian, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Xue-Hui; An, Tong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are powerful tools for the manipulation of the large genomes of DNA viruses, such as herpesviruses. However, the methods currently used to construct the recombinant viruses, an important intermediate link in the generation of BACs, involve the laborious process of multiple plaque purifications. Moreover, some fastidious viruses may be lost or damaged during these processes, making it impossible to generate BACs from these large-genome DNA viruses. Here, we introduce the CRISPR/Cas9 as a site-specific gene knock-in instrument that promotes the homologs recombination of a linearized transfer vector and the Pseudorabies virus genome through double incisions. The efficiency of recombination is as high as 86%. To our knowledge, this is the highest efficiency ever reported for Pseudorabies virus recombination. We also demonstrate that the positions and distances of the CRISPR/Cas9 single guide RNAs from the homology arms correlate with the efficiency of homologous recombination. Our work show a simple and fast cloning method of BACs with large genome inserted by greatly enhancing the HR efficiencies through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homology-directed repair mechanism, and this method could be of helpful for manipulating large DNA viruses, and will provide a successful model for insertion of large DNA fragments into other viruses. PMID:28066407

  7. Acute toxicity evaluation of explosive wastewater by bacterial bioluminescence assays using a freshwater luminescent bacterium, Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhengfang; Zhao, Quanlin; Zhang, Mohe; Gao, Yuchen

    2011-02-28

    The compositions of explosive wastewater generated from TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) purification stage were characterized by using UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) and gas chromatograph/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The acute toxicity was evaluated by bacterium bioluminescence assay using a freshwater luminescent bacterium (Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov.) and a marine luminescent bacterium (Photobacterium phosphoreum). The results showed that the wastewater's biodegradability was poor due to the high amount of chemical oxygen demand (COD). The main organic components were dinitrotoluene sulfonates (DNTS) with small amount of TNT, dinitrotoluene (DNT), mononitrotoluene (MNT) and other derivatives of nitrobenzene. It was highly toxic to luminescent bacteria P. phosphoreum and V. qinghaiensis sp. Nov. After reaction time of 15 min, the relative concentration of toxic pollutants (expressed as reciprocal of dilution ratio of wastewater) at 50% of luminescence inhibition ratio was 5.32×10(-4) for P. phosphoreu, while that was 4.34×10(-4) for V. qinghaiensis. V. qinghaiensis is more sensitive and suitable for evaluating the wastewater's acute toxicity than P. phosphoreum. After adsorption by resin, the acute toxicity can be greatly reduced, which is helpful for further treatment by biological methods.

  8. Self-trapped excitons in pure and Na- and Tl-doped caesium halides and the recombination luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chun-Rong; Chen, Ling-Fu; Song, K. S.

    1999-07-01

    On the basis of a method used earlier to predict the off-centre relaxed triplet self-trapped excitons in alkali halides, similar systems in caesium halides are studied. This work confirms the expected off-centre relaxation along the [100] cubic axes with increasing magnitude in the order CsI, CsBr and CsCl. The calculated emission energies are in reasonable agreement with observed values. The well-known 2.95 eV emission band of CsI:Na has been studied as a tunnelling recombination between a close pair consisting of a VK centre and a Na atom. For a number of close-pair geometries the emission energies are close to 3 eV. The strong emission bands of CsI:Tl at 2.25 eV and 2.55 eV have been interpreted as arising from tunnelling recombination of close pairs each consisting of a Tl0 and a VK centre. The calculated emission energies and polarizations are discussed in conjunction with the experimental data.

  9. Enhanced production of ε-caprolactone by coexpression of bacterial hemoglobin gene in recombinant Escherichia coli expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-12-28

    Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in a microbial system expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) can be influenced by not only the efficient regeneration of NADPH but also a sufficient supply of oxygen. In this study, the bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria (vhb) was introduced into the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing CHMO to investigate the effects of an oxygen-carrying protein on microbial BV oxidation of cyclohexanone. Coexpression of Vhb allowed the recombinant E. coli strain to produce a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 15.7 g/l in a fed-batch BV oxidation of cyclohexanone, which corresponded to a 43% improvement compared with the control strain expressing CHMO only under the same conditions.

  10. Generation of Nanobodies against SlyD and development of tools to eliminate this bacterial contaminant from recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaozhong; Romão, Ema; Vertommen, Didier; Vincke, Cécile; Morales-Yánez, Francisco; Gutiérrez, Carlos; Liu, Changxiao; Muyldermans, Serge

    2017-09-01

    The gene for a protein domain, derived from a tumor marker, fused to His tag codons and under control of a T7 promotor was expressed in E. coli strain BL21 (DE3). The recombinant protein was purified from cell lysates through immobilized metal affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography. A contaminating bacterial protein was consistently co-purified, even using stringent washing solutions containing 50 or 100 mM imidazole. Immunization of a dromedary with this contaminated protein preparation, and the subsequent generation and panning of the immune Nanobody library yielded several Nanobodies of which 2/3 were directed against the bacterial contaminant, reflecting the immunodominance of this protein to steer the dromedary immune response. Affinity adsorption of this contaminant using one of our specific Nanobodies followed by mass spectrometry identified the bacterial contaminant as FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (SlyD) from E. coli. This SlyD protein contains in its C-terminal region 14 histidines in a stretch of 31 amino acids, which explains its co-purification on Ni-NTA resin. This protein is most likely present to varying extents in all recombinant protein preparations after immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Using our SlyD-specific Nb 5 we generated an immune-complex that could be removed either by immunocapturing or by size exclusion chromatography. Both methods allow us to prepare a recombinant protein sample where the SlyD contaminant was quantitatively eliminated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Luminescence nanothermometry.

    PubMed

    Jaque, Daniel; Vetrone, Fiorenzo

    2012-08-07

    The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed.

  12. Comparison of the response of bacterial luminescence and mitochondrial respiration to the effluent of an oil refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Riisberg, M.; Bratlie, E.; Stenersen, J.

    1996-04-01

    The effects of oil refinery effluents on rat mitochondrial respiration and on the luminescence of the bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum were compared. Mitochondria from male Wistar rat livers were exposed to different concentrations of refinery effluents in a semiclosed 3-ml reaction vessel. Respiration was measured polarographically with an oxygen electrode. Effects on P. phosphoreum were measured by the standard test developed by Microbics. The mitochondrial method showed EC50s in the range from 1 to 7.5%, while Microtox gave EC50 in the range from 30 to 42%. The higher sensitivity of mitochondria may be exploited in the development of a sensitive biosensor for toxicity of oil refinery effluents.

  13. A versatile bacterial expression vector designed for single-step cloning of multiple DNA fragments using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Mats A; Gowda, Naveen Kumar Chandappa; Andréasson, Claes

    2014-06-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is the starting point for biochemical and biophysical analyses and requires methodology to efficiently proceed from gene sequence to purified protein. While optimized strategies for the efficient cloning of single-gene fragments for bacterial expression is available, efficient multiple DNA fragment cloning still presents a challenge. To facilitate this step, we have developed an efficient cloning strategy based on yeast homologous recombination cloning (YHRC) into the new pET-based bacterial expression vector pSUMO-YHRC. The vector supports cloning for untagged expression as well as fusions to His6-SUMO or His6 tags. We demonstrate that YHRC from single PCR products of 6 independent genes into the vector results in virtually no background. Importantly, in a quantitative assay for functional expression we find that single-step YHRC of 7 DNA fragments can be performed with very high cloning efficiencies. The method and reagents described in this paper significantly simplifies the construction of expression plasmids from multiple DNA fragments, including complex gene fusions, chimeric genes and polycistronic constructs.

  14. Nitrogen vacancies as a common element of the green luminescence and nonradiative recombination centers in Mg-implanted GaN layers formed on a GaN substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Kazunobu; Takashima, Shinya; Edo, Masaharu; Ueno, Katsunori; Shimizu, Mitsuaki; Takahashi, Tokio; Ishibashi, Shoji; Uedono, Akira; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.

    2017-06-01

    The photoluminescences of ion-implanted (I/I) and epitaxial Mg-doped GaN (GaN:Mg) are compared. The intensities and lifetimes of the near-band-edge and ultraviolet luminescences associated with a MgGa acceptor of I/I GaN:Mg were significantly lower and shorter than those of the epilayers, respectively. Simultaneously, the green luminescence (GL) became dominant. These emissions were quenched far below room temperature. The results indicate the generation of point defects common to GL and nonradiative recombination centers (NRCs) by I/I. Taking the results of positron annihilation measurement into account, N vacancies are the prime candidate to emit GL and create NRCs with Ga vacancies, (VGa) m (VN) n , as well as to inhibit p-type conductivity.

  15. Recombinant immunotoxins containing truncated bacterial toxins for the treatment of hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Immunotoxins are molecules that contain a protein toxin and a ligand that is either an antibody or a growth factor. The ligand binds to a target cell antigen, and the target cell internalizes the immunotoxin, allowing the toxin to migrate to the cytoplasm where it can kill the cell. In the case of recombinant immunotoxins, the ligand and toxin are encoded in DNA that is then expressed in bacteria, and the purified immunotoxin contains the ligand and toxin fused together. Among the most active recombinant immunotoxins clinically tested are those that are targeted to hematologic malignancies. One agent, containing human interleukin-2 and truncated diphtheria toxin (denileukin diftitox), has been approved for use in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and has shown activity in other hematologic malignancies, including leukemias and lymphomas. Diphtheria toxin has also been targeted by other ligands, including granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-3, to target myelogenous leukemia cells. Single-chain antibodies containing variable heavy and light antibody domains have been fused to truncated Pseudomonas exotoxin to target lymphomas and lymphocytic leukemias. Recombinant immunotoxins anti-Tac(Fv)-PE38 (LMB-2), targeting CD25, and RFB4(dsFv)-PE38 (BL22, CAT-3888), targeting CD22, have each been tested in patients. Major responses have been observed after failure of standard chemotherapy. The most successful application of recombinant immunotoxins today is in hairy cell leukemia, where BL22 has induced complete remissions in most patients who were previously treated with optimal chemotherapy.

  16. Biodegradation of γ-hexachlorocyclohexane by transgenic hairy root cultures of Cucurbita moschata that accumulate recombinant bacterial LinA.

    PubMed

    Nanasato, Yoshihiko; Namiki, Sayuri; Oshima, Masao; Moriuchi, Ryota; Konagaya, Ken-Ichi; Seike, Nobuyasu; Otani, Takashi; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka; Tabei, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    γ-HCH was successfully degraded using LinA-expressed transgenic hairy root cultures of Cucurbita moschata . Fusing an endoplasmic reticulum-targeting signal peptide to LinA was essential for stable accumulation in the hairy roots. The pesticide γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) is a persistent organic pollutant (POP) that raises public health and environmental pollution concerns worldwide. Although several isolates of γ-HCH-degrading bacteria are available, inoculating them directly into γ-HCH-contaminated soil is ineffective because of the bacterial survival rate. Cucurbita species incorporate significant amounts of POPs from soils compared with other plant species. Here, we describe a novel bioremediation strategy that combines the bacterial degradation of γ-HCH and the efficient uptake of γ-HCH by Cucurbita species. We produced transgenic hairy root cultures of Cucurbita moschata that expressed recombinant bacterial linA, isolated from the bacterium Sphingobium japonicum UT26. The LinA protein was accumulated stably in the hairy root cultures by fusing an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeting signal peptide to LinA. Then, we demonstrated that the cultures degraded more than 90 % of γ-HCH (1 ppm) overnight and produced the γ-HCH metabolite 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, indicating that LinA degraded γ-HCH. These results indicate that the gene linA has high potential for phytoremediation of environmental γ-HCH.

  17. Direct Bacterial Killing In Vitro by Recombinant Nod2 Is Compromised by Crohn's Disease-Associated Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Creasey, Tammy; Dzink-Fox, JoAnn; Gounarides, John; Petit, Stephanie; Ropenga, Anna; Ryder, Neil; Smith, Kathryn; Smith, Philip; Parkinson, Scott J.

    2010-01-01

    Background A homeostatic relationship with the intestinal microflora is increasingly appreciated as essential for human health and wellbeing. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of Nod2, a bacterial recognition protein, are associated with development of the inflammatory bowel disorder, Crohn's disease. We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying disruption of intestinal symbiosis in patients carrying Nod2 mutations. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, using purified recombinant LRR domains, we demonstrate that Nod2 is a direct antimicrobial agent and this activity is generally deficient in proteins carrying Crohn's-associated mutations. Wild-type, but not Crohn's-associated, Nod2 LRR domains directly interacted with bacteria in vitro, altered their metabolism and disrupted the integrity of the plasma membrane. Antibiotic activity was also expressed by the LRR domains of Nod1 and other pattern recognition receptors suggesting that the LRR domain is a conserved anti-microbial motif supporting innate cellular immunity. Conclusions/Significance The lack of anti-bacterial activity demonstrated with Crohn's-associated Nod2 mutations in vitro, supports the hypothesis that a deficiency in direct bacterial killing contributes to the association of Nod2 polymorphisms with the disease. PMID:20531959

  18. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012 individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is<107. An argument for high Ne values for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but this diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimate Ne correctly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne ×s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifs is above 10-7 or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9 per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more

  19. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    DOE PAGES

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012 individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is<107. An argument for high Ne values for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but thismore » diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimate Ne correctly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne ×s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifs is above 10-7 or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9 per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more sophisticated theory considers that bacterial genomes have millions of sites each and selection events on these many sites could interfere with each other, so that only larger effects would be important. However, bacteria can exchange genetic material, and in principle, this exchange could eliminate the interference between the evolution of

  20. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    ABSTRACT

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict thatNeis<107. An argument for highNevalues for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but this diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimateNecorrectly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution ifNe×sis >1, wheresis the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifsis above 10-7or so.

    IMPORTANCEBecause bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local

  1. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    DOE PAGES

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict thatNeis<107. An argument for highNevalues for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but this diversity may be duemore » to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimateNecorrectly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution ifNe×sis >1, wheresis the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifsis above 10-7or so. IMPORTANCEBecause bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more sophisticated theory considers that bacterial genomes have millions of sites each and selection events on these many sites could interfere with each other, so that only larger effects would be important. However, bacteria can exchange genetic material, and in principle, this exchange could eliminate the interference between the evolution of the

  2. Origins and Recombination of the Bacterial-Sized Multichromosomal Mitochondrial Genome of Cucumber[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Alverson, Andrew J; Rice, Danny W; Dickinson, Stephanie; Barry, Kerrie; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2011-01-01

    Members of the flowering plant family Cucurbitaceae harbor the largest known mitochondrial genomes. Here, we report the 1685-kb mitochondrial genome of cucumber (Cucumis sativus). We help solve a 30-year mystery about the origins of its large size by showing that it mainly reflects the proliferation of dispersed repeats, expansions of existing introns, and the acquisition of sequences from diverse sources, including the cucumber nuclear and chloroplast genomes, viruses, and bacteria. The cucumber genome has a novel structure for plant mitochondria, mapping as three entirely or largely autonomous circular chromosomes (lengths 1556, 84, and 45 kb) that vary in relative abundance over a twofold range. These properties suggest that the three chromosomes replicate independently of one another. The two smaller chromosomes are devoid of known functional genes but nonetheless contain diagnostic mitochondrial features. Paired-end sequencing conflicts reveal differences in recombination dynamics among chromosomes, for which an explanatory model is developed, as well as a large pool of low-frequency genome conformations, many of which may result from asymmetric recombination across intermediate-sized and sometimes highly divergent repeats. These findings highlight the promise of genome sequencing for elucidating the recombinational dynamics of plant mitochondrial genomes. PMID:21742987

  3. Optimization of Recombinant Expression of Synthetic Bacterial Phytase in Pichia pastoris Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Ali; Dehnavi, Ehsan; Aghaeepoor, Mojtaba; Amani, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli phytase is an acidic histidine phytase with great specific activity. Pichia pastoris is a powerful system for the heterologous expression of active and soluble proteins which can express recombinant proteins in high cell density fermenter without loss of product yield and efficiently secrete heterologous proteins into the media. Recombinant protein expression is influenced by expression conditions such as temperature, concentration of inducer, and pH. By optimization, the yield of expressed proteins can be increase. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been widely used for the optimization and studying of different parameters in biotechnological processes. Objectives: In this study, the expression of synthetic appA gene in P. pastoris was greatly improved by adjusting the expression condition. Materials and Methods: The appA gene with 410 amino acids was synthesized by P. pastoris codon preference and cloned in expression vector pPinkα-HC, under the control of AOX1 promoter, and it was transformed into P. pastoris GS115 by electroporation. Recombinant phytase was expressed in buffered methanol-complex medium (BMMY) and the expression was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and enzymatic assay. To achieve the highest level of expression, methanol concentration, pH and temperature were optimized via RSM. Finally, the optimum pH and temperature for recombinant phytase activity was determined. Results: Escherichia coli phytase was expressed in P. pastoris under different cultivation conditions (post-induction temperature, methanol concentration, and post-induction pH). The optimized conditions by RSM using face centered central composite design were 1% (v/v) methanol, pH = 5.8, and 24.5°C. Under the optimized conditions, appA was successfully expressed in P. pastoris and the maximum phytase activity was 237.2 U/mL after 72 hours of expression. Conclusions: By optimization of recombinant

  4. Expression of recombinant staphylokinase, a fibrin-specific plasminogen activator of bacterial origin, in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Gerszberg, Aneta; Wiktorek-Smagur, Aneta; Hnatuszko-Konka, Katarzyna; Łuchniak, Piotr; Kononowicz, Andrzej K

    2012-03-01

    One of the most dynamically developing sectors of green biotechnology is molecular farming using transgenic plants as natural bioreactors for the large scale production of recombinant proteins with biopharmaceutical and therapeutic values. Such properties are characteristic of certain proteins of bacterial origin, including staphylokinase. For many years, work has been carried out on the use of this protein in thrombolytic therapy. In this study, transgenic Solanum tuberosum plants expressing a CaMV::sak-mgpf-gusA gene fusion, were obtained. AGL1 A. tumefaciens strain was used in the process of transformation. The presence of the staphylokinase gene was confirmed by PCR in 22.5% of the investigated plants. The expression of the fusion transgene was detected using the β-glucuronidase activity assay in 32 putative transgenic plants. Furthermore, on the basis of the GUS histochemical reaction, the transgene expression pattern had a strong, constitutive character in seven of the transformants. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of a protein extract from the SAK/PCR-positive plants, revealed the presence of a119 kDa protein that corresponds to that of the fusion protein SAK-mGFP-GUSA. Western blot analysis, using an antibody against staphylokinase, showed the presence of the staphylokinase domain in the 119 kDa protein in six analyzed transformants. However, the enzymatic test revealed amidolytic activity characteristic of staphylokinase in the protein extract of only one plant. This is the first report on a Solanum tuberosum plant producing a recombinant staphylokinase protein, a plasminogen activator of bacterial origin.

  5. Cumulant analysis of charge recombination kinetics in bacterial reaction centers reconstituted into lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, G; Mallardi, A; Giustini, M; Berti, D; Venturoli, G

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge recombination between the primary photoxidized donor (P(+)) and the secondary reduced quinone acceptor (Q(B)(-)) have been studied in reaction centers (RCs) from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporated into lecithin vesicles containing large ubiquinone pools over the temperature range 275 K = (50 +/- 15) nm). Following these premises, we describe the kinetics of P(+)Q(B)(-) recombination with a truncated cumulant expansion and relate it to P(Q) and to the free energy changes for Q(A)(-)Q(B) --> Q(A)Q(B)(-) electron transfer (DeltaG(AB)(o)) and for quinone binding (DeltaG(bind)(o)) at Q(B). The model accounts well for the temperature and quinone dependence of the charge recombination kinetics, yielding DeltaG(AB)(o) = -7.67 +/- 0.05 kJ mol(-1) and DeltaG(bind)(o) = -14.6 +/- 0.6 kJ mol(-1) at 298 K. PMID:10968981

  6. Lederberg on bacterial recombination, Haldane, and cold war genetics: an interview.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    2014-01-01

    Joshua Lederberg (1925-2008), was one of the pioneers of molecular genetics perhaps best known for his discovery of genetic recombination in bacteria which earned him a Nobel Prize in 1958 (shared with George Beadle and Edward Tatum). Lederberg's interests were broad including the origin of life, exobiology (a term that he coined) and emerging diseases and artificial intelligence in his, later years. This article contains the transcription of an interview in excerpts, docu- menting the interactions between Lederberg and fellow biologist J.B.S. Haldane wlich lasted from 1946 until Haldane's death in Kolkata (then Calcutta) in 1964.

  7. The impact of recombination on dN/dS within recently emerged bacterial clones.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago; Harris, Simon R; Holden, Matthew T G; He, Miao; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D; Feil, Edward J

    2011-07-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing platforms is set to reveal an unprecedented level of detail on short-term molecular evolutionary processes in bacteria. Here we re-analyse genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) datasets for recently emerged clones of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium difficile. We note a highly significant enrichment of synonymous SNPs in those genes which have been affected by recombination, i.e. those genes on mobile elements designated "non-core" (in the case of S. aureus), or those core genes which have been affected by homologous replacements (S. aureus and C. difficile). This observation suggests that the previously documented decrease in dN/dS over time in bacteria applies not only to genomes of differing levels of divergence overall, but also to horizontally acquired genes of differing levels of divergence within a single genome. We also consider the role of increased drift acting on recently emerged, highly specialised clones, and the impact of recombination on selection at linked sites. This work has implications for a wide range of genomic analyses.

  8. The Impact of Recombination on dN/dS within Recently Emerged Bacterial Clones

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago; Harris, Simon R.; Holden, Matthew T. G.; He, Miao; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.; Feil, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing platforms is set to reveal an unprecedented level of detail on short-term molecular evolutionary processes in bacteria. Here we re-analyse genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) datasets for recently emerged clones of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium difficile. We note a highly significant enrichment of synonymous SNPs in those genes which have been affected by recombination, i.e. those genes on mobile elements designated “non-core” (in the case of S. aureus), or those core genes which have been affected by homologous replacements (S. aureus and C. difficile). This observation suggests that the previously documented decrease in dN/dS over time in bacteria applies not only to genomes of differing levels of divergence overall, but also to horizontally acquired genes of differing levels of divergence within a single genome. We also consider the role of increased drift acting on recently emerged, highly specialised clones, and the impact of recombination on selection at linked sites. This work has implications for a wide range of genomic analyses. PMID:21779170

  9. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed Central

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-01-01

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z. Images PMID:493112

  10. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-08-10

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z.

  11. Luminescence decay of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Uttamchandani, D.; Sander, D.; O'Donnell, K. P.

    1993-04-01

    The luminescence decay pattern of porous silicon samples prepared by electrochemical etching is characterised experimentally by a non-exponential profile, a strong dependence on temperature and an absence of spectral diffusion. We describe this luminescence as carrier-dopping-assisted recombination. Following the correlation function approach to non-dispersive transport developed by Scher and co-workers [Physics Today 41 (1991) 26], we suggest a simple derivation of analytical functions which accurately describes the anomalous luminescence decay of porous silicon, and show that this model includes exponential and Kohlrausch [Pogg. Ann. Phys. 119 (1863) 352] (stretched-exponential) relaxations as special cases.

  12. Recombinant expression and purification of "virus-like" bacterial encapsulin protein cages.

    PubMed

    Rurup, W Frederik; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Koay, Melissa S T

    2015-01-01

    Ultracentrifugation, particularly the use of sucrose or cesium chloride density gradients, is a highly reliable and efficient technique for the purification of virus-like particles and protein cages. Since virus-like particles and protein cages have a unique size compared to cellular macromolecules and organelles, the rate of migration can be used as a tool for purification. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of recently discovered virus-like assemblies called bacterial encapsulins from Thermotoga maritima and Brevibacterium linens.

  13. Luminescence nanothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaque, Daniel; Vetrone, Fiorenzo

    2012-07-01

    The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed.The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed. This work was supported by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (Project S2009/MAT-1756), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia (MAT2010-16161) and by Caja Madrid Foundation.

  14. Production of cocktail of polyclonal antibodies using bacterial expressed recombinant protein for multiple virus detection.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Reetika; Mandal, Bikash; Paul, Prabir Kumar; Chigurupati, Phaneendra; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Cocktail of polyclonal antibodies (PAb) were produced that will help in multiple virus detection and overcome the limitation of individual virus purification, protein expression and purification as well as immunization in multiple rabbits. A dual fusion construct was developed using conserved coat protein (CP) sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) in an expression vector, pET-28a(+). The fusion protein (∼40kDa) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Likewise, a triple fusion construct was developed by fusing conserved CP sequences of CMV and PRSV with conserved nucleocapsid protein (N) sequence of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) and expressed as a fusion protein (∼50kDa) in pET-28a(+). PAb made separately to each of these three viruses recognized the double and triple fusion proteins in Western blot indicating retention of desired epitopes for binding with target antibodies. The fusion proteins (∼40kDa and ∼50kDa) were used to produce cocktail of PAb by immunizing rabbits, which simultaneously detected natural infection of CMV and PRSV or CMV, PRSV and GBNV in Cucurbitaceous, Solanaceous and other hosts in DAC-ELISA. This is the first report on production of a cocktail of PAb to recombinant fusion protein of two or three distinct viruses.

  15. Luminescence properties of LiGaO2 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinkler, L.; Trukhin, A.; Berzina, B.; Korsaks, V.; Ščajev, P.; Nedzinskas, R.; Tumėnas, S.; Chou, M. M. C.; Chang, L.; Li, C.-A.

    2017-07-01

    The comprehensive spectral study of lithium metagallate LiGaO2 crystal has been done including methods of pump-probe techniques, optical absorption, photoluminescence, luminescence kinetics, thermoluminescence and polarised luminescence in broad temperature region. Luminescence spectrum of the crystal contains the main emission bands at 4.43, 3.76, 2.38 and 1.77 eV. The novel data on luminescence excitation spectra including VUV area, kinetics and polarization are presented. The correlation between pump-probe experiment results and luminescence properties is found. Conclusions are done about the recombination character of all the observed emission bands, implying tunnel recombination of donor-acceptor pairs.

  16. Type III restriction is alleviated by bacteriophage (RecE) homologous recombination function but enhanced by bacterial (RecBCD) function.

    PubMed

    Handa, Naofumi; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2005-11-01

    Previous works have demonstrated that DNA breaks generated by restriction enzymes stimulate, and are repaired by, homologous recombination with an intact, homologous DNA region through the function of lambdoid bacteriophages lambda and Rac. In the present work, we examined the effect of bacteriophage functions, expressed in bacterial cells, on restriction of an infecting tester phage in a simple plaque formation assay. The efficiency of plaque formation on an Escherichia coli host carrying EcoRI, a type II restriction system, is not increased by the presence of Rac prophage-presumably because, under the single-infection conditions of the plaque assay, a broken phage DNA cannot find a homologue with which to recombine. To our surprise, however, we found that the efficiency of plaque formation in the presence of a type III restriction system, EcoP1 or EcoP15, is increased by the bacteriophage-mediated homologous recombination functions recE and recT of Rac prophage. This type III restriction alleviation does not depend on lar on Rac, unlike type I restriction alleviation. On the other hand, bacterial RecBCD-homologous recombination function enhances type III restriction. These results led us to hypothesize that the action of type III restriction enzymes takes place on replicated or replicating DNA in vivo and leaves daughter DNAs with breaks at nonallelic sites, that bacteriophage-mediated homologous recombination reconstitutes an intact DNA from them, and that RecBCD exonuclease blocks this repair by degradation from the restriction breaks.

  17. Bacterial production and structure-functional validation of a recombinant antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of an anti-cancer therapeutic antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hun; Sim, Dae-Won; Park, Dongsun; Jung, Tai-Geun; Lee, Seonghwan; Oh, Taeheun; Ha, Jong-Ryul; Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Seo, Min-Duk; Kang, Ho Chul; Kim, Young Pil; Won, Hyung-Sik

    2016-12-01

    Fragment engineering of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has emerged as an excellent paradigm to develop highly efficient therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents. Engineered mAb fragments can be economically produced in bacterial systems using recombinant DNA technologies. In this work, we established recombinant production in Escherichia coli for monovalent antigen-binding fragment (Fab) adopted from a clinically used anticancer mAB drug cetuximab targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Recombinant DNA constructs were designed to express both polypeptide chains comprising Fab in a single vector and to secrete them to bacterial periplasmic space for efficient folding. Particularly, a C-terminal engineering to confer an interchain disulfide bond appeared to be able to enhance its heterodimeric integrity and EGFR-binding activity. Conformational relevance of the purified final product was validated by mass spectrometry and crystal structure at 1.9 Å resolution. Finally, our recombinant cetuximab-Fab was found to have strong binding affinity to EGFR overexpressed in human squamous carcinoma model (A431) cells. Its binding ability was comparable to that of cetuximab. Its EGFR-binding affinity was estimated at approximately 0.7 nM of Kd in vitro, which was quite stronger than the binding affinity of natural ligand EGF. Hence, the results validate that our construction could serve as an efficient platform to produce a recombinant cetuximab-Fab with a retained antigen-binding functionality.

  18. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) activity upon recombinant expression and purification of human telomerase in a bacterial system.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Debra T; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Larson, Amy C; Hansen, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase biogenesis is a highly regulated process that solves the DNA end-replication problem. Recombinant expression has so far been accomplished only within a eukaryotic background. Towards structural and functional analyses, we developed bacterial expression of human telomerase. Positive activity by the telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) was identified in cell extracts of Escherichia coli expressing a sequence-optimized hTERT gene, the full-length hTR RNA with a self-splicing hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, and the human heat shock complex of Hsp90, Hsp70, p60/Hop, Hsp40, and p23. The Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin did not affect post-assembly TRAP activity. By various purification methods, TRAP activity was also obtained upon expression of only hTERT and hTR. hTERT was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry in a ∼120 kDa SDS-PAGE fragment from a TRAP-positive purification fraction. TRAP activity was also supported by hTR constructs lacking the box H/ACA small nucleolar RNA domain. End-point TRAP indicated expression levels within 3-fold of that from HeLa carcinoma cells, which is several orders of magnitude below detection by the direct assay. These results represent the first report of TRAP activity from a bacterium and provide a facile system for the investigation of assembly factors and anti-cancer therapeutics independently of a eukaryotic setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system.

  20. Cytogenetic mapping with centromeric bacterial artificial chromosomes contigs shows that this recombination-poor region comprises more than half of barley chromosome 3H.

    PubMed

    Aliyeva-Schnorr, Lala; Beier, Sebastian; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Doležel, Jaroslav; Stein, Nils; Houben, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Genetic maps are based on the frequency of recombination and often show different positions of molecular markers in comparison to physical maps, particularly in the centromere that is generally poor in meiotic recombinations. To decipher the position and order of DNA sequences genetically mapped to the centromere of barley (Hordeum vulgare) chromosome 3H, fluorescence in situ hybridization with mitotic metaphase and meiotic pachytene chromosomes was performed with 70 genomic single-copy probes derived from 65 fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) contigs genetically assigned to this recombination cold spot. The total physical distribution of the centromeric 5.5 cM bin of 3H comprises 58% of the mitotic metaphase chromosome length. Mitotic and meiotic chromatin of this recombination-poor region is preferentially marked by a heterochromatin-typical histone mark (H3K9me2), while recombination enriched subterminal chromosome regions are enriched in euchromatin-typical histone marks (H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K27me3) suggesting that the meiotic recombination rate could be influenced by the chromatin landscape. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Novel Variants of Streptococcus thermophilus Bacteriophages Are Indicative of Genetic Recombination among Phages from Different Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Paula; Janzen, Thomas; Neves, Ana Rute; Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H; Lametsch, René; Neve, Horst; Franz, Charles M A P; Vogensen, Finn K

    2017-03-01

    Bacteriophages are the main cause of fermentation failures in dairy plants. The majority of Streptococcus thermophilus phages can be divided into either cos- or pac-type phages and are additionally characterized by examining the V2 region of their antireceptors. We screened a large number of S. thermophilus phages from the Chr. Hansen A/S collection, using PCR specific for the cos- or pac-type phages, as well as for the V2 antireceptor region. Three phages did not produce positive results with the assays. Analysis of phage morphologies indicated that two of these phages, CHPC577 and CHPC926, had shorter tails than the traditional S. thermophilus phages. The third phage, CHPC1151, had a tail size similar to those of the cos- or pac-type phages, but it displayed a different baseplate structure. Sequencing analysis revealed the genetic similarity of CHPC577 and CHPC926 with a subgroup of Lactococcus lactis P335 phages. Phage CHPC1151 was closely related to the atypical S. thermophilus phage 5093, homologous with a nondairy streptococcal prophage. By testing adsorption of the related streptococcal and lactococcal phages to the surface of S. thermophilus and L. lactis strains, we revealed the possibility of cross-interactions. Our data indicated that the use of S. thermophilus together with L. lactis, extensively applied for dairy fermentations, triggered the recombination between phages infecting different bacterial species. A notable diversity among S. thermophilus phage populations requires that a new classification of the group be proposed.IMPORTANCEStreptococcus thermophilus is a component of thermophilic starter cultures commonly used for cheese and yogurt production. Characterizing streptococcal phages, understanding their genetic relationships, and studying their interactions with various hosts are the necessary steps for preventing and controlling phage attacks that occur during dairy fermentations. Copyright © 2017 Szymczak et al.

  2. Novel Variants of Streptococcus thermophilus Bacteriophages Are Indicative of Genetic Recombination among Phages from Different Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Szymczak, Paula; Neves, Ana Rute; Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H.; Lametsch, René; Neve, Horst; Franz, Charles M. A. P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages are the main cause of fermentation failures in dairy plants. The majority of Streptococcus thermophilus phages can be divided into either cos- or pac-type phages and are additionally characterized by examining the V2 region of their antireceptors. We screened a large number of S. thermophilus phages from the Chr. Hansen A/S collection, using PCR specific for the cos- or pac-type phages, as well as for the V2 antireceptor region. Three phages did not produce positive results with the assays. Analysis of phage morphologies indicated that two of these phages, CHPC577 and CHPC926, had shorter tails than the traditional S. thermophilus phages. The third phage, CHPC1151, had a tail size similar to those of the cos- or pac-type phages, but it displayed a different baseplate structure. Sequencing analysis revealed the genetic similarity of CHPC577 and CHPC926 with a subgroup of Lactococcus lactis P335 phages. Phage CHPC1151 was closely related to the atypical S. thermophilus phage 5093, homologous with a nondairy streptococcal prophage. By testing adsorption of the related streptococcal and lactococcal phages to the surface of S. thermophilus and L. lactis strains, we revealed the possibility of cross-interactions. Our data indicated that the use of S. thermophilus together with L. lactis, extensively applied for dairy fermentations, triggered the recombination between phages infecting different bacterial species. A notable diversity among S. thermophilus phage populations requires that a new classification of the group be proposed. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus thermophilus is a component of thermophilic starter cultures commonly used for cheese and yogurt production. Characterizing streptococcal phages, understanding their genetic relationships, and studying their interactions with various hosts are the necessary steps for preventing and controlling phage attacks that occur during dairy fermentations. PMID:28039135

  3. Expression screening of bacterial libraries of recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants for candidates with thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Varsha; Gierczak, Richard F; Sheffield, William P

    2013-12-01

    Exhaustive mutagenesis studies of the reactive centre loop (RCL), a key structural component of proteins belonging to the serpin superfamily of protease inhibitors, are complicated by the size of the RCL, serpin conformational complexity, and, for most serpins, the lack of a serpin-dependent phenotype of expressing cells. Here, we describe a thrombin capture assay that distinguished thrombin-inhibitory recombinant human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API M358R) from non-inhibitory API variants in Escherichia coli lysates prepared from either single clones or pools. Binding of API proteins in the lysates to thrombin immobilized on microtiter plate wells was quantified via colour generated by a peroxidase-coupled anti-API antibody. Bacterial expression plasmids encoding inhibitory API M358R were mixed 1:99 with plasmids encoding non-inhibitory API T345R/M358R and the resulting library screened in pools of 10. All above-background signals arising from pools or subsequently re-probed single clones were linked to the presence of plasmids encoding API M358R. Screening of a portion of another expression library encoding hypervariable API with all possibilities at codons 352-358 also yielded only novel, thrombin-inhibitory variants. Probing a smaller library expressing all possible codons at Ala347 yielded the wild type, 6 different functional variants, one partially active variant, and two variants with no thrombin-inhibitory activity. API antigen levels varied considerably less among Ala347 variants than activity levels, and comparison of rate constants of inhibition of purified API variants to their corresponding thrombin capture assay lysate values was used to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. The results indicate that the approach is sufficiently robust to correctly identify functional versus non-functional candidates in API expression libraries, and could be of value in systematically probing structure/function relationships not only in the API

  4. Removal of bacterial suspension water occupying the intercellular space of detached leaves after agroinfiltration improves the yield of recombinant hemagglutinin in a Nicotiana benthamiana transient gene expression system.

    PubMed

    Fujiuchi, Naomichi; Matsuda, Ryo; Matoba, Nobuyuki; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    The use of detached leaves instead of whole plants provides an alternative means for recombinant protein production based on Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient gene overexpression. However, the process for high-level protein production in detached leaves has not yet been established. In this study, we focused on leaf handling and maintenance conditions immediately after infiltration with Agrobacterium suspension (agroinfiltration) to improve recombinant protein expression in detached Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. We demonstrated that the residual water of bacterial suspension in detached leaves had significant impact on the yield of recombinant influenza hemagglutinin (HA). Immediately after agroinfiltration, detached leaves were stored in a dehumidified chamber to allow bacterial suspension water occupying intercellular space to be removed by transpiration. We varied the duration of this water removal treatment from 0.7 to 4.4 h, which resulted in leaf fresh weights ranging from 0.94 to 1.28 g g(-1) relative to weights measured just before agroinfiltration. We used these relative fresh weights (RFWs) as an indicator of the amount of residual water. The detached leaves were then incubated in humidified chambers for 6 days. We found that the presence of residual water significantly decreased HA yield, with a clear inverse correlation observed between HA yield and RFW. We next compared HA yields in detached leaves with those obtained from intact leaves by whole-plant expression performed at the same time. The maximum HA yield obtained from a detached leaf with a RFW of approximately 1.0, namely, 800 μg gFW(-1), was comparable to the mean HA yield of 846 μg gFW(-1) generated in intact leaves. Our results indicate the necessity of removing bacterial suspension water from agroinfiltrated detached leaves in transient overexpression systems and point to a critical factor enabling the detached-leaf system as a viable recombinant protein factory.

  5. Recombinant bacterial amylopullulanases

    PubMed Central

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2013-01-01

    Pullulanases are endo-acting enzymes capable of hydrolyzing α-1, 6-glycosidic linkages in starch, pullulan, amylopectin, and related oligosaccharides, while amylopullulanases are bifunctional enzymes with an active site capable of cleaving both α-1, 4 and α-1, 6 linkages in starch, amylose and other oligosaccharides, and α-1, 6 linkages in pullulan. The amylopullulanases are classified in GH13 and GH57 family enzymes based on the architecture of catalytic domain and number of conserved sequences. The enzymes with two active sites, one for the hydrolysis of α-1, 4- glycosidic bond and the other for α-1, 6-glycosidic bond, are called α-amylase-pullulanases, while amylopullulanases have only one active site for cleaving both α-1, 4- and α-1, 6-glycosidic bonds. The amylopullulanases produced by bacteria find applications in the starch and baking industries as a catalyst for one step starch liquefaction-saccharification for making various sugar syrups, as antistaling agent in bread and as a detergent additive. PMID:23645215

  6. The Role of Trap-assisted Recombination in Luminescent Properties of Organometal Halide CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Films and Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Hai-Yu; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Hao, Ya-Wei; Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Bing-Rong; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid metal halide perovskites have been paid enormous attentions in photophysics research, whose excellent performances were attributed to their intriguing charge carriers proprieties. However, it still remains far from satisfaction in the comprehensive understanding of perovskite charge-transport properities, especially about trap-assisted recombination process. In this Letter, through time-resolved transient absorption (TA) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements, we provided a relative comprehensive investigation on the charge carriers recombination dynamics of CH3NH3PbBr3 (MAPbBr3) perovskite films and quantum dots (QDs), especially about trap-assisted recombination. It was found that the integral recombination mode of MAPbBr3 films was highly sensitive to the density distribution of generated charge carriers and trap states. Additional, Trap effects would be gradually weakened with elevated carrier densities. Furthermore, the trap-assisted recombination can be removed from MAPbBr3 QDs through its own surface passivation mechanism and this specialty may render the QDs as a new material in illuminating research. This work provides deeper physical insights into the dynamics processes of MAPbBr3 materials and paves a way toward more light-harvesting applications in future. PMID:27249792

  7. Re-directing bacterial microcompartment systems to enhance recombinant expression of lysis protein E from bacteriophage ΦX174 in Escherichia coli

    DOE PAGES

    Yung, Mimi C.; Bourguet, Feliza A.; Carpenter, Timothy S.; ...

    2017-04-26

    Recombinant expression of toxic proteins remains a challenging problem. Furthermore, one potential method to shield toxicity and thus improve expression of these proteins is to encapsulate them within protein compartments to sequester them away from their targets. Many bacteria naturally produce so-called bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) in which enzymes comprising a biosynthetic pathway are encapsulated in a proteinaeous shell, which is in part thought to shield the cells from the toxicity of reaction intermediates. As a proof-of-concept, we attempted to encapsulate toxic, lysis protein E (E) from bacteriophage ΦX174 inside recombinant BMCs to enhance its expression and achieve higher yields duringmore » downstream purification.« less

  8. Bacterial DNA repair genes and their eukaryotic homologues: 5. The role of recombination in DNA repair and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Nowosielska, Anetta

    2007-01-01

    Recombinational repair is a well conserved DNA repair mechanism present in all living organisms. Repair by homologous recombination is generally accurate as it uses undamaged homologous DNA molecule as a repair template. In Escherichia coli homologous recombination repairs both the double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can be induced upon exposure to exogenous sources such as ionizing radiation or endogenous DNA-damaging agents including reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as during natural biological processes like conjugation. However, the bulk of double strand breaks are formed during replication fork collapse encountering an unrepaired single strand gap in DNA. Under such circumstances DNA replication on the damaged template can be resumed only if supported by homologous recombination. This functional cooperation of homologous recombination with replication machinery enables successful completion of genome duplication and faithful transmission of genetic material to a daughter cell. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination is also involved in essential biological processes such as preservation of genome integrity, DNA damage checkpoint activation, DNA damage repair, DNA replication, mating type switching, transposition, immune system development and meiosis. When unregulated, recombination can lead to genome instability and carcinogenesis.

  9. Effects of growth medium composition, iron sources and atmospheric oxygen concentrations on production of luciferase-bacterial magnetic particle complex by a recombinant Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, C -D.; Takeyama, H; Tanaka, T; Matsunaga, T

    2001-07-05

    Growth conditions for mass production of luciferase-bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) by a recombinant Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 were investigated in a pH-regulated fed-batch culture system. Enrichment of growth medium with L-cysteine, yeast extract and polypeptone enhanced both bacterial growth and BMP production. The presence of L-cysteine in the medium was useful for induction of cell growth. Strict anaerobic conditions led to a prolonged lag phase and limited the final cell density. Trace oxygen enhanced cell growth with increasing BMP production. As iron sources, ferrous sulfate and ferric gallate dramatically enhanced BMP yield as compared with ferric quinate, an iron chelate conventionally used. The optimized conditions increased cell density to 0.59 +/- 0.03 g cell dry weight/liter and BMP production to 14.8 +/- 0.5 mg dry weight/liter in fed-batch culture for four days.

  10. Iron feeding optimization and plasmid stability in production of recombinant bacterial magnetic particles by Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 in fed-batch culture.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Takeyama, H; Matsunaga, T

    2001-01-01

    The production of bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) by recombinant Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 harboring the plasmid pKML was enhanced in pH-regulated fed-batch culture. The addition of fresh nutrients was feedback-controlled as a function of the pH of the culture. The yield of BMPs was optimized by adjusting the rate of ferric iron addition. Feeding ferric quinate at 15.4 microg/min resulted ina BMP yield of 7.5 mg/l, which is the highest yield so far reported. Expression of a plasmid-encoded fusion protein and segregation of the plasmid during bacterial growth here both stable during, fed-batch culture. More than 75 % of the cells retained the plasmid for 130 h under antibiotic-free conditions. In addition, the fusion protein permitting the display of a specific protein on the BMP surface was also stably expressed.

  11. The RecRO pathway of DNA recombinational repair in Helicobacter pylori and its role in bacterial survival in the host

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Lo, Leja F.; Maier, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Two pathways for DNA recombination, AddAB (RecBCD-like) and RecRO, were identified in Helicobacter pylori, a pathogenic bacterium that colonizes human stomachs resulting in a series of gastric diseases. In this study, we examined the physiological roles of H. pylori RecRO pathway in DNA recombinational repair. We characterized H. pylori single mutants in recR and in recO, genes in the putative gap repair recombination pathway, and an addA recO double mutant that is thus deficient in both pathways that initiate DNA recombinational repair. The recR or recO single mutants showed the same level of sensitivity to mitomycin C as the parent strain, suggesting that the RecRO pathway is not responsible for the repair of DNA double strand breaks. However, H. pylori recR and recO mutants are highly sensitive to oxidative stress and separately to acid stress, two major stress conditions that H. pylori encounters in its physiological niche. The complementation of the recR mutant restored the sensitivity to oxidative and acid stress to the wild type level. By measuring DNA transformation frequencies, the recR and recO single mutants were shown to have no effect on inter-genomic recombination, whereas the addA recO double mutant had a greatly (~12-fold) reduced transformation frequency. On the other hand, the RecRO pathway was shown to play a significant role in intra-genomic recombination with direct repeat sequences. Whereas the recA strain had a deletion frequency 35-fold lower than that of background level, inactivation of recR resulted in a 4-fold decrease in deletion frequency. In a mouse infection model, the three mutant strains displayed a greatly reduced ability to colonize the host stomachs. The geometric means of colonization number for the wild type, recR, recO, and addA recO strains were 6 × 105, 1.6 × 104, 1.4 × 104 and 4 × 103 CFU/g stomach, respectively. H. pylori RecRO-mediated DNA recombinational repair (intra-genomic recombination) is thus involved in

  12. An efficient tag derived from the common epitope of tospoviral NSs proteins for monitoring recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial and plant systems.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao-Wen; Chen, Kuan-Chun; Raja, Joseph A J; Li, Jian-Xian; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2013-04-15

    NSscon (23 aa), a common epitope in the gene silencing suppressor NSs proteins of the members of the Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) serogroup, was previously identified. In this investigation, we expressed different green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused deletions of NSscon in bacteria and reacted with NSscon monoclonal antibody (MAb). Our results indicated that the core 9 amino acids, "(109)KFTMHNQIF(117)", denoted as "nss", retain the reactivity of NSscon. In bacterial pET system, four different recombinant proteins labeled with nss, either at N- or C-extremes, were readily detectable without position effects, with sensitivity superior to that for the polyhistidine-tag. When the nss-tagged Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) helper component-protease (HC-Pro) and WSMoV nucleocapsid protein were transiently expressed by agroinfiltration in tobacco, they were readily detectable and the tag's possible efficacy for gene silencing suppression was not noticed. Co-immunoprecipitation of nss-tagged and non-tagged proteins expressed from bacteria confirmed the interaction of potyviral HC-Pro and coat protein. Thus, we conclude that this novel nss sequence is highly valuable for tagging recombinant proteins in both bacterial and plant expression systems.

  13. Measuring Carrier Lifetime in GaAs by Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1986-01-01

    Luminescence proposed as nondestructive technique for measuring Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination lifetime GaAs. Sample irradiated, and luminescence escapes through surface. Measurement requires no mechanical or electrical contact with sample. No ohmic contacts or p/n junctions needed. Sample not scrapped after tested.

  14. Population genetics and phylogenetic inference in bacterial molecular systematics: the roles of migration and recombination in Bradyrhizobium species cohesion and delineation.

    PubMed

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Silva, Claudia; Werner, Dietrich; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2005-01-01

    A combination of population genetics and phylogenetic inference methods was used to delineate Bradyrhizobium species and to uncover the evolutionary forces acting at the population-species interface of this bacterial genus. Maximum-likelihood gene trees for atpD, glnII, recA, and nifH loci were estimated for diverse strains from all but one of the named Bradyrhizobium species, and three unnamed "genospecies," including photosynthetic isolates. Topological congruence and split decomposition analyses of the three housekeeping loci are consistent with a model of frequent homologous recombination within but not across lineages, whereas strong evidence was found for the consistent lateral gene transfer across lineages of the symbiotic (auxiliary) nifH locus, which grouped strains according to their hosts and not by their species assignation. A well resolved Bayesian species phylogeny was estimated from partially congruent glnII+recA sequences, which is highly consistent with the actual taxonomic scheme of the genus. Population-level analyses of isolates from endemic Canarian genistoid legumes based on REP-PCR genomic fingerprints, allozyme and DNA polymorphism analyses revealed a non-clonal and slightly epidemic population structure for B. canariense isolates of Canarian and Moroccan origin, uncovered recombination and migration as significant evolutionary forces providing the species with internal cohesiveness, and demonstrated its significant genetic differentiation from B. japonicum, its sister species, despite their sympatry and partially overlapped ecological niches. This finding provides strong evidence for the existence of well delineated species in the bacterial world. The results and approaches used herein are discussed in the context of bacterial species concepts and the evolutionary ecology of (brady)rhizobia.

  15. Bacterially Expressed Full-Length Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum RH5 Protein Binds Erythrocytes and Elicits Potent Strain-Transcending Parasite-Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K. Sony; Pandey, Alok K.; Singh, Hina; Sahar, Tajali; Emmanuel, Amlabu; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Chauhan, Virander S.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte binding-like homologous protein 5 (PfRH5) is an essential merozoite ligand that binds with its erythrocyte receptor, basigin. PfRH5 is an attractive malaria vaccine candidate, as it is expressed by a wide number of P. falciparum strains, cannot be genetically disrupted, and exhibits limited sequence polymorphisms. Viral vector-induced PfRH5 antibodies potently inhibited erythrocyte invasion. However, it has been a challenge to generate full-length recombinant PfRH5 in a bacterial-cell-based expression system. In this study, we have produced full-length recombinant PfRH5 in Escherichia coli that exhibits specific erythrocyte binding similar to that of the native PfRH5 parasite protein and also, importantly, elicits potent invasion-inhibitory antibodies against a number of P. falciparum strains. Antibasigin antibodies blocked the erythrocyte binding of both native and recombinant PfRH5, further confirming that they bind with basigin. We have thus successfully produced full-length PfRH5 as a functionally active erythrocyte binding recombinant protein with a conformational integrity that mimics that of the native parasite protein and elicits potent strain-transcending parasite-neutralizing antibodies. P. falciparum has the capability to develop immune escape mechanisms, and thus, blood-stage malaria vaccines that target multiple antigens or pathways may prove to be highly efficacious. In this regard, antibody combinations targeting PfRH5 and other key merozoite antigens produced potent additive inhibition against multiple worldwide P. falciparum strains. PfRH5 was immunogenic when immunized with other antigens, eliciting potent invasion-inhibitory antibody responses with no immune interference. Our results strongly support the development of PfRH5 as a component of a combination blood-stage malaria vaccine. PMID:24126527

  16. Phage display and bacterial expression of a recombinant Fab specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O6 lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Tout, N L; Lam, J S

    1997-01-01

    Immunotherapy with antibodies (Abs) against the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains an alternative to serotype-specific LPS-based vaccines due to their limited use and to antibiotics due to the intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials observed in P. aeruginosa. We have chosen a monoclonal Ab (MAb), MF23-1, that binds to the O antigen of the most clinically relevant serotype, IATS O6, for producing a recombinant antibody. Heavy (H) and light (L) chain genes were isolated from MF23-1 to form a functional Fab molecule in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and on the surface of phage by using phagemid vector pComb3. The entire kappa L chain gene was used, but the H chain gene was amplified to 2 amino acids past cysteine 128 which is involved in interchain disulfide bond formation with the L chain. The truncated H chain associated with the L chain in the periplasm of E. coli to form a functional Fab molecule that bound in both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence assay to O6 LPS. Therefore, the remainder of the CH1 past cysteine 128 is not essential for stable formation of the Fab portion of MF23-1. This recombinant Fab (r-Fab) was shown to be specific for the LPS of the most predominant clinical isolate, serotype O6, while no cross-reactivity was detected to the LPS of the other 19 remaining serotypes. This r-Fab was also expressed on the surface of filamentous phage upon addition of helper phage to recombinant E. coli containing phagemid. Recombinant phage from clones MT13 and MT24 bound specifically to O6 LPS in ELISA. These results represent an important step toward the design of therapeutic Abs to be used against P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:9067648

  17. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  18. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  19. Vaccination with Brucella abortus recombinant in vivo-induced antigens reduces bacterial load and promotes clearance in a mouse model for infection.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Jake E; Isaak, Dale D; Leonhardt, Jack A; Vernati, Giulia; Pate, Jessie C; Andrews, Gerard P

    2011-03-11

    Current vaccines used for the prevention of brucellosis are ineffective in inducing protective immunity in animals that are chronically infected with Brucella abortus, such as elk. Using a gene discovery approach, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) on B. abortus, we previously identified ten loci that encode products up-regulated during infection in elk and consequently may play a role in virulence. In our present study, five of the loci (D15, 0187, VirJ, Mdh, AfuA) were selected for further characterization and compared with three additional antigens with virulence potential (Hia, PrpA, MltA). All eight genes were PCR-amplified from B. abortus and cloned into E. coli. The recombinant products were then expressed, purified, adjuvanted, and delivered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice. After primary immunization and two boosts, mice were challenged i.p. with 5 x 10⁴ CFU of B. abortus strain 19. Spleens from challenged animals were harvested and bacterial loads determined by colony count at various time points. While vaccination with four of the eight individual proteins appeared to have some effect on clearance kinetics, mice vaccinated with recombinant Mdh displayed the most significant reduction in bacterial colonization. Furthermore, mice immunized with Mdh maintained higher levels of IFN-γ in spleens compared to other treatment groups. Collectively, our in vivo data gathered from the S19 murine colonization model suggest that vaccination with at least three of the IVIAT antigens conferred an enhanced ability of the host to respond to infection, reinforcing the utility of this methodology for the identification of potential vaccine candidates against brucellosis. Mechanisms for immunity to one protein, Mdh, require further in vitro exploration and evaluation against wild-type B. abortus challenge in mice, as well as other hosts. Additional studies are being undertaken to clarify the role of Mdh and other IVI antigens in B. abortus virulence and induction of

  20. "Supertrap" at Work: Extremely Efficient Nonradiative Recombination Channels in MAPbI3 Perovskites Revealed by Luminescence Super-Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Merdasa, Aboma; Tian, Yuxi; Camacho, Rafael; Dobrovolsky, Alexander; Debroye, Elke; Unger, Eva L; Hofkens, Johan; Sundström, Villy; Scheblykin, Ivan G

    2017-06-27

    Organo-metal halide perovskites are some of the most promising materials for the new generation of low-cost photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. Their solution processability is a beneficial trait, although it leads to a spatial inhomogeneity of perovskite films with a variation of the trap state density at the nanoscale. Comprehending their properties using traditional spectroscopy therefore becomes difficult, calling for a combination with microscopy in order to see beyond the ensemble-averaged response. We studied photoluminescence (PL) blinking of micrometer-sized individual methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) perovskite polycrystals, as well as monocrystalline microrods up to 10 μm long. We correlated their PL dynamics with structure employing scanning electron and optical super-resolution microscopy. Combining super-resolution localization imaging and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI), we could detect and quantify preferential emitting regions in polycrystals exhibiting different types of blinking. We propose that blinking in MAPbI3 occurs by the activation/passivation of a "supertrap" which presumably is a donor-acceptor pair able to trap both electrons and holes. As such, nonradiative recombination via supertraps, in spite being present at a rather low concentrations (10(12)-10(15) cm(-3)), is much more efficient than via all other defect states present in the material at higher concentrations (10(16)-10(18) cm(-3)). We speculate that activation/deactivation of a supertrap occurs by its temporary dissociation into free donor and acceptor impurities. We found that supertraps are most efficient in structurally homogeneous and large MAPbI3 crystals where carrier diffusion is efficient, which may therefore pose limitations on the efficiency of perovskite-based devices.

  1. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  2. Bacterial expression and antibiotic activities of recombinant variants of human β-defensins on pathogenic bacteria and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Garcia, Ligia; Ortiz, Ernesto; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo

    2013-05-01

    Five variants of human β-defensins (HBDs) were expressed in Escherichia coli using two vector systems (pET28a(+) and pQE30) with inducible expression by IPTG. The last vector has not been previously reported as an expression system for HBDs. The recombinant peptides were different in their lengths and overall charge. The HBDs were expressed as soluble or insoluble proteins depending on the expression system used, and the final protein yields ranged from 0.5 to 1.6 mg of peptide/g of wet weight cells, with purities higher than 90%. The recombinant HBDs demonstrated a direct correlation between antimicrobial activity and the number of basic charged residues; that is, their antimicrobial activity was as follows: HBD3-M-HBD2 > HBD3 = HBD3-M = HB2-KLK > HBD2 when assayed against E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, HBD2 had the best antimicrobial activity against the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv (1.5 μM) and the heterologous tandem peptide, HBD3-M-HBD2, had the best minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value (2.7 μM) against a multidrug resistance strain (MDR) of M. tuberculosis, demonstrating the feasibility of the use of HBDs against pathogenic M. tuberculosis reported to be resistant to commercial antibiotics.

  3. Design of a comprehensive biochemistry and molecular biology experiment: phase variation caused by recombinational regulation of bacterial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation, antibody agglutination test, and PCR analysis. Phase variation was observed by baterial motility assay and identified by antibody agglutination test and PCR analysis. This comprehensive experiment can be performed to help students improve their ability to use the knowledge acquired in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Studies of immunity and bacterial invasiveness in mice given a recombinant salmonella vector encoding murine interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, S J; Ramsay, A J; Strugnell, R A

    1996-07-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was expressed in Salmonella typhimurium in an attempt to increase the mucosal immune response against the bacterium. Murine IL-6 was PCR amplified from cDNA, cloned, sequenced, and found to be functionally active when expressed in S. typhimurium BRD509, the (delta)aroA (delta)aroD vaccine strain. Expression of murine IL-6 did not appear to adversely affect the growth of salmonellae, as the construct was retained in the absence of antibiotic selection and the growth rate was unaffected compared with that of the parent strain in vitro. However, IL-6 expression led to a significant reduction in bacterial invasiveness in vitro and in vivo. Splenocytes and small intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes were isolated from mice orally immunized with BRD509 expressing IL-6 (pKK233-2/IL-6), and the number of antibody-secreting cells was determined by the ELISPOT technique. No differences were observed between mice immunized with BRD509(pKK.233-2/IL-6) and those immunized with BRD509(pKK233-2) with respect to the antibody subclass-specific responses elicited despite the markedly reduced invasiveness of the former. Serum antibody responses were also examined by a kinetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and equivalent levels of antibody response were detected in mice given BRD509(pKK233-2/IL-6) and those given BRD509(pKK233-2). The humoral immune response against bacterial lipopolysaccharides was also examined in transgenic IL-6-deficient mice given oral inocula of BRD509. Equivalent numbers of antibody-secreting cells (ELISPOTs) were observed in the spleens and laminae propriae of both IL-6-deficient (-/-) mice and control (+/+) mice harboring an intact IL-6 gene, whereas small, yet significant differences in the serum immunoglobulin A ELISA titers were observed. These data suggest that the immunoglobulin A response against Salmonella lipopolysaccharides is largely IL-6 independent.

  5. Anti-Bacterial Activity of Recombinant Human β-Defensin-3 Secreted in the Milk of Transgenic Goats Produced by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chengquan; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Quan, Fusheng; Gao, Mingqing; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether recombinant human β-defensin-3 (rHBD3) in the milk of transgenic goats has an anti-bacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) that could cause mastitis. A HBD3 mammary-specific expression vector was transfected by electroporation into goat fetal fibroblasts which were used to produce fourteen healthy transgenic goats by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The expression level of rHBD3 in the milk of the six transgenic goats ranged from 98 to 121 µg/ml at 15 days of lactation, and was maintained at 90–111 µg/ml during the following 2 months. Milk samples from transgenic goats showed an obvious inhibitory activity against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of rHBD3 in milk against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae were 9.5–10.5, 21.8–23.0 and 17.3–18.5 µg/mL, respectively, which was similar to those of the HBD3 standard (P>0.05). The in vivo anti-bacterial activities of rHBD3 in milk were examined by intramammary infusion of viable bacterial inoculums. We observed that 9/10 and 8/10 glands of non-transgenic goats infused with S. aureus and E. coli became infected. The mean numbers of viable bacteria went up to 2.9×103 and 95.4×103 CFU/ml at 48 h after infusion, respectively; the mean somatic cell counts (SCC) in infected glands reached up to 260.4×105 and 622.2×105 cells/ml, which were significantly higher than the SCC in uninfected goat glands. In contrast, no bacteria was presented in glands of transgenic goats and PBS-infused controls, and the SSC did not significantly change throughout the period. Moreover, the compositions and protein profiles of milk from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were identical. The present study demonstrated that HBD3 were an effective anti-bacterial protein to enhance the mastitis resistance of dairy animals. PMID:23799010

  6. Anti-bacterial activity of recombinant human β-defensin-3 secreted in the milk of transgenic goats produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Luo, Yan; Ge, Hengtao; Han, Chengquan; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yongsheng; Su, Jianmin; Quan, Fusheng; Gao, Mingqing; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether recombinant human β-defensin-3 (rHBD3) in the milk of transgenic goats has an anti-bacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae) that could cause mastitis. A HBD3 mammary-specific expression vector was transfected by electroporation into goat fetal fibroblasts which were used to produce fourteen healthy transgenic goats by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The expression level of rHBD3 in the milk of the six transgenic goats ranged from 98 to 121 µg/ml at 15 days of lactation, and was maintained at 90-111 µg/ml during the following 2 months. Milk samples from transgenic goats showed an obvious inhibitory activity against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of rHBD3 in milk against E. coli, S. aureus and S. agalactiae were 9.5-10.5, 21.8-23.0 and 17.3-18.5 µg/mL, respectively, which was similar to those of the HBD3 standard (P>0.05). The in vivo anti-bacterial activities of rHBD3 in milk were examined by intramammary infusion of viable bacterial inoculums. We observed that 9/10 and 8/10 glands of non-transgenic goats infused with S. aureus and E. coli became infected. The mean numbers of viable bacteria went up to 2.9×10(3) and 95.4×10(3) CFU/ml at 48 h after infusion, respectively; the mean somatic cell counts (SCC) in infected glands reached up to 260.4×10(5) and 622.2×10(5) cells/ml, which were significantly higher than the SCC in uninfected goat glands. In contrast, no bacteria was presented in glands of transgenic goats and PBS-infused controls, and the SSC did not significantly change throughout the period. Moreover, the compositions and protein profiles of milk from transgenic and non-transgenic goats were identical. The present study demonstrated that HBD3 were an effective anti-bacterial protein to enhance the mastitis resistance of dairy animals.

  7. Improved soluble bacterial expression and properties of the recombinant flavonoid glucosyltransferase UGT73G1 from Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ruxin; Chen, Caihong; Li, Yan; Sun, Kaiyan; Zhou, Fangfang; Chen, Kequan; Jia, Honghua

    2017-08-10

    Glycosylation of quercetin using flavonol-specific glycosyltransferases offers an alternate method for isoquercitrin production. Obtaining sufficient quantities of bioactive enzymes is an important prerequisite for highly effective biocatalysis and biotransformation. In this study, a codon-optimized gene for the flavonoid glucosyltransferase UGT73G1 from Allium cepa was heterologously expressed in the preferred prokaryotic expression host Escherichia coli. By combining expression as a fusion protein with 6-histidine tags with coexpression with molecular chaperones, increased soluble expression of UGT73G1 was achieved in E. coli. Two-terminal 6-histidine tags contributed more to the expression than molecular chaperones, as demonstrated by comparison of specific activities in crude extracts obtained from the recombinant E. coli strains. Studies of the catalytic properties of purified UGT73G1 indicated that its activity was significantly promoted by Mn(2+) and Mg(2+), while it was strongly inhibited by Cu(2+). These expression strategies enhanced the solubility and activity of the overexpressed protein and enabled characterization of this plant-derived glucosyltransferase expressed in a prokaryotic host. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Cattle Immunized with a Recombinant Subunit Vaccine Formulation Exhibits a Trend towards Protection against Histophilus somni Bacterial Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Madampage, Claudia Avis; Wilson, Don; Townsend, Hugh; Crockford, Gordon; Rawlyk, Neil; Dent, Donna; Evans, Brock; Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Dorin, Craig; Potter, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Histophilosis, a mucosal and septicemic infection of cattle is caused by the Gram negative pathogen Histophilus somni (H. somni). As existing vaccines against H. somni infection have shown to be of limited efficacy, we used a reverse vaccinology approach to identify new vaccine candidates. Three groups (B, C, D) of cattle were immunized with subunit vaccines and a control group (group A) was vaccinated with adjuvant alone. All four groups were challenged with H. somni. The results demonstrate that there was no significant difference in clinical signs, joint lesions, weight change or rectal temperature between any of the vaccinated groups (B,C,D) vs the control group A. However, the trend to protection was greatest for group C vaccinates. The group C vaccine was a pool of six recombinant proteins. Serum antibody responses determined using ELISA showed significantly higher titers for group C, with P values ranging from < 0.0148 to < 0.0002, than group A. Even though serum antibody titers in group B (5 out of 6 antigens) and group D were significantly higher compared to group A, they exerted less of a trend towards protection. In conclusion, the vaccine used in group C exhibits a trend towards protective immunity in cattle and would be a good candidate for further analysis to determine which proteins were responsible for the trend towards protection. PMID:27501390

  9. Cattle Immunized with a Recombinant Subunit Vaccine Formulation Exhibits a Trend towards Protection against Histophilus somni Bacterial Challenge.

    PubMed

    Madampage, Claudia Avis; Wilson, Don; Townsend, Hugh; Crockford, Gordon; Rawlyk, Neil; Dent, Donna; Evans, Brock; Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Dorin, Craig; Potter, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Histophilosis, a mucosal and septicemic infection of cattle is caused by the Gram negative pathogen Histophilus somni (H. somni). As existing vaccines against H. somni infection have shown to be of limited efficacy, we used a reverse vaccinology approach to identify new vaccine candidates. Three groups (B, C, D) of cattle were immunized with subunit vaccines and a control group (group A) was vaccinated with adjuvant alone. All four groups were challenged with H. somni. The results demonstrate that there was no significant difference in clinical signs, joint lesions, weight change or rectal temperature between any of the vaccinated groups (B,C,D) vs the control group A. However, the trend to protection was greatest for group C vaccinates. The group C vaccine was a pool of six recombinant proteins. Serum antibody responses determined using ELISA showed significantly higher titers for group C, with P values ranging from < 0.0148 to < 0.0002, than group A. Even though serum antibody titers in group B (5 out of 6 antigens) and group D were significantly higher compared to group A, they exerted less of a trend towards protection. In conclusion, the vaccine used in group C exhibits a trend towards protective immunity in cattle and would be a good candidate for further analysis to determine which proteins were responsible for the trend towards protection.

  10. One-step affinity tag purification of full-length recombinant human AP-1 complexes from bacterial inclusion bodies using a polycistronic expression system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ming; Lee, A-Young; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2008-01-01

    The AP-1 transcription factor is a dimeric protein complex formed primarily between Jun (c-Jun, JunB, JunD) and Fos (c-Fos, FosB, Fra-1, Fra-2) family members. These distinct AP-1 complexes are expressed in many cell types and modulate target gene expression implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses. Although the importance of AP-1 has long been recognized, the biochemical characterization of AP-1 remains limited in part due to the difficulty in purifying full-length, reconstituted dimers with active DNA-binding and transcriptional activity. Using a combination of bacterial coexpression and epitope-tagging methods, we successfully purified all 12 heterodimers (3 Jun × 4 Fos) of full-length human AP-1 complexes as well as c-Jun/c-Jun, JunD/JunD, and c-Jun/JunD dimers from bacterial inclusion bodies using one-step nickel-NTA affinity tag purification following denaturation and renaturation of coexpressed AP-1 subunits. Coexpression of two constitutive components in a dimeric AP-1 complex helps stabilize the proteins when compared with individual protein expression in bacteria. Purified dimeric AP-1 complexes are functional in sequence-specific DNA binding, as illustrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting, and are also active in transcription with in vitro-reconstituted human papillomavirus (HPV) chromatin containing AP-1-binding sites in the native configuration of HPV nucleosomes. The availability of these recombinant full-length human AP-1 complexes has greatly facilitated mechanistic studies of AP-1-regulated gene transcription in many biological systems. PMID:18329890

  11. One-step affinity tag purification of full-length recombinant human AP-1 complexes from bacterial inclusion bodies using a polycistronic expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Ming; Lee, A-Young; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2008-05-01

    The AP-1 transcription factor is a dimeric protein complex formed primarily between Jun (c-Jun, JunB, JunD) and Fos (c-Fos, FosB, Fra-1, Fra-2) family members. These distinct AP-1 complexes are expressed in many cell types and modulate target gene expression implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, and stress responses. Although the importance of AP-1 has long been recognized, the biochemical characterization of AP-1 remains limited in part due to the difficulty in purifying full-length, reconstituted dimers with active DNA-binding and transcriptional activity. Using a combination of bacterial coexpression and epitope-tagging methods, we successfully purified all 12 heterodimers (3 Junx4 Fos) of full-length human AP-1 complexes as well as c-Jun/c-Jun, JunD/JunD, and c-Jun/JunD dimers from bacterial inclusion bodies using one-step nickel-NTA affinity tag purification following denaturation and renaturation of coexpressed AP-1 subunits. Coexpression of two constitutive components in a dimeric AP-1 complex helps stabilize the proteins when compared with individual protein expression in bacteria. Purified dimeric AP-1 complexes are functional in sequence-specific DNA binding, as illustrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting, and are also active in transcription with in vitro-reconstituted human papillomavirus (HPV) chromatin containing AP-1-binding sites in the native configuration of HPV nucleosomes. The availability of these recombinant full-length human AP-1 complexes has greatly facilitated mechanistic studies of AP-1-regulated gene transcription in many biological systems.

  12. Enhanced expression of a recombinant bacterial laccase at low temperature and microaerobic conditions: purification and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Mohammadian, Mahdi; Fathi-Roudsari, Mehrnoosh; Mollania, Nasrin; Badoei-Dalfard, Arastoo; Khajeh, Khosro

    2010-08-01

    Laccases (benzenediol oxygen oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.2) have many biotechnological applications because of their oxidation ability towards a wide range of phenolic compounds. Within recent years, researchers have been highly interested in the identification and characterization of laccases from bacterial sources. In this study, we have isolated and cloned a gene encoding laccase (CotA) from Bacillus sp. HR03 and then expressed it under microaerobic conditions and decreased temperature in order to obtain high amounts of soluble protein. The laccase was purified and its biochemical properties were investigated using three common laccase substrates, 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), syringaldazine (SGZ) and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (2,6-DMP). K(M) and k(cat) were calculated 535 microM and 127 s(-1) for ABTS, 53 microM and 3 s(-1) for 2, 6-DMP and 5 microM and 20 s(-1) for SGZ when the whole reactions were carried out at room temperature. Laccase activity was also studied when the enzyme was preincubated at 70 and 80 degrees C. With SGZ as the substrate, the activity was increased three-fold after 50 min preincubation at 70 degrees C and 2.4-fold after 10 min preincubation at 80 degrees C. Preincubation of the enzyme in 70 degrees C for 30 min raised the activity four-fold with ABTS as the substrate. Also, L-dopa was used as a substrate. The enzyme was able to oxidize L-dopa with the K(M) and k(cat) of 1,493 microM and 194 s(-1), respectively.

  13. Formation of reactive oxygen species by human and bacterial pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes reconstituted from recombinant components.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, Attila; Nemeria, Natalia S; Torocsik, Beata; Tretter, Laszlo; Nilsson, Mattias; Jordan, Frank; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2015-12-01

    Individual recombinant components of pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (PDHc, OGDHc) of human and Escherichia coli (E. coli) origin were expressed and purified from E. coli with optimized protocols. The four multienzyme complexes were each reconstituted under optimal conditions at different stoichiometric ratios. Binding stoichiometries for the highest catalytic efficiency were determined from the rate of NADH generation by the complexes at physiological pH. Since some of these complexes were shown to possess 'moonlighting' activities under pathological conditions often accompanied by acidosis, activities were also determined at pH 6.3. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by the E3 component of hOGDHc is a pathologically relevant feature, superoxide generation by the complexes with optimal stoichiometry was measured by the acetylated cytochrome c reduction method in both the forward and the reverse catalytic directions. Various known affectors of physiological activity and ROS production, including Ca(2+), ADP, lipoylation status or pH, were investigated. The human complexes were also reconstituted with the most prevalent human pathological mutant of the E3 component, G194C and characterized; isolated human E3 with the G194C substitution was previously reported to have an enhanced ROS generating capacity. It is demonstrated that: i. PDHc, similarly to OGDHc, is able to generate ROS and this feature is displayed by both the E. coli and human complexes, ii. Reconstituted hPDHc generates ROS at a significantly higher rate as compared to hOGDHc in both the forward and the reverse reactions when ROS generation is calculated for unit mass of their common E3 component, iii. The E1 component or E1-E2 subcomplex generates significant amount of ROS only in hOGDHc; iv. Incorporation of the G194C variant of hE3, the result of a disease-causing mutation, into reconstituted hOGDHc and hPDHc indeed leads to a decreased activity of both

  14. Formation of reactive oxygen species by human and bacterial pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes reconstituted from recombinant components

    PubMed Central

    Ambrus, Attila; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Torocsik, Beata; Tretter, Laszlo; Nilsson, Mattias; Jordan, Frank; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Individual recombinant components of pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (PDHc, OGDHc) of human and Escherichia coli (E. coli) origin were expressed and purified from E. coli with optimized protocols. The four multienzyme complexes were each reconstituted under optimal conditions at different stoichiometric ratios. Binding stoichiometries for the highest catalytic efficiency were determined from the rate of NADH generation by the complexes at physiological pH. Since some of these complexes were shown to possess ‘moonlighting’ activities under pathological conditions often accompanied by acidosis, activities were also determined at pH 6.3. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by the E3 component of hOGDHc is a pathologically relevant feature, superoxide generation by the complexes with optimal stoichiometry was measured by the acetylated cytochrome c reduction method in both the forward and the reverse catalytic directions. Various known affectors of physiological activity and ROS production, including Ca2+, ADP, lipoylation status or pH, were investigated. The human complexes were also reconstituted with the most prevalent human pathological mutant of the E3 component, G194C and characterized; isolated human E3 with the G194C substitution was previously reported to have an enhanced ROS generating capacity. It is demonstrated that: i. PDHc, similarly to OGDHc, is able to generate ROS and this feature is displayed by both the E. coli and human complexes, ii. Reconstituted hPDHc generates ROS at a significantly higher rate as compared to hOGDHc in both the forward and the reverse reactions when ROS generation is calculated for unit mass of their common E3 component, iii. The E1 component or E1-E2 subcomplex generates significant amount of ROS only in hOGDHc; iv. Incorporation of the G194C variant of hE3, the result of a disease-causing mutation, into reconstituted hOGDHc and hPDHc indeed leads to a decreased activity of both

  15. Impact of two DNA repair pathways, homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, on bacterial spore inactivation under simulated martian environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Ralf; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2011-09-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis were used as a model system to study the impact of the two major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms [homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ)] on the survivability of air-dried mono- and multilayers of bacterial spores under a simulated martian environment; i.e., an environment with low temperature (-10 °C), pure CO 2 atmosphere (99.99% CO 2), 200-1100 nm UV-VIS-NIR radiation, and 0.69 kPa pressure. Spores in multilayers exhibited low inactivation rates compared to monolayers, mainly due to shadowing effects of overlying spores. Simulated martian UV irradiation reduced dramatically spore viability, whereas when shielded from martian UV radiation, spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to simulated martian environmental conditions than were wild-type spores. In addition, NHEJ-deficient spores were consistently more sensitive than HR-deficient spores to simulated Mars environmental conditions, suggesting that DSBs were an important type of DNA damage. The results indicated that both HR and NHEJ provide an efficient set of DNA repair pathways ensuring spore survival after exposure to simulated martian environmental conditions.

  16. Combined prime-boost vaccination against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) using a recombinant vaccinia virus and a bacterial plasmid both expressing TBE virus non-structural NS1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Aleshin, SE; Timofeev, AV; Khoretonenko, MV; Zakharova, LG; Pashvykina, GV; Stephenson, JR; Shneider, AM; Altstein, AD

    2005-01-01

    Background Heterologous prime-boost immunization protocols using different gene expression systems have proven to be successful tools in protecting against various diseases in experimental animal models. The main reason for using this approach is to exploit the ability of expression cassettes to prime or boost the immune system in different ways during vaccination procedures. The purpose of the project was to study the ability of recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) and bacterial plasmid, both carrying the NS1 gene from tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus under the control of different promoters, to protect mice against lethal challenge using a heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol. Results The heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol, using a VV recombinant and bacterial plasmid, both containing the NS1 TBE virus protein gene under the control of different promoters, achieved a high level of protection in mice against lethal challenge with a highly pathogenic TBE virus strain. No signs of pronounced TBE infection were detected in the surviving animals. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocols using recombinant VV and bacterial plasmids could be used for the development of flavivirus vaccines. PMID:16076390

  17. Protective efficacy of a recombinant bacterial artificial chromosome clone of a very virulent Marek's disease virus containing a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Mays, Jody K; Black-Pyrkosz, Alexis; Spatz, Stephen; Fadly, Aly M; Dunn, John R

    2016-12-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV), an alphaherpesvirus, causes Marek's disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease in poultry characterized by T-cell lymphomas, nerve lesions, and mortality. Vaccination is used worldwide to control MD, but increasingly virulent field strains can overcome this protection, driving a need to create new vaccines. Previous studies revealed that insertion of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) long terminal repeat (LTR) into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of a very virulent strain of MDV, Md5, rendered the resultant recombinant virus, rMd5 REV-LTR BAC, fully attenuated in maternal antibody positive (Mab+) chickens at passage 40. In the current study, the protective efficacy of rMd5 REV-LTR BAC was evaluated. First, passage 70 was identified as being fully attenuated in maternal antibody negative chickens and chosen as the optimal passage level for use in protective efficacy studies. Second, three protective efficacy trials were conducted comparing the rMd5 REV-LTR p70 BAC to the CVI988/Rispens vaccine. Groups of Mab+ and Mab- 15I5 × 71 chickens were vaccinated in ovo at 18 days of embryonation or intra-abdominally at day of hatch, and challenged at 5 days post-hatch with the vv+MDV strain 686. Vaccination at day of hatch and in ovo with rMd5 REV-LTR p70 BAC protected chickens against MDV-induced bursa and thymic atrophy, but did not provide the same level of protection against MD tumours as that afforded by the commercial vaccine, CVI988/Rispens.

  18. Recombinant thermoactive phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and its coupling with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs) for the conversion of CO2 to oxaloacetate.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carginale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-15

    With the continuous increase of atmospheric CO2 in the last decades, efficient methods for carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization are urgently required. The possibility of converting CO2 into useful chemicals could be a good strategy to both decreasing the CO2 concentration and for achieving an efficient exploitation of this cheap carbon source. Recently, several single- and multi-enzyme systems for the catalytic conversion of CO2 mainly to bicarbonate have been implemented. In order to design and construct a catalytic system for the conversion of CO2 to organic molecules, we implemented an in vitro multienzyme system using mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. The system, in fact, was constituted by a recombinant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, in combination with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs), for converting CO2 into oxaloacetate, a compound of potential utility in industrial processes. The catalytic procedure is in two steps: the conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by CA, followed by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate with bicarbonate, catalyzed by PEPC, with formation of oxaloacetate (OAA). All tested CAs, belonging to α-, β-, and γ-CA classes, were able to increase OAA production compared to procedures when only PEPC was used. Interestingly, the efficiency of the CAs tested in OAA production was in good agreement with the kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction of these enzymes. This PEPC also revealed to be thermoactive and thermostable, and when coupled with the extremely thermostable CA from Sulphurhydrogenibium azorense (SazCA) the production of OAA was achieved even if the two enzymes were exposed to temperatures up to 60 °C, suggesting a possible role of the two coupled enzymes in biotechnological processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of biological aerosols by luminescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Peter J.; Tieman, Darlene; Coon, Phillip A.; Paterno, Dorothea A.; Milton, Maurice M.

    1999-12-01

    Luciferin-Luciferase (L-L) luminescence techniques were used to successfully measure adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (pg/ml) in concentrated aerosol samples containing either vegetative bacterial cells or spores. Aerosols were collected with wet and dry sampling devices. Evaluation for the presence of total bio-mass from bacterial and non-bacterial sources of ATP was achieved by suspending the collected aerosol samples in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pipeting a 50-(mu) l aliquot of the PBS suspension into a FiltravetteTM, and then adding bacterial releasing agent (BRA). The sample was then reacted with L-L, and the resulting Relative Luminescence Units (RLU's), indicative of ATP from all sources, were measured. Bacterial cells were enumerated with the additional application of a wash with somatic cell releasing agent (SRA) to remove any interferences and non-bacterial sources of ATP prior to BRA application. This step removes interfering substances and non-bacterial sources of ATP. For spore analysis, an equi-volume sample of the PBS suspension was added to an equi-volume of trypticase soy broth (TSB), incubated at 37 C for 15 minutes, and processed using methods identical to bacterial cell analysis. Using these technique we were able to detect Bacillus subtilin variation niger, formerly known as Bacillus globigii (BG), in aerosol samples at concentrations greater than or equal to 105 colony forming units (CFU) per ml. Results of field and chamber trials show that one can detect the presence of bacterial and non-bacterial sources of ATP. One can also differentiate spore and vegetative bacterial cells. These techniques may be appropriate to situations where the measurement of bacterial aerosols is needed.

  20. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2016-09-01

    Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  1. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and recombinant plasmid pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA by bacterial magnetosomes for osteosarcoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li; Ke, Youqun; Yu, Shuisheng; Jing, Juehua

    To explore a novel combination of chemotherapy, gene therapy, and thermotherapy for osteosarcoma, a targeted heat-sensitive co-delivery system based on bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) was developed. The optimal culture conditions of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) AMB-1 and characterization of BMs were achieved. A recombinant eukaryotic plasmid heat shock protein 70-polo-like kinase 1-short hairpin RNA (pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA) under transcriptional control of a thermosensitive promoter (human HSP70 promoter) was constructed for gene therapy. Doxorubicin (DOX) and pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA were included in the targeted thermosensitive co-delivery system, and in vitro DOX release activity, targeted gene silencing efficiency and in vitro antitumor efficacy were investigated. The results showed that the optimal culture conditions of MTB AMB-1 are an oxygen concentration of 4.0%, a pH value of 7.0, 20 μmol/L of ferrous sulfate, 800 mg/L of sodium nitrate, and 200 mg/L of succinic acid. The temperature of BMs reached 43°C within 3 minutes and could be maintained for 30 minutes by adjusting the magnitude of the alternating magnetic field (AMF). The diameters of BMs, BM-DOX, BM-recombinant eukaryotic plasmid pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA (shPlk1), and BM-DOX-shPlk1 were 43.7±4.6, 79.2±5.4, 88.9±7.8, and 133.5±11.4 nm, respectively. The zeta potentials of BMs, BM-DOX, BM-shPlk1, and BM-DOX-shPlk1 were -29.4±6.9, -9.5±5.6, -16.7±4.8, and -10.3±3.1 mV, respectively. Besides, the system exhibited good release behavior. DOX release rate from BM-DOX-shPlk1 was 54% after incubation with phosphate-buffered saline at 43°C and 37% after incubation with 50% fetal bovine serum, which was significantly higher than that at 37°C (P<0.05). In addition, the expressions of Plk1 mRNA and protein were significantly suppressed in cells treated with BM-DOX-shPlk1 following hyperthermia treatment under the influence of an AMF compared to other groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, evaluation of the effect of in vitro

  2. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and recombinant plasmid pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA by bacterial magnetosomes for osteosarcoma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li; Ke, Youqun; Yu, Shuisheng; Jing, Juehua

    2016-01-01

    To explore a novel combination of chemotherapy, gene therapy, and thermotherapy for osteosarcoma, a targeted heat-sensitive co-delivery system based on bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) was developed. The optimal culture conditions of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) AMB-1 and characterization of BMs were achieved. A recombinant eukaryotic plasmid heat shock protein 70-polo-like kinase 1-short hairpin RNA (pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA) under transcriptional control of a thermosensitive promoter (human HSP70 promoter) was constructed for gene therapy. Doxorubicin (DOX) and pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA were included in the targeted thermosensitive co-delivery system, and in vitro DOX release activity, targeted gene silencing efficiency and in vitro antitumor efficacy were investigated. The results showed that the optimal culture conditions of MTB AMB-1 are an oxygen concentration of 4.0%, a pH value of 7.0, 20 μmol/L of ferrous sulfate, 800 mg/L of sodium nitrate, and 200 mg/L of succinic acid. The temperature of BMs reached 43°C within 3 minutes and could be maintained for 30 minutes by adjusting the magnitude of the alternating magnetic field (AMF). The diameters of BMs, BM-DOX, BM-recombinant eukaryotic plasmid pHSP70-Plk1-shRNA (shPlk1), and BM-DOX-shPlk1 were 43.7±4.6, 79.2±5.4, 88.9±7.8, and 133.5±11.4 nm, respectively. The zeta potentials of BMs, BM-DOX, BM-shPlk1, and BM-DOX-shPlk1 were −29.4±6.9, −9.5±5.6, −16.7±4.8, and −10.3±3.1 mV, respectively. Besides, the system exhibited good release behavior. DOX release rate from BM-DOX-shPlk1 was 54% after incubation with phosphate-buffered saline at 43°C and 37% after incubation with 50% fetal bovine serum, which was significantly higher than that at 37°C (P<0.05). In addition, the expressions of Plk1 mRNA and protein were significantly suppressed in cells treated with BM-DOX-shPlk1 following hyperthermia treatment under the influence of an AMF compared to other groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, evaluation of the effect of in

  3. External Luminescence and Photon Recycling in Near-Field Thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSutter, John; Vaillon, Rodolphe; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2017-07-01

    The importance of considering near-field effects on photon recycling and spontaneous emission in a thermophotovoltaic device is investigated. Fluctuational electrodynamics is used to calculate external luminescence from a photovoltaic cell as a function of emitter type, vacuum gap thickness between the emitter and cell, and cell thickness. The observed changes in external luminescence suggest strong modifications of photon recycling caused by the presence of the emitter. Photon recycling for propagating modes is affected by reflection at the vacuum-emitter interface and is substantially decreased by the leakage towards the emitter through the tunneling of frustrated modes. In addition, spontaneous emission by the cell can be strongly enhanced by the presence of an emitter supporting surface-polariton modes. It follows that using a radiative recombination model with a spatially uniform radiative lifetime, even corrected by a photon-recycling factor, is inappropriate. Applying the principles of detailed balance and accounting for nonradiative recombination mechanisms, the impact of external luminescence enhancement in the near field on thermophotovoltaic performance is investigated. It is shown that unlike isolated cells, the external luminescence efficiency is not solely dependent on cell quality but significantly increases as the vacuum gap thickness decreases below 400 nm for the case of an intrinsic silicon emitter. In turn, the open-circuit voltage and power density benefit from this enhanced external luminescence toward the emitter. This benefit is larger as cell quality, characterized by the contribution of nonradiative recombination, decreases.

  4. [Cloning and expression of genes of the luminescence system in Photobacterium leiognathi].

    PubMed

    Illarionov, B A; Protopopova, M V

    1987-08-01

    The genes of Photobacterium leiognathi luminescence system were cloned in plasmid pUC18. Escherichia coli cells harboring a recombinant plasmid pPHL1 are luminescent. pPHL1 contains luciferase genes and genes responsible for aldehyde biosynthesis. The luminescence of Escherichia coli is subject to autoinductor regulation similar to the one existing in luminescent bacteria. The 2.7 kb fragment of Photobacterium leiognathi DNA containing the genes for alpha- and beta-luciferase subunits were cloned in pUC19.

  5. Selective excitation of the yellow luminescence of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, J.S.; Yu, P.Y.; Teo, K.L.; Weber, E.R.; Grzegory, I.; Uchida, K.

    1999-07-01

    The yellow luminescence of n-type GaN has been studied with selective excitation using a combination of Ar ion and dye lasers. Narrower structures whose peak energies follow the excitation photon energy over the width of the yellow luminescence have been observed. Unlike the yellow luminescence excited by above band gap excitations, these fine structures exhibits thermal activated quenching behavior. We propose that these fine structures are due to emission occurring at complexes of shallow donors and deep acceptors which can be resonantly excited by photons with energies below the band gap. The activation energy deduced from their intensity is that for delocalization of electrons out of the complexes. Our results therefore suggest that there is more than one recombination channel (usually assumed to be due to distant donor-acceptor pairs) to the yellow luminescence in GaN.

  6. The recombination of genetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic recombination is the major mechanism by which new arrangements of genetic elements are produced in all living organisms, from the simplest bacterial viruses to humans. This volume presents an overview of the types of recombination found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  7. Time-resolved measurements of Cooper-pair radiative recombination in InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, S. S.; Nakajima, H.; Kumano, H.; Suemune, I.; Irie, H.; Asano, Y.; Akahane, K.; Sasaki, M.; Murayama, A.

    2015-08-21

    We studied InAs quantum dots (QDs) where electron Cooper pairs penetrate from an adjacent niobium (Nb) superconductor with the proximity effect. With time-resolved luminescence measurements at the wavelength around 1550 nm, we observed luminescence enhancement and reduction of luminescence decay time constants at temperature below the superconducting critical temperature (T{sub C}) of Nb. On the basis of these measurements, we propose a method to determine the contribution of Cooper-pair recombination in InAs QDs. We show that the luminescence enhancement measured below T{sub C} is well explained with our theory including Cooper-pair recombination.

  8. Recombinant Baculovirus Isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3 ), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac(®) or BaculoDirect™, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Previously, many methods required a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. Fortunately, this step is no longer required for most systems currently available. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay or real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac(®) system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  9. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition.

  10. Multidimensional Luminescence Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-30

    reflector in the dye laser cavity; BS, beam splitter ; PD, photodiode; M, beam steering mirrors; P, HPLC solvent 20 • ’ ’ ’ ’ , ’ , i i i . ..... i...the excitation beam , the -’ luminescence till also have an associated modulation depending on the time delay. This property is used in phase resolved...luminescence measurements. The phase resolved method uses a continuous sinusoidally modulated L ex-itation beam . Knowing the modulation frequency (f

  11. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  12. Study of Luminescence Characteristics of Trivalent Terbium in Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Mike S.; Armagan, Guzin; Winfree, William P.

    1995-01-01

    An important use of silicate glasses doped with terbium oxide (Tb2O3) is their use as fiber optic sensors for high-resolution imaging applications requiring the detection of x-rays (e.g. tomography and radiography). The x-ray radiation is absorbed by the glass, producing electron-hole pairs (excitons). The excitons migrate through the glass matrix and then recombine, emitting characteristic Tb(3+) luminescence in the optical wavelength region. This emission is due to forbidden transitions of 4f electrons and therefore has a long decay time. Long decay time is undesirable when imaging transient events since it results in blurring in time of the images. It has been reported elsewhere that in crystals Tb(3+) ions can act both as luminescence centers and as fluorescence traps. These traps can capture excitons and delay their recombination. This delayed fluorescence is seen as a long lived, secondary component to the luminescence decay curve, or afterglow. Such a secondary decay component to the luminescence decay of Tb(3+) has been observed before in soda glass following pulsed optical excitation. In order to determine the conditions under which afterglow occurs, an understanding of the material's luminescent properties is required.

  13. Study of Luminescence Characteristics of Trivalent Terbium in Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Mike S.; Armagan, Guzin; Winfree, William P.

    1995-01-01

    An important use of silicate glasses doped with terbium oxide (Tb2O3) is their use as fiber optic sensors for high-resolution imaging applications requiring the detection of x-rays (e.g. tomography and radiography). The x-ray radiation is absorbed by the glass, producing electron-hole pairs (excitons). The excitons migrate through the glass matrix and then recombine, emitting characteristic Tb(3+) luminescence in the optical wavelength region. This emission is due to forbidden transitions of 4f electrons and therefore has a long decay time. Long decay time is undesirable when imaging transient events since it results in blurring in time of the images. It has been reported elsewhere that in crystals Tb(3+) ions can act both as luminescence centers and as fluorescence traps. These traps can capture excitons and delay their recombination. This delayed fluorescence is seen as a long lived, secondary component to the luminescence decay curve, or afterglow. Such a secondary decay component to the luminescence decay of Tb(3+) has been observed before in soda glass following pulsed optical excitation. In order to determine the conditions under which afterglow occurs, an understanding of the material's luminescent properties is required.

  14. Sensitivity of detection of bacteria with fluorescent and luminescent phenotypes using different instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovko, Lubov Y.; Griffiths, Mansel W.

    2000-04-01

    The problem of bacterial enumeration in different samples is of great importance in many fields of research. Construction of recombinant fluorescent and luminescent bacteria that can be easily detected by nondestructive instrumental methods proves us with an opportunity to monitor bacteria in a wide variety of clinical, environmental and food samples in real time. Three different labels were employed: Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), Bacterial luciferase (BL) and Firefly Luciferase (FFL). Both plasmid and chromosomal transformants of different strains of E. coli, P. putida and S. enteritidis were used. For the detection of the in vivo GFP the Shimadzu RF 540 spectrofluorimeter, Labsystems FL- 500 plate fluorimeter and Night Owl LB 98 CCD-camera from EG and G Berthold supplied with excitation light source and proper spectral filters both in macroscopic and microscopic mode were used. For the detection of in vivo luminescence of BL and FFL, tube luminometer BG-P from GEM Biomedical Inc., luminometric plate reader from BioOrbit, BIQ Bioview CCD camera from Cambridge Imaging Ltd and Night Owl LB 98 CCD camera both in macroscopic and microscopic mode were used. The expression levels of the labels, their stability, stability of the signal and detection limits of tagged bacteria were investigated. The detection limits for GFP tagged bacteria were 5 X 104 - 6 X 106, for BL tagged bacteria 5 X 102 - 2 X 105, and for FFL tagged bacteria - 4 X 103 - 106 CFU/ml, depending on the instrument used. Single bacteria could be detected with the help of the Night Owl in the microscopic mode.

  15. Lunar luminescence measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of lunar sites obtained in June 1983 have been analyzed for residual luminescence using the spectral line depth technique. The results or three sites each at three wavelengths are presented. The sites observed were Mare Crisium, Kepler, and Aristarchus. In each case, the value quoted was based not only on the strong Fraunhofer line in the spectral range covered but also on from 11 to 21 weaker lines within 80 A of the strongest feature. These data do not support previous observations. The values given do not indicate a greatly reddened spectrum, and the luminescence spectrum of the mare site is not significantly different from the two young crater sites. These observations cannot be adequately explained by thermal luminescence, theories of direct excitation are also unable to explain the strength of the flux.

  16. Wireless Luminescence Integrated Sensors (WLIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Sayler, G.S.

    2003-11-10

    The goal of this project was the development of a family of wireless, single-chip, luminescence-sensing devices to solve a number of difficult distributed measurement problems in areas ranging from environmental monitoring and assessment to high-throughput screening of combinatorial chemistry libraries. These wireless luminescence integrated sensors (WLIS) consist of a microluminometer, wireless data transmitter, and RF power input circuit all realized in a standard integrated circuit (IC) process with genetically engineered, whole-cell, bioluminescent bioreporters encapsulated and deposited on the IC. The end product is a family of compact, low-power, rugged, low-cost sensors. As part of this program they developed an integrated photodiode/signal-processing scheme with an rms noise level of 175 electrons/second for a 13-minute integration time, and a quantum efficiency of 66% at the 490-nm bioluminescent wavelength. this performance provided a detection limit of < 1000 photons/second. Although sol-gel has previously been used to encapsulate yeast cells, the reaction conditions necessary for polymerization (primarily low pH) have beforehand proven too harsh for bacterial cell immobilizations. Utilizing sonication methods, they have were able to initiate polymerization under pH conditions conductive to cell survival. both a toluene bioreporter (Pseudomonas putida TVA8) and a naphthalene bioreporter (Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44) were successfully encapsulated in sol-gel and shown to produce a fairly significant bioluminescent response. In addition to the previously developed naphthalene- and toluene-sensitive bioreporters, they developed a yeast-based xenoestrogen reporter. This technology has been licensed by Micro Systems Technologies, a startup company in Dayton, Ohio for applications in environmental containments monitoring, and for detecting weapons of mass destruction (i.e. homeland security).

  17. Peculiarities of thermal extinction of deep-center luminescence in cadmium selenide

    SciTech Connect

    Ermolovich, I.B.; Bulakh, B.M.

    1986-10-01

    The authors study the mechanisms of thermal extinction of the luminescence bands in cadmium selenide with lambda mad = 0.92 (band I) and 1.16 um (band II), for which the main photoluminescence centers are responsible. CdSe crystals grown from the gas phase and deliberately not doped were studied. The curves of the intensities of the bands I and II in the layers and single crystals are shown. A model is presented of the configurational coordinates for explaining the internal mechanism of extinction of impurity luminescence in crystal phosphors. A diagram is shown of the recombination transitions for wide-gap crystal phosphors with the anticipation of two luminescence centers and a nonradiative recombination center. This study proves that the corresponding luminescence centers in cadmium selenide single crystals and layers have the same physicochemical structure.

  18. Nanostructured luminescently labeled nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kricka, Larry J; Fortina, Paolo; Park, Jason Y

    2017-03-01

    Important and emerging trends at the interface of luminescence, nucleic acids and nanotechnology are: (i) the conventional luminescence labeling of nucleic acid nanostructures (e.g. DNA tetrahedron); (ii) the labeling of bulk nucleic acids (e.g. single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA) with nanostructured luminescent labels (e.g. copper nanoclusters); and (iii) the labeling of nucleic acid nanostructures (e.g. origami DNA) with nanostructured luminescent labels (e.g. silver nanoclusters). This review surveys recent advances in these three different approaches to the generation of nanostructured luminescently labeled nucleic acids, and includes both direct and indirect labeling methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Norovirus recombination.

    PubMed

    Bull, Rowena A; Tanaka, Mark M; White, Peter A

    2007-12-01

    RNA recombination is a significant driving force in viral evolution. Increased awareness of recombination within the genus Norovirus of the family Calicivirus has led to a rise in the identification of norovirus (NoV) recombinants and they are now reported at high frequency. Currently, there is no classification system for recombinant NoVs and a widely accepted recombinant genotyping system is still needed. Consequently, there is duplication in reporting of novel recombinants. This has led to difficulties in defining the number and types of recombinants in circulation. In this study, 120 NoV nucleotide sequences were compiled from the current GenBank database and published literature. NoV recombinants and their recombination breakpoints were identified using three methods: phylogenetic analysis, SimPlot analysis and the maximum chi2 method. A total of 20 NoV recombinant types were identified in circulation worldwide. The recombination point is the ORF1/2 overlap in all isolates except one, which demonstrated a double recombination event within the polymerase region.

  20. Tobacco mosaic virus infection results in an increase in recombination frequency and resistance to viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens in the progeny of infected tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Kathiria, Palak; Sidler, Corinne; Golubov, Andrey; Kalischuk, Melanie; Kawchuk, Lawrence M; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-08-01

    Our previous experiments showed that infection of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) leads to an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). The progeny of infected plants also had an increased rate of rearrangements in resistance gene-like loci. Here, we report that tobacco plants infected with TMV exhibited an increase in HRF in two consecutive generations. Analysis of global genome methylation showed the hypermethylated genome in both generations of plants, whereas analysis of methylation via 5-methyl cytosine antibodies demonstrated both hypomethylation and hypermethylation. Analysis of the response of the progeny of infected plants to TMV, Pseudomonas syringae, or Phytophthora nicotianae revealed a significant delay in symptom development. Infection of these plants with TMV or P. syringae showed higher levels of induction of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1 gene expression and higher levels of callose deposition. Our experiments suggest that viral infection triggers specific changes in progeny that promote higher levels of HRF at the transgene and higher resistance to stress as compared with the progeny of unstressed plants. However, data reported in these studies do not establish evidence of a link between recombination frequency and stress resistance.

  1. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    PubMed Central

    Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry. PMID:26137472

  2. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    PubMed

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  3. Oligonucleotide recombination enabled site-specific mutagenesis in bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recombineering refers to a strategy for engineering DNA sequences using a specialized mode of homologous recombination. This technology can be used for rapidly constructing precise changes in bacterial genome sequences in vivo. Oligo recombination is one type of recombineering that uses ssDNA olig...

  4. Environmental and synthesis-dependent luminescence properties of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Duque, Juan G; Pasquali, Matteo; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim

    2009-08-25

    Luminescence properties of individual (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were studied using continuous wave and time-resolved spectroscopy. Nanotubes synthesized by different methods (HiPco and CoMoCat) and dispersed in two different ionic surfactants were examined either in aqueous environments or deposited on surfaces. SWNT preparations leading to the highest luminescence intensities and narrowest spectral widths exhibit the longest luminescence decay times. This highlights the role of the nanotube environment and synthesis methods in the nonradiative relaxation processes of the excitonic recombination. Samples of HiPco nanotubes dispersed in sodium deoxycholate contained the brightest nanotubes in aqueous environments.

  5. CCD Luminescence Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom

    1987-01-01

    New diagnostic tool used to understand performance and failures of microelectronic devices. Microscope integrated to low-noise charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera to produce new instrument for analyzing performance and failures of microelectronics devices that emit infrared light during operation. CCD camera also used to indentify very clearly parts that have failed where luminescence typically found.

  6. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1997-02-04

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition. 14 figs.

  7. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein.

    PubMed

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98-99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample.

  8. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H.

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821T, an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98–99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample. PMID:25843055

  9. A broadly applicable function for describing luminescence dose response

    SciTech Connect

    Burbidge, C. I.

    2015-07-28

    The basic form of luminescence dose response is investigated, with the aim of developing a single function to account for the appearance of linear, superlinear, sublinear, and supralinear behaviors and variations in saturation signal level and rate. A function is assembled based on the assumption of first order behavior in different major factors contributing to measured luminescence-dosimetric signals. Different versions of the function are developed for standardized and non-dose-normalized responses. Data generated using a two trap two recombination center model and experimental data for natural quartz are analyzed to compare results obtained using different signals, measurement protocols, pretreatment conditions, and radiation qualities. The function well describes a range of dose dependent behavior, including sublinear, superlinear, supralinear, and non-monotonic responses and relative response to α and β radiation, based on change in relative recombination and trapping probability affecting signals sourced from a single electron trap.

  10. Controlled formation of magnetite crystal by partial oxidation of ferrous hydroxide in the presence of recombinant magnetotactic bacterial protein Mms6.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Yosuke; Arakaki, Atsushi; Staniland, Sarah S; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2007-12-01

    Mms6 is a small acidic protein that is tightly associated with bacterial magnetite in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. This protein has previously shown iron binding activity, allowing it to generate uniform magnetic crystals by co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric ions. Here, magnetite crystals were formed by the partial oxidation of ferrous hydroxide in the presence and absence of Mms6. The crystals synthesised were systematically characterised according to their sizes and morphologies using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Mms6-mediated synthesis of magnetite by this methods produced crystals of a uniform size and narrow size distribution with a cubo-octahedral morphology, similar to bacterial magnetite observed in M. magneticum AMB-1. The crystals formed in the absence of Mms6 were octahedral, larger with an increased size distribution. Protein quantification analysis of Mms6 in the synthesised particles indicated tight association of this protein onto the crystal. Furthermore, high affinities to iron ions and a highly charged electrostatic quality suggest that the protein acts as a template for the nucleus formation and/or acts as a growth regulator by recognising crystal faces. The method introduced in this study presents an alternative route for controlling the size and shape of magnetite crystals without the use of organic solvent and high temperatures.

  11. Comparison of mammalian and bacterial expression library screening to detect recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants with enhanced thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Gierczak, Richard F; Bhakta, Varsha; Xie, Michael; Sheffield, William P

    2015-08-20

    Serpins are a widely distributed family of serine proteases. A key determinant of their specificity is the reactive centre loop (RCL), a surface motif of ∼20 amino acids in length. Expression libraries of variant serpins could be rapidly probed with proteases to develop novel inhibitors if optimal systems were available. The serpin variant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor M358R (API M358R) inhibits the coagulation protease thrombin, but at sub-maximal rates compared to other serpins. Here we compared two approaches to isolate functional API variants from serpin expression libraries, using the same small library of API randomized at residue 358 (M358X): flow cytometry of transfected HEK 293 cells expressing membrane-displayed API; and a thrombin capture assay (TCA) performed on pools of bacterial lysates expressing soluble API. No enrichment for specific P1 residues was observed when the RCL codons of the 1% of sorted transfected 293 cells with the highest fluorescent thrombin-binding signals were subcloned and sequenced. In contrast, screening of 16 pools of bacterial API-expressing transformants led to the facile identification of API M358R and M358K as functional variants. Kinetic characterization showed that API M358R inhibited thrombin 17-fold more rapidly than API M358K. Reducing the incubation time with immobilized thrombin improved the sensitivity of TCA to detect supra-active API M358R variants and was used to screen a hypervariable library of API variants expressing 16 different amino acids at residues 352-357. The most active variant isolated, with TLSATP substituted for FLEAI, inhibited thrombin 2.9-fold more rapidly than API M358R. Our results indicate that flow cytometric approaches used in protein engineering of antibodies are not appropriate for serpins, and highlight the utility of the optimized TCA for serpin protein engineering.

  12. Temperature influence on luminescent coupling efficiency in concentrator MJ SCs

    SciTech Connect

    Shvarts, Maxim Emelyanov, Viktor; Mintairov, Mikhail; Evstropov, Valery; Timoshina, Nailya

    2015-09-28

    In the work, presented are the results of investigation of temperature dependencies of the luminescent coupling effectiveness in lattice-matched (LM) GaInP/GaAs/Ge and metamorphic (MM) GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells. The “ordinary” luminescent coupling effectiveness rise has been observed with temperature decrease for GaAs-Ge, GaInP-GaInAs and GaInAs-Ge pairs of subcells, and its limiting values have been defined. A “reverse” behavior of the luminescent coupling effectiveness for the GaInP-GaAs pair has been found, determined emittance potential drop of wideband GaInP p-n junction. It is shown that the established “unusual” behavior of the LC efficiency may be determined by the presence of thermalized centers of non-radiative recombination of charge carriers for the GaInP subcell in GaInP/GaAs/Ge LM structure. Estimation of characteristic parameters for the nonradiative recombination processes in wideband GaInP p-n junction has been carried out, and values for the energy of the nonradiative center thermalization (E{sub nrad2} =79.42meV) and for the activation energy of nonradiative band-to-band recombination (E{sub A}=33.4meV) have been obtained.

  13. Recombineering: A Homologous Recombination-Based Method of Genetic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, Shyam K.; Thomason, Lynn C.; Kuznetsov, Sergey G.; Court, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    Recombineering is an efficient method of in vivo genetic engineering applicable to chromosomal as well as episomal replicons in E. coli. This method circumvents the need for most standard in vitro cloning techniques. Recombineering allows construction of DNA molecules with precise junctions without constraints being imposed by restriction enzyme site location. Bacteriophage homologous recombination proteins catalyze these recombineering reactions using double- and single-strand linear DNA substrates, so-called targeting constructs, introduced by electroporation. Gene knockouts, deletions and point mutations are readily made, gene tags can be inserted, and regions of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) or the E. coli genome can be subcloned by gene retrieval using recombineering. Most of these constructs can be made within about a week's time. PMID:19180090

  14. Recombinant Cyclophilins Lack Nuclease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Manteca, Angel; Sanchez, Jesus

    2004-01-01

    Several single-domain prokaryotic and eukaryotic cyclophilins have been identified as also being unspecific nucleases with a role in DNA degradation during the lytic processes that accompany bacterial cell death and eukaryotic apoptosis. Evidence is provided here that the supposed nuclease activity of human and bacterial recombinant cyclophilins is due to contamination of the proteins by the host Escherichia coli endonuclease and is not an intrinsic property of these proteins. PMID:15342605

  15. Recombinant cyclophilins lack nuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Manteca, Angel; Sanchez, Jesus

    2004-09-01

    Several single-domain prokaryotic and eukaryotic cyclophilins have been identified as also being unspecific nucleases with a role in DNA degradation during the lytic processes that accompany bacterial cell death and eukaryotic apoptosis. Evidence is provided here that the supposed nuclease activity of human and bacterial recombinant cyclophilins is due to contamination of the proteins by the host Escherichia coli endonuclease and is not an intrinsic property of these proteins.

  16. Luminescent trimethoprim-polyaminocarboxylate lanthanide complex conjugates for selective protein labeling and time-resolved bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, D. Rajasekhar; Pedró Rosa, Laura E.; Miller, Lawrence W.

    2011-01-01

    Labeling proteins with long-lifetime emitting lanthanide (III) chelate reporters enables sensitive, time-resolved luminescence bioaffinity assays. Heterodimers of trimethoprim (TMP) covalently linked to various cs124-sensitized, polyaminocarboxylate chelates stably retain lanthanide ions and exhibit quantum yields of europium emission up to 20% in water. A time-resolved, luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) assay showed that TMP-polyaminocarboxylates bind to Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (eDHFR) fusion proteins with nanomolar affinity in purified solutions and in bacterial lysates. The ability to selectively impart terbium or europium luminescence to fusion proteins in complex physiological mixtures bypasses the need for specific antibodies and simplifies sample preparation. PMID:21619068

  17. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  18. Microstructural lines involving luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-01

    Japanese National Printing Bureau has been focused upon the development of anti-copy lines for many years. The basic concept with regard to security measure lies in the merge of art and technology. On this basis, our originally developed anti-copy lines show flexibility to various security designs. Our newest anti-copy lines comprising from the Tri-Branched and Divided Lines shows clearer latent image effect compared to that of our other developed anti-copy lines. However, the anti-copy effect of security printing lines with microstructure is deteriorating due to the emergence of digital image techniques with higher resolution. In this situation, this paper introduces a new security measure comprising from luminescence and security printing lines with microstructure. It gives rise to a latent image effect under UV light due to the characteristic microstructure while visually same density. The principle advantage is that the combination of the anti-copy and luminescent feature strongly enhances its secure effect in documents. There is no necessity of two kinds of inks and any specially designed equipment to produce security documents with microstructural lines involving luminescence.

  19. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Erwin, David N.; Kiel, Johnathan L.; Batishko, Charles R.; Stahl, Kurt A.

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  20. Silk macromolecules with amino acid-poly(ethylene glycol) grafts for controlling layer-by-layer encapsulation and aggregation of recombinant bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Drachuk, Irina; Calabrese, Rossella; Harbaugh, Svetlana; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Kaplan, David L; Stone, Morley; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2015-02-24

    This study introduces double-brush designs of functionalized silk polyelectrolytes based upon regenerated silk fibroin (SF), which is modified with poly-L-lysine (SF-PLL), poly-L-glutamic acid (SF-PGA), and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains with different grafting architecture and variable amino acid-PEG graft composition for cell encapsulation. The molecular weight of poly amino acids (length of side chains), molecular weight and degree of PEG grafting (D) were varied in order to assess the formation of cytocompatible and robust layer-by-layer (LbL) shells on two types of bacterial cells (Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria). We observed that shells assembled with charged polycationic amino acids adversely effected the properties of microbial cells while promoting the formation of large cell aggregates. In contrast, hydrogen-bonded shells with high PEG grafting density were the most cytocompatible, while promoting formation of stable colloidal suspensions of individual cell encapsulates. The stability to degradation of silk shells (under standard cell incubation procedure) was related to the intrinsic properties of thermodynamic bonding forces, with shells based on electrostatic interactions having stronger resistance to deterioration compared to pure hydrogen-bonded silk shells. By optimizing the charge density of silk polyelectrolytes brushes, as well as the length and the degree of PEG side grafts, robust and cytocompatible cell coatings were engineered that can control aggregation of cells for biosensor devices and other potential biomedical applications.

  1. A unique DNA repair and recombination gene (recN) sequence for identification and intraspecific molecular typing of bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and its comparative analysis with ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Aundy; Prameela, Thekkan Puthiyaveedu; Suseelabhai, Rajamma

    2013-06-01

    Ribosomal gene sequences are a popular choice for identification of bacterial species and, often, for making phylogenetic interpretations. Although very popular, the sequences of 16S rDNA and 16-23S intergenic sequences often fail to differentiate closely related species of bacteria. The availability of complete genome sequences of bacteria, in the recent years, has accelerated the search for new genome targets for phylogenetic interpretations. The recently published full genome data of nine strains of R. solanacearum, which causes bacterial wilt of crop plants, has provided enormous genomic choices for phylogenetic analysis in this globally important plant pathogen. We have compared a gene candidate recN, which codes for DNA repair and recombination function, with 16S rDNA/16-23S intergenic ribosomal gene sequences for identification and intraspecific phylogenetic interpretations in R. solanacearum. recN gene sequence analysis of R. solanacearum revealed subgroups within phylotypes (or newly proposed species within plant pathogenic genus, Ralstonia), indicating its usefulness for intraspecific genotyping. The taxonomic discriminatory power of recN gene sequence was found to be superior to ribosomal DNA sequences. In all, the recN-sequence-based phylogenetic tree generated with the Bayesian model depicted 21 haplotypes against 15 and 13 haplotypes obtained with 16S rDNA and 16-23S rDNA intergenic sequences, respectively. Besides this, we have observed high percentage of polymorphic sites (S 23.04%), high rate of mutations (Eta 276) and high codon bias index (CBI 0.60), which makes the recN an ideal gene candidate for intraspecific molecular typing of this important plant pathogen.

  2. An Introduction to Luminescence in Inorganic Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, John A.

    1980-01-01

    Introduces luminescence by characterizing phosphors, describing phosphor phenomena, presenting a configurational coordinate model of characteristic luminescence, and describing some commercial applications of phosphors. (CS)

  3. An Introduction to Luminescence in Inorganic Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, John A.

    1980-01-01

    Introduces luminescence by characterizing phosphors, describing phosphor phenomena, presenting a configurational coordinate model of characteristic luminescence, and describing some commercial applications of phosphors. (CS)

  4. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  5. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  6. Interactions between bicarbonate, potassium, and magnesium, and sulfur-dependent induction of luminescence in Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Yosuke; Era, Mariko; Ogawa, Akane; Morita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    In spite of its central importance in research efforts, the relationship between seawater compounds and bacterial luminescence has not previously been investigated in detail. Thus, in this study, we investigated the effect of cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH(4) (+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) and anions (Cl(-) , HCO(3) (-) , CO(3) (2-) , and NO(3) (-) ) on the induction of both inorganic (sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate) and organic (L-cysteine and L-cystine) sulfur-dependent luminescence in Vibrio fischeri. We found that HCO(3) (-) (bicarbonate) and CO(3) (2-) (carbonate), in the form of various compounds, had a stimulatory effect on sulfur-dependent luminescence. The luminescence induced by bicarbonate was further promoted by the addition of magnesium. Potassium also increased sulfur-dependent luminescence when sulfate or thiosulfate was supplied as the sole sulfur source, but not when sulfite, L-cysteine, or L-cystine was supplied. The positive effect of potassium was accelerated by the addition of magnesium and/or calcium. Furthermore, the additional supply of magnesium improved the induction of sulfite- or L-cysteine-dependent luminescence, but not the l-cystine-dependent type. These results suggest that sulfur-dependent luminescence of V. fischeri under nutrient-starved conditions is mainly controlled by bicarbonate, carbonate, and potassium. In addition, our results indicate that an additional supply of magnesium is effective for increasing V. fischeri luminescence.

  7. Asp-to-Asn substitution at the first position of the DxD TOPRIM motif of recombinant bacterial topoisomerase I is extremely lethal to E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bokun; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Sorokin, Elena; Abrenica, Maria; Aedo, Sandra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2009-01-16

    The TOPRIM domain found in many nucleotidyl transferases contains a DxD motif involved in magnesium ion coordination for catalysis. Medium- to high-copy-number plasmid clones of Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I (YpTOP) with Asp-to-Asn substitution at the first aspartate residue (D117N) of this motif could not be generated in Escherichia coli without second-site mutation even when expression was under the control of the tightly regulated BAD promoter and suppressed by 2% glucose in the medium. Arabinose induction of a single-copy YpTOP-D117N mutant gene integrated into the chromosome resulted in approximately 10(5)-fold of cell killing in 2.5 h. Attempt to induce expression of the corresponding E. coli topoisomerase I mutant (EcTOP-D111N) encoded on a high-copy-number plasmid resulted in either loss of viability or reversion of the clone to wild type. High-copy-number plasmid clones of YpTOP-D119N and EcTOP-D113N with the Asn substitution at the second Asp of the TOPRIM motif could be stably maintained, but overexpression also decreased cell viability significantly. The Asp-to-Asn substitutions at these TOPRIM residues can selectively decrease Mg(2+) binding affinity with minimal disruption of the active-site geometry, leading to trapping of the covalent complex with cleaved DNA and causing bacterial cell death. The extreme sensitivity of the first TOPRIM position suggested that this might be a useful site for binding of small molecules that could act as topoisomerase poisons.

  8. Improved NADPH Regeneration for Fungal Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase by Co-Expressing Bacterial Glucose Dehydrogenase in Resting-Cell Biotransformation of Recombinant Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyunwoo; Durairaj, Pradeepraj; Lee, Dowoo; Ahsan, Md Murshidul; Yun, Hyungdon

    2016-12-28

    Fungal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes catalyze versatile monooxygenase reactions and play a major role in fungal adaptations owing to their essential roles in the production avoid metabolites critical for pathogenesis, detoxification of xenobiotics, and exploitation avoid substrates. Although fungal CYP-dependent biotransformation for the selective oxidation avoid organic compounds in yeast system is advantageous, it often suffers from a shortage avoid intracellular NADPH. In this study, we aimed to investigate the use of bacterial glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) for the intracellular electron regeneration of fungal CYP monooxygenase in a yeast reconstituted system. The benzoate hydroxylase FoCYP53A19 and its homologous redox partner FoCPR from Fusarium oxysporum were co-expressed with the BsGDH from Bacillus subtilis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterologous expression and biotransformations. We attempted to optimize several bottlenecks concerning the efficiency of fungal CYP-mediated whole-cell-biotransformation to enhance the conversion. The catalytic performance of the intracellular NADPH regeneration system facilitated the hydroxylation of benzoic acid to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid with high conversion in the resting-cell reaction. The FoCYP53A19+FoCPR+BsGDH reconstituted system produced 0.47 mM 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (94% conversion) in the resting-cell biotransformations performed in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) containing 0.5 mM benzoic acid and 0.25% glucose for 24 h at 30°C. The "coupled-enzyme" system can certainly improve the overall performance of NADPH-dependent whole-cell biotransformations in a yeast system.

  9. Oligo Recombination in Gram Negative Bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Homologous recombination is important for bacterial survival because it simultaneously provides genomic stability as well as genomic plasticity. Of the mechanistic pathways for homologous recombination, those mediated by RecA are the most thoroughly characterized and are understood to be structural...

  10. Oligonucleotide recombination in gram negative bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This report describes several key aspects of a novel form of RecA-independent homologous recombination. We found that synthetic single stranded DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced into bacteria by transformation can site-specifically recombine with bacterial chromosomes in the absence of any a...

  11. The nature of unusual luminescence in natural calcite, CaCO3

    SciTech Connect

    Gaft, M.; Nagli, L.; Panczer, G.; Waychunas, G.; Porat, N.

    2008-11-01

    The unusual luminescence of particular varieties of natural pink calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) samples was studied by laser-induced time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy at different temperatures. The luminescence is characterized by intense blue emission under short-wave UV lamp excitation with an extremely long decay time, accompanied by pink-orange luminescence under long wave UV excitation. Our investigation included optical absorption, natural thermostimulated luminescence (NTL) and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) studies. Two luminescence centers were detected: a narrow violet band, with {lambda}{sub max} = 412 nm, {Delta} = 45 nm, two decay components of {tau}{sub 1} = 5 ns and {tau}{sub 2} = 7.2 ms, accompanied by very long afterglow, and an orange emission band with {lambda}{sub max} = 595 nm, {Delta} = 90 nm and {tau} = 5 ns. Both luminescence centers are thermally unstable with the blue emission disappearing after heating at 500 C, and the orange emission disappearing after heating at different temperatures starting from 230 C, although sometimes it is stable up to 500 C in different samples. Both centers have spectral-kinetic properties very unusual for mineral luminescence, which in combination with extremely low impurity concentrations, prevent their identification with specific impurity related emission. The most likely explanation of these observations may be the presence of radiation-induced luminescence centers. The long violet afterglow is evidently connected with trapped charge carrier liberation, with their subsequent migration through the valence band and ultimate recombination with a radiation-induced center responsible for the unusual violet luminescence.

  12. Recombineering: genetic engineering in bacteria using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Lynn C; Sawitzke, James A; Li, Xintian; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2014-04-14

    The bacterial chromosome and bacterial plasmids can be engineered in vivo by homologous recombination using PCR products and synthetic oligonucleotides as substrates. This is possible because bacteriophage-encoded recombination proteins efficiently recombine sequences with homologies as short as 35 to 50 bases. Recombineering allows DNA sequences to be inserted or deleted without regard to location of restriction sites. This unit first describes preparation of electrocompetent cells expressing the recombineering functions and their transformation with dsDNA or ssDNA. It then presents support protocols that describe several two-step selection/counter-selection methods of making genetic alterations without leaving any unwanted changes in the targeted DNA, and a method for retrieving onto a plasmid a genetic marker (cloning by retrieval) from the Escherichia coli chromosome or a co-electroporated DNA fragment. Additional protocols describe methods to screen for unselected mutations, removal of the defective prophage from recombineering strains, and other useful techniques. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Recombinant expression in moderate halophiles.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Masao; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Hiroko

    2010-04-01

    A novel expression of recombinant proteins was developed using moderate halophiles that accumulate osmolytes and hence provide cytoplasmic environments where osmolyte-driven folding can take place. Promoters and selection marker were developed for high expression of foreign proteins. Examples are given for expression of bacterial nucleoside diphosphate kinase and human serine racemase.

  14. Luminescence nanocrystals for solar cell enhancement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Man; Chen, Wei; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2010-03-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) prepared by wet-chemical routes have been proposed as an attractive candidate for fabrication of the third-generation thin-film solar cells due to their quantum confinement effects and excellent dispersion ability in polymer films. However, to date, a solar cell incorporating semiconductor NCs in the photoactive layer still has rather low efficiency due to the low carrier mobility of the non-continued NC phase and the possible radiative recombination in NCs. To avoid these disadvantages, NCs have been proposed and applied as a luminescent species in a passive photon converting layer to modify the solar spectrum before the light enters the photovoltaic device. Photon conversion processes, including up-conversion, down-conversion, and down-shifting, have been observed in various colloidal NC samples and have great potential to enhance photovoltaic performance when applied to the existing single-junction solar cells or narrow-band molecular-based devices.

  15. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  16. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N [Berkeley, CA; Corneillie, Todd M [Campbell, CA; Xu, Jide [Berkeley, CA

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  17. Self-trapped exciton and core-valence luminescence in BaF{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Vistovskyy, V. V. Zhyshkovych, A. V.; Chornodolskyy, Ya. M.; Voloshinovskii, A. S.; Myagkota, O. S.; Gloskovskii, A.; Gektin, A. V.; Vasil'ev, A. N.; Rodnyi, P. A.

    2013-11-21

    The influence of the BaF{sub 2} nanoparticle size on the intensity of the self-trapped exciton luminescence and the radiative core-valence transitions is studied by the luminescence spectroscopy methods using synchrotron radiation. The decrease of the self-trapped exciton emission intensity at energies of exciting photons in the range of optical exciton creation (hν ≤ E{sub g}) is less sensitive to the reduction of the nanoparticle sizes than in the case of band-to-band excitation, where excitons are formed by the recombination way. The intensity of the core-valence luminescence shows considerably weaker dependence on the nanoparticle sizes in comparison with the intensity of self-trapped exciton luminescence. The revealed regularities are explained by considering the relationship between nanoparticle size and photoelectron or photohole thermalization length as well as the size of electronic excitations.

  18. Are luminescent bacteria suitable for online detection and monitoring of toxic compounds in drinking water and its sources?

    PubMed

    Woutersen, Marjolijn; Belkin, Shimshon; Brouwer, Bram; van Wezel, Annemarie P; Heringa, Minne B

    2011-05-01

    Biosensors based on luminescent bacteria may be valuable tools to monitor the chemical quality and safety of surface and drinking water. In this review, an overview is presented of the recombinant strains available that harbour the bacterial luciferase genes luxCDABE, and which may be used in an online biosensor for water quality monitoring. Many bacterial strains have been described for the detection of a broad range of toxicity parameters, including DNA damage, protein damage, membrane damage, oxidative stress, organic pollutants, and heavy metals. Most lux strains have sensitivities with detection limits ranging from milligrams per litre to micrograms per litre, usually with higher sensitivities in compound-specific strains. Although the sensitivity of lux strains can be enhanced by various molecular manipulations, most reported detection thresholds are still too high to detect levels of individual contaminants as they occur nowadays in European drinking waters. However, lux strains sensing specific toxic effects have the advantage of being able to respond to mixtures of contaminants inducing the same effect, and thus could be used as a sensor for the sum effect, including the effect of compounds that are as yet not identified by chemical analysis. An evaluation of the suitability of lux strains for monitoring surface and drinking water is therefore provided.

  19. Enhanced radiation detectors using luminescent materials

    DOEpatents

    Vardeny, Zeev V.; Jeglinski, Stefan A.; Lane, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    A radiation detecting device comprising a radiation sensing element, and a layer of luminescent material to expand the range of wavelengths over which the sensing element can efficiently detect radiation. The luminescent material being selected to absorb radiation at selected wavelengths, causing the luminescent material to luminesce, and the luminescent radiation being detected by the sensing element. Radiation sensing elements include photodiodes (singly and in arrays), CCD arrays, IR detectors and photomultiplier tubes. Luminescent materials include polymers, oligomers, copolymers and porphyrines, Luminescent layers include thin films, thicker layers, and liquid polymers.

  20. Bacteriophage recombination systems and biotechnical applications.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Nafiseh; Slavcev, Roderick

    2014-04-01

    Bacteriophage recombination systems have been widely used in biotechnology for modifying prokaryotic species, for creating transgenic animals and plants, and more recently, for human cell gene manipulation. In contrast to homologous recombination, which benefits from the endogenous recombination machinery of the cell, site-specific recombination requires an exogenous source of recombinase in mammalian cells. The mechanism of bacteriophage evolution and their coexistence with bacterial cells has become a point of interest ever since bacterial viruses' life cycles were first explored. Phage recombinases have already been exploited as valuable genetic tools and new phage enzymes, and their potential application to genetic engineering and genome manipulation, vectorology, and generation of new transgene delivery vectors, and cell therapy are attractive areas of research that continue to be investigated. The significance and role of phage recombination systems in biotechnology is reviewed in this paper, with specific focus on homologous and site-specific recombination conferred by the coli phages, λ, and N15, the integrase from the Streptomyces phage, ΦC31, the recombination system of phage P1, and the recently characterized recombination functions of Yersinia phage, PY54. Key steps of the molecular mechanisms involving phage recombination functions and their application to molecular engineering, our novel exploitations of the PY54-derived recombination system, and its application to the development of new DNA vectors are discussed.

  1. The mechanism of electronic excitation in the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtseva, E. V.; Kudryasheva, N. S.

    2007-01-01

    The current state of the problem of formation of the electron-excited product in the chemiluminescent reaction that underlies the bacterial luminescence is analysed. Various schemes of chemical transformations capable of producing a bacterial bioluminescence emitter are presented. The problem of excitation of secondary emitters is considered; two possible mechanisms of their excitation are analysed.

  2. Persistent luminescence nanothermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Rodríguez, Emma; López-Peña, Gabriel; Montes, Eduardo; Lifante, Ginés; García Solé, José; Jaque, Daniel; Diaz-Torres, Luis Armando; Salas, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    Persistent phosphorescence nanoparticles emitting in the red and near-infrared spectral regions are strongly demanded as contrast nanoprobes for autofluorescence free bioimaging and biosensing. In this work, we have developed Sr4Al14O25:Eu2+, Cr3+, Nd3+ nanopowders that produce persistent red phosphorescence peaking at 694 nm generated by Cr3+ ions. This emission displays temperature sensitivity in the physiological temperature range (20-60 °C), which makes these nanoparticles potentially useful as fluorescence (contactless) nanothermometers operating without requiring optical excitation. Nd3+ ions, which act as shallow electron traps for the red Cr3+ persistent emission, also display infrared emission bands, extending the fluorescence imaging capability to the second biological window. This unique combination of properties makes these nanoparticles multifunctional luminescent probes with great potential applications in nanomedicine.

  3. Luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, J. S. T.; Vallini, F.; Montoya, S. A.; Ferrari, L.; Shahin, S.; Riley, C. T.; Kanté, B.; Fullerton, E. E.; Liu, Z.; Fainman, Y.

    2017-01-01

    When engineered on scales much smaller than the operating wavelength, metal-semiconductor nanostructures exhibit properties unobtainable in nature. Namely, a uniaxial optical metamaterial described by a hyperbolic dispersion relation can simultaneously behave as a reflective metal and an absorptive or emissive semiconductor for electromagnetic waves with orthogonal linear polarization states. Using an unconventional multilayer architecture, we demonstrate luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces, wherein distributed semiconducting quantum wells display extreme absorption and emission polarization anisotropy. Through normally incident micro-photoluminescence measurements, we observe absorption anisotropies greater than a factor of 10 and degree-of-linear polarization of emission >0.9. We observe the modification of emission spectra and, by incorporating wavelength-scale gratings, show a controlled reduction of polarization anisotropy. We verify hyperbolic dispersion with numerical simulations that model the metasurface as a composite nanoscale structure and according to the effective medium approximation. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate >350% emission intensity enhancement relative to the bare semiconducting quantum wells.

  4. Luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, J. S. T.; Vallini, F.; Montoya, S. A.; Ferrari, L.; Shahin, S.; Riley, C. T.; Kanté, B.; Fullerton, E. E.; Liu, Z.; Fainman, Y.

    2017-01-01

    When engineered on scales much smaller than the operating wavelength, metal-semiconductor nanostructures exhibit properties unobtainable in nature. Namely, a uniaxial optical metamaterial described by a hyperbolic dispersion relation can simultaneously behave as a reflective metal and an absorptive or emissive semiconductor for electromagnetic waves with orthogonal linear polarization states. Using an unconventional multilayer architecture, we demonstrate luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces, wherein distributed semiconducting quantum wells display extreme absorption and emission polarization anisotropy. Through normally incident micro-photoluminescence measurements, we observe absorption anisotropies greater than a factor of 10 and degree-of-linear polarization of emission >0.9. We observe the modification of emission spectra and, by incorporating wavelength-scale gratings, show a controlled reduction of polarization anisotropy. We verify hyperbolic dispersion with numerical simulations that model the metasurface as a composite nanoscale structure and according to the effective medium approximation. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate >350% emission intensity enhancement relative to the bare semiconducting quantum wells. PMID:28067219

  5. Luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Smalley, J S T; Vallini, F; Montoya, S A; Ferrari, L; Shahin, S; Riley, C T; Kanté, B; Fullerton, E E; Liu, Z; Fainman, Y

    2017-01-09

    When engineered on scales much smaller than the operating wavelength, metal-semiconductor nanostructures exhibit properties unobtainable in nature. Namely, a uniaxial optical metamaterial described by a hyperbolic dispersion relation can simultaneously behave as a reflective metal and an absorptive or emissive semiconductor for electromagnetic waves with orthogonal linear polarization states. Using an unconventional multilayer architecture, we demonstrate luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces, wherein distributed semiconducting quantum wells display extreme absorption and emission polarization anisotropy. Through normally incident micro-photoluminescence measurements, we observe absorption anisotropies greater than a factor of 10 and degree-of-linear polarization of emission >0.9. We observe the modification of emission spectra and, by incorporating wavelength-scale gratings, show a controlled reduction of polarization anisotropy. We verify hyperbolic dispersion with numerical simulations that model the metasurface as a composite nanoscale structure and according to the effective medium approximation. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate >350% emission intensity enhancement relative to the bare semiconducting quantum wells.

  6. Recombinant allergens

    PubMed Central

    Jutel, Marek; Solarewicz-Madejek, Katarzyna; Smolinska, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only known causative treatment of allergic diseases. Recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies arose from a strong need to both to improve safety and enhance efficacy of SIT. In addition, new vaccines can be effective in allergies including food allergy or atopic dermatitis, which poorly respond to the current treatment with allergen extracts. A number of successful clinical studies with both wild-type and hypoallergenic derivatives of recombinant allergens vaccines have been reported for the last decade. They showed high efficacy and safety profile as well as very strong modulation of T and B cell responses to specific allergens. PMID:23095874

  7. Lanthanide-based luminescence biolabelling.

    PubMed

    Sy, Mohamadou; Nonat, Aline; Hildebrandt, Niko; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2016-04-14

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes display unrivalled spectroscopic properties, which place them in a special category in the luminescent toolbox. Their long-lived line-like emission spectra are the cornerstones of numerous analytical applications ranging from ultrasensitive homogeneous fluoroimmunoassays to the study of molecular interactions in living cells with multiplexed microscopy. However, achieving such minor miracles is a result of years of synthetic efforts and spectroscopic studies to understand and gather all the necessary requirements for the labels to be efficient. This feature article intends to survey these criteria and to discuss some of the most important examples reported in the literature, before explaining in detail some of the applications of luminescent lanthanide labels to bioanalysis and luminescence microscopy. Finally, the emphasis will be put on some recent applications that hold great potential for future biosensing.

  8. Luminescent solar concentrators: Semiconductor solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debije, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Reabsorption losses have long been holding back the commercial viability of luminescent solar concentrators. Now, non-toxic silicon-based quantum dots with enhanced Stokes shift may enable the technology to enjoy practical implementation.

  9. Detrimental nonlocality in luminescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluska, Mariusz; Czerwinski, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    Luminescence studies are used to investigate the local properties of various light-emitting materials. A critical issue of these studies is presented that the signals often lack all advantages of luminescence-studies of high locality, and may originate from an extended spatial region of even a few millimeters in size or the whole sample, i.e., places other than intended for investigation. This is a key problem for research and development in photonics. Due to this nonlocality, information indicating defects, irregularities, nonuniformities and inhomogeneities is lost. The issue refers to typical structures with a strong built-in electric field. Such fields exist intentionally in most photonic structures and occur unintentionally in many other materials investigated by applied physics. We reveal [using test samples prepared with focused ion beam (FIB) on an AlGaAs/GaAs laser heterostructure with an InGaAs quantum well (QW)] that nonlocality increases at low temperatures. This is contrary to the widely expected outcome, as low-temperature luminescence measurements are usually assumed to be free from disturbances. We explain many effects observed due to nonlocality in luminescence studies and prove that separation of the investigated area by focused ion beam milling is a practical solution enabling truly local luminescence measurements. All conclusions drawn using the example of cathodoluminescence are useful for other luminescence techniques.

  10. Magnetic field effects on the solute luminescence of alkane solutions irradiated with heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    LaVerne, J.A.; Brocklehurst, B.

    1996-02-01

    The effects of track structure on the luminescence decays in cyclohexane and in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isoocatane) solutions of 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) have been determined in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field. Irradiations were performed with protons of 1-15 MeV and with helium ions of 2-20 MeV energy. Companion studies were performed with {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y {Beta}-radiolysis. The magnetic field effect is due to the hyperfine interaction of nuclear spins in the geminate pair of solvent radical ions produced. In both solvents, the effect of the magnetic field on luminescence decreases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET) from about 40% for {Beta}-particles to only a few percent with helium ions. Magnetic field effects with protons decrease in time whereas they are constant with {Beta}-particles. This result is attributed to the overlap of initially isolated spurs during the evolution of the proton track; the probability of nongeminate recombination increases with the number of neighboring ion pairs. The total luminescence intensity per incident particle remains constant with proton energy but increases slightly with increasing helium ion energy. At a given particle energy, the intensity is greater in cyclohexane than in isoocatane. The pulse shapes of the luminescence decays reflect the distributions in ion recombination times, and very little variation in luminescence decay rates is observed with increasing LET. 37 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  12. Recombinant gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Lathi, R B; Milki, A A

    2001-10-01

    Recombinant DNA technology makes it possible to produce large amounts of human gene products for pharmacologic applications, supplanting the need for human tissues. The genes for the alpha and beta subunits of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) have been characterized and cloned. Recombinant FSH (rFSH) has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of fertility disorders. In comparison with the urinary gonadotropin products, human menopausal gonadotropins (HMG), and urinary follitropins (uFSH), rFSH is more potent and better tolerated by patients. Recombinant HCG appears to be as efficacious as urinary HCG with the benefit of improved local tolerance. Recombinant LH (rLH) is likely to be recommended as a supplement to rFSH for ovulation induction in hypogonadotropic women. It may also benefit in vitro fertilization patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with rFSH combined with pituitary suppression, with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or antagonist.

  13. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  14. Time-resolved spectroscopy of intrinsic luminescence of Y 3Ga 5O 12 and (LaLu) 3Lu 2Ga 3O 12 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorenko, Yu.; Zorenko, T.; Vistovskyy, V.; Grinberg, M.; Łukasiewicz, T.

    2009-10-01

    The nature of intrinsic luminescence of Y 3Ga 5O 12 (YGG) and (LaLu) 3Lu 2Ga 3O 12 (LLGG) single crystals grown from a melt was determined. In the case of a YGG single crystal containing Y Ga antisite defects with a concentration of 0.25-0.275 at.% the intrinsic luminescence was considered as a superposition of luminescence of self-trapped excitons (STE), luminescence of excitons localized near antisite defects (LE(AD) centers) and luminescence caused by a recombination of an electron with a hole captured at Y Ga antisite defects. Due to a large (2-3%) concentration of Lu La antisite defects in LLGG single crystals the intrinsic luminescence was a superposition mainly of the LE(AD) center emission and the recombination luminescence of Lu La antisite defects. The energy structure of the mentioned centers in YGG and LGGG hosts was determined from the excitation spectra of their luminescence under excitation by synchrotron radiation in the range of the fundamental absorption edge of these garnets.

  15. Rapid homogeneous immunoassay for cardiac troponin I using switchable lanthanide luminescence.

    PubMed

    Päkkilä, Henna; Malmi, Eeva; Lahtinen, Satu; Soukka, Tero

    2014-12-15

    Homogeneous assays are advantageous because of their simplicity and rapid kinetics but typically their performance is severely compromised compared to heterogeneous assay formats. Here, we report a homogeneous immunoassay utilizing switchable lanthanide luminescence for detection and site-specifically labeled recombinant antibody fragments as binders to improve the assay performance. Switchable lanthanide luminescence enabled elimination of assay background due to division of the luminescent lanthanide chelate into two non-luminescent label moieties. Simultaneous biomolecular recognition of model analyte cardiac troponin I by two antibody fragments brought the label moieties together and resulted in self-assembly of luminescent mixed chelate complex. The assay was very rapid as maximal signal-to-background ratios were achieved already after 6 min of incubation. Additionally, the limit of detection was 0.38 ng/mL (16 pM), which was comparable to the limit of detection for the heterogeneous reference assay based on the same binders (0.26 ng/mL or 11 pM). This is the first study to apply switchable lanthanide luminescence in immunoassays and demonstrates the versatile potential of the technology for rapid and sensitive homogeneous assays.

  16. A Novel Universal Detection Agent for Time-Gated Luminescence Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Sayyadi, Nima; Care, Andrew; Connally, Russell E.; Try, Andrew C.; Bergquist, Peter L.; Sunna, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent lanthanide chelates have been used to label antibodies in time-gated luminescence (TGL) bioimaging. However, it is a challenging task to label directly an antibody with lanthanide-binding ligands and achieve control of the target ligand/protein ratios whilst ensuring that affinity and avidity of the antibody remain uncompromised. We report the development of a new indirect detection reagent to label antibodies with detectable luminescence that circumvents this problem by labelling available lysine residues in the linker portion of the recombinant fusion protein Linker-Protein G (LPG). Succinimide-activated lanthanide chelating ligands were attached to lysine residues in LPG and Protein G (without Linker) and the resulting Luminescence-Activating (LA-) conjugates were compared for total incorporation and conjugation efficiency. A higher and more efficient incorporation of ligands at three different molar ratios was observed for LPG and this effect was attributed to the presence of eight readily available lysine residues in the linker region of LPG. These Luminescence-Activating (LA-) complexes were subsequently shown to impart luminescence (upon formation of europium(III) complexes) to cell-specific antibodies within seconds and without the need for any complicated bioconjugation procedures. The potential of this technology was demonstrated by direct labelling of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in TGL bioimaging. PMID:27282464

  17. Theoretical model for thermally stimulated luminescence, conductivity and exoelectronic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guissi, S.; Bindi, R.; Iacconi, P.; Jeambrun, D.; Lapraz, D.

    1998-01-01

    A theoretical model which takes into account thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL), conductivity (TSC) and exoelectronic emission (TSEE) is proposed in this article. The model is established for the case of a single type of electron trap, a single type of recombination centre and in the presence of thermally disconnected traps. It generalizes the model of Lewandowski and McKeever by taking the TSEE phenomenon into consideration. TSEE is described as resulting from the thermionic effect and so the model applies only to a thin solid film about 10 nm thick. As an application example, the influence of various parameters involved in the model on peak shape and position is investigated.

  18. Enhancement of Luminescence of Colloidal Ag2S Quantum Dots by Thionine Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, O. V.; Grevtseva, I. G.; Kondratenko, T. S.; Smirnov, M. S.; Evtukhova, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Enhancement of IR luminescence (1205 nm) of colloidal Ag2S quantum dots (QDs) with an average size of 2.5 ± 0.3 nm was detected upon excitation in the absorption band of thionine dye molecules (530-610 nm). It is found that the observed effect occurs during a hybrid association of Ag2S QDs with monomers of the cationic thionine (Th + ) molecule. It is concluded that the photosensitization of IR luminescence of colloidal Ag2S QDs is realized due to a resonance nonradiative transfer of electronic excitation energy directly to the centers of radiative recombination from the excited Th + molecules.

  19. A recombinant single-chain human class II MHC molecule (HLA-DR1) as a covalently linked heterotrimer of alpha chain, beta chain, and antigenic peptide, with immunogenicity in vitro and reduced affinity for bacterial superantigens.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Bavari, S; Ulrich, R; Sadegh-Nasseri, S; Ferrone, S; McHugh, L; Mage, M

    1997-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules bind to numerous peptides and display these on the cell surface for T cell recognition. In a given immune response, receptors on T cells recognize antigenic peptides that are a minor population of MHC class II-bound peptides. To control which peptides are presented to T cells, it may be desirable to use recombinant MHC molecules with covalently bound antigenic peptides. To study T cell responses to such homogeneous peptide-MHC complexes, we engineered an HLA-DR1 cDNA coding for influenza hemagglutinin, influenza matrix, or HIV p24 gag peptides covalently attached via a peptide spacer to the N terminus of the DR1 beta chain. Co-transfection with DR alpha cDNA into mouse L cells resulted in surface expression of HLA-DR1 molecules that reacted with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for correctly folded HLA-DR epitopes. This suggested that the spacer and peptide did not alter expression or folding of the molecule. We then engineered an additional peptide spacer between the C terminus of a truncated beta chain (without transmembrane or cytoplasmic domains) and the N terminus of full-length DR alpha chain. Transfection of this cDNA into mouse L cells resulted in surface expression of the entire covalently linked heterotrimer of peptide, beta chain, and alpha chain with the expected molecular mass of approximately 66 kDa. These single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules reacted with mAb specific for correctly folded HLA-DR epitopes, and identified one mAb with [MHC + peptide] specificity. Affinity-purified soluble secreted single-chain molecules with truncated alpha chain moved in electrophoresis as compact class II MHC dimers. Cell surface two-chain or single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules with a covalent HA peptide stimulated HLA-DR1-restricted HA-specific T cells. They were immunogenic in vitro for peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The two-chain and single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules with covalent HA peptide had reduced binding

  20. Utilizing Nanofabrication to Construct Strong, Luminescent Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Huang, Gang; Lu, Hong B.; McCready, David E.; Joly, Alan G.; Bovin, Jan-Olov

    2006-05-28

    Luminescent materials have been utilized widely in applications from lighting to sensing. The new development of technologies based on luminescence properties requires the materials to have high luminescence efficiency and mechanical strength. In this article, we report the fabrication of luminescent materials possessing high mechanical strength by nanofabrication with polyvinyl alcohol used as a stabilizer or coupling agent. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission microscope observations reveal that the nanocomposite sample contains ZnS and ZnO nanoparticles as well as kozoite and sodium nitrate. The mechanical strength and hardness of these nanocomposite materials are higher than polycarbonate and some carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites. Strong luminescence is observed in the new nanocomposites and the luminescence intensity does not degrade following up to 30 minutes of X-ray irradiation. Our results indicate that nanofabrication may provide a good method to improve the mechanical strength of luminescent materials for some applications in which high strength luminescent materials are needed.

  1. Turning on the Light: Lessons from Luminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Patricia B.; Engelson, Carol; St. Peter, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Some of the processes by which light is emitted without a simultaneous change in temperature are discussed and is classified as luminescence or cold light. Luminescent processes include triboluminescence, fluorescence, phosphorescence, chemiluminescence, and bioluminescence.

  2. Turning on the Light: Lessons from Luminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Patricia B.; Engelson, Carol; St. Peter, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Some of the processes by which light is emitted without a simultaneous change in temperature are discussed and is classified as luminescence or cold light. Luminescent processes include triboluminescence, fluorescence, phosphorescence, chemiluminescence, and bioluminescence.

  3. Luminescent Solar Concentrator Daylighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, Jonathan G.

    1984-11-01

    Various systems that offer potential solutions to the problem of interior daylighting have been discussed in the literature. Virtually all of these systems rely on some method of tracking the sun along its azimuth and elevation, i.e., direct imaging of the solar disk. A simpler approach, however, involves a nontracking nonimaging device that effectively eliminates moving parts and accepts both the diffuse and direct components of solar radiation. Such an approach is based on a system that combines in a common luminaire the light emitted by luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), of the three primary colors, with a highly efficient artificial point source (HID metal halide) that automatically compensates for fluctuations in the LSC array via a daylight sensor and dimming ballast. A preliminary analysis suggests that this system could supply 90% of the lighting requirement, over the course of an 8 hour day, strictly from the daylight component under typical insolation con-ditions in the Southwest United States. In office buildings alone, the total aggregate energy savings may approach a half a quad annually. This indicates a very good potential for the realization of substantial savings in building electric energy consumption.

  4. Method of measuring luminescence of a material

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Steven D.

    2015-12-15

    A method of measuring luminescence of a material is disclosed. The method includes applying a light source to excite an exposed material. The method also includes amplifying an emission signal of the material. The method further includes measuring a luminescent emission at a fixed time window of about 10 picoseconds to about 10 nanoseconds. The luminescence may be radio photoluminescence (RPL) or optically stimulated luminescence (OSL).

  5. Specificity of aequorin luminescence to calcium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimomura, O.; Johnson, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    The presence of Pb(++), Co(++), Cu(++), and Cd(++), each of which possesses a certain luminescence-triggering activity of aequorin, potentially interferes with the specificity of the aequorin luminescence response to Ca(++). Interference by the above cations can be eliminated, without influencing the sensitivity of the luminescence of aequorin to Ca(++), by adding 1 mM of sodium diethyldithiocarbamate.

  6. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-10-25

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

  7. Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.; Fecht, B.A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of the MEASUREMENT OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  8. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishko, C. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Fecht, B. A.

    The goal of the Measurement of Chemiluminescence project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  9. Multi-junction-solar-cell designs and characterizations based on detailed-balance principle and luminescence yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Hidefumi; Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Kim, Changsu; Chen, Shaoqiang; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-03-01

    We developed a straightforward method based on detailed balance relations to analyze individual subcells in multi-junction solar cells via measuring absolute electroluminescence quantum yields. This method was applied to characterization of a InGaP/GaAs/Ge 3-junction solar cell for satellite use. In addition to subcell I-V characteristics and internal luminescence yields, we derived balance sheets of energy and carriers, which revealed respective subcell contributions of radiative and nonradiative recombination losses, junction loss, and luminescence coupling. These results provide important diagnosis and feedback to fabrications. We calculated conversion-efficiency limit and optimized bandgap energy in 2-, 3-, and 4-junction tandem solar cells, including finite values of sub-cell internal luminescence quantum yields to account for realistic material qualities in sub-cells. With reference to the measured internal luminescence quantum yields, the theoretical results provide realistic targets of efficiency limits and improved design principles of practical tandem solar cells.

  10. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: a matrix including lanthanide ions is provided on the surface containing the bacterial spores; functionalized aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores on the surface; a complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is formed on the surface; the complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence of the complex on the surface; and the bacterial spores exhibiting the luminescence of the complex on the surface are detected and quantified.

  11. An Overview of Genetic Mechanisms in the Bacterial Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Judith; Baumberg, Simon

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the genetic elements found in the bacterial cell which play a role in recombining DNA sequences. Provides a core structure to which the mechanisms occurring in and between bacterial cells can be related. Discusses the practicalities of recombinant DNA techniques. (Author/CW)

  12. An Overview of Genetic Mechanisms in the Bacterial Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Judith; Baumberg, Simon

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the genetic elements found in the bacterial cell which play a role in recombining DNA sequences. Provides a core structure to which the mechanisms occurring in and between bacterial cells can be related. Discusses the practicalities of recombinant DNA techniques. (Author/CW)

  13. Defect luminescence in films containing Ge and GeO{sub 2} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, M.; Atherton, S.J.; Fauchet, P.M.

    1997-07-01

    Amorphous SiO{sub x} alloys containing Ge or GeO{sub 2} nanocrystals are produced by dc-magnetron sputtering and controlled crystallization. The samples are investigated by Raman scattering, transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence and excitation spectroscopy. Under UV excitation, both types of films luminesce around 3.1 eV, with identical PL line shapes and subnanosecond PL dynamics. The strongest PL intensity is found for the films containing FeO{sub 2} crystals and for the largest nanocrystals. These results are a clear indication that although the blue luminescence is without a doubt correlated with the formation of Ge (or GeO{sub 2}) nanocrystals, it is not produced by the radiative recombination of excitons confined in the nanocrystals. Possible mechanisms for the luminescence are discussed, including defects at the nanocrystal/matric interface or in the matrix itself.

  14. Mechanically driven luminescence in a ZnS:Cu-PDMS composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Kee-Sun; Timilsina, Suman; Singh, Satendra Pal; Choi, Taekjib; Kim, Ji Sik

    2016-10-01

    The conventional mechanoluminescence (ML) mechanism of phosphors such as SrAl2O4:Eu and ZnS:Mn is known to utilize carrier trapping at shallow traps followed by stress (or strain)-induced detrapping, which leads to activator recombination in association with local piezoelectric fields. However, such a conventional ML mechanism was found to be invalid for the ZnS:Cu-embedded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite, due to the absence of luminescence with a rigid matrix and a negligibly small value of the piezoelectric coefficient (d33) of the composite. An alternative mechanism, namely, the triboelectricity-induced luminescence has been proposed for the mechanically driven luminescence of a ZnS:Cu-PDMS composite.

  15. Applications of luminescent systems to infectious disease methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Deming, J. W.; Mcgarry, M. A.; Nibley, D. A.; Okrend, H.; Thomas, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The characterization of a clinical sample by a simple, fast, accurate, automatable analytical measurement is important in the management of infectious disease. Luminescence assays offer methods rich with options for these measurements. The instrumentation is common to each assay, and the investment is reasonable. Three general procedures were developed to varying degrees of completeness which measure bacterial levels by measuring their ATP, FMN and iron porphyrins. Bacteriuria detection and antibiograms can be determined within half a day. The characterization of the sample for its soluble ATP, FMN or prophyrins was also performed.

  16. Unraveling the luminescence signatures of chemical defects in polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lihua; Tran, Huan Doan; Wang, Chenchen; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2015-09-28

    Chemical defects in polyethylene (PE) can deleteriously downgrade its electrical properties and performance. Although these defects usually leave spectroscopic signatures in terms of characteristic luminescence peaks, it is nontrivial to make unambiguous assignments of the peaks to specific defect types. In this work, we go beyond traditional density functional theory calculations to determine intra-defect state transition and charge recombination process derived emission and absorption energies in PE. By calculating the total energy differences of the neutral defect at excited and ground states, the emission energies from intra-defect state transition are obtained, reasonably explaining the photoluminescence peaks in PE. In order to study the luminescence emitted in charge recombination processes, we characterize PE defect levels in terms of thermodynamic and optical charge transition levels that involve total energy calculations of neutral and charged defects. Calculations are performed at several levels of theory including those involving (semi)local and hybrid electron exchange-correlation functionals, and many-body perturbation theory. With these critical elements, the emission energies are computed and further used to clarify and confirm the origins of the observed electroluminescence and thermoluminescence peaks.

  17. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on light emission by various strains of marine luminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Katsev, Andrey M; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Szpilewska, Hanna

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting bacteria are the most abundant and widespread luminescent organisms. Most species of such bacteria live in marine environments. However, until recently, biological role of bacterial luminescence remained unknown. Recent studies indicated that light produced in bacterial cells may stimulate DNA repair. Therefore, it is not surprising that agents that cause DNA damage induce expression of lux genes. Moreover, it was proposed previously that bacterial luciferases may be involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Recently, this hypothesis was confirmed experimentally. Here we investigated effects of hydrogen peroxide on light emission by various strains of luminescent bacteria. We found that luminescence of strains with luciferase of fast kinetics of reaction decreased at considerably lower concentrations of H2O2 than that of strains with luciferase of the slow kinetics. The action (either direct or indirect) of luciferases as anti-oxidants seemed to be independent of activity of catalase, which was found to be different in various strains. Therefore, it seems that luciferases of the slow kinetics are more efficient in detoxification of reactive oxygen species than those of the fast kinetics.

  18. Detection of Metal and Organometallic Compounds with Bioluminescent Bacterial Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Durand, M J; Hua, A; Jouanneau, S; Cregut, M; Thouand, G

    2015-10-17

    Chemical detection of metal and organometallic compounds is very specific and sensitive, but these techniques are time consuming and expensive. Although these techniques provide information about the concentrations of compounds, they fail to inform us about the toxicity of a sample. Because the toxic effects of metals and organometallic compounds are influenced by a multitude of environmental factors, such as pH, the presence of chelating agents, speciation, and organic matter, bioassays have been developed for ecotoxicological studies. Among these bioassays, recombinant luminescent bacteria have been developed over the past 20 years, and many of them are specific for the detection of metals and metalloids. These bioassays are simple to use, are inexpensive, and provide information on the bioavailable fraction of metals and organometals. Thus, they are an essential complementary tool for providing information beyond chemical analysis. In this chapter, we propose to investigate the detection of metals and organometallic compounds with bioluminescent bacterial bioassays and the applications of these bioassays to environmental samples. Graphical Abstract.

  19. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  20. Multicopy Plasmid Modification with Phage λ Red Recombineering

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Lynn C.; Costantino, Nina; Shaw, Dana V.; Court, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering using the bacteriophage λ Red generalized recombination system, was used to create various modifications of a multicopy plasmid derived from pBR322. All genetic modifications possible on the E. coli chromosome and on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are also possible on multicopy plasmids and are obtained with similar frequencies to their chromosomal counterparts, including creation of point mutations (5-10% unselected frequency), deletions and substitutions. Parental and recombinant plasmids are nearly always present as a mixture following recombination, and circular multimeric plasmid molecules are often generated during the recombineering. PMID:17434584

  1. Luminescence dynamics of bound exciton of hydrogen doped ZnO nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Yi, Gyu -Chul; Chon, Bonghwan; ...

    2016-04-11

    In this study, all-optical camera, converting X-rays into visible photons, is a promising strategy for high-performance X-ray imaging detector requiring high detection efficiency and ultrafast detector response time. Zinc oxide is a suitable material for all-optical camera due to its fast radiative recombination lifetime in sub-nanosecond regime and its radiation hardness. ZnO nanostructures have been considered as proper building blocks for ultrafast detectors with spatial resolution in sub-micrometer scale. To achieve remarkable enhancement of luminescence efficiency n-type doping in ZnO has been employed. However, luminescence dynamics of doped ZnO nanostructures have not been thoroughly investigated whereas undoped ZnO nanostructures havemore » been employed to study their luminescence dynamics. Here we report a study of luminescence dynamics of hydrogen doped ZnO nanowires obtained by hydrogen plasma treatment. Hydrogen doping in ZnO nanowires gives rise to significant increase in the near-band-edge emission of ZnO and decrease in averaged photoluminescence lifetime from 300 to 140 ps at 10 K. The effects of hydrogen doping on the luminescent characteristics of ZnO nanowires were changed by hydrogen doping process variables.« less

  2. Luminescence evolution from alumina ceramic surface before flashover under direct and alternating current voltage in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Yi-Bo; Song, Bai-Peng; Mu, Hai-Bao; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Li, Feng; Wang, Meng

    2016-06-01

    The luminescence evolution phenomena from alumina ceramic surface in vacuum under high voltage of direct and alternating current are reported, with the voltage covering a large range from far below to close to the flashover voltage. Its time resolved and spatial distributed behaviors are examined by a photon counting system and an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) together with a digital camera, respectively. The luminescence before flashover exhibits two stages as voltage increasing, i.e., under a relative low voltage (Stage A), the luminescence is ascribed to radiative recombination of hetero-charges injected into the sample surface layer by Schottky effect; under a higher voltage (Stage B), a stable secondary electron emission process, resulting from the Fowler-Nordheim emission at the cathode triple junction (CTJ), is responsible for the luminescence. Spectrum analysis implies that inner secondary electrons within the surface layer of alumina generated during the SSEE process also participate in the luminescence of Stage B. A comprehensive interpretation of the flashover process is formulated, which might promote a better understanding of flashover issue in vacuum.

  3. Radiation-induced luminescence in magnesium aluminate spinel crystals and ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyna, V. T.; Kazarinov, Yu. G.; Kobyakov, V. A.; Reimanis, I. E.

    2006-09-01

    Radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) in spinel crystals and ceramics were investigated to elucidate the radiation-induced electronic processes in single crystals grown by Verneuil and Czochralski methods as well as transparent and translucent ceramics. Both RL and TL spectra demonstrate a UV-band related to electron-hole recombination luminescence at intrinsic defects; green and red luminescence are identified with emission of Mn 2+- and Cr 3+-ions, respectively. The kinetics of growth of different RL luminescence bands depending on dose at the prolonged X-irradiation shows the competitive character of charge and energy transfer between defects and impurity ions. The dependence of RL intensity on the temperature of the sample was measured in the range of 300-750 K and compared with TL for different emission bands. The variety of maxima in the temperature dependence of RL and in the glow curves of TL measured for different luminescence bands in spinels of different origins and crystalline forms is used to show that charge carrier traps and luminescence centers are not isolated defects but are complexes of defects and impurities. The formation, structure and properties of these complexes depend on the processing conditions.

  4. Luminescence evolution from alumina ceramic surface before flashover under direct and alternating current voltage in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Yi-Bo; Song, Bai-Peng; Mu, Hai-Bao E-mail: gjzhang@xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Guan-Jun E-mail: gjzhang@xjtu.edu.cn; Li, Feng; Wang, Meng

    2016-06-15

    The luminescence evolution phenomena from alumina ceramic surface in vacuum under high voltage of direct and alternating current are reported, with the voltage covering a large range from far below to close to the flashover voltage. Its time resolved and spatial distributed behaviors are examined by a photon counting system and an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) together with a digital camera, respectively. The luminescence before flashover exhibits two stages as voltage increasing, i.e., under a relative low voltage (Stage A), the luminescence is ascribed to radiative recombination of hetero-charges injected into the sample surface layer by Schottky effect; under a higher voltage (Stage B), a stable secondary electron emission process, resulting from the Fowler-Nordheim emission at the cathode triple junction (CTJ), is responsible for the luminescence. Spectrum analysis implies that inner secondary electrons within the surface layer of alumina generated during the SSEE process also participate in the luminescence of Stage B. A comprehensive interpretation of the flashover process is formulated, which might promote a better understanding of flashover issue in vacuum.

  5. Origin of green luminescence in hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Čížek, J. Hruška, P.; Melikhova, O.; Procházka, I.; Valenta, J.; Novotný, M.; Bulíř, J.

    2015-06-22

    Combining photoluminescence and positron annihilation studies of hydrothermally grown ZnO crystals with stoichiometry varied by controlled annealing enabled us to clarify the origin of green luminescence. It was found that green luminescence in ZnO has multiple origins and consists of a band at 2.3(1) eV due to recombination of electrons of the conduction band by zinc vacancy acceptors coupled with hydrogen and a band at 2.47(2) eV related to oxygen vacancies. The as-grown ZnO crystals contain zinc vacancies associated with hydrogen and exhibit a green luminescence at 2.3(1) eV. Annealing in Zn vapor removed zinc vacancies and introduced oxygen vacancies. This led to disappearance of the green luminescence band at 2.3(1) eV and appearance of a green emission at higher energy of 2.47(2) eV. Moreover, the color of the crystal was changed from colorless to dark red. In contrast, annealing of the as-grown crystal in Cd vapor did not remove zinc vacancies and did not cause any significant change of green luminescence nor change in coloration.

  6. Luminescence dynamics of bound exciton of hydrogen doped ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jinkyoung; Yi, Gyu -Chul; Chon, Bonghwan; Joo, Taiha; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-04-11

    In this study, all-optical camera, converting X-rays into visible photons, is a promising strategy for high-performance X-ray imaging detector requiring high detection efficiency and ultrafast detector response time. Zinc oxide is a suitable material for all-optical camera due to its fast radiative recombination lifetime in sub-nanosecond regime and its radiation hardness. ZnO nanostructures have been considered as proper building blocks for ultrafast detectors with spatial resolution in sub-micrometer scale. To achieve remarkable enhancement of luminescence efficiency n-type doping in ZnO has been employed. However, luminescence dynamics of doped ZnO nanostructures have not been thoroughly investigated whereas undoped ZnO nanostructures have been employed to study their luminescence dynamics. Here we report a study of luminescence dynamics of hydrogen doped ZnO nanowires obtained by hydrogen plasma treatment. Hydrogen doping in ZnO nanowires gives rise to significant increase in the near-band-edge emission of ZnO and decrease in averaged photoluminescence lifetime from 300 to 140 ps at 10 K. The effects of hydrogen doping on the luminescent characteristics of ZnO nanowires were changed by hydrogen doping process variables.

  7. Effect of ultrasonic treatment on photoelectric and luminescent properties of ZnSe crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zobov, E. M. Zobov, M. E.; Gabibov, F. S.; Kamilov, I. K.; Manyakhin, F. I.; Naimi, E. K.

    2008-03-15

    The results of the effect of ultrasonic treatment of ZnSe crystals on the structure of the energy spectrum of electronic states of centers with deep levels forming photoelectric and luminescent properties of this compound are presented. It is for the first time proved experimentally that the climb of edge dislocations under the effect of ultrasound leads to regrouping and generation of defects forming deep levels, which manifest themselves in phenomena of photosensitivity and radiative recombination.

  8. Rapid screening for soil ecotoxicity with a battery of luminescent bacteria tests.

    PubMed

    Heinlaan, Margit; Kahru, Anne; Kasemets, Kaja; Kurvet, Imbi; Waterlot, Cristophe; Sepp, Kalev; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Douay, Francis

    2007-03-01

    A bacterial test battery, involving i) Microtox, an aquatic test, ii) the Flash assay, a soil-suspension test (with Vibrio fischeri as the test organism), and iii) the Metal Detector assay, a semi-specific aquatic test for heavy metals (with recombinant luminescent Escherichia coli), was used in a combined toxicological and chemical hazard assessment of Estonian soils sampled from a former Soviet military airfield (13 samples) and from traffic-influenced roadsides (5 samples). The soils showed slightly elevated levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), but not of heavy metals. In most of the samples, the levels of TPH did not exceed the Estonian permitted limit values set for residential areas. Toxicity testing was performed on both fresh and dried soils, after aqueous extraction for 1 hour and 24 hours. The toxicity results obtained with the Microtox test did not significantly differ in all of the sample treatment schemes; however, it appeared that the drying and sieving of the soils increased the bioavailability of toxicants, probably due to an enlarged reactive soil surface area. According to chemical analysis of the soils and the data from the Microtox test and the Metal Detector assay (performed on aqueous elutriates of the soils), these soils would not be considered to be hazardous. In contrast, the Flash assay performed on soil-water suspensions of dried soils, showed that most of the soils were toxic and thus probably contained undetermined particle-bound bioavailable toxicants. The photobacterial toxicity test (the Flash assay) can be recommended for the rapid screening of soils, as it is sensitive, cheap and inexpensive, and provides valuable information on particle-bound bioavailable toxicants, useful for complementing a chemical analysis and for assessing the risks originating from polluted soils.

  9. Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Bacterial Vaginosis – CDC Fact Sheet Language: English (US) Españ ...

  10. Dating sediments using luminescence signals

    SciTech Connect

    Wintle, A. )

    1993-05-01

    Before siting a nuclear power station or a nuclear waste repository, it is necessary to establish that the area has been free of earthquake activity for a sufficient period of time. Evidence of past earthquake activity is often provided by faults in surface sediments. Age limits for fault formation can be set by obtaining the depositional ages of the sediment unit in which the fault was formed and the overlying sediment. A useful technique would be one that dating could be applied to the mineral grains that make up the sediments and that would give the time that has passed since the grains were blown or washed into position. Luminescence dating techniques, of which the most well known is thermo-luminescence (TL), provide such information. This approach has been successful in dating movement on the Wasatch Fault in Utah. A combination of TL and radiocarbon dates indicated that three faulting events had occurred within the past 5000 years. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Material for a luminescent solar concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A material for use in a luminescent solar concentrator, formed by ceramitizing the luminescent ion Cr/sup 3 +/ with a transparent ceramic glass containing mullite. The resultant material has tiny Cr/sup 3 +/-bearing crystallites dispersed uniformly through an amorphous glass. The invention combines the high luminescent efficiency of Cr/sup 3 +/ in the crystalline phase with the practical and economical advantages of glass technology.

  12. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  13. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Demas, J.N.; Goodwin, P.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Keller, R.A.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, M.

    1998-11-10

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region. 6 figs.

  14. Thermal History Using Microparticle Trap Luminescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Yukihara, L. G. Jacobsohn, M. W. Blair, and R. Muenchausen. "Feasibility ofUsing Oxyorthosilicates as Optically Stimulated Luminescence Detectors ". Radiat...L. G. Jacobsohn, R. Muenchausen. "Feasibility of using oxyorthosilicates as optically stimulated luminescence radiation detectors ." 7th...International Conference on Luminescent Detectors and Transformers of Ionizing Radiation, LUMDETR-2009, Krakow, Poland, July 12th- 17th (2009). 4. E. G

  15. Diazoluminomelanin: A Synthetic Luminescent Biopolymer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Ob 07 Luminol 3-Amino-L-tyrosine Chemiluminescence 1u14 Melanin 19. ABSTRACT...l. 4- phthalazinedione ( luminol ) that generated sustained high level luminescence under physiologic conditions without the necessity of a catalyst...The denvative was made by a diazotization reaction with luminol and 3-amino-L-tyrosine. The resulting orange-brown anionic polymer has been given the

  16. Luminescent Properties of Semiconductor Electrodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    This zone is treated as being " dead " to luminescence...KEY WORDS (CeniJnwo on severee aide If ,.c.eewy ad Identity by block n0mbor) photoluminescence, electroluminescence, dead -layer model, cadmium...Background 20 B. The Dead -Layer Model 21 C. Applications of the Dead -Layer Model to PEC’s 25 IV. General EL Properties 36 A. Background 36 B. EL From

  17. Development of a luminescent mutagenicity test for high-throughput screening of aquatic samples.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Nick; Lamoree, Marja; Houtman, Corine; de Boer, Jacob; Kool, Jeroen; Hamers, Timo

    2017-09-06

    The Salmonella reversion based Ames test is the most widely used method for mutagenicity testing. For rapid toxicity assessment of e.g. water samples and for effect-directed analysis, however, the Ames test suffers from lack of throughput and is regarded as a laborious, time consuming method. To achieve faster analysis, with increased throughput, a (downscaled) luminescent derivative of the Ames Salmonella/microsome fluctuation test has been developed through expression of the Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase in the Salmonella TA98 and TA100 strains. The applicability of this test is demonstrated by analysis of environmentally relevant compounds, a suspended particulate matter extract and an industrial effluent sample. Use of the luminescent reporter reduced the required detection time from 48 to 28h with a specificity of 84% for responses reported in the literature to a set of 14 mutagens as compared to 72% in the unmodified fluctuation test. Testing of the same compounds in a downscaled luminescent format resulted in an 88% similarity with the response found in the regular luminescent format. The increase in throughput, faster analysis and potential for real-time bacterial quantification that luminescence provides, allows future application in the high-throughput screening of large numbers of samples or sample fractions, as required in effect-directed analysis in order to accelerate the identification of (novel) mutagens. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Biodiversity among luminescent symbionts from squid of the genera Uroteuthis, Loliolus and Euprymna (Mollusca: Cephalopoda).

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Ferreira, R C; Nishiguchi, M K

    2007-10-01

    Luminescent bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae (Bacteria: γ-Proteobacteria) are commonly found in complex, bilobed light organs of sepiolid and loliginid squids. Although morphology of these organs in both families of squid is similar, the species of bacteria that inhabit each host has yet to be verified. We utilized sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA, luciferase α-subunit (luxA) and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapA) genes to determine phylogenetic relationships between 63 strains of Vibrio bacteria, which included representatives from different environments as well as unidentified luminescent isolates from loliginid and sepiolid squid from Thailand. A combined phylogenetic analysis was used including biochemical data such as carbon use, growth and luminescence. Results demonstrated that certain symbiotic Thai isolates found in the same geographic area were included in a clade containing bacterial species phenotypically suitable to colonize light organs. Moreover, multiple strains isolated from a single squid host were identified as more than one bacteria species in our phylogeny. This research presents evidence of species of luminescent bacteria that have not been previously described as symbiotic strains colonizing light organs of Indo-West Pacific loliginid and sepiolid squids, and supports the hypothesis of a non-species-specific association between certain sepiolid and loliginid squids and marine luminescent bacteria.

  19. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  20. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  1. Luminescent detection of hydrazine and hydrazine derivatives

    DOEpatents

    Swager, Timothy M [Newton, MA; Thomas, III, Samuel W.

    2012-04-17

    The present invention generally relates to methods for modulating the optical properties of a luminescent polymer via interaction with a species (e.g., an analyte). In some cases, the present invention provides methods for determination of an analyte by monitoring a change in an optical signal of a luminescent polymer upon exposure to an analyte. Methods of the present invention may be useful for the vapor phase detection of analytes such as explosives and toxins. The present invention also provides methods for increasing the luminescence intensity of a polymer, such as a polymer that has been photobleached, by exposing the luminescent polymer to a species such as a reducing agent.

  2. Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2014-09-23

    An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

  3. Luminescence properties of a Fibonacci photonic quasicrystal.

    PubMed

    Passias, V; Valappil, N V; Shi, Z; Deych, L; Lisyansky, A A; Menon, V M

    2009-04-13

    An active one-dimensional Fibonacci photonic quasi-crystal is realized via spin coating. Luminescence properties of an organic dye embedded in the quasi-crystal are studied experimentally and compared to theoretical simulations. The luminescence occurs via the pseudo-bandedge mode and follows the dispersion properties of the Fibonacci crystal. Time resolved luminescence measurement of the active structure shows faster spontaneous emission rate, indicating the effect of the large photon densities available at the bandedge due to the presence of critically localized states. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations for steady-state luminescence spectra.

  4. Luminescence petrography of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Light-colored metaclastic rock fragments, mainly anorthositic breccias, are dominant in the lithic clasts of rock 14321 and constitute about 25% of the Apollo 14 soils. Concentration of anorthositic breccias is less in the Apollo 15 soils, but is higher in the Front samples. The Rille edge soils are rich in basalt fragments. The Apollo 15 soils are also rich in green glasses. True anorthosites in the Hadley region were found only at the St. George Crater site. Varying degrees of metamorphism were found in the anorthositic fragments, and luminescence zonations give independent evidence of metamorphism. Compositional zoning verifies the interpretation of luminescence. Rock 14321 gives evidence of modest annealing, but the light metaclastic fragments were metamorphosed before incorporation into the rock. Reaction rimming on plagioclase results in mosaicism and preferentially affects grains. The spectral analysis of luminescence in plagioclase shows that a red-infrared emission band is present in a small fraction of plagioclase grains. Samples from trench bottoms and from beneath a large boulder were compared with surface samples. Large variations in soil composition indicate marked layering in the Apollo 15 soils.

  5. Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T.L.; Lee, K.T.

    2009-01-01

    Luminescence is typically described as light emitted by objects at low temperatures, induced by chemical reactions, electrical energy, atomic interactions, or acoustical and mechanical stress. An example is photoluminescence created when photons (electromagnetic radiation) strike a substance and are absorbed, resulting in the emission of a resonant fluorescent or phosphorescent albedo. In planetary science, there exists X-ray fluorescence induced by sunlight absorbed by a regolith a property used to measure some of the chemical composition of the Moon s surface during the Apollo program. However, there exists an equally important phenomenon in planetary science which will be designated here as photon luminescence. It is not conventional photoluminescence because the incoming radiation that strikes the planetary surface is not photons but rather cosmic rays (CRs). Nevertheless, the result is the same: the generation of a photon albedo. In particular, Galactic CRs (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) both induce a photon albedo that radiates from the surface of the Moon. Other particle albedos are generated as well, most of which are hazardous (e.g. neutrons). The photon luminescence or albedo of the lunar surface induced by GCRs and SEPs will be derived here, demonstrating that the Moon literally glows in the dark (when there is no sunlight or Earthshine). This extends earlier work on the same subject [1-4]. A side-by-side comparison of these two albedos and related mitigation measures will also be discussed.

  6. Luminescent barometry in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavandi, Janet; Callis, James; Gouterman, Martin; Khalil, Gamal; Wright, Daniel; Green, Edmond; Burns, David; Mclachlan, Blair

    1990-01-01

    A flexible and relatively inexpensive method and apparatus are described for continuous pressure mapping of aerodynamic surfaces using photoluminescence and imaging techniques. Platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) has a phosphorescence known to be quenched by oxygen. When dissolved in a silicone matrix, PtOEP may be distributed over a surface as a thin, uniform film. When the film is irradiated with ultraviolet light, the luminescence intensity provides a readily detectable, qualitative surface flow visualization. Moreover, since the luminescence intensity is found to be inversely proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen, a quantitative measure of pressure change may be obtained using a silicon target vidicon or a charge-coupled device video sensor to measure intensity. Luminescent images are captured by a commercial frame buffer board. Images taken in wind tunnels during airflow are ratioed to images taken under ambient 'wind-off' conditions. The resulting intensity ratio information is converted to pressure using calibration curves of I0/I vs p/p0, where I0 is the intensity at ambient pressure p0 and I is the intensity at any other pressure p.

  7. Luminescent barometry in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavandi, Janet; Callis, James; Gouterman, Martin; Khalil, Gamal; Wright, Daniel; Green, Edmond; Burns, David; Mclachlan, Blair

    1990-01-01

    A flexible and relatively inexpensive method and apparatus are described for continuous pressure mapping of aerodynamic surfaces using photoluminescence and imaging techniques. Platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) has a phosphorescence known to be quenched by oxygen. When dissolved in a silicone matrix, PtOEP may be distributed over a surface as a thin, uniform film. When the film is irradiated with ultraviolet light, the luminescence intensity provides a readily detectable, qualitative surface flow visualization. Moreover, since the luminescence intensity is found to be inversely proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen, a quantitative measure of pressure change may be obtained using a silicon target vidicon or a charge-coupled device video sensor to measure intensity. Luminescent images are captured by a commercial frame buffer board. Images taken in wind tunnels during airflow are ratioed to images taken under ambient 'wind-off' conditions. The resulting intensity ratio information is converted to pressure using calibration curves of I0/I vs p/p0, where I0 is the intensity at ambient pressure p0 and I is the intensity at any other pressure p.

  8. Luminescent barometry in wind tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavandi, Janet; Callis, James; Gouterman, Martin; Khalil, Gamal; Wright, Daniel; Green, Edmond; Burns, David; McLachlan, Blair

    1990-11-01

    A flexible and relatively inexpensive method and apparatus are described for continuous pressure mapping of aerodynamic surfaces using photoluminescence and imaging techniques. Platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) has a phosphorescence known to be quenched by oxygen. When dissolved in a silicone matrix, PtOEP may be distributed over a surface as a thin, uniform film. When the film is irradiated with ultraviolet light, the luminescence intensity provides a readily detectable, qualitative surface flow visualization. Moreover, since the luminescence intensity is found to be inversely proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen, a quantitative measure of pressure change may be obtained using a silicon target vidicon or a charge-coupled device video sensor to measure intensity. Luminescent images are captured by a commercial frame buffer board. Images taken in wind tunnels during airflow are ratioed to images taken under ambient 'wind-off' conditions. The resulting intensity ratio information is converted to pressure using calibration curves of I0/I vs p/p0, where I0 is the intensity at ambient pressure p0 and I is the intensity at any other pressure p.

  9. Luminescent Organic Semiconducting Langmuir Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Agina, Elena V; Mannanov, Artur A; Sizov, Alexey S; Vechter, Olga; Borshchev, Oleg V; Bakirov, Artem V; Shcherbina, Maxim A; Chvalun, Sergei N; Konstantinov, Vladislav G; Bruevich, Vladimir V; Kozlov, Oleg V; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S; Paraschuk, Dmitry Yu; Ponomarenko, Sergei A

    2017-05-31

    In recent years, monolayer organic field-effect devices such as transistors and sensors have demonstrated their high potential. In contrast, monolayer electroluminescent organic field-effect devices are still in their infancy. One of the key challenges here is to create an organic material that self-organizes in a monolayer and combines efficient charge transport with luminescence. Herein, we report a novel organosilicon derivative of oligothiophene-phenylene dimer D2-Und-PTTP-TMS (D2, tetramethyldisiloxane; Und, undecylenic spacer; P, 1,4-phenylene; T, 2,5-thiophene; TMS, trimethylsilyl) that meets these requirements. The self-assembled Langmuir monolayers of the dimer were investigated by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray reflectometry, and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, and their semiconducting properties were evaluated in organic field-effect transistors. We found that the best uniform, fully covered, highly ordered monolayers were semiconducting. Thus, the ordered two-dimensional (2D) packing of conjugated organic molecules in the semiconducting Langmuir monolayer is compatible with its high-yield luminescence, so that 2D molecular aggregation per se does not preclude highly luminescent properties. Our findings pave the way to the rational design of functional materials for monolayer organic light-emitting transistors and other optoelectronic devices.

  10. Interfering with Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Kerstin; Steinbach, Anke; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the exchange of chemical signals in bacterial populations to adjust the bacterial phenotypes according to the density of bacterial cells. This serves to express phenotypes that are advantageous for the group and ensure bacterial survival. To do so, bacterial cells synthesize autoinducer (AI) molecules, release them to the environment, and take them up. Thereby, the AI concentration reflects the cell density. When the AI concentration exceeds a critical threshold in the cells, the AI may activate the expression of virulence-associated genes or of luminescent proteins. It has been argued that targeting the QS system puts less selective pressure on these pathogens and should avoid the development of resistant bacteria. Therefore, the molecular components of QS systems have been suggested as promising targets for developing new anti-infective compounds. Here, we review the QS systems of selected gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, namely, Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and discuss various antivirulence strategies based on blocking different components of the QS machinery. PMID:26819549

  11. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: bacterial spores are transferred from a place of origin to a test surface, the test surface comprises lanthanide ions. Aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores; a complex of the lanthanide ions and aromatic molecules is formed on the test surface, the complex is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence on the test surface; the luminescence on the test surface is detected and quantified.

  12. Method and Apparatus for Detecting and Quantifying Bacterial Spores on a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: bacterial spores are transferred from a place of origin to a test surface, the test surface comprises lanthanide ions. Aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores; a complex of the lanthanide ions and aromatic molecules is formed on the test surface, the complex is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence on the test surface; the luminescence on the test surface is detected and quantified.

  13. Bacterial phospholipases.

    PubMed

    Titball, R W

    1998-01-01

    context it is worth bearing in mind that eukaryotic phospholipases C, which play key roles in many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, are the subject of intense study by the pharmaceutical industry. Some of the bacterial toxins are potent cytotoxic agents and this has encouraged some workers to explore the possibility that immunotoxins can be developed (Chovnick et al. 1991). Purified recombinant phospholipases C will continue to be used in the study of cell membranes, and the increasing numbers of enzymes with different substrate specificities will enhance their application.

  14. Application of new semisynthetic aequorins with long half-decay time of luminescence to G-protein-coupled receptor assay.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Iimori, Rie; Sahara, Yuiko; Hisada, Sunao; Hosoya, Takamitsu

    2010-12-15

    Aequorin is a Ca(2+)-binding photoprotein and consists of an apoprotein (apoaequorin) and a 2-peroxide of coelenterazine. Eight new coelenterazine analogues modified at the C2-position were synthesized and incorporated into recombinant apoaequorin with O(2) to yield different semisynthetic aequorins. The luminescence properties and the sensitivity to Ca(2+) of these semisynthetic aequorins were characterized. Two semisynthetic aequorins, namely me- and cf3-aequorin, showed a slow decay of the luminescence pattern with less sensitivity to Ca(2+) and were useful for the cell-based G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) reporter assays. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of Bacillus endospores using total luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clint B.; Anderson, John E.; Webb, Stanley R.

    2004-09-01

    Detection and analysis of bacteria from environmental samples (e.g. water, air, and food) are usually accomplished by standard culture techniques or by analyses that target specific DNA sequences, antigens or chemicals. For large cell numbers in aqueous suspensions, an alternative technique that has proven useful is total luminescence spectroscopy (TLS). TLS is the acquisition of fluorescence data that records the unique excitation-emission matrix (EEM) of compound fluorophores. Past work has shown that one type of bacterial endospore, Bacillus megaterium, possessed a distinct EEM pattern useful for differentiating it in complex biological fluids and suspensions. The work described here extends those observations to establish some limits on the sensitivity and specificity of TLS for the detection and analysis of bacterial endospores versus (bacterial) vegetative cells in aqueous culture. Our findings show Bacillus endospores exhibit a dramatic blue shift of 130 nm in excitation and a smaller shift of 50 nm in emission when compared to ancillary endospore and non-endospore forming bacterial cells.

  16. Infrared negative luminescent devices and higher operating temperature detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, G. R.; Gordon, N. T.; Hall, D. J.; Ashby, M. K.; Little, J. C.; Masterton, G.; Hails, J. E.; Giess, J.; Haworth, L.; Emeny, M. T.; Ashley, T.

    2004-01-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a ‘source’ of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for, and non-uniformity correction of, high sensitivity staring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, infrared (IR) detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We present results on negative luminescence in the mid- and long-IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1 cm×1 cm. We also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very high-performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  17. Infrared negative luminescent devices and higher operating temperature detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Geoff R.; Gordon, Neil T.; Hall, David J.; Little, J. Chris; Masterton, G.; Hails, J. E.; Giess, J.; Haworth, L.; Emeny, Martin T.; Ashley, Tim

    2004-02-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a ‘source" of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for and non-uniformity correction of high sensitivity starring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, IR detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We will present results on negative luminescence in the mid and long IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1cm x 1cm. We will also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very higher performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  18. Infrared Negative Luminescent Devices and Higher Operating Temperature Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Tim

    2003-03-01

    Infrared LEDs and negative luminescent devices, where less light is emitted than in equilibrium, have been attracting an increasing amount of interest recently. They have a variety of applications, including as a source' of IR radiation for gas sensing; radiation shielding for and non-uniformity correction of high sensitivity starring infrared detectors; and dynamic infrared scene projection. Similarly, IR detectors are used in arrays for thermal imaging and, discretely, in applications such as gas sensing. Multi-layer heterostructure epitaxy enables the growth of both types of device using designs in which the electronic processes can be precisely controlled and techniques such as carrier exclusion and extraction can be implemented. This enables detectors to be made which offer good performance at higher than normal operating temperatures, and efficient negative luminescent devices to be made which simulate a range of effective temperatures whilst operating uncooled. In both cases, however, additional performance benefits can be achieved by integrating optical concentrators around the diodes to reduce the volume of semiconductor material, and so minimise the thermally activated generation-recombination processes which compete with radiative mechanisms. The integrated concentrators are in the form of Winston cones, which can be formed using an iterative dry etch process involving methane/hydrogen and oxygen. We will present results on negative luminescence in the mid and long IR wavebands, from devices made from indium antimonide and mercury cadmium telluride, where the aim is sizes greater than 1cm x 1cm. We will also discuss progress on, and the potential for, operating temperature and/or sensitivity improvement of detectors, where very high performance imaging is anticipated from systems which require no mechanical cooling.

  19. The origin of white luminescence from silicon oxycarbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Nikas, V.; Gallis, S. Huang, M.; Kaloyeros, A. E.; Nguyen, A. P. D.; Stesmans, A.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2014-02-10

    Silicon oxycarbide (SiC{sub x}O{sub y}) is a promising material for achieving strong room-temperature white luminescence. The present work investigated the mechanisms for light emission in the visible/ultraviolet range (1.5–4.0 eV) from chemical vapor deposited amorphous SiC{sub x}O{sub y} thin films, using a combination of optical characterizations and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. Photoluminescence (PL) and EPR studies of samples, with and without post-deposition passivation in an oxygen and forming gas (H{sub 2} 5 at. % and N{sub 2} 95 at. %) ambient, ruled out typical structural defects in oxides, e.g., Si-related neutral oxygen vacancies or non-bridging oxygen hole centers, as the dominant mechanism for white luminescence from SiC{sub x}O{sub y}. The observed intense white luminescence (red, green, and blue emission) is believed to arise from the generation of photo-carriers by optical absorption through C-Si-O related electronic transitions, and the recombination of such carriers between bands and/or at band tail states. This assertion is based on the realization that the PL intensity dramatically increased at an excitation energy coinciding with the E{sub 04} band gaps of the material, as well as by the observed correlation between the Si-O-C bond density and the PL intensity. An additional mechanism for the existence of a blue component of the white emission is also discussed.

  20. Spectral Characterization of a Novel Luminescent Organogel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waguespack, Yan; White, Shawn R.

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic-based luminescence experiments were designed to expose the students to various concepts of single-triplet excited states, electron spin, vibrational relaxation, fluorescence-phosphorescence lifetimes and quenching. The students were able to learn about luminescence spectra of the gel and have the experience of synthesizing a…

  1. Spectral Characterization of a Novel Luminescent Organogel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waguespack, Yan; White, Shawn R.

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic-based luminescence experiments were designed to expose the students to various concepts of single-triplet excited states, electron spin, vibrational relaxation, fluorescence-phosphorescence lifetimes and quenching. The students were able to learn about luminescence spectra of the gel and have the experience of synthesizing a…

  2. Upconversion luminescence from CdSe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Joly, Alan G; McCready, David E

    2005-06-08

    Efficient upconversion luminescence has been observed from CdSe nanoparticles ranging in size from 2.5 to 6 nm. The upconversion luminescence exhibits a near-quadratic laser power dependence. Emissions from both excitons and trap states are observed in the upconversion and photoluminescence spectra, and in the upconversion luminescence the emission from the trap states is enhanced relative to the trap-state emission in the photoluminescence. The upconversion decay lifetimes are slightly longer than the photoluminescence decay lifetimes. Time-resolved spectral measurements indicate that this is due to the involvement of long decay components from surface or trap states. Both the photoluminescence and upconversion luminescence decrease in intensity with increasing temperature due mainly to thermal quenching. All the observations indicate that trap states work as emitters rather than as intermediate states for upconversion luminescence and that two-photon absorption is the likely excitation mechanism.

  3. Luminescence of thermally altered human skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Krap, Tristan; Nota, Kevin; Wilk, Leah S; van de Goot, Franklin R W; Ruijter, Jan M; Duijst, Wilma; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2017-07-01

    Literature on luminescent properties of thermally altered human remains is scarce and contradictory. Therefore, the luminescence of heated bone was systemically reinvestigated. A heating experiment was conducted on fresh human bone, in two different media, and cremated human remains were recovered from a modern crematory. Luminescence was excited with light sources within the range of 350 to 560 nm. The excitation light was filtered out by using different long pass filters, and the luminescence was analysed by means of a scoring method. The results show that temperature, duration and surrounding medium determine the observed emission intensity and bandwidth. It is concluded that the luminescent characteristic of bone can be useful for identifying thermally altered human remains in a difficult context as well as yield information on the perimortem and postmortem events.

  4. Theoretical study of time-resolved luminescence in semiconductors. III. Trap states in the band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Maiberg, Matthias Hölscher, Torsten; Zahedi-Azad, Setareh; Scheer, Roland

    2015-09-14

    In the third part of this series, we study the influence of trap states in the band gap of semiconductors on the time-resolved luminescence decay (TRL) after a pulsed excitation. The results based on simulations with Synopsys TCAD{sup ®} and analytical approximations are given for p-doped Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} as a working example. We show that a single trap can be mostly described by two parameters which are assigned to minority carrier capture and emission. We analyze their influence on the luminescence decay and study the difference between a single trap and an energetic Gaussian trap distribution. It is found that trap states artificially increase the TRL decay and obscure the recombination dynamics. Thus, there is a demand for experimental methods which can reveal the recombination of minority carriers in a TRL experiment without trapping effect. In this regard, a variation of the device temperature, the excitation frequency, the injection level, as well as a bias illumination may be promising approaches. We study these methods, discuss advantages and disadvantages, and show experimental TRL for prove of concept. At the end, we validate our approach of simulating only band-to-band radiative recombination although photoluminescence spectra often exhibit free-to-bound radiative recombination of charge carriers.

  5. Luminescent gold nanoparticles for bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen

    Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable and diverse material properties hold great potential as contrast agents for better disease management. Over the past decades, luminescent gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with intrinsic emissions ranging from the visible to the near infrared have been synthesized and emerge as a new class of fluorophores for bioimaging. This dissertation aims to fundamentally understand the structure-property relationships in luminescent AuNPs and apply them as contrast agents to address some critical challenges in bioimaging at both the in vitro and in vivo level. In Chapter 2, we described the synthesized ~20 nm polycrystalline AuNPs (pAuNPs), which successfully integrated and enhanced plasmonic and fluorescence properties into a single AuNP through the grain size effect. The combination of these properties in one NP enabled AuNPs to serve as a multimodal contrast agent for in vitro optical microscopic imaging, making it possible to develop correlative microscopic imaging techniques. In Chapters 3-5, we proposed a feasible approach to optimize the in vivo kinetics and clearance profile of nanoprobes for multimodality in vivo bioimaging applications by using straightforward surface chemistry with luminescent AuNPs as a model. Luminescent glutathione-coated AuNPs of ~2 nm were synthesized. Investigation of the biodistribution showed that these glutathione-coated AuNPs (GS-AuNPs) exhibit stealthiness to the reticuloendothelial system (RES) organs and efficient renal clearance, with only 3.7+/-1.9% and 0.3+/-0.1% accumulating in the liver and spleen, and over 65% of the injection dose cleared out via the urine within the first 72 hours. In addition, ~2.5 nm NIR-emitting radioactive glutathione-coated [198Au]AuNPs (GS-[198Au]AuNPs) were synthesized for further evaluation of the pharmacokinetic profile of GS-AuNPs and potential multimodal imaging. The results showed that the GS-[198Au]AuNPs behave like small-molecule contrast agents in

  6. Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Bacterial Vaginosis Page Content Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection in ... in harmful bacteria. The actual organism responsible for vaginosis hasn’t been clearly identified. BV is uncommon ...

  7. Enhanced photocatalytic activity and persistent luminescence in Zn2GeO4:Mn2+ by Eu3+ doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Wang, Yinhai; Li, Lei; Huang, Haiju; Zhao, Hui; Hu, Zhengfa

    2016-09-01

    Zn2GeO4:Mn2+,Eu3+ and Zn2GeO4:Mn2+ powders were synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the structures and morphologies of the synthesized powders, respectively. The photocatalytic properties and long persistent luminescence performance were improved by Eu3+ doping. Thermoluminescent (TL) curves showed that the trap concentration in the material was increased with Eu3+ doping, which formed trap centers in Zn2GeO4:Mn2+. The trap centers can capture the electrons or holes and subsequently increase the separation of photogenerated electrons and holes by suppressing the recombination of captured electrons and holes; thus, resulting in an improved photocatalytic activity and a prolonged persistent luminescence. The present strategy may be used as a general method to improve the photocatalytic activity and persistent luminescence.

  8. Luminescent proteins from Aequorea victoria: applications in drug discovery and in high throughput analysis.

    PubMed

    Deo, S K; Daunert, S

    2001-02-01

    Recent progress in generating a vast number of drug targets through genomics and large compound libraries through combinatorial chemistry have stimulated advancements in drug discovery through the development of new high throughput screening (HTS) methods. Automation and HTS techniques are also highly desired in fields such as clinical diagnostics. Luminescence-based assays have emerged as an alternative to radiolabel-based assays in HTS as they approach the sensitivity of radioactive detection along with ease of operation, which makes them amenable to miniaturization. Luminescent proteins provide the advantage of reduced reagent and operating costs because they can be produced in unlimited amounts through the use of genetic engineering tools. In that regard, the use of two naturally occurring and recombinantly produced luminescent proteins from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, namely, aequorin and the green fluorescent protein (GFP), has attracted attention in a number of analytical applications in diverse research areas. Aequorin is naturally bioluminescent and has therefore, virtually no associated background signal, which allows its detection down to attomole levels. GFP has become the reporter of choice in a variety of applications given that it is an autofluorescent protein that does not require addition of any co-factors for fluorescence emission. Furthermore, the generation of various mutants of GFP with differing luminescent and spectral properties has spurred additional interest in this protein. In this review, we focus on the use of aequorin and GFP in the development of highly sensitive assays that find applications in drug discovery and in high throughput analysis.

  9. Acid synthesis of luminescent amine-functionalized or erbium-doped silica spheres for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Enrichi, Francesco; Trave, Enrico; Bersani, Marco

    2008-03-01

    In this work we discuss and investigate the morphological and optical properties of luminescent silica spheres which can have interesting applications in bioimaging and biosensing. The spheres are synthesized following an acid route by the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylortosilicate (TEOS) and can be functionalized by incorporation of aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) during the synthesis, inducing a significant luminescence that can be attributed to a recombination mechanism from localized organic defects related to -NH(2) groups. It is shown that the acid synthesis route produces very regular spherical particles, but their diameter vary in the range of 200-4,000 nm. The luminescence properties have been investigated and optimized by variation of the annealing temperature for the functionalized spheres, obtaining the most efficient PL emission after a thermal treatment of 1 h at 600 degrees C in air. Moreover, the possibility to introduce rare earths like erbium in the spheres was also studied and the corresponding Er(3) luminescence emission at 1.53 microm is reported in terms of intensity and lifetime, pointing out that erbium can be easily and efficiently incorporated during the acid synthesis giving high PL intensity with a good lifetime of 3.9 ms.

  10. Tobacco Mosaic Virus Infection Results in an Increase in Recombination Frequency and Resistance to Viral, Bacterial, and Fungal Pathogens in the Progeny of Infected Tobacco Plants1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kathiria, Palak; Sidler, Corinne; Golubov, Andrey; Kalischuk, Melanie; Kawchuk, Lawrence M.; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Our previous experiments showed that infection of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) leads to an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). The progeny of infected plants also had an increased rate of rearrangements in resistance gene-like loci. Here, we report that tobacco plants infected with TMV exhibited an increase in HRF in two consecutive generations. Analysis of global genome methylation showed the hypermethylated genome in both generations of plants, whereas analysis of methylation via 5-methyl cytosine antibodies demonstrated both hypomethylation and hypermethylation. Analysis of the response of the progeny of infected plants to TMV, Pseudomonas syringae, or Phytophthora nicotianae revealed a significant delay in symptom development. Infection of these plants with TMV or P. syringae showed higher levels of induction of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1 gene expression and higher levels of callose deposition. Our experiments suggest that viral infection triggers specific changes in progeny that promote higher levels of HRF at the transgene and higher resistance to stress as compared with the progeny of unstressed plants. However, data reported in these studies do not establish evidence of a link between recombination frequency and stress resistance. PMID:20498336

  11. Solid-surface luminescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtubise, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    We have characterized several interactions that are very important in solid-matrix luminescence. With silica gel chromatoplates and filter paper, simple equations were derived for calculating the individual contributions to the percent decrease in luminescence due to either moisture or to a quenching gas. For sodium acetate as a solid matrix and p-aminobenzoate as a model compound, it was concluded that p-aminobenzoate was incorporated into the crystal structure of sodium acetate, and the triplet energy was lost be skeletal vibrations in sodium acetate. Also, with the same system is was shown that p-aminobenzoate did not undergo rotational relaxation, and thus rotational processes did not contribute to the deactivation of the triplet state. Several results were obtained from model compounds adsorbed on filter paper under different temperature and humidity conditions and with a variety of heavy atoms present. Fundamental photophysical equations were used in calculating several basic parameters that revealed information on rate processes and how the absorbed energy was distributed in an adsorbed lumiphor. The most important advancement with filter paper was the development of equations that relate phosphorescence parameters of adsorbed phosphors to the Young's modulus of filter paper. These equations are based on a fundamental theory that relates the hydrogen-bonding network of paper to the modulus of paper.

  12. Uranocircite: luminescence and crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Matkovskiy, A.O.; Sidorenko, G.A.; Tarashchan, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    A study on the determination of the complex structure of the electron-vibration spectra and the elucidation of their relation to crystallochemical factors in uranocircite is presented. The work was performed on samples from zones of a single crystal of the same natural meta-uranocircite, differing in color, and also on other specimens from various Soviet and foreign deposits. Of the 15 meta-uranocircite specimens investigated, in 14 cases the luminescence spectra were homoypic and were a series of equidistant groups of lines of the fine structure; the spectral position of which was practically constant for all the specimens. The degree of hydration was found to have practically no influence on the luminescence of the meta-uranocircite. The investigation supports the supposition that there are marked differences in the structures of minerals of the uran-mica group, although in the authors' opinion, the mechanism itself of multi-center radiation is universal and manifested for all secondary uranium minerals. (JMT)

  13. Engineering nanoparticles to silence bacterial communication.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kristen P; Wang, Lei; Chen, Yung-Pin; Pellechia, Perry J; Benicewicz, Brian C; Decho, Alan W

    2015-01-01

    The alarming spread of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has warranted the study of alternative antimicrobial agents. Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical cell-to-cell communication mechanism utilized by bacteria to coordinate group behaviors and establish infections. QS is integral to bacterial survival, and therefore provides a unique target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, silicon dioxide nanoparticles (Si-NP) were engineered to target the signaling molecules [i.e., acylhomoserine lactones (HSLs)] used for QS in order to halt bacterial communication. Specifically, when Si-NP were surface functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), then added to cultures of bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), whose luminous output depends upon HSL-mediated QS, the cell-to-cell communication was dramatically reduced. Reductions in luminescence were further verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses of luminescence genes. Binding of HSLs to Si-NPs was examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicated that by delivering high concentrations of engineered NPs with associated quenching compounds, the chemical signals were removed from the immediate bacterial environment. In actively-metabolizing cultures, this treatment blocked the ability of bacteria to communicate and regulate QS, effectively silencing and isolating the cells. Si-NPs provide a scaffold and critical stepping-stone for more pointed developments in antimicrobial therapy, especially with regard to QS-a target that will reduce resistance pressures imposed by traditional antibiotics.

  14. Engineering nanoparticles to silence bacterial communication

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kristen P.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Yung-Pin; Pellechia, Perry J.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Decho, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    The alarming spread of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has warranted the study of alternative antimicrobial agents. Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical cell-to-cell communication mechanism utilized by bacteria to coordinate group behaviors and establish infections. QS is integral to bacterial survival, and therefore provides a unique target for antimicrobial therapy. In this study, silicon dioxide nanoparticles (Si-NP) were engineered to target the signaling molecules [i.e., acylhomoserine lactones (HSLs)] used for QS in order to halt bacterial communication. Specifically, when Si-NP were surface functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), then added to cultures of bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), whose luminous output depends upon HSL-mediated QS, the cell-to-cell communication was dramatically reduced. Reductions in luminescence were further verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses of luminescence genes. Binding of HSLs to Si-NPs was examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicated that by delivering high concentrations of engineered NPs with associated quenching compounds, the chemical signals were removed from the immediate bacterial environment. In actively-metabolizing cultures, this treatment blocked the ability of bacteria to communicate and regulate QS, effectively silencing and isolating the cells. Si-NPs provide a scaffold and critical stepping-stone for more pointed developments in antimicrobial therapy, especially with regard to QS—a target that will reduce resistance pressures imposed by traditional antibiotics. PMID:25806030

  15. Luminescent spectroscopy of dry tailings urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyi, Olexander; Bordun, Oleg; Yarynovska, Ivanna

    2006-05-01

    In the work the results of research of luminescent spectrums by photo excitation in the interval of waves lengths 250 - 550 nm and ofluminescent spectrums by the nitric laser (337,1 mn) excitation ofdiy tailings urinaryby the temperature of 300 °K are represented. In the spectral interval of 400 - 800 nm a wide bar of luminescence, intensity of which depends on the type of excitation. was observed. It is set, that presence of salts with oxalate, urate and phosphatic compositions in urine results in the move of maximum of luniinescent spectrums in the long-wave region of spectrum and changes the intensity of luminescence. The possible mechanisms of the observed changes in the spectrums of luminescence of dry urine tailings are examined in the work. The model of recombrnational processes which describe the looked luminescent processes is offered. Possible explanations of the looked features in the spectrums of luminescence combine with luminescence of nanobiological complexes, inorganic salts, urea and natural proteins enter in composition of which.

  16. Development of luminescent bacteria as tracers for geological reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    Bioluminescent cultures were acquired and tested for use as biological tracers for reservoir characterization by small independent oil companies. Initially these bacterial cultures were fastidious to work with, but when we finally determined their critical growth parameters simple test variations were developed that could be routinely accomplished. The intensity of their luminescence is easily distinguished by the human eye and requires no sophisticated technical knowledge or instrumentation. Cultures were received from culture banks and collected from marine environments. In our laboratory they were screened using the criteria of optimum growth and luminescence. Three stock cultures proved to grow profusely even when variations were made in nutrient additions, salts, and temperature. These three selected cultures were not inhibited when introduced to formations and formation waters and were not overgrown by other bacteria. Cultures isolated from the Gulf of Mexico were overgrown by indigenous bacteria and therefore, they were eliminated from further screening and adaption. Experiments were performed according to three major task descriptions: 1. Establish growth and luminescencing limitations of selected bacteria in various media, varying salt concentration and temperature. 2. Adapt cultures to formation waters. 3. Determine transport limitations of bioluminescent bacteria through representative reservoir cores. 19 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  18. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  19. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuto, H. Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.; Musumeci, F.

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  20. Energy conversion modeling of the intrinsic persistent luminescence of solids via energy transfer paths between transition levels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bolong; Sun, Mingzi

    2017-04-05

    An energy conversion model has been established for the intrinsic persistent luminescence in solids related to the native point defect levels, formations, and transitions. In this study, we showed how the recombination of charge carriers between different defect levels along the zero phonon line (ZPL) can lead to energy conversions supporting the intrinsic persistent phosphorescence in solids. This suggests that the key driving force for this optical phenomenon is the pair of electrons hopping between different charged defects with negative-Ueff. Such a negative correlation energy will provide a sustainable energy source for electron-holes to further recombine in a new cycle with a specific quantum yield. This will help us to understand the intrinsic persistent luminescence with respect to native point defect levels as well as the correlations of electronics and energetics.

  1. Subpicosecond luminescence rise time in magnesium codoped GAGG:Ce scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulaitis, G.; Vaitkevičius, A.; Nargelas, S.; Augulis, R.; Gulbinas, V.; Bohacek, P.; Nikl, M.; Borisevich, A.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Auffray, E.

    2017-10-01

    The influence of co-doping of Gd3Al2GA3O12:Ce (GAGG:Ce) scintillator with magnesium on the rise time of luminescence response was studied in two GAGG:Ce crystals grown in nominally identical conditions except of Mg co-doping in one of them. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy and free carrier absorption techniques were exploited. It is evidenced that the Mg co-doping decreases the rise time down to sub-picosecond domain. Meanwhile, the light yield decreases by ∼20%. Thus, the feasibility of exploitation of the fast rise edge in luminescence response for ultrafast timing in scintillation detectors is demonstrated. The role of Mg impurities in facilitating the excitation transfer to radiative recombination centers is discussed.

  2. Experimental setup for camera-based measurements of electrically and optically stimulated luminescence of silicon solar cells and wafers.

    PubMed

    Hinken, David; Schinke, Carsten; Herlufsen, Sandra; Schmidt, Arne; Bothe, Karsten; Brendel, Rolf

    2011-03-01

    We report in detail on the luminescence imaging setup developed within the last years in our laboratory. In this setup, the luminescence emission of silicon solar cells or silicon wafers is analyzed quantitatively. Charge carriers are excited electrically (electroluminescence) using a power supply for carrier injection or optically (photoluminescence) using a laser as illumination source. The luminescence emission arising from the radiative recombination of the stimulated charge carriers is measured spatially resolved using a camera. We give details of the various components including cameras, optical filters for electro- and photo-luminescence, the semiconductor laser and the four-quadrant power supply. We compare a silicon charged-coupled device (CCD) camera with a back-illuminated silicon CCD camera comprising an electron multiplier gain and a complementary metal oxide semiconductor indium gallium arsenide camera. For the detection of the luminescence emission of silicon we analyze the dominant noise sources along with the signal-to-noise ratio of all three cameras at different operation conditions.

  3. Bacterial endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Durand, Marlene L

    2009-07-01

    Endophthalmitis refers to bacterial or fungal infection of the vitreous and/or aqueous humors of the eye. Bacterial endophthalmitis occurs most commonly after eye surgery or penetrating ocular trauma (exogenous endophthalmitis), but may also occur from hematogenous seeding during bacteremia (endogenous endophthalmitis). The presentation is usually acute, with eye pain and decreased vision. In exogenous endophthalmitis, infection is confined to the eye. There is no fever and minimal, if any, peripheral leukocytosis. Treatment includes direct injection of antibiotics into the vitreous, and vitrectomy in more severe cases. Systemic antibiotics are indicated in endogenous endophthalmitis; their role in exogenous endophthalmitis is controversial. Visual outcome depends on the virulence of the bacterial pathogen and the speed with which treatment is given. Acute bacterial endophthalmitis is a medical emergency, because delay in treatment may result in vision loss.

  4. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Ostaszewska-Puchalska, Iwona; Zdrodowska-Stefanow, Bozena; Puciło, Katarzyna

    2004-09-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of the most common lower genital tract infections among women of childbearing age. This paper is a survey of literature data concerning epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria of this clinical syndrome.

  5. Nanocrystals for luminescent solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Liam R; Knowles, Kathryn E; McDowall, Stephen; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-02-11

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) harvest sunlight over large areas and concentrate this energy onto photovoltaics or for other uses by transporting photons through macroscopic waveguides. Although attractive for lowering solar energy costs, LSCs remain severely limited by luminophore reabsorption losses. Here, we report a quantitative comparison of four types of nanocrystal (NC) phosphors recently proposed to minimize reabsorption in large-scale LSCs: two nanocrystal heterostructures and two doped nanocrystals. Experimental and numerical analyses both show that even the small core absorption of the leading NC heterostructures causes major reabsorption losses at relatively short transport lengths. Doped NCs outperform the heterostructures substantially in this critical property. A new LSC phosphor is introduced, nanocrystalline Cd(1-x)Cu(x)Se, that outperforms all other leading NCs by a significant margin in both small- and large-scale LSCs under full-spectrum conditions.

  6. Cell probing by delayed luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, Francesco; Ballerini, Monica; Baroni, Giuliana; Costato, Michele; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Milani, Marziale; Scordino, Agata; Triglia, Antonio

    1999-05-01

    Delayed luminescence (D.L.) is a measure that provides important information on biological systems fields, structures and activities, by counting impinging and emitted photons. Many recent experimental works have shown the existence of a close connection, sometimes analytically expressed between the biological state of the system and D.L. parameters. Our investigations aim to show that D.L. is a workable analytical technique covering a large number of disciplinary fields, from agriculture to pollution control and from medical diagnostics to food quality control. The authors have conducted systematic research about D.L. from unicellular alga Acetabularia acetabulum to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cultures and about more complex systems such as Soya seed (Glycine max, L.) and its dependence on sample preparation, history, intracellular signaling, metabolism and pollutant presence. We will discuss the most relevant results together with theoretical considerations on the basic interaction at work between biological systems and electromagnetic fields.

  7. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  8. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  9. Luminescence spectra of a cholesteric photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolganov, P. V.

    2017-05-01

    The transmission and luminescence spectra of a cholesteric photonic crystal doped with an organic dye are measured. The density of photon states is calculated using the material parameters obtained from the comparison of the experimental and theoretical spectra. The shape of the luminescence spectra is modified with respect to the density of photon states owing to the difference in the structure of the normal modes of the photonic crystal near the short-wavelength and long-wavelength edges of the photonic quasi-band gap upon the "pushing" of the photon states from the gap and to the nonvanishing orientation ordering of the luminescent molecules. The luminescence spectrum calculated taking into account the chiral structure of the photonic crystal agrees with the experimental spectrum.

  10. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  11. Recent developments in luminescent solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sark, W. G. J. H. M.

    2014-10-01

    High efficiency photovoltaic devices combine full solar spectrum absorption and effective generation and collection of charge carriers, while commercial success depends on cost effectiveness in manufacturing. Spectrum modification using down shifting has been demonstrated in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) since the 1970s, as a cheap alternative for standard c-Si technology. LSCs consist of a highly transparent plastic plate, in which luminescent species are dispersed, which absorb incident light and emit light at a red-shifted wavelength, with high quantum efficiency. Material issues have hampered efficiency improvements, in particular re-absorption of light emitted by luminescent species and stability of these species. In this contribution, approaches are reviewed on minimizing re-absorption, which should allow surpassing the 10% luminescent solar concentrator efficiency barrier.

  12. Differential requirements of singleplex and multiplex recombineering of large DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Thimma R; Kelsall, Emma J; Fevat, Léna M S; Munson, Sarah E; Cowley, Shaun M

    2015-01-01

    Recombineering is an in vivo genetic engineering technique involving homologous recombination mediated by phage recombination proteins. The use of recombineering methodology is not limited by size and sequence constraints and therefore has enabled the streamlined construction of bacterial strains and multi-component plasmids. Recombineering applications commonly utilize singleplex strategies and the parameters are extensively tested. However, singleplex recombineering is not suitable for the modification of several loci in genome recoding and strain engineering exercises, which requires a multiplex recombineering design. Defining the main parameters affecting multiplex efficiency especially the insertion of multiple large genes is necessary to enable efficient large-scale modification of the genome. Here, we have tested different recombineering operational parameters of the lambda phage Red recombination system and compared singleplex and multiplex recombineering of large gene sized DNA cassettes. We have found that optimal multiplex recombination required long homology lengths in excess of 120 bp. However, efficient multiplexing was possible with only 60 bp of homology. Multiplex recombination was more limited by lower amounts of DNA than singleplex recombineering and was greatly enhanced by use of phosphorothioate protection of DNA. Exploring the mechanism of multiplexing revealed that efficient recombination required co-selection of an antibiotic marker and the presence of all three Red proteins. Building on these results, we substantially increased multiplex efficiency using an ExoVII deletion strain. Our findings elucidate key differences between singleplex and multiplex recombineering and provide important clues for further improving multiplex recombination efficiency.

  13. Learning about protein solubility from bacterial inclusion bodies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; González-Montalbán, Nuria; García-Fruitós, Elena; Villaverde, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The progressive solving of the conformation of aggregated proteins and the conceptual understanding of the biology of inclusion bodies in recombinant bacteria is providing exciting insights on protein folding and quality. Interestingly, newest data also show an unexpected functional and structural complexity of soluble recombinant protein species and picture the whole bacterial cell factory scenario as more intricate than formerly believed. PMID:19133126

  14. Studying bacterial quorum-sensing at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino Perez, Pablo; Pelakh, Leslie; Young, Jonathan; Johnson, Elaine; Hagen, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    Like many bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri can detect its own population density through a quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The bacterium releases a signal molecule (AI, autoinducer), which accumulates at high population density and triggers a genetic switch. In V.fischeri this leads to bioluminescence. Little is known about how stochastic gene expression affects QS at the level of single cells. We are imaging the luminescence of individual V.fischeri cells in a flow chamber and directly measuring the intercell variability in AI activation of the QS circuit. Our single-cell luminescence experiments allow us to track cells over time and characterize variations in their response to AI levels. We find heterogeneous response to the external signal: at a given AI concentration some cells may be strongly luminescent while others are virtually dark. The analysis of noise in the individual cell response can eventually lead to a better understanding of how cells use QS to gather information about their environment.

  15. Automated Sample Deoxygenation for Improved Luminescence Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-25

    fET-AY4 732 AUTOMATED SAMPLE DEOXYGENATION FOR IMPROVED LUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS U) EMORY UNIV RTLANTA GA DEPT OF CHEMISTRY M E ROLLIE ET AL 25 NOV... Deoxygenation for Improved Luminescence Measurements 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) | ,Rollie, M.E.; Patonay, Gabor; and Warner, Isiah M. A .3a. TYPE OF REPORT...GROUP ISU*GRO P ,,,uminescence Spectroscopy; Fluorescence Analysis,* Room *f Temperature Phosphorescence; Deoxygenation ; Quenching ISTRACT (Continue on

  16. Luminescence conversion of blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlotter, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN/6HSiC chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white emitting LEDs. The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence down-conversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic luminescent dye molecules. A white emitting LED, using an inorganic converter, Y3Al5O12:Ce3+( ), has also been realized.

  17. Persistent luminescence in Ba{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl:Eu{sup 2+},R{sup 3+} (R = Y, La, Ce, Gd, Tb and Lu)

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Guifang; Hu, Yihua Chen, Li; Wang, Xiaojuan; Mu, Zhongfei

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The persistent luminescence in Ba{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl:Eu{sup 2+},R{sup 3+} was reported. • The influences of auxiliary codopants was discussed. • The concentration quenching of persistent luminescence was discussed. - Abstract: We investigated the persistent luminescence in europium-doped barium chloroapatite upon codoping with auxiliary rare earth ions. Luminescence properties of the phosphors, including photoluminescence, luminescence decay, and thermoluminescence are systematically studied. We formulated a model of persistent luminescence on the basis of the experimental results. In our model, some Eu{sup 2+} ions are oxidized to Eu{sup 3+} under short UV excitation, and the released electrons are trapped at the positive defect. The persistent luminescence arises from the recombination of these trapped electrons with the photo-ionized Eu{sup 3+} ions. The influence of auxiliary codopants was discussed in terms of ionic potential and ionic radius. Eventually, the concentration quenching of persistent luminescence was reported and discussed.

  18. Highly sensitive nonlinear luminescent ceramics for volumetric and multilayer data carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Martynovich, E F; Dresvyanskiy, V P; Voitovich, A P; Bagayev, S N

    2015-10-31

    The interaction of optical ceramics based on wide-bandgap crystals with near-IR femtosecond laser radiation is studied experimentally. The formation of luminescent centres in LiF and MgF{sub 2} ceramics under the action of single laser pulses is considered. Two interaction regimes are used. In the regime of low-aperture focusing of laser radiation (800 nm, 30 fs, 0.3 mJ), multiple selffocusing and filamentation in the samples are observed. The luminescent centres are formed in thin channels induced by light filaments. The average effective self-focusing length is ∼100 μm; the formation of luminescent centres begins at this length and ceases at a wavelength of about 380 mm. The luminescent trace (spur) induced by a single laser filament was ∼30 μm long and 1.3 μm in diameter. The second regime of light interaction with the sample was based on high-aperture focusing with a simultaneous decrease in the laser pulse energy. This led to the formation of single pits with a diameter smaller than the optical diffraction limit. The luminescent centres induced by the laser radiation were aggregated colour centres. The mechanism of their creation included the highly-nonlinear generation of electron – hole pairs in the filamentation region, their recombination with the formation of anion excitons and the decay of excitons into Fresnel defects by the Lushchik – Vitol – Hersh – Pooley mechanism, as well as their recharging, migration and aggregation. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-08-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 {+-} 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO{sub 4} at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. Studies on the effect of added LiNO{sub 3} or Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF{sub 6} content of WF{sub 6} gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF{sub 6}.

  20. Recombination Dynamics in Quantum Well Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquet, Julie Elizabeth

    Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence as a function of excitation energy density have been observed in order to study recombination dynamics in GaAs/Al(,x)Ga(,1 -x)As quantum well structures. The study of room temperature photoluminescence from the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) -grown multiple quantum well structure and photoluminescence peak energy as a function of tem- perature shows that room temperature recombination at excitation densities above the low 10('16) cm('-3) level is due to free carriers, not excitons. This is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of impurities in quantum wells; data taken at different emission wave- lengths at low temperatures shows that the impurity-related states at photon energies lower than the free exciton peaks luminesce much more slowly than the free exciton states. Results from a similar structure grown by metal -organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) are explained by saturation of traps. An unusual increase in decay rate observed tens of nanoseconds after excitation is probably due to carriers falling out of the trap states. Since this is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of MOCVD-grown quantum well structures, this unusual behavior may be realted to the MOCVD growth process. Further investigations indi- cate that the traps are not active at low temperatures; they become active at approximately 150 K. The traps are probably associated with the (hetero)interfaces rather than the bulk Al(,x)Ga(,1-x)As material. The 34 K photoluminescence spectrum of this sample revealed a peak shifted down by approximately 36 meV from the main peak. Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence results here show that this peak is not a stimulated phonon emission sideband, but rather is an due to an acceptor impurity, probably carbon. Photo- luminescence for excitation above and below the barrier bandgap shows that carriers are efficiently collected in the wells in both single and multiple

  1. Bacterial rheotaxis.

    PubMed

    Marcos; Fu, Henry C; Powers, Thomas R; Stocker, Roman

    2012-03-27

    The motility of organisms is often directed in response to environmental stimuli. Rheotaxis is the directed movement resulting from fluid velocity gradients, long studied in fish, aquatic invertebrates, and spermatozoa. Using carefully controlled microfluidic flows, we show that rheotaxis also occurs in bacteria. Excellent quantitative agreement between experiments with Bacillus subtilis and a mathematical model reveals that bacterial rheotaxis is a purely physical phenomenon, in contrast to fish rheotaxis but in the same way as sperm rheotaxis. This previously unrecognized bacterial taxis results from a subtle interplay between velocity gradients and the helical shape of flagella, which together generate a torque that alters a bacterium's swimming direction. Because this torque is independent of the presence of a nearby surface, bacterial rheotaxis is not limited to the immediate neighborhood of liquid-solid interfaces, but also takes place in the bulk fluid. We predict that rheotaxis occurs in a wide range of bacterial habitats, from the natural environment to the human body, and can interfere with chemotaxis, suggesting that the fitness benefit conferred by bacterial motility may be sharply reduced in some hydrodynamic conditions.

  2. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Weaver, C H; Mengel, M B

    1988-08-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (nonspecific vaginitis) is a polymicrobial, superficial vaginal infection caused by an increase in anaerobic organisms and a concomitant decrease in lactobacilli. Gardnerella vaginalis, once thought to be the sole etiologic agent, is probably one of several endogenous members of the vaginal flora that overgrow in women with bacterial vaginosis. Whether the growth of anaerobes or a primary decrease in lactobacilli is the initial pathogenic event remains unclear. Epidemiological studies have revealed that current or previous infections caused by Trichomonas organisms, increased sexual activity, and intrauterine device use are risk factors for this condition. Studies have indicated that bacterial vaginosis, previously thought to be a benign illness, is associated with some morbidity in pregnant women. Symptoms remain unreliable in the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. Diagnostic efficacy is best achieved by utilizing clinical signs. Assessment of cure is best accomplished by Gram stain, not clinical criteria. Metronidazole, 500 mg orally for seven days, remains the treatment of choice; however, a 2-g single dose of metronidazole represents a reasonable alternative if cost and compliance issues predominate in a clinical situation. Although a recent study supports the contention that treatment of the male sexual partner of women with bacterial vaginosis is effective, a general recommendation cannot be made with confidence on the issue of sexual partner treatment until other supporting work is done.

  3. Bacterial conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Most cases of conjunctivitis in adults are probably due to viral infection, but children are more likely to develop bacterial conjunctivitis than they are viral forms. The main bacterial pathogens are Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults and children, and Moraxella catarrhalis in children. Contact lens wearers may be more likely to develop gram-negative infections. Bacterial keratitis occurs in up to 30 per 100,000 contact lens wearers. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of empirical treatment in adults and children with suspected bacterial conjunctivitis? What are the effects of treatment in adults and children with bacteriologically confirmed bacterial conjunctivitis? What are the effects of treatment in adults and children with clinically confirmed gonococcal conjunctivitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 44 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: ocular decongestants, oral antibiotics, parenteral antibiotics, saline, topical antibiotics, and warm compresses. PMID:22348418

  4. Bacterial conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Epling, John

    2012-02-20

    Most cases of conjunctivitis in adults are probably due to viral infection, but children are more likely to develop bacterial conjunctivitis than they are viral forms. The main bacterial pathogens are Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults and children, and Moraxella catarrhalis in children. Contact lens wearers may be more likely to develop gram-negative infections. Bacterial keratitis occurs in up to 30 per 100,000 contact lens wearers. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of empirical treatment in adults and children with suspected bacterial conjunctivitis? What are the effects of treatment in adults and children with bacteriologically confirmed bacterial conjunctivitis? What are the effects of treatment in adults and children with clinically confirmed gonococcal conjunctivitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 44 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: ocular decongestants, oral antibiotics, parenteral antibiotics, saline, topical antibiotics, and warm compresses.

  5. Bacterial rheotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Marcos; Fu, Henry C.; Powers, Thomas R.; Stocker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    The motility of organisms is often directed in response to environmental stimuli. Rheotaxis is the directed movement resulting from fluid velocity gradients, long studied in fish, aquatic invertebrates, and spermatozoa. Using carefully controlled microfluidic flows, we show that rheotaxis also occurs in bacteria. Excellent quantitative agreement between experiments with Bacillus subtilis and a mathematical model reveals that bacterial rheotaxis is a purely physical phenomenon, in contrast to fish rheotaxis but in the same way as sperm rheotaxis. This previously unrecognized bacterial taxis results from a subtle interplay between velocity gradients and the helical shape of flagella, which together generate a torque that alters a bacterium's swimming direction. Because this torque is independent of the presence of a nearby surface, bacterial rheotaxis is not limited to the immediate neighborhood of liquid–solid interfaces, but also takes place in the bulk fluid. We predict that rheotaxis occurs in a wide range of bacterial habitats, from the natural environment to the human body, and can interfere with chemotaxis, suggesting that the fitness benefit conferred by bacterial motility may be sharply reduced in some hydrodynamic conditions. PMID:22411815

  6. A biosensor for environmental genotoxin screening based on an SOS lux assay in recombinant Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Ptitsyn, L R; Horneck, G; Komova, O; Kozubek, S; Krasavin, E A; Bonev, M; Rettberg, P

    1997-11-01

    A genetically controlled luminescent bacterial reporter assay, the SOS lux test, was developed for rapid detection of environmental genotoxins. The bioassay is based on the recombinant plasmid pPLS-1, which was constructed as a derivative of pBR322, carrying the promoterless luxCDABFE genes of Photobacterium leiognathi downstream of a truncated cda gene from ColD with a strong SOS promoter. E. coli recA+ strains containing this construction are inducible to high levels of light production in the presence of substances or agents that cause damage to the DNA of the cells. The light signal, reflecting the SOS-inducing potency, is recorded from the growing culture within 1 s, and the test results are available within 1 to 2 h. Induction of bioluminescence was demonstrated by treatment of E. coli C600(pPLS-1) with 6 genotoxic chemicals (mitomycin C, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, nalidixic acid, dimethylsulfate, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde) and with UV and gamma radiation. A clear dose-response relationship was established for all eight genotoxins. The sensitivity of the SOS lux test is similar to that of other bioassays for genotoxicity or mutagenicity, such as the SOS chromotest, umu test, and Ames mutatest. These results indicate that the SOS lux test is potentially useful for the in situ and continuous detection of genotoxins.

  7. A biosensor for environmental genotoxin screening based on an SOS lux assay in recombinant Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ptitsyn, L R; Horneck, G; Komova, O; Kozubek, S; Krasavin, E A; Bonev, M; Rettberg, P

    1997-01-01

    A genetically controlled luminescent bacterial reporter assay, the SOS lux test, was developed for rapid detection of environmental genotoxins. The bioassay is based on the recombinant plasmid pPLS-1, which was constructed as a derivative of pBR322, carrying the promoterless luxCDABFE genes of Photobacterium leiognathi downstream of a truncated cda gene from ColD with a strong SOS promoter. E. coli recA+ strains containing this construction are inducible to high levels of light production in the presence of substances or agents that cause damage to the DNA of the cells. The light signal, reflecting the SOS-inducing potency, is recorded from the growing culture within 1 s, and the test results are available within 1 to 2 h. Induction of bioluminescence was demonstrated by treatment of E. coli C600(pPLS-1) with 6 genotoxic chemicals (mitomycin C, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, nalidixic acid, dimethylsulfate, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde) and with UV and gamma radiation. A clear dose-response relationship was established for all eight genotoxins. The sensitivity of the SOS lux test is similar to that of other bioassays for genotoxicity or mutagenicity, such as the SOS chromotest, umu test, and Ames mutatest. These results indicate that the SOS lux test is potentially useful for the in situ and continuous detection of genotoxins. PMID:9361425

  8. A thermo-responsive supramolecular organogel: dual luminescence properties and luminescence conversion induced by Cd(2+).

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinxian; Zhang, Jinjin; Tang, Ning; Wu, Jincai

    2014-12-14

    A simple dual luminescent acylhydrazone-functionalized benzimidazole derivative (L) was blended with ethylene glycol affording a thermo-responsive green-light-emitting supramolecular gel (G-gel). This G-gel can convert to a blue-light-emitting gel (B-gel) by strongly increasing the luminescence of the benzimidazole moiety upon addition of one equivalent of Cd(2+).

  9. An activatable, polarity dependent, dual-luminescent imaging agent with a long luminescence lifetime.

    PubMed

    Rood, Marcus T M; Oikonomou, Maria; Buckle, Tessa; Raspe, Marcel; Urano, Yasuteru; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2014-09-04

    In this proof-of-concept study, a new activatable imaging agent based on two luminophores and two different quenching mechanisms is reported. Both partial and total activation of the luminescence signal can be achieved, either in solution or in vitro. Bond cleavage makes the compound suitable for luminescence lifetime imaging.

  10. Characterization of the translation products of the major mRNA species from rabbit lactating mammary glands and construction of bacterial recombinants containing casein and alpha-lactalbumin complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Suard, Y M; Tosi, M; Kraehenbuhl, J P

    1982-01-01

    Total cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNA from lactating rabbit mammary glands was analysed on methylmercury hydroxide-agarose gels. The size of the most abundant mRNA species ranged between 0.5 and 5.0 kb (kilobases), with major bands at 0.55, 0.84, 0.92, 1.18 and 2.4 kb and discrete minor bands of 1.5, 1.7, 3.0 and 3.9 kb. Translation in vitro of total mRNA with [3H]leucine or [35S]methionine as precursor yielded four major bands with apparent Mr values of 16 000, 25 000, 26 000 and 29 000. The four protein bands were identified by immunoprecipitation by using specific antisera as alpha-lactalbumin and x-, kappa- and alpha-caseins, respectively. Labelling with (35S]cysteine followed by immunoprecipitation with anti-transferrin or anti-alpha-lactalbumin sera allowed the identification of two whey proteins. Translated transferrin was resolved as an 80 000-dalton band and alpha-lactalbumin appeared as a 16 000-dalton protein. A library of recombinant plasmids containing cDNA (complementary DNA) sequences representing cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNA was used to isolate clones for the major rabbit caseins and alpha-lactalbumin. A preliminary characterization of these cDNA clones was achieved by colony hybridization with enriched RNA fractions as probes. Positive clones were identified by use of hybrid-promoted translation in vitro and immunoprecipitation of the translation products. The corresponding mRNA species were further identified by hybridizing RNA blots with radioactively labelled cDNA clones. We present the restriction map of alpha-casein and kappa-casein cDNA clones. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6123313

  11. Direct facile screening of recombinant DNA vector constructs.

    PubMed

    Winnard, Paul T; Challa, Rushi; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Raman, Venu

    2014-04-01

    Direct efficient facile screening of bacterial transformants with the goal of selecting, retrieving, and using recombinant DNA is exemplified by simple visual-based colorimetric inspections or fluorescent protein-based assays. We describe pRedScript, which introduces the constitutive expression of a very bright red fluorescent protein into transformants. On agar plates, red colonies are simply visualized in ambient white light in stark contrast to recombinant transformants that are white. In addition, the bright red fluorescence of the reporter protein can also be harnessed as a sensitive signal for screening bacterial promoters during the development of optimized fermentation conditions.

  12. Zn vacancy induced green luminescence on non-polar surfaces in ZnO nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, F.; Villani, M.; Catellani, A.; Calzolari, A.; Cicero, G.; Calestani, D.; Calestani, G.; Zappettini, A.; Dierre, B.; Sekiguchi, T.; Salviati, G.

    2014-01-01

    Although generally ascribed to the presence of defects, an ultimate assignment of the different contributions to the emission spectrum in terms of surface states and deep levels in ZnO nanostructures is still lacking. In this work we unambiguously give first evidence that zinc vacancies at the (1010) nonpolar surfaces are responsible for the green luminescence of ZnO nanostructures. The result is obtained by performing an exhaustive comparison between spatially resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and imaging and ab initio simulations. Our findings are crucial to control undesired recombinations in nanostructured devices. PMID:24894901

  13. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  14. Selected topics from classical bacterial genetics.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, Elisabeth A; Elbing, Karen; Brent, Roger

    2002-08-01

    Current cloning technology exploits many facts learned from classical bacterial genetics. This unit covers those that are critical to understanding the techniques described in this book. Topics include antibiotics, the LAC operon, the F factor, nonsense suppressors, genetic markers, genotype and phenotype, DNA restriction, modification and methylation and recombination.

  15. Bacterial Inclusion Bodies: Discovering Their Better Half.

    PubMed

    Rinas, Ursula; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Corchero, José Luis; Vázquez, Esther; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Villaverde, Antonio

    2017-02-26

    Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) are functional, non-toxic amyloids occurring in recombinant bacteria showing analogies with secretory granules of the mammalian endocrine system. The scientific interest in these mesoscale protein aggregates has been historically masked by their status as a hurdle in recombinant protein production. However, progressive understanding of how the cell handles the quality of recombinant polypeptides and the main features of their intriguing molecular organization has stimulated the interest in inclusion bodies and spurred their use in diverse technological fields. The engineering and tailoring of IBs as functional protein particles for materials science and biomedicine is a good example of how formerly undesired bacterial byproducts can be rediscovered as promising functional materials for a broad spectrum of applications.

  16. Bacterial Tracheitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nears (News) Vaccination 101: Make Sure Kids Are Up to Date Additional Content Medical News Bacterial Tracheitis By Rajeev ... News HealthDay Vaccination 101: Make Sure Kids Are Up to Date MONDAY, Aug. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As the ...

  17. Luminescent tetrametallic complexes of ruthenium

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, W.R. Jr.; Brewer, K.J.; Gettliffe, G.; Petersen, J.D. )

    1989-01-11

    Tetrametallic complexes constructed around the metal core Ru(dpp){sub 3}{sup 2+} (where dpp = 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine) have been prepared and characterized. The complexes, which have the general formula Ru((dpp)ML{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup n+}, where ML{sub 2} = Ru{sup II}(bpy){sub 2} (n = 8), Ru{sup II}(phen){sub 2} (n = 8), and Ru{sup II}(tpy)Cl (n = 5) and bpy = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, and tpy = 2,2{prime}:6{prime},2{double prime}-terpyridine, are prepared from the reaction of Ru(dpp){sub 3}{sup 2+} with ML{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} in ethanol/water. The tetrametallic complexes luminesce at room temperature in acetonitrile with emissions characteristic of a single ruthenium center with excited-state lifetimes in the 100-ns range. Electrochemically, the most facile reductions occur at the dpp ligand, and the lower energy oxidation is a single peak associated with the three peripheral ruthenium centers. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Natural competence and recombination in the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Kung, Stephanie H; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2011-08-01

    Homologous recombination is one of many forces contributing to the diversity, adaptation, and emergence of pathogens. For naturally competent bacteria, transformation is one possible route for the acquisition of novel genetic material. This study demonstrates that Xylella fastidiosa, a generalist bacterial plant pathogen responsible for many emerging plant diseases, is naturally competent and able to homologously recombine exogenous DNA into its genome. Several factors that affect transformation and recombination efficiencies, such as nutrient availability, growth stage, and methylation of transforming DNA, were identified. Recombination was observed in at least one out of every 10(6) cells when exogenous plasmid DNA was supplied and one out of every 10(7) cells when different strains were grown together in vitro. Based on previous genomic studies and experimental data presented here, there is mounting evidence that recombination can occur at relatively high rates and could play a large role in shaping the genetic diversity of X. fastidiosa.

  19. Monitoring Temperatures of Tires Using Luminescent Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J

    2006-01-01

    A method of noncontact, optical monitoring of the surface temperature of a tire has been devised to enable the use of local temperature rise as an indication of potential or impending failures. The method involves the use of temperature-sensitive paint (or filler): Temperature-sensitive luminescent dye molecules or other luminescent particles are incorporated into a thin, flexible material coating the tire surface of interest. (Alternatively, in principle, the luminescent material could be incorporated directly into the tire rubber, though this approach has not yet been tested.) The coated surface is illuminated with shorter-wavelength light to excite longer-wavelength luminescence, which is observed by use of a charge-coupled-device camera or a photodetector (see Figure 1). If temporally constant illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the intensity response of the luminescence. If pulsed illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the time or frequency response of the luminescence. If sinusoidally varying illumination is used, then the temperature can be deduced from the known temperature dependence of the phase response of the luminescence. Unlike a prior method of monitoring the temperature at a fixed spot on a tire by use of a thermocouple, this method is not restricted to one spot and can, therefore, yield information on the spatial distribution of temperature: in particular, it enables the discovery of newly forming hot spots where damage may be starting. Also unlike in the thermocouple method, the measurements in this method are not vulnerable to breakage of wires in repeated flexing of the tire. Moreover, unlike in another method in which infrared radiation is monitored as an indication of surface temperature, the luminescence measurements in this method are not significantly affected by changes in infrared emissivity. This method has been

  20. Pixel Bleeding Correction in Laser Scanning Luminescence Imaging Demonstrated Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Yukihara, Eduardo G; Ahmed, Md Foiez

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes and investigates the performance of an algorithm to correct for "pixel bleeding" caused by slow luminescence centers in laser scanning imaging (e.g., X-ray imaging using photostimulable phosphors and 2D dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence). The algorithm is based on a deconvolution procedure that takes into account the lifetime of the slow luminescence center and is further constrained by the detection of fast and slow luminescence centers and combining rows scanned in opposite directions. The algorithm was tested using simulated data and demonstrated experimentally by applying it to image reconstruction of two types of Al2O3 X-ray detector films ( Al2O3:C and Al2O3 :C,Mg), whose use in 2D dosimetry in conjunction with laser-scanning readout has so far been prevented by slow luminescence centers (F-centers, 35 ms lifetime). We show that the algorithm allows the readout of Al2O3 film detectors 300-500 times faster than generally allowed considering the lifetime of the main luminescence centers. By relaxing the stringent requirements on the detector's luminescence lifetime, the algorithm opens the possibility of using new materials in 2D dosimetry as well as other laser scanning applications, such as X-ray imaging using storage phosphors and scanning confocal microscopy, although the effect of the noise introduced must be investigated for each specific application.

  1. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator. Following...

  2. Effect of irradiation and thermal annealing on quartz materials luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovkin, M. V.; Ananyeva, L. G.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray and gamma-quanta irradiation of radiation-resistant quartz materials including natural and synthetic quartz crystals and high-purity quartzite causes the luminescence in the ultraviolet range (365 nm), thermally stimulated luminescence and radiofrequency electromagnetic emission. Preliminary radiation and thermal annealing improves luminescence properties of quartz materials.

  3. Order and disorder around Cr(3+) in chromium doped persistent luminescent AB2O4 spinels.

    PubMed

    Basavaraju, Neelima; Priolkar, Kaustubh R; Gourier, Didier; Bessière, Aurélie; Viana, Bruno

    2015-04-28

    The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy technique is used to better understand the charging and decharging processes of the persistent luminescence in the Cr(3+)doped AB2O4 spinels (A = Zn, Mg and B = Ga and Al) with low photon energy excitation by visible light. Cr K edge XANES spectra have been simulated for different near neighbour environments around the Cr(3+) recombination centres and compared with the experimental curve. In the Cr(3+):ZnGa2O4 compound, the Cr(3+) local structure corresponds mostly to that of a normal spinel (∼70%), while the rest comprises of a distorted octahedral environment arising from cationic site inversion and a contribution from chromium clustering. This local structure is considerably different in Cr(3+):MgGa2O4 and Cr(3+):ZnAl2O4, where, for both cases, chromium clustering represents the main contribution. The strong correlation between the intensity of persistent luminescence and the percentage of Cr in clusters leads us to infer that the presence of Cr clusters is responsible for the decrease of the intensity of the visible light induced persistent luminescence in the Cr(3+) doped AB2O4 spinels.

  4. Synthesis and influence of ultrasonic treatment on luminescence of Mn incorporated ZnS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadis, A.-I.; Muresan, L. E.; Perhaita, I.; Munteanu, V.; Karabulut, Y.; Garcia Guinea, J.; Canimoglu, A.; Ayvacikli, M.; Can, N.

    2017-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) doping of ZnS phosphors was achieved by precipitation method using different ultrasound (US) maturation times. The structural and luminescence properties of the samples were carried out by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence (CL). The real amount of manganese incorporated in ZnS lattice was calculated based on ICP-OES results. According with XRD patterns, the phase structure of ZnS:Mn samples is cubic. EDS spectra reveal deviations of the Mn dopant concentration from the target composition. Both 300 K PL and CL emission spectra of the Mn doped ZnS phosphors display intense orange emission at 590 and 600 nm, respectively, which is characteristic emission of Mn ion corresponding to a 4T1→6A1 transition. Both PL and CL spectra confirmed manganese is substitutionally incorporated into the ZnS host as Mn2+. However, it is suggested that the origin of broad blue emission around 400 nm appeared in CL is due to the radiative recombination at deep level defect states in the ZnS. The ultrasound treatment at first enhances the luminescent intensity by ∼3 times in comparison with samples prepared by classical way. This study gives rise to an optimization guideline, which is extremely demanded for the development of new luminescent materials.

  5. Investigation of InGaN/GaN laser degradation based on luminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Pengyan; Zhang, Shuming Liu, Jianping; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Liqun; Sun, Qian; Tian, Aiqin; Zhou, Kun; Yang, Hui; Zhou, Taofei

    2016-06-07

    Degradation of InGaN/GaN laser diode (LD) is investigated based on the luminescence properties. Gradual degradation of the LD is presented with the threshold current increase and the slope efficiency decrease. The cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence characterizations of the LD show a dislocation independent degradation of the active region under the ridge. Detailed studies on the temperature-dependent micro-photoluminescence and the electroluminescence indicate that the degradation of the LD is attributed to the generation of non-radiative recombination centers in the local multiple quantum well regions with lower indium content. The activation energy of the non-radiative recombination centers is about 10.2 meV.

  6. Luminescence of europium (III) complexes for visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolontaeva, Olga A.; Pozharov, Mikhail V.; Korolovich, Vladimir F.; Khokhlova, Anastasia R.; Kirdyanova, Anna N.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.; Zakharova, Tamara V.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-04-01

    With the purpose to develop bright non-toxic luminescent label for theranostic application we have studied complexation of lanthanide dipicolinates (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylates) by sodium alginate and effect of thermal exposure of synthesized micro-capsules on their luminescent properties. Synthesized micro-capsules are stable in acidic medium but dissolve at pH ~ 4 due to transformation of cationic europium dipicolinate complex to anionic. Luminescence studies have shown that emission spectra of europium(III)-alginate complexes (both chloride and dipicolinate) contain two intensive bands characteristic to Eu3+ ion (5D0 --> 7F1 (590 nm) and 5D0 --> 7F1 (612 nm)). We have also found that at 160ºC europium(III)- alginate micro-capsules decompose to black, soot-like substance, therefore, their thermal treatment must be performed in closed environment (i.e., sealed ampoules).

  7. Cerium luminescence in nd0 perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlur, A. A.; Happek, U.

    2010-05-01

    The luminescence of Ce 3+ in perovskite (ABO 3) hosts with nd0 B-site cations, specifically Ca(Hf,Zr)O 3 and (La,Gd)ScO 3, is investigated in this report. The energy position of the Ce 3+ excitation and emission bands in these perovskites is compared to those of typical Al 3+ perovskites; we find a Ce 3+ 5d 1 centroid shift and Stokes shift that are larger versus the corresponding values for the Al 3+ perovskites. It is also shown that Ce 3+ luminescence quenching is due to Ce 3+ photoionization. The comparison between these perovskites shows reasonable correlations between Ce 3+ luminescence quenching, the energy position of the Ce 3+ 5d 1 excited state with respect to the host conduction band, and the host composition.

  8. [Synthesis of reserve polyhydroxyalkanoates by luminescent bacteria].

    PubMed

    Boiandin, A N; Kalacheva, G S; Rodicheva, E K; Volova, T G

    2008-01-01

    The ability of marine luminescent bacteria to synthesize polyesters of hydroxycarboxylic acids (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA) as reserve macromolecules was studied. Twenty strains from the collection of the luminescent bacteria CCIBSO (WDSM839) of the Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, assigned to different taxa (Photobacterium leiognathi, Ph. phosphoreum, Vibrio harveyi, and V. fischeri) were analyzed. The most productive strains were identified, and the conditions ensuring high polymer yields in batch culture (40-70% of the cell dry mass weight) were determined. The capacity of synthesizing two- and three-component polymers containing hydroxybutyric acid as the main monomer and hydroxyvaleric and hydroxyhexanoic acids was revealed in Ph. leiognathi and V. harveyi strains. The results allow luminescent microorganisms to be regarded as new producers of multicomponent polyhydroxyalkanoates.

  9. Luminescent Mycena: new and noteworthy species.

    PubMed

    Desjardin, Dennis E; Perry, Brian A; Lodge, D Jean; Stevani, Cassius V; Nagasawa, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    Seven species of Mycena are reported as luminescent, representing specimens collected in Belize, Brazil, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Japan (Bonin Islands), Malaysia (Borneo) and Puerto Rico. Four of them represent new species (Mycena luxaeterna, M. luxarboricola, M. luxperpetua, M. silvaelucens) and three represent new reports of luminescence in previously described species (M. aff. abieticola, M. aspratilis, M. margarita). Mycena subepipterygia is synonymized with M. margarita, and M. chlorinosma is proposed as a possible synonym. Comprehensive descriptions, illustrations, photographs and comparisons with phenetically similar species are provided. A redescription of M. chlorophos, based on analyses of type specimens and recently collected topotypical material, is provided. The addition of these seven new or newly reported luminescent species of Mycena brings the total to 71 known bioluminescent species of fungi.

  10. Luminescent aryl-group eleven metal complexes.

    PubMed

    López-de-Luzuriaga, José M; Monge, Miguel; Olmos, M Elena

    2017-02-14

    Among the coinage metal complexes displaying luminescent properties, those bearing C-donor aryl ligands have an increasing part in the chemistry of these metals. These types of ligands confer a high kinetic and thermodynamic stability on the complexes, but they can also be involved in the photoluminescent behaviour of the complexes. The development of new aryl-containing complexes of group eleven metals, the study of their photoluminescent properties and their related properties and applications are discussed in this perspective. Among these, luminescent gold(i) and gold(iii) compounds are being intensively used for the development of new properties with potential applications such as, for instance, electroluminescence, triboluminescence, mechanochromism, aggregated induced emissions, quenching, luminescent liquid crystals, low molecular weight gelators and photocatalysts, among others.

  11. Contact luminescence spectromicroscopic instruments for biomedical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayan, G. V.; Barsky, I. Y.

    2001-07-01

    A number of contact luminescence photometers and spectrophotometers were worked out at SOI for estimation of functional state of living tissues and organs, and the pathological condition of organism in particular. Contact double-wavelength microfluorometers were designed for fluorescence measurements of pyridine nucleotides and flavoproteids. There are two design modifications of the microfluorometers for biopsy diagnostics and for use during the time an operation. Intraoperation luminescence probe makes it possible to evaluate the status of the blood microcirculation in an organ as basic induce of the vitality of tissues and organs during surgical operations. Processing of this instrument is based on luminescence angiography. A fiber-optic medical spectrophotometer is for fluorescence spectra registration of skin local sections in the region 400-800 nm. Some examples of the clinical use of these apparatus are described.

  12. Luminescence and chemical potential of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smestad, Greg P.; Ries, Harald

    1991-12-01

    The transduction and conversion of radiant energy into work in a quantum process are dependant on the luminescent properties of the materials involved. Materials with photoluminescent efficiencies greater than 0.1% are likely candidates for solar cells and solar converters. The luminescent optical properties of a material are directly related to the output device parameters. The chemical potential of the incoming light is a function of the photon energy and incident radiance. The amount of work per particle, or voltage, that can be extracted by a solar converter is related to chemical potential of the excitation, which can be inferred from the photoluminescence efficiency at ambient temperature. A discussion is made as to the use and optical properties of materials such as Si and GaAs, FeS2, and biological and organic dyes as efficient solar quantum converter materials. Proper choice of absorber thickness as to maximize the luminescent output observed is shown to optimize solar converter performance.

  13. Dual Luminescence Imaging for Two Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaue, Hirotaka; Morita, Katsuaki

    2016-11-01

    Dual luminescence imaging gives time-resolved information of fluid dynamic phenomena. It uses two luminescent probes; one is sensitive to the detecting medium and the other as a reference. It is a non-intrusive technique, and both luminescent outputs are captured by a high-speed color camera as color-filtered images. By taking a ratio of the two images at the same time frame, this imaging technique can give time-resolved information. It is suitable for a moving and free surface objects. It is also suitable for a measurement where a target is small to mount a conventional thermocouple and pressure probes. Some of the applications of this imaging are described in the presentation, such as icing and boiling phenomena.

  14. Bacterial cryotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Grant

    2009-03-01

    Electron cryotomography (ECT) is an emerging technique that allows thin samples such as small cells, viruses, or tissue sections to be imaged in 3-D in a near-native, ``frozen-hydrated'' state to molecular (˜4 nm) resolution. Thus ECT fills a critical gap between light microscopy and higher resolution structural techniques like X-ray crystallography and NMR. In a combination of technology development and biological application, during the past few years our lab has been studying bacterial ultrastructure through ECT of intact, plunge-frozen cells. We have now collected over a thousand tomograms of more than ten different species. This work has revealed the surprising complexity of the bacterial cytoskeleton as well as the architectures of several important ``supramolecular'' complexes including the chemoreceptor array, the flagellar motor, and the cell wall peptidoglycan. Example results highlighting both the potential and limitations of this technology will be shown.

  15. Spectral luminescence analysis of amniotic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Kasko, Leonid P.; Mamontova, Marina V.; Chernitsky, Eugene A.

    1997-12-01

    It is shown that the amniotic fluid has intensive ultra-violet luminescence caused by proteins. Along with it amniotic fluid radiated in the field of 380 - 650 nm with maxima at 430 - 450 nm and 520 - 560 nm. The first peak of luminescence ((lambda) exc equals 350 nm; (lambda) em equals 430 - 440 nm) is caused (most probably) by the presence in amniotic fluid of some hormones, NADH2 and NADPH2. A more long-wave component ((lambda) exc equals 460 nm; (lambda) em equals 520 - 560 nm) is most likely connected with the presence in amniotic fluid pigments (bilirubin connected with protein and other). It is shown that intensity and maximum of ultra-violet luminescence spectra of amniotic fluid in normality and at pathology are identical. However both emission spectra and excitation spectra of long-wave ((lambda) greater than 450 nm) luminescence of amniotic fluid from pregnant women with such prenatal abnormal developments of a fetus as anencephaly and spina bifida are too long-wave region in comparison with the norm. Results of research testify that spectral luminescent analysis of amniotic fluid can be used for screening of malformations of the neural tube. It is very difficult for a practical obstetrician to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of the fetus. Apart from ultrasonic examination, cytogenetic examination of amniotic fluid and defumination of concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein and acetylcholin-esterases in the amniotic fluid and blood plasma are the most widely used diagnostic approaches. However, biochemical and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are time-consuming. In the present work spectral luminescence properties of the amniotic fluid are investigated to determine spectral parameters that can be used to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of their offsprings.

  16. Red luminescence of CsI crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Smol`skaya, L.P.; Kolesnikova, T.A.

    1995-12-01

    Emission in the red spectral range with the maximum at 670 nm and two decay components <5 ns and 1 {mu}s is found in the cathodoluminescence of CsI crystals excited by a pulsed electron beam with the 5-ns duration. The short component is assigned to the ultrafast luminescence caused by the transitions within the valence band. It is assumed that the microsecond component of the red luminescence is caused by the radiative exciton annihilation at the unstable defects produced by ionizing radiation. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Simultaneous Luminescence Pressure and Temperature Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A simultaneous luminescence pressure and temperature mapping system is developed including improved dye application techniques for surface temperature and pressure measurements from 5 torr to 1000 torr with possible upgrade to from 0.5 torr to several atmospheres with improved camera resolution. Adsorbed perylene dye on slip-cast silica is pressure (oxygen) sensitive and reusable to relatively high temperatures (-150 C). Adsorbed luminescence has an approximately linear color shift with temperature, which can be used for independent temperature mapping and brightness pressure calibration with temperature.

  18. Simultaneous Luminescence Pressure and Temperature Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simultaneous luminescence pressure and temperature mapping system is developed including improved dye application techniques for surface temperature and pressure measurements from 5 torr to 1000 torr with possible upgrade to from 0.5 torr to several atmospheres with improved camera resolution. Adsorbed perylene dye on slip-cast silica is pressure (oxygen) sensitive and reusable to relatively high temperatures (approximately 150 C). Adsorbed luminescence has an approximately linear color shift with temperature, which can be used for independent temperature mapping and brightness pressure calibration with temperature.

  19. Photoacoustic effect induced by negative luminescence device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, T.; Peura, J.; Matveev, B. A.; Remennyy, M. A.; Stus', N. M.

    2010-07-01

    The cantilever enhanced photoacoustic trace gas detection technique has been combined with mid-infrared light emitting diodes (LEDs) producing significant negative luminescence at a reverse bias. In contrast to normal positive photoacoustic phenomenon the negative luminescence of the LED creates wavelength specific cooling of the gas under study and pressure drop in the photoacoustic sample cell, which can be detected by a cantilever microphone. In experiments a LED operating at 5.5 μm wavelength range was used to detect acetone vapor.

  20. Luminescence Probe Studies of Nafion Polyelectrolytes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-07

    I iD-Ri33 519 LUMINESCENCE PROBE STUDIES OF NRFION FOLYELECTROLYTES i/i (U) TEXAS A AND M UNIV COLLEGE STATION DEPT OF CHEMIISTRY N E PRIETO ET AL...Task No. NR 627-838 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 2 *Luminescence Probe Studi s of Nafion Polyelectrolytes Pby Nelson E. Prieto and Charles R. Martin 41...E. Prieto and Charles R. Martin N00014-82K-0612 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS _%. -PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK AREA & WORKC UNIT

  1. Luminescence of apollo 11 lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Greenman, N N; Gross, H G

    1970-01-30

    Luminescence measurements were made of four lunar rocks, two terrestrial rocks (granite and gabbro), and one terrestrial mineral (willemite) by comparing the spectral curves with the curve of a barium sulfate standard. Efficiencies with 3000 angstrom excitation were < 6 x 10(-5) for the lunar samples, < 8 x 10(-5) for gabbro of very similar composition to the lunar samples, approximately 10(-4) for granite, and approximately 2 X 10(-2) for willemite. If these are typical values for other ultraviolet excitation wavelengths, the Apollo 11 site appears to contribute little to the observed lunar luminescence.

  2. Homologous recombination drives both sequence diversity and gene content variation in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying; Ma, Jennifer H; Warren, Keisha; Tsang, Raymond S W; Low, Donald E; Jamieson, Frances B; Alexander, David C; Hao, Weilong

    2013-01-01

    The study of genetic and phenotypic variation is fundamental for understanding the dynamics of bacterial genome evolution and untangling the evolution and epidemiology of bacterial pathogens. Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is among the most intriguing bacterial pathogens in genomic studies due to its dynamic population structure and complex forms of pathogenicity. Extensive genomic variation within identical clonal complexes (CCs) in Nm has been recently reported and suggested to be the result of homologous recombination, but the extent to which recombination contributes to genomic variation within identical CCs has remained unclear. In this study, we sequenced two Nm strains of identical serogroup (C) and multi-locus sequence type (ST60), and conducted a systematic analysis with an additional 34 Nm genomes. Our results revealed that all gene content variation between the two ST60 genomes was introduced by homologous recombination at the conserved flanking genes, and 94.25% or more of sequence divergence was caused by homologous recombination. Recombination was found in genes associated with virulence factors, antigenic outer membrane proteins, and vaccine targets, suggesting an important role of homologous recombination in rapidly altering the pathogenicity and antigenicity of Nm. Recombination was also evident in genes of the restriction and modification systems, which may undermine barriers to DNA exchange. In conclusion, homologous recombination can drive both gene content variation and sequence divergence in Nm. These findings shed new light on the understanding of the rapid pathoadaptive evolution of Nm and other recombinogenic bacterial pathogens.

  3. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Dick K G; Broer, Dirk J; Debije, Michael G; Keur, Wilco; Meijerink, Andries; Ronda, Cees R; Verbunt, Paul P C

    2012-05-07

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introduce a phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardly any reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator is the large scattering of this material; we discuss possible solutions for this. Furthermore, the use of broad-band cholesteric filters to prevent escape of luminescent radiation from this phosphor is investigated both experimentally and using simulations. Simulations are also used to predict the ultimate performance of luminescent concentrators.

  4. Lanthanide luminescence for functional materials and bio-sciences.

    PubMed

    Eliseeva, Svetlana V; Bünzli, Jean-Claude G

    2010-01-01

    Recent startling interest for lanthanide luminescence is stimulated by the continuously expanding need for luminescent materials meeting the stringent requirements of telecommunication, lighting, electroluminescent devices, (bio-)analytical sensors and bio-imaging set-ups. This critical review describes the latest developments in (i) the sensitization of near-infrared luminescence, (ii) "soft" luminescent materials (liquid crystals, ionic liquids, ionogels), (iii) electroluminescent materials for organic light emitting diodes, with emphasis on white light generation, and (iv) applications in luminescent bio-sensing and bio-imaging based on time-resolved detection and multiphoton excitation (500 references).

  5. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-08-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  6. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials. PMID:27550235

  7. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Colosimo, A M; Anwand, W; Boatner, L A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, T T; Liedke, M O; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F A

    2016-08-23

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  8. Low-temperature luminescence and thermoluminescence from BeO:Zn single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikov, I. N.; Petrenko, M. D.; Ivanov, V. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    Low-temperature luminescence and thermoluminescence (TL) of BeO:Zn single crystals have been studied in the temperature range of 6-380 K and energy ranges of 1.2-6.5 eV (emission spectra) and 3.7-20 eV (luminescence excitation and reflection spectra). The introduction of zinc impurity ions (0.05 at. %) into BeO host lattice leads to the creation of both the trapped electron and hole centers: Zn+ and Zn2+ O-. These two new centers are responsible for two TL glow peaks at 307 and 145 K with activation energies of 0.96 and 0.40 eV, and two emission bands at 6.0 and 1.9-2.6 eV. The first emission band is attributed to radiative annihilation of the Zn-impurity bound excitons, and the second one is associated with the intracenter electronic transitions in the defect complex comprising zinc impurity ion. The 6.0 eV luminescence center can be excited at 9.6 eV, the low-energy tail of the BeO host absorption, but below the first excitonic maximum (10.45 eV). The 1.9-2.6 eV luminescence center can be excited at the BeO optical transparency band. Both emission bands in BeO:Zn appear in the X-ray induced luminescence spectra at T = 6 K. This indicates that not only these luminescence centers are excited during band-to-band transitions, but they participate in recombination processes as well. The low-temperature (T0 = 6 K) TL study of BeO:Zn single crystals was made for the first time. Analysis of the low-temperature TL glow curves allowed us not only to experimentally determine the energy characteristics of the Zn impurity states in BeO:Zn, but reveal an extremely strong influence of the isovalent zinc impurity on fluctuation rearrangement of BeO host lattice. Note, the fluctuation rearrangement of BeO host lattice, which occurs in the temperature range of self-trapped exciton transformation (80-180 K), was previously known only for undoped BeO and BeO crystals with heterovalent impurities [I. N. Ogorodnikov and A. V. Kruzhalov, Proc. SPIE 2967 (1997) 42].

  9. Toxicity on the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri (Beijerinck). I: QSAR equation for narcotics and polar narcotics.

    PubMed

    Vighi, Marco; Migliorati, Sonia; Monti, Gianna Serafina

    2009-01-01

    Toxicity data on chemicals, supposed to have a narcotic or polar narcotic toxicological mode of action, have been produced on the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri using the Microtox test procedure. Advanced statistical methods have been used to calculate statistically sound values for ecotoxicological endpoints. Simple quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) equations were developed for narcotics and polar narcotics. These equations were compared with those proposed by the European Technical Guidance Document on Risk Assessment for other aquatic organisms (algae, Daphnia, and fish). Similarities and differences are discussed. The need for including the bacterial component in the ecotoxicological risk assessment for aquatic ecosystems is highlighted.

  10. Recombination and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Hawkins, Michelle; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The links between recombination and replication have been appreciated for decades and it is now generally accepted that these two fundamental aspects of DNA metabolism are inseparable: Homologous recombination is essential for completion of DNA replication and vice versa. This review focuses on the roles that recombination enzymes play in underpinning genome duplication, aiding replication fork movement in the face of the many replisome barriers that challenge genome stability. These links have many conserved features across all domains of life, reflecting the conserved nature of the substrate for these reactions, DNA. PMID:25341919

  11. Dissociative recombination in aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of dissociative recombination in planetary aeronomy is summarized, and two examples are discussed. The first is the role of dissociative recombination of N2(+) in the escape of nitrogen from Mars. A previous model is updated to reflect new experimental data on the electronic states of N produced in this process. Second, the intensity of the atomic oxygen green line on the nightside of Venus is modeled. Use is made of theoretical rate coefficients for production of O (1S) in dissociative recombination from different vibrational levels of O2(+).

  12. Monitoring of recombinant protein production using bioluminescence in a semiautomated fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Trezzani, I; Nadri, M; Dorel, C; Lejeune, P; Bellalou, J; Lieto, J; Hammouri, H; Longin, R; Dhurjati, P

    2003-01-01

    On-line optimization of fermentation processes can be greatly aided by the availability of information on the physiological state of the cell. The goal of our "BioLux" research project was to design a recombinant cell capable of intracellular monitoring of product synthesis and to use it as part of an automated fermentation system. A recombinant plasmid was constructed containing an inducible promoter that controls the gene coding for a model protein and the genes necessary for bioluminescence. The cells were cultured in microfermenters equipped with an on-line turbidity sensor and a specially designed on-line light sensor capable of continuous measurement of bioluminescence. Initial studies were done under simple culture conditions, and a linear correlation between luminescence and protein production was obtained. Such specially designed recombinant bioluminescent cells can potentially be applied for model-based inference of intracellular product formation, as well as for optimization and control of recombinant fermentation processes.

  13. Fabrication of luminescent porous silicon with stain etches and evidence that luminescence originates in amorphous layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Lin, T. L.; Pike, W. T.; Vasquez, R. P.; Wu, Z.-C.

    1992-01-01

    Simple immersion of Si in stain etches of HF:HNO3:H2O or NaNO2 in aqueous HF was used to produce films exhibiting luminescence in the visible similar to that of anodically-etched porous Si. All of the luminescent samples consist of amorphous porous Si in at least the near surface region. No evidence was found for small crystalline regions within these amorphous layers.

  14. Spectral and luminescent properties of forsterite single crystals heavily doped with chromium: II. Luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V F; Tenyakov, S Yu; Dianov, Evgenii M; Gaister, A V; Zharikov, Evgeny V

    2003-03-31

    The polarised luminescence spectra of forsterite single crystals grown from a melt containing from 0.015 to 0.97 wt% of chromium are studied. Most of the crystals were grown by the Czochralski method under standard oxidation conditions (1.4-2.4 vol% of oxygen). Some crystals were grown in the atmosphere with a higher content of oxygen ({approx}12 vol%) or in the neutral atmosphere (100% of Ar). The luminescence of Cr{sup 4+} ions excited to the {sup 3}T{sub 2} level at 980 nm and to the {sup 3}T{sub 1} level at 632.8 nm exhibited no quenching over the entire range of crystal doping. In crystals absorbing above 70% of laser energy, the self-absorption of luminescence of Cr{sup 4+} ions was observed. The reabsorption of luminescence of Cr{sup 3+}(2) ions located in sites of the forsterite crystal with the mirror symmetry occurs stronger because of a greater overlap of the luminescence band of Cr{sup 3+}(2) ions with the absorption bands of Cr{sup 4+} ions. The luminescence of Cr{sup 4+} ions is found to be polarised predominantly along the b axis for any polarisation of exciting radiation. The broadband luminescence of Cr{sup 3+}(2) ions is polarised predominantly along the c axis for all the crystals studied, irrespective of the polarisation of exciting radiation and the oxygen concentration in the crystal-growth atmosphere. The luminescence of Cr{sup 3+}(2) ions polarised along the c, b, and a axes has maxima at {approx}900, 860, and 850 nm, respectively. (active media)

  15. Detection of bacterial spores with lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes.

    PubMed

    Cable, Morgan L; Kirby, James P; Levine, Dana J; Manary, Micah J; Gray, Harry B; Ponce, Adrian

    2009-07-15

    The detection of bacterial spores via dipicolinate-triggered lanthanide luminescence has been improved in terms of detection limit, stability, and susceptibility to interferents by use of lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes. Specifically, we compared the effectiveness of Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy complexes with the macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetate (DO2A) to the corresponding lanthanide aquo ions. The Ln(DO2A)(+) binary complexes bind dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major constituent of bacterial spores, with greater affinity and demonstrate significant improvement in bacterial spore detection. Of the four luminescent lanthanides studied, the terbium complex exhibits the greatest dipicolinate binding affinity (100-fold greater than Tb(3+) alone, and 10-fold greater than other Ln(DO2A)(+) complexes) and highest quantum yield. Moreover, the inclusion of DO2A extends the pH range over which Tb-DPA coordination is stable, reduces the interference of calcium ions nearly 5-fold, and mitigates phosphate interference 1000-fold compared to free terbium alone. In addition, detection of Bacillus atrophaeus bacterial spores was improved by the use of Tb(DO2A)(+), yielding a 3-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio over Tb(3+). Out of the eight cases investigated, the Tb(DO2A)(+) binary complex is best for the detection of bacterial spores.

  16. Detection of Bacterial Spores with Lanthanide-Macrocycle Binary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Morgan L.; Kirby, James P.; Levine, Dana J.; Manary, Micah J.; Gray, Harry B.; Ponce, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The detection of bacterial spores via dipicolinate-triggered lanthanide luminescence has been improved in terms of detection limit, stability, and susceptibility to interferents by use of lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes. Specifically, we compared the effectiveness of Sm, Eu, Tb and Dy complexes with the macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetate (DO2A) to the corresponding lanthanide aquo ions. The Ln(DO2A)+ binary complexes bind dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major constituent of bacterial spores, with greater affinity and demonstrate significant improvement in bacterial spore detection. Of the four luminescent lanthanides studied, the terbium complex exhibits the greatest dipicolinate binding affinity (100-fold greater than Tb3+ alone, and 10-fold greater than other Ln(DO2A)+ complexes) and highest quantum yield. Moreover, the inclusion of DO2A extends the pH range over which Tb-DPA coordination is stable, reduces the interference of calcium ions nearly 5-fold, and mitigates phosphate interference 1000-fold compared to free terbium alone. In addition, detection of Bacillus atrophaeus bacterial spores was improved by the use of Tb(DO2A)+, yielding a 3-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio over Tb3+. Out of the eight cases investigated, the Tb(DO2A)+ binary complex is best for the detection of bacterial spores. PMID:19537757

  17. The Landscape of Realized Homologous Recombination in Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Koji; Didelot, Xavier; Jolley, Keith A.; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Maiden, Martin C.J.; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Falush, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Recombination enhances the adaptive potential of organisms by allowing genetic variants to be tested on multiple genomic backgrounds. Its distribution in the genome can provide insight into the evolutionary forces that underlie traits, such as the emergence of pathogenicity. Here, we examined landscapes of realized homologous recombination of 500 genomes from ten bacterial species and found all species have “hot” regions with elevated rates relative to the genome average. We examined the size, gene content, and chromosomal features associated with these regions and the correlations between closely related species. The recombination landscape is variable and evolves rapidly. For example in Salmonella, only short regions of around 1 kb in length are hot whereas in the closely related species Escherichia coli, some hot regions exceed 100 kb, spanning many genes. Only Streptococcus pyogenes shows evidence for the positive correlation between GC content and recombination that has been reported for several eukaryotes. Genes with function related to the cell surface/membrane are often found in recombination hot regions but E. coli is the only species where genes annotated as “virulence associated” are consistently hotter. There is also evidence that some genes with “housekeeping” functions tend to be overrepresented in cold regions. For example, ribosomal proteins showed low recombination in all of the species. Among specific genes, transferrin-binding proteins are recombination hot in all three of the species in which they were found, and are subject to interspecies recombination. PMID:26516092

  18. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation

    PubMed Central

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung BK; Laub, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly one millimeter long, or approximately 1000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length-scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  19. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation.

  20. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Jesús De La Calle, Iría; Jesús De La Calle, M Antonia

    2009-11-28

    Bacterial vaginosis is a widely spread health problem with multiple connotations. It has been the subject of many studies and work during decades and it still remains a polemic entity, with contradictory finding. The polymicrobian etiology, unsolved epidemiology, obstetrico-gynecological complications and high recurrence rate following treatment, make this infection a target for researchers. It is not an inflammatory process -yet an immune response exists. In this disorder, vaginal discharge increases, and it is associated with a high risk of developing sexually transmitted diseases.

  1. Enhancing and quenching luminescence with gold nanoparticle films: the influence of substrate on the luminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Guidelli, Eder; Ramos, Ana Paula; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) films were sputtered over glass and aluminum substrates to enhance optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), a luminescent technique employed for radiation detection, from x-ray irradiated NaCl nanocrystals. The AuNP films deposited over glass led to enhanced-OSL emission, whereas the AuNP films deposited on aluminum substrates quenched the OSL emission. The enhanced-OSL intensity is proportional to the optical density of the film's plasmon resonance band at the stimulation wavelength. For the case of the AuNP/aluminum films, the luminescence quenching diminishes, and OSL intensity partially recovers upon increasing the distance between the AuNPs and the aluminum substrates, and between the luminescent nanocrystals and the AuNP films. These results suggest that plasmonic interactions between the emitter nanocrystals, the localized surface plasmons (LSP) of the AuNPs, and the substrate are responsible for the OSL enhancement and quenching. In this sense, the substrate dictates whether LSP relaxation occurs by radiative or non-radiative transisitions, leading to enhanced or quenched OSL, respectively. Therefore, besides showing that AuNP films can enhance and/or tune the sensitivity of luminescent radiation detectors, and demonstrating OSL as a new technique to investigate mechanisms of plasmon-enhanced luminescence, these results bring insights on how substrates strongly modify the optical properties of AuNP films.

  2. Intrinsic radiative recombination from quantum states in GaAs-Aℓ xGa 1-xAs multi-quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, C.; Miller, R. C.; Dingle, R.; Gossard, A. C.; Wiegman, W.

    1981-01-01

    From absorption, emission, luminescence excitation and electron spin orientation studies of undoped GaAs-Aℓ xGa 1-xAs superlattices we demonstrate the intrinsic nature of the radiative recombination process. This is in direct contrast to recombination observed in similar purity thick GaAs material. Moreover, our results do not support a recent suggestion that enhanced LO phonon-electron coupling should occur in such superlattice structures.

  3. Acute toxicity assessment of explosive-contaminated soil extracting solution by luminescent bacteria assays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenjie; Jiang, Zhenming; Zhao, Quanlin; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Su, Hongping; Gao, Xuewen; Ye, Zhengfang

    2016-11-01

    Explosive-contaminated soil is harmful to people's health and the local ecosystem. The acute toxicity of its extracting solution was tested by bacterial luminescence assay using three kinds of luminescent bacteria to characterize the toxicity of the soil. An orthogonal test L 16 (4(5)) was designed to optimize the soil extracting conditions. The optimum extracting conditions were obtained when the ultrasonic extraction time, ultrasonic extraction temperature, and the extraction repeat times were 6 h, 40 °C, and three, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed that the main components of the contaminated soil's extracting solution were 2,4-dinitrotoluene-3-sulfonate (2,4-DNT-3-SO3(-)); 2,4-dinitrotoluene-5-sulfonate (2,4-DNT-5-SO3(-)); and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT). Compared with Photobacterium phosphoreum and Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov. is more suitable for assessing the soil extracting solution's acute toxicity. Soil washing can remove most of the contaminants toxic to luminescent bacterium Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Nov., suggesting that it may be a potential effective remediation method for explosive-contaminated soil.

  4. Modeling Light Propagation in Luminescent Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Derya

    This study presents physical, computational and analytical modeling approaches for light propagation in luminescent random media. Two different approaches are used, namely (i) a statistical approach: Monte-Carlo simulations for photon transport and (ii) a deterministic approach: radiative transport theory. Both approaches account accurately for the multiple absorption and reemission of light at different wavelengths and for anisotropic luminescence. The deterministic approach is a generalization of radiative transport theory for solving inelastic scattering problems in random media. We use the radiative transport theory to study light propagation in luminescent media. Based on this theory, we also study the optically thick medium. Using perturbation methods, a corrected diffusion approximation with asymptotically accurate boundary conditions and a boundary layer solution are derived. The accuracy and the efficacy of this approach is verified for a plane-parallel slab problem. In particular, we apply these two approaches (MC and radiative transport theory) to model light propagation in semiconductor-based luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). The computational results for both approaches are compared with each other and found to agree. The results of this dissertation present practical and reliable techniques to use for solving forward/inverse inelastic scattering problems arising in various research areas such as optics, biomedical engineering, nuclear engineering, solar science and material science.

  5. Luminescent Mycena: new and noteworthy species

    Treesearch

    Dennis E. Desjardin; D. Jean Lodge; Cassius V. Stevani; Eiji. Nagasawa

    2010-01-01

    Seven species of Mycena are reported as luminescent, representing specimens collected in Belize, Brazil, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Japan (Bonin Islands), Malaysia (Borneo) and Puerto Rico. Four of them represent new species (Mycena luxaeterna, M. luxarboricola, M. luxperpetua, M. silvaelucens) and three represent new reports of...

  6. Luminescence Originating in an Optical Fiber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-28

    TIME COVERED /1 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year Month, Oay) S.PAGE COUNT Technical FROM TO_ _ 28 October 1988 12 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION Applied ... Spectroscopy 17. COSATI CODES18. SUB Eg.TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIED OUPU Optical Fibers, Luminescence, Sensors

  7. Superfluorinated and NIR-luminescent gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Dichiarante, V; Tirotta, I; Catalano, L; Terraneo, G; Raffaini, G; Chierotti, M R; Gobetto, R; Baldelli Bombelli, F; Metrangolo, P

    2017-01-03

    A novel class of superfluorinated and NIR-luminescent gold nanoclusters were obtained starting from a branched thiol, bearing 27 equivalent (19)F atoms per molecule. These unprecedented clusters combine in a unique nanosystem both NIR photoluminescence and (19)F NMR properties, thus representing a promising multimodal platform for bioimaging applications.

  8. The mensuration of delayed luminescence on ginseng

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Fenghua; Bai, Hua; Tang, Guoqing

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, the delayed luminescence of ginseng produced from two different areas was determined with the self built bioluminescence detecting system. And the attenuation curve of bioluminescence of the experimental samples were studied, before and after the samples extracted by 58% alcohol. We primarily gave out the parameters describing emitting characteristic. Using the method of optic induced bioluminescence, we also determined the weak luminescence emitting from the ginseng tuber, and find the intensity and decay time having obvious difference from skin and core, with these data we can distinguish the producing area and feature of the ginseng. In the experiment, the light-induce luminescence of the sample was menstruated, which has been infused by water and 58% alcohol; the difference between two kinds of samples which were infused and not infused has been delivered. In order to investigate the effect of excitation-light spectrum component to delayed luminescence of ginseng, a light filter witch allow a wavelength scope of 225nm~420nm pass through was installed between the light source and sample, keeping other work condition unchanged, the bioluminescence was also determined. For investigating the effect of extracting to emitting, the absorption spectrum of above samples ware studied, and the time-sequence of absorption spectrum was obtained. Based on the data obtained from our experiment, we analyzed the radiation mechanism of ginseng slice and tuber.

  9. Studies of positron induced luminescence from polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Lewis, T.A.; Tolk, N.H.

    1994-06-01

    Light emission from polymers (anthracene dissolved in polystryrene) induced by low-energy positrons and electrons has been studied. Results indicate a clear difference between optical emissions under positron and electron bombardment. The positron-induced luminescence spectrum is believed to be generated by both collisional and annihilation processes.

  10. Structural changes and relaxations monitored by luminescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Yang, B; Townsend, P D

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence data have often been used to study imperfections and to characterize lattice distortions because the signals are sensitive to changes of structure and composition. Previous studies have included intentionally added probe ions such as rare earth ions to sense distortions in local crystal fields caused by modified structural environments. An under-exploited extension of this approach was to use luminescence to monitor crystalline phase changes. A current overview of this new and powerful technique shows that continuous scanning of the sample temperatures immediately offered at least three types of signatures for phase transitions. Because of high sensitivity, luminescence signals were equally responsive to structural changes from inclusions and nanoparticles. These coupled to the host material via long-range interactions and modified the host signals. Two frequently observed examples that are normally overlooked are from nanoparticle inclusions of water and CO2. Examples also indicated that phase transitions were detected in more diverse materials such as superconductors and fullerenes. Finally, luminescence studies have shown that in some crystalline examples, high dose ion implantation of surface layers could induce relaxations and/or structural changes of the entire underlying bulk material. This was an unexpected result and therefore such a possibility has not previously been explored. However, the implications for ion implication are significant and could be far more general than the examples mentioned here. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  12. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  13. Increasing the luminescence of lanthanide complexes.

    PubMed

    Leif, Robert C; Vallarino, Lidia M; Becker, Margie C; Yang, Sean

    2006-08-01

    This review compares the chemical and physical properties of lanthanide ion complexes and of other narrow-emitting species that can be used as labels for cytometry. A series of luminescent lanthanide ion macrocyclic complexes, Quantum Dyes, which do not release or exchange their central lanthanide ion, do accept energy transfer from ligands, and are capable of covalent binding to macromolecules, including proteins and nucleic acids, is described and their properties are discussed. Two methods are described for increasing the luminescence intensity of lanthanide ion complexes, which intrinsically is not as high as that of standard fluorophores or quantum dots. One method consists of adding a complex of a second lanthanide ion in a micellar solution (columinescence); the other method produces dry preparations by evaporation of a homogeneous solution containing an added complex of a second lanthanide ion or an excess of an unbound antenna ligand. Both methods involve the Resonance Energy Transfer Enhanced Luminescence, RETEL, effect as the mechanism for the luminescence enhancement.

  14. Luminescence from Erbium Oxide Grown on Silicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    H9.14 Luminescence from erbium oxide grown on silicon E. Nogales’, B. Mrndez , J.Piqueras’, R.Plugaru2 , J. A. Garcfa3 and T. J. Tate4 ’ Universidad ... Complutense de Madrid, Dpto. Ffsica de Materiales, 28040 Madrid, Spain.2Inst. of Microtechnology, Bucharest, Romania.3Universidad del Pais Vasco, Dpto

  15. Surface recombination in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, J.M.; Walukiewicz, W.

    1995-07-01

    We propose two general criteria for a surface defect state to act as an efficient, nonradiative recombination center. The first is that the thermal ionization energy should not deviate from the mid-gap energy by more than the relaxation energy of the defect, In this case the activation energy for the recombination is given by the barrier for the capture of the first carrier, whereas the second carrier is captured athermally. The second citerion is related to the position of the average dangling bond energy relative to the band edges. If, as in the cases of InP or InAs, it is located close to a band edge, a low surface recombination velocity is expected. However a much faster recombination is predicated and experimentally observed in the materials with the average dangling bond energy located close to the mid-gap. The relevance of these criteria for the novel wide-gap optoelectronic materials is discussed.

  16. Multiphoton Assisted Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, E. S.; Jones, R. R.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    We have observed multiphoton assisted recombination in the presence of a 38.8 GHz microwave field. Stimulated emission of up to ten microwave photons results in energy transfer from continuum electrons, enabling recombination. The maximum electron energy loss is far greater than the 2Up predicted by the standard “simpleman’s” model. The data are well reproduced by both an approximate analytic expression and numerical simulations in which the combined Coulomb and radiation fields are taken into account.

  17. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  18. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  19. Optimized readout system for cooled optically stimulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Eschbach, P. A.

    1990-09-01

    Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) in CaF2:Mn is an ionizing radiation dosimetry method recently developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In this method CaF2:Mn crystals irradiated by gamma radiation at room temperature are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), stimulated by ultraviolet laser light at 326 nm, and allowed to warm to room temperature. Light emission proportional to the gamma exposure occurs as the TLD warms from liquid nitrogen temperature to room temperature. The new method is an example of a highly sensitive phototransfer technique which could form the basis for future radiation dosimetry applications. Measurements to date have shown high potential for measuring gamma exposures in the range of 10 microR. The high sensitivity of the COSL technique is due in part to the larger quantum efficiency of radiative recombination at low temperatures and to the complete absence of the incandescent background associated with conventional thermoluminescent readout methods. Along with the potential for a system which is more sensitive than thermoluminescent readers, multiple COSL readouts can be performed with minimal reduction in the COSL intensity. The multiple readout capability can serve as a possible permanent dosimetry record, thus allowing the reanalysis of a questionable reading. In an attempt to optimize the sensitivity of the COSL method, a new readout system is being developed.

  20. Blue luminescence of Au nanoclusters embedded in silica matrix.

    PubMed

    Dhara, S; Chandra, Sharat; Magudapathy, P; Kalavathi, S; Panigrahi, B K; Nair, K G M; Sastry, V S; Hsu, C W; Wu, C T; Chen, K H; Chen, L C

    2004-12-22

    Photoluminescence study using the 325 nm He-Cd excitation is reported for the Au nanoclusters embedded in SiO(2) matrix. Au clusters are grown by ion beam mixing with 100 KeV Ar(+) irradiation on Au [40 nm]/SiO(2) at various fluences and subsequent annealing at high temperature. The blue bands above approximately 3 eV match closely with reported values for colloidal Au nanoclusters and supported Au nanoislands. Radiative recombination of sp electrons above Fermi level to occupied d-band holes are assigned for observed luminescence peaks. Peaks at 3.1 and 3.4 eV are correlated to energy gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points, respectively, with possible involvement of relaxation mechanism. The blueshift of peak positions at 3.4 eV with decreasing cluster size is reported to be due to the compressive strain in small clusters. A first principle calculation based on density functional theory using the full potential linear augmented plane wave plus local orbitals formalism with generalized gradient approximation for the exchange correlation energy is used to estimate the band gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points by calculating the band structures and joint density of states for different strain values in order to explain the blueshift of approximately 0.1 eV with decreasing cluster size around L-symmetry point.

  1. Luminescent biocompatible quantum dots: a tool for immunosorbent assay design.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Ellen R; Uyeda, H Tetsuo; Hayhurst, Andrew; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2007-01-01

    We have developed several conjugation strategies based on noncovalent self-assembly for the attachment of proteins and other biomolecules to water-soluble luminescent colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots [QDs]). The resulting QD-protein conjugates were employed in designing a variety of bioinspired applications, including single and multiplexed immunosorbent assays to detect toxins and small molecule explosives. In these studies we showed that QD fluorophores offer several important advantages. In particular, their tunable broad excitation spectra combined with narrow fluorescence emission peaks permit single-line excitation of multiple color nanocrystals, with facile signal deconvolution to extract individual contributions from each population (e.g., size) of QDs in multiplexed assays. Furthermore, the QDs strong resistance to photobleaching under continuous illumination relative to many organic dyes makes them ideal fluorophores for long-term cellular imaging studies. This chapter details the materials and methods for the synthesis of surface-functionalized CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs, the construction and preparation of recombinant proteins, the conjugation of antibodies (and antibody fragments) to QDs, and the use of antibody-conjugated QDs in fluoroimmunoassays.

  2. Blue luminescence of Au nanoclusters embedded in silica matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dhara, S.; Chandra, Sharat; Magudapathy, P.; Kalavathi, S.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Nair, K.G.M.; Sastry, V.S.; Hsu, C.W.; Wu, C.T.; Chen, K.H.; Chen, L.C.

    2004-12-22

    Photoluminescence study using the 325 nm He-Cd excitation is reported for the Au nanoclusters embedded in SiO{sub 2} matrix. Au clusters are grown by ion beam mixing with 100 KeV Ar{sup +} irradiation on Au [40 nm]/SiO{sub 2} at various fluences and subsequent annealing at high temperature. The blue bands above {approx}3 eV match closely with reported values for colloidal Au nanoclusters and supported Au nanoislands. Radiative recombination of sp electrons above Fermi level to occupied d-band holes are assigned for observed luminescence peaks. Peaks at 3.1 and 3.4 eV are correlated to energy gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points, respectively, with possible involvement of relaxation mechanism. The blueshift of peak positions at 3.4 eV with decreasing cluster size is reported to be due to the compressive strain in small clusters. A first principle calculation based on density functional theory using the full potential linear augmented plane wave plus local orbitals formalism with generalized gradient approximation for the exchange correlation energy is used to estimate the band gaps at the X- and L-symmetry points by calculating the band structures and joint density of states for different strain values in order to explain the blueshift of {approx}0.1 eV with decreasing cluster size around L-symmetry point.

  3. Quenching methods for background reduction in luminescence-based probe-target binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Hong; Goodwin, Peter M; Keller, Richard A.; Nolan, Rhiannon L.

    2007-04-10

    Background luminescence is reduced from a solution containing unbound luminescent probes, each having a first molecule that attaches to a target molecule and having an attached luminescent moiety, and luminescent probe/target adducts. Quenching capture reagent molecules are formed that are capable of forming an adduct with the unbound luminescent probes and having an attached quencher material effective to quench luminescence of the luminescent moiety. The quencher material of the capture reagent molecules is added to a solution of the luminescent probe/target adducts and binds in a proximity to the luminescent moiety of the unbound luminescent probes to quench luminescence from the luminescent moiety when the luminescent moiety is exposed to exciting illumination. The quencher capture reagent does not bind to probe molecules that are bound to target molecules and the probe/target adduct emission is not quenched.

  4. Recombination and chromosome segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, David J; Søballe, Britta; Barre, François-Xavier; Filipe, Sergio; Lau, Ivy; Massey, Thomas; Yates, James

    2004-01-01

    The duplication of DNA and faithful segregation of newly replicated chromosomes at cell division is frequently dependent on recombinational processes. The rebuilding of broken or stalled replication forks is universally dependent on homologous recombination proteins. In bacteria with circular chromosomes, crossing over by homologous recombination can generate dimeric chromosomes, which cannot be segregated to daughter cells unless they are converted to monomers before cell division by the conserved Xer site-specific recombination system. Dimer resolution also requires FtsK, a division septum-located protein, which coordinates chromosome segregation with cell division, and uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to activate the dimer resolution reaction. FtsK can also translocate DNA, facilitate synapsis of sister chromosomes and minimize entanglement and catenation of newly replicated sister chromosomes. The visualization of the replication/recombination-associated proteins, RecQ and RarA, and specific genes within living Escherichia coli cells, reveals further aspects of the processes that link replication with recombination, chromosome segregation and cell division, and provides new insight into how these may be coordinated. PMID:15065657

  5. Paper-based biodetection using luminescent nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ju, Qiang; Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-05-10

    Point-of-care and in-field technologies for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of molecular biomarkers have attracted much interest. Rugged bioassay technology capable of fast detection of markers for pathogens and genetic diseases would in particular impact the quality of health care in the developing world, but would also make possible more extensive screening in developed countries to tackle problems such as those associated with water and food quality, and tracking of infectious organisms in hospitals and clinics. Literature trends indicate an increasing interest in the use of nanomaterials, and in particular luminescent nanoparticles, for assay development. These materials may offer attributes for development of assays and sensors that could achieve improvements in analytical figures of merit, and provide practical advantages in sensitivity and stability. There is opportunity for cost-efficiency and technical simplicity by implementation of luminescent nanomaterials as the basis for transduction technology, when combined with the use of paper substrates, and the ubiquitous availability of cell phone cameras and associated infrastructure for optical detection and transmission of results. Luminescent nanoparticles have been described for a broad range of bioanalytical targets including small molecules, oligonucleotides, peptides, proteins, saccharides and whole cells (e.g., cancer diagnostics). The luminescent nanomaterials that are described herein for paper-based bioassays include metal nanoparticles, quantum dots and lanthanide-doped nanocrystals. These nanomaterials often have broad and strong absorption and narrow emission bands that improve opportunity for multiplexed analysis, and can be designed to provide emission at wavelengths that are efficiently processed by conventional digital cameras. Luminescent nanoparticles can be embedded in paper substrates that are designed to direct fluid flow, and the resulting combination of technologies can offer

  6. Image analysis applied to luminescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Eric; Lelievre-Berna, Eddy; Fafeur, Veronique; Vandenbunder, Bernard

    1998-04-01

    We have developed a novel approach to study luminescent light emission during migration of living cells by low-light imaging techniques. The equipment consists in an anti-vibration table with a hole for a direct output under the frame of an inverted microscope. The image is directly captured by an ultra low- light level photon-counting camera equipped with an image intensifier coupled by an optical fiber to a CCD sensor. This installation is dedicated to measure in a dynamic manner the effect of SF/HGF (Scatter Factor/Hepatocyte Growth Factor) both on activation of gene promoter elements and on cell motility. Epithelial cells were stably transfected with promoter elements containing Ets transcription factor-binding sites driving a luciferase reporter gene. Luminescent light emitted by individual cells was measured by image analysis. Images of luminescent spots were acquired with a high aperture objective and time exposure of 10 - 30 min in photon-counting mode. The sensitivity of the camera was adjusted to a high value which required the use of a segmentation algorithm dedicated to eliminate the background noise. Hence, image segmentation and treatments by mathematical morphology were particularly indicated in these experimental conditions. In order to estimate the orientation of cells during their migration, we used a dedicated skeleton algorithm applied to the oblong spots of variable intensities emitted by the cells. Kinetic changes of luminescent sources, distance and speed of migration were recorded and then correlated with cellular morphological changes for each spot. Our results highlight the usefulness of the mathematical morphology to quantify kinetic changes in luminescence microscopy.

  7. A direct evidence of allocating yellow luminescence band in undoped GaN by two-wavelength excited photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Julkarnain, M. E-mail: jnain.apee@ru.ac.bd; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.; Arakawa, Y.

    2015-11-23

    The behavior of below-gap luminescence of undoped GaN grown by MOCVD has been studied by the scheme of two-wavelength-excited photoluminescence. The emission intensity of shallow donor to valence band transition (I{sub OX}) increased while intensities of donor-acceptor pair transition and the Yellow Luminescence band (YLB) decreased after the irradiation of a below-gap excitation source of 1.17 eV. The conventional energy schemes and recombination models have been considered to explain our experimental result but only one model in which YLB is the transition of a shallow donor to a deep state placed at ∼1 eV above the valence band maximum satisfies our result. The defect related parameters that give a qualitative insight in the samples have been evaluated by systematically solving the rate equations and fitting the result with the experiment.

  8. Purification of recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant ovalbumin expressed in bacterial host is essentially free from post-translational modifications and can be useful in understanding the structure-function relationship of the protein. In this study, ovalbumin was expressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. Ovalbumin inclusion bodies were solubilized using urea and refolded by decreasing the urea concentration by dilution. Refolded protein was purified by anion exchange chromatography. Overall recovery of purified recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies was about 30% with 98% purity. Purified recombinant ovalbumin was characterized by mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Recombinant ovalbumin was shown to be resistant to trypsin using protease resistance assay. This indicated proper refolding of ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of E. coli. This method provides a simple way of producing ovalbumin free of post-translational modifications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  10. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Priestley, C J; Kinghorn, G R

    1996-09-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is an alteration of the vaginal flora, where the normally predominant lactobacilli are replaced by a cocktail of organisms including Gardnerella vaginalis and anaerobes. It presents with a grey, homogenous, offensive vaginal discharge that has a raised pH. However, around half the women with this condition are asymptomatic. Diagnosis is best made by microscopic examination of a Gram-stained smear of vaginal secretions. Treatment is with metronidazole or clindamycin. The indications for treatment of asymptomatic BV are not clear, but women should probably be treated before any invasive gynaecological procedure, including intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) insertion. BV during pregnancy is associated with preterm labour, although a causal effect is not proven; studies are in progress to determine whether treatment of BV will improve the outcome of these pregnancies.

  11. Bacterial Actins.

    PubMed

    Izoré, Thierry; van den Ent, Fusinita

    2017-01-01

    A diverse set of protein polymers, structurally related to actin filaments contributes to the organization of bacterial cells as cytomotive or cytoskeletal filaments. This chapter describes actin homologs encoded by bacterial chromosomes. MamK filaments, unique to magnetotactic bacteria, help establishing magnetic biological compasses by interacting with magnetosomes. Magnetosomes are intracellular membrane invaginations containing biomineralized crystals of iron oxide that are positioned by MamK along the long-axis of the cell. FtsA is widespread across bacteria and it is one of the earliest components of the divisome to arrive at midcell, where it anchors the cell division machinery to the membrane. FtsA binds directly to FtsZ filaments and to the membrane through its C-terminus. FtsA shows altered domain architecture when compared to the canonical actin fold. FtsA's subdomain 1C replaces subdomain 1B of other members of the actin family and is located on the opposite side of the molecule. Nevertheless, when FtsA assembles into protofilaments, the protofilament structure is preserved, as subdomain 1C replaces subdomain IB of the following subunit in a canonical actin filament. MreB has an essential role in shape-maintenance of most rod-shaped bacteria. Unusually, MreB filaments assemble from two protofilaments in a flat and antiparallel arrangement. This non-polar architecture implies that both MreB filament ends are structurally identical. MreB filaments bind directly to membranes where they interact with both cytosolic and membrane proteins, thereby forming a key component of the elongasome. MreB filaments in cells are short and dynamic, moving around the long axis of rod-shaped cells, sensing curvature of the membrane and being implicated in peptidoglycan synthesis.

  12. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Krawiec, S; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction between a large plasmid and a second chromosome is discussed. Recent information on repeated sequences and chromosomal rearrangements is presented. The growing understanding of limitations on the rearrangements that can be tolerated by bacteria and those that cannot is summarized, and the sensitive region flanking the terminator loci is described. Sources and types of genetic variation in bacteria are listed, from simple single nucleotide mutations to intragenic and intergenic recombinations. A model depicting the dynamics of the evolution and genetic activity of the bacterial chromosome is described which entails acquisition by recombination of clonal segments within the chromosome. The model is consistent with the existence of only a few genetic types of E. coli worldwide. Finally, there is a summary of recent reports on lateral genetic exchange across great taxonomic distances, yet another source of genetic variation and innovation. PMID:2087223

  13. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  14. MICROFLUIDIC MODULES FOR ISOLATION OF RECOMBINANT CYTOKINE FROM BACTERIAL LYSATES

    SciTech Connect

    Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2014-01-01

    The portability and personalization of health-care diagnostics and treatments benefits from advancements and applications of micro and nanotechnology. Modularization and miniaturization of standardized biochemical processes and tests facilitates the advancement and customization of analyte detection and diagnosis on-chip. The goal of our work here is to develop modular platforms for on-chip biochemical processing of synthesized biologics for a range of on-demand applications. Our report focuses on the initial development, characterization and application of microfluidic size exclusion/gel filtration and ion exchange protein concentration modules for cytokine isolation from spiked cell extracts.

  15. Detection of Ciprofloxacin in Urine through Sensitized Lanthanide Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Subhankar; Ahn, Kyo Han

    2016-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, is widely used for the treatment of bacterial infection in humans due to its broad antibacterial spectrum. An excessive use or overdose of ciprofloxacin on the other hand can cause several adverse effects not only to humans but also to microorganisms. Unabsorbed ciprofloxacin in the body is mostly excreted through urine and finally goes to the environment, providing a drug resistance pressure on bacteria. Hence a simple and efficient detection method of ciprofloxacin is necessary, which, for example, can be used to analyze ciprofloxacin content in urine. Although ciprofloxacin itself shows inherent fluorescence, direct fluorescent detection of ciprofloxacin in raw urine sample is difficult due to autofluorescence of urine by other components. Herein we report that a Tb(III) complex of DO3A (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid) can be efficiently sensitized by ciprofloxacin to emit luminescence separately from the urine autofluorescence wavelength region. Tb-DO3A shows excellent sensitivity with a detection limit of three parts per billion in aqueous buffer solution. Further, Tb-DO3A is used to detect ciprofloxacin with high sensitivity and selectivity in a raw urine sample without any purification or separation procedures in the concentrations ranging from 1 µg·mL−1 to 50 µg·mL−1. The direct measurement of ciprofloxacin excreted in urine may be used to control overdose of the drug. PMID:27929396

  16. Phosphate modulated luminescence in lanthanum vanadate nanorods- Catechin, polyphenolic ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamilmani, Vairapperumal; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan

    2017-08-01

    Rare earth orthovanadates and phosphates offer a very high opportunity for fabrication of nanoscale devices that exploit their luminescence properties. Optimization of luminescence by way of modulation of size, shape, structure, and morphology has been an area of study for several researchers. There has been a debate as to whether doped orthophosphate or orthovanadate is better luminescent material as both are chemically similar. It has been reported earlier that catechin hydrate can play the role of a structure director and thus influence the luminescence properties of orthovanadates. In this work, a catechin modulated the synthesis of Eu-doped lanthanum orthophosphate by phosphate substitution into vanadate host lattice is reported. A mechanistic understanding of the luminescence changes in LaMO4 has been proposed. During the substitution of V with P, catechin modulates the structure between 1D nanorods and nanowires. The host crystal structure, shape, and size influence the luminescence properties in doped LaMO4.

  17. Luminescence quenching of Dy3+ ions in lead bismuthate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarski, Wojciech A.; Pisarska, Joanna; Lisiecki, Radosław; Dominiak-Dzik, Grażyna; Ryba-Romanowski, Witold

    2012-04-01

    Luminescence of lead bismuthate glasses PbO-Bi2O3-Ga2O3 containing Dy3+ ions has been studied. Two overlapping luminescence bands corresponding to 3P1-1S0 transition of Bi3+ and 4F9/2 -6H13/2 transition of Dy3+ were detected under 480 nm excitation. Comparison of luminescence features for the system under study to those reported for dysprosium-doped lead borate glass PbO-B2O3-Ga2O3 indicates that the luminescence of Dy3+ is efficiently quenched by Bi3+ ions. Analysis of luminescence dynamics implies that the excitation energy transfer from Dy3+ to Bi3+ is nonradiative. The theoretical calculations using Inokuti-Hirayama model confirm strong luminescence of Dy3+ ions in lead bismuthate glasses.

  18. Recent progress in biomedical applications of persistent luminescence nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Ma, Qinqin; Wang, Yingqian; Shen, Haijing; Yuan, Quan

    2017-05-18

    Persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) are an emerging group of promising luminescent materials that can remain luminescent after the excitation ceases. In the past decade, PLNPs with intriguing optical properties have been developed and their applications in biomedicine have been widely studied. Due to the ultra-long decay time of persistent luminescence, autofluorescence interference in biosensing and bioimaging can be efficiently eliminated. Moreover, PLNPs can remain luminescent for hours, making them valuable in bio-tracing. Also, persistent luminescence imaging can guide cancer therapy with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and superior sensitivity. Briefly, PLNPs are demonstrated to be a newly-emerging class of functional materials with unprecedented advantages in biomedicine. In this review, we summarized recent advances in the preparation of PLNPs and the applications of PLNPs in biosensing, bioimaging and cancer therapy.

  19. Anti-Stokes shift luminescent materials for bio-applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingjun; Su, Qianqian; Feng, Wei; Li, Fuyou

    2017-02-20

    Anti-Stokes shift luminescence is a special optical process, which converts long-wavelength excitation to short-wavelength emission. This unique ability is especially helpful for bio-applications, because the longer-wavelength light source, usually referring to near infrared light, has a larger penetration depth offering a longer working distance for in vivo applications. The anti-Stokes shift luminescence signal can also be distinguished from the auto-fluorescence of biological tissues, thus reducing background interference during bioimaging. Herein, we summarize recent advances in anti-Stokes shift luminescent materials, including lanthanide and triplet-triplet-annihilation-based upconversion nanomaterials, and newly improved hot-band absorption-based luminescent materials. We focus on the synthetic strategies, optical optimization and biological applications as well as present comparative discussions on the luminescence mechanisms and characteristics of these three types of luminescent materials.

  20. Luminescence of Au(I)-thiolate complex affected by solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lina; Cao, Yuanjie; Chen, Juan; Sun, Zhihu; Yao, Tao; Jiang, Yong; Wei, Shiqiang

    2017-08-01

    This work presents a study on the correlation between luminescence property of Au(I)-SR (SR: thiolate) complexes and solvent polarity. Luminescent [Au15(SR)14-16]+ complexes were synthesized in the weakly polar solvent of toluene, while the non-luminescent [Au7(SR)6]+ species were obtained by the same synthesis method in the polar solvent of ethanol. The dependence of luminescence intensity on the mixed solvent with various toluene/ethanol ratios was also explored. It is proposed that the luminescence of Au(I)-SR complexes originates from the aggregation of the bilayer supramolecular structures induced by the weakly polar solvent. This aggregation strengthens the intra and intercomplex aurophilic Au(I)···Au(I) interactions and subsequently enhances the luminescence intensity of the complexes.

  1. Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000687.htm Bacterial vaginosis - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... back after you use the bathroom. Preventing Bacterial Vaginosis You can help prevent bacterial vaginosis by: Not ...

  2. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... page It's been added to your dashboard . Bacterial vaginosis (also called BV or vaginitis) is an infection ...

  3. Bacterial pericarditis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Bacterial pericarditis is an inflammation of the pericardium, the sac-like covering of the heart, caused by a bacterial infection. The bacterial infection causes inflammation and swelling of the pericardium. Pain ...

  4. Neutron dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Eschbach, P. A.

    1991-06-01

    The addition of thermoluminescent (TL) materials within hydrogenous matrices to detect neutron induced proton recoils for radiation dosimetry is a well known concept. Previous attempts to implement this technique have met with limited success, primarily due to the high temperatures required for TL readout and the low melting temperatures of hydrogen-rich plastics. Research in recent years PNL has produced a new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technique known as the Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) that offers, for the first time, the capability of performing extremely sensitive radiation dosimetry at low temperatures. In addition to its extreme sensitivity, the COSL technique offers multiple readout capability, limited fading in a one year period, and the capability of analyzing single grains within a hydrogenous matrix.

  5. Luminescence properties of silicon-cellulose nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikulev, Vitaly; Loginova, Svetlana; Gurtov, Valery

    2012-07-01

    We have characterized the structure and luminescence properties for two-component material composed of nanocrystalline cellulose and nanocrystalline (less to 100 nm) silicon powder. An efficient and stable photoluminescence of nanocomposite, resistant to the influence of gas-phase oxidants, has been found. The obtained material has electret-like properties and demonstrates the possibility of multiple-recharging in an electric field near 5·103 V/cm at temperatures ranging from -70°C to 100°C. The presence of the electric field, as well as ozone or low-temperature plasma treatment, does not change the luminescence spectrum due to quantum size properties of silicon nanoparticles. We believe that these particles may appear in two states: both embedded in a cellulose matrix and in the form of mechanical mixture.

  6. Tunable lifetime multiplexing using luminescent nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiqing; Zhao, Jiangbo; Zhang, Run; Liu, Yujia; Liu, Deming; Goldys, Ewa M.; Yang, Xusan; Xi, Peng; Sunna, Anwar; Lu, Jie; Shi, Yu; Leif, Robert C.; Huo, Yujing; Shen, Jian; Piper, James A.; Robinson, J. Paul; Jin, Dayong

    2014-01-01

    Optical multiplexing plays an important role in applications such as optical data storage, document security, molecular probes and bead assays for personalized medicine. Conventional fluorescent colour coding is limited by spectral overlap and background interference, restricting the number of distinguishable identities. Here, we show that tunable luminescent lifetimes τ in the microsecond region can be exploited to code individual upconversion nanocrystals. In a single colour band, one can generate more than ten nanocrystal populations with distinct lifetimes ranging from 25.6 µs to 662.4 µs and decode their well-separated lifetime identities, which are independent of both colour and intensity. Such `τ-dots' potentially suit multichannel bioimaging, high-throughput cytometry quantification, high-density data storage, as well as security codes to combat counterfeiting. This demonstration extends the optical multiplexing capability by adding the temporal dimension of luminescent signals, opening new opportunities in the life sciences, medicine and data security.

  7. Anomalous enhancement of nanodiamond luminescence upon heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomich, A. A.; Kudryavtsev, O. S.; Dolenko, T. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Fisenko, A. V.; Konov, V. I.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristic photoluminescence (PL) of nanodiamonds (ND) of different origin (detonation, HPHT, extracted from meteorite) was studied in situ at high temperatures in the range 20-450 °C. Luminescence was excited using 473 nm laser and recorded in the range 500-800 nm. In contrast to decrease of point defect PL in bulk diamond with temperature, we found that the ND luminescence related to ND surface defects increases almost an order of magnitude upon heating to 200-250 °C. The observed effect reveals that water adsorbed on ND surfaces efficiently quenches PL; water desorption on heating leads to dramatic increase of the radiative de-excitation.

  8. Modeling and simulation of luminescence detection platforms.

    PubMed

    Salama, Khaled; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Hassibi, Arjang; El-Gamal, Abbas

    2004-06-15

    Motivated by the design of an integrated CMOS-based detection platform, a simulation model for CCD and CMOS imager-based luminescence detection systems is developed. The model comprises four parts. The first portion models the process of photon flux generation from luminescence probes using ATP-based and luciferase label-based assay kinetics. An optics simulator is then used to compute the incident photon flux on the imaging plane for a given photon flux and system geometry. Subsequently, the output image is computed using a detailed imaging sensor model that accounts for photodetector spectral response, dark current, conversion gain, and various noise sources. Finally, signal processing algorithms are applied to the image to enhance detection reliability and hence increase the overall system throughput. To validate the model, simulation results are compared to experimental results obtained from a CCD-based system that was built to emulate the integrated CMOS-based platform.

  9. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Luminescent lanthanide chelates and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Selvin, Paul R.; Hearst, John

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides lanthanide chelates capable of intense luminescence. The celates comprise a lanthanide chelator covalently joined to a coumarin-like or quinolone-like sensitizer. Exemplary sensitzers include 2- or 4-quinolones, 2- or 4-coumarins, or derivatives thereof e.g. carbostyril 124 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-quinolone), coumarin 120 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-coumarin), coumarin 124 (7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-coumarin), aminomethyltrimethylpsoralen, etc. The chelates form high affinity complexes with lanthanides, such as terbium or europium, through chelator groups, such as DTPA. The chelates may be coupled to a wide variety of compounds to create specific labels, probes, diagnostic and/or therapeutic reagents, etc. The chelates find particular use in resonance energy transfer between chelate-lanthanide complexes and another luminescent agent, often a fluorescent non-metal based resonance energy acceptor. The methods provide useful information about the structure, conformation, relative location and/or interactions of macromolecules.

  11. Method and apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  12. Method and apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Demas, J.N.; Goodwin, P.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Keller, R.A.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, M.

    1998-10-27

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region. 6 figs.

  13. Immunogenicity of therapeutic recombinant immunotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Ronit; Onda, Masanori; Pastan, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant Immunotoxins (RITs) are chimeric proteins designed to treat cancer. They are made up of an Fv or Fab that targets an antigen on a cancer cell fused to a 38 kDa portion of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE38). Because PE38 is a bacterial protein, it is highly immunogenic in patients with solid tumors that have normal immune systems, but much less immunogenic in patients with hematologic malignancies where the immune system is suppressed. RITs have shown efficacy in refractory hairy cell leukemia and in some children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but have been much less effective in solid tumors, because neutralizing antibodies develop and prevent additional treatment cycles. In this paper we will 1) review data from clinical trials describing the immunogenicity of PE38 in different patient populations, 2) review results form clinical trials using different immunosuppressive drugs and 3) describe our efforts to make new less-immunogenic RITs by identifying and removing T and B cell epitopes to hide the RIT from the immune system. PMID:26864110

  14. Luminescence of erbium ions in tellurite glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Savikin, Alexander P.; Grishin, Igor A.; Sharkov, Valery V.; Budruev, Andrei V.

    2013-11-15

    Optical characteristics of new generation of tellurite glasses having high stability against crystallization have been studied. As the initial reagents for the glasses synthesis on the base of tellurium oxide (TeO{sub 2}) there were used such oxides as WO{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, ZnO—Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and active components such as high purity Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ErF{sub 3} and YbF{sub 3}. Intensities of luminescence at 1.53 µm of the erbium ions were determined after excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. - Graphical abstract: In contrast to the case of ZBLAN glass the TeO{sub 2}–WO{sub 3} (Er{sup 3+}) glass has bright intensity of luminescence at 1.53 µm for erbium ions that should be caused by excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. Display Omitted - Highlights: • We examined changes in growth of luminescence in doubly-doped tellurite glasses. • We found that luminescence grows in two orders by using Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} at 1.53 μm. • We see possibility to use those glasses as active elements for integrated optics.

  15. Thermally stimulated luminescence of urine salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordun, O.; Drobchak, O.

    2008-05-01

    The thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) of normal and pathological urine was studied. The presence of pathological salts leads to extinguishing of TSL intensity and to the appearance of additional stripes with maxima nearly 118 and 205K, except of characteristic stripes with the maxima nearly 173 and 260K. TSL stripes depend on urine constituents. The comparison of TSL intensity of normal and pathological urine is carried out and energies of thermal activation are determined for most intensive TSL stripes.

  16. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  17. Luminescence color as a characteristic for selection in poultry eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalova, Natalya B.; Vasiljeva, Ludmilia T.; Zamorskaja, Tatjana; Bychajev, Al.

    1996-12-01

    This work concerns luminescence of egg shell and chick down and livability and egg production of hens. It was established that the best layers showed orange color of egg shell luminescence at the beginning of the laying period. Yellow color of chick down luminescence indicates on the chicken's good development especially concerning its digestive and circulatory systems, and connects with its future high livability and egg production. So the use of the color of luminescence is advisable as an additional characteristic providing good possibility to forecast the development of a chicken, its resistance for stressors, its livability and egg production afterwards.

  18. The deformation stimulated luminescence in KCl, KBr and KI crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunkeyev, K.; Sergeyev, D.; Drozdowski, W.; Brylev, K.; Myasnikova, L.; Barmina, A.; Zhanturina, N.; Sagimbaeva, Sh; Aimaganbetova, Z.

    2017-05-01

    Currently, strengthening of the intensity of luminescence in alkali halide crystals (AHC) at lattice symmetry lowering is discussed as a promising direction for the development of scintillation detectors [1-3]. In this regard, for the study of anion excitons and radiation defects in the AHC anion sublattice at deformation, the crystals with the same sizes of cations and different sizes of anions were chosen. In the X-ray spectra of KCl at 10 K, the luminescence at 3.88 eV; 3.05 eV and 2.3 eV is clearly visible. The luminescence at 3.05 eV corresponds to the tunneling recharge [F*, H]. Luminescence at 3.88 eV is quenched in the region of thermal destruction of F‧-centers and characterizes tunneling recharge of F‧, VK-centers. In KCl at 90 K, the luminescence of self-trapped excitons (STE) is completely absent. In KBr at deformation not only STE luminescence, but also deformation stimulated luminescence at 3.58 eV were recorded, the last one corresponds to tunneling recharge of F‧, VK-centers. In KI crystal at 10 K and 90 K at deformation, only STE luminescence is enhanced. There are no deformation luminescence bands in KI compares with KBr and KCl crystals.

  19. Dislocation luminescence in GaN single crystals under nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study on the dislocation luminescence in GaN by nanoindentation, cathodoluminescence, and Raman. The dislocation luminescence peaking at 3.12 eV exhibits a series of special properties in the cathodoluminescence measurements, and it completely disappears after annealing at 500°C. Raman spectroscopy shows evidence for existence of vacancies in the indented region. A comprehensive investigation encompassing cathodoluminescence, Raman, and annealing experiments allow the assignment of dislocation luminescence to conduction-band-acceptor transition involving Ga vacancies. The nanoscale plasticity of GaN can be better understood by considering the dislocation luminescence mechanism. PMID:25593548

  20. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  1. Luminescent behavior of semiconductor doped polyamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Kaur, Rajvir; Samra, Kawaljeet Singh

    2017-07-01

    In the present investigation, luminescent behavior of ZnO doped polyamide has been studied using different optical techniques. Sol-gel method was used for the preparation of free standing films of pristine and semiconductor doped polyamide. Samples with different compositions i.e. 0% and 0.3% by weight of ZnO in polyamide were prepared. UV-Visible (UV), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Photo-luminescence (PL) spectroscopic techniques were utilized to characterize the prepared films. UV-Visible analysis revealed the decrease of optical bandgap, but a little increase of absorbance at 437cm-1, 675cm-1 and 1640cm-1 were observed from FTIR spectra, after doping with ZnO. Two broad and prominent bands at 364 nm and 409 nm were observed in the PL spectrum of undoped polyamide. After doping, quenching and shifting of these peaks towards red end of the spectrum i.e. 380 nm and 460 nm respectively, were observed, which might be due to agglomeration of ZnO, however due to oxygen vacancies, two new prominent peaks were raised at 452 nm and 490 nm. The reason behind this luminescent behavior by using the results of different techniques has been discussed.

  2. Tuning luminescence and reducing reabsorption of CdSe quantum disks for luminescent solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huichuan; Xie, Peng; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Baojun

    2015-08-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum disks (QDs) have been synthesized for application in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). Luminescence tuning and reabsorption reduction of the QDs were achieved by controlling their size using a hot injection method. The overlap of the absorption and photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared CdSe QDs was negligible. The as-prepared CdSe QDs were incorporated into polymethylmethacrylate without aggregation and luminescence quenching. The obtained highly transparent composites with non-affecting light-emitting properties were used as LSCs. The placement of a CdSe QDs doped LSC prototype (10 × 1 × 0.1 cm) on a Si-cell resulted in a 201% increase in the electrical power output of the Si-cell compared with that of the bare Si-cell.

  3. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... intestine does not have a high number of bacteria. Excess bacteria in the small intestine may use ...

  4. Promising Biological Indicator of Heavy Metal Pollution: Bioluminescent Bacterial Strains Isolated and Characterized from Marine Niches of Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Thakre, Neha A; Shanware, Arti S

    2015-09-01

    In present study, several marine water samples collected from the North Goa Beaches, India for isolation of luminescent bacterial species. Isolates obtained labelled as DP1-5 and AB1-6. Molecular characterization including identification of a microbial culture using 16S rRNA gene based molecular technique and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that DP3 & AB1 isolates were Vibrio harveyi. All of the isolates demonstrated multiple metal resistances in terms of growth, with altered luminescence with variable metal concentration. Present investigations were an attempt towards exploring and reporting an updated diversity of bioluminescent bacterial species from various sites around the Goa, India which would be explored in future for constructing luminescence based biosensor for efficiently monitoring the level of hazardous metals in the environment.

  5. Features of laser-induced luminescence and photoconductivity of layered Cu3In5S9 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, A. G.; Kyazym-zade, A. G.; Salmanov, V. M.; Mamedov, R. M.; Salmanova, A. A.; Gasanova, L. G.; Mahammadov, A. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Luminescence and photoconductivity of layered Cu3In5S9 crystals at high levels of optical excitation are studied experimentally. A pulsed nanosecond Nd:YAG laser with built-in second and third harmonic generators to generate 1064-, 532-, and 355-nm radiation is used as a light source. It is found that the photoluminescence spectra exhibit two emission bands due to zone-acceptor level and impurity donor-impurity acceptor transitions. It is shown that the photoconductivity in Cu3In5S9 is monopolar. The waveform of the photoconductivity consists of fast and slow components associated with two channels of recombination.

  6. Infectious delivery of alphaherpesvirus bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Kurt; Fraefel, Cornel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) can accommodate and stably propagate the genomes of large DNA viruses in E. coli. As DNA virus genomes are often per se infectious upon transfection into mammalian cells, their cloning in BACs and easy modification by homologous recombination in bacteria has become an important strategy to investigate the functions of individual virus genes. This chapter describes a strategy to clone the genomes of viruses of the Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily within the family of the Herpesviridae, which is a group of large DNA viruses that can establish both lytic and latent infections in most animal species including humans. The cloning strategy includes the following steps: (1) Construction of a transfer plasmid that contains the BAC backbone with selection and screening markers, and targeting sequences which support homologous recombination between the transfer plasmid and the alphaherpesvirus genome. (2) Introduction of the transfer plasmid sequences into the alphaherpesvirus genome via homologous recombination in mammalian cells. (3) Isolation of recombinant virus genomes containing the BAC backbone sequences from infected mammalian cells and electroporation into E. coli. (4) Preparation of infectious BAC DNA from bacterial cultures and transfection into mammalian cells. (5) Isolation and characterization of progeny virus.

  7. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  8. The dissociative recombination of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubé, S.; Lehfaoui, L.; Rowe, B. R.; Mitchell, J. B. A.

    1998-09-01

    The dissociative recombination rate coefficient for 0953-4075/31/18/016/img2 has been measured at 300 K using a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe-mass spectrometer apparatus. A value of 0953-4075/31/18/016/img3 has been found.

  9. Introduction to dissociative recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.; Mitchell, J. Brian A.

    1989-01-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions with electrons has important consequences in many areas of physical science. Ab-initio calculations coupled with resonant scattering theory and multichannel quantum defect studies have produced detailed results illuminating the role of ion vibrational excitation, the quantum yields of the DR products, and the role of Rydberg states. The theoretical and experimental results are discussed.

  10. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D’Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew RM

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  11. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  12. Recombineering linear BACs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingwen; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Recombineering is a powerful genetic engineering technique based on homologous recombination that can be used to accurately modify DNA independent of its sequence or size. One novel application of recombineering is the assembly of linear BACs in E. coli that can replicate autonomously as linear plasmids. A circular BAC is inserted with a short telomeric sequence from phage N15, which is subsequently cut and rejoined by the phage protelomerase enzyme to generate a linear BAC with terminal hairpin telomeres. Telomere-capped linear BACs are protected against exonuclease attack both in vitro and in vivo in E. coli cells and can replicate stably. Here we describe step-by-step protocols to linearize any BAC clone by recombineering, including inserting and screening for presence of the N15 telomeric sequence, linearizing BACs in vivo in E. coli, extracting linear BACs, and verifying the presence of hairpin telomere structures. Linear BACs may be useful for functional expression of genomic loci in cells, maintenance of linear viral genomes in their natural conformation, and for constructing innovative artificial chromosome structures for applications in mammalian and plant cells.

  13. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  14. A statistical model for bacterial speciation triggered by lateral gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, Sunjeet; Peng, Wequin

    2006-03-01

    The process of bacterial speciation has been a major unresolved issue in the study of bacterial evolution. It has been proposed that lateral gene transfer and homologous recombination play critical and complementary roles in speciation. We introduce a statistical model, of a population, for the evolution under lateral gene transfer and local homologous recombination. We examine the evolutionary dynamics and its dependence on various evolutionary operators. J. G. Lawrence, Theor. Popul. Biol. 61, 449(2002).

  15. Creating porcine biomedical models through recombineering.

    PubMed

    Rogatcheva, Margarita M; Rund, Laurie A; Swanson, Kelly S; Marron, Brandy M; Beever, Jonathan E; Counter, Christopher M; Schook, Lawrence B

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics provide genetic information from humans and other mammals (mouse, rat, dog and primates) traditionally used as models as well as new candidates (pigs and cattle). In addition, linked enabling technologies, such as transgenesis and animal cloning, provide innovative ways to design and perform experiments to dissect complex biological systems. Exploitation of genomic information overcomes the traditional need to choose naturally occurring models. Thus, investigators can utilize emerging genomic knowledge and tools to create relevant animal models. This approach is referred to as reverse genetics. In contrast to 'forward genetics', in which gene(s) responsible for a particular phenotype are identified by positional cloning (phenotype to genotype), the 'reverse genetics' approach determines the function of a gene and predicts the phenotype of a cell, tissue, or organism (genotype to phenotype). The convergence of classical and reverse genetics, along with genomics, provides a working definition of a 'genetic model' organism (3). The recent construction of phenotypic maps defining quantitative trait loci (QTL) in various domesticated species provides insights into how allelic variations contribute to phenotypic diversity. Targeted chromosomal regions are characterized by the construction of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contigs to isolate and characterize genes contributing towards phenotypic variation. Recombineering provides a powerful methodology to harvest genetic information responsible for phenotype. Linking recombineering with gene-targeted homologous recombination, coupled with nuclear transfer (NT) technology can provide 'clones' of genetically modified animals.

  16. Expanding the recombinant protein quality in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Cano-Garrido, Olivia; Rueda, Fabian L; Sànchez-García, Laura; Ruiz-Ávila, Luis; Bosser, Ramon; Villaverde, Antonio; García-Fruitós, Elena

    2014-12-04

    Escherichia coli has been a main host for the production of recombinant proteins of biomedical interest, but conformational stress responses impose severe bottlenecks that impair the production of soluble, proteolytically stable versions of many protein species. In this context, emerging Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) bacterial hosts provide alternatives as cell factories for recombinant protein production, in which limitations associated to the use of Gram-negative microorganisms might result minimized. Among them, Lactic Acid Bacteria and specially Lactococcus lactis are Gram-positive GRAS organisms in which recombinant protein solubility is generically higher and downstream facilitated, when compared to E. coli. However, deep analyses of recombinant protein quality in this system are still required to completely evaluate its performance and potential for improvement. We have explored here the conformational quality (through specific fluorescence emission) and solubility of an aggregation-prone GFP variant (VP1GFP) produced in L. lactis. In this context, our results show that parameters such as production time, culture conditions and growth temperature have a dramatic impact not only on protein yield, but also on protein solubility and conformational quality, that are particularly favored under fermentative metabolism. Metabolic regime and cultivation temperature greatly influence solubility and conformational quality of an aggregation-prone protein in L. lactis. Specifically, the present study proves that anaerobic growth is the optimal condition for recombinant protein production purposes. Besides, growth temperature plays an important role regulating both protein solubility and conformational quality. Additionally, our results also prove the great versatility for the manipulation of this bacterial system regarding the improvement of functionality, yield and quality of recombinant proteins in this species. These findings not only confirm L. lactis as an

  17. Genomic homologous recombination in planta.

    PubMed Central

    Gal, S; Pisan, B; Hohn, T; Grimsley, N; Hohn, B

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring intrachromosomal homologous recombination in whole plants is described. A multimer of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) sequences, arranged such that CaMV could only be produced by recombination, was integrated into Brassica napus nuclear DNA. This set-up allowed scoring of recombination events by the appearance of viral symptoms. The repeated homologous regions were derived from two different strains of CaMV so that different recombinant viruses (i.e. different recombination events) could be distinguished. In most of the transgenic plants, a single major virus species was detected. About half of the transgenic plants contained viruses of the same type, suggesting a hotspot for recombination. The remainder of the plants contained viruses with cross-over sites distributed throughout the rest of the homologous sequence. Sequence analysis of two recombinant molecules suggest that mismatch repair is linked to the recombination process. Images PMID:2026150

  18. The Contribution of Genetic Recombination to CRISPR Array Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kupczok, Anne; Landan, Giddy; Dagan, Tal

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a microbial immune system against foreign DNA. Recognition sequences (spacers) encoded within the CRISPR array mediate the immune reaction in a sequence-specific manner. The known mechanisms for the evolution of CRISPR arrays include spacer acquisition from foreign DNA elements at the time of invasion and array erosion through spacer deletion. Here, we consider the contribution of genetic recombination between homologous CRISPR arrays to the evolution of spacer repertoire. Acquisition of spacers from exogenic arrays via recombination may confer the recipient with immunity against unencountered antagonists. For this purpose, we develop a novel method for the detection of recombination in CRISPR arrays by modeling the spacer order in arrays from multiple strains from the same species. Because the evolutionary signal of spacer recombination may be similar to that of pervasive spacer deletions or independent spacer acquisition, our method entails a robustness analysis of the recombination inference by a statistical comparison to resampled and perturbed data sets. We analyze CRISPR data sets from four bacterial species: two Gammaproteobacteria species harboring CRISPR type I and two Streptococcus species harboring CRISPR type II loci. We find that CRISPR array evolution in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus agalactiae can be explained solely by vertical inheritance and differential spacer deletion. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we find an excess of single spacers potentially incorporated into the CRISPR locus during independent acquisition events. In Streptococcus thermophilus, evidence for spacer acquisition by recombination is present in 5 out of 70 strains. Genetic recombination has been proposed to accelerate adaptation by combining beneficial mutations that arose in independent lineages. However, for most species under study, we find that CRISPR evolution is shaped mainly by spacer acquisition and

  19. Heterogeneity in the Frequency and Characteristics of Homologous Recombination in Pneumococcal Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hanage, William P.; Harris, Simon R.; Bentley, Stephen; Fraser, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is one of the most important human bacterial pathogens, and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pneumococcus is also known for undergoing extensive homologous recombination via transformation with exogenous DNA. It has been shown that recombination has a major impact on the evolution of the pathogen, including acquisition of antibiotic resistance and serotype-switching. Nevertheless, the mechanism and the rates of recombination in an epidemiological context remain poorly understood. Here, we proposed several mathematical models to describe the rate and size of recombination in the evolutionary history of two very distinct pneumococcal lineages, PMEN1 and CC180. We found that, in both lineages, the process of homologous recombination was best described by a heterogeneous model of recombination with single, short, frequent replacements, which we call micro-recombinations, and rarer, multi-fragment, saltational replacements, which we call macro-recombinations. Macro-recombination was associated with major phenotypic changes, including serotype-switching events, and thus was a major driver of the diversification of the pathogen. We critically evaluate biological and epidemiological processes that could give rise to the micro-recombination and macro-recombination processes. PMID:24786281

  20. Heterogeneity in the frequency and characteristics of homologous recombination in pneumococcal evolution.

    PubMed

    Mostowy, Rafal; Croucher, Nicholas J; Hanage, William P; Harris, Simon R; Bentley, Stephen; Fraser, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is one of the most important human bacterial pathogens, and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pneumococcus is also known for undergoing extensive homologous recombination via transformation with exogenous DNA. It has been shown that recombination has a major impact on the evolution of the pathogen, including acquisition of antibiotic resistance and serotype-switching. Nevertheless, the mechanism and the rates of recombination in an epidemiological context remain poorly understood. Here, we proposed several mathematical models to describe the rate and size of recombination in the evolutionary history of two very distinct pneumococcal lineages, PMEN1 and CC180. We found that, in both lineages, the process of homologous recombination was best described by a heterogeneous model of recombination with single, short, frequent replacements, which we call micro-recombinations, and rarer, multi-fragment, saltational replacements, which we call macro-recombinations. Macro-recombination was associated with major phenotypic changes, including serotype-switching events, and thus was a major driver of the diversification of the pathogen. We critically evaluate biological and epidemiological processes that could give rise to the micro-recombination and macro-recombination processes.

  1. Plasmid transfer by conjugation as a possible route of horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Xylella fastidiosa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important component of evolution and adaptation of bacterial species. Xylella fastidiosa has the ability to incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome by homologous recombination at relatively high rates. This genetic recombination is believed to play a role in adaptati...

  2. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the eye. (e) Exemption from certification. Certification of this color additive is not necessary for... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator. Following...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the eye. (e) Exemption from certification. Certification of this color additive is not necessary for... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator. Following...

  4. Luminescent Processes Elucidated by Simple Experiments on ZnS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwankner, R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes some impurity-related optical properties of semiconductors, with special emphasis on the luminescence of zinc sulfide (ZnS). Presents and interprets five experiments using a ZnS screen, ultraviolet lamp, transparent Dewar liquid nitrogen, and a helium/neon gas base. Includes application of luminescence measurements to archaeology. (SK)

  5. Doped luminescent materials and particle discrimination using same

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick; Allendorf, Mark D; Feng, Patrick L

    2014-10-07

    Doped luminescent materials are provided for converting excited triplet states to radiative hybrid states. The doped materials may be used to conduct pulse shape discrimination (PSD) using luminescence generated by harvested excited triplet states. The doped materials may also be used to detect particles using spectral shape discrimination (SSD).

  6. Unimportance of siloxene in the luminescence of porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.L.; Marcus, M.A.; Adler, D.L.; Xie, Y.; Harris, T.D.; Citrin, P.H. )

    1993-04-19

    Near-edge- and extended-x-ray absorption fine structure measurements, as well as luminescence excitation and emission spectra, were obtained from samples of porous Si and siloxene. Combined, these data establish that, contrary to a recently proposed explanation, siloxene is not generally responsible for the observed room-temperature luminescence in porous Si.

  7. Luminescent Processes Elucidated by Simple Experiments on ZnS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwankner, R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes some impurity-related optical properties of semiconductors, with special emphasis on the luminescence of zinc sulfide (ZnS). Presents and interprets five experiments using a ZnS screen, ultraviolet lamp, transparent Dewar liquid nitrogen, and a helium/neon gas base. Includes application of luminescence measurements to archaeology. (SK)

  8. Ultrashort pulse laser microsurgery system with plasma luminescence feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrow, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-11-10

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue during ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) micro-spinal surgery. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  9. Method for altering the luminescence of a semiconductor

    DOEpatents

    Barbour, J. Charles; Dimos, Duane B.

    1999-01-01

    A method is described for altering the luminescence of a light emitting semiconductor (LES) device. In particular, a method is described whereby a silicon LES device can be selectively irradiated with a radiation source effective for altering the intensity of luminescence of the irradiated region.

  10. Wide-range thermochromic luminescence of organoboronium complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xuepeng; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-01-04

    Alkyl-substituted tetra-coordinate organoboronium bisdiketone complexes exhibit dramatic luminescence thermochromism in organic solvents. In glass-forming alcohols, these complexes exhibit a reversible aqua blue to orange-red to greenish yellow luminescence emission colour change upon cooling.

  11. Method for altering the luminescence of a semiconductor

    DOEpatents

    Barbour, J.C.; Dimos, D.B.

    1999-01-12

    A method is described for altering the luminescence of a light emitting semiconductor (LES) device. In particular, a method is described whereby a silicon LES device can be selectively irradiated with a radiation source effective for altering the intensity of luminescence of the irradiated region. 4 figs.

  12. Electroluminescent apparatus having a structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-09-02

    An apparatus such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer disposed on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains color-changing and non-color-changing regions arranged in a particular pattern.

  13. Laser-induced generation of micrometer-sized luminescent patterns on rare-earth-doped amorphous films

    SciTech Connect

    Zanatta, A.R.; Ribeiro, C.T.M.

    2004-12-01

    Room-temperature photoluminescence has been achieved from rare-earth-doped amorphous (a-) GeN films. The samples were prepared by the radio-frequency-sputtering method, and light emission from the rare-earth (RE) centers was obtained after irradiating the films with a highly focused laser beam. As a result of this laser annealing procedure, almost circular holes with approximately 1-{mu}m diameter were produced on the surface of the a-GeN films. The area nearby these holes correspond to crystalline Ge and coincide with the regions, where relatively strong RE-related luminescence takes place. These laser-annealed areas can be easily and conveniently managed in order to generate different microscopic luminescent patterns. Depending on the RE ion employed, visible and near-infrared light emission were obtained from the patterns so produced. The development of these micrometer-sized luminescent centers, as well as their probable mechanisms of excitation-recombination, will be presented and discussed. The importance of the current experimental results to future technological applications such as microdevices, for example, will also be outlined.

  14. Luminescence sensitivity changes in natural quartz induced by high temperature annealing: a high frequency EPR and OSL study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poolton, N. R. J.; Smith, G. M.; Riedi, P. C.; Bulur, E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A. S.; Adrian, M.

    2000-04-01

    Quartz undergoes very significant luminescence sensitivity changes after high temperature annealing (0-1200 °C), with particular enhancement occurring between the phase transition temperatures 573 and 870 °C. In order to understand why this occurs, high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), operating at 90 GHz, has been used to monitor the structure and population of defects in natural sedimentary quartz, following annealing and icons/Journals/Common/gamma" ALT="gamma" ALIGN="TOP"/> -irradiation. The results are compared with the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data of the same samples. It is shown that: (i) the structure and population of the dominant [AlO4 ]0 recombination centres are largely unaffected by the annealing process; (ii) the oxygen vacancy E´ centres are destroyed when annealed at temperatures between the phase transitions and; (iii) the numbers of both [TiO4 /H+ ]0 and [TiO4 /Li+ ]0 donors increase between 400 and 700 °C. Photo-EPR spectra are presented, providing evidence that both the Ti associated donors and Al acceptors are directly involved in the OSL process. The heat-induced changes in the population of these EPR defects is mirrored in part by the change in the luminescence sensitivity of several OSL components. Evidence is also presented suggesting that E´ may act as non-radiative centres competing in the OSL process.

  15. Ag/ZnO hybrid systems studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy-based luminescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pascua, Leandro; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Stavale, Fernando

    2016-03-07

    Coupled metal/oxide systems are prepared by depositing and embedding Ag nanoparticles into crystalline ZnO films grown on Au(111) supports. The morphology and optical properties of the compounds are investigated by topographic imaging and luminescence spectroscopy performed in a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). The luminescence of bare ZnO is governed by the band-recombination and a Zn-vacancy related peak. After Ag deposition, two additional maxima are detected that are assigned to the in-plane and out-of-plane plasmon in Ag nanoparticles and have energies below and slightly above the oxide band-gap, respectively. Upon coating the particles with additional ZnO, the out-of-plane plasmon redshifts and loses intensity, indicating strong coupling to the oxide electronic system, while the in-plane mode broadens but remains detectable. The original situation can be restored by gently heating the sample, which drives the silver back to the surface. However, the optical response of pristine ZnO is not recovered even after silver evaporation at high temperature. Small discrepancies are explained with changes in the ZnO defect landscape, e.g., due to silver incorporation. Our experiments demonstrate how energy-transfer processes can be investigated in well-defined metal/oxide systems by means of STM-based spectroscopic techniques.

  16. Exciton luminescence from Cu2SnS3 bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Naoya; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Tanaka, Kunihiko

    2016-02-01

    The optical properties of Cu2SnS3 (CTS) bulk crystals grown by chemical vapor transport were studied by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The PL spectra from the CTS bulk crystals were analyzed as a function of excitation power and temperature. The main phase of the as-grown samples was determined to be monoclinic CTS by Raman spectroscopy. The observed PL spectra from the CTS bulk crystals were composed of peaks corresponding to free-exciton, two bound-excitons, and donor-acceptor pair recombination luminescence. The peak energies for the free-exciton and two bound-exciton emissions were 0.9317, 0.9291, and 0.9260 eV, respectively, at temperature of 4.2 K. The bound-exciton luminescence was not observed above 30 K. The thermal activation energies for the free-exciton and two bound-exciton emissions were 6.5, 4.8, and 5.2 meV, respectively. The fundamental band gap in the CTS bulk crystals was expected to be ca. 0.94 eV.

  17. Luminescence and scintillation properties of Cs3BiCl6 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Makoto; Koshimizu, Masanori; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yanagida, Takayuki; Ono, Shingo; Asai, Keisuke

    2016-11-01

    The optical and scintillation properties of Cs3BiCl6 single crystals were characterized, and absorption properties were investigated for thin films. The thin films showed two absorption bands at ∼220 nm and 330 nm; these bands can be attributed to the 1A1g → 1T1u and 1A1g → 3T1u transitions of Bi3+ ions, respectively. A luminescence band was observed at ∼390 nm in the photoluminescence spectra; this band can be attributed to the 3T1u → 1A1g transition of Bi3+ ions. In the X-ray-induced radioluminescence spectrum, in addition to the luminescence band at 390 nm, another band was observed at 600-700 nm; this band was tentatively attributed to the radiative recombination of self-trapped excitons. The decay-time constants of photoluminescence and scintillation decay were of the order of nanoseconds. The scintillation light yield was 800 photons/MeV. The results indicate that Cs3BiCl6 has a fast scintillation decay and a relatively poor light yield.

  18. Synthesis, luminescence and scintillation of rare earth doped lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsohn, L. G.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Kucera, C. J.; James, T. L.; Roberts, S. A.; Qian, H.; Yukihara, E. G.; DeVol, T. A.; Ballato, J.

    2010-12-01

    Scintillation from nanoparticles is a nascent field but offers valuable fundamental insights and practical utilities. In this work, the scintillation response of LaF 3:Eu nanoparticles is reported. Core/multi-shell nanoparticles were prepared using a modified solution precipitation method that takes advantage of the organic ligand ammonium di- n-octadecyldithiophosphate (ADDP) to simultaneously achieve shelling of doped core nanoparticles while avoiding agglomeration. Nanoparticles were characterized on their structure, morphology, luminescence, and scintillation behavior by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence, and radioluminescence (RL) measurements, respectively. Analysis of the scintillation process revealed that the unique aspect of scintillation in nanoparticles when compared to bulk materials is related to the migration of carriers within the nanoparticle. Cladding of the Eu-doped core with an undoped shell was found to increase scintillation intensity by a factor of 3, and further shelling leads to a continuous decrease in RL intensity. Surface passivation, together with the decreasing probability of radiative recombination of carriers at the luminescent centers in the core with increasing number of shells grown around the core are suggested to describe the observed RL intensity behavior. Scintillation enhancement by means of shelling is a promising pathway to enhance the use of scintillator nanoparticles in detection devices.

  19. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  20. Visible luminescence of dysprosium ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses.

    PubMed

    Pisarska, Joanna; Żur, Lidia; Pisarski, Wojciech A

    2011-08-15

    Visible luminescence of Dy(3+) ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses was examined. Luminescence spectra show two intense bands at 480 nm and 573 nm due to (4)F(9/2)→(6)H(15/2) (blue) and (4)F(9/2)→(6)H(13/2) (yellow) transitions of Dy(3+). Luminescence decays from (4)F(9/2) state and yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratios (Y/B) were analysed with PbX(2) (X=F, Cl) content. An introduction of PbX(2) to the borate glass results in the increasing of (4)F(9/2) lifetime and the decreasing of yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratio, which is due to reduction of covalency between Dy(3+) and O(2-)/X(-) ions.