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Sample records for recombinant major outer

  1. Sequence analysis, expression, and binding activity of recombinant major outer sheath protein (Msp) of Treponema denticola.

    PubMed Central

    Fenno, J C; Müller, K H; McBride, B C

    1996-01-01

    The gene encoding the major outer sheath protein (Msp) of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola ATCC 35405 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Preliminary sequence analysis showed that the 5' end of the msp gene was not present on the 5.5-kb cloned fragment described in a recent study (M. Haapasalo, K. H. Müller, V. J. Uitto, W. K. Leung, and B. C. McBride, Infect. Immun. 60:2058-2065,1992). The 5' end of msp was obtained by PCR amplification from a T. denticola genomic library, and an open reading frame of 1,629 bp was identified as the coding region for Msp by combining overlapping sequences. The deduced peptide consisted of 543 amino acids and had a molecular mass of 58,233 Da. The peptide had a typical prokaryotic signal sequence with a potential cleavage site for signal peptidase 1. Northern (RNA) blot analysis showing the msp transcript to be approximately 1.7 kb was consistent with the identification of a promoter consensus sequence located optimally upstream of msp and a transcription termination signal found downstream of the stop codon. The entire msp sequence was amplified from T. denticola genomic DNA and cloned in E. coli by using a tightly regulated T7 RNA polymerase vector system. Expression of Msp was toxic to E. coli when the entire msp gene was present. High levels of Msp were produced as inclusion bodies when the putative signal peptide sequence was deleted and replaced by a vector-encoded T7 peptide sequence. Recombinant Msp purified to homogeneity from a clone containing the full-length msp gene adhered to immobilized laminin and fibronectin but not to bovine serum albumin. Attachment of recombinant Msp was decreased in the presence of soluble substrate. Attachment of T. denticola to immobilized laminin and fibronectin was increased by pretreatment of the substrate with recombinant Msp. These studies lend further support to the hypothesis that Msp mediates the extracellular matrix binding activity of T. denticola. PMID

  2. Surface expression, single-channel analysis and membrane topology of recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Heather E; McClafferty, Heather; Ashley, Richard H

    2005-01-01

    Background Chlamydial bacteria are obligate intracellular pathogens containing a cysteine-rich porin (Major Outer Membrane Protein, MOMP) with important structural and, in many species, immunity-related roles. MOMP forms extensive disulphide bonds with other chlamydial proteins, and is difficult to purify. Leaderless, recombinant MOMPs expressed in E. coli have yet to be refolded from inclusion bodies, and although leadered MOMP can be expressed in E. coli cells, it often misfolds and aggregates. We aimed to improve the surface expression of correctly folded MOMP to investigate the membrane topology of the protein, and provide a system to display native and modified MOMP epitopes. Results C. trachomatis MOMP was expressed on the surface of E. coli cells (including "porin knockout" cells) after optimizing leader sequence, temperature and medium composition, and the protein was functionally reconstituted at the single-channel level to confirm it was folded correctly. Recombinant MOMP formed oligomers even in the absence of its 9 cysteine residues, and the unmodified protein also formed inter- and intra-subunit disulphide bonds. Its topology was modeled as a (16-stranded) β-barrel, and specific structural predictions were tested by removing each of the four putative surface-exposed loops corresponding to highly immunogenic variable sequence (VS) domains, and one or two of the putative transmembrane strands. The deletion of predicted external loops did not prevent folding and incorporation of MOMP into the E. coli outer membrane, in contrast to the removal of predicted transmembrane strands. Conclusions C. trachomatis MOMP was functionally expressed on the surface of E. coli cells under newly optimized conditions. Tests of its predicted membrane topology were consistent with β-barrel oligomers in which major immunogenic regions are displayed on surface-exposed loops. Functional surface expression, coupled with improved understanding of MOMP's topology, could provide

  3. Antibody Responses to Recombinant Protein Fragments of the Major Outer Membrane Protein and Polymorphic Outer Membrane Protein POMP90 in Chlamydophila abortus-Infected Pregnant Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Morag; Entrican, Gary; Wattegedera, Sean; Buxton, David; McKendrick, Iain J.; Longbottom, David

    2005-01-01

    Chlamydophila abortus is one of the major causes of infectious abortion in pregnant sheep (enzootic abortion of ewes or EAE) worldwide. Organisms shed in infected placentas and uterine discharges at lambing time are the main sources of environmental contamination, responsible for transmission to susceptible animals and possible human contacts. In the present study, a recently developed test, based on a recombinant fragment of the polymorphic outer membrane protein POMP90 (rOMP90-4 indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [iELISA]) and one based on the variable segment 2 (VS2) region of the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) (MOMP VS2 iELISA) were compared using sera from C. abortus-infected ewes at different stages throughout pregnancy. The rOMP90 iELISA detected antibody much earlier in pregnancy than the MOMP iELISA, which, like the complement fixation test, detected antibody only at the time of abortion or lambing. No anti-MOMP antibody response could be detected in three of seven experimentally infected ewes. Furthermore, the rOMP90 iELISA detected antibody in an animal that seroconverted during the course of the study, which the MOMP iELISA failed to detect. Overall, the results show that the rOMP90-4 iELISA is considerably more sensitive than the MOMP VS2 iELISA for identifying animals infected with C. abortus. Earlier detection of infection will allow appropriate control measures to be taken to reduce environmental contamination, thus limiting the spread of infection, financial losses, and the possible risks of zoonotic transmission to humans. PMID:15939753

  4. Vaccination of koalas with a recombinant Chlamydia pecorum major outer membrane protein induces antibodies of different specificity compared to those following a natural live infection.

    PubMed

    Kollipara, Avinash; Polkinghorne, Adam; Beagley, Kenneth W; Timms, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydial infection in koalas is common across the east coast of Australia and causes significant morbidity, infertility and mortality. An effective vaccine to prevent the adverse consequences of chlamydial infections in koalas (particularly blindness and infertility in females) would provide an important management tool to prevent further population decline of this species. An important step towards developing a vaccine in koalas is to understand the host immune response to chlamydial infection. In this study, we used the Pepscan methodology to identify B cell epitopes across the Major Outer Membrane Protein (MOMP) of four C. pecorum strains/genotypes that are recognized, either following (a) natural live infection or (b) administration of a recombinant MOMP vaccine. Plasma antibodies from the koalas naturally infected with a C. pecorum G genotype strain recognised the epitopes located in the variable domain (VD) four of MOMP G and also VD4 of MOMP H. By comparison, plasma antibodies from an animal infected with a C. pecorum F genotype strain recognised epitopes in VD1, 2 and 4 of MOMP F, but not from other genotype MOMPs. When Chlamydia-free koalas were immunised with recombinant MOMP protein they produced antibodies not only against epitopes in the VDs but also in conserved domains of MOMP. Naturally infected koalas immunised with recombinant MOMP protein also produced antibodies against epitopes in the conserved domains. This work paves the way for further refinement of a MOMP-based Chlamydia vaccine that will offer wide cross-protection against the variety of chlamydial infections circulating in wild koala populations.

  5. Cloning and Characterization of Multigenes Encoding the Immunodominant 30-Kilodalton Major Outer Membrane Proteins of Ehrlichia canis and Application of the Recombinant Protein for Serodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Norio; Unver, Ahmet; Zhi, Ning; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    1998-01-01

    A 30-kDa major outer membrane protein of Ehrlichia canis, the agent of canine ehrlichiosis, is the major antigen recognized by both naturally and experimentally infected dog sera. The protein cross-reacts with a serum against a recombinant 28-kDa protein (rP28), one of the outer membrane proteins of a gene (omp-1) family of Ehrlichia chaffeensis. Two DNA fragments of E. canis were amplified by PCR with two primer pairs based on the sequences of E. chaffeensis omp-1 genes, cloned, and sequenced. Each fragment contained a partial 30-kDa protein gene of E. canis. Genomic Southern blot analysis with the partial gene probes revealed the presence of multiple copies of these genes in the E. canis genome. Three copies of the entire gene (p30, p30-1, and p30a) were cloned and sequenced from the E. canis genomic DNA. The open reading frames of the two copies (p30 and p30-1) were tandemly arranged with an intergenic space. The three copies were similar but not identical and contained a semivariable region and three hypervariable regions in the protein molecules. The following genes homologous to three E. canis 30-kDa protein genes and the E. chaffeensis omp-1 family were identified in the closely related rickettsiae: wsp from Wolbachia sp., p44 from the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, msp-2 and msp-4 from Anaplasma marginale, and map-1 from Cowdria ruminantium. Phylogenetic analysis among the three E. canis 30-kDa proteins and the major surface proteins of the rickettsiae revealed that these proteins are divided into four clusters and the two E. canis 30-kDa proteins are closely related but that the third 30-kDa protein is not. The p30 gene was expressed as a fusion protein, and the antibody to the recombinant protein (rP30) was raised in a mouse. The antibody reacted with rP30 and a 30-kDa protein of purified E. canis. Twenty-nine indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA)-positive dog plasma specimens strongly recognized the rP30 of E. canis. To evaluate whether the rP30

  6. Antibody and Cytokine Responses of Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) Vaccinated with Recombinant Chlamydial Major Outer Membrane Protein (MOMP) with Two Different Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahneaz Ali; Desclozeaux, Marion; Waugh, Courtney; Hanger, Jon; Loader, Jo; Gerdts, Volker; Potter, Andrew; Polkinghorne, Adam; Beagley, Kenneth; Timms, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Developing a vaccine against Chlamydia is key to combating widespread mortalities and morbidities associated with this infection in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus). In previous studies, we have shown that two or three doses of a Recombinant Major Outer Membrane Protein (rMOMP) antigen-based vaccine, combined with immune stimulating complex (ISC) adjuvant, results in strong cellular and humoral immune responses in koalas. We have also separately evaluated a single dose vaccine, utilising a tri-adjuvant formula that comprises polyphosphazine based poly I: C and host defense peptides, with the same antigen. This formulation also produced strong cellular and humoral immune responses in captive koalas. In this current study, we directly compared the host immune responses of two sub-groups of wild Chlamydia negative koalas in one population vaccinated with the rMOMP protein antigen and adjuvanted with either the ISC or tri-adjuvant formula. Overall, both adjuvants produced strong Chlamydia-specific cellular (IFN-γ and IL-17A) responses in circulating PBMCs as well as MOMP-specific and functional, in vitro neutralising antibodies. While the immune responses were similar, there were adjuvant-specific immune differences between the two adjuvants, particularly in relation to the specificity of the MOMP epitope antibody responses. PMID:27219467

  7. Genetic diversity of Chlamydia pecorum strains in wild koala locations across Australia and the implications for a recombinant C. pecorum major outer membrane protein based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kollipara, Avinash; Polkinghorne, Adam; Wan, Charles; Kanyoka, Pride; Hanger, Jon; Loader, Joanne; Callaghan, John; Bell, Alicia; Ellis, William; Fitzgibbon, Sean; Melzer, Alistar; Beagley, Kenneth; Timms, Peter

    2013-12-27

    The long term survival of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is at risk due to a range of threatening processes. A major contributing factor is disease caused by infection with Chlamydia pecorum, which has been detected in most mainland koala populations and is associated with ocular and genital tract infections. A critical aspect for the development of vaccines against koala chlamydial infections is a thorough understanding of the prevalence and strain diversity of C. pecorum infections across wild populations. In this study, we describe the largest survey (403 koalas from eight wild populations and three wildlife hospitals) examining the diversity of C. pecorum infections. 181 of the 403 koalas tested (45%) positive for C. pecorum by species-specific quantitative PCR with infection rates ranging from 20% to 61% in the eight wild populations sampled. The ompA gene, which encodes the chlamydial major outer membrane protein (MOMP), has been the major target of several chlamydial vaccines. Based on our analysis of the diversity of MOMP amino types in the infected koalas, we conclude that, (a) there exists significant diversity of C. pecorum strains in koalas, with 10 distinct, full length C. pecorum MOMP amino types identified in the 11 koala locations sampled, (b) despite this diversity, there are predicted T and B cell epitopes in both conserved as well as variable domains of MOMP which suggest cross-amino type immune responses, and (c) a recombinant MOMP-based vaccine consisting of MOMP "F" could potentially induce heterotypic protection against a range of C. pecorum strains.

  8. Protection against an intranasal challenge by vaccines formulated with native and recombinant preparations of the Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guifeng; Pal, Sukumar; Weiland, Joseph; Peterson, Ellena M.; de la Maza, Luis M.

    2009-01-01

    To compare the ability of a native and a recombinant preparation of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn; Ct-nMOMP and Ct-rMOMP) to protect against an intranasal (i.n.) challenge, BALB/c mice were vaccinated by the intramuscular (i.m.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) routes using CpG-1826 and Montanide ISA 720 as adjuvants. Animals inoculated i.n. with live elementary bodies (EB) of Chlamydia served as a positive control. Negative control groups were immunized with either Neisseria gonorrhoeae recombinant porin B (Ng-rPorB) or with minimal essential medium (MEM-0). Mice immunized with Ct-rMOMP, Ct-nMOMP and EB developed a strong immune response as shown by high levels of Chlamydia specific antibodies in serum and a strong T-cell lymphoproliferative response. Following the i.n. challenge with 104 inclusion forming units (IFU) of C. trachomatis. mice immunized with Ct-nMOMP or Ct-rMOMP lost significantly less weight than the negative control animals immunized with Ng-rPorB or MEM-0 (P<0.05). However, mice vaccinated with the Ct-nMOMP lost less weight than those immunized with the Ct-rMOMP (P<0.05). Mice were euthanized at 10 days following the challenge, their lungs weighed and the number of IFU of Chlamydia determined. Based on the lung weight and number of IFU recovered, significant protection was observed in the groups of mice immunized with both Ct-nMOMP and the Ct-rMOMP (P<0.05). Nevertheless, significantly better protection was achieved with the Ct-nMOMP in comparison with the Ct-rMOMP (P<0.05). In conclusion, vaccination with a preparation of the nMOMP elicited a more robust protection than immunization with rMOMP suggesting that the conformational structure of MOMP is critical for inducing strong protection. PMID:19446590

  9. Protection against an intranasal challenge by vaccines formulated with native and recombinant preparations of the Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guifeng; Pal, Sukumar; Weiland, Joseph; Peterson, Ellena M; de la Maza, Luis M

    2009-08-06

    To compare the ability of a native and a recombinant preparation of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn; Ct-nMOMP and Ct-rMOMP) to protect against an intranasal (i.n.) challenge, BALB/c mice were vaccinated by the intramuscular (i.m.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) routes using CpG-1826 and Montanide ISA 720 as adjuvants. Animals inoculated i.n. with live elementary bodies (EB) of Chlamydia served as a positive control. Negative control groups were immunized with either Neisseria gonorrhoeae recombinant porin B (Ng-rPorB) or with minimal essential medium (MEM-0). Mice immunized with Ct-rMOMP, Ct-nMOMP and EB developed a strong immune response as shown by high levels of Chlamydia specific antibodies in serum and a strong T-cell lymphoproliferative response. Following the i.n. challenge with 10(4) inclusion forming units (IFU) of C. trachomatis, mice immunized with Ct-nMOMP or Ct-rMOMP lost significantly less weight than the negative control animals immunized with Ng-rPorB or MEM-0 (P<0.05). However, mice vaccinated with the Ct-nMOMP lost less weight than those immunized with the Ct-rMOMP (P<0.05). Mice were euthanized at 10 days following the challenge, their lungs weighed and the number of IFU of Chlamydia determined. Based on the lung weight and number of IFU recovered, significant protection was observed in the groups of mice immunized with both Ct-nMOMP and the Ct-rMOMP (P<0.05). Nevertheless, significantly better protection was achieved with the Ct-nMOMP in comparison with the Ct-rMOMP (P<0.05). In conclusion, vaccination with a preparation of the nMOMP elicited a more robust protection than immunization with rMOMP, suggesting that the conformational structure of MOMP is critical for inducing strong protection.

  10. An efficient depyrogenation method for recombinant bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Basto, Afonso P; Morais, Joana; Marcelino, Eduardo; Leitão, Alexandre; Santos, Dulce M

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial outer membrane lipoproteins are anchored in the outer membrane lipid layer in close association with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and with other hydrophobic membrane proteins, making their purification technically challenging. We have previously shown that a thorough delipidation of outer membrane preparations from the Escherichia coli expression host is an important step to eliminate contaminant proteins when purifying recombinant antigens expressed in fusion with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprI lipoprotein. Here we report the cloning and expression of three antigens in fusion with OprI (ovalbumin, eGFP and BbPDI) and our efforts to deal with the variable LPS contamination levels observed in different batches of purified lipoproteins. The use of polymyxin B columns or endotoxin removal polycationic magnetic beads for depyrogenation of purified lipoproteins resulted in high protein losses and the use of Triton X-114 or sodium deoxycholate during the course of affinity chromatography showed to be ineffective to reduce LPS contamination. Instead, performing a hot phenol/water LPS extraction from outer membrane preparations prior to metal affinity chromatography allowed the purification of the recombinant fusion lipoproteins with LPS contents below 0.02EU/μg of protein. The purified recombinant lipoproteins retain their capacity to stimulate bone marrow-derived dendritic cells allowing for the study of their immunomodulatory properties through TLR2/1. This is a simple and easy to scale up method that can also be considered for the purification of other outer membrane lipoproteins.

  11. Horizontal Gene Transfer and Assortative Recombination within the Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Population Provide Genetic Diversity at the Single carO Gene, Encoding a Major Outer Membrane Protein Channel ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Mussi, María Alejandra; Limansky, Adriana S.; Relling, Verónica; Ravasi, Pablo; Arakaki, Adrián; Actis, Luis A.; Viale, Alejandro M.

    2011-01-01

    We described previously the presence in Acinetobacter baumannii of a novel outer membrane (OM) protein, CarO, which functions as an l-ornithine OM channel and whose loss was concomitant with increased carbapenem resistance among clonally related nosocomial isolates of this opportunistic pathogen. Here, we describe the existence of extensive genetic diversity at the carO gene within the A. baumannii clinical population. The systematic analysis of carO sequences from A. baumannii isolates obtained from public hospitals in Argentina revealed the existence of four highly polymorphic carO variants among them. Sequence polymorphism between the different A. baumannii CarO variants was concentrated in three well-defined protein regions that superimposed mostly to predicted surface-exposed loops. Polymorphism among A. baumannii CarO variants was manifested in differential electrophoretic mobilities, antigenic properties, abilities to form stable oligomeric structures, and l-ornithine influx abilities through the A. baumannii OM under in vivo conditions. Incongruence between the phylogenies of the clinical A. baumannii isolates analyzed and those of the carO variants they harbor suggests the existence of assortative (entire-gene) carO recombinational exchange within the A. baumannii population. Exchange of carO variants possessing differential characteristics mediated by horizontal gene transfer may constitute an A. baumannii population strategy to survive radically changing environmental conditions, such as the leap from inanimate sources to human hosts and vice versa, persistence in a compromised host, and/or survival in health care facilities. PMID:21764928

  12. Analysis of Recent Major Outer-Rise Earthquake Rupture Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, M.; Ammon, C.; Lay, T.; Kanamori, H.

    2009-12-01

    Outer-rise earthquakes can help indicate the degree of seismic coupling of a subduction zone megathrust as well help constrain stress transfer processes in underthrusting oceanic lithosphere during the seismic cycle. In addition, outer rise earthquake-related structures may play a significant role in the transport of water into subduction zones, and possibly provide seismogenic structures re-activated during intermediate-depth earthquakes. And finally, although less frequent than large underthrusting events, large outer-rise earthquakes may pose significant hazard since they have been found to display higher stress drops and greater enrichment in high frequency shaking than comparable size interplate events. In this study we analyze and compare the seismic properties of three specific outer-rise sequences, representing relatively diverse tectonic characteristics, including events from southern Vanuatu (formerly New Hebrides), central Kuril Islands, and the Andaman Islands regions. Similar to several important historic events, these recent large outer rise sequences provide information on the transmission of slab-pull generated stresses and their relationship with large underthrusting earthquakes. To allow comparison with the 13 January (Mw 8.1) 2007 central Kuril Islands sequence that we studied previously, we conduct finite-fault analyses of the 16 May, 1995 Vanuatu, Mw = 7.7 and 10 August, 2009 Andaman Islands, Mw = 7.5, outer-rise events using azimuthally distributed teleseismic P and SH waveforms and Rayleigh-wave effective source time functions. The unique tectonic geometry of the Vanuatu event, occurring near the corner of the overriding Pacific Plate, conveys information about the influence of geometry on the outer-rise character. The Andaman earthquake occurred in a region with substantially oblique plate motion where geometrical plate relationships remain somewhat unclear. Considering their seismic properties and relationship to nearby great underthrusting

  13. Major outer membrane proteins unique to reproductive cells of Hyphomonas jannaschiana.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, N; Dagasan, L; Sledjeski, D; Weiner, R M

    1989-01-01

    Separation on the basis of molecular weight resolved three proteins specific to the swarmer cell of Hyphomonas jannaschiana. In the reproductive cell, 4 major proteins were identified as cytoplasmic and 10 were identified as envelope. Of these envelope proteins, one was common to both the inner and outer membranes, four were common to the inner membrane, and five were common to the outer membrane. Four of these outer membrane proteins were specific to the reproductive cell, and two of these proteins, with apparent molecular weights of 116,000 and 29,000, constituted 19% of the total cell protein and 54% of the outer membrane protein. Images PMID:2703471

  14. Expression of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Manning, D S; Stewart, S J

    1993-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Chlamydia trachomatis was expressed in Escherichia coli. To assess whether it assembled into a conformationally correct structure at the cell surface, we characterized the recombinant MOMP (rMOMP) by Western immunoblot analysis, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize contiguous and conformational MOMP epitopes. Western blot analysis showed that most of the rMOMP comigrated with authentic monomer MOMP, indicating that its signal peptide was recognized and cleaved by E. coli. The rMOMP could not be detected on the cell surface of viable or formalin-killed E. coli organisms by indirect immunofluorescence staining with a MAb specific for a MOMP contiguous epitope. In contrast, the same MAb readily stained rMOMP-expressing E. coli cells that had been permeabilized by methanol fixation. A MAb that recognizes a conformational MOMP epitope and reacted strongly with formalin- or methanol-fixed elementary bodies failed to stain formalin- or methanol-fixed E. coli expressing rMOMP. Moreover, this MAb did not immunoprecipitate rMOMP from expressing E. coli cells even though it precipitated the authentic protein from lysates of C. trachomatis elementary bodies. Therefore we concluded that rMOMP was not localized to the E. coli cell surface and was not recognizable by a conformation-dependent antibody. These results indicate that rMOMP expressed by E. coli is unlikely to serve as an accurate model of MOMP structure and function. They also question the utility of rMOMP as a source of immunogen for eliciting neutralizing antibodies against conformational antigenic sites of the protein. Images PMID:8406797

  15. Construction and Immunogenicity of Recombinant Swinepox Virus Expressing Outer Membrane Protein L of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yizhen; Lin, Huixing; Ma, Zhe; Fan, Hongjie

    2016-07-28

    Salmonella spp. are gram-negative flagellated bacteria that cause a variety of diseases in humans and animals, ranging from mild gastroenteritis to severe systemic infection. To explore development of a potent vaccine against Salmonella infections, the gene encoding outer membrane protein L (ompL) was inserted into the swinepox virus (SPV) genome by homologous recombination. PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence assays were used to verify the recombinant swinepox virus rSPV-OmpL. The immune responses and protection efficacy of rSPV-OmpL were assessed in a mouse model. Forty mice were assigned to four groups, which were immunized with rSPV-OmpL, inactive Salmonella (positive control), wildtype SPV (wtSPV; negative control), or PBS (challenge control), respectively. The OmpLspecific antibody in the rSPV-OmpL-immunized group increased dramatically and continuously over time post-vaccination, and was present at a significantly higher level than in the positive control group (p < 0.05). The concentrations of IFN-γ and IL-4, which represent Th1-type and Th2-type cytokine responses, were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the rSPVOmpL- vaccinated group than in the other three groups. After intraperitoneal challenge with a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium CVCC542, eight out of ten mice in the rSPV-OmpLvaccinated group were protected, whereas all the mice in the negative control and challenge control groups died within 3 days. Passive immune protection assays showed that hyperimmune sera against OmpL could provide mice with effective protection against challenge from S. typhimurium. The recombinant swinepox virus rSPV-OmpL might serve as a promising vaccine against Salmonella infection.

  16. Purification and partial characterization of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, H.D.; Kromhout, J.; Schachter, J.

    1981-03-01

    Elementary bodies (EB) of Chlamydia trachomatis serotypes C, E, and L2 were extrinsically radioiodinated, and whole-cell lysates of these serotypes were compared by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Autoradiography of the polypeptide profiles identified a major surface protein with an apparent subunit molecular weight of 39,500 that was common to each C. trachomatis serotype. The abilities of nonionic (Triton X-100), dipolar ionic (Zwittergent TM-314), mild (sodium deoxycholate and sodium N-lauroyl sarcosine), and strongly anionic (SDS) detergents to extract this protein from intact EB of the L2 serotype were investigated by SDS-PAGE analysis of the soluble and insoluble fractions obtained after each detergent treatment. Only SDS readily extracted this protein from intact EB. Sarkosyl treatment selectively solubilized the majority of other EB proteins, leaving the 39,500-dalton protein associated with the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction. Ultrastructural studies of the Sarkosyl-insoluble EB pellet showed it to consist of empty EB particles possessing an apparently intact outer membrane. No structural evidence for a peptidoglycan-like cell wall was found. Morphologically these chlamydial outer membrane complexes (COMC) resembled intact chlamydial EB outer membranes. The 39,500-dalton outer membrane protein was quantitatively extracted from COMC by treating them with 2% SDS at 60 degrees C. This protein accounted for 61% of the total COMC-associated protein, and its extraction resulted in a concomitant loss of the COMC membrane structure and morphology. The 39,500-dalton major outer membrane protein is a serogroup antigen of C. trachomatis organisms.

  17. Allele-dependent recombination frequency: homology requirement in meiotic recombination at the hot spot in the mouse major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, M; Sagai, T; Lindahl, K F; Toyoda, Y; Moriwaki, K; Shiroishi, T

    1995-05-20

    Meiotic recombination break joints in the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are clustered within short segments known as hot spots. We systematically investigated the requirement for sequence homology between two chromosomes for recombination activity at the hot spot next to the Lmp2 gene. The results indicated that a high rate of recombination required a high degree of similarity of overall genome structure at the hot spot. In particular, the same copy number of repetitive sequences within the hot spot was essential for a high frequency of recombination, suggesting that recombination in mouse meiosis is more sensitive to heterozygous deletion or insertion of DNA than to mismatches of single-base substitutions.

  18. Major outer membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila carries a species-specific epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, F S; Conlin, C A

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (LP3IIG2) directed against a species-specific epitope of Legionella pneumophila is available from Genetic Systems Corp., Seattle, Wash., for use as a diagnostic reagent. Outer membrane protein-rich fractions were prepared from L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 8 by treatment of cell envelopes with 2% Triton X-100. Immunoblots of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels demonstrated that each membrane fraction contained two bands that reacted with LP3IIG2. The monoclonal antibody bound preferentially to a 26,000-molecular-weight band that appears to result from modification of the 29,000-molecular-weight major outer membrane protein. Images PMID:2420824

  19. Native surface association of a recombinant 38-kilodalton Treponema pallidum antigen isolated from the Escherichia coli outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, T E; Radolf, J D; Walfield, A M; Cunningham, T M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1986-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid designated pAW305, containing a 6-kilobase insert of Treponema pallidum DNA, directed the expression of a 38-kilodalton (kDa) treponemal antigen in Escherichia coli. The 38-kDa antigen copurified with the outer membrane fraction of the E. coli cell envelope after treatment with nonionic detergents or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Rabbits immunized with the recombinant 38-kDa antigen developed antibodies which reacted specifically with a 38-kDa T. pallidum antigen on immunoblots, and 38-kDa antisera specifically immobilized T. pallidum in a complement-dependent manner in the T. pallidum immobilization test. Antisera to the 38-kDa recombinant antigen were also used to demonstrate its native surface association on T. pallidum by immunoelectron microscopy. Images PMID:3516880

  20. Major psychological factors affecting acceptance of gene-recombination technology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the validity of a causal model that was made to predict the acceptance of gene-recombination technology. A structural equation model was used as a causal model. First of all, based on preceding studies, the factors of perceived risk, perceived benefit, and trust were set up as important psychological factors determining acceptance of gene-recombination technology in the structural equation model. An additional factor, "sense of bioethics," which I consider to be important for acceptance of biotechnology, was added to the model. Based on previous studies, trust was set up to have an indirect influence on the acceptance of gene-recombination technology through perceived risk and perceived benefit in the model. Participants were 231 undergraduate students in Japan who answered a questionnaire with a 5-point bipolar scale. The results indicated that the proposed model fits the data well, and showed that acceptance of gene-recombination technology is explained largely by four factors, that is, perceived risk, perceived benefit, trust, and sense of bioethics, whether the technology is applied to plants, animals, or human beings. However, the relative importance of the four factors was found to vary depending on whether the gene-recombination technology was applied to plants, animals, or human beings. Specifically, the factor of sense of bioethics is the most important factor in acceptance of plant gene-recombination technology and animal gene-recombination technology, and the factors of trust and perceived risk are the most important factors in acceptance of human being gene-recombination technology.

  1. A multi-epitope vaccine based on Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein induces specific immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jianxin; Hou, Bailong; Wang, Bingbing; Lin, Xiaoyun; Gong, Wenci; Dong, Haiyan; Zhu, Shanli; Chen, Shao; Xue, Xiangyang; Zhao, Kong-Nan; Zhang, Lifang

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a candidate vaccine comprising the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) multi-epitope of Chlamydia trachomatis. A short gene of multi-epitope derived from MOMP containing multiple T- and B-cell epitopes was artificially synthesized. The recombinant plasmid pET32a(+) containing codon optimized MOMP multi-epitope gene was constructed. Expression of the fusion protein Trx-His-MOMP multi-epitope in Escherichia coli was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blot analysis. Balb/c mice were inoculated with the purified fusion protein subcutaneously three times with 2-week intervals. Results showed that the MOMP multi-epitope elicited not only strong humoral immune responses to C. trachomatis by generating significantly high levels of specific antibodies (IgG1 and IgG2a), but also a cellular immune response by inducing robust cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in mice. Furthermore, the MOMP multi-epitope substantially primed secretion of IFN-γ, revealing that this vaccine could induce a strong Th1 response. Finally, the mice vaccinated with the MOMP multi-epitope displayed a reduction of C. trachomatis shedding upon a chlamydial challenge and an accelerated clearance of the infected C. trachomatis. In conclusion, the MOMP multi-epitope vaccine may have the potentiality for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against the C. trachomatis infection.

  2. Outer membrane protein DsrA is the major fibronectin-binding determinant of Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Isabelle; White, C Dinitra; Nepluev, Igor; Throm, Robert E; Spinola, Stanley M; Elkins, Christopher

    2008-04-01

    The ability to bind extracellular matrix proteins is a critical virulence determinant for skin pathogens. Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiological agent of the genital ulcer disease chancroid, binds extracellular matrix components, including fibronectin (FN). We investigated H. ducreyi FN binding and report several important findings about this interaction. First, FN binding by H. ducreyi was greatly increased in bacteria grown on heme and almost completely inhibited by hemoglobin. Second, wild-type strain 35000HP bound significantly more FN than did a dsrA mutant in two different FN binding assays. Third, the expression of dsrA in the dsrA mutant restored FN binding and conferred the ability to bind FN to a non-FN-binding Haemophilus influenzae strain. Fourth, an anti-DsrA monoclonal antibody partially blocked FN binding by H. ducreyi. The hemoglobin receptor, the collagen-binding protein, the H. ducreyi lectin, the fine-tangle pili, and the outer membrane protein OmpA2 were not involved in H. ducreyi FN binding, since single mutants bound FN as well as the parent strain did. However, the major outer membrane protein may have a minor role in FN binding by H. ducreyi, since a double dsrA momp mutant bound less FN than did the single dsrA mutant. Finally, despite major sequence differences, DsrA proteins from both class I and class II H. ducreyi strains mediated FN and vitronectin binding. We concluded that DsrA is the major factor involved in FN binding by both classes of H. ducreyi strains.

  3. Long-Term Stability of a Vaccine Formulated with the Amphipol-Trapped Major Outer Membrane Protein from Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Feinstein, H. Eric; Tifrea, Delia; Sun, Guifeng; Popot, Jean-Luc; de la Maza, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a major bacterial pathogen throughout the world. Although antibiotic therapy can be implemented in the case of early detection, a majority of the infections are asymptomatic, requiring the development of preventive measures. Efforts have focused on the production of a vaccine using the C. trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP). MOMP is purified in its native (n) trimeric form using the zwitterionic detergent Z3–14, but its stability in detergent solutions is limited. Amphipols (APols) are synthetic polymers that can stabilize membrane proteins (MPs) in detergent-free aqueous solutions. Preservation of protein structure and optimization of exposure of the most effective antigenic regions can avoid vaccination with misfolded, poorly protective protein. Previously, we showed that APols maintain nMOMP secondary structure and that nMOMP/APol vaccine formulations elicit better protection than formulations using either recombinant or nMOMP solubilized in Z3–14. To achieve a greater understanding of the structural behavior and stability of nMOMP in APols, we have used several spectroscopic techniques to characterize its secondary structure (circular dichroism), tertiary and quaternary structures (immunochemistry and gel electrophoresis) and aggregation state (light scattering) as a function of temperature and time. We have also recorded NMR spectra of 15N-labeled nMOMP and find that the exposed loops are detectable in APols but not in detergent. Our analyses show that APols protect nMOMP much better than Z3–14 against denaturation due to continuous heating, repeated freeze/thaw cycles, or extended storage at room temperature. These results indicate that APols can help improve MP-based vaccine formulations. PMID:24942817

  4. Immunochemical diversity of the major outer membrane protein of avian and mammalian Chlamydia psittaci.

    PubMed Central

    Fukushi, H; Hirai, K

    1988-01-01

    Immunochemical properties of the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of 16 strains of Chlamydia psittaci isolated from psittacine birds, budgerigars, a pigeon, turkeys, humans, cats, a muskrat, sheep, and cattle and a strain of C. trachomatis, L2/434/Bu, were compared by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by immunoblotting analysis with hyperimmunized rabbit antisera to strains of parrot, turkey, feline, and bovine origin. The MOMPs of the strains showed variation in molecular weights and immunological specificities. Fifteen of the C. psittaci strains were classified into two avian and two mammalian types based on immunological specificity of the MOMP, whereas the other strain was not classified in this study. Immunological classification based on specificity of the MOMP by immunoblotting proved to be a valuable method to classify various strains of C. psittaci. Images PMID:3366861

  5. Pore-forming ability of major outer membrane proteins from Wolinella recta ATCC 33238.

    PubMed Central

    Kennell, W L; Egli, C; Hancock, R E; Holt, S C

    1992-01-01

    Three major outer membrane proteins with apparent molecular masses of 43, 45, and 51 kDa were purified from Wolinella recta ATCC 33238, and their pore-forming abilities were determined by the black lipid bilayer method. The non-heat-modifiable 45-kDa protein (Omp 45) showed no pore-forming activity even at high KCl concentrations. The single-channel conductances in 1 M KCl of the heat-modifiable proteins with apparent molecular masses of 43 kDa (Omp 43) and 51 kDa (Omp 51) were 0.49 and 0.60 nS, respectively. The proteins formed nonselective channels and, as determined by experiments of ion selectivity and zero-current potential, were weakly anion selective. Images PMID:1370429

  6. Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant outer membrane protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Sheping; Qiu, Xuemei

    2011-06-01

    Gram-negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals. The outer membrane protein of bacteria plays an important role in the infection and pathogenicity to the host. Thus, the outer membrane proteins are an ideal target for vaccines. We amplified a complete outer membrane protein gene (ompW) from V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802. We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The gene coded for a protein that was 42.78 kDa. We purified the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting, respectively. Our results provide a basis for future application of the OmpW protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by V. parahaemolyticus. In addition, the purified OmpW protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

  7. Protective immunity against Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection induced by a vaccine based on the major outer membrane multi-epitope human papillomavirus major capsid protein L1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Liu, Jianxiao; Gong, Wenci; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Shanli; Zhang, Lifang

    2011-03-24

    The administration of an efficacious vaccine is the most effective long-term measure to control the genital tract infection caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) in humans. The current challenge for Ct vaccine development is to develop an effective delivery vehicle for induction of a high level of mucosal T and complementary B cell responses. We evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a candidate vaccine comprising the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) multiepitope of Ct delivered with the human papillomavirus (HPV) major capsid protein L1 as a vehicle with adjuvant properties, in a murine model of chlamydial genital infection. A recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1(+) containing mammalian codon-optimization HPV6b L1 gene and Ct MOMP multiepitope was constructed. The Ct MOMP multiepitope containing T- and B-cell epitope-rich peptides was inserted into C-terminal of HPV6b L1-coding sequence. The constructed plasmid after verified by enzyme restriction assay and DNA sequencing was transfected into COS-7 cells. Expression of the chimeric gene in COS-7 cells was confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay. Results revealed successful expression of the chimeric HPV6b L1/Ct MOMP multiepitope gene both at the mRNA and protein levels in transfected COS-7 cells. Intramuscular (IM) administration in mice was able to elicit not only antibodies against Ct MOMP, but also Th1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity against the Ct MOMP epitopes. In addition, recipients of IM immunization of HPV6b L1/Ct MOMP multiepitope were highly resistant to infection. Altogether, the results suggested that IM delivery of HPV6b L1-MOMP multiepitope may be a suitable vaccine regimen potentially capable of inducing protective mucosal immunity against Ct infection.

  8. Subdominant outer membrane antigens in anaplasma marginale: conservation, antigenicity, and protective capacity using recombinant protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP) extracts or a well- defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are seve...

  9. Extraction, purification, and characterization of major outer membrane proteins from Wolinella recta ATCC 33238.

    PubMed Central

    Kennell, W L; Holt, S C

    1991-01-01

    The outer membrane of Wolinella recta ATCC 33238 was isolated by French pressure cell disruption and differential centrifugation. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were solubilized by Zwittergent 3.14 extraction and separated by DEAE-Sephacel ion-exchange chromatography. The major OMPs that were found in W. recta ATCC 33238 and in several other Wolinella spp. consisted of proteins with apparent molecular masses of 51, 45, and 43 kDa. These three conserved proteins were purified to essential homogeneity by one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and characterized chemically. Heating at between 75 and 100 degrees C revealed both the 43- and 51-kDa proteins to be heat modified from apparent molecular masses of 32 and 38 kDa, respectively. The 45-kDa protein was unmodified at all temperatures tested. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing-SDS-PAGE revealed the 51-kDa protein to be composed of multiple pIs between a pH of 5.0 and greater than 8.0 while the 43- and 45-kDa proteins had a pI of approximately 6.0. N'-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of the first 30 to 40 amino acids and search of the Protein Identification Resource data base for similar proteins only revealed the 43-kDa protein to be similar to the P.69 OMP of Bordetella pertussis; however, the homology was weak (33%). Amino acid analysis revealed the 43-kDa protein to be noncharged and the 45- and 51-kDa proteins to be hydrophilic, containing between 38 to 42% polar residues but no cysteine. This study reports the purification and partial characterization of three conserved proteins in W. recta ATCC 33238. Images PMID:1894372

  10. The C- terminal region of the Major Outer Sheath Protein (Msp) of Treponema denticola inhibits neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan M; Vanyo, Stephen T; Visser, Michelle B

    2017-03-13

    Treponema denticola is an oral spirochete strongly associated with severe periodontal disease. A prominent virulence factor, the major outer sheath protein (Msp), disorients neutrophil chemotaxis by altering the cellular phosphoinositide balance, leading to impairment of downstream chemotactic events including actin rearrangement, Rac1 activation and Akt activation in response to chemoattractant stimulation. The specific regions of Msp responsible for interactions with neutrophils remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of truncated Msp regions on neutrophil chemotaxis and associated signaling pathways. Murine neutrophils were treated with recombinant protein truncations followed by assessment of chemotaxis and associated signal pathway activation. Chemotaxis assays indicate sequences within the C-terminal region; particularly the first 130 amino acids, have the strongest inhibitory effect on neutrophil chemotaxis. Neutrophils incubated with the C-terminal region protein also demonstrated the greatest inhibition of Rac1 activation, increased phosphoinositide phosphatase activity, and decreased Akt activation; orchestrating impairment of chemotaxis. Furthermore, incubation with antibodies specific to only the C-terminal region blocked the Msp induced inhibition of chemotaxis and denaturing the protein restored Rac1 activation. Msp from the strain OTK, with numerous amino acid substitutions throughout the polypeptide, including the C-terminal region compared to strain 35405, showed increased ability to impair neutrophil chemotaxis. Collectively, these results indicate the C-terminal region of Msp is the most potent region to modulate neutrophil chemotactic signaling and that specific sequences and structure is likely required. Knowledge of how spirochetes dampen neutrophil response is limited and Msp may represent a novel therapeutic target for periodontal disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the major outer surface protein, OSP-A from North American and European isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, B.C.; Dunn, J.J.; France, L.L.; Jaing, W.; Polin, D.; Gorgone, G.; Luft, B.; Dykhuizen, D.

    1995-12-31

    Lyme borreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne disease in North America and Western Europe. As the major delayed immune response in humans, a better understanding of the major outer surface lipoproteins OspA and OspB are of much interest. These proteins have been shown to exhibit three distinct phylogenetic genotypes based on their DNA sequences. This paper describes the cloning of genomic DNA for each variant and amplification of PCR. DNA sequence data was used to derive computer driven phylogenetic analysis and deduced amino acid sequences. Overproduction of variant OspAs was carried out in E. coli using a T7-based expression system. Circular dichroism and fluorescence studies was carried out on the recombinant B31 PspA yielding evidence supporting a B31 protein containing 11% alpha-helix, 34% antiparallel beta-sheet, 12% parallel beta sheet.

  12. The major outer membrane protein of Acidovorax delafieldii is an anion-selective porin.

    PubMed

    Brunen, M; Engelhardt, H; Schmid, A; Benz, R

    1991-07-01

    The major outer membrane protein (Omp34) of Acidovorax delafieldii (formerly Pseudomonas delafieldii) was purified to homogeneity and was characterized biochemically and functionally. The polypeptide has an apparent molecular weight (Mr) of 34,000, and it forms stable oligomers at pH 9.0 in the presence of 10% octylpolyoxyethylene or 2% lithium dodecyl sulfate below 70 degrees C. The intact protein has a characteristic secondary structure composition, as revealed by Fourier transforming infrared spectroscopy (about 60% beta sheet). These features and the amino acid composition are typical for porins. The purified Omp34 is associated with 1 to 2 mol of lipopolysaccharide per mol of the monomer. Pore-forming activity was demonstrated with lipid bilayer experiments. Single-channel and selectivity measurements showed that the protein forms highly anion-selective channels. The unusual dependence of the single-channel conductance on salt concentration suggests that the porin complexes bear positive surface charges, accumulating negatively charged counterions at the pore mouth.

  13. Gut microbiota-derived outer membrane vesicles: under-recognized major players in health and disease?

    PubMed

    Muraca, Maurizio; Putignani, Lorenza; Fierabracci, Alessandra; Teti, Anna; Perilongo, Giorgio

    2015-05-01

    The role of gut microbiota both in human health and in disease is the subject of intense investigation. The interactions between gut microbiota and the host involve a complex network of metabolic pathways and of biologically active molecules secreted by intestinal bacteria, some of which are packed into nanoparticles known as outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). OMVs can enter the systemic circulation and be delivered to different organs including the brain, eliciting a variety of immunological and metabolic responses. The resulting acute and chronic effects are largely unknown. However, recent studies suggest that OMVs could play a critical role in immune homeostasis and in acute inflammatory reactions. Moreover, the "leaky gut" hypothesis has recently emphasized the role of the brain-gut axis in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorders, pointing to the importance of bacteria and of bacterial products delivered into the circulation in eliciting the low-grade inflammatory response associated with this syndrome. Interestingly, experimental evidence suggests that OMVs can also affect the permeability of the blood-brain barrier. This review also highlights the importance of investigating possible influences of OMVs on the development of the immune system.

  14. Recombinant outer membrane protein F-B subunit of LT protein as a prophylactic measure against Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Farsani, Hassan Heydari; Rasooli, Iraj; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Nazarian, Shahram; Astaneh, Shakiba Darwish Alipour

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study immunogenicity of outer membrane protein F (OprF) fused with B subunit of LT (LTB), against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). METHODS: The OprF, a major surface exposed outer membrane protein that is antigenically conserved in various strains of P. aeruginosa, is a promising immunogen against P. aeruginosa. In the present study recombinant OprF and OprF-LTB fusion gene was cloned, expressed and purified. BALB/c mice and rabbits were immunized using recombinant OprF and OprF-LTB and challenged at the burn site with P. aeruginosa lethal dose of 104 CFU. The protective efficacy of rabbit anti OprF IgG against P. aeruginosa burn infection was investigated by passive immunization. RESULTS: It has been well established that the LTB is a powerful immunomodulator with strong adjuvant activity. LTB as a bacterial adjuvant enhanced immunogenicity of OprF and anti OprF IgG titer in serum was increased. Experimental findings showed significantly higher average survival rate in burned mice immunized with OprF-LTB than immunized with OprF or the control group. Rabbits anti OprF IgG brought about 75% survival of mice following challenge with P. aeruginosa. Post challenge hepatic and splenic tissues of mice group immunized with OprF-LTB had significantly lower bacterial load than those immunized with OprF or the control groups. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that LTB-fused OprF might be a potential candidate protein for a prophylactic measure against P. aeruginosa in burn infection. PMID:26713284

  15. Recombinant outer membrane vesicles carrying Chlamydia muridarum HtrA induce antibodies that neutralize chlamydial infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Erika; Ianni, Elvira; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Petracca, Roberto; Galli, Giuliano; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Norais, Nathalie; Laera, Donatello; Giusti, Fabiola; Pierleoni, Andrea; Donati, Manuela; Cevenini, Roberto; Finco, Oretta; Grandi, Guido; Grifantini, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spheroid particles released by all Gram-negative bacteria as a result of the budding out of the outer membrane. Since they carry many of the bacterial surface-associated proteins and feature a potent built-in adjuvanticity, OMVs are being utilized as vaccines, some of which commercially available. Recently, methods for manipulating the protein content of OMVs have been proposed, thus making OMVs a promising platform for recombinant, multivalent vaccines development. Methods Chlamydia muridarum DO serine protease HtrA, an antigen which stimulates strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and humans, was expressed in Escherichia coli fused to the OmpA leader sequence to deliver it to the OMV compartment. Purified OMVs carrying HtrA (CM rHtrA-OMV) were analyzed for their capacity to induce antibodies capable of neutralizing Chlamydia infection of LLC-MK2 cells in vitro. Results CM rHtrA-OMV immunization in mice induced antibodies that neutralize Chlamydial invasion as judged by an in vitro infectivity assay. This was remarkably different from what observed with an enzymatically functional recombinant HtrA expressed in, and purified from the E. coli cytoplasm (CM rHtrA). The difference in functionality between anti-CM rHtrA and anti-CM rHtrA-OMV antibodies was associated to a different pattern of protein epitopes recognition. The epitope recognition profile of anti-CM HtrA-OMV antibodies was similar to that induced in mice during Chlamydial infection. Conclusions When expressed in OMVs HtrA appears to assume a conformation similar to the native one and this results in the elicitation of functional immune responses. These data further support the potentiality of OMVs as vaccine platform. PMID:24009891

  16. Recombinant Phospholipase A1 of the Outer Membrane of Psychrotrophic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis: Expression, Purification, and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Bakholdina, S I; Tischenko, N M; Sidorin, E V; Isaeva, M P; Likhatskaya, G N; Dmitrenok, P S; Kim, N Yu; Chernikov, O V; Solov'eva, T F

    2016-01-01

    The pldA gene encoding membrane-bound phospholipase A1 of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Recombinant phospholipase A1 (rPldA) was isolated from inclusion bodies dissolved in 8 M urea by two-stage chromatography (ion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography) as an inactive monomer. The molecular mass of the rPldA determined by MALDI-TOF MS was 31.7 ± 0.4 kDa. The highly purified rPldA was refolded by 10-fold dilution with buffer containing 10 mM Triton X-100 and subsequent incubation at room temperature for 16 h. The refolded rPldA hydrolyzed 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine in the presence of calcium ions. The enzyme exhibited maximal activity at 37°C and nearly 40% of maximal activity at 15°C. The phospholipase A1 was active over a wide range of pH from 4 to 11, exhibiting maximal activity at pH 10. Spatial structure models of the monomer and the dimer of Y. pseudotuberculosis phospholipase A1 were constructed, and functionally important amino acid residues of the enzyme were determined. Structural differences between phospholipases A1 from Y. pseudotuberculosis and E. coli, which can affect the functional activity of the enzyme, were revealed.

  17. Isolation and purification of recombinant outer surface protein C (rOspC) of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Krupka, Michal; Bĕláková, Jana; Sebestová, Martina; Tuhácková, Jana; Raska, Milan; Vrzal, Vladimír; Weigl, Evzen

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this work was isolation and purification of the major immunodominant protein, Outer surface protein C (OspC) of three members of the species group Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. Our aim was to obtain this protein in a quantity and purity sufficient for immunization of experimental animals. For optimalization of protein purification's yield we used immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) under different conditions. The greatest efficiency was achieved by using of HiTrap Chelating Column under native conditions.

  18. Better understanding of homologous recombination through a 12-week laboratory course for undergraduates majoring in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Shen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yan; Hu, Xiaomei; Hu, Fuquan; Rao, Xiancai

    2017-03-17

    Homologous recombination, a central concept in biology, is defined as the exchange of DNA strands between two similar or identical nucleotide sequences. Unfortunately, undergraduate students majoring in biotechnology often experience difficulties in understanding the molecular basis of homologous recombination. In this study, we developed and implemented a 12-week laboratory course for biotechnology undergraduates in which gene targeting in Streptococcus suis was used to facilitate their understanding of the basic concept and process of homologous recombination. Students worked in teams of two to select a gene of interest to create a knockout mutant using methods that relied on homologous recombination. By integrating abstract knowledge and practice in the process of scientific research, students gained hands-on experience in molecular biology techniques while learning about the principle and process of homologous recombination. The learning outcomes and survey-based assessment demonstrated that students substantially enhanced their understanding of how homologous recombination could be used to study gene function. Overall, the course was very effective for helping biotechnology undergraduates learn the theory and application of homologous recombination, while also yielding positive effects in developing confidence and scientific skills for future work in research. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2017.

  19. The major anaerobically induced outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Pan 1, is a lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, G T; Clark, V L

    1992-01-01

    Pan 1 is an acidic outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae that is expressed only when gonococci are grown anaerobically. On silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, Pan 1 migrates as an intense but diffuse 54-kDa protein. The deduced amino acid sequence of Pan 1 from the aniA (anaerobically induced protein) open reading frame reveals a lipoprotein consensus sequence, Ala-Leu-Ala-Ala-Cys, and a processed molecular mass of 39 kDa. Furthermore, there is strong homology at the N terminus and C terminus of Pan 1 to the termini of the gonococcal outer membrane lipoproteins Lip and Laz. [3H]palmitic acid labeling of gonococci grown under oxygen-limited conditions demonstrated specific incorporation of label into Pan 1, suggesting further that Pan 1 is a lipoprotein. Images PMID:1398981

  20. The Recent Recombinant Evolution of a Major Crop Pathogen, Potato virus Y

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Johan Christiaan; Bellstedt, Dirk Uwe; Pirie, Michael David

    2012-01-01

    Potato virus Y (PVY) is a major agricultural disease that reduces crop yields worldwide. Different strains of PVY are associated with differing degrees of pathogenicity, of which the most common and economically important are known to be recombinant. We need to know the evolutionary origins of pathogens to prevent further escalations of diseases, but putatively reticulate genealogies are challenging to reconstruct with standard phylogenetic approaches. Currently available phylogenetic hypotheses for PVY are either limited to non-recombinant strains, represent only parts of the genome, and/or incorrectly assume a strictly bifurcating phylogenetic tree. Despite attempts to date potyviruses in general, no attempt has been made to date the origins of pathogenic PVY. We test whether diversification of the major strains of PVY and recombination between them occurred within the time frame of the domestication and modern cultivation of potatoes. In so doing, we demonstrate a novel extension of a phylogenetic approach for reconstructing reticulate evolutionary scenarios. We infer a well resolved phylogeny of 44 whole genome sequences of PVY viruses, representative of all known strains, using recombination detection and phylogenetic inference techniques. Using Bayesian molecular dating we show that the parental strains of PVY diverged around the time potatoes were first introduced to Europe, that recombination between them only occurred in the last century, and that the multiple recombination events that led to highly pathogenic PVYNTN occurred within the last 50 years. Disease causing agents are often transported across the globe by humans, with disastrous effects for us, our livestock and crops. Our analytical approach is particularly pertinent for the often small recombinant genomes involved (e.g. HIV/influenza A). In the case of PVY, increased transport of diseased material is likely to blame for uniting the parents of recombinant pathogenic strains: this process needs

  1. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Monaris, D.; Sbrogio-Almeida, M. E.; Dib, C. C.; Canhamero, T. A.; Souza, G. O.; Vasconcellos, S. A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigAC) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigAC, either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigAC or LigAC coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen. PMID:26108285

  2. Protective Immunity and Reduced Renal Colonization Induced by Vaccines Containing Recombinant Leptospira interrogans Outer Membrane Proteins and Flagellin Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Monaris, D; Sbrogio-Almeida, M E; Dib, C C; Canhamero, T A; Souza, G O; Vasconcellos, S A; Ferreira, L C S; Abreu, P A E

    2015-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease caused by different Leptospira species, such as Leptospira interrogans, that colonize the renal tubules of wild and domestic animals. Thus far, attempts to develop effective leptospirosis vaccines, both for humans and animals, have failed to induce immune responses capable of conferring protection and simultaneously preventing renal colonization. In this study, we evaluated the protective immunity induced by subunit vaccines containing seven different recombinant Leptospira interrogans outer membrane proteins, including the carboxy-terminal portion of the immunoglobulinlike protein A (LigA(C)) and six novel antigens, combined with aluminum hydroxide (alum) or Salmonella flagellin (FliC) as adjuvants. Hamsters vaccinated with the different formulations elicited high antigen-specific antibody titers. Immunization with LigA(C), either with alum or flagellin, conferred protective immunity but did not prevent renal colonization. Similarly, animals immunized with LigA(C) or LigA(C) coadministered with six leptospiral proteins with alum adjuvant conferred protection but did not reduce renal colonization. In contrast, immunizing animals with the pool of seven antigens in combination with flagellin conferred protection and significantly reduced renal colonization by the pathogen. The present study emphasizes the relevance of antigen composition and added adjuvant in the efficacy of antileptospirosis subunit vaccines and shows the complex relationship between immune responses and renal colonization by the pathogen.

  3. Development of a subunit vaccine containing recombinant Riemerella anatipestifer outer membrane protein A and CpG ODN adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chun-Yen; Liu, Chia-Hui; Liou, Jhong-Jie; Lee, Jai-Wei; Cheng, Li-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer, a Gram-negative bacillus, causes septicemia that can result in high mortality for ducklings. In this study, we evaluated the immune response and protective efficacy provided by a subunit vaccine containing recombinant outer membrane protein A (rOmpA) and plasmid constructs containing CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN). Results showed that CpG ODN enhanced both humoral and cell-mediated immunity elicited by rOmpA as early as two weeks after primary immunization. When compared to ducks immunized with rOmpA, ducks immunized with rOmpA+CpG ODN showed higher levels (p<0.05) of antibody titer, T cell proliferation, and percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The relative fold inductions of mRNA expression of Th1-type (IFN-γ and IL-12), and Th2-type (IL-6) cytokines in PBMCs isolated from ducks immunized with rOmpA+CpG ODN were significantly higher than those of the rOmpA group. Homologous challenge result showed that the rOmpA+CpG ODN vaccine reduced the pathological score by 90% in comparison with the saline control. In conclusion, our study found that CpG ODN can enhance both humoral and cellular immunity elicited by a rOmpA vaccine. The rOmpA+CpG ODN vaccine can be further developed as a subunit vaccine against R. anatipestifer.

  4. Crystal structure of a major outer membrane protein from Thermus thermophilus HB27.

    PubMed

    Brosig, Alexander; Nesper, Jutta; Boos, Winfried; Welte, Wolfram; Diederichs, Kay

    2009-02-06

    The thermophilic eubacterium Thermus thermophilus belongs to one of the oldest branches of evolution and has a multilayered cell envelope that differs from that of modern Gram-negative bacteria. Its outer membrane contains integral outer membrane proteins (OMPs), of which only a few are characterized. TtoA, a new beta-barrel OMP, was identified by searching the genome sequence of strain HB27 for the presence of a C-terminal signature sequence. The structure of TtoA was determined to a resolution of 2.8 A, representing the first crystal structure of an OMP from a thermophilic bacterium. TtoA consists of an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a large extracellular part to which a divalent cation is bound. A five-stranded extracellular beta-sheet protrudes out of the membrane-embedded transmembrane barrel and is stabilized by a disulfide bridge. The edge of this beta-sheet forms crystal contacts that could mimic interactions with other proteins. In modern Gram-negative bacteria, the C-terminal signature sequence of OMPs is required for binding to an Omp85 family protein as a prerequisite for its assembly. We present hints that a similar assembly pathway exists in T. thermophilus by an in vitro binding assay, where unfolded TtoA binds to the Thermus Omp85 family protein TtOmp85, while a mutant without the signature sequence does not.

  5. PRDM9 is a major determinant of meiotic recombination hotspots in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Baudat, F; Buard, J; Grey, C; Fledel-Alon, A; Ober, C; Przeworski, M; Coop, G; de Massy, B

    2010-02-12

    Meiotic recombination events cluster into narrow segments of the genome, defined as hotspots. Here, we demonstrate that a major player for hotspot specification is the Prdm9 gene. First, two mouse strains that differ in hotspot usage are polymorphic for the zinc finger DNA binding array of PRDM9. Second, the human consensus PRDM9 allele is predicted to recognize the 13-mer motif enriched at human hotspots; this DNA binding specificity is verified by in vitro studies. Third, allelic variants of PRDM9 zinc fingers are significantly associated with variability in genome-wide hotspot usage among humans. Our results provide a molecular basis for the distribution of meiotic recombination in mammals, in which the binding of PRDM9 to specific DNA sequences targets the initiation of recombination at specific locations in the genome.

  6. THE INVISIBLE MAJORITY? EVOLUTION AND DETECTION OF OUTER PLANETARY SYSTEMS WITHOUT GAS GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Andrew W.; Gaidos, Eric; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2010-08-20

    due to the presence of additional outer planets. Future microlensing surveys will detect {approx}130 analogs over a 5 yr survey, including a handful of multiple-planet systems. Finally, the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM-Lite) should be capable of detecting 96% of the innermost icy planets over the course of a 5 yr mission.

  7. Major substructure in the M31 outer halo: distances and metallicities along the giant stellar stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn, A. R.; McMonigal, B.; Bate, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.; Ibata, R. A.; Martin, N. F.; McConnachie, A. W.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Irwin, M. J.; Elahi, P. J.; Venn, K. A.; Mackey, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    We present a renewed look at M31's giant stellar stream along with the nearby structures streams C and D, exploiting a new algorithm capable of fitting to the red giant branch (RGB) of a structure in both colour and magnitude space. Using this algorithm, we are able to generate probability distributions in distance, metallicity and RGB width for a series of subfields spanning these structures. Specifically, we confirm a distance gradient of approximately 20 kpc per degree along a 6 deg extension of the giant stellar stream, with the farthest subfields from M31 lying ˜120 kpc more distant than the innermost subfields. Further, we find a metallicity that steadily increases from -0.7^{+0.1}_{-0.1} to -0.2^{+0.2}_{-0.1} dex along the inner half of the stream before steadily dropping to a value of -1.0^{+0.2}_{-0.2} dex at the farthest reaches of our coverage. The RGB width is found to increase rapidly from 0.4^{+0.1}_{-0.1} to 1.1^{+0.2}_{-0.1} dex in the inner portion of the stream before plateauing and decreasing marginally in the outer subfields of the stream. In addition, we estimate stream C to lie at a distance between 794 and 862 kpc and stream D between 758 and 868 kpc. We estimate the median metallicity of stream C to lie in the range -0.7 to -1.6 dex and a metallicity of -1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.2} dex for stream D. RGB widths for the two structures are estimated to lie in the range 0.4-1.2 dex and 0.3-0.7 dex, respectively. In total, measurements are obtained for 19 subfields along the giant stellar stream, four along stream C, five along stream D and three general M31 spheroid fields for comparison. We thus provide a higher resolution coverage of the structures in these parameters than has previously been available in the literature.

  8. The Invisible Majority? Evolution and Detection of Outer Planetary Systems without Gas Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Andrew W.; Gaidos, Eric; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2010-08-01

    presence of additional outer planets. Future microlensing surveys will detect ~130 analogs over a 5 yr survey, including a handful of multiple-planet systems. Finally, the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM-Lite) should be capable of detecting 96% of the innermost icy planets over the course of a 5 yr mission.

  9. Serological Diagnosis of Ovine Enzootic Abortion by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay with a Recombinant Protein Fragment of the Polymorphic Outer Membrane Protein POMP90 of Chlamydophila abortus

    PubMed Central

    Longbottom, David; Fairley, Susan; Chapman, Stephanie; Psarrou, Evgenia; Vretou, Evangelia; Livingstone, Morag

    2002-01-01

    Ovine enzootic abortion (OEA) resulting from infection of sheep and goats with Chlamydophila abortus is of major economic importance worldwide. Over the last 50 years the serological diagnosis of infection has been based mainly on the complement fixation test (CFT), which lacks both sensitivity and specificity because of cross-reactive antibodies to other gram-negative bacteria, including another common chlamydial pathogen of sheep, Chlamydophila pecorum. In the present study, a series of overlapping recombinant antigens representing the polymorphic outer membrane protein POMP90 of C. abortus was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a panel of 143 serum samples from sheep experimentally infected with C. abortus, from sheep clinically free of OEA, and from specific-pathogen-free lambs experimentally infected with different subtypes of C. pecorum. The results were compared to those obtained by CFT and another recently described test, an indirect ELISA (iELISA) with the recombinant OMP91B (rOMP91B) fragment (rOMP91B iELISA) (D. Longbottom, E. Psarrou, M. Livingstone, and E. Vretou, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 195:157-161, 2001). The rOMP90-3 and rOMP90-4 ELISAs were identified as being more sensitive and specific than CFT. Assays with both fragments were evaluated further with a panel of 294 field serum samples from flocks with documented histories of abortion, from flocks with no clinical histories of abortion but which had a high proportion of samples seropositive by CFT, and from animals with no histories of abortion but from which various C. pecorum subtypes had been isolated. ELISAs with both POMP90 fragments outperformed CFT with serum samples from C. pecorum-infected animals, producing no false-positive results. However, the ELISA with the rOMP90-4 fragment appeared to be more sensitive than the one with rOMP90-3, as it identified more of the OEA-positive samples. The ELISA with the rOMP90-4 fragment was also able to identify apparently healthy

  10. Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constant for the CH3 Recombination Reaction: A Loss Process in Outer Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cody, R. J.; Payne, W. A.; Thorn, R. P., Jr.; Romani, P. N.; Stief, L. J.; Nesbitt, F. L.; Iannone, M. A.; Tardy, D. C.

    2002-01-01

    The methyl free radical (CH3) has been observed in the atmospheres of Saturn and Neptune by the ISO satellite. There are discrepancies between the column densities for the CH3 radical derived from the ISO observations and the column densities derived from atmospheric photochemical models. For Neptune the model column density is 1.5 times that derived from ISO. For Saturn the model is 6 times that from ISO. The recombination of methyl radicals is the major loss process for methyl in these atmospheres. The serious disagreement between observed and calculated levels of CH3 has led to suggestions that the atmospheric models greatly underestimated the loss of CH3 due to poor knowledge of the rate of the reaction (1) CH3 + CH3 + M goes to C2H6 + M at the low temperatures and pressures of these atmospheric systems. Although the reaction CH3 + CH3 + M goes to C2H6 + M has been extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally, the laboratory conditions have been, with only a few exceptions, higher temperatures (T greater than 298K), higher pressures (P greater than or equal to 10 Torr - 13.3 mbar) or M=Ar rather than H2 or He as the bath gas.

  11. Studies on gonococcus infection. XVIII. 125I-labeled peptide mapping of the major protein of the gonococcal cell wall outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J

    1979-01-01

    The major outer membrane proteins from 10 gonococcal strains were examined after 125I-labeling of the proteins as single bands resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. These 125I-proteins were then treated with either trypsin or alpha-chymotrypsin, and the resultant 125I-peptides were visualized by autoradiography after two-dimensional electrophoretic and chromatographic separation on thin-layer cellulose sheets. Several 125I-peptides were present in all the major outer membrane proteins examined. The presence and absence of additional 125I-peptides segregated the major proteins into two pattern groups. One group consisted of major outer membranes with molecular weights of 34,000 or 33,000; major proteins with molecular weights of 32,000 constituted the other group. Two beta-lactamase-producing gonococcal isolates were examined. Their major outer membrane proteins were identical in apparent molecular weights and alpha-chymotryptic 125I-peptide fingerprints; these proteins contained 125I-peptides not found in other gonococcal major proteins. No 125I-peptide differences were found among the major outer membrane proteins of strain F62 gonococci that exhibited differences in piliation and/or colony opacity characteristics. Images PMID:110681

  12. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with major outer membrane proteins of Brucella melitensis to measure immune response to Brucella species.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, S B; Bibb, W F; Shih, C N; Kaufmann, A F; Mitchell, J R; McKinney, R M

    1986-01-01

    We developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system to measure human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM response to the major outer membrane proteins of Brucella melitensis. The ELISA was more sensitive in detecting antibody than a standard microagglutination (MA) test with B. abortus antigen. Of 101 sera from persons with suspected brucellosis, 79 (78.2%) gave ELISA IgM titers greater than or equal to the B. abortus MA titer without 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME), which measures both IgM and IgG. Of the 101 sera, 97% gave ELISA IgG titers greater than or equal to the MA with 2ME titer. A total of 58 sera, drawn from 11 human patients from 1 to 29 weeks after onset of brucellosis, gave higher geometric mean titers for the ELISA IgG test than for the MA with 2ME test. These 58 sera also gave ELISA IgM geometric mean titers that were greater than or within one doubling dilution of the geometric mean titers of MA without 2ME. In addition to detecting antibody response to B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis, the ELISA was sensitive to antibody response to human and canine infections with B. canis. The B. canis antibody response is not detected by the MA test with B. abortus antigen. The ELISA, with a standard preparation of major outer membrane proteins of B. melitensis as antigen, appears to be useful in measuring antibody response in humans to infections by all species of Brucella known to infect humans. PMID:3095364

  13. Recombination Is a Major Driving Force of Genetic Diversity in the Anaplasmataceae Ehrlichia ruminantium

    PubMed Central

    Cangi, Nídia; Gordon, Jonathan L.; Bournez, Laure; Pinarello, Valérie; Aprelon, Rosalie; Huber, Karine; Lefrançois, Thierry; Neves, Luís; Meyer, Damien F.; Vachiéry, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The disease, Heartwater, caused by the Anaplasmataceae E. ruminantium, represents a major problem for tropical livestock and wild ruminants. Up to now, no effective vaccine has been available due to a limited cross protection of vaccinal strains on field strains and a high genetic diversity of Ehrlichia ruminantium within geographical locations. To address this issue, we inferred the genetic diversity and population structure of 194 E. ruminantium isolates circulating worldwide using Multilocus Sequence Typing based on lipA, lipB, secY, sodB, and sucA genes. Phylogenetic trees and networks were generated using BEAST and SplitsTree, respectively, and recombination between the different genetic groups was tested using the PHI test for recombination. Our study reveals the repeated occurrence of recombination between E. ruminantium strains, suggesting that it may occur frequently in the genome and has likely played an important role in the maintenance of genetic diversity and the evolution of E. ruminantium. Despite the unclear phylogeny and phylogeography, E. ruminantium isolates are clustered into two main groups: Group 1 (West Africa) and a Group 2 (worldwide) which is represented by West, East, and Southern Africa, Indian Ocean, and Caribbean strains. Some sequence types are common between West Africa and Caribbean and between Southern Africa and Indian Ocean strains. These common sequence types highlight two main introduction events due to the movement of cattle: from West Africa to Caribbean and from Southern Africa to the Indian Ocean islands. Due to the long branch lengths between Group 1 and Group 2, and the propensity for recombination between these groups, it seems that the West African clusters of Subgroup 2 arrived there more recently than the original divergence of the two groups, possibly with the original waves of domesticated ruminants that spread across the African continent several thousand years ago. PMID:27747194

  14. Purification, pore-forming ability, and antigenic relatedness of the major outer membrane protein of Shigella dysenteriae type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, S; Das, A B; Ghosh, A N; Biswas, T

    1994-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (MOMP), the most abundant outer membrane protein, was purified to homogeneity from Shigella dysenteriae type 1. The purification method involved selective extraction of MOMP with sodium dodecyl sulfate in the presence of 0.4 M sodium chloride followed by size exclusion chromatography with Sephacryl S-200 HR. MOMP was found to form hydrophilic diffusion pores by incorporation into artificial liposome vesicles composed of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine and dicetylphosphate, indicating that MOMP of S. dysenteriae type 1 exhibited significant porin activity. However, the liposomes containing heat-denatured MOMP were barely active. The molecular weight of MOMP found by size exclusion chromatography was 130,000, and in sodium dodecyl sulfate-10% polyacrylamide gel it moved as an oligomer of 78,000 molecular weight. Upon boiling, fully dissociated monomers of 38,000 molecular weight were seen for S. dysenteriae type 1. However, among the four Shigella spp., the monomeric MOMP generated upon boiling ranged from 38,000 to 35,000 in molecular weight. Antibody raised in BALB/c mice immunized with MOMP of S. dysenteriae type 1 reacted strongly with purified MOMP of S. dysenteriae type 1 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antibody reacted with whole-cell preparations of S. dysenteriae type 1 in an ELISA, suggesting that MOMP possessed surface components. Moreover, MOMP could be visualized on the bacterial surface by immunoelectron microscopy with anti-MOMP antibody. S. dysenteriae type 1 MOMP-specific immunoglobulin eluted from MOMP bound to a nitrocellulose membrane was found to cross-react with MOMP preparations of S. flexneri, S. boydii, and S. sonnei, indicating that MOMPs were antigenically related among Shigella species. The strong immunogenicity, surface exposure, and antigenic relatedness make MOMP of Shigella species an immunologically significant macromolecule for study. Images PMID:7927692

  15. Protective immunity elicited by recombinant bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) expressing outer surface protein A (OspA) lipoprotein: a candidate Lyme disease vaccine

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The current vaccine against tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis strain bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), offers potential advantages as a live, innately immunogenic vaccine vehicle for the expression and delivery of protective recombinant antigens (Stover, C.K., V.F. de la Cruz, T.R. Fuerst, J.E. Burlein, L.A. Benson, L.T. Bennett, G.P. Bansal, J.F. Young, M.H. Lee, G.F. Hatfull et al. 1991. Nature [Lond]. 351:456; Jacobs, W.R., Jr., S.B. Snapper, L. Lugosi and B.R. Bloom. 1990. Curr. Top. Microbiol. Immunol. 155:153; Jacobs, W.R., M. Tuckman, and B.R. Bloom. 1987. Nature [Lond.]. 327:532); but as an attenuated intracellular bacterium residing in macrophages, BCG would seem to be best suited for eliciting cellular responses and not humoral responses. Since bacterial lipoproteins are often among the most immunogenic of bacterial antigens, we tested whether BCG expression of a target antigen as a membrane-associated lipoprotein could enhance the potential for a recombinant BCG vaccine to elicit high-titered protective antibody responses to target antigens. Immunization of mice with recombinant BCG vaccines expressing the outer surface protein A (OspA) antigen of Borrelia burgdorferi as a membrane-associated lipoprotein resulted in protective antibody responses that were 100- 1,000-fold higher than responses elicited by immunization with recombinant BCG expressing OspA cytoplasmically or as a secreted fusion protein. Furthermore, these improved antibody responses were observed in heterogeneous mouse strains that vary in their immune responsiveness to OspA and sensitivity to BCG growth. Thus, expression of protective antigens as chimeric membrane-associated lipoproteins on recombinant BCG may result in the generation of new candidate vaccines against Lyme borreliosis and other human or veterinary diseases where humoral immunity is the protective response. PMID:8315378

  16. Vaccination of horses with a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) expressing African horse sickness (AHS) virus major capsid protein VP2 provides complete clinical protection against challenge.

    PubMed

    Alberca, Berta; Bachanek-Bankowska, Katarzyna; Cabana, Marta; Calvo-Pinilla, Eva; Viaplana, Elisenda; Frost, Lorraine; Gubbins, Simon; Urniza, Alicia; Mertens, Peter; Castillo-Olivares, Javier

    2014-06-17

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is an arthropod-borne pathogen that infects all species of equidae and causes high mortality in horses. Previously, a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus expressing the protein VP2 of AHSV serotype 4 was shown to induce virus neutralising antibodies in horses and protected interferon alpha receptor gene knock-out mice (IFNAR -/-) against virulent AHSV challenge. This study builds on the previous work, examining the protective efficacy of MVA-VP2 vaccination in the natural host of AHSV infection. A study group of 4 horses was vaccinated twice with a recombinant MVA virus expressing the major capsid protein (VP2) of AHSV serotype 9. Vaccinated animals and a control group of unvaccinated horses were then challenged with a virulent strain of AHSV-9. The vaccinated animals were completely protected against clinical disease and also against viraemia as measured by standard end-point dilution assays. In contrast, all control horses presented viraemia after challenge and succumbed to the infection. These results demonstrate the potential of recombinant MVA viruses expressing the outer capsid VP2 of AHSV as a protective vaccine against AHSV infection in the field.

  17. Recombination and selection in the major histocompatibility complex of the endangered forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii)

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ruibo; Shafer, Aaron B.A.; Laguardia, Alice; Lin, Zhenzhen; Liu, Shuqiang; Hu, Defu

    2015-01-01

    The forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii) is a high elevation species distributed across western China and northern Vietnam. Once abundant, habitat loss and poaching has led to a dramatic decrease in population numbers prompting the IUCN to list the species as endangered. Here, we characterized the genetic diversity of a Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus and teased apart driving factors shaping its variation. Seven DRB exon 2 alleles were identified among a group of randomly sampled forest musk deer from a captive population in the Sichuan province of China. Compared to other endangered or captive ungulates, forest musk deer have relatively low levels of MHC genetic diversity. Non-synonymous substitutions primarily occurred in the putative peptide-binding region (PBR), with analyses suggesting that recombination and selection has shaped the genetic diversity across the locus. Specifically, inter-allelic recombination generated novel allelic combinations, with evidence for both positive selection acting on the PBR and negative selection on the non-PBR. An improved understanding of functional genetic variability of the MHC will facilitate better design and management of captive breeding programs for this endangered species. PMID:26603338

  18. Recombination and selection in the major histocompatibility complex of the endangered forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii).

    PubMed

    Cai, Ruibo; Shafer, Aaron B A; Laguardia, Alice; Lin, Zhenzhen; Liu, Shuqiang; Hu, Defu

    2015-11-25

    The forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii) is a high elevation species distributed across western China and northern Vietnam. Once abundant, habitat loss and poaching has led to a dramatic decrease in population numbers prompting the IUCN to list the species as endangered. Here, we characterized the genetic diversity of a Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) locus and teased apart driving factors shaping its variation. Seven DRB exon 2 alleles were identified among a group of randomly sampled forest musk deer from a captive population in the Sichuan province of China. Compared to other endangered or captive ungulates, forest musk deer have relatively low levels of MHC genetic diversity. Non-synonymous substitutions primarily occurred in the putative peptide-binding region (PBR), with analyses suggesting that recombination and selection has shaped the genetic diversity across the locus. Specifically, inter-allelic recombination generated novel allelic combinations, with evidence for both positive selection acting on the PBR and negative selection on the non-PBR. An improved understanding of functional genetic variability of the MHC will facilitate better design and management of captive breeding programs for this endangered species.

  19. Mechanistic Insight into the TH1-Biased Immune Response to Recombinant Subunit Vaccines Delivered by Probiotic Bacteria-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Joseph A.; Huang, Chung-Jr.; Doody, Anne M.; Leung, Tiffany; Mineta, Kaho; Feng, Danielle D.; Wayne, Elizabeth C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Leifer, Cynthia; DeLisa, Matthew P.; Mendez, Susana; Putnam, David

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccine engineering increasingly focuses on the development of more effective delivery platforms. However, current recombinant vaccines fail to sufficiently stimulate protective adaptive immunity against a wide range of pathogens while remaining a cost effective solution to global health challenges. Taking an unorthodox approach to this fundamental immunological challenge, we isolated the TLR-targeting capability of the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 bacteria (EcN) by engineering bionanoparticlate antigen carriers derived from EcN outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Exogenous model antigens expressed by these modified bacteria as protein fusions with the bacterial enterotoxin ClyA resulted in their display on the surface of the carrier OMVs. Vaccination with the engineered EcN OMVs in a BALB/c mouse model, and subsequent mechanism of action analysis, established the EcN OMV’s ability to induce self-adjuvanted robust and protective humoral and TH1-biased cellular immunity to model antigens. This finding appears to be strain-dependent, as OMV antigen carriers similarly engineered from a standard K12 E. coli strain derivative failed to generate a comparably robust antigen-specific TH1 bias. The results demonstrate that unlike traditional subunit vaccines, these biomolecularly engineered “pathogen-like particles” derived from traditionally overlooked, naturally potent immunomodulators have the potential to effectively couple recombinant antigens with meaningful immunity in a broadly applicable fashion. PMID:25426709

  20. Structural and Functional Characterization of Recombinant Interleukin-10 from Indian Major Carp Labeo rohita

    PubMed Central

    Karan, Sweta; Dash, Pujarini; Kaushik, Himani; Sahoo, Pramoda K.; Garg, Lalit C.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-10, an important regulator of both the innate and adaptive immune systems, is a multifunctional major cytokine. Though it is one of the major cytokines, IL-10 from the Indian major carp, Labeo rohita, has not yet been characterized. In the present study, we report large scale production and purification of biologically active recombinant IL-10 of L. rohita (rLrIL-10) using a heterologous expression system and its biophysical and functional characterization. High yield (~70 mg/L) of soluble rLrIL-10 was obtained at shake flask level. The rLrIL-10 was found to exist as a dimer. Far-UV CD spectroscopy showed presence of predominantly alpha helices. The tertiary structure of the purified rLrIL-10 was verified by fluorescence spectroscopy. Two-dimensional gel analysis revealed the presence of six isoforms of the rLrIL-10. The rLrIL-10 was biologically active and its administration significantly reduced serum proinflammatory cytokines, namely, interleukin 1β, TNFα, and IL-8, and augmented the NKEF transcript levels in spleen of L. rohita. Anti-inflammatory role of the rLrIL-10 was further established by inhibition of phagocytosis using NBT reduction assay in vitro. The data indicate that the dimeric alpha helical structure and function of IL-10 of L. rohita as a key regulator of anti-inflammatory response have remained conserved during evolution. PMID:27689097

  1. Extracellular chloride regulation of Kv2.1, contributor to the major outward Kv current in mammalian outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiantao; Surguchev, Alexei; Bian, Shumin; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar

    2012-01-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) function as both receptors and effectors in providing a boost to auditory reception. Amplification is driven by the motor protein prestin, which is under anionic control. Interestingly, we now find that the major, 4-AP-sensitive, outward K+ current of the OHC (IK) is also sensitive to Cl−, although, in contrast to prestin, extracellularly. IK is inhibited by reducing extracellular Cl− levels, with a linear dependence of 0.4%/mM. Other voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channel conductances in supporting cells, such as Hensen and Deiters' cells, are not affected by reduced extracellular Cl−. To elucidate the molecular basis of this Cl−-sensitive IK, we looked at potential molecular candidates based on Cl− sensitivity and/or similarities in kinetics. For IK, we identified three different Ca2+-independent components of IK based on the time constant of inactivation: a fast, transient outward current, a rapidly activating, slowly inactivating current (Ik1), and a slowly inactivating current (Ik2). Extracellular Cl− differentially affects these components. Because the inactivation time constants of Ik1 and Ik2 are similar to those of Kv1.5 and Kv2.1, we transiently transfected these constructs into CHO cells and found that low extracellular Cl− inhibited both channels with linear current reductions of 0.38%/mM and 0.49%/mM, respectively. We also tested heterologously expressed Slick and Slack conductances, two intracellularly Cl−-sensitive K+ channels, but found no extracellular Cl− sensitivity. The Cl− sensitivity of Kv2.1 and its robust expression within OHCs verified by single-cell RT-PCR indicate that these channels underlie the OHC's extracellular Cl− sensitivity. PMID:21940671

  2. Analysis of Transcriptionally Active Gene Clusters of Major Outer Membrane Protein Multigene Family in Ehrlichia canis and E. chaffeensis

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Norio; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Unver, Ahmet

    2001-01-01

    Ehrlichia canis and E. chaffeensis are tick-borne obligatory intramonocytic ehrlichiae that cause febrile systemic illness in humans and dogs, respectively. The current study analyzed the pleomorphic multigene family encoding approximately 30-kDa major outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of E. canis and E. chaffeensis. Upstream from secA and downstream of hypothetical transcriptional regulator, 22 paralogs of the omp gene family were found to be tandemly arranged except for one or two genes with opposite orientations in a 28- and a 27-kb locus in the E. canis and E. chaffeensis genomes, respectively. Each locus consisted of three highly repetitive regions with four nonrepetitive intervening regions. E. canis, in addition, had a 6.9-kb locus which contained a repeat of three tandem paralogs in the 28-kb locus. These total 47 paralogous and orthologous genes encoded OMPs of approximately 30 to 35 kDa consisting of several hypervariable regions alternating with conserved regions. In the 5′-end half of the 27-kb locus or the 28-kb locus of each Ehrlichia species, 14 paralogs were linked by short intergenic spaces ranging from −8 bp (overlapped) to 27 bp, and 8 remaining paralogs in the 3′-end half were connected by longer intergenic spaces ranging from 213 to 632 bp. All 22 paralogs, five unknown genes, and secA in the omp cluster in E. canis were transcriptionally active in the monocyte culture, and the paralogs with short intergenic spaces were cotranscribed with their adjacent genes, including the respective intergenic spaces at both the 5′ and the 3′ sides. Although omp genes are diverse, our results suggest that the gene organization of the clusters and the gene locus are conserved between two species of Ehrlichia to maintain a unique transcriptional mechanism for adaptation to environmental changes common to them. PMID:11254561

  3. Point mutations in the major outer membrane protein drive hypervirulence of a rapidly expanding clone of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zuowei; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Sahin, Orhan; Yaeger, Michael; Plummer, Paul; Zhai, Weiwei; Shen, Zhangqi; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-01-01

    Infections due to clonal expansion of highly virulent bacterial strains are clear and present threats to human and animal health. Association of genetic changes with disease is now a routine, but identification of causative mutations that enable disease remains difficult. Campylobacter jejuni is an important zoonotic pathogen transmitted to humans mainly via the foodborne route. C. jejuni typically colonizes the gut, but a hypervirulent and rapidly expanding clone of C. jejuni recently emerged, which is able to translocate across the intestinal tract, causing systemic infection and abortion in pregnant animals. The genetic basis responsible for this hypervirulence is unknown. Here, we developed a strategy, termed “directed genome evolution,” by using hybridization between abortifacient and nonabortifacient strains followed by selection in an animal disease model and whole-genome sequence analysis. This strategy successfully identified SNPs in porA, encoding the major outer membrane protein, are responsible for the hypervirulence. Defined mutagenesis verified that these mutations were both necessary and sufficient for causing abortion. Furthermore, sequence analysis identified porA as the gene with the top genome-wide signal of adaptive evolution using Fu’s Fs, a population genetic metric for recent population size changes, which is consistent with the recent expansion of clone “sheep abortion.” These results identify a key virulence factor in Campylobacter and a potential target for the control of this zoonotic pathogen. Furthermore, this study provides general, unbiased experimental and computational approaches that are broadly applicable for efficient elucidation of disease-causing mutations in bacterial pathogens. PMID:27601641

  4. Major epiplasmic proteins of ciliates are articulins: cloning, recombinant expression, and structural characterization

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of certain protists comprises an extensive membrane skeleton, the epiplasm, which contributes to the cell shape and patterning of the species-specific cortical architecture. The isolated epiplasm of the ciliated protist Pseudomicrothorax dubius consists of two major groups of proteins with molecular masses of 78-80 kD and 11- 13 kD, respectively. To characterize the structure of these proteins, peptide sequences of two major polypeptides (78-80 kD) as well as a cDNA representing the entire coding sequence of a minor and hitherto unidentified component (60 kD; p60) of the epiplasm have been determined. All three polypeptides share sequence similarities. They contain repeated valine- and proline-rich motifs of 12 residues with the consensus VPVP--V-V-V-. In p60 the central core domain consists of 24 tandemly repeated VPV motifs. Within the repeat motifs positively and negatively charged residues, when present, show an alternating pattern in register with the V and P positions. Recombinant p60 was purified in 8 M urea and dialyzed against buffer. Infrared spectroscopic measurements indicate 30% beta-sheet. Electron microscopy reveals short filamentous polymers with a rather homogenous diameter (approximately 15-20 nm), but variable lengths. The small polymers form thicker filaments, ribbons, and larger sheets or tubes. A core domain similar to that of P. dubius p60 is also found in the recently described epiplasmic proteins of the flagellate Euglena, the so-called articulins. Our results show that the members of this protein family are not restricted to flagellates, but are also present in the distantly related ciliates where they are major constituents of the epiplasm. Comparison of flagellate and ciliate articulins highlights common features of this novel family of cytoskeletal proteins. PMID:7559761

  5. Induction of immune responses by two recombinant proteins of brucella abortus, outer membrane proteins 2b porin and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kyung Yong; Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hyun-Eui; Lee, Jin Ju; Kim, Suk; Yoo, Han Sang

    2014-06-28

    The diagnosis of Brucella abortus is mainly based on serological methods using antibody against LPS, which has diagnostic problems. Therefore, to solve this problem, we evaluated two proteins of B. abortus, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SodC) and outer membrane proteins 2b porin (Omp2b). The genes were cloned and expressed in a pMAL system, and the recombinant proteins, rOmp2b and rSodC, were purified as fusion forms with maltosebinding protein. The identity of the proteins was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis with sera of mice infected with B. abortus. Production of cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in RAW 264.7 cells and mouse splenocytes after stimulation with the proteins. Moreover, cellular and humoral immune responses were investigated in BALB/c mice after immunization with the proteins. TNF-α, IL-6, and NO were significantly inducible in RAW 264.7 cells. Splenocytes of naive mice produced IFN-γ and IL-4 significantly by stimulation. Moreover, number of IgG, IFN-γ, and IL-4 producing cells were increased in immunized mice with the two proteins. Production of IgG and IgM with rOmp2b was higher than those with rSodC in immunized mice. These results suggest that the two recombinant proteins of B. abortus may be potential LPS-free proteins for diagnosis.

  6. Protective immunization of horses with a recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine co-expressing genes encoding the outer capsid proteins of African horse sickness virus.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Alan J; Quan, Melvyn; Lourens, Carina W; Audonnet, Jean-Christophe; Minke, Jules M; Yao, Jiansheng; He, Ling; Nordgren, Robert; Gardner, Ian A; Maclachlan, N James

    2009-07-16

    We describe the development and preliminary characterization of a recombinant canarypox virus vectored (ALVAC) vaccine for protective immunization of equids against African horse sickness virus (AHSV) infection. Horses (n=8) immunized with either of two concentrations of recombinant canarypox virus vector (ALVAC-AHSV) co-expressing synthetic genes encoding the outer capsid proteins (VP2 and VP5) of AHSV serotype 4 (AHSV-4) developed variable titres (<10-80) of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies and were completely resistant to challenge infection with a virulent strain of AHSV-4. In contrast, a horse immunized with a commercial recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine expressing the haemagglutinin genes of two equine influenza H3N8 viruses was seronegative to AHSV and following infection with virulent AHSV-4 developed pyrexia, thrombocytopenia and marked oedema of the supraorbital fossae typical of the "dikkop" or cardiac form of African horse sickness. AHSV was detected by virus isolation and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in the blood of the control horse from 8 days onwards after challenge infection whereas AHSV was not detected at any time in the blood of the ALVAC-AHSV vaccinated horses. The control horse seroconverted to AHSV by 2 weeks after challenge infection as determined by both virus neutralization and ELISA assays, whereas six of eight of the ALVAC-AHSV vaccinated horses did not seroconvert by either assay following challenge infection with virulent AHSV-4. These data confirm that the ALVAC-AHSV vaccine will be useful for the protective immunization of equids against African horse sickness, and avoids many of the problems inherent to live-attenuated AHSV vaccines.

  7. Development and comparative evaluation of a plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on recombinant outer membrane antigens Omp28 and Omp31 for diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Sapana; Kumar, Ashu; Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Mangalgi, Smita; Rathod, Vedika; Prakash, Archana; Barua, Anita; Arora, Sonia; Sathyaseelan, Kannusamy

    2013-08-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic infectious disease of humans and livestock with worldwide distribution and is caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. The diagnosis of brucellosis always requires laboratory confirmation by either isolation of pathogens or detection of specific antibodies. The conventional serological tests available for the diagnosis of brucellosis are less specific and show cross-reactivity with other closely related organisms. These tests also necessitate the handling of Brucella species for antigen preparation. Therefore, there is a need to develop reliable, rapid, and user-friendly systems for disease diagnosis and alternatives to vaccine approaches. Keeping in mind the importance of brucellosis as an emerging infection and the prevalence in India, we carried out the present study to compare the recombinant antigens with the native antigens (cell envelope and sonicated antigen) of Brucella for diagnosis of human brucellosis by an indirect plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Recombinant outer membrane protein 28 (rOmp28) and rOmp31 antigens were cloned, expressed, and purified in the bacterial expression system, and the purified proteins were used as antigens. Indirect plate ELISAs were then performed and standardized for comparison of the reactivities of recombinant and native antigens against the 433 clinical samples submitted for brucellosis testing, 15 culture-positive samples, and 20 healthy donor samples. The samples were separated into four groups based on their positivity to rose bengal plate agglutination tests (RBPTs), standard tube agglutination tests (STATs), and 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) tests. The sensitivities and specificities of all the antigens were calculated, and the rOmp28 antigen was found to be more suitable for the clinical diagnosis of brucellosis than the rOmp31 antigen and native antigens. The rOmp28-based ELISA showed a very high degree of agreement with the conventional agglutination tests and

  8. Molecular characterization of the Pb recombination hotspot in the mouse major histocompatibility complex class II region.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Taku; Yoshino, Masayasu; Mizuno, Ken-Ichi; Lindahl, Kirsten Fischer; Koide, Tsuyoshi; Gaudieri, Silvana; Gojobori, Takashi; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2002-08-01

    In the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II region, meiotic recombination breakpoints are clustered in four specific sites known as hotspots. Here we reveal the primary structure of a hotspot near the Pb gene. A total of 12 crossover points were found to be confined to a 15-kb DNA segment of the Pb pseudogene. Moreover, the crossover points are concentrated in a 341-bp segment, which includes a part of exon 4 and intron 4 of the Pb gene. All four MHC hotspots appear to be located within genes or at the 3' end of genes, contrasting with characterized hotspots in budding yeast, which are mostly located at the 5'-promoter regions of genes. The Pb hotspot has several consensus motifs, an octamer transcription factor-binding sequence, the B-motif-like transcription factor-binding sequence, and tandem repeats of tetramer sequence-all of which are shared by the other three hotspots. Systematic analysis of the public database demonstrated that the full motif set occurs rarely in the nucleotide sequence of the entire MHC class II region. All results suggest that the motif set has an indispensable role in determining their site specificity.

  9. A high recombination frequency within the chicken major histocompatibility (B) complex.

    PubMed

    Hepkema, B G; Tilanus, M G; Blankert, H J; Albers, G A; Grosfeld-Stulemeyer, M C; Hensen, E J

    1993-10-01

    Chickens of a commercial pure White Leghorn line were typed for B-F and B-G by serological, biochemical and molecular biological methods. Amongst 287 typed animals of one particular line, three animals with recombinant haplotypes were identified. Compared to earlier reports this revealed a statistically significant (P < 0.05), tenfold higher recombination frequency in this chicken line.

  10. Comparative analysis of the structures of the outer membrane protein P1 genes from major clones of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Grass, S; Einhorn, M; Bailey, C; Newell, C

    1989-01-01

    P1 outer membrane proteins from Haemophilus influenzae type b are heterogeneous antigenically and with respect to apparent molecular weight in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. For determination of the molecular basis for the differences in the P1 proteins, the genes for the P1 proteins from strain 1613, representative of outer membrane protein subtype 3L, and strain 8358, representative of outer membrane protein subtype 6U, were cloned, sequenced, and compared with the previously reported gene for the P1 protein from strain MinnA, a strain with the outer membrane protein subtype 1H. These prototype strains are representatives of the three major clonal families of H. influenzae type b responsible for invasive disease in diverse areas of the world. The nucleotide sequences of the P1 genes from strains 1613 and 8358 were 94 and 90% identical to the MinnA sequence, respectively. The derived amino acid sequences were 91 and 86% identical, respectively. Heterogeneity between the MinnA and 1613 proteins was largely localized to two short variable regions; the protein from strain 8538 contained a third variable region not observed in the other P1 proteins. Thus, the outer membrane protein P1 genes are highly conserved; the variable regions may code for the previously demonstrated strain-specific antigenic determinants. Images PMID:2572549

  11. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Porin Family Highlights a Major Difference in the Outer Membrane of Chlamydial Symbionts and Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Aistleitner, Karin; Heinz, Christian; Hörmann, Alexandra; Heinz, Eva; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Schulz, Frederik; Maier, Elke; Pichler, Peter; Benz, Roland; Horn, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The Chlamydiae constitute an evolutionary well separated group of intracellular bacteria comprising important pathogens of humans as well as symbionts of protozoa. The amoeba symbiont Protochlamydia amoebophila lacks a homologue of the most abundant outer membrane protein of the Chlamydiaceae, the major outer membrane protein MOMP, highlighting a major difference between environmental chlamydiae and their pathogenic counterparts. We recently identified a novel family of putative porins encoded in the genome of P. amoebophila by in silico analysis. Two of these Protochlamydia outer membrane proteins, PomS (pc1489) and PomT (pc1077), are highly abundant in outer membrane preparations of this organism. Here we show that all four members of this putative porin family are toxic when expressed in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. Immunofluorescence analysis using antibodies against heterologously expressed PomT and PomS purified directly from elementary bodies, respectively, demonstrated the location of both proteins in the outer membrane of P. amoebophila. The location of the most abundant protein PomS was further confirmed by immuno-transmission electron microscopy. We could show that pomS is transcribed, and the corresponding protein is present in the outer membrane throughout the complete developmental cycle, suggesting an essential role for P. amoebophila. Lipid bilayer measurements demonstrated that PomS functions as a porin with anion-selectivity and a pore size similar to the Chlamydiaceae MOMP. Taken together, our results suggest that PomS, possibly in concert with PomT and other members of this porin family, is the functional equivalent of MOMP in P. amoebophila. This work contributes to our understanding of the adaptations of symbiotic and pathogenic chlamydiae to their different eukaryotic hosts. PMID:23383036

  12. The cationic liposomal adjuvants CAF01 and CAF09 formulated with the major outer membrane protein elicit robust protection in mice against a Chlamydia muridarum respiratory challenge.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; Tifrea, Delia F; Follmann, Frank; Andersen, Peter; de la Maza, Luis M

    2017-03-23

    Two cationic liposomal adjuvants CAF01 and CAF09 were formulated with the native or the recombinant Chlamydia muridarum major outer membrane protein (nMOMP and rMOMP). BALB/c mice were immunized with the four vaccine formulations using the subcutaneous followed by the intranasal (i.n.) routes. As positive controls mice were inoculated i.n. with live C. muridarum and negative controls received i.n. minimal essential medium (MEM). Four weeks after the last immunization mice were challenged i.n. with 10(4) inclusion forming units (IFU) of C. muridarum. Following the challenge the mice were weighed daily. At 10days post-challenge the mice were euthanized, their lungs weighed and the number of C. muridarum IFU determined. Serum collected the day before the challenge showed that all four groups of mice immunized with CAF01, or CAF09 and MOMP had significant C. muridarum-specific antibody titers. As determined by a T-cell lymphoproliferative assay, these four groups of mice also mounted robust cell mediated immune responses with high production of IFN-γ and IL17 and low levels of IL-4. Following the challenge the four groups of mice lost significantly less body weight than the MEM-immunized group. Lungs of mice vaccinated with CAF01, or CAF09, and nMOMP were significantly lighter than those from mice immunized using rMOMP. The number of IFU recovered from the lungs of mice vaccinated with CAF01, or CAF09, and nMOMP was similar to the number of IFU recovered from mice immunized with live EB. Mice that received rMOMP had significantly higher numbers of IFU than other groups. In conclusion, CAF01 and CAF09 elicited very robust protective humoral and cellular immune responses and were equally effective at adjuntavizing the C. muridarum MOMP. Mice vaccinated with nMOMP were significantly better protected than those immunized with rMOMP, indicative of the importance of the structural conformation of this antigen in protection.

  13. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas S.; Lisby, Michael; Salanti, Ali; Fordyce, Sarah L.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Carter, Richard; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Theander, Thor G.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome-wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens. PMID:24253306

  14. Genome Diversity, Recombination, and Virulence across the Major Lineages of Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, José F.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Gallo, Juan E.; Sykes, Sean; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Misas, Elizabeth; Whiston, Emily A.; Bagagli, Eduardo; Soares, Celia M. A.; Teixeira, Marcus de M.; Taylor, John W.; Clay, Oliver K.; McEwen, Juan G.

    2016-01-01

    development of new diagnostics and treatments. In this article, we compared genomes of 31 diverse isolates representing the major lineages of Paracoccidioides spp. and completed the first annotated genome sequences for the PS3 and PS4 lineages. We analyzed the population structure and characterized the genetic diversity among the lineages of Paracoccidioides, including a deep split of S1 into two lineages (S1a and S1b), and differentiated S1b, associated with most clinical cases, as the more highly recombining and diverse lineage. In addition, we found patterns of positive selection in surface proteins and secreted enzymes among the lineages, suggesting diversifying mechanisms of pathogenicity and adaptation across this species complex. These genetic differences suggest associations with the geographic range, pathogenicity, and ecological niches of Paracoccidioides lineages. PMID:27704050

  15. Recombinant Sox Enzymes from Paracoccus pantotrophus Degrade Hydrogen Sulfide, a Major Component of Oral Malodor

    PubMed Central

    Ramadhani, Atik; Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi; Oho, Takahiko

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is emitted from industrial activities, and several chemotrophs possessing Sox enzymes are used for its removal. Oral malodor is a common issue in the dental field and major malodorous components are volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), including H2S and methyl mercaptan. Paracoccus pantotrophus is an aerobic, neutrophilic facultatively autotrophic bacterium that possesses sulfur-oxidizing (Sox) enzymes in order to use sulfur compounds as an energy source. In the present study, we cloned the Sox enzymes of P. pantotrophus GB17 and evaluated their VSC-degrading activities for the prevention of oral malodor. Six genes, soxX, soxY, soxZ, soxA, soxB, and soxCD, were amplified from P. pantotrophus GB17. Each fragment was cloned into a vector for the expression of 6×His-tagged fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant Sox (rSox) proteins were purified from whole-cell extracts of E. coli using nickel affinity chromatography. The enzyme mixture was investigated for the degradation of VSCs using gas chromatography. Each of the rSox enzymes was purified to apparent homogeneity, as confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The rSox enzyme mixture degraded H2S in dose- and time-dependent manners. All rSox enzymes were necessary for degrading H2S. The H2S-degrading activities of rSox enzymes were stable at 25–80°C, and the optimum pH was 7.0. The amount of H2S produced by periodontopathic bacteria or oral bacteria collected from human subjects decreased after an incubation with rSox enzymes. These results suggest that the combination of rSox enzymes from P. pantotrophus GB17 is useful for the prevention of oral malodor. PMID:28260736

  16. Cloning, expression, and purification of recombinant major mango allergen Man i 1 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Che; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Wen, Hsiao-Wei

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the number of people around the world who suffer from fruit allergies has increased. Mango can induce anaphylaxis, and two major mango allergens have been identified - Man i 1 and Man i 2. Apart from their molecular weights and pI values, no other information about them is known. This work identifies the DNA and amino acid sequences of Man i 1 and constructs an expression system for recombinant Man i 1 (rMan i 1). Firstly, 3' and 5' RACE assays were used to identify the cDNA fragment of Man i 1. Subsequently, the full length of Man i 1 cDNA was inserted into a pET-21a(+) vector, and the inserted plasmid was transformed to Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) to express rMan i 1. The conditions for the expression of rMan i 1, including IPTG concentration, induction temperature, and induction time, were optimized. The highest amount of soluble rMan i 1 was obtained after induction with 0.1 mM IPTG at 16 °C for 20 h. The His-tagged rMan i 1 was purified using Ni-NTA agarose and its identity was verified using an anti-histidine antibody and the serum of a mango-allergic person. Additionally, rMan i 1 was identified as glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and shared 86.2% identity in amino acid sequence of GAPDH from wheat. Finally, an E. coli expression system of rMan i 1 was established, with the potential to be used in immunotherapy against mango allergy or the development of assays for detecting the residues of mango allergens.

  17. The tolC locus of Escherichia coli affects the expression of three major outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Morona, R; Reeves, P

    1982-01-01

    tolC mutants, which are resistant to colicin E1 and also highly sensitive to detergents and dyes, were shown to lack the OmpF outer membrane protein. There was little effect on transcription as judged by the use of an ompF-lac operon fusion strain, and the tolC effect was probably due to a post-transcriptional effect. The NmpC protein and protein 2 were also tolC dependent. Images PMID:6281230

  18. Short-term therapy with recombinant growth hormone in polytransfused thalassaemia major patients with growth deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, L; Gurrado, R; Zecchino, C; Manolo, F; De Sanctis, V; Cisternino, M; Caruso-Nicoletti, M; Galati, M

    1998-01-01

    Growth failure is commonly described in polytransfused thalassaemia major patients (Th) with or without growth hormone (GH) releasing hormone-GH axis impairment. We have investigated the efficacy of short-term recombinant GH (rhGH) therapy (Saizen [Serono] 0.1 IU/kg/day 6 evenings/week administered s.c. for 12 months) on growth and predicted final height in 28 (19M, 9F) regularly transfused Th with growth deficiency (aged 14.8 +/- 2.0 yr) on long term desferrioxamine s.c. therapy. All Th had no evidence of congestive heart failure, hypothyroidism or impaired glucose tolerance; in all patients the GH peak (evaluated during both insulin and clonidine test) was < or = 20 mIU/l; hypergonadotropic hypogonadism was excluded in Th with delayed puberty. At the start of therapy height age (HA)/bone age (BA) ratio was 0.92 +/- 0.12. Bone age delay was positively correlated to chronological age (CA), serum ferritin levels (mean of the last three years), the age at the start of chelation therapy, growth velocity calculated for CA during the last year; a positive correlation was also found between circulating IGF-I levels and age at the start of chelation therapy. After 1 year on rhGH therapy there was a significant increase of height calculated for CA (not for BA), of growth velocity calculated for both CA and BA and of circulating IGF-I levels; the HA variation/BA variation ratio was 1.85 +/- 1.71, without any significant difference between predicted final height at the start (-1.08 +/- 1.28 SDS) and at the end of rhGH therapy (-0.88 +/- 1.13). The variation of height calculated for CA was positively correlated to both CA and growth velocity during the last year before rhGH therapy (calculated for CA) and negatively to the height at the start (calculated for CA). There were no side effects and haematological parameters did not show significant changes. In conclusion, our data, obtained in a relatively large group of Th, confirm the emerging results of short-term (12 months

  19. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of the gene (aniA) encoding the major anaerobically induced outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, G T; Clark, V L

    1992-01-01

    When grown under anaerobic conditions, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, expresses several novel outer membrane proteins. One of these, Pan 1, has an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa in electrophoresis and is recognized by serum samples from patients with gonococcal infection. The presence of antibodies to this protein in patient sera suggests that Pan 1 is expressed during gonococcal infection and, more importantly, that N. gonorrhoeae grows anaerobically in vivo. We have cloned the Pan 1 structural gene, aniA, by screening a gonococcal lambda gt11 expression library with monospecific, polyclonal anti-Pan 1 antiserum. Three distinct immunoreactive recombinants, containing overlapping fragments of DNA, were isolated and confirmed to be coding for Pan 1 protein sequences. Northern (RNA blot) hybridization of an insert from an aniA recombinant to total gonococcal cellular RNA revealed the presence of a 1.5-kb transcript that was specific to RNA from anaerobically grown gonococci, indicating that the aniA gene is regulated at the transcriptional level and is monocistronic. To characterize the aniA gene, we have sequenced the entire 2-kb region spanned by the overlapping recombinants. We have also performed primer extension analysis on RNA isolated from aerobically and anaerobically grown gonococci in order to define the aniA promoter region. Two putative primer extension products specific to organisms grown anaerobically were identified by homology to known Escherichia coli promoter sequences, suggesting that the regulation of aniA expression involves multiple promoter regions. Images PMID:1383156

  20. Chloroform-Methanol Residue of Coxiella burnetii Markedly Potentiated the Specific Immunoprotection Elicited by a Recombinant Protein Fragment rOmpB-4 Derived from Outer Membrane Protein B of Rickettsia rickettsii in C3H/HeN Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wenping; Wang, Pengcheng; Xiong, Xiaolu; Jiao, Jun; Yang, Xiaomei; Wen, Bohai

    2015-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacteria, Rickettsia rickettsii and Coxiella burnetii, are the potential agents of bio-warfare/bio-terrorism. Here C3H/HeN mice were immunized with a recombinant protein fragment rOmp-4 derived from outer membrane protein B, a major protective antigen of R. rickettsii, combined with chloroform-methanol residue (CMR) extracted from phase I C. burnetii organisms, a safer Q fever vaccine. These immunized mice had significantly higher levels of IgG1 and IgG2a to rOmpB-4 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), two crucial cytokines in resisting intracellular bacterial infection, as well as significantly lower rickettsial loads and slighter pathological lesions in organs after challenge with R. rickettsii, compared with mice immunized with rOmpB-4 or CMR alone. Additionally, after challenge with C. burnetii, the coxiella loads in the organs of these mice were significantly lower than those of mice immunized with rOmpB-4 alone. Our results prove that CMR could markedly potentiate enhance the rOmpB-4-specific immunoprotection by promoting specific and non-specific immunoresponses and the immunization with the protective antigen of R. rickettsii combined with CMR of C. burnetii could confer effective protection against infection of R. rickettsii or C. burnetii. PMID:25909586

  1. Chloroform-Methanol Residue of Coxiella burnetii Markedly Potentiated the Specific Immunoprotection Elicited by a Recombinant Protein Fragment rOmpB-4 Derived from Outer Membrane Protein B of Rickettsia rickettsii in C3H/HeN Mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenping; Wang, Pengcheng; Xiong, Xiaolu; Jiao, Jun; Yang, Xiaomei; Wen, Bohai

    2015-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacteria, Rickettsia rickettsii and Coxiella burnetii, are the potential agents of bio-warfare/bio-terrorism. Here C3H/HeN mice were immunized with a recombinant protein fragment rOmp-4 derived from outer membrane protein B, a major protective antigen of R. rickettsii, combined with chloroform-methanol residue (CMR) extracted from phase I C. burnetii organisms, a safer Q fever vaccine. These immunized mice had significantly higher levels of IgG1 and IgG2a to rOmpB-4 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), two crucial cytokines in resisting intracellular bacterial infection, as well as significantly lower rickettsial loads and slighter pathological lesions in organs after challenge with R. rickettsii, compared with mice immunized with rOmpB-4 or CMR alone. Additionally, after challenge with C. burnetii, the coxiella loads in the organs of these mice were significantly lower than those of mice immunized with rOmpB-4 alone. Our results prove that CMR could markedly potentiate enhance the rOmpB-4-specific immunoprotection by promoting specific and non-specific immunoresponses and the immunization with the protective antigen of R. rickettsii combined with CMR of C. burnetii could confer effective protection against infection of R. rickettsii or C. burnetii.

  2. Identification of Protective Epitopes by Sequencing of the Major Outer Membrane Protein Gene of a Variant Strain of Chlamydia psittaci Serotype 1 (Chlamydophila abortus)

    PubMed Central

    Vretou, Evangelia; Psarrou, Evgenia; Kaisar, Maria; Vlisidou, Isabella; Salti-Montesanto, Viviane; Longbottom, David

    2001-01-01

    Protective monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of species of the family Chlamydiaceae, which is the primary vaccine candidate antigen, recognize nonlinear epitopes conferred by the oligomeric conformation of the molecule. Protective MAbs failed to recognize oligomeric MOMP of the variant strain LLG, which bears amino acid substitutions in variable segments (VSs) 1, 2, and 4, and competed with monomer-specific MAbs mapping to these VSs in reference strain 577. The results suggest that multiple sites located in the three VSs contribute to the epitope of protective MAbs. PMID:11119563

  3. Electron traps as major recombination centers in n-GaN films grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Hwan; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Smirnov, Nikolai B.; Yakimov, Eugene B.; Tarelkin, Sergey A.; Turutin, Andery V.; Shemerov, Ivan V.; Pearton, Stephen J.

    2016-06-01

    For a group of n-GaN films grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using both straight MOCVD and epitaxial lateral overgrowth techniques (ELOG proper or pendeo overgrowth), the spectra of deep traps were measured by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) with electrical or optical injection (ODLTS). The results were compared with diffusion length measurement results obtained from electron-beam-induced current experiments. The results strongly indicate that deep electron traps near E c - 0.56 eV could be the major recombination centers determining the diffusion length values in pendeo samples.

  4. An estimate of the recombination frequency between the B locus and the D locus within the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, E M; Petersons, J S; Flournoy, N; Clift, R A; Thomas, E D

    1976-10-01

    Mixed leukocyte culture studies on 120 families, including 120 HLA haplo-identical siblings and 210 HLA-identical siblings, were analyzed for unusual patterns of reactivity. Three discrepant reactions were noted in which cells from HLA-identical siblings showed strong mutual stimulation. These data provide an estimate of 0.0065 as the recombination frequency between the HLA-B and HLA-D regions of the major histocompatibility chromosome in man. When combined with the data of Keuning et al. (1975), the value is 0.0068 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.0022 to 0.0158.

  5. Identification of the sodium-calcium exchanger as the major ricin-binding glycoprotein of bovine rod outer segments and its localization to the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, D.M.; Molday, R.S. ); Friedel, U.; Cook, N.J. )

    1990-02-13

    After neuraminidase treatment the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger of bovine rod outer segments was found to specifically bind Ricinus communis agglutinin. SDS gel electrophoresis and Western blotting of ricin-binding proteins purified from rod outer segment membranes by lectin affinity chromatography revealed the existence of two major polypeptides of M{sub r} 215K and 103K, the former of which was found to specifically react with PMe 1B3, a monoclonal antibody specific for the 230-kDa non-neuraminidase-treated Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger. Reconstitution of the ricin affinity-purified exchanger into calcium-containing liposomes revealed that neuraminidase treatment had no significant effect on the kinetics of Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange activation by sodium. The authors further investigated the density of the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger in disk and plasma membrane preparations using Western blotting, radioimmunoassays, immunoelectron microscopy, and reconstitution procedures. The results indicate that the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger is localized in the rod photoreceptor plasma membrane and is absent or present in extremely low concentrations in disk membranes, as they have previously shown to be the case for the cGMP-gated cation channel. Previous reports describing the existence of Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange activity in rod outer segment disk membrane preparations may be due to the fusion of plasma membrane components and/or the presence of contaminating plasma membrane vesicles.

  6. Extracellular self-assembly of virus-like particles from secreted recombinant polyoma virus major coat protein.

    PubMed

    Ng, J; Koechlin, O; Ramalho, M; Raman, D; Krauzewicz, N

    2007-12-01

    Mouse polyoma virus major coat protein (VP1) expressed from a recombinant baculovirus is efficiently transported to infected cell nuclei and assembles into protein nanospheres morphologically similar to natural capsids. The nanospheres readily combine with plasmid DNA to form a hybrid gene therapy agent known as virus-like particles (VLPs). To facilitate large-scale production of VLPs free from cellular contaminants, the use of stable Drosophila cell lines expressing either wild-type protein, or VP1 tagged with a secretion signal for targeting to the extracellular medium, was investigated. Both wild-type and tagged VP1 expressed at 2-4 mg VP1/litre of culture. As expected, the wild-type protein self-assembled into VLPs. The tagged VP1 was efficiently secreted to the extracellular medium but was also glycosylated, unlike wild-type VP1. Despite this fact, a small fraction of the recombinant secreted protein assembled into VLP-like structures that had altered disulphide bonding, but were still biologically active. These results demonstrate the considerable tolerance in the nanosphere assembly to structural (i.e. aberrant glycosylation) and environmental (i.e. extracellular medium vs. nuclear milieu) changes. Thus, with modifications to improve nanosphere assembly, the secretion method could be adapted to large-scale preparation of VLPs, providing significant advantages over current methods of production of the vector.

  7. A novel O-linked glycan modulates Campylobacter jejuni major outer membrane protein-mediated adhesion to human histo-blood group antigens and chicken colonization

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Jafar; Pirinccioglu, Necmettin; Oldfield, Neil J.; Carlsohn, Elisabet; Stoof, Jeroen; Aslam, Akhmed; Self, Tim; Cawthraw, Shaun A.; Petrovska, Liljana; Colborne, Natalie; Sihlbom, Carina; Borén, Thomas; Wooldridge, Karl G.; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important cause of human foodborne gastroenteritis; strategies to prevent infection are hampered by a poor understanding of the complex interactions between host and pathogen. Previous work showed that C. jejuni could bind human histo-blood group antigens (BgAgs) in vitro and that BgAgs could inhibit the binding of C. jejuni to human intestinal mucosa ex vivo. Here, the major flagella subunit protein (FlaA) and the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) were identified as BgAg-binding adhesins in C. jejuni NCTC11168. Significantly, the MOMP was shown to be O-glycosylated at Thr268; previously only flagellin proteins were known to be O-glycosylated in C. jejuni. Substitution of MOMP Thr268 led to significantly reduced binding to BgAgs. The O-glycan moiety was characterized as Gal(β1–3)-GalNAc(β1–4)-GalNAc(β1–4)-GalNAcα1-Thr268; modelling suggested that O-glycosylation has a notable effect on the conformation of MOMP and this modulates BgAg-binding capacity. Glycosylation of MOMP at Thr268 promoted cell-to-cell binding, biofilm formation and adhesion to Caco-2 cells, and was required for the optimal colonization of chickens by C. jejuni, confirming the significance of this O-glycosylation in pathogenesis. PMID:24451549

  8. Sequence Diversity of the oprI Gene, Coding for Major Outer Membrane Lipoprotein I, among rRNA Group I Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, Daniel; Bouton, Christiane; Sarniguet, Alain; De Vos, Paul; Vauterin, Marc; Cornelis, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    The sequence of oprI, the gene coding for the major outer membrane lipoprotein I, was determined by PCR sequencing for representatives of 17 species of rRNA group I pseudomonads, with a special emphasis on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Within the P. aeruginosa species, oprI sequences for 25 independent isolates were found to be identical, except for one silent substitution at position 96. The oprI sequences diverged more for the other rRNA group I pseudomonads (85 to 91% similarity with P. aeruginosa oprI). An accumulation of silent and also (but to a much lesser extent) nonsilent substitutions in the different sequences was found. A clustering according to the respective presence and/or positions of the HaeIII, PvuII, and SphI sites could also be obtained. A sequence cluster analysis showed a rather widespread distribution of P. fluorescens isolates. All other rRNA group I pseudomonads clustered in a manner that was in agreement with other studies, showing that the oprI gene can be useful as a complementary phylogenetic marker for classification of rRNA group I pseudomonads. PMID:9851998

  9. A spatial correlation of the flow distribution on the outer continental shelf of Louisiana during the major hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico during the 2005 season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coor, J. L.; Li, C. Y.; Rouse, L. J.

    2007-12-01

    The 2005 hurricane season was unusually active, producing 31 named storms in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico. Of these 31 storms, 11 entered the Gulf of Mexico, the most notable of which were Hurricanes Cindy, Dennis, Katrina, and Rita. Data were collected during these storms by acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) based on 58 oil and gas platforms scattered across the outer continental shelf (OCS) region of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nine to 31 ADCPs were active and recording data during each major storm passage through the Gulf of Mexico. Data were recorded from depths of 60 to 70m down to 1100 to 1200m, with a few extending to depths around 2000m. From these data, the flow distribution of the OCS region was studied with the use of time series and spectrum analysis. Preliminary analysis has shown temporal variations in the vertical structure, increased diurnal oscillation current velocities (by a factor of approximately two), near-inertial oscillations, and variations in the overall direction of the flow before, during, and after the passage of the hurricanes. Methods of harmonic analysis and rotary spectra were implemented in this study. These data and results provide an estimate of the spatial extent to which a hurricane influences subsurface currents.

  10. Treponema denticola Major Outer Sheath Protein Induces Actin Assembly at Free Barbed Ends by a PIP2-Dependent Uncapping Mechanism in Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Michelle B.; Koh, Adeline; Glogauer, Michael; Ellen, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    The major outer sheath protein (Msp) of Treponema denticola perturbs actin dynamics in fibroblasts by inducing actin reorganization, including subcortical actin filament assembly, leading to defective calcium flux, diminished integrin engagement of collagen, and retarded cell migration. Yet, its mechanisms of action are unknown. We challenged Rat-2 fibroblasts with enriched native Msp. Msp activated the small GTPases Rac1, RhoA and Ras, but not Cdc42, yet only Rac1 localized to areas of actin rearrangement. We used Rac1 dominant negative transfection and chemical inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) to show that even though Rac1 activation was PI3K-dependent, neither was required for Msp-induced actin rearrangement. Actin free barbed end formation (FBE) by Msp was also PI3K-independent. Immunoblotting experiments showed that gelsolin and CapZ were released from actin filaments, whereas cofilin remained in an inactive state. Msp induced phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) formation through activation of a phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase and its recruitment to areas of actin assembly at the plasma membrane. Using a PIP2 binding peptide or lipid phosphatase inhibitor, PIP2 was shown to be required for Msp-mediated actin uncapping and FBE formation. Evidently, Msp induces actin assembly in fibroblasts by production and recruitment of PIP2 and release of the capping proteins CapZ and gelsolin from actin barbed ends. PMID:21901132

  11. Structure analysis of OmpC, one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of E. coli, by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.F.

    1983-07-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the structure analysis of a pore-forming membrane protein, OmpC, which is one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. In order to obtain structural information it was necessary to develop a suitable technique for preparing two-dimensional crystalline arrays of this membrane protein in an unfixed, unstained and hydrated condition. Electron micrographs were recorded at exposures of less than 5 electrons/A/sup 2/ in order to avoid severe radiation damage. The resulting images were crystallographically averaged, in order to overcome the statistical limitations associated with the low electron exposures. The resulting images, which extend to a resolution of approx. 13.5 A, lend themselves to a natural interpretation that is consistent with the mass density of protein, water and lipid, prior data from 2-D and 3-D structure studies of negatively stained specimens at approx. = 20 A resolution, and published spectroscopic data on the peptide chain secondary structure.

  12. Mutation of the gene encoding a major outer-membrane protein in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris causes pleiotropic effects, including loss of pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yih-Yuan; Wu, Chieh-Hao; Lin, Juey-Wen; Weng, Shu-Fen; Tseng, Yi-Hsiung

    2010-09-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the phytopathogen that causes black rot in crucifers. The xanthan polysaccharide and extracellular enzymes produced by this organism are virulence factors, the expression of which is upregulated by Clp (CRP-like protein) and DSF (diffusible signal factor), which is synthesized by RpfF. It is also known that biofilm formation/dispersal, regulated by the effect of controlled synthesis of DSF on cell-cell signalling, is required for virulence. Furthermore, a deficiency in DSF causes cell aggregation with concomitant production of a gum-like substance that can be dispersed by addition of DSF or digested by exogenous endo-beta-1,4-mannanase expressed by Xcc. In this study, Western blotting of proteins from a mopB mutant (XcMopB) showed Xcc MopB to be the major outer-membrane protein (OMP); Xcc MopB shared over 97 % identity with homologues from other members of Xanthomonas. Similarly to the rpfF mutant, XcMopB formed aggregates with simultaneous production of a gummy substance, but these aggregates could not be dispersed by DSF or endo-beta-1,4-mannanase, indicating that different mechanisms were involved in aggregation. In addition, XcMopB showed surface deformation, altered OMP composition, impaired xanthan production, increased sensitivity to stressful conditions including SDS, elevated temperature and changes in pH, reduced adhesion and motility and defects in pathogenesis. The finding that the major OMP is required for pathogenicity is unprecedented in phytopathogenic bacteria.

  13. The Fusobacterium nucleatum major outer-membrane protein (FomA) forms trimeric, water-filled channels in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Kleivdal, H; Benz, R; Jensen, H B

    1995-10-01

    The pore-forming activity of the major outer-membrane protein FomA of the anaerobic Fusobacterium nucleatum was studied in artificial lipid bilayer membranes. FomA was isolated from F. nucleatum strains Fev1, ATCC 10953, and ATCC 25586 by extraction with lithium dodecyl sulfate and lithium chloride and had an apparent molecular mass of about 40 kDa. When solubilized at low temperatures, the protein ran with an apparent molecular mass of about 62 kDa on SDS/PAGE. Cross-linking experiments and two-dimensional SDS/PAGE gave evidence that the 62-kDa protein band represented the trimeric form of FomA. The protein trimers were susceptible to SDS and temperature. The stability of the porin trimers varied among the strains. The properties of the FomA channels were studied in reconstitution experiments with black lipid bilayer membranes. The F. nucleatum porins formed channels with single-channel conductances in the range 0.66-1.30 nS in M KCl. The single-channel conductance was a function of the mobilities of the ions present in the aqueous solution bathing the bilayer membrane. This means that FomA forms general diffusion channels since (a) the conductance showed a linear dependence on the salt concentration, (b) the ion selectivity was small and varied for the three strains, and (c) the channels did not exhibit any binding site for maltotriose or triglycine. The water-filled channel was voltage dependent, and conductance decrements were observed at transmembrane potentials of +/- 50 mV. The conductance decrement steps were about one-third of the total conductance of a functional unit in its fully 'open' state. This strongly suggests that the trimer is the functional unit of the porin.

  14. Using major outer membrane protein typing as an epidemiological tool to investigate outbreaks caused by milk-borne Campylobacter jejuni isolates in California.

    PubMed

    Jay-Russell, Michele T; Mandrell, Robert E; Yuan, Jean; Bates, Anna; Manalac, Rosa; Mohle-Boetani, Janet; Kimura, Akiko; Lidgard, Janice; Miller, William G

    2013-01-01

    We describe using major outer membrane protein (MOMP) typing as a screen to compare the Campylobacter jejuni porA gene sequences of clinical outbreak strains from human stool with the porA sequences of dairy farm strains isolated during two milk-borne campylobacteriosis outbreak investigations in California. The genetic relatedness of clinical and environmental strains with identical or closely related porA sequences was confirmed by multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. The first outbreak involved 1,644 C. jejuni infections at 11 state correctional facilities and was associated with consumption of pasteurized milk supplied by an on-site dairy (dairy A) at a prison in the central valley. The second outbreak involved eight confirmed and three suspect C. jejuni cases linked to consumption of commercial raw milk and raw chocolate colostrum at another central valley dairy (dairy B). Both dairies bottled fluid milk on the farm and distributed the finished product to off-site locations. Altogether, C. jejuni was isolated from 7 of 15 (46.7%) bovine fecal, 12 of 20 (60%) flush alley water, and 1 of 20 (5%) lagoon samples collected on dairy A. At dairy B, C. jejuni was cultured from 9 of 26 (34.6%) bovine fecal samples. Environmental strains indistinguishable from the clinical outbreak strains were found in five flush alley water samples (dairy A) and four bovine fecal samples (dairy B). The findings demonstrate that MOMP typing is a useful tool to triage environmental isolates prior to conducting more labor-intensive molecular typing methods.

  15. Major Outer Membrane Protein Omp25 of Brucella suis Is Involved in Inhibition of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production during Infection of Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jubier-Maurin, Véronique; Boigegrain, Rose-Anne; Cloeckaert, Axel; Gross, Antoine; Alvarez-Martinez, Maria-Teresa; Terraza, Annie; Liautard, Janny; Köhler, Stephan; Rouot, Bruno; Dornand, Jacques; Liautard, Jean Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Brucella spp. can establish themselves and cause disease in humans and animals. The mechanisms by which Brucella spp. evade the antibacterial defenses of their host, however, remain largely unknown. We have previously reported that live brucellae failed to induce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production upon human macrophage infection. This inhibition is associated with a nonidentified protein that is released into culture medium. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of gram-negative bacteria have been shown to modulate macrophage functions, including cytokine production. Thus, we have analyzed the effects of two major OMPs (Omp25 and Omp31) of Brucella suis 1330 (wild-type [WT] B. suis) on TNF-α production. For this purpose, omp25 and omp31 null mutants of B. suis (Δomp25 B. suis and Δomp31 B. suis, respectively) were constructed and analyzed for the ability to activate human macrophages to secrete TNF-α. We showed that, in contrast to WT B. suis or Δomp31 B. suis, Δomp25 B. suis induced TNF-α production when phagocytosed by human macrophages. The complementation of Δomp25 B. suis with WT omp25 (Δomp25-omp25 B. suis mutant) significantly reversed this effect: Δomp25-omp25 B. suis-infected macrophages secreted significantly less TNF-α than did macrophages infected with the Δomp25 B. suis mutant. Furthermore, pretreatment of WT B. suis with an anti-Omp25 monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope exposed at the surface of the bacteria resulted in substancial TNF-α production during macrophage infection. These observations demonstrated that Omp25 of B. suis is involved in the negative regulation of TNF-α production upon infection of human macrophages. PMID:11447156

  16. Comparison of clinical performance of antigen based-enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and major outer membrane protein (MOMP)-PCR for detection of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection

    PubMed Central

    Nateghi Rostami, Mahmoud; Hossein Rashidi, Batool; Aghsaghloo, Fatemeh; Nazari, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen worldwide. Early detection and treatment of C.trachomatis genital infection prevent serious reproductive complications. Objective: Performances of enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and major outer membrane protein (MOMP)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis of genital C.trachomatis infection in women were compared. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study a total of 518 women volunteers were included (33.67±8.3 yrs) who had been referred to Gynecology clinics of Qom province, Iran, were included. Endocervical swab specimens were collected to detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen in EIA and to amplify MOMP gene of C.trachomatis in PCR. Results were confirmed using ompI nested-PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated for performance of the tests. Odds ratios were determined using binary logistic regression analysis. Results: In total, 37 (7.14%) cases were positive by EIA and/or MOMP-PCR. All discrepant results were confirmed by nested-PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV values of EIA were 59.46%, 100%, 100% and 96.98%, and those of MOMP-PCR were 97.30%, 100%, 100%, 99.79%, respectively. Reproductive complications including 2.7% ectopic pregnancy, 5.4% stillbirth, 5.4% infertility, and 10.8% PROM were recorded. The risk of developing chlamydiosis was increased 4.8-fold in volunteers with cervicitis (p<0.05; OR 4.80; 95% CI 1.25-18.48). Conclusion: C.trachomatis infection should be regarded in women of reproductive ages especially those with cervicitis. Primary screening of women by using the low cost antigen-EIA is recommended; however, due to the low sensitivity of Ag-EIA, verification of the negative results by a DNA amplification method is needed. PMID:27525325

  17. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant major envelope protein (rH3L) of buffalopox virus in animal models.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Yogisharadhya, Revanaiah; Venkatesan, Gnanavel; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Shivachandra, Sathish Bhadravati

    2016-02-01

    Buffalopox virus, a zoonotic Indian vaccinia-like virus, is responsible for contagious disease affecting mainly buffaloes, cattle and humans. H3L gene, encoding for an immunodominant major envelope protein of intracellular mature virion of orthopoxviruses, is highly conserved and found to elicit neutralizing antibodies. Therefore in the present study, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the recombinant H3L protein of buffalopox virus in laboratory animal models has been evaluated. A partial H3L gene encoding for the C-terminal truncated ectodomain of H3L protein (1M to I280) of BPXV-Vij/96 strain was cloned, over-expressed and purified as histidine-tagged fusion protein (50 kDa) from Escherichia coli using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified rH3L protein was further used for active immunization of guinea pig (250 μg/dose) and adult mice (10 μg and 50 μg/dose) with or without adjuvants (alum, Freund's Complete Adjuvant and CpG). Subsequently, a gradual increase in antigen specific serum IgG as well as neutralizing antibody titres measured by using indirect-ELISA and serum neutralization test respectively, was noted in both guinea pigs and mouse models. Suckling mice immunized passively with anti-H3L serum showed 80% pre-exposure prophylaxis upon challenge with virulent buffalopox virus strain. An indirect-ELISA based on rH3L protein showed no cross-reactivity with hyperimmune sera against sheeppox virus (SPPV), goatpox virus (GTPV), orf virus (ORFV), foot- and- mouth disease virus (FMDV), peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) and bluetongue virus (BTV) during the course of study. The study highlights the potential utility of rH3L protein as a safer prophylactic and diagnostic reagent for buffalopox.

  18. Solution Structure, Copper Binding and Backbone Dynamics of Recombinant Ber e 1–The Major Allergen from Brazil Nut

    PubMed Central

    Rundqvist, Louise; Tengel, Tobias; Zdunek, Janusz; Björn, Erik; Schleucher, Jürgen; Alcocer, Marcos J. C.; Larsson, Göran

    2012-01-01

    Background The 2S albumin Ber e 1 is the major allergen in Brazil nuts. Previous findings indicated that the protein alone does not cause an allergenic response in mice, but the addition of components from a Brazil nut lipid fraction were required. Structural details of Ber e 1 may contribute to the understanding of the allergenic properties of the protein and its potential interaction partners. Methodology/Principal Findings The solution structure of recombinant Ber e 1 was solved using NMR spectroscopy and measurements of the protein back bone dynamics at a residue-specific level were extracted using 15N-spin relaxation. A hydrophobic cavity was identified in the structure of Ber e 1. Using the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement property of Cu2+ in conjunction with NMR, it was shown that Ber e 1 is able to specifically interact with the divalent copper ion and the binding site was modeled into the structure. The IgE binding region as well as the copper binding site show increased dynamics on both fast ps-ns timescale as well as slower µs-ms timescale. Conclusions/Significance The overall fold of Ber e 1 is similar to other 2S albumins, but the hydrophobic cavity resembles that of a homologous non-specific lipid transfer protein. Ber e 1 is the first 2S albumin shown to interact with Cu2+ ions. This Cu2+ binding has minimal effect on the electrostatic potential on the surface of the protein, but the charge distribution within the hydrophobic cavity is significantly altered. As the hydrophobic cavity is likely to be involved in a putative lipid interaction the Cu2+ can in turn affect the interaction that is essential to provoke an allergenic response. PMID:23056307

  19. Influence of a Putative ECF Sigma Factor on Expression of the Major Outer Membrane Protein, OprF, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Schoofs, Geert; Hancock, Robert E. W.; De Mot, René

    1999-01-01

    The gene encoding OprF, a major outer membrane protein in Pseudomonas species (formerly known as type 1 pseudomonads), was thought to be constitutively transcribed from a single sigma 70 promoter immediately upstream of the gene. We now report the identification of a novel putative ECF (extracytoplasmic function) sigma factor gene, sigX, located immediately upstream of oprF in both Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Pseudomonas fluorescens OE 28.3 and show that disruption of this gene significantly reduces OprF expression. In P. aeruginosa, Northern analysis demonstrated that this reduction was a result of an effect on transcription of monocistronic oprF combined with a polar effect due to termination of a transcript containing sigX and oprF. Comparison of sigX-disrupted and wild-type cell transcripts by primer extension indicated that monocistronic transcription of oprF occurs from two overlapping promoters, one that is SigX-dependent and resembles ECF sigma factor promoters in its minus-35 region and another promoter that is independent of SigX and is analogous to the sigma 70-type promoter previously reported. Complementation of the P. aeruginosa sigX-disrupted mutant with plasmid-encoded OprF did not resolve the phenotypes associated with this mutant, which included a markedly reduced logarithmic-phase growth rate in rich medium (compared to that in minimal medium), further reduction of the growth rate in a low-osmolarity environment, secretion of an unidentified pigment, and increased sensitivity to the antibiotic imipenem. This indicates that SigX is involved in the regulation of other genes in P. aeruginosa. Disruption of the sigX gene in P. fluorescens also had an effect on the logarithmic-phase growth rate in rich medium. A conserved sigX gene was also identified in a Pseudomonas syringae isolate and six P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. Collectively, these data indicate that an ECF sigma factor plays a role in the regulation and expression of OprF and also

  20. Enhancement of uptake of lipopolysaccharide in macrophages by the major outer membrane protein OmpA of gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Korn, A; Rajabi, Z; Wassum, B; Ruiner, W; Nixdorff, K

    1995-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to the major outer membrane protein OmpA from Proteus mirabilis were generated and used to monitor the kinetics of uptake in macrophages of LPS as well as LPS bound to OmpA. Uptake was measured by a modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a microtiter culture system. The MAb were of various immunoglobulin G subclasses and showed strong reactivities with their antigens. Four hybridoma clones recognizing LPS and three recognizing OmpA from P. mirabilis 19 were selected for the present study on the basis of reactions in ELISA and Western blot (immunoblot) analyses. In the uptake assay, it was possible to differentiate between antigen on the cell surface and antigen which had been internalized. Uptake of LPS by macrophages was relatively rapid during the first 4 h of culture and then progressed more slowly over the remaining 24-h observation period. The level of detection of LPS in this assay system was in the nanogram range. When macrophages were pulsed with LPS for 30 min and subsequently washed to remove antigen not bound to the cells, the amount of LPS detectable on the macrophage surface decreased progressively for 3 h after the pulse, which indicated internalization of the antigen. Thereafter, LPS rose to an increased level on the cell surface. The rate of uptake of LPS was more rapid when it was in complex with OmpA. When the fate of OmpA was monitored in the same LPS-protein complexes by use of MAb to OmpA in a pulse experiment, the level of protein measured on the cell surface decreased after an initial rise, which again indicated internalization, but the protein did not reappear on the cell surface in a form detectable with the MAb. Compared with the LPS monitoring system, detection of OmpA associated with macrophages was weak, although the MAb to OmpA reacted strongly with the protein in the ELISA and Western blot analyses. PMID:7790087

  1. Major factors influencing linkage disequilibrium by analysis of different chromosome regions in distinct populations: demography, chromosome recombination frequency and selection.

    PubMed

    Zavattari, P; Deidda, E; Whalen, M; Lampis, R; Mulargia, A; Loddo, M; Eaves, I; Mastio, G; Todd, J A; Cucca, F

    2000-12-12

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping of disease genes is complicated by population- and chromosome-region-specific factors. We have analysed demographic factors by contrasting intermarker LD results obtained in a large cosmopolitan population (UK), a large genetic isolate (Sardinia) and a subisolate (village of Gavoi) for two regions of the X chromosome. A dramatic increase of LD was found in the subisolate. Demographic history of populations therefore influences LD. Chromosome-region-specific effects, namely the pattern and frequency of homologous recombination, were next delineated by the analysis of chromosome 6p21, including the HLA region. Patterns of global LD in this region were very similar in the UK and Sardinian populations despite their entirely distinct demographies, and correlate well with the pattern of recombinations. Nevertheless, haplotypes extend across recombination hot spots indicative of selection of certain haplotypes. Subisolate aside, chromosome-region-specific differences in LD patterns appear to be more important than the differences in intermarker LD between distinct populations.

  2. Expression of recombinant T-cell epitopes of major Japanese cedar pollen allergens fused with cholera toxin B subunit in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Vinh Van; Zou, Yanshuang; Kurata, Kentaro; Enomoto, Keiichi

    2015-05-01

    Peptides containing T-cell epitopes from allergens, which are not reactive to allergen-specific IgE, are appropriate candidates as antigens for specific immunotherapy against allergies. To develop a vaccine that can be used in practical application to prevent and treat Japanese cedar pollen allergy, four major T-cell epitopes from the Cry j 1 antigen and six from the Cry j 2 antigen were selected to design cry j 1 epi and cry j 2 epi, DNA constructs encoding artificial polypeptides of the selected epitopes. To apply cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) as an adjuvant, cry j 1 epi and cry j 2 epi were linked and then fused to the CTB gene in tandem to construct a fusion gene, ctb-linker-cry j 1 epi- cry j 2 epi-flag. The fusion gene was introduced into a pET-28a(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The expressed recombinant protein was purified by a His-tag affinity column and confirmed by western blot analysis using anti-CTB and anti-FLAG antibodies. The purified recombinant protein also proved to be antigenic against anti-Cry j 1 and anti-Cry j 2 antibodies. Expression of the recombinant protein induced with 1mM IPTG reached a maximum in 3-5h, and recovery of the affinity-purified recombinant protein was approximately 120mg/L of culture medium. The present study indicates that production of sufficient amounts of recombinant protein with antigenic epitopes may be possible by recombinant techniques using E. coli or other bacterial strains for protein expression.

  3. ST2249-MRSA-III: a second major recombinant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone causing healthcare infection in the 1970s.

    PubMed

    Nimmo, G R; Steen, J A; Monecke, S; Ehricht, R; Slickers, P; Thomas, J C; Appleton, S; Goering, R V; Robinson, D A; Coombs, G W

    2015-05-01

    Typing of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Australia in the 1970s revealed a novel clone, ST2249-MRSA-III (CC45), present from 1973 to 1979. This clone was present before the Australian epidemic caused by the recombinant clone, ST239-MRSA-III. This study aimed to characterize the genome of ST2249-MRSA-III to establish its relationship to other MRSA clones. DNA microarray analysis was conducted and a draft genome sequence of ST2249 was obtained. The recombinant structure of the ST2249 genome was revealed by comparisons to publicly available ST239 and ST45 genomes. Microarray analysis of genomic DNA of 13 ST2249 isolates showed gross similarities with the ST239 chromosome in a segment around the origin of replication and with ST45 for the remainder of the chromosome. Recombination breakpoints were precisely determined by the changing pattern of nucleotide polymorphisms in the genome sequence of ST2249 isolate SK1585 compared with ST239 and ST45. One breakpoint was identified to the right of oriC, between sites 1014 and 1065 of the gene D484_00045. Another was identified to the left of oriC, between sites 1185 and 1248 of D484_01632. These results indicate that ST2249 inherited approximately 35.3% of its chromosome from an ST239-like parent and 64.7% from an ST45-like parent. ST2249-MRSA-III resulted from a major recombination between parents that resemble ST239 and ST45. Although only limited Australian archival material is available, the oldest extant isolate of ST2249 predates the oldest Australian isolate of ST239 by 3 years. It is therefore plausible that these two recombinant clones were introduced into Australia separately.

  4. MicL, a new σE-dependent sRNA, combats envelope stress by repressing synthesis of Lpp, the major outer membrane lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Monica S.; Updegrove, Taylor B.; Gogol, Emily B.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Gross, Carol A.; Storz, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    In enteric bacteria, the transcription factor σE maintains membrane homeostasis by inducing synthesis of proteins involved in membrane repair and two small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that down-regulate synthesis of abundant membrane porins. Here, we describe the discovery of a third σE-dependent sRNA, MicL (mRNA-interfering complementary RNA regulator of Lpp), transcribed from a promoter located within the coding sequence of the cutC gene. MicL is synthesized as a 308-nucleotide (nt) primary transcript that is processed to an 80-nt form. Both forms possess features typical of Hfq-binding sRNAs but surprisingly target only a single mRNA, which encodes the outer membrane lipoprotein Lpp, the most abundant protein of the cell. We show that the copper sensitivity phenotype previously ascribed to inactivation of the cutC gene is actually derived from the loss of MicL and elevated Lpp levels. This observation raises the possibility that other phenotypes currently attributed to protein defects are due to deficiencies in unappreciated regulatory RNAs. We also report that σE activity is sensitive to Lpp abundance and that MicL and Lpp comprise a new σE regulatory loop that opposes membrane stress. Together MicA, RybB, and MicL allow σE to repress the synthesis of all abundant outer membrane proteins in response to stress. PMID:25030700

  5. Cloning of the Major Capsid Protein (MCP) of Grouper Iridovirus of Taiwan (TGIV) and Preliminary Evaluation of a Recombinant MCP Vaccine against TGIV

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hsin-I; Chiou, Pinwen Peter; Gong, Hong-Yi; Chou, Hsin-Yiu

    2015-01-01

    Fish iridoviruses cause systemic diseases with high mortality in various species of wild and farm-raised fish, resulting in severe economic losses. In 1998, we isolated a new epizootic iridovirus in cultured grouper (Epinephelus sp.) in Taiwan, thus named as grouper iridovirus of Taiwan (TGIV). We report here the cloning of TGIV major capsid protein (MCP). Phylogenetic analysis of the iridoviral MCPs confirmed the classification of TGIV into the Megalocytivirus genus. Recombinant TGIV MCP and GIV MCP were then generated to produce polyclonal antibodies. Western blot analysis revealed that the two antisera were species-specific, indicating no common epitope shared by the MCPs of the two viruses. We further assayed the potency of a subunit vaccine containing recombinant TGIV MCP. The vaccine effectively protected grouper from TGIV infection. The result demonstrated that MCP is a suitable antigen for anti-TGIV vaccines. PMID:26633384

  6. Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Behannon, K. W.; Carbary, J. F.; Eviatar, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Similarities between the Saturnian and terrestrial outer magnetosphere are examined. Saturn, like Earth, has a fully developed magnetic tail, 80 to 100 RS in diameter. One major difference between the two outer magnetospheres is the hydrogen and nitrogen torus produced by Titan. This plasma is, in general, convected in the corotation direction at nearly the rigid corotation speed. Energies of magnetospheric particles extend to above 500 keV. In contrast, interplanetary protons and ions above 2 MeV have free access to the outer magnetosphere to distances well below the Stormer cutoff. This access presumably occurs through the magnetotail. In addition to the H+, H2+, and H3+ ions primarily of local origin, energetic He, C, N, and O ions are found with solar composition. Their flux can be substantially enhanced over that of interplanetary ions at energies of 0.2 to 0.4 MeV/nuc.

  7. Growth promotion of red sea bream, Pagrosomus major, by oral administration of recombinant eel and salmon growth hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Mai, Kang-Sen; Xu, Ying-Li; Miao, Hong-Zhi; Liu, Zhen-Hui; Dong, Yong; Lan, Shan; Wang, Rao; Zhang, Pei-Jun

    2001-06-01

    Recombinant eel GH and yeast containing chinook salmon growth hormone (reGH and rcsGH) were incorporated into gelatin and sodium alginate (reGH-GS and rcsGH-GS) or polymer matrix (reGH-HP55) to protect the hormone from proteolytic cleavage in the stomach. The diets containing reGH-GS, rcsGH-GS, reGH-HP55 and free-reGH or uncoated-rcsGH were administered to red sea bream. Feeding of reGH-GS, reGH-HP55 and rcsGH-GS diets resulted in significant increases in body weight and fork length over those of controls. These results strongly suggest that gelatin and sodium alginate as well as polymer matrix protected the hormone from proteolytic enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract to allow the bioactive hormone to enter the circulation and eventually stimulate fish growth.

  8. Recombination suppression in the vicinity of the breakpoints of a balanced 1:11 autosomal translocation associated with schizophrenia and other forms of major mental illness

    SciTech Connect

    He, L.; Blackwood, D.H.R.; Maclean, A.W.

    1994-09-01

    The frequency and extent of pairing failure around human translocations is unknown. We have examined the pattern of recombination around the breakpoints of a balanced autosomal translocation t(1:11)(q43:q21) associated with major mental illness. We have postulated that the association with mental illness in the family has not arisen by chance, but rather that functional disruption of a gene at or near a breakpoint site is responsible. Efforts to isolate the breakpoints for molecular analysis of the region are now at an advanced stage. On the other hand if pairing failure is occurring in the family in the region of the breakpoints, a susceptibility allele for mental illness, acting independently of the translocation, may be located some distance away. DNA was available from seventeen carriers and ten non-translocation carriers, giving a total of thirty-one informative meioses spanning 4 generations. The derivative one and eleven chromosomes were also isolated in somatic cell hybrids and were used to confirm allele phase. We genotyped the pedigree members using nine markers covering 30 cMs on either side of both the chromosome one and eleven breakpoints. No recombinants were found with markers within 3 cMs of either breakpoint. Four markers at an average of 7 cMs respectively on either side of the two breakpoints gave a total of three crossovers from thirty-one meioses versus an expected 9, demonstrating (p<0.05) significant recombination suppression. By contrast, examination of chromosome regions at greater distances from the breakpoints showed recombination rates similar to those expected from CEPH data with no evidence of suppression. We conclude that crossover suppression occurs in this family but is restricted to a region within 7 cMs of the breakpoints.

  9. Prdm9, a major determinant of meiotic recombination hotspots, is not functional in dogs and their wild relatives, wolves and coyotes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Fuentes, Violeta; Di Rienzo, Anna; Vilà, Carles

    2011-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is a fundamental process needed for the correct segregation of chromosomes during meiosis in sexually reproducing organisms. In humans, 80% of crossovers are estimated to occur at specific areas of the genome called recombination hotspots. Recently, a protein called PRDM9 was identified as a major player in determining the location of genome-wide meiotic recombination hotspots in humans and mice. The origin of this protein seems to be ancient in evolutionary time, as reflected by its fairly conserved structure in lineages that diverged over 700 million years ago. Despite its important role, there are many animal groups in which Prdm9 is absent (e.g. birds, reptiles, amphibians, diptera) and it has been suggested to have disruptive mutations and thus to be a pseudogene in dogs. Because of the dog's history through domestication and artificial selection, we wanted to confirm the presence of a disrupted Prdm9 gene in dogs and determine whether this was exclusive of this species or whether it also occurred in its wild ancestor, the wolf, and in a close relative, the coyote. We sequenced the region in the dog genome that aligned to the last exon of the human Prdm9, containing the entire zinc finger domain, in 4 dogs, 17 wolves and 2 coyotes. Our results show that the three canid species possess mutations that likely make this gene non functional. Because these mutations are shared across the three species, they must have appeared prior to the split of the wolf and the coyote, millions of years ago, and are not related to domestication. In addition, our results suggest that in these three canid species recombination does not occur at hotspots or hotspot location is controlled through a mechanism yet to be determined.

  10. An N-linked high-mannose type oligosaccharide, expressed at the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis, mediates attachment and infectivity of the microorganism to HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, C; Takahashi, N; Swanson, A F; Ozeki, Y; Hakomori, S

    1996-12-15

    The structure of the carbohydrate of the 40-kD major outer membrane component of Chlamydia trachomatis and its role in defining infectivity of the organism were investigated. The oligosaccharides were released from the glycoprotein by N-glycanase digestion, coupled to a 2-aminopyridyl residue, and subjected to two-dimensional sugar mapping technique. The major fractions consisted of "high-mannose type" oligosaccharides containing 8-9 mannose residues. Bi- and tri-antennary "complex type" oligosaccharides having terminal galactose were detected as minor components. These oligosaccharides were N-linked and contained no sialic acid. This structural profile is consistent with our previous characterization based on lectin-binding and glycosidase digestion. Functional specificity of identified chlamydial oligosaccharides was analyzed using glycopeptides fractionated from ovalbumin and structurally defined oligosaccharides from other sources. The glycopeptide fraction having high-mannose type oligosaccharide, as compared to those having complex or hybrid-type, showed a stronger inhibitory effect on attachment and infectivity of chlamydial organisms to HeLa cells. Among high-mannose type oligosaccharides, the strongest inhibition was observed with mannose 8 as compared with mannose 6, 7, or 9. These results indicate that a specific high-mannose type oligosaccharide linked to the major outer membrane protein of C. trachomatis mediates attachment and infectivity of the organism to HeLa cells.

  11. One-step purification and porin transport activity of the major outer membrane proteins P2 from Haemophilus influenzae, FomA from Fusobacterium nucleatum and PorB from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Kattner, Christof; Pfennig, Sabrina; Massari, Paola; Tanabe, Mikio

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial porins are major outer membrane proteins that function as essential solute transporters between the bacteria and the extracellular environment. Structural features of porins are also recognized by eukaryotic cell receptors involved in innate and adaptive immunity. To better investigate the function of porins, proper refolding is necessary following purification from inclusion bodies [1, 2]. Using a single-step size exclusion chromatographic method, we have purified three major porins from pathogenic bacteria, the OmpP2 (P2) from Haemophilus influenzae, FomA from Fusobacterium nucleatum and PorB from Neisseria meningitidis, at high yield and report their unique solute transport activity with size exclusion limit. Furthermore, we have optimized their purification method and achieved improvement of their thermostability for facilitating functional and structural analyses.

  12. Nucleotide sequence and expression of the gene encoding the major 25-kilodalton outer membrane protein of Brucella ovis: Evidence for antigenic shift, compared with other Brucella species, due to a deletion in the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Cloeckaert, A; Verger, J M; Grayon, M; Zygmunt, M S; Grépinet, O

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences encoding the major 25-kDa outer membrane protein (OMP) (omp25 genes) of Brucella ovis 63/290, Brucella melitensis 16M, Brucella suis 1330, Brucella canis RM6/66, and Brucella neotomae 5K33 (all reference strains) were determined and compared with that of Brucella abortus 544 (P. de Wergifosse, P. Lintermans, J. N. Limet, and A. Cloeckaert, J. Bacteriol. 177:1911-1914, 1995). The major difference found was between the omp25 gene of B. ovis and those of the other Brucella species; the B. ovis gene had a 36-bp deletion located at the 3' end of the gene. The corresponding regions of other Brucella species contain two 8-bp direct repeats and two 4-bp inverted repeats, which could have been involved in the genesis of the deletion. The mechanism responsible for the genesis of the deletion appears to be related to the "slipped mispairing" mechanism described in the literature. Expression of the 25-kDa outer membrane protein (Omp25) in Brucella spp. or expression from the cloned omp25 gene in Escherichia coli cells was studied with a panel of anti-Omp25 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). As shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoelectron microscopy, Omp25 was exported to the outer membrane in E. coli expressing either the truncated omp25 gene of B. ovis or the entire omp25 genes of the other Brucella species. Size and antigenic shifts due to the 36-bp deletion were demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting and by the differences in binding patterns in ELISA of the anti-Omp25 MAbs at the cell surface of E. coli cells harboring the appropriate gene and of cells of B. ovis and other Brucella species. In particular, MAbs directed against discontinuous epitopes of the entire Omp25 showed the absence of, or a significant reduction in, antibody reactivity with the B. ovis truncated Omp25. The results indicated that, as defined by the MAbs, exported Omp25 probably presents similar

  13. Inhibition of the multiplication of Mycobacterium leprae by vaccination with a recombinant M. bovis BCG strain that secretes major membrane protein II in mice.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y; Tamura, T; Matsuoka, M; Makino, M

    2009-10-01

    The ability of a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain that secretes major membrane protein II (MMP-II) of Mycobacterium leprae (BCG-SM) to confer protection against leprosy was evaluated by use of a mouse footpad model. C57BL/6J mice intradermally inoculated with BCG-SM produced splenic T cells which secreted significant amounts of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in response to either the recombinant MMP-II, the M. leprae-derived membrane fraction, or the BCG-derived cytosolic fraction in vitro more efficiently than those from the mice infected with the vector control BCG strain (BCG-pMV, a BCG strain containing pMV-261). A higher percentage of CD8(+) T cells obtained from BCG-SM-inoculated mice than those obtained from BCG-pMV-inoculated mice produced intracellular IFN-gamma on restimulation with the M. leprae antigens. BCG-SM inhibited the multiplication of M. leprae in the footpads of C57BL/6J mice more efficiently than BCG-pMV. These results indicate that a BCG strain that secretes MMP-II could be a better vaccine candidate for leprosy.

  14. Structures of and allelic diversity and relationships among the major outer membrane protein (ompA) genes of the four chlamydial species.

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenboeck, B; Kousoulas, K G; Storz, J

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequences coding for 81% of the ompA gene from 24 chlamydial strains, representing all chlamydial species, were determined from DNA amplified by polymerase chain reactions. Chlamydial strains of serovars and strains with similar chromosomal restriction fragment length polymorphism had identical ompA DNA sequences. The ompA sequences were segregated into 23 different ompA alleles and aligned with each other, and phylogenetic relationships among them were inferred by neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony analyses. The neighbor-joining method produced a single phylogram which was rooted at the branch between two major clusters. One cluster included all Chlamydia trachomatis ompA alleles (trachoma group). The second cluster was composed of three major groups of ompA alleles: psittacosis group (alleles MN, 6BC, A22/M, B577, LW508, FEPN, and GPIC), pneumonia group (Chlamydia pneumoniae AR388 with the allele KOALA), and polyarthritis group (ruminant and porcine chlamydial alleles LW613, 66P130, L71, and 1710S with propensity for polyarthritis). These groups were distinguished through specific DNA sequence signatures. Maximum parsimony analysis yielded two equally most parsimonious phylograms with topologies similar to the ompA tree of neighbor joining. Two phylograms constructed from chlamydial genomic DNA distances had topologies identical to that of the ompA phylogram with respect to branching of the chlamydial species. Human serovars of C. trachomatis with essentially identical genomes represented a single taxonomic unit, while they were divergent in the ompA tree. Consistent with the ompA phylogeny, the porcine isolate S45, previously considered to be Chlamydia psittaci, was identified as C. trachomatis through biochemical characteristics. These data demonstrate that chlamydial ompA allelic relationships, except for human serovars of C. trachomatis, are cognate with chromosomal phylogenies. Images PMID:8419295

  15. The major outer membrane protein OmpU of Vibrio splendidus contributes to host antimicrobial peptide resistance and is required for virulence in the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Duperthuy, Marylise; Binesse, Johan; Le Roux, Frédérique; Romestand, Bernard; Caro, Audrey; Got, Patrice; Givaudan, Alain; Mazel, Didier; Bachère, Evelyne; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2010-04-01

    Vibrio splendidus, strain LGP32, is an oyster pathogen associated with the summer mortalities affecting the production of Crassostrea gigas oysters worldwide. Vibrio splendidus LGP32 was shown to resist to up to 10 microM Cg-Def defensin and Cg-BPI bactericidal permeability increasing protein, two antimicrobial peptides/proteins (AMPs) involved in C. gigas immunity. The resistance to both oyster Cg-Def and Cg-BPI and standard AMPs (polymyxin B, protegrin, human BPI) was dependent on the ompU gene. Indeed, upon ompU inactivation, minimal bactericidal concentrations decreased by up to fourfold. AMP resistance was restored upon ectopic expression of ompU. The susceptibility of bacterial membranes to AMP-induced damages was independent of the ompU-mediated AMP resistance. Besides its role in AMP resistance, ompU proved to be essential for the adherence of V. splendidus LGP32 to fibronectin. Interestingly, in vivo, ompU was identified as a major determinant of V. splendidus pathogenicity in oyster experimental infections. Indeed, the V. splendidus-induced oyster mortalities dropped from 56% to 11% upon ompU mutation (Kaplan-Meier survival curves, P < 0.01). Moreover, in co-infection assays, the ompU mutant was out competed by the wild-type strain with competitive indexes in the range of 0.1-0.2. From this study, ompU is required for virulence of V. splendidus. Contributing to AMP resistance, conferring adhesive properties to V. splendidus, and being essential for in vivo fitness, the OmpU porin appears as an essential effector of the C. gigas/V. splendidus interaction.

  16. Protective immunity of a Pichia pastoris expressed recombinant iridovirus major capsid protein in the Chinese giant salamander, Andrias davidianus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Fan, Yuding; LaPatra, Scott E; Ma, Jie; Xu, Jin; Meng, Yan; Jiang, Nan; Zeng, Lingbing

    2015-10-13

    The major capsid protein (MCP) is the main immunogenic protein of iridoviruses, that has been widely used as an immunogen in vaccination trials. In this study, the codon-optimized giant salamander iridovirus (GSIV) MCP gene (O-MCP) was synthesized and cloned into a pPICZα B vector for secretory expression in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris after methanol induction. The expression of the O-MCP protein was detected by the Bradford protein assay, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and electron microscopy. The Bradford protein assay indicated that the concentration of the O-MCP expressed was about 40 μg/ml in culture supernatants. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the O-MCP had a molecular weight of about 66 kDa and reacted with a His-specific MAb that was confirmed by Western blotting. Electron microscopy observations revealed that the purified O-MCP could self-assemble into virus-like particles. Healthy giant salamanders were vaccinated by intramuscular injection with the O-MCP antigen at a dose of 20 μg/individual. The numbers of erythrocytes and leukocytes in the peripheral blood of immunized Chinese giant salamanders increased significantly at day 3 and reached a peak at day 5 post-immunization. Meanwhile, the differential leukocyte counts of monocytes and neutrophils increased significantly at day 5 post-immunization compared to that of the control group. The percentage of lymphocytes was 71.33 ± 3.57% at day 21 post-immunization. The neutralization assay showed that the serum neutralizing antibody titer reached 321 at day 21 post-immunization. The GSIV challenge test revealed that the relative percent survival of Chinese giant salamanders vaccinated with O-MCP was 78%. These results indicated that the O-MCP antigen expressed by the Pichia pastoris system elicited significant immune response in the Chinese giant salamander against GSIV and might represent a potential yeast-derived vaccine candidate that could be used for the control of disease caused by the

  17. Structural analysis and immunogenicity of recombinant major envelope protein (rA27L) of buffalopox virus, a zoonotic Indian vaccinia-like virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Yogisharadhya, Revanaiah; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Venkatesan, Gnanavel; Shivachandra, Sathish Bhadravati

    2015-10-05

    Buffalopox virus (BPXV), an Indian variant of vaccinia virus (VACV), is a zoonotic agent and affects buffaloes, cattle and humans. A27L is one of the conserved major immuno-dominant envelope proteins of orthopox viruses (OPVs) involved in viral entry/maturation and elicits neutralizing antibodies. In this study, the A27L gene of BPXV-Vij/96 strain encoding recombinant mature A27L (21S to E110) and C-terminal truncated A27L-LZD (21S to N84aa) proteins were cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins. Structurally, A27L of BPXV was similar to that of VACV and found to contain four regions including a potential coiled-coil motif (CCM) in the centre (43 to 84aa). Oligomerization of recombinant A27L fusion protein (∼30 kDa) leads to the formation of dimer/trimers/tetramers under non-reducing conditions. Further, the purified rA27L protein was used for active immunization of rabbit (250 μg/rabbit) and adult mice (10 μg and 50 μg/mice) with or without adjuvants (FCA, alum and CpG). Immune response measured by using indirect-ELISA and SNT revealed a gradual increase in antigen specific serum IgG as well as neutralization antibody titers. Upon challenge with virulent BPXV strain, a protection of 60% was observed in suckling mice passively administered with anti-rA27L sera. No cross-reactivity of rA27L protein with hyperimmune sera against ORFV, GTPV, SPPV, PPRV, FMDV and BTV was noticed in indirect-ELISA. The study indicated that the rA27L protein is a safe and potential prophylactic as well as diagnostic antigen for buffalopox.

  18. Natural selection coupled with intragenic recombination shapes diversity patterns in the major histocompatibility complex class II genes of the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Yan; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhang, He-Min; Ge, Yun-Fa; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2010-05-15

    Ample variations of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are essential for vertebrates to adapt to various environmental conditions. In this study, we investigated the genetic variations and evolutionary patterns of seven functional MHC class II genes (one DRA, two DRB, two DQA, and two DQB) of the giant panda. The results showed the presence of two monomorphic loci (DRA and DQB2) and five polymorphic loci with different numbers of alleles (seven at DRB1, six at DRB3, seven at DQA1, four at DQA2, six at DQB1). The presence of balancing selection in the giant panda was supported by the following pieces of evidence: (1) The observed heterozygosity was higher than expected. (2) Amino acid heterozygosity was significantly higher at antigen-binding sites (ABS) compared with non-ABS sequences. (3) The selection parameter omega (d(N)/d(S)) was significantly higher at ABS compared with non-ABS sequences. (4) Approximately 95.45% of the positively selected codons (P>0.95) were located at or adjacent to an ABS. Furthermore, this study showed that (1) The Qinling subspecies exhibited high omega values across each locus (all >1), supporting its extensive positive selection. (2) The Sichuan subspecies displayed small omega at DRB1 (omega<0.72) and DQA2 (omega<0.48), suggesting that these sites underwent strong purifying selection. (3) Intragenic recombination was detected in DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1. The molecular diversity in classic Aime-MHC class II genes implies that the giant panda had evolved relatively abundant variations in its adaptive immunity along the history of host-pathogen co-evolution. Collectively, these findings indicate that natural selection accompanied by recombination drives the contrasting diversity patterns of the MHC class II genes between the two studied subspecies of giant panda.

  19. Thermoelectric Outer Planets Spacecraft (TOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research and advanced development work is reported on a ballistic-mode, outer planet spacecraft using radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) power. The Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS) project was established to provide the advanced systems technology that would allow the realistic estimates of performance, cost, reliability, and scheduling that are required for an actual flight mission. A system design of the complete RTG-powered outer planet spacecraft was made; major technical innovations of certain hardware elements were designed, developed, and tested; and reliability and quality assurance concepts were developed for long-life requirements. At the conclusion of its active phase, the TOPS Project reached its principal objectives: a development and experience base was established for project definition, and for estimating cost, performance, and reliability; an understanding of system and subsystem capabilities for successful outer planets missions was achieved. The system design answered long-life requirements with massive redundancy, controlled by on-board analysis of spacecraft performance data.

  20. Recombinant AAV2-mediated β-globin expression in human fetal hematopoietic cells from the aborted fetuses with β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Wang, Feng; Xue, Jin-Feng; Zhao, Fei; Song, Liu-Jiang; Tan, Meng-Qun

    2011-06-01

    Genetic correction of autologous hematopoietic stem cells has been proposed as an attractive treatment method for β-thalassemia. Our previous study has shown that recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV2) efficiently transduces human fetal liver hematopoietic cells, and mediates the expression of the human β-globin gene in vivo. In this study, we investigated whether rAAV2 could also mediate the expression of normal β-globin gene in human hematopoietic cells from β-thalassemia patients. Human hematopoietic cells were isolated from aborted β-thalassemia major fetuses, transduced with rAAV2-β-globin, and then transplanted into nude mice. We found that rAAV2-β-globin transduced human fetal hematopoietic cells, as determined by allele-specific PCR analysis. Furthermore, β-globin transgene expression was detected in human hematopoietic cells up to 70 days post-transplantation in the recipient mice. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that human β-globin expression levels increased significantly compared with control, as indicated by a 1.2-2.8-fold increase in the ratio of β/α-globin chain. These novel data demonstrate that rAAV2 can transduce and mediate the normal β-globin gene expression in fetal hematopoietic cells from β-thalassemia patients. Our findings further support the potential use of rAAV-based gene therapy in the treatment of human β-thalassemia.

  1. Plasmid-determined resistance to serum bactericidal activity: a major outer membrane protein, the traT gene product, is responsible for plasmid-specified serum resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Moll, A; Manning, P A; Timmis, K N

    1980-01-01

    Resistance to the bactericidal activity of serum appears to be an important virulence property of invasive bacteria. The conjugative multiple-antibiotic-resistance plasmid R6-5 was found to confer upon Escherichia coli host bacteria increased resistance against rabbit serum. Gene-cloning techniques were used to localize the serum resistance determinant of R6-5 to a segment of the plasmid that encodes conjugal transfer functions, and a pACYC184 hybrid plasmid, designated pKT107, that contains this segment was constructed. The generation and analysis of deletion and insertion mutant derivatives of the pKT107 plasmid that no longer specify serum resistance permitted precise localization of the serum-resistance cistron on the R6-5 map and demonstrated that this locus is coincident with that of traT, one of the two surface exclusion genes of R6-5. Examination of the proteins synthesized in E. coli minicells of pKT107 and its serum-sensitive mutant derivative plasmids confirmed that the serum-resistance gene product of R6-5 is the traT protein and showed that this protein is a major structural component (about 21,000 copies per cell) of the bacterial outer membrane. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6995306

  2. Transduction of E13 murine neural precursor cells by non-immunogenic recombinant adeno-associated viruses induces major changes in neuronal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Nash, K R; Cardenas-Aguayo, Mdel C; Berg, M J; Marks, N

    2012-05-17

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) provide a cellular model to compare transduction efficiency and toxicity for a series of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs). Results led to the choice of rAAV9 as a preferred candidate to transduce NPCs for in vivo transplantation. Importantly, transduction promoted a neuronal phenotype characterized by neurofilament M (NFM) with a concomitant decrease in the embryonic marker, nestin, without significant change in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). In marked contrast to recent studies for induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), exposure to rAAVs is non-immunogenic and these do not result in genetic abnormalities, thus bolstering the earlier use of NPCs such as those isolated from E13 murine cells for clinical applications. Mechanisms of cellular interactions were explored by treatment with genistein, a pan-specific inhibitor of protein receptor tyrosine kinases (PRTKs) that blocked the transduction and differentiation, thus implying a central role for this pathway for inducing infectivity along with observed phenotypic changes and as a method for drug design. Implantation of transduced NPCs into adult mouse hippocampus survived up to 28 days producing a time line for targeting or migration to dentate gyrus and CA3-1 compatible with future clinical applications. Furthermore, a majority showed commitment to highly differentiated neuronal phenotypes. Lack of toxicity and immune response of rAAVs plus ability for expansion of NPCs in vitro auger well for their isolation and suggest potential therapeutic applications in repair or replacement of diseased neurons in neurodegeneration.

  3. Enhanced protective efficacy against tuberculosis provided by a recombinant urease deficient BCG expressing heat shock protein 70-major membrane protein-II having PEST sequence.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yumiko; Maeda, Yumi; Tamura, Toshiki; Mukai, Tetsu; Mitarai, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Saburo; Makino, Masahiko

    2016-12-07

    Enhancement of the T cell-stimulating ability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG) is necessary to develop an effective tuberculosis vaccine. For this purpose, we introduced the PEST-HSP70-major membrane protein-II (MMPII)-PEST fusion gene into ureC-gene depleted recombinant (r) BCG to produce BCG-PEST. The PEST sequence is involved in the proteasomal processing of antigens. BCG-PEST secreted the PEST-HSP70-MMPII-PEST fusion protein and more efficiently activated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in terms of phenotypic changes and cytokine productions than an empty-vector-introduced BCG or HSP70-MMPII gene-introduced ureC gene-depleted BCG (BCG-DHTM). Autologous human naïve CD8(+) T cells and naïve CD4(+) T cells were effectively activated by BCG-PEST and produced IFN-γ in an antigen-specific manner through DCs. These T cell activations were closely associated with phagosomal maturation and intraproteasomal protein degradation in antigen-presenting cells. Furthermore, BCG-PEST produced long-lasting memory-type T cells in C57BL/6 mice more efficiently than control rBCGs. Moreover, a single subcutaneous injection of BCG-PEST more effectively reduced the multiplication of subsequent aerosol-challenged Mycobacterium tuberculosis of the standard H37Rv strain and clinically isolated Beijing strain in the lungs than control rBCGs. The vaccination effect of BCG-PEST lasted for at least 6months. These results indicate that BCG-PEST may be able to efficiently control the spread of tuberculosis in human.

  4. The effects of recombinant eel growth hormone, methyltestosterone and L-thyroxine on the growth of red sea bream, Pagrosomus major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Ge, Guo-Chang; Miao, Hong-Zhi

    1995-03-01

    the effects of recombinant eel growth hormone (reGH), methyltestosterone (MT) and L-thyroxine (T4) on the growth of red sea bream, Pagrosomus major, were investigated. Administration of reGH to fry by immersion at 2 mg/1 for 2 h every 5 days resulted in significant increase in both weight and length, but the condition factor (CF) diminished relative to that of similarly treated controls over the 37 day treatment period. Immersion in 0.1 mg/l T4 also resulted in significant increase in both weight and length and higher survival rate of test fry compared to the controls. Immersion in MT had less effect on growth and high-dose resulted in high mortality. In the second study, injection of 2 μg reGH/(g·wk) caused a significant increase in the specific growth rate (SGR) of test red sea bream fingerlings relative to that of the controls during the 4—week treatment period and maintained the increasing trend over the post-treatment period (weeks 4 6). Injection of MT at a dosage of 1μg/(g·wk) resulted in a significant increase in SGR during the 4—week treatment period. Intramuscular injection of 0.1 μg T4/(g·wk) also resulted in a significant increase in weight. Injection of high-doses of MT and T4 inhibited growth and resulted in darkening skin, bulging eyes and thinning body. In muscle chemical composition, the treated groups had no significant differences compared to the controls, but the high-dose MT and T4 groups showed significant increases in lipid content. Potential practical methods for hormone application in fish culture are discussed.

  5. Origin of Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Boyce, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We feel that at the present moment the available theoretical models of the Kuiper belt are still in advance of the data, and thus our main task has been to conduct observational work guided by theoretical motivations. Our efforts over the past year can be divided into four categories: A) Wide-field Searches for Kuiper Belt Objects; B) Pencil-beam Searches for Kuiper Belt Objects; C) Wide-field Searches for Moons of the Outer Planets; D) Pencil-beam Searches for Faint Uranian and Neptunian Moons; E) Recovery Observations. As of April 2002, we have conducted several searches for Kuiper belt objects using large-format mosaic CCD camera on 4-meter class telescopes. In May 1999, we used the Kitt Peak 4-meter with the NOAO Mosaic camera we attempted a search for KBOs at a range of ecliptic latitudes. In addition to our wide-field searches, we have conducted three 'pencil-beam' searches in the past year. In a pencil-beam search we take repeated integrations of the same field throughout a night. After preprocessing the resulting images we shift and recombine them along a range of rates and directions consistent with the motion of KBOs. Stationary objects then smear out, while objects moving at near the shift rate appear as point sources. In addition to our searches for Kuiper belt objects, we are completing the inventory of the outer solar system by search for faint satellites of the outer planets. In August 2001 we conducted pencil beam searches for faint Uranian and Neptunian satellites at CFHT and CTIO. These searches resulted in the discover of two Neptunian and four Uranian satellite candidates. The discovery of Kuiper belt objects and outer planet satellites is of little use if the discoveries are not followed by systematic, repeated astrometric observations that permit reliable estimates of their orbits.

  6. Physics of the outer heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gazis, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Major advances in the physics of the outer heliosphere are reviewed for the 1987-1990 time frame. Emphasis is placed on five broad topics: the detailed structure of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances, the global structure of the interplanetary field, latidudinal variations and meridional flows, radial and temporal variations, and the interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium. 122 refs.

  7. Volume Recombination in Alcator C-Mod Divertor Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.

    1997-11-01

    Volume recombination has been predicted(See, for example, A. Loarte, Proc. 12th PSI Conf, J. Nucl. Mater (1996) I9, in press.) to be a significant sink for plasma ions under the detached divertor conditions achieved on many tokamaks. This volume recombination sink was observed initially in Alcator C-Mod and shown to be a major fraction of the ion loss. Signatures of recombination have now been observed on DIII-D(R.C. Isler, et al., paper submitted for publication), Asdex-UG (B. Napiontek, et al. 24th EPS Conf., Berchtesgaden, Germany, 1997, P4.007, in press.), and JET(R.D. Monk, et al. 24th EPS Conf., Berchtesgaden, Germany, 1997, P1.030, in press.). It is important primarily because the recombined atoms are not accelerated through the sheath - thus reducing divertor plate sputtering, and because most of the potential energy of recombination (13.6 eV) is released as radiation before the ion strikes the plate. The Alcator C-Mod measurements show that the recombination occurs in low Te ( ~1 eV), high ne ( ~1× 10^21 m-3) regions, and is significantly larger in detached regions. At the inboard, detached divertor plate the measured volume recombination rate is typically greater than the rate of ion collection at that plate and is about an order of magnitude higher than on the attached, outer plate. These spatially resolved measurements also show that the recombination rate is peaked near the strike point and imply that the recombination is occurring close to the plate surface. The C-Mod observations about the magnitude and spatial distribution of the recombination are consistent with the modelling of similar discharges(F. Wising et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36, p 136 (1996).). The experimental evidence for recombination is found in the deuterium emission spectra from the divertor, in particular in the Balmer- and/or Lyman-series. The spectra show that the dominant recombination mechanism is 3-body recombination into excited states of deuterium and that the populations

  8. Establishment of recombinant major allergens Bet v 1 and Phl p 5a as Ph. Eur. reference standards and validation of ELISA methods for their measurement. Results from feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Vieths, S; Barber, D; Chapman, M; Costanzo, A; Daas, A; Fiebig, H; Hanschmann, K M; Hrabina, M; Kaul, S; Ledesma, A; Moingeon, P; Reese, G; Schörner, C; van Ree, R; Weber, B; Buchheit, K H

    2012-04-01

    The potency of allergen extracts is determined as total allergenic activity without consideration of their composition and the units differ from one manufacturer to another, making it very difficult to compare the different products. Recently, purified major allergens have been obtained by recombinant DNA technology and produced under Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) conditions. In principle, such recombinant allergens could be established as reference standards and could help for the standardisation of the major allergen content of allergen extracts. Two recombinant major allergens, one from birch pollen, rBet v 1, and one from Timothy grass pollen, Phl p 5a, have been selected at the end of the CREATE programme as a potential starting point for the establishment as European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) Reference Standards through a project run by the Biological Standardisation Programme (BSP) of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM). To this end, bulk candidate recombinant materials, produced under GMP conditions, were procured from two European manufacturers and subsequently formulated and lyophilised. Four ELISA systems from three different manufacturers were included in the project, two for Bet v 1 and two for Phl p 5a with the aim of establishing reference methods for determination of the respective major antigens both in natural allergen extracts as well as in recombinant allergen products. The project was run in 3 phases: a preparatory and preliminary testing phase (feasibility phase or Phase 1), an extended feasibility phase carried out in 3 laboratories (Phase 2) to confirm the transferability of the methods and an international collaborative study with a large number of participating laboratories (Phase 3). This article describes the work done in Phase 1 and Phase 2, i.e. the physico-chemical and biological characterisation of the recombinant candidate reference standards, the assessment of their suitability for the

  9. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.; Grant, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This grant has supported work by T. Owen and B. A. Smith on planetary and satellite nomenclature, carried out under the general auspices of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The IAU maintains a Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) whose current chair is Prof.Kaare Aksnes of the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway. Both Owen and Smith are members of the WGPSN; Owen as chair of the Outer Solar System Task Group, and Smith as chair of the Mars Task Group. The major activity during the last grant period (2002) was the approval of several new names for features on Mars by Smith's group and features on Jovian satellites plus new names for satellites of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus by Owen's group. Much of this work was accomplished by e-mail exchanges, but the new nomenclature was formally discussed and approved at a meeting of the WGPSN held in conjunction with the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting in Birmingham, Alabama in October 2002.

  10. Outer planet satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon. 210 refs.

  11. Epigenetic silencing of V(D)J recombination is a major determinant for selective differentiation of mucosal-associated invariant t cells from induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Chie; Mituyama, Toutai; Wakao, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAITs) are innate-like T cells that play a pivotal role in the host defense against infectious diseases, and are also implicated in autoimmune diseases, metabolic diseases, and cancer. Recent studies have shown that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from MAITs selectively redifferentiate into MAITs without altering their antigen specificity. Such a selective differentiation is a prerequisite for the use of MAITs in cell therapy and/or regenerative medicine. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. Here, we performed methylome and transcriptome analyses of MAITs during the course of differentiation from iPSCs. Our multi-omics analyses revealed that recombination-activating genes (RAG1 and RAG2) and DNA nucleotidylexotransferase (DNTT) were highly methylated with their expression being repressed throughout differentiation. Since these genes are essential for V(D)J recombination of the T cell receptor (TCR) locus, this indicates that nascent MAITs are kept from further rearrangement that may alter their antigen specificity. Importantly, we found that the repression of RAGs was assured in two layers: one by the modulation of transcription factors for RAGs, and the other by DNA methylation at the RAG loci. Together, our study provides a possible explanation for the unaltered antigen specificity in the selective differentiation of MAITs from iPSCs. PMID:28346544

  12. Evaluation of immune responses and analysis of the effect of vaccination of the Leishmania major recombinant ribosomal proteins L3 or L5 in two different murine models of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Laura; Santos, Diego M; Souza, Ana P; Coelho, Eduardo A F; Barral, Aldina; Alonso, Carlos; Escutia, Marta R; Bonay, Pedro; de Oliveira, Camila I; Soto, Manuel

    2013-02-18

    Four new antigenic proteins located in Leishmania ribosomes have been characterized: S4, S6, L3 and L5. Recombinant versions of the four ribosomal proteins from Leishmania major were recognized by sera from human and canine patients suffering different clinical forms of leishmaniasis. The prophylactic properties of these proteins were first studied in the experimental model of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major inoculation into BALB/c mice. The administration of two of them, LmL3 or LmL5 combined with CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) was able to protect BALB/c mice against L. major infection. Vaccinated mice showed smaller lesions and parasite burden compared to mice inoculated with vaccine diluent or vaccine adjuvant. Protection was correlated with an antigen-specific increased production of IFN-γ paralleled by a decrease of the antigen-specific IL-10 mediated response in protected mice relative to non-protected controls. Further, it was demonstrated that BALB/c mice vaccinated with recombinant LmL3 or LmL5 plus CpG-ODN were also protected against the development of cutaneous lesions following inoculation of L. braziliensis. Together, data presented here indicate that LmL3 or LmL5 ribosomal proteins combined with Th1 inducing adjuvants, may be relevant components of a vaccine against cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by distinct species.

  13. Outer Space Traffic Safety Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Paul B.

    2013-09-01

    Management of traffic in outer space is a major safety problem. Traffic is increasing. Most satellites are navigable but they have to co-exist with space debris which is not navigable. We need minimum safety rules for outer space traffic. We have the possible beginnings of international safety standards in the form of national space object tracking; Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) standardization through ICAO and the International Committee on GNSS (ICG); the IADC space debris guidelines; and the proposed Code of Conduct. However, safety could be improved by standards for such activities as licensing launches of satellites into outer space; standards for accident investigation and search and rescue: operational safety zones around space objects such as the International Space Station. This paper describes legal authority for minimum safety standards. It considers safety standards established by private agreements among commercial operators. Finally it examines a number of options for an international forum to establish safety standards, including self-regulation, COPUOS, ICAO, ITU, a space code of conduct, and a new space organization.

  14. Inhibition of homologous recombination repair with Pentoxifylline targets G2 cells generated by radiotherapy and induces major enhancements of the toxicity of cisplatin and melphalan given after irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    The presentation reviews the modus operandi of the dose modifying drug Pentoxifylline and the dose enhancement factors which can be achieved in different cell types. Preclinical and clinical data show that Pentoxifylline improves the oxygenation of hypoxic tumours and enhances tumour control by irradiation. In vitro experiments demonstrate that Pentoxifylline also operates when oxygen is not limiting and produces dose modifying factors in the region of 1.2 – 2.0. This oxygen independent effect is poorly understood. In p53 mutant cells irradiation induces a G2 block which is abrogated by Pentoxifylline. The enhancement of cell kill observed when Pentoxifylline and irradiation are given together could arise from rapid entry of damaged tumour cells into mitosis and propagation of DNA lesions as the result of curtailment of repair time. Recovery ratios and repair experiments using CFGE after high dose irradiation demonstrate that Pentoxifylline inhibits repair directly and that curtailment of repair time is not the explanation. Use of the repair defective xrs1 and the parental repair competent CHO-K1 cell line shows that Pentoxifylline inhibits homologous recombination repair which operates predominantly in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. When irradiated cells residing in G2 phase are exposed to very low doses of cisplatin at a toxic dose of 5 %. (TC: 0.05) massive toxicity enhancements up to a factor of 80 are observed in melanoma, squamous carcinoma and prostate tumour cell lines. Enhancements of radiotoxicity seen when Pentoxifylline and radiation are applied together are small and do not exceed a factor of 2.0. The capacity of Pentoxifyline to inhibit homologous recombination repair has not as yet been clinically utilized. A suitable application could be in the treatment of cervical carcinoma where irradiation and cisplatin are standard modality. In vitro data also strongly suggest that regimes where irradiation is used in combination with alkylating drugs may

  15. Inhibition of homologous recombination repair with Pentoxifylline targets G2 cells generated by radiotherapy and induces major enhancements of the toxicity of cisplatin and melphalan given after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Lothar

    2006-05-03

    The presentation reviews the modus operandi of the dose modifying drug Pentoxifylline and the dose enhancement factors which can be achieved in different cell types. Preclinical and clinical data show that Pentoxifylline improves the oxygenation of hypoxic tumours and enhances tumour control by irradiation. In vitro experiments demonstrate that Pentoxifylline also operates when oxygen is not limiting and produces dose modifying factors in the region of 1.2-2.0. This oxygen independent effect is poorly understood. In p53 mutant cells irradiation induces a G2 block which is abrogated by Pentoxifylline. The enhancement of cell kill observed when Pentoxifylline and irradiation are given together could arise from rapid entry of damaged tumour cells into mitosis and propagation of DNA lesions as the result of curtailment of repair time. Recovery ratios and repair experiments using CFGE after high dose irradiation demonstrate that Pentoxifylline inhibits repair directly and that curtailment of repair time is not the explanation. Use of the repair defective xrs1 and the parental repair competent CHO-K1 cell line shows that Pentoxifylline inhibits homologous recombination repair which operates predominantly in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. When irradiated cells residing in G2 phase are exposed to very low doses of cisplatin at a toxic dose of 5%. (TC: 0.05) massive toxicity enhancements up to a factor of 80 are observed in melanoma, squamous carcinoma and prostate tumour cell lines. Enhancements of radiotoxicity seen when Pentoxifylline and radiation are applied together are small and do not exceed a factor of 2.0. The capacity of Pentoxifyline to inhibit homologous recombination repair has not as yet been clinically utilized. A suitable application could be in the treatment of cervical carcinoma where irradiation and cisplatin are standard modality. In vitro data also strongly suggest that regimes where irradiation is used in combination with alkylating drugs may also

  16. Metabolism of the major Echinacea alkylamide N-isobutyldodeca-2E,4E,8Z,10Z-tetraenamide by human recombinant cytochrome P450 enzymes and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Toselli, F; Matthias, A; Bone, K M; Gillam, E M J; Lehmann, R P

    2010-08-01

    Echinacea preparations are used for the treatment and prevention of upper respiratory tract infections. The phytochemicals believed responsible for the immunomodulatory properties are the alkylamides found in ethanolic extracts, with one of the most abundant being the N-isobutyldodeca-2E,4E,8Z,10Z-tetraenamide (1). In this study, we evaluated the human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of this alkylamide using recombinant P450s, human liver microsomes and pure synthetic compound. Epoxidation, N-dealkylation and hydroxylation products were detected, with different relative amounts produced by recombinant P450s and microsomes. The major forms showing activity toward the metabolism of 1 were CYP1A1, CYP1A2 (both producing the same epoxide and N-dealkylation product), CYP2A13 (producing two epoxides), and CYP2D6 (producing two epoxides and an hydroxylated metabolite). Several other forms showed less activity. In incubations with human liver microsomes and selective inhibitors, CYP2E1 was found to be principally responsible for producing the dominant, hydroxylation product, whereas CYP2C9 was the principal source of the epoxides and CYP1A2 was responsible for the dealkylation product. In summary, in this study the relative impacts of the main human xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450s on the metabolism of a major Echinacea alkylamide have been established and the metabolites formed have been identified.

  17. Enhancing human-like collagen accumulation by deleting the major glucose transporter ptsG in recombinant Escherichia coli BL21.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan'e; Zhang, Tao; Fan, Daidi; Mu, Tingzhen; Xue, Wenjiao; Hui, Junfeng; Ma, Xiaoxuan

    2014-01-01

    Collagen has been proven to be a valuable biomedical material for many medical applications. Human-like collagen (HLC) is a novel important biomedical material with diverse medical applications. In this work, recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 3.7 ∆ptsG was constructed, the characters of ptsG mutant strain were analyzed, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied to investigate the effect of ptsG gene deletion on the transcriptional level of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) genes responsible for glucose transport. The HLC production and cell growth ability were 1.33- and 1.24-fold higher than those of its parent strain in the fermentation medium, respectively, and 1.16- and 1.17-fold in the modified minimal medium individually. The acetate accumulation decreased by 42%-56% compared to its parent strain in the fermentation medium, and 70%-87% in the modified minimal medium. The results of RT-qPCR showed that the transcriptional level of crr, ptsH, ptsI, and blgF in ptsG mutant all decreased dramatically, which inferred a decrease in the glucose uptake rate, but the transcriptional level of FruB and manX increased slightly, which demonstrated the activation of fructose- and mannose-specific transport pathways in the ptsG mutant. This study demonstrates that ptsG deletion is an effective strategy to reduce acetate accumulation and increase biomass and HLC production.

  18. Comparison of /sup 125/I-labeled and /sup 14/C-Labeled peptides of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia Trachomatis Strain L2/434 separated by high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, R.C.; Caldwell, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if in-gel chloramine-T radioiodination adequately labels OM proteins to allow for accurate and precise structural comparison of these molecules. Therefore, intrinsically /sup 14/C-amino acid labeled proteins and /sup 125/I-labeled proteins were cleaved with two endopeptidic reagents and the peptide fragments separated by HPLC. A comparison of retention times of the fragments, as determined by differential radiation counting, thus indicated whether /sup 125/Ilabeling identified of all the peptide peaks seen in the /sup 14/Clabeled proteins. Results demonstrated that radioiodination yields complete and accurate information about the primary structure of outer membrane proteins. In addition, it permits the use of extremely small amounts of protein allowing for method optimization and multiple separations to insure reproducibility.

  19. Law in Outer Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the current practice and fascinating future of legal issues involved in outer space exploration and colonization. Current space law, by necessity, addresses broad principles rather than specific incidents. Nonetheless, it covers a variety of issues including commercial development, rescue agreements, object registration,…

  20. Validation of Recombinant Salivary Protein PpSP32 as a Suitable Marker of Human Exposure to Phlebotomus papatasi, the Vector of Leishmania major in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Bettaieb, Jihene; Abdeladhim, Maha; Hadj Kacem, Saoussen; Abdelkader, Rania; Gritli, Sami; Chemkhi, Jomaa; Aslan, Hamide; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ben Salah, Afif; Louzir, Hechmi; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Ben Ahmed, Melika

    2015-01-01

    Background During a blood meal, female sand flies, vectors of Leishmania parasites, inject saliva into the host skin. Sand fly saliva is composed of a large variety of components that exert different pharmacological activities facilitating the acquisition of blood by the insect. Importantly, proteins present in saliva are able to elicit the production of specific anti-saliva antibodies, which can be used as markers for exposure to vector bites. Serological tests using total sand fly salivary gland extracts are challenging due to the difficulty of obtaining reproducible salivary gland preparations. Previously, we demonstrated that PpSP32 is the immunodominant salivary antigen in humans exposed to Phlebotomus papatasi bites and established that humans exposed to P. perniciosus bites do not recognize it. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, we have validated, in a large cohort of 522 individuals, the use of the Phlebotomus papatasi recombinant salivary protein PpSP32 (rPpSP32) as an alternative method for testing exposure to the bite of this sand fly. We also demonstrated that screening for total anti-rPpSP32 IgG antibodies is sufficient, being comparable in efficacy to the screening for IgG2, IgG4 and IgE antibodies against rPpSP32. Additionally, sera obtained from dogs immunized with saliva of P. perniciosus, a sympatric and widely distributed sand fly in Tunisia, did not recognize rPpSP32 demonstrating its suitability as a marker of exposure to P. papatasi saliva. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicate that rPpSP32 constitutes a useful epidemiological tool to monitor the spatial distribution of P. papatasi in a particular region, to direct control measures against zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis, to assess the efficiency of vector control interventions and perhaps to assess the risk of contracting the disease. PMID:26368935

  1. Genetic Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  2. Plasmid DNA and protein vaccination of mice to the outer surface protein A of Borrelia burgdorferi leads to induction of T helper cells with specificity for a major epitope and augmentation of protective IgG antibodies in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhong, W; Wiesmüller, K H; Kramer, M D; Wallich, R; Simon, M M

    1996-11-01

    Plasmid DNA-based vaccination is an efficient way to evoke various forms of protective immunity in laboratory animals. Our previous experiments have shown that mice immunized with either plasmid DNA encoding the outer surface lipoprotein A (pOspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi or the respective lipoprotein (Lip-OspA) produce protective antibodies against subsequent challenge with virulent spirochetes. In the present study, we compared the specificity and function of T cells generated in AKR/N mice previously immunized to either pOspA or Lip-OspA. T cell populations derived by either of the two protocols consistently responded by proliferation in vitro to one (residues 186-203; B4) out of a panel of 27 overlapping 20-mer peptides spanning the entire OspA molecule of strain ZS7. B4 was shown to express allele-specific ligand motifs for I-Ek. Most of the other peptides produced variable and much less pronounced or marginal proliferative T cell responses. T cells reactive to B4 as well as to some minor epitopes were CD4+CD8- T cells which produced IFN-gamma but no detectable IL-4 upon antigen stimulation in vitro. Priming of AKR/N mice with B4 but not with inactive peptides of OspA led to an enhanced production of IgG antibodies, mainly of the IgG1 isotype, including those to a prominent protective epitope (LA-2) upon subsequent challenge with Lip-OspA or intact spirochetes. The data demonstrate that both plasmid DNA and protein immunization with OspA results in T cell responses with specificity for a dominant OspA epitope and suggest that priming of mice with immunodominant peptides accelerates the appearance of protective antibodies in vivo. The identification of T helper cell epitopes relevant for the induction of protective antibodies will also facilitate the design of more potent vaccines against Lyme disease.

  3. The isolation of novel phage display-derived human recombinant antibodies against CCR5, the major co-receptor of HIV.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai; Hizi, Amnon

    2013-08-01

    Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening strategy by using cells that co-express GFP and CCR5, along with an excess of control cells that do not express these proteins (and are otherwise identical to the CCR5-expressing cells). These control cells are intended to remove most of the phages that bind the cells nonspecifically; thus leading to an enrichment of the phages presenting anti-CCR5-specific antibodies. Subsequently, the CCR5-presenting cells were quantitatively sorted by flow cytometry, and the bound phages were eluted, amplified, and used for further successive selection rounds. Several different clones of human single-chain Fv antibodies that interact with CCR5-expressing cells were identified. The most specific monoclonal antibody was converted to a full-length IgG and bound the second extracellular loop of CCR5. The experimental approach presented herein for screening for CCR5-specific antibodies can be applicable to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against any cell-surface expressed protein of interest.

  4. Intranasal Delivery of Recombinant AAV Containing BDNF Fused with HA2TAT: a Potential Promising Therapy Strategy for Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xian-cang; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-ling; Jiang, Wen-hui; Jia, Min; Wang, Cai-xia; Dong, Ying-ying; Dang, Yong-hui; Gao, Cheng-ge

    2016-03-03

    Depression is a disturbing psychiatric disease with unsatisfied therapy. Not all patients are sensitive to anti-depressants currently in use, side-effects are unavoidable during therapy, and the cases with effectiveness are always accompanied with delayed onset of clinical efficacy. Delivering brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to brain seems to be a promising therapy. However, a better approach to delivery is still rudimentary. The purpose of our present work is to look for a rapid-onset and long-lasting therapeutic strategy for major depressive disorder (MDD) by effectively delivering BDNF to brain. BDNF, fused with cell-penetrating peptides (TAT and HA2), was packaged in adenovirus associated virus (AAV) to construct the BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV for intranasally delivering BDNF to central nervous system (CNS) via nose-brain pathway. Intranasal administration of BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV to normal mice displayed anti-depression effect in forced swimming test when the delivery lasted relatively longer. The AAV applied to mice subjected to chronic mild stress (CMS) through intranasal administration for 10 days also alleviated depression-like behaviors. Western-blotting analysis revealed that BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV nasal administration enhanced hippocampal BDNF content. These results indicate intranasal administration of constructed BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV exerts anti-depression effect in CMS mice by increasing hippocampal BDNF, suggesting that this strategy holds a promising therapeutic potential for MDD.

  5. Intranasal Delivery of Recombinant AAV Containing BDNF Fused with HA2TAT: a Potential Promising Therapy Strategy for Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xian-cang; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-ling; Jiang, Wen-hui; Jia, Min; Wang, Cai-xia; Dong, Ying-ying; Dang, Yong-hui; Gao, Cheng-ge

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a disturbing psychiatric disease with unsatisfied therapy. Not all patients are sensitive to anti-depressants currently in use, side-effects are unavoidable during therapy, and the cases with effectiveness are always accompanied with delayed onset of clinical efficacy. Delivering brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to brain seems to be a promising therapy. However, a better approach to delivery is still rudimentary. The purpose of our present work is to look for a rapid-onset and long-lasting therapeutic strategy for major depressive disorder (MDD) by effectively delivering BDNF to brain. BDNF, fused with cell-penetrating peptides (TAT and HA2), was packaged in adenovirus associated virus (AAV) to construct the BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV for intranasally delivering BDNF to central nervous system (CNS) via nose-brain pathway. Intranasal administration of BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV to normal mice displayed anti-depression effect in forced swimming test when the delivery lasted relatively longer. The AAV applied to mice subjected to chronic mild stress (CMS) through intranasal administration for 10 days also alleviated depression-like behaviors. Western-blotting analysis revealed that BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV nasal administration enhanced hippocampal BDNF content. These results indicate intranasal administration of constructed BDNF-HA2TAT/AAV exerts anti-depression effect in CMS mice by increasing hippocampal BDNF, suggesting that this strategy holds a promising therapeutic potential for MDD. PMID:26935651

  6. Application of quality by design principles to the development and technology transfer of a major process improvement for the manufacture of a recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Looby, Mairead; Ibarra, Neysi; Pierce, James J; Buckley, Kevin; O'Donovan, Eimear; Heenan, Mary; Moran, Enda; Farid, Suzanne S; Baganz, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the application of quality by design (QbD) principles to the development and implementation of a major manufacturing process improvement for a commercially distributed therapeutic protein produced in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture. The intent of this article is to focus on QbD concepts, and provide guidance and understanding on how the various components combine together to deliver a robust process in keeping with the principles of QbD. A fed-batch production culture and a virus inactivation step are described as representative examples of upstream and downstream unit operations that were characterized. A systematic approach incorporating QbD principles was applied to both unit operations, involving risk assessment of potential process failure points, small-scale model qualification, design and execution of experiments, definition of operating parameter ranges and process validation acceptance criteria followed by manufacturing-scale implementation and process validation. Statistical experimental designs were applied to the execution of process characterization studies evaluating the impact of operating parameters on product quality attributes and process performance parameters. Data from process characterization experiments were used to define the proven acceptable range and classification of operating parameters for each unit operation. Analysis of variance and Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to assess the appropriateness of process design spaces. Successful implementation and validation of the process in the manufacturing facility and the subsequent manufacture of hundreds of batches of this therapeutic protein verifies the approaches taken as a suitable model for the development, scale-up and operation of any biopharmaceutical manufacturing process.

  7. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.

    1998-01-01

    The Principal Investigator's responsibilities on this grant fell into two categories according to his participation. In the nomenclature work of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Owen is chair of the Task Group for the Outer Solar System. He is also a member of the IAU's Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) which is composed of the chairs of the several Task Groups plus the presidents of two IAU Commissions and several outside consultants. The WGPSN is presided over by its President, Professor Kaare Aksnes from the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway.

  8. Jupiter's outer atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, N. M.

    1973-01-01

    The current state of the theory of Jupiter's outer atmosphere is briefly reviewed. The similarities and dissimilarities between the terrestrial and Jovian upper atmospheres are discussed, including the interaction of the solar wind with the planetary magnetic fields. Estimates of Jovian parameters are given, including magnetosphere and auroral zone sizes, ionospheric conductivity, energy inputs, and solar wind parameters at Jupiter. The influence of the large centrifugal force on the cold plasma distribution is considered. The Jovian Van Allen belt is attributed to solar wind particles diffused in toward the planet by dynamo electric fields from ionospheric neutral winds, and the consequences of this theory are indicated.

  9. Carotenoid-to-chlorophyll energy transfer in recombinant major light-harvesting complex (LHCII) of higher plants. I. Femtosecond transient absorption measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Croce, R; Müller, M G; Bassi, R; Holzwarth, A R

    2001-01-01

    The energy transfer kinetics from carotenoids to chlorophylls and among chlorophylls has been measured by femtosecond transient absorption kinetics in a monomeric unit of the major light-harvesting complex (LHCII) from higher plants. The samples were reconstituted complexes with different carotenoid contents. The kinetics was measured both in the carotenoid absorption region and in the chlorophyll Q(y) region using two different excitation wavelengths suitable for selective excitation of the carotenoids. Analysis of the data shows that the overwhelming part of the energy transfer from the carotenoids occurs directly from the initially excited S(2) state of the carotenoids. Only a small part (<20%) may possibly take an S(1) pathway. All the S(2) energy transfer from carotenoids to chlorophylls occurs with time constants <100 fs. We have been able to differentiate among the three carotenoids, two luteins and neoxanthin, which have transfer times of approximately 50 and 75 fs for the two luteins, and approximately 90 fs for neoxanthin. About 50% of the energy absorbed by carotenoids is initially transferred directly to chlorophyll b (Chl b), while the rest is transferred to Chl a. Neoxanthin almost exclusively transfers to Chl b. Due to various complex effects discussed in the paper, such as a specific coupling of Chl b and Chl a excited states, the percentage of direct Chl b transfer thus is somewhat lower than estimated by us previously for LHCII from Arabidopsis thaliana. (Connelly, J. P., M. G. Müller, R. Bassi, R. Croce, and A. R. Holzwarth. 1997. Biochemistry. 36:281). We can distinguish three different Chls b receiving energy directly from carotenoids. We propose as a new mechanism that the carotenoid-to-Chl b transfer occurs to a large part via the B(x) state of Chl b and to the Q(x) state, while the transfer to Chl a occurs only via the Q(x) state. We find no compelling evidence in favor of a substantial S(1) transfer path of the carotenoids, although some

  10. Bacterial Recombineering: Genome Engineering via Phage-Based Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Pines, Gur; Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The ability to specifically modify bacterial genomes in a precise and efficient manner is highly desired in various fields, ranging from molecular genetics to metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Much has changed from the initial realization that phage-derived genes may be employed for such tasks to today, where recombineering enables complex genetic edits within a genome or a population. Here, we review the major developments leading to recombineering becoming the method of choice for in situ bacterial genome editing while highlighting the various applications of recombineering in pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology. We also present the current understanding of the mechanism of recombineering. Finally, we discuss in detail issues surrounding recombineering efficiency and future directions for recombineering-based genome editing.

  11. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  12. Orientation Dependence in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K.; Takahashi, N.; Fujitani, Y.; Yoshikura, H.; Kobayashi, I.

    1996-01-01

    Homologous recombination was investigated in Escherichia coli with two plasmids, each carrying the homologous region (two defective neo genes, one with an amino-end deletion and the other with a carboxyl-end deletion) in either direct or inverted orientation. Recombination efficiency was measured in recBC sbcBC and recBC sbcA strains in three ways. First, we measured the frequency of cells carrying neo(+) recombinant plasmids in stationary phase. Recombination between direct repeats was much more frequent than between inverted repeats in the recBC sbcBC strain but was equally frequent in the two substrates in the recBC sbcA strain. Second, the fluctuation test was used to exclude bias by a rate difference between the recombinant and parental plasmids and led to the same conclusion. Third, direct selection for recombinants just after transformation with or without substrate double-strand breaks yielded essentially the same results. Double-strand breaks elevated recombination in both the strains and in both substrates. These results are consistant with our previous findings that the major route of recombination in recBC sbcBC strains generates only one recombinant DNA from two DNAs and in recBC sbcA strains generates two recombinant DNAs from two DNAs. PMID:8722759

  13. Saturn's outer satellite - Phoebe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Voyager 2 took these images of Saturn's outer satellite Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles)away. This pair shows two different hemispheres of the satellite. The left image shows a bright mountain on the upper right edge reflecting the light of the setting sun. This mountain is possibly the central peak of a large impact crater taking up most of the upper right quadrant of Phoebe in this view. The right images shows a hemisphere with an intrinsically bright spot in the top portion of the image as well as the ridges appearing bright in the sunset light of the lower right. These images were processed by the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  14. Observing Outer Planet Systems in the Mid-21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, M. S.; Showalter, M. R.

    2017-02-01

    We offer several ideas on space telescopes, spacecraft missions, and the workforce of the future. Most importantly, technology will enable a major increase in time-domain observations, transforming our view of many parts of the outer solar system.

  15. Strategy for outer planets exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    NASA's Planetary Programs Office formed a number of scientific working groups to study in depth the potential scientific return from the various candidate missions to the outer solar system. The results of these working group studies were brought together in a series of symposia to evaluate the potential outer planet missions and to discuss strategies for exploration of the outer solar system that were consistent with fiscal constraints and with anticipated spacecraft and launch vehicle capabilities. A logical, scientifically sound, and cost effective approach to exploration of the outer solar system is presented.

  16. Recombinant allergens

    PubMed Central

    Jutel, Marek; Solarewicz-Madejek, Katarzyna; Smolinska, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only known causative treatment of allergic diseases. Recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies arose from a strong need to both to improve safety and enhance efficacy of SIT. In addition, new vaccines can be effective in allergies including food allergy or atopic dermatitis, which poorly respond to the current treatment with allergen extracts. A number of successful clinical studies with both wild-type and hypoallergenic derivatives of recombinant allergens vaccines have been reported for the last decade. They showed high efficacy and safety profile as well as very strong modulation of T and B cell responses to specific allergens. PMID:23095874

  17. Recombinant gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Lathi, R B; Milki, A A

    2001-10-01

    Recombinant DNA technology makes it possible to produce large amounts of human gene products for pharmacologic applications, supplanting the need for human tissues. The genes for the alpha and beta subunits of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) have been characterized and cloned. Recombinant FSH (rFSH) has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of fertility disorders. In comparison with the urinary gonadotropin products, human menopausal gonadotropins (HMG), and urinary follitropins (uFSH), rFSH is more potent and better tolerated by patients. Recombinant HCG appears to be as efficacious as urinary HCG with the benefit of improved local tolerance. Recombinant LH (rLH) is likely to be recommended as a supplement to rFSH for ovulation induction in hypogonadotropic women. It may also benefit in vitro fertilization patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with rFSH combined with pituitary suppression, with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or antagonist.

  18. Spectrum Recombination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes several methods of executing lecture demonstrations involving the recombination of the spectrum. Groups the techniques into two general classes: bringing selected portions of the spectrum together using lenses or mirrors and blurring the colors by rapid movement or foreshortening. (JM)

  19. Anaplasma platys Immunoblot Test Using Major Surface Antigens.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tzung-Huei; Parraga, Maria E; Alvarez, Elizabeth; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2016-09-01

    Anaplasma platys is an uncultivable tick-borne obligatory intracellular bacterium, which is known to infect platelets of dogs. A. platys causes infectious canine cyclic thrombocytopenia in subtropical and tropical regions throughout the world. Several cases of human infection with A. platys infection have also been reported. However, seroprevalence of A. platys exposure and infection has not been determined in most of the regions, in part, due to lack of a simple and reliable assay method. Furthermore, A. platys antigens recognized by dogs are unknown. We previously sequenced gene encoding A. platys major outer membrane proteins P44 and Omp-1X. In the present study, we obtained purified recombinant A. platys P44 and Omp-1X proteins, and using them as antigens in immunoblotting examined seroreactivity in dogs. Of 34 specimens from Venezuela where A. platys infection was previously reported, 25 specimens (73.5%) reacted to rAplP44 and/or rAplOMP-1X. Neither Anaplasma phagocytophilum-seropositive (N = 10) nor A. phagocytophilum-seronegative canine specimens (N = 10) from the geographic regions where A. platys infection has never been reported, reacted rAplP44 or rAplOMP-1X. The result indicates a high A. platys seroprevalence rate in tested dogs from Venezuela and suggests that the immunoblot analysis based on recombinant A. platys major outer membrane proteins can provide a simple and defined tool to enlighten the prevalence of A. platys infection.

  20. Molecular identity of human outer radial glia during cortical development.

    PubMed

    Pollen, Alex A; Nowakowski, Tomasz J; Chen, Jiadong; Retallack, Hanna; Sandoval-Espinosa, Carmen; Nicholas, Cory R; Shuga, Joe; Liu, Siyuan John; Oldham, Michael C; Diaz, Aaron; Lim, Daniel A; Leyrat, Anne A; West, Jay A; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2015-09-24

    Radial glia, the neural stem cells of the neocortex, are located in two niches: the ventricular zone and outer subventricular zone. Although outer subventricular zone radial glia may generate the majority of human cortical neurons, their molecular features remain elusive. By analyzing gene expression across single cells, we find that outer radial glia preferentially express genes related to extracellular matrix formation, migration, and stemness, including TNC, PTPRZ1, FAM107A, HOPX, and LIFR. Using dynamic imaging, immunostaining, and clonal analysis, we relate these molecular features to distinctive behaviors of outer radial glia, demonstrate the necessity of STAT3 signaling for their cell cycle progression, and establish their extensive proliferative potential. These results suggest that outer radial glia directly support the subventricular niche through local production of growth factors, potentiation of growth factor signals by extracellular matrix proteins, and activation of self-renewal pathways, thereby enabling the developmental and evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex.

  1. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  2. In silico studies of outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis por a: its expression and immunogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Behrouzi, Ava; Bouzari, Saeid; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Irani, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major causative agent of bacterial septicemia and meningitis in humans. Currently, there are no vaccines to prevent disease caused by strains of N.meningitidis serogroup B. The Class 1 Outer Membrane Protein (OMP) has been named porA which is a cation selective transmembrane protein of 45 KDa that forms trimeric pore in the meningococcal outer membrane. PorA from serogroup B N. meningitidis was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pBAD-gIIIA. Recombinant protein was expressed with arabinose and affinity purified by Ni-NTA agarose, SDS-PAGE and western blotting were performed for protein determination and verification. BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with purified rPorA together with alum adjuvant. Serum antibody responses to serogroups B N.meningitidis were determined by ELISA. Serum IgG response significantly increased in the group immunized with rPorA together with alum adjuvant in comparison with control groups. These results suggest that rPorA can be a potential vaccine candidate for serogroup B N.meningitidis.

  3. In Silico Studies of Outer Membrane of Neisseria Meningitidis Por A: Its Expression and Immunogenic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Behrouzi, Ava; Bouzari, Saeid; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Irani, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major causative agent of bacterial septicemia and meningitis in humans. Currently, there are no vaccines to prevent disease caused by strains of N.meningitidis serogroup B. The Class 1 Outer Membrane Protein (OMP) has been named porA which is a cation selective transmembrane protein of 45 KDa that forms trimeric pore in the meningococcal outer membrane. PorA from serogroup B N. meningitidis was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pBAD-gIIIA. Recombinant protein was expressed with arabinose and affinity purified by Ni-NTA agarose, SDS-PAGE and western blotting were performed for protein determination and verification. BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with purified rPorA together with alum adjuvant. Serum antibody responses to serogroups B N.meningitidis were determined by ELISA. Serum IgG response significantly increased in the group immunized with rPorA together with alum adjuvant in comparison with control groups. These results suggest that rPorA can be a potential vaccine candidate for serogroup B N.meningitidis. PMID:25317403

  4. Evolution of outer membrane beta-barrels from an ancestral beta beta hairpin.

    PubMed

    Remmert, M; Biegert, A; Linke, D; Lupas, A N; Söding, J

    2010-06-01

    Outer membrane beta-barrels (OMBBs) are the major class of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria, and plastids. Their transmembrane domains consist of 8-24 beta-strands forming a closed, barrel-shaped beta-sheet around a central pore. Despite their obvious structural regularity, evidence for an origin by duplication or for a common ancestry has not been found. We use three complementary approaches to show that all OMBBs from Gram-negative bacteria evolved from a single, ancestral beta beta hairpin. First, we link almost all families of known single-chain bacterial OMBBs with each other through transitive profile searches. Second, we identify a clear repeat signature in the sequences of many OMBBs in which the repeating sequence unit coincides with the structural beta beta hairpin repeat. Third, we show that the observed sequence similarity between OMBB hairpins cannot be explained by structural or membrane constraints on their sequences. The third approach addresses a longstanding problem in protein evolution: how to distinguish between a very remotely homologous relationship and the opposing scenario of "sequence convergence." The origin of a diverse group of proteins from a single hairpin module supports the hypothesis that, around the time of transition from the RNA to the protein world, proteins arose by amplification and recombination of short peptide modules that had previously evolved as cofactors of RNAs.

  5. Recombinant expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Emily J.; Yates, Laura E.; Terra, Vanessa S.; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for over 14 million cases of pneumonia worldwide annually, and over 1 million deaths, the majority of them children. The major determinant for pathogenesis is a polysaccharide capsule that is variable and is used to distinguish strains based on their serotype. The capsule forms the basis of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) that contains purified capsular polysaccharide from 23 serotypes, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), containing 13 common serotypes conjugated to CRM197 (mutant diphtheria toxin). Purified capsule from S. pneumoniae is required for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine production, and costs can be prohibitively high, limiting accessibility of the vaccine in low-income countries. In this study, we demonstrate the recombinant expression of the capsule-encoding locus from four different serotypes of S. pneumoniae within Escherichia coli. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the minimum set of genes necessary to reliably and efficiently express these capsules heterologously. These E. coli strains could be used to produce a supply of S. pneumoniae serotype-specific capsules without the need to culture pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, these strains could be applied to synthetic glycobiological applications: recombinant vaccine production using E. coli outer membrane vesicles or coupling to proteins using protein glycan coupling technology. PMID:27110302

  6. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: origin and recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, W P; Bernasconi, F; Mutirangura, A; Ledbetter, D H; Langlois, S; Malcolm, S; Morris, M A; Schinzel, A A

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N = 27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N = 5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination are utilized. Standard methods of centromere mapping are employed to determine the level of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, most paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. PMID:8352279

  7. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  8. Controlled release from recombinant polymers.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-09-28

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed.

  9. Construction of a multivalent meningococcal vaccine strain based on the class 1 outer membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Ley, P; Poolman, J T

    1992-01-01

    Outer membrane complexes (OMCs) are promising vaccine candidates for protection against meningococcal disease. However, a major obstacle to this approach is the fact that the protective antibodies induced are generally type specific. In an attempt to overcome this problem, we have investigated the possibility of constructing a multivalent vaccine strain by insertion of an additional class 1 outer membrane protein-encoding gene. Starting with a derivative of strain H44/76 deficient in class 3 outer membrane protein, a second class 1 gene was inserted into the chromosome, through homologous recombination with a suicide plasmid carrying the class 1 gene from strain 2996 placed within a class 5 gene. In this way, a strain was obtained in which a class 3 protein was in effect replaced by a class 1 protein from another subtype, i.e. P1.5,2 in addition to the P1.7,16 protein of H44/76. Immunization of mice with such OMCs resulted in high bactericidal titers against both H44/76 and 2996, where normally only strain-specific antibodies are induced. Mutational removal of class 3 protein from the immunizing OMCs had no detectable effect on the bactericidal titer against H44/76, whereas removal of class 1 protein led to a strong reduction. These results demonstrate the dominant role of the subtype-specific sequences of class 1 protein in the induction of bactericidal antibodies and show that construction of a multivalent OMC-based vaccine should be feasible. Images PMID:1639486

  10. Origin of Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Our ongoing research program combines extensive deep and wide-field observations using a variety of observational platforms with numerical studies of the dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system in order to advance the main scientific goals of the community studying the Kuiper belt and the outer solar system. These include: (1) determining the relative populations of the known classes of KBOs as well as other possible classes; ( 2 ) determining the size distributions or luminosity function of the individual populations or the Kuiper belt as a whole; (3) determining the inclinations distributions of these populations; (4) establishing the radial extent of the Kuiper belt; ( 5 ) measuring and relating the physical properties of different types of KBOs to those of other solar system bodies; and, (6) completing our systematic inventory of the satellites of the outer planets.

  11. Improved diagnostic performance of a commercial anaplasma antibody competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using recombinant major surface protein 5–glutathione S-transferase fusion protein as antigen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study tested the hypothesis that removal of maltose binding protein from recombinant antigen used for plate coating would improve the specificity of Anaplasma antibody competitive ELISA. Three hundred and eight sera with significant MBP antibody binding (=30%I) in Anaplasma negative herds was 1...

  12. The Double Chooz Outer Veto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toups, Matthew

    2009-05-01

    Measuring a non-zero value for the neutrino mixing angle θ13 sets the scale for future precision measurements in the lepton sector such as CP violation. The Double Chooz experiment will begin taking data later this year with a sensitivity to 2̂(2θ13) in the 0.02 - 0.03 range, improving on the CHOOZ bound by about an order of magnitude. Efficient rejection of backgrounds induced by cosmic muons is essential to achieving this sensitivity. The Double Chooz Outer Veto plays a crucial role in vetoing and tagging these muons. An update on the status of the Double Chooz Outer Veto will be presented.

  13. The Outer Banks of North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolan, Robert; Lins, Harry; Smith, Jodi Jones

    2016-12-27

    , trees, and shrubs.In 1937, Congress authorized the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, which was established in 1953. The national seashore preserved one of the world’s best examples of a barrier island environment, and minimized the effect of erosion that was becoming a serious problem. In 1966, Congress authorized the Cape Lookout National Seashore to ensure that Core and Shackleford Banks would not undergo major development and could be preserved in their natural state.The rate of population growth along the Outer Banks in recent decades has been among the highest in North Carolina. More important, however, has been the growth in vacationers—in 2008, more than a quarter of a million visitors during a typical week. Municipalities now need to provide services to a transient population as much as six times as large as their permanent resident population.Although human activities have dominated the landscape changes observed on the Outer Banks for the past century or two, these changes must be understood in the context of the prevailing atmospheric, oceanic, and geologic processes that have governed the form and function of these islands for thousands of years. It is these natural processes that imbue the Outer Banks with their unique and dichotomous qualities of tranquility and tumult. In the presence of human occupation, it is these same processes that make the islands one of the highest natural-hazard risk zones along the Eastern Seaboard of the United States.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of the Outer Membrane of Borrelia hermsii

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ellen S.; Skare, Jonathan T.; Exner, Maurice M.; Blanco, David R.; Kagan, Bruce L.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    The outer membrane of Borrelia hermsii has been shown by freeze-fracture analysis to contain a low density of membrane-spanning outer membrane proteins which have not yet been isolated or identified. In this study, we report the purification of outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from B. hermsii HS-1 and the subsequent identification of their constituent outer membrane proteins. The B. hermsii outer membranes were released by vigorous vortexing of whole organisms in low-pH, hypotonic citrate buffer and isolated by isopycnic sucrose gradient centrifugation. The isolated OMV exhibited porin activities ranging from 0.2 to 7.2 nS, consistent with their outer membrane origin. Purified OMV were shown to be relatively free of inner membrane contamination by the absence of measurable β-NADH oxidase activity and the absence of protoplasmic cylinder-associated proteins observed by Coomassie blue staining. Approximately 60 protein spots (some of which are putative isoelectric isomers) with 25 distinct molecular weights were identified as constituents of the OMV enrichment. The majority of these proteins were also shown to be antigenic with sera from B. hermsii-infected mice. Seven of these antigenic proteins were labeled with [3H]palmitate, including the surface-exposed glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase, the variable major proteins 7 and 33, and proteins of 15, 17, 38, 42, and 67 kDa, indicating that they are lipoprotein constituents of the outer membrane. In addition, immunoblot analysis of the OMV probed with antiserum to the Borrelia garinii surface-exposed p66/Oms66 porin protein demonstrated the presence of a p66 (Oms66) outer membrane homolog. Treatment of intact B. hermsii with proteinase K resulted in the partial proteolysis of the Oms66/p66 homolog, indicating that it is surface exposed. This identification and characterization of the OMV proteins should aid in further studies of pathogenesis and immunity of tick-borne relapsing fever. PMID:9488399

  15. Outer planets and icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drobyshevski, E. M.

    1991-01-01

    The resources offered by the outer bodies in the Solar System, starting with the main belt asteroids and Jovian System, are not only larger and more diverse but may even be easier to reach than, say, those of Mars. The use of their material, including water and organic matter, depends exclusively on the general strategy of exploration of the Solar System. Of major interest in this respect are the large ice satellites - Titan, Ganymede, and Callisto. Motion through the planetary magnetospheres excites in their ice envelopes megampere currents which, in the presence of rocky, etc., inclusions with electronic conduction should lead to the bulk electrolysis of ice and accumulation in it of 2H2 + O2 in the form of a solid solution. With the concentration of 2H2 + O2 reaching about 15 wt. percent, the solution becomes capable of detonation by a strong meteoritic impact. An explosion of Ganymede's ice envelope about 0.5 By ago could account for the formation of the Trojans and irregular satellites, all known differences between Ganymede and Callisto, and many other things. The explosion of a small icy planet with M approx less than 0.5 Moon created the asteroid belt. Two to three explosions occurred on Io, and two on Europa. The specific features of the longperiod comets close to Saturn's orbit permit dating Titan's envelope explosion as 10,000 yr ago, which produced its thick atmosphere, young Saturn's rings, as well as a reservoir of ice fragments saturated by 2H2 + O2, i.e., cometary nuclei between the orbits of Jupiter and Saturn. Thus these nuclei should contain, besides organic matter, also 2H2 + O2, which could be used for their transportation as well as for fuel for spaceships. Ices of such composition can reside deep inside Deimos, the Trojans, C-asteroids, etc. The danger of a future explosion of Callisto's electrolyzed ices, which would result in a catastrophic bombardment of the Earth by comets, may be high enough to warrant a revision of the priorities and

  16. Outer planets and icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobyshevski, E. M.

    The resources offered by the outer bodies in the Solar System, starting with the main belt asteroids and Jovian System, are not only larger and more diverse but may even be easier to reach than, say, those of Mars. The use of their material, including water and organic matter, depends exclusively on the general strategy of exploration of the Solar System. Of major interest in this respect are the large ice satellites - Titan, Ganymede, and Callisto. Motion through the planetary magnetospheres excites in their ice envelopes megampere currents which, in the presence of rocky, etc., inclusions with electronic conduction should lead to the bulk electrolysis of ice and accumulation in it of 2H2 + O2 in the form of a solid solution. With the concentration of 2H2 + O2 reaching about 15 wt. percent, the solution becomes capable of detonation by a strong meteoritic impact. An explosion of Ganymede's ice envelope about 0.5 By ago could account for the formation of the Trojans and irregular satellites, all known differences between Ganymede and Callisto, and many other things. The explosion of a small icy planet with M approx less than 0.5 Moon created the asteroid belt. Two to three explosions occurred on Io, and two on Europa. The specific features of the longperiod comets close to Saturn's orbit permit dating Titan's envelope explosion as 10,000 yr ago, which produced its thick atmosphere, young Saturn's rings, as well as a reservoir of ice fragments saturated by 2H2 + O2, i.e., cometary nuclei between the orbits of Jupiter and Saturn. Thus these nuclei should contain, besides organic matter, also 2H2 + O2, which could be used for their transportation as well as for fuel for spaceships. Ices of such composition can reside deep inside Deimos, the Trojans, C-asteroids, etc. The danger of a future explosion of Callisto's electrolyzed ices, which would result in a catastrophic bombardment of the Earth by comets, may be high enough to warrant a revision of the priorities and

  17. Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: Origin and recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A.; Mutirangura, A.; Ledbetter, D.H. ); Langlois, S. ); Morris, M.A.; Malcolm, S.

    1993-09-01

    Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N=27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N-5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, more paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome. 33 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  18. Magnetosphere of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    Scaling laws for possible outer planet magnetospheres are derived. These suggest that convection and its associated auroral effects will play a relatively smaller role than at earth, and that there is a possibility that they could have significant radiation belts of energetic trapped particles.

  19. Outer Planet Assessment Group (OPAG) Recommended Exploration Strategy for the Outer Planets 2013-2022

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, William B.; Steering Committee, Opag; Planets Community, Outer

    2010-05-01

    The Outer Solar System provides critical clues to how solar systems form and evolve, how planetary systems become habitable, and how life has evolved in our solar system. NASA's Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) was established to identify scientific priorities and pathways for Outer Solar System exploration. Fundamental new discoveries are best made with a mixture of mission sizes that includes large (flagship) missions, and medium-sized and smaller-sized (as practical) missions, along with vigorous support for basic research, data analysis, and technology development — a balanced strategy most efficiently implemented as an Outer Planets Exploration Program. Missions to the Outer Solar System are major undertakings, requiring large and expensive launch vehicles, long mission durations, highly reliable (frequently radiation hard) and autonomous spacecraft, and radioisotope power sources in most cases. OPAG has recommended to the US National Research Council Planetary Science Decadal Survey to explore the possibilities for ‘small flagship' class missions to be considered, providing a greater range of choice and capabilities in the mix to balance program size and science return. With the Galileo mission concluded, the Cassini equinox mission in progress, and Juno in development, OPAG has strongly endorsed the competitive selection by NASA of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) as the next Outer Planets Flagship and as part of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) with ESA, a collaboration that includes a Ganymede orbiter and an increased focus on Jupiter science; OPAG has strongly recommended support of JEO and EJSM in the Decadal Survey. In addition, OPAG has strongly endorsed approval by NASA of the Cassini Solstice Mission, including the Juno-like end-of-mission scenario, given the likely phenomenal return on investment. OPAG also advocates the need for a focused technology program for the next Outer Planet Flagship Mission after EJSM, in order to be ready

  20. Recombinant protein expression in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Davis, Keith R; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant protein pharmaceuticals are now widely used in treatment of chronic diseases, and several recombinant protein subunit vaccines are approved for human and veterinary use. With growing demand for complex protein pharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, manufacturing capacity is becoming limited. There is increasing need for safe, scalable, and economical alternatives to mammalian cell culture-based manufacturing systems, which require substantial capital investment for new manufacturing facilities. Since a seminal paper reporting immunoglobulin expression in transgenic plants was published in 1989, there have been many technological advances in plant expression systems to the present time where production of proteins in leaf tissues of nonfood crops such as Nicotiana species is considered a viable alternative. In particular, transient expression systems derived from recombinant plant viral vectors offer opportunities for rapid expression screening, construct optimization, and expression scale-up. Extraction of recombinant proteins from Nicotiana leaf tissues can be achieved by collection of secreted protein fractions, or from a total protein extract after grinding the leaves with buffer. After separation from solids, the major purification challenge is contamination with elements of the photosynthetic complex, which can be solved by application of a variety of facile and proven strategies. In conclusion, the technologies required for safe, efficient, scalable manufacture of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana leaf tissues have matured to the point where several products have already been tested in phase I clinical trials and will soon be followed by a rich pipeline of recombinant vaccines, microbicides, and therapeutic proteins.

  1. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  2. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  3. Current Trends of HIV Recombination Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Katherine A.; Wong, Justin J.L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major characteristics of HIV-1 is its high genetic variability and extensive heterogeneity. This characteristic is due to its molecular traits, which in turn allows it to vary, recombine, and diversify at a high frequency. As such, it generates complex molecular forms, termed recombinants, which evade the human immune system and so survive. There is no sequence constraint to the recombination pattern as it appears to occur at inter-group (between groups M and O), as well as interand intra-subtype within group M. Rapid emergence and active global transmission of HIV-1 recombinants, known as circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and unique recombinant forms (URFs), requires urgent attention. To date, 55 CRFs have been reported around the world. The first CRF01_AE originated from Central Africa but spread widely in Asia. The most recent CRF; CRF55_01B is a recombinant form of CRF01_AE and subtype B, although its origin is yet to be publicly disclosed. HIV-1 recombination is an ongoing event and plays an indispensable role in HIV epidemics in different regions. Africa, Asia and South America are identified as recombination hot-spots. They are affected by continual emergence and cocirculation of newly emerging CRFs and URFs, which are now responsible for almost 20% of HIV-1 infections worldwide. Better understanding of recombinants is necessary to determine their biological and molecular attributes. PMID:24470968

  4. Localization of phosphatidylcholine in outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the effects of phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus on the extent of phospholipid hydrolysis in envelope membrane vesicles and in intact chloroplasts. When isolated envelope vesicles were incubated in presence of phospholipase C, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol, but not phosphatidylinositol, were totally converted into diacylglycerol if they were available to the enzyme (i.e., when the vesicles were sonicated in presence of phospholipase C). These experiments demonstrate that phospholipase C can be used to probe the availability of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol in the cytosolic leaflet of the outer envelope membrane from spinach chloroplasts. When isolated, purified, intact chloroplasts were incubated with low amounts of phospholipase C (0.3 U/mg chlorophyll) under very mild conditions (12 degrees C for 1 min), greater than 80% of phosphatidylcholine molecules and almost none of phosphatidylglycerol molecules were hydrolyzed. Since we have also demonstrated, by using several different methods (phase-contrast and electron microscopy, immunochemical and electrophoretic analyses) that isolated spinach chloroplasts, and especially their outer envelope membrane, remained intact after mild treatment with phospholipase C, we can conclude that there is a marked asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts. Phosphatidylcholine, the major polar lipid of the outer envelope membrane, is almost entirely accessible from the cytosolic side of the membrane and therefore is probably localized in the outer leaflet of the outer envelope bilayer. On the contrary, phosphatidylglycerol, the major polar lipid in the inner envelope membrane and the thylakoids, is probably not accessible to phospholipase C from the cytosol and therefore is probably localized mostly in the inner leaflet of the outer envelope membrane and in the other chloroplast membranes. PMID:3988805

  5. Improving baculovirus recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuguang; Chapman, David A. G.; Jones, Ian M.

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses have established themselves as a favoured technology for the high-level expression of recombinant proteins. The construction of recombinant viruses, however, is a time consuming step that restricts consideration of the technology for high throughput developments. Here we use a targeted gene knockout technology to inactivate an essential viral gene that lies adjacent to the locus used for recombination. Viral DNA prepared from the knockout fails to initiate an infection unless rescued by recombination with a baculovirus transfer vector. Modified viral DNA allows 100% recombinant virus formation, obviates the need for further virus purification and offers an efficient means of mass parallel recombinant formation. PMID:12527795

  6. 76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and...

  7. 76 FR 54787 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY... revised North American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram,...

  8. DNA recombination. Recombination initiation maps of individual human genomes.

    PubMed

    Pratto, Florencia; Brick, Kevin; Khil, Pavel; Smagulova, Fatima; Petukhova, Galina V; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel

    2014-11-14

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are introduced in meiosis to initiate recombination and generate crossovers, the reciprocal exchanges of genetic material between parental chromosomes. Here, we present high-resolution maps of meiotic DSBs in individual human genomes. Comparing DSB maps between individuals shows that along with DNA binding by PRDM9, additional factors may dictate the efficiency of DSB formation. We find evidence for both GC-biased gene conversion and mutagenesis around meiotic DSB hotspots, while frequent colocalization of DSB hotspots with chromosome rearrangement breakpoints implicates the aberrant repair of meiotic DSBs in genomic disorders. Furthermore, our data indicate that DSB frequency is a major determinant of crossover rate. These maps provide new insights into the regulation of meiotic recombination and the impact of meiotic recombination on genome function.

  9. Radio Emissions from the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    1996-01-01

    For nearly fifteen years the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft have been detecting an unusual radio emission in the outer heliosphere in the frequency range from about 2 to 3 kHz. Two major events have been observed, the first in 1983-84 and the second in 1992-93. In both cases the onset of the radio emission occurred about 400 days after a period of intense solar activity, the first in mid-July 1982, and the second in May-June 1991. These two periods of solar activity produced the two deepest cosmic ray Forbush decreases ever observed. Forbush decreases are indicative of a system of strong shocks and associated disturbances propagating outward through the heliosphere. The radio emission is believed to have been produced when this system of shocks and disturbances interacted with one of the outer boundaries of the heliosphere, most likely in the vicinity of the the heliopause. The emission is believed to be generated by the shock-driven Langmuir-wave mode conversion mechanism, which produces radiation at the plasma frequency (f(sub p)) and at twice the plasma frequency (2f(sub p)). From the 400-day travel time and the known speed of the shocks, the distance to the interaction region can be computed, and is estimated to be in the range from about 110 to 160 AU.

  10. Acinetobacter baumannii outer membrane protein A modulates the biogenesis of outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Chan; Choi, Chul Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Choi, Chi-Won; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Park, Jeong Soon; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Je Chul

    2012-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) during both in vitro and in vivo growth, but the biogenesis mechanism by which A. baumannii produces OMVs remains undefined. Outer membrane protein A of A. baumannii (AbOmpA) is a major protein in the outer membrane and the C-terminus of AbOmpA interacts with diaminopimelate of peptidoglycan. This study investigated the role of AbOmpA in the biogenesis of A. baumannii OMVs. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to analyze OMV biogenesis in A. baumannii ATCC 19606T and an isogenic ΔAbOmpA mutant. OMV production was significantly increased in the ΔAbOmpA mutant compared to wild-type bacteria as demonstrated by quantitation of proteins and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) packaged in OMVs. LPS profiles prepared from OMVs from wild-type bacteria and the ΔAbOmpA mutant had identical patterns, but proteomic analysis showed different protein constituents in OMVs from wild-type bacteria compared to the ΔAbOmpA mutant. In conclusion, AbOmpA influences OMV biogenesis by controlling OMV production and protein composition.

  11. Geometrical interpretation for the outer SU(3) outer multiplicity label

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draayer, Jerry P.; Troltenier, D.

    1995-01-01

    A geometrical interpretation for the outer multiplicity rho that occurs in a reduction of the product of two SU(3) representations, (lambda(sub pi), mu(sub pi)) x (lambda(sub nu), mu(sub nu)) approaches sigma(sub rho)(lambda, mu)(sub rho), is introduced. This coupling of proton (pi) and neutron (nu) representations arises, for example, in both boson and fermion descriptions of heavy deformed nuclei. Attributing a geometry to the coupling raises the possibility of introducing a simple interaction that provides a physically meaningful way for distinguishing multiple occurrences of (lambda, mu) values that can arise in such products.

  12. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  13. Extended recombinant bacterial ghost system.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, W; Witte, A; Eko, F O; Kamal, M; Jechlinger, W; Brand, E; Marchart, J; Haidinger, W; Huter, V; Felnerova, D; Stralis-Alves, N; Lechleitner, S; Melzer, H; Szostak, M P; Resch, S; Mader, H; Kuen, B; Mayr, B; Mayrhofer, P; Geretschläger, R; Haslberger, A; Hensel, A

    1999-08-20

    Controlled expression of cloned PhiX174 gene E in Gram-negative bacteria results in lysis of the bacteria by formation of an E-specific transmembrane tunnel structure built through the cell envelope complex. Bacterial ghosts from a variety of bacteria are used as non-living candidate vaccines. In the recombinant ghost system, foreign proteins are attached on the inside of the inner membrane as fusions with specific anchor sequences. Ghosts have a sealed periplasmic space and the export of proteins into this space vastly extends the capacity of ghosts or recombinant ghosts to function as carriers of foreign antigens. In addition, S-layer proteins forming shell-like self assembly structures can be expressed in candidate vaccine strains prior to E-mediated lysis. Such recombinant S-layer proteins carrying foreign epitopes further extend the possibilities of ghosts as carriers of foreign epitopes. As ghosts have inherent adjuvant properties, they can be used as adjuvants in combination with subunit vaccines. Subunits or other ligands can also be coupled to matrixes like dextran which are used to fill the internal lumen of ghosts. Oral, aerogenic or parenteral immunization of experimental animals with recombinant ghosts induced specific humoral and cellular immune responses against bacterial and target components including protective mucosal immunity. The most relevant advantage of recombinant bacterial ghosts as immunogens is that no inactivation procedures that denature relevant immunogenic determinants are employed in this production. This fact explains the superior quality of ghosts when compared to other inactivated vaccines. The endotoxic component of the outer membrane does not limit the use of ghosts as vaccine candidates but triggers the release of several potent immunoregulatory cytokines. As carriers, there is no limitation in the size of foreign antigens that can be inserted in the membrane and the capacity of all spaces including the membranes, peri

  14. Mean recombination time of diffusion controlled geminate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mozumder, A.

    1982-05-15

    A recently introduced method by Deutch for determining the mean passage time for diffusion controlled processes (J. Chem. Phys. 73, 4700 (1980)) has been further developed for application to the reactions of geminate pairs. First, a nonzero probability of escaping geminate recombination requires a normalized definition of mean recombination time which is done consistently. Second, only a finite dose results in a finite mean reaction time. Adopting a special outer boundary condition related to the dose, mean recombination times are calculated for ionic and neutral geminate reactions. For application in radiation- and photochemistry, fully and partially diffusion controlled conditions are applied to ionic and neutral cases, respectively.

  15. Protein-Protein Interactions between Intermediate Chains and the Docking Complex of Chlamydomonas Flagellar Outer Arm Dynein

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Takahiro; Owa, Mikito; King, Stephen M.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Outer arm dynein (OAD) is bound to specific loci on outer-doublet-microtubules by interactions at two sites: via intermediate chain 1 (IC1) and the outer dynein arm docking complex (ODA-DC). Studies using Chlamydomonas mutants have suggested that the individual sites have rather weak affinities for microtubules, and therefore strong OAD attachment to microtubules is achieved by their cooperation. To test this idea, we examined interactions between IC1, IC2 (another intermediate chain) and ODA-DC using recombinant proteins. Recombinant IC1 and IC2 were found to form a 1:1 complex, and this complex associated with ODA-DC in vitro. Binding of IC1 to mutant axonemes revealed that there are specific binding sites for IC1. From these data, we propose a novel model of OAD-outer doublet association. PMID:23747306

  16. The CDF Central Outer Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, K.T.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    We describe the CDF Central Outer Tracker (COT), an open-cell drift chamber currently being constructed for the CDF detector to run at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron collider. This detector will provide central tracking with excellent momentum resolution in the high- density environment of a hadron collider. It will be able to resolve 132 ns beam crossings and provide tracking trigger information to the Level 1 trigger. The design is based upon the existing and successful CDF Central Tracking Chamber. The preliminary mechanical and electrical designs are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Outer scale of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vladimir P.

    2005-10-01

    In the early 70's, the scientists in Italy (A.Consortini, M.Bertolotti, L.Ronchi), USA (R.Buser, Ochs, S.Clifford) and USSR (V.Pokasov, V.Lukin) almost simultaneously discovered the phenomenon of deviation from the power law and the effect of saturation for the structure phase function. During a period of 35 years we have performed successively the investigations of the effect of low-frequency spectral range of atmospheric turbulence on the optical characteristics. The influence of the turbulence models as well as a outer scale of turbulence on the characteristics of telescopes and systems of laser beam formations has been determined too.

  18. Substrate Specificity within a Family of Outer Membrane Carboxylate Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Vijayaraghavan, Jagamya; Liu, Jiaming; Cheneke, Belete R.; Touw, Debra S.; Lepore, Bryan W.; Indic, Mridhu; Movileanu, Liviu; van den Berg, Bert; Dutzler, Raimund

    2012-01-17

    Many Gram-negative bacteria, including human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, do not have large-channel porins. This results in an outer membrane (OM) that is highly impermeable to small polar molecules, making the bacteria intrinsically resistant towards many antibiotics. In such microorganisms, the majority of small molecules are taken up by members of the OprD outer membrane protein family. Here we show that OprD channels require a carboxyl group in the substrate for efficient transport, and based on this we have renamed the family Occ, for outer membrane carboxylate channels. We further show that Occ channels can be divided into two subfamilies, based on their very different substrate specificities. Our results rationalize how certain bacteria can efficiently take up a variety of substrates under nutrient-poor conditions without compromising membrane permeability. In addition, they explain how channel inactivation in response to antibiotics can cause resistance but does not lead to decreased fitness.

  19. Recombination in Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    González-Candelas, Fernando; López-Labrador, F. Xavier; Bracho, María Alma

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a Flavivirus with a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of about 9,600 nucleotides. It is a major cause of liver disease, infecting almost 200 million people all over the world. Similarly to most RNA viruses, HCV displays very high levels of genetic diversity which have been used to differentiate six major genotypes and about 80 subtypes. Although the different genotypes and subtypes share basic biological and pathogenic features they differ in clinical outcomes, response to treatment and epidemiology. The first HCV recombinant strain, in which different genome segments derived from parentals of different genotypes, was described in St. Petersburg (Russia) in 2002. Since then, there have been only a few more than a dozen reports including descriptions of HCV recombinants at all levels: between genotypes, between subtypes of the same genotype and even between strains of the same subtype. Here, we review the literature considering the reasons underlying the difficulties for unequivocally establishing recombination in this virus along with the analytical methods necessary to do it. Finally, we analyze the potential consequences, especially in clinical practice, of HCV recombination in light of the coming new therapeutic approaches against this virus. PMID:22069526

  20. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  1. The construction and characterization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae lacking protein III in its outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Protein III (PIII) is a highly conserved, antigenically stable gonococcal outer membrane protein that is closely associated with the major outer membrane protein, protein I (PI). We have previously reported the cloning of the PIII gene. This gene was inserted into the Eco RI site of the runaway plasmid pMOB45. The beta-lactamase (beta la) Bam HI restriction fragment from the gonococcal plasmid pFA3 was inserted at the Xba I site in the PIII gene. The plasmid construct was Hae III methylated and the PIII/beta la insert was excised with Eco RI and used to transform gonococcal strain F62. One beta la+, ampicillin- resistant transformant was isolated and designated 2D. A Western blot of 2D whole cell lysate was probed with affinity-purified polyclonal PIII antisera. No PIII reactivity was detected. Southern blot analysis was performed on F62 and 2D chromosomal DNA that were cut with Eco RI or Cla I. A PIII DNA probe hybridized with fragments 2.2 kb larger in strain 2D than strain F62. This corresponds to the size of the beta la insert. A beta la-specific probe hybridized with the same 2D restriction fragments as above, but did not react with any F62 fragments, confirming that homologous recombination had occurred. There were minimal phenotypic changes between 2D and its parent strain, F62. Chromosomal DNA from 2D was able to transform gonococcal strains F62, UU1, and Pgh 3-2, rendering these PIII-. 2D and other PIII- transformants can now be used to study the role of PIII in gonococcal physiology, metabolism, membrane structure, and pathogenesis. Moreover, we now have organisms from which we can purify gonococcal proteins without PIII contamination. PMID:2499656

  2. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  3. CYP2J2 and CYP2C19 are the major enzymes responsible for metabolism of albendazole and fenbendazole in human liver microsomes and recombinant P450 assay systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhexue; Lee, Doohyun; Joo, Jeongmin; Shin, Jung-Hoon; Kang, Wonku; Oh, Sangtaek; Lee, Do Yup; Lee, Su-Jun; Yea, Sung Su; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Taeho; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon

    2013-11-01

    Albendazole and fenbendazole are broad-spectrum anthelmintics that undergo extensive metabolism to form hydroxyl and sulfoxide metabolites. Although CYP3A and flavin-containing monooxygenase have been implicated in sulfoxide metabolite formation, the enzymes responsible for hydroxyl metabolite formation have not been identified. In this study, we used human liver microsomes and recombinant cytochrome P450s (P450s) to characterize the enzymes involved in the formation of hydroxyalbendazole and hydroxyfenbendazole from albendazole and fenbendazole, respectively. Of the 10 recombinant P450s, CYP2J2 and/or CYP2C19 was the predominant enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of albendazole and fenbendazole. Albendazole hydroxylation to hydroxyalbendazole is primarily mediated by CYP2J2 (0.34 μl/min/pmol P450, which is a rate 3.9- and 8.1-fold higher than the rates for CYP2C19 and CYP2E1, respectively), whereas CYP2C19 and CYP2J2 contributed to the formation of hydroxyfenbendazole from fenbendazole (2.68 and 1.94 μl/min/pmol P450 for CYP2C19 and CYP2J2, respectively, which are rates 11.7- and 8.4-fold higher than the rate for CYP2D6). Correlation analysis between the known P450 enzyme activities and the rate of hydroxyalbendazole and hydroxyfenbendazole formation in samples from 14 human liver microsomes showed that albendazole hydroxylation correlates with CYP2J2 activity and fenbendazole hydroxylation correlates with CYP2C19 and CYP2J2 activities. These findings were supported by a P450 isoform-selective inhibition study in human liver microsomes. In conclusion, our data for the first time suggest that albendazole hydroxylation is primarily catalyzed by CYP2J2, whereas fenbendazole hydroxylation is preferentially catalyzed by CYP2C19 and CYP2J2. The present data will be useful in understanding the pharmacokinetics and drug interactions of albendazole and fenbendazole in vivo.

  4. Major depression

    MedlinePlus

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... providers do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  5. Novel applications of recombinant erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Edward J; Thiemermann, Christoph; Yaqoob, Magdi M

    2006-04-01

    Recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) was introduced into clinical practice after the identification of EPO as the major haemopoietic growth factor determining survival and maturation of erythroid precursors. Advances in our understanding of the novel sites of action of EPO in the vasculature, brain, heart and kidney have opened new avenues of therapeutic potential for EPO, and have led to an increased understanding of the biological roles of EPO and its mechanisms of cell protection.

  6. Outer Appearances Can Be Deceiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the chemical composition of the rock at Gusev Crater dubbed 'Mazatzal' after it was brushed and ground by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's rock abrasion tool. The data, taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer over the last few sols, show that the amount of chlorine and sulfur tri-oxide in Mazatzal first increased after brushing, then diminished after grinding. The interior of the rock appears to have the same chemical make-up as other volcanic or basalt rocks studied in the Gusev Crater area ('Adirondack' and 'Humphrey'). Its outer coating or rind, on the other hand, appears to be of a different constitution. Scientists are still puzzling out the implications of these data.

    The larger symbols on the graph represent inferred rock compositions, while the smaller symbols are actual data points. Observations were made at the target dubbed 'New York' on Mazatzal.

  7. Aft outer rim seal arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J; Campbell, Christian X

    2015-04-28

    An outer rim seal arrangement (10), including: an annular rim (70) centered about a longitudinal axis (30) of a rotor disc (31), extending fore and having a fore-end (72), an outward-facing surface (74), and an inward-facing surface (76); a lower angel wing (62) extending aft from a base of a turbine blade (22) and having an aft end (64) disposed radially inward of the rim inward-facing surface to define a lower angel wing seal gap (80); an upper angel wing (66) extending aft from the turbine blade base and having an aft end (68) disposed radially outward of the rim outward-facing surface to define a upper angel wing seal gap (80, 82); and guide vanes (100) disposed on the rim inward-facing surface in the lower angel wing seal gap. Pumping fins (102) may be disposed on the upper angel wing seal aft end in the upper angel wing seal gap.

  8. Chemistry of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Various aspects were studied of past or present chemistry in the atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites using lab simulations. Three areas were studied: (1) organic chemistry induced by kinetically hot hydrogen atoms in the region of Jupiter's atmosphere containing the ammonia cirrus clouds; (2) the conversion of NH3 into N2 by plasmas associated with entry of meteors and other objects into the atmosphere of early Titan; and (3) the synthesis of simple hydrocarbons and HCN by lightning in mixtures containing N2, CH4, and NH3 representing the atmospheres of Titan and the outer planets. The results showed that: (1) hot H2 atoms formed from the photodissociation of NH3 in Jupiter's atmosphere could account for some of the atmospheric chemistry in the ammonia cirrus cloud region; (2) the thermalization of hot H2 atoms in atmospheres predominated by molecular H is not as rapid as predicted by elastic collision theory; (3) the net quantum loss of NH3 in the presence of a 200 fold excess of H2 is 0.02, much higher than was expected from the amount of H2 present; (4) the conversion of NH3 into N2 in plasmas associated with infalling meteors is very efficient and rapid, and could account for most of the N2 present on Titan; (5) the yields of C2H2 and HCN from lightning induced chemistry in mixtures of CH4 and N2 is consistent with quenched thermodynamic models of the discharge core; and (6) photolysis induced by the UV light emitted by the gases in the hot plasmas may account for some, if not most, of the excess production of C2H6 and the more complex hydrocarbons.

  9. Detecting and Analyzing Genetic Recombination Using RDP4.

    PubMed

    Martin, Darren P; Murrell, Ben; Khoosal, Arjun; Muhire, Brejnev

    2017-01-01

    Recombination between nucleotide sequences is a major process influencing the evolution of most species on Earth. The evolutionary value of recombination has been widely debated and so too has its influence on evolutionary analysis methods that assume nucleotide sequences replicate without recombining. When nucleic acids recombine, the evolution of the daughter or recombinant molecule cannot be accurately described by a single phylogeny. This simple fact can seriously undermine the accuracy of any phylogenetics-based analytical approach which assumes that the evolutionary history of a set of recombining sequences can be adequately described by a single phylogenetic tree. There are presently a large number of available methods and associated computer programs for analyzing and characterizing recombination in various classes of nucleotide sequence datasets. Here we examine the use of some of these methods to derive and test recombination hypotheses using multiple sequence alignments.

  10. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  11. Genetic recombination and molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, B; Betancourt, A J; Kaiser, V B; Gordo, I

    2009-01-01

    Reduced rates of genetic recombination are often associated with reduced genetic variability and levels of adaptation. Several different evolutionary processes, collectively known as Hill-Robertson (HR) effects, have been proposed as causes of these correlates of recombination. Here, we use DNA sequence polymorphism and divergence data from the noncrossing over dot chromosome of Drosophila to discriminate between two of the major forms of HR effects: selective sweeps and background selection. This chromosome shows reduced levels of silent variability and reduced effectiveness of selection. We show that neither model fits the data on variability. We propose that, in large genomic regions with restricted recombination, HR effects among nonsynonymous mutations undermine the effective strength of selection, so that their background selection effects are weakened. This modified model fits the data on variability and also explains why variability in very large nonrecombining genomes is not completely wiped out. We also show that HR effects of this type can produce an individual selection advantage to recombination, as well as greatly reduce the mean fitness of nonrecombining genomes and genomic regions.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali; Kolko, Miriam; Moons, Lieve; Van Hove, Inge

    2017-03-29

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells.

  13. Law and politics in outer space: A bibliography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, I. L.; Wilson, C. E.; Vosburgh, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The materials are categorized by specific topics and by types of materials. The sources are books, articles, reports, United Nations materials, U.S. Government documents, etc. Books are listed by geographical areas, and articles are divided into what are considered to be the major space topics. Book and article sections are also divided into English and foreign language entries. A bibliographical essay introduces the literature to those unacquainted with law and politics of outer space.

  14. Outer planets grand tours: Planetary radio astronomy team report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Requirements related to scientific observations of planetary radio emissions during outer planets grand tours are discussed. Observations at low frequencies where non-thermal cooperative plasma phenomena play a major role are considered for determining dynamical processes and magnetic fields near a planet. Magnetic field measurements by spacecraft magnetometers, and by radio receivers in their harmonic modes are proposed for interpretation of planetary radio emission.

  15. Herpesvirus gB-induced fusion between the virion envelope and outer nuclear membrane during virus egress is regulated by the viral US3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Wisner, Todd W; Wright, Catherine C; Kato, Akihisa; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Mou, Fan; Baines, Joel D; Roller, Richard J; Johnson, David C

    2009-04-01

    Herpesvirus capsids collect along the inner surface of the nuclear envelope and bud into the perinuclear space. Enveloped virions then fuse with the outer nuclear membrane (NM). We previously showed that herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins gB and gH act in a redundant fashion to promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. HSV mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate enveloped virions in herniations, vesicles that bulge into the nucleoplasm. Earlier studies had shown that HSV mutants lacking the viral serine/threonine kinase US3 also accumulate herniations. Here, we demonstrate that HSV gB is phosphorylated in a US3-dependent manner in HSV-infected cells, especially in a crude nuclear fraction. Moreover, US3 directly phosphorylated the gB cytoplasmic (CT) domain in in vitro assays. Deletion of gB in the context of a US3-null virus did not add substantially to defects in nuclear egress. The majority of the US3-dependent phosphorylation of gB involved the CT domain and amino acid T887, a residue present in a motif similar to that recognized by US3 in other proteins. HSV recombinants lacking gH and expressing either gB substitution mutation T887A or a gB truncated at residue 886 displayed substantial defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that phosphorylation of the gB CT domain is important for gB-mediated fusion with the outer NM. This suggested a model in which the US3 kinase is incorporated into the tegument layer (between the capsid and envelope) in HSV virions present in the perinuclear space. By this packaging, US3 might be brought close to the gB CT tail, leading to phosphorylation and triggering fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM.

  16. Molecular Basis of Bacterial Outer Membrane Permeability Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria characteristically are surrounded by an additional membrane layer, the outer membrane. Although outer membrane components often play important roles in the interaction of symbiotic or pathogenic bacteria with their host organisms, the major role of this membrane must usually be to serve as a permeability barrier to prevent the entry of noxious compounds and at the same time to allow the influx of nutrient molecules. This review summarizes the development in the field since our previous review (H. Nikaido and M. Vaara, Microbiol. Rev. 49:1-32, 1985) was published. With the discovery of protein channels, structural knowledge enables us to understand in molecular detail how porins, specific channels, TonB-linked receptors, and other proteins function. We are now beginning to see how the export of large proteins occurs across the outer membrane. With our knowledge of the lipopolysaccharide-phospholipid asymmetric bilayer of the outer membrane, we are finally beginning to understand how this bilayer can retard the entry of lipophilic compounds, owing to our increasing knowledge about the chemistry of lipopolysaccharide from diverse organisms and the way in which lipopolysaccharide structure is modified by environmental conditions. PMID:14665678

  17. Characterizing the Outer Divertor Leg Transition to Full Detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, A. G.; Allen, S. L.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Meyer, W. H.; Porter, G. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Bray, B. D.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Leonard, A. W.; Liu, C.; Eldon, D.; Groth, M.; Stangeby, P. C.; Tsui, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    Experiments at DIII-D have explored the transition from an attached to fully detached divertor condition in L- and H-mode with an unprecedented level of detail. Improved divertor Thomson scattering capturing Te <= 1 eV, coupled with high resolution spectroscopic studies of molecular and neutral emissions, and Stark broadening of the deuterium Paschen series provide essential data for modeling the transition to detachment. 2D Te and ne profiles of the outer leg reveal movement of the ionization front away from the plate not replicated in modeling. Measured Paschen and molecular emissions suggest the onset of recombination occurs prior to, and to a greater extent than modeled. These data help guide and expose any missing physics in predictions for detached operation in future devices. This work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  18. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  19. NIF Double Shell outer-shell experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, E. C.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Daughton, W. S.; Wilson, D. C.; Dodd, E. S.; Renner, D. B.; Cardenas, T.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    At the core of the Double Shell concept is the kinetic energy transfer from the outer shell to the inner shell via collision. This collision sets both the implosion shape of the inner shell, from imprinting of the shape of the outer shell, as well as the maximum energy available to compress the DT fuel. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to control the time-dependent shape of the outer shell, such that the outer shell is nominally round at the collision time. We present the experiment results from our sub-scale ( 1 MJ) NIF outer-shell only shape tuning campaign, where we vary shape by changing a turn-on time delay between the same pulse shape on the inner and outer cone beams. This type of shape tuning is unique to this platform and only possible since the Double Shell design uses a single-shock drive (4.5 ns reverse ramp pulse). The outer-shell only targets used a 5.75 mm diameter standard near-vacuum NIF hohlraum with 0.032 mg/cc He gas fill, and a Be capsule with 0.4% uniform Cu dopant, with 242 um thick ablator. We also present results from a third outer-shell only shot used to measure shell trajectory, which is critical in determining the shell impact time. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  20. Outer trapped surfaces in Vaidya spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Ishai

    2007-03-15

    It is proven that in Vaidya spacetimes of bounded total mass, the outer boundary, in spacetime, of the region containing outer trapped surfaces, is the event horizon. Further, it is shown that the region containing trapped surfaces in these spacetimes does not always extend to the event horizon.

  1. CATALYTIC RECOMBINER FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1960-07-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen recombiner is described for use with water-boiler type reactors. The catalyst used is the wellknown platinized alumina, and the novelty lies in the structural arrangement used to prevent flashback through the gas input system. The recombiner is cylindrical, the gases at the input end being deflected by a baffle plate through a first flashback shield of steel shot into an annular passage adjacent to and extending the full length of the housing. Below the baffle plate the gases flow first through an outer annular array of alumina pellets which serve as a second flashback shield, a means of distributing the flowing gases evenly and as a means of reducing radiation losses to the walls. Thereafter the gases flow inio the centrally disposed catalyst bed where recombination is effected. The steam and uncombined gases flow into a centrally disposed cylindrical passage inside the catalyst bod and thereafter out through the exit port. A high rate of recombination is effected.

  2. 76 FR 63654 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Doc No: 2011-26503] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block... American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Official Protraction Diagram (OPD),...

  3. Astroparticles: Messengers from Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiati, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Since Galileo pointed a spyglass toward the sky, 400 years ago, observations empowered by man-made instrumentation have provided us with an enormous leap in the knowledge of how the Universe functions. More and more powerful optical telescopes made it possible for us to reach the farthest corners of space. At the same time, the advances in microphysics and the discovery of the electromagnetic spectrum, made it possible to directly look at the Universe in a way that our eyes cannot see. The discoveries of the intimate structure of matter, of subatomic particles and of how they interact with each other, have led astronomers to use the smallest objects in Nature to observe the farthest reaches of the otherwise invisible Universe. Not unlike Galileo, today we observe Outer Space with visible light and beyond, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from long wavelength radio waves to short wavelength gamma rays. But also with instruments detecting cosmic rays (the atomic nuclei we know on Earth) neutrinos (neutral subatomic particles that interact very weakly with matter) and gravitational waves (perturbations of spacetime predicted by General Relativity). Each cosmic messenger provides us with a unique piece of information about their source and the history of their journey to us. Modern astrophysics has the challenging goal to collect as much information as possible from all those messengers, to reconstruct the story of the Universe and how it became what it is today. This journey started with the unsettling discovery that we are only one minuscule dot in the immensity of the Universe and yet we are able to observe objects that are far in space and time. This journey is yet to complete its course, and the more we advance our knowledge, the more we need to understand. This interdisciplinary talk provides an overview of this journey and the future perspectives.

  4. A study of recombinant protective H. pylori antigens

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zheng; Tao, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Ai-Long; Wang, Pi-Long

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant vector which can express Mr26000 outer membrane protein (OMP) from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), and to obtain the vaccine protecting against H. pylori infection and a diagnostic reagent kit quickly detecting H. pylori infection. METHODS: The gene encoding the structural Mr26000 outer membrane protein of H. pylori was amplified from H. pylori chromosomal DNA by PCR, and inserted in the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a(+), which was transformed into the Top10 E. coli strain. Recombinant vector was selected, identified and transformed into BL-21(DE3) E. coli strain. The recombinant fusion proteins were expressed. The antigenicity of recombinant protein was studied by ELISA or immunoblotting and immunized Balb/c mice. RESULTS: The gene of Mr26000 OMP was amplified to be 594 base pairs, 1.1% of the cloned genes was mutated and 1.51% of amino acid residues was changed, but there was homogeneity between them. The recombinant fusion protein encoded objective polypeptides of 198 amino acid residues, corresponding to calculated molecular masses of Mr26000. The level of soluble expression products was about 38.96% of the total cell protein. After purification by Ni-NTA agarose resin columniation, the purity of objective protein became about 90%. The ELISA results showed that recombinant fusion protein could be recognized by patient serum infected with H. pylori and rabbit serum immunized with the recombinant protein. Furthermore, Balb/c mice immunized with the recombinant protein were protected against H. pylori infection. CONCLUSION: Mr26000 OMP may be a candidate vaccine preventing H. pylori infection. PMID:11925614

  5. The Magnetic Field in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.

    2004-01-01

    One of the great achievements of Parker was the prediction that the solar magnetic field would be drawn into Archimedian spirals as it is carried away from the Sun by the solar wind. This prediction has been amply confirmed by many in situ measurements in the intervening four decades. But, Parker made his prediction for a solar wind that expands into infinite space while we now know that the local interstellar medium (LISM) is far from empty and, in fact, confines the solar wind to a finite volume, known as the heliosphere, that extends to approximately 100 AU in the upstream direction (the solar system is moving through the LISM). Voyagers 1/2, presently at -80 AU, are approaching the upstream boundaries of the heliosphere and returning data on the properties of the magnetic field. This is important for understanding how galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) reach the Earth. Voyagers show that the IMF at 10-80 AU behaves much as Parker predicted - with two important exceptions. This is not surprising since the field is essentially passively advected by the solar wind out to 80 AU. But, new models say that nearer the heliosphere boundaries the field plays a major role in the solar wind-LISM interaction. However, of the many physical ingredients that constitute the outer heliosphere, the magnetic field poses some of the most interesting and difficult numerical modeling problems. Presently, only a few results have been published and much remains to be done. Here I will summarize the expected and measured behavior of the magnetic field at 80 AU. Then I will describe modeling predictions beyond 80 AU: magnetic "tornadoes", polarity envelopes, the Axford-Cranfill effect, inner and outer magnetic walls and more. I will also list what I believe to be important new modeling objectives. Finally, I will speculate on what is happening with the magnetic field near the nose of the heliosphere. My conclusion is that models of GCR modulation rarely incorporate even crudely realistic

  6. Epigenetic control of meiotic recombination in plants.

    PubMed

    Yelina, Natasha; Diaz, Patrick; Lambing, Christophe; Henderson, Ian R

    2015-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is a deeply conserved process within eukaryotes that has a profound effect on patterns of natural genetic variation. During meiosis homologous chromosomes pair and undergo DNA double strand breaks generated by the Spo11 endonuclease. These breaks can be repaired as crossovers that result in reciprocal exchange between chromosomes. The frequency of recombination along chromosomes is highly variable, for example, crossovers are rarely observed in heterochromatin and the centromeric regions. Recent work in plants has shown that crossover hotspots occur in gene promoters and are associated with specific chromatin modifications, including H2A.Z. Meiotic chromosomes are also organized in loop-base arrays connected to an underlying chromosome axis, which likely interacts with chromatin to organize patterns of recombination. Therefore, epigenetic information exerts a major influence on patterns of meiotic recombination along chromosomes, genetic variation within populations and evolution of plant genomes.

  7. Is outer arm dynein intermediate chain 1 multifunctional?

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, K; Takai, H; Ogiwara, A; Yokota, E; Shimizu, T; Inaba, K; Mohri, H

    1996-01-01

    The outer arm dynein of sea urchin sperm axoneme contains three intermediate chains (IC1, IC2, and IC3; M(r) 128,000, 98,000, and 74,000, respectively). IC2 and IC3 are members of the WD family; the WD motif is responsible for a protein-protein interaction. We describe here the molecular cloning of IC1. IC1 has a unique primary structure, the N-terminal part is homologous to the sequence of thioredoxin, the middle part consists of three repetitive sequences homologous to the sequence of nucleoside diphosphate kinase, and the C-terminal part contains a high proportion of negatively charged glutamic acid residues. Thus, IC1 is a novel dynein intermediate chain distinct from IC2 and IC3 and may be a multifunctional protein. The thioredoxin-related part of IC1 is more closely related to those of two redox-active Chlamydomonas light chains than thioredoxin. Antibodies were prepared against the N-terminal and middle domains of IC1 expressed as His-tagged proteins in bacteria. These antibodies cross-reacted with some dynein polypeptides (potential homologues of IC1) from distantly related species. We propose here that the three intermediate chains are the basic core units of sperm outer arm dynein because of their ubiquitous existence. The recombinant thioredoxin-related part of IC1 and outer arm dyneins from sea urchin and distantly related species were specifically bound to and eluted from a phenylarsine oxide affinity column with 2-mercaptoethanol, indicating that they contain vicinal dithiols competent to undergo reversible oxidation/reduction. Images PMID:8970153

  8. Recombinant Baculovirus Isolation.

    PubMed

    King, Linda A; Hitchman, Richard; Possee, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Although there are several different methods available of making recombinant baculovirus expression vectors (reviewed in Chapter 3 ), all require a stage in which insect cells are transfected with either the virus genome alone (Bac-to-Bac(®) or BaculoDirect™, Invitrogen) or virus genome and transfer vector. In the latter case, this allows the natural process of homologous recombination to transfer the foreign gene, under control of the polyhedrin or other baculovirus gene promoter, from the transfer vector to the virus genome to create the recombinant virus. Previously, many methods required a plaque-assay to separate parental and recombinant virus prior to amplification and use of the recombinant virus. Fortunately, this step is no longer required for most systems currently available. This chapter provides an overview of the historical development of increasingly more efficient systems for the isolation of recombinant baculoviruses (Chapter 3 provides a full account of the different systems and transfer vectors available). The practical details cover: transfection of insect cells with either virus DNA or virus DNA and plasmid transfer vector; a reliable plaque-assay method that can be used to separate recombinant virus from parental (nonrecombinant) virus where this is necessary; methods for the small-scale amplification of recombinant virus; and subsequent titration by plaque-assay or real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods unique to the Bac-to-Bac(®) system are also covered and include the transformation of bacterial cells and isolation of bacmid DNA ready for transfection of insect cells.

  9. The role of CpG ODN in enhancement of immune response and protection in BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant major surface glycoprotein of Leishmania (rgp63) encapsulated in cationic liposome.

    PubMed

    Jaafari, Mahmoud R; Badiee, Ali; Khamesipour, Ali; Samiei, Afshin; Soroush, Dina; Kheiri, Masoumeh Tavassoti; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; McMaster, W Robert; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2007-08-10

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN) are known to be a potent immunoadjuvant for a wide range of antigens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of CpG ODN co-encapsulated with rgp63 antigen in cationic liposomes (Lip-rgp63-CpG ODN) in immune response enhancement and protection in BALB/c mice against leishmaniasis. Lip-rgp63-CpG ODN prepared by using dehydration-rehydration vesicle (DRV) method significantly inhibited (P<0.001) Leishmania major infection in mice measured by footpad swelling compared to Lip-rgp63, rgp63 alone, rgp63 plus CpG ODN, PBS or control liposomes. The mice immunized with Lip-rgp63-CpG ODN also showed the lowest spleen parasite burden, highest IgG2a/IgG1 ratio and IFN-gamma production and the lowest IL-4 production compared to the other groups. The results indicate that co-encapsulation of CpG ODN in liposomes improves the immunogenicity of Leishmania antigen.

  10. Development of a rapid in vitro protein refolding assay which discriminates between peptide-bound and peptide-free forms of recombinant porcine major histocompatibility class I complex (SLA-I).

    PubMed

    Oleksiewicz, M B; Kristensen, B; Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A-S; Nielsen, J

    2002-05-01

    The extracellular domains of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I, major histocompatibility complex protein class I) were cloned and sequenced for two haplotypes (H4 and H7) which do not share any alleles based on serological typing, and which are the most important in Danish farmed pigs. The extracellular domain of SLA-I was connected to porcine beta2 microglobulin by glycine-rich linkers. The engineered single-chain proteins, consisting of fused SLA-I and beta2 microglobulin, were overexpressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. Also, variants were made of the single-chain proteins, by linking them through glycine-rich linkers to peptides representing T-cell epitopes from classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). An in vitro refold assay was developed, using a monoclonal anti-SLA antibody (PT85A) to gauge refolding. The single best-defined, SLA-I restricted porcine CD8(+) T-cell epitope currently known is a 9-residue peptide from the polyprotein of CSFV (J. Gen. Virol. 76 (1995) 3039). Based on results with the CSFV epitope and two porcine haplotypes (H4 and H7), the in vitro refold assay appeared able to discriminate between peptide-free and peptide-occupied forms of SLA-I. It remains to be seen whether the rapid and technically very simple in vitro refold assay described here will prove generally applicable for the screening of virus-derived peptides for SLA-I binding.

  11. Depletion of the Outer Asteroid Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Malhotra, Renu

    1997-01-01

    During the early history of the solar system, it is likely that the outer planets changed their distance from the sun, and hence, their influence on the asteroid belt evolved with time. The gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn on the orbital evolution of asteroids in the outer asteroid belt was calculated. The results show that the sweeping of mean motion resonances associated with planetary migration efficiently destabilizes orbits in the outer asteroid belt on a time scale of 10 million years. This mechanism provides an explanation for the observed depletion of asteroids in that region.

  12. Major Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  13. Distribution and kinematics of classical cepheids in the Galactic outer ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mel'nik, A. M.; Rautiainen, P.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Dambis, A. K.; Rastorguev, A. S.

    The existence of an outer ring in the Galaxy can explain the kinematics of OB associations in the Perseus and Sagittarius stellar-gas complexes. Moreover, it can also explain the orientation of the Carina arm with respect to the major axis of the bar. We show that the morphological and kinematical features of the sample of classical cepheids are consistent with the presence of a two-component outer ring in the Galaxy.

  14. Outer planet probe engineering model structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Gustin, W. H.; Griffin, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of proof of concept structural tests was performed on an engineering model of the Outer Planets Atmospheric Entry Probe. The tests consisted of pyrotechnic shock, dynamic and static loadings. The tests partially verified the structural concept.

  15. The carbon budget in the outer solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, D P; Pollack, J B; McKay, C P; Reynolds, R T; Summers, A L

    1989-01-01

    Detailed models of the internal structures of Pluto and Charon, assuming rock and water ice as the only constituents, indicate that the mean silicate mass fraction of this two-body system is on the order of 0.7; thus the Pluto/Charon system is significantly "rockier" than the satellites of the giant planets (silicate mass fraction approximately 0.55). This compositional contrast reflects different formation mechanisms: it is likely that Pluto and Charon formed directly from the solar nebula, while the circumplanetary nebulae that produced the giant planet satellites were derived from envelopes that surrounded the forming giant planets (envelopes in which icy planetesimals dissolved more readily than rocky planetesimals). Simple cosmic abundance calculations, and the assumption that the Pluto/Charon system formed directly from solar nebula condensates, strongly suggest that the majority of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of carbon monoxide; these results are consistent with (1) inheritance from the dense molecular clouds in the interstellar medium (where CH4/CO < 10(-2) in the gas phase) and/or (2) of the Lewis and Prinn kinetic inhibition model of solar nebula chemistry. Theoretical predictions of the C/H enhancements in the atmospheres of the giant planets, when compared to the actual observed enhancements, suggest that 10%, or slightly more, of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of condensed materials (although the amount of condensed C may have dropped slightly with increasing heliocentric distance). Strict compositional limits computed for the Pluto/Charon system using the densities of CH4 and CO ices indicate that these pure ices are at best minor components in the interiors of these bodies, and imply that CH4 and CO ices were not the dominant C-bearing solids in the outer nebula. Clathrate-hydrates could not have appropriated enough CH4 or CO to be the major form of condensed carbon, although such clathrates may be

  16. Dissociative recombination in aeronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of dissociative recombination in planetary aeronomy is summarized, and two examples are discussed. The first is the role of dissociative recombination of N2(+) in the escape of nitrogen from Mars. A previous model is updated to reflect new experimental data on the electronic states of N produced in this process. Second, the intensity of the atomic oxygen green line on the nightside of Venus is modeled. Use is made of theoretical rate coefficients for production of O (1S) in dissociative recombination from different vibrational levels of O2(+).

  17. Cratering Rates in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    We have constructed a self-consistent study of cratering rates in the outer solar system. Two papers were written, one on cratering asymmetries on synchronously rotating satellites and the other on the cratering rates themselves. The first addresses the well-founded expectation that the leading hemisphere of a synchronously rotating satellite should be more heavily cratered than the trailing hemisphere, and how our solar system has avoided showing much sign of this. We conclude that Ganymede has in the past rotated nonsynchronously, which may imply that it once harboured a thicker inner ocean than it does now. The other study began as an attempt to determine the age of the surface of Europa at a time when Europa was regarded as a major Exobiological target. In keeping with changing times the study expanded to the point that it now recommends cratering rates for worlds as diverse as Charon and Pluto, and includes the contributions of several invaluable co-authors, none of whom would agree with all of my conclusions. The nexus of the work is the size-frequency distribution of comets striking Jupiter (Figure). This was determined using the historically observed record of comets striking or nearly striking Jupiter; the size-frequency distributions of craters on lightly cratered surfaces of Europa, Ganymede, and Triton; and the size-frequncy distribution of Kuiper Belt objects. Extreme reductionists will be happy to know that the surface of Europa probably has an age of around 50 million years. Perhaps more intriguing is that Neptune's moon Triton, by origin a giant comet and by capture and orbital evolution a once fully melted giant comet, has a surface that is probably no older than Europa's.

  18. Recombination hotspots: Models and tools for detection.

    PubMed

    Paul, Prosenjit; Nag, Debjyoti; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2016-04-01

    Recombination hotspots are the regions within the genome where the rate, and the frequency of recombination are optimum with a size varying from 1 to 2kb. The recombination event is mediated by the double-stranded break formation, guided by the combined enzymatic action of DNA topoisomerase and Spo 11 endonuclease. These regions are distributed non-uniformly throughout the human genome and cause distortions in the genetic map. Numerous lines of evidence suggest that the number of hotspots known in humans has increased manifold in recent years. A few facts about the hotspot evolutions were also put forward, indicating the differences in the hotspot position between chimpanzees and humans. In mice, recombination hot spots were found to be clustered within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. Several models, that help explain meiotic recombination has been proposed. Moreover, scientists also developed some computational tools to locate the hotspot position and estimate their recombination rate in humans is of great interest to population and medical geneticists. Here we reviewed the molecular mechanisms, models and in silico prediction techniques of hot spot residues.

  19. Planet Nine From Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Brown, Michael E.

    2016-10-01

    All known Kuiper belt objects with orbital periods longer than 4,000 years have orbits that are clustered in physical space. Statistically, the chances of such alignment being coincidental are smaller than a hundredth of a percent. In this talk, we show that the observed clustering of Kuiper belt orbits can be explained by a distant, eccentric, Neptune-like planet, whose orbit lies in approximately the same plane as those of the distant Kuiper belt objects, but whose perihelion is 180° away from the perihelia of the minor bodies. In addition to accounting for the observed grouping of orbital trajectories, the existence of such a planet naturally explains the presence of high-perihelion Sedna-like objects, as well as the known collection of high semi-major axis objects with inclinations between 60° and 150°.

  20. Major depression.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan M; Pagalilauan, Genevieve L; Simpson, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a common, disabling condition seen frequently in primary care practices. Non-psychiatrist ambulatory providers are increasingly responsible for diagnosing, and primarily managing patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this review is to help primary care providers to understand the natural history of MDD, identify practical tools for screening, and a thoughtful approach to management. Clinically challenging topics like co-morbid conditions, treatment resistant depression and pharmacotherapy selection with consideration to side effects and medication interactions, are also covered.

  1. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  2. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  3. Multiphoton Assisted Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, E. S.; Jones, R. R.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    We have observed multiphoton assisted recombination in the presence of a 38.8 GHz microwave field. Stimulated emission of up to ten microwave photons results in energy transfer from continuum electrons, enabling recombination. The maximum electron energy loss is far greater than the 2Up predicted by the standard “simpleman’s” model. The data are well reproduced by both an approximate analytic expression and numerical simulations in which the combined Coulomb and radiation fields are taken into account.

  4. Major Andre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henisch, B. A.; Henisch, H. K.

    1976-01-01

    If most Revolutionary era people seem two-dimensional their lives simpler to understand than ours, it may be only that history, with the benefit of hindsight, clarifies. Examines a profile of Major John Andre, the British liaison officer in Benedict Arnold's plan to surrender West Point, as both hero and villain to show the complexity of early…

  5. Planet 9 From Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    At the outskirts of the solar system, beyond the orbit of Neptune, lies an expansive field of icy debris known as the Kuiper belt. The orbits of the individual asteroid-like bodies within the Kuiper belt trace out highly elongated elliptical paths, and require hundreds to thousands of years to complete a single revolution around the Sun. Although the majority of the Kuiper belt's dynamical structure can be understood within the framework of the known eight-planet solar system, bodies with orbital periods longer than about 4,000 years exhibit a peculiar orbital alignment that eludes explanation. What sculpts this alignment and how is it preserved? In this talk, I will argue that the observed clustering of Kuiper belt orbits can be maintained by a distant, eccentric, Neptune-like planet, whose orbit lies in approximately the same plane as those of the distant Kuiper belt objects, but is anti-aligned with respect to those of the small bodies. In addition to accounting for the observed grouping of orbits, the existence of such a planet naturally explains other, seemingly unrelated dynamical features of the solar system.

  6. Old open clusters in the outer Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, G.; Geisler, D.; Villanova, S.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Majewski, S. R.

    2007-12-01

    Context: The outer parts of the Milky Way disk are believed to be one of the main arenas where the accretion of external material in the form of dwarf galaxies and subsequent formation of streams is taking place. The Monoceros stream and the Canis Major and Argo over-densities are notorious examples. Understanding whether what we detect is the signature of accretion or, more conservatively, simply the intrinsic nature of the disk, represents one of the major goals of modern Galactic astronomy. Aims: We try to shed more light on the properties of the outer disk by exploring the properties of distant anti-center old open clusters. We want to verify whether distant clusters follow the chemical and dynamical behavior of the solar vicinity disk, or whether their properties can be better explained in terms of an extra-galactic population. Methods: VLT high resolution spectra have been acquired for five distant open clusters: Ruprecht 4, Ruprecht 7, Berkeley 25, Berkeley 73 and Berkeley 75. We derive accurate radial velocities to distinguish field interlopers and cluster members. For the latter we perform a detailed abundance analysis and derive the iron abundance [Fe/H] and the abundance ratios of several α elements. Results: Our analysis confirms previous indications that the radial abundance gradient in the outer Galactic disk does not follow the expectations extrapolated from the solar vicinity, but exhibits a shallower slope. By combining the metallicity of the five program clusters with eight more clusters for which high resolution spectroscopy is available, we find that the mean metallicity in the outer disk between 12 and 21 kpc from the Galactic center is [Fe/H] ≈ -0.35, with only marginal indications for a radial variation. In addition, all the program clusters exhibit solar scaled or slightly enhanced α elements, similar to open clusters in the solar vicinity and thin disk stars. Conclusions: We investigate whether this outer disk cluster sample might

  7. Propagation of Interplanetary Disturbances in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. We have developed a one-dimensional, spherically symmetric, multi-fluid MHD model that includes solar wind protons and electrons, pickup ions, and interstellar neutral hydrogen. This model advances the existing solar wind models for the outer heliosphere in two important ways: one is that it distinguishes solar wind protons from pickup ions, and the other is that it allows for energy transfer from pickup ions to the solar wind protons. Model results compare favorably with the Voyager 2 observations. 2. 2. Solar wind slowdown and interstellar neutral density. The solar wind in the outer heliosphere is fundamentally different from that in the inner heliosphere since the effects of interstellar neutrals become significant. 3. ICME propagation from the inner to outer heliosphere. Large coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have major effects on the structure of the solar wind and the heliosphere. The plasma and magnetic field can be compressed ahead of interplanetary CMEs. 4. During the current solar cycle (Cycle 23), several major CMEs associated with solar flares produced large transient shocks which were observed by widely-separated spacecraft such as Wind at Earth and Voyager 2 beyond 60 AU. Using data from these spacecraft, we use the multi-fluid model to investigate shock propagation and interaction in the heliosphere. Specifically, we studied the Bastille Day 2000, April 2001 and Halloween 2003 events. 5. Statistical properties of the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. In a collaboration with L.F. Burlaga of GSFC, it is shown that the basic statistical properties of the solar wind in the outer heliosphere can be well produced by our model. We studied the large-scale heliospheric magnetic field strength fluctuations as a function of distance from the Sun during the declining phase of a solar cycle, using our numerical model with observations made at 1 AU during 1995 as input. 6. Radial heliospheric magnetic field events. The

  8. Deciphering the function of the outer membrane protein OprD homologue of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Catel-Ferreira, Manuella; Nehmé, Rony; Molle, Virginie; Aranda, Jesús; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Chevalier, Sylvie; Bou, Germán; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2012-07-01

    The increasing number of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates is a major cause for concern which restricts therapeutic options to treat severe infections caused by this emerging pathogen. To identify the molecular mechanisms involved in carbapenem resistance, we studied the contribution of an outer membrane protein homologue of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa OprD porin. Suspected to be the preferred pathway of carbapenems in A. baumannii, the oprD homologue gene was inactivated in strain ATCC 17978. Comparison of wild-type and mutant strains did not confirm the expected increased resistance to any antibiotic tested. OprD homologue sequence analysis revealed that this protein actually belongs to an OprD subgroup but is closer to the P. aeruginosa OprQ protein, with which it could share some functions, e.g., allowing bacterial survival under low-iron or -magnesium growth conditions or under poor oxygenation. We thus overexpressed and purified a recombinant OprD homologue protein to further examine its functional properties. As a specific channel, this porin presented rather low single-channel conductance, i.e., 28 pS in 1 M KCl, and was partially closed by micro- and millimolar concentrations of Fe(3+) and Mg(2+), respectively, but not by imipenem and meropenem or basic amino acids. The A. baumannii OprD homologue is likely not involved in the carbapenem resistance mechanism, but as an OprQ-like protein, it could contribute to the adaptation of this bacterium to magnesium- and/or iron-depleted environments.

  9. DETECTING THE RAPIDLY EXPANDING OUTER SHELL OF THE CRAB NEBULA: WHERE TO LOOK

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiang; Ferland, G. J.; Baldwin, J. A.; Loh, E. D.; Richardson, C. T.

    2013-09-10

    We present a range of steady-state photoionization simulations, corresponding to different assumed shell geometries and compositions, of the unseen postulated rapidly expanding outer shell to the Crab Nebula. The properties of the shell are constrained by the mass that must lie within it, and by limits to the intensities of hydrogen recombination lines. In all cases the photoionization models predict very strong emissions from high ionization lines that will not be emitted by the Crab's filaments, alleviating problems with detecting these lines in the presence of light scattered from brighter parts of the Crab. The near-NIR [Ne VI] {lambda}7.652 {mu}m line is a particularly good case; it should be dramatically brighter than the optical lines commonly used in searches. The C IV {lambda}1549 doublet is predicted to be the strongest absorption line from the shell, which is in agreement with Hubble Space Telescope observations. We show that the cooling timescale for the outer shell is much longer than the age of the Crab, due to the low density. This means that the temperature of the shell will actually ''remember'' its initial conditions. However, the recombination time is much shorter than the age of the Crab, so the predicted level of ionization should approximate the real ionization. In any case, it is clear that IR observations present the best opportunity to detect the outer shell and so guide future models that will constrain early events in the original explosion.

  10. Origin of the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J. (Principal Investigator); Boyce, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Our ongoing research program combines extensive deep and wide-field observations using a variety of observational platforms with numerical studies of the dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system in order to advance the main scientific goals of the community studying the Kuiper belt and the outer solar system. These include: (1) determining the relative populations of the known classes of KBOs as well as other possible classes; (2) determining the size distributions or luminosity function of the individual populations or the Kuiper belt as a whole; (3) determining the inclinations distributions of these populations; (4) establishing the radial extent of the Kuiper belt; (5) measuring and relating the physical properties of different types of KBOs to those of other solar system bodies; and, (6) completing our systematic inventory of the satellites of the outer planets.

  11. Chasing shadows in the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Federica

    The characteristics of the populations of objects that inhabit the outer solar system carry the fingerprint of the processes that governed the formation and evolution of the solar system. Occultation surveys push the limit of observation into the very small and distant outer solar system objects, allowing us to set constraints on the structure of the Kuiper belt, Scattered disk and Sedna populations. I collected, reduced, and analyzed vast datasets looking for occultations of stars by outer solar system objects, both working with the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey (TAOS) collaboration and leading the MMT/Megacam occultation effort. Having found no such events in my data, I was able to place upper limits on the Kuiper belt, scattered disk and Sedna population. These limits and their derivation are described here.

  12. MHD processes in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic field measurements from Voyager and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes in the outer heliosphere are reviewed. A bibliography of the experimental and theoretical work concerning magnetic fields and plasmas observed in the outer heliosphere is given. Emphasis in this review is on basic concepts and dynamical processes involving the magnetic field. The theory that serves to explain and unify the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma observations is magnetohydrodynamics. Basic physical processes and observations that relate directly to solutions of the MHD equations are emphasized, but obtaining solutions of this complex system of equations involves various assumptions and approximations. The spatial and temporal complexity of the outer heliosphere and some approaches for dealing with this complexity are discussed.

  13. Anomalous Abundances in Gaseous Nebulae From Recombination and Collisional Lines: Improved Photoionization and Recombination Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anil Kumar; Nahar, S. N.; Eissner, W. B.; Montenegro, M.

    2011-01-01

    A perplexing anomaly arises in the determination of abundances of common elements in gaseous nebulae, as derived from collisionally excited lines (CEL) as opposed to those from Recombination Lines (RCL). The "abundance discrepancy factors" can range from a factor of 2 to an order of magnitude or more. That has led to quite different interpretation of the physical structure and processes in gaseous nebulae, such as temperature fluctuations across the object, or metal-rich concentrations leading to a dual-abundnace scenario. We show that the problem may lie in inaccuracies in photoionization and recombination models neglecting low-energy resonance phenomena due to fine structure. Whereas the atomic physics of electron impact excitation of forbidden lines is well understood, and accurate collision strengths have long been available, that is not generally the case for electron-ion recombination cross sections. A major problem is the inclusion of relativisitic effects as it pertains to the existence of very low-energy fine structure resonances in photoionization cross sections. We carry out new relativistic calculations for photoionization and recombination cross sections using a recently extended version of the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes, and the unified electron-ion recombination method that subsumes both the radiative and the dielectronic recombination (RR and DR) processes in an ab initio and self-consistent manner. We find that near-thresold resonances manifest themselves within fine structure levels of the ground state of ions, enhancing low-temperature recombination rate coefficients at 1000-10,000 K. The resulting enahncement in level-specific and total recombination rate coefficients should therefore lead to reduced abundances derived from RCL, and in accordance with those from CEL. We present results for photoionization of O II into, and recombination from, O III. Theoretical cross sections are benchmarked against high-resolution measurements from synchrotron

  14. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  15. Atom Recombination on Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Chai

    Upon high speed re-entry of the Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO) through the earth's atmosphere, oxygen and nitrogen atoms produced in the shock wave in front of the SSO recombine on the surface of the SSO, releasing heat. To minimize the rise of surface temperature due to the reaction, surface material of the SSO should have a low recombination probability, gamma, of atoms impinging on it. To design such material, it is necessary to understand the mechanism of atom recombination. With this in mind, gamma values were measured for recombination of O, N, and H atoms in a diffusion tube reactor between 700 and 1250 K (HT), 300 and 700 K (MT), and at 194 K (LT) on silica. The rate of recombination was first order with respect to the atom concentration from LT to HT. The Arrhenius plots, gamma vs. 1/T, were very complex. All observations are explained by assuming a surface with a small fraction of active sites that irreversibly bind chemisorbed atoms. Everything happens as if the active sites were surrounded by collection zones within which all atoms striking the surface are adsorbed reversibly with an assumed sticking probability of unity. These atoms then diffuse on the surface. Some of them reach the active sites where they can recombine with the chemisorbed atoms. At LT, all atoms striking the surface reach the active sites. As a result of desorption at MT, the collection zones shrink with increasing temperature. At HT, only atoms striking active sites directly from the gas phase lead to recombination. An analytical solution of the diffusion-reaction problem obtained for a model where the active sites are distributed uniformly fits with the experimental data from LT to HT. The two novel features of this work are the identification of the active sites on silica for recombination of H on silica at HT as surface OH groups and the suggestion that another kind of active site is responsible for recombination of O and N atoms at HT as well as for H atoms at LT and MT. Although

  16. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H.; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM. PMID:26627837

  17. Genome-wide recombination dynamics are associated with phenotypic variation in maize.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qingchun; Li, Lin; Yang, Xiaohong; Tong, Hao; Xu, Shutu; Li, Zhigang; Li, Weiya; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Li, Jiansheng; Yan, Jianbing

    2016-05-01

    Meiotic recombination is a major driver of genetic diversity, species evolution, and agricultural improvement. Thus, an understanding of the genetic recombination landscape across the maize (Zea mays) genome will provide insight and tools for further study of maize evolution and improvement. Here, we used c. 50 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms to precisely map recombination events in 12 artificial maize segregating populations. We observed substantial variation in the recombination frequency and distribution along the ten maize chromosomes among the 12 populations and identified 143 recombination hot regions. Recombination breakpoints were partitioned into intragenic and intergenic events. Interestingly, an increase in the number of genes containing recombination events was accompanied by a decrease in the number of recombination events per gene. This kept the overall number of intragenic recombination events nearly invariable in a given population, suggesting that the recombination variation observed among populations was largely attributed to intergenic recombination. However, significant associations between intragenic recombination events and variation in gene expression and agronomic traits were observed, suggesting potential roles for intragenic recombination in plant phenotypic diversity. Our results provide a comprehensive view of the maize recombination landscape, and show an association between recombination, gene expression and phenotypic variation, which may enhance crop genetic improvement.

  18. Immunological characterization of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Simionatto, Simone; Marchioro, Silvana B; Galli, Vanessa; Brum, Clarice B; Klein, Catia S; Rebelatto, Raquel; Silva, Everton F; Borsuk, Sibele; Conceição, Fabricio R; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2012-03-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the primary pathogen of enzootic pneumonia, is highly prevalent worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. Commercial vaccines are widely used in the control of this disease, however, they provide only partial protection. The aim of this study was to evaluate 34 recombinant proteins of M. hyopneumoniae expressed in Escherichia coli. Antigenic and immunogenic properties of these proteins were analyzed. For this, the proteins were tested against hyperimmune and convalescent pig sera through ELISA and Western blot. Immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was evaluated in BALB/c mice following intramuscular inoculation. Most antigens were able to induce a strong immune response and sera from inoculated mice were able to recognize native proteins by cell ELISA and Western blot. Several recombinant proteins were specifically recognized by convalescent pig sera, indicating they are expressed during infection. These data may help to develop more efficacious vaccines against M. hyopneumoniae.

  19. Transcription and Recombination: When RNA Meets DNA

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Andrés; Gaillard, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    A particularly relevant phenomenon in cell physiology and proliferation is the fact that spontaneous mitotic recombination is strongly enhanced by transcription. The most accepted view is that transcription increases the occurrence of double-strand breaks and/or single-stranded DNA gaps that are repaired by recombination. Most breaks would arise as a consequence of the impact that transcription has on replication fork progression, provoking its stalling and/or breakage. Here, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the cross talk between transcription and recombination, with emphasis on (1) the transcription–replication conflicts as the main source of recombinogenic DNA breaks, and (2) the formation of cotranscriptional R-loops as a major cause of such breaks. The new emerging questions and perspectives are discussed on the basis of the interference between transcription and replication, as well as the way RNA influences genome dynamics. PMID:25085910

  20. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  1. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  2. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  3. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  4. Impact Program: The Outer CMZ C+ Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John

    The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) contains the densest, most turbulent, and highest pressure clouds in our Galaxy. Although the CMZ extends to a radius of R 250 pc from the Galactic Center, most star formation occurs within R 100 pc. The CMZ is asymmetric; more than two-thirds of the dense gas is at positive longitudes while the majority of massive stars traced by compact 24 um emission are at negative longitudes. This program will test the hypothesis that the positive-longitude part of the CMZ up-plane from Sgr B2 is pre-star-forming while the negative longitude portion down-plane from Sgr C is post-starburst and has disrupted its natal clouds. The observations will search for mass outflow from the CMZ starburst regions that could mass-load and fuel the Fermi-LAT bubbles. We will obtain seven strip-maps and target sixty compact 24 um sources in three fields in [CII] with the upGREAT LFA and [NII] and CO with the L1 channel. Field 1 extends from Sgr B2 to longitude l=2 to study the dense complexes at positive longitudes to determine if they are condensing to form future star forming CMZ clouds. Field 2 probes negative longitudes to investigate the nature of the compact 24 micron sources and to determine if massive star feedback had disrupted this portion of the CMZ dense cloud population. Field 3 probes the kinematics of ionized and atomic gas above and below the molecular layer to see if star formation feedback is fueling and mass-loading the Fermi-LAT bubbles. SOFIA upGREAT is the best facility to address these issues. The proposed 35 hour program complements the 20 hours of observations in the ROC by investigating the outer CMZ and its vertical structure to answer fundamental questions about dynamics, the formation and destruction of the dense clouds, the recent star-formation history, the role of feedback, and the origin of the kpc-scale Fermi-LAT bubble.

  5. Diversification of Orientia tsutsugamushi genotypes by intragenic recombination and their potential expansion in endemic areas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwanghun; Ha, Na-Young; Min, Chan-Ki; Kim, Hong-Il; Yen, Nguyen Thi Hai; Lee, Keun-Hwa; Oh, Inbo; Kang, Jae-Seung; Choi, Myung-Sik; Kim, Ik-Sang

    2017-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a mite-borne febrile disease caused by O. tsutsugamushi infection. Recently, emergence of scrub typhus has attracted considerable attention in several endemic countries in Asia and the western Pacific. In addition, the antigenic diversity of the intracellular pathogen has been a serious obstacle for developing effective diagnostics and vaccine. Methodology/Principal findings To understand the evolutionary pathway of genotypic diversification of O. tsutsugamushi and the environmental factors associated with the epidemiological features of scrub typhus, we analyzed sequence data, including spatiotemporal information, of the tsa56 gene encoding a major outer membrane protein responsible for antigenic variation. A total of 324 tsa56 sequences covering more than 85% of its open reading frame were analyzed and classified into 17 genotypes based on phylogenetic relationship. Extensive sequence analysis of tsa56 genes using diverse informatics tools revealed multiple intragenic recombination events, as well as a substantially higher mutation rate than other house-keeping genes. This suggests that genetic diversification occurred via frequent point mutations and subsequent genetic recombination. Interestingly, more diverse bacterial genotypes and dominant vector species prevail in Taiwan compared to other endemic regions. Furthermore, the co-presence of identical and sub-identical clones of tsa56 gene in geographically distant areas implies potential spread of O. tsutsugamushi genotypes. Conclusions/Significance Fluctuation and diversification of vector species harboring O. tsutsugamushi in local endemic areas may facilitate genetic recombination among diverse genotypes. Therefore, careful monitoring of dominant vector species, as well as the prevalence of O. tsutsugamushi genotypes may be advisable to enable proper anticipation of epidemiological changes of scrub typhus. PMID:28248956

  6. Outer membrane vesicles displaying engineered glycotopes elicit protective antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Jenny L.; Huang, Chung-Jr; Endicott, Christine E.; Moeller, Tyler D.; Rasmussen, Jed A.; Fletcher, Joshua R.; Boll, Joseph M.; Rosenthal, Joseph A.; Dobruchowska, Justyna; Wang, Zhirui; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Putnam, David; Trent, M. Stephen; Jones, Bradley D.; DeLisa, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    The O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS) component of lipopolysaccharides on the surface of gram-negative bacteria is both a virulence factor and a B-cell antigen. Antibodies elicited by O-PS often confer protection against infection; therefore, O-PS glycoconjugate vaccines have proven useful against a number of different pathogenic bacteria. However, conventional methods for natural extraction or chemical synthesis of O-PS are technically demanding, inefficient, and expensive. Here, we describe an alternative methodology for producing glycoconjugate vaccines whereby recombinant O-PS biosynthesis is coordinated with vesiculation in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli to yield glycosylated outer membrane vesicles (glycOMVs) decorated with pathogen-mimetic glycotopes. Using this approach, glycOMVs corresponding to eight different pathogenic bacteria were generated. For example, expression of a 17-kb O-PS gene cluster from the highly virulent Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis (type A) strain Schu S4 in hypervesiculating E. coli cells yielded glycOMVs that displayed F. tularensis O-PS. Immunization of BALB/c mice with glycOMVs elicited significant titers of O-PS–specific serum IgG antibodies as well as vaginal and bronchoalveolar IgA antibodies. Importantly, glycOMVs significantly prolonged survival upon subsequent challenge with F. tularensis Schu S4 and provided complete protection against challenge with two different F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (type B) live vaccine strains, thereby demonstrating the vaccine potential of glycOMVs. Given the ease with which recombinant glycotopes can be expressed on OMVs, the strategy described here could be readily adapted for developing vaccines against many other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27274048

  7. Prevention of the Outer Space Weaponization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Gennady P.

    2002-01-01

    9 states. The satellites of various functions (early warning, communication, data acquisition, reconnaissance and navigation) were actively used and continue to be used with the purposes of raising efficiency of ground armed forces, especially in fight against international terrorism. At the same time such satellites are not a weapon in the sense of that word since they do not create the threats of armed attack in outer space or from outer space. Moreover, they promote maintaining of stability in the international relations. For this reason the reconnaissance and data acquisition satellites used for the verification of observance by States of the arms limitation agreements are under international protection as national technical means of the control. Similar protection is enjoyed by the early warning satellites. With the help of space communication facilities the more reliable operative connection of the statesmen is organized in the strained situations. By this way the probability of making of the incorrect retaliatory decisions in critical political situations is reduced. At the same time it's necessary to take into consideration that the activities of such satellite systems are tightly connected with ground armed forces of the states. the earth, what from the point of view of international law may be qualified as establishing a partial demilitarization regime in outer space. After the prohibition of anti-satellite weapons (ASAT) and anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons it will be possible to speak about establishing of an international legal regime of complete demilitarization in outer space eliminating any kinds of weapon from outer space. in a peaceful time. weaponization.The main task of this paper is to analyze and to discuss the present binding regime of the outer space deweaponization and particular measures on consolidation and strengthening of this regime. agreements of the Russian Federation and the USA into multilateral Treaties. Such "immunity" would cover

  8. Recombination in Eukaryotic Single Stranded DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Darren P.; Biagini, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Golden, Michael; Roumagnac, Philippe; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution. PMID:21994803

  9. Recombination in eukaryotic single stranded DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Darren P; Biagini, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Golden, Michael; Roumagnac, Philippe; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-09-01

    Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution.

  10. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history

  11. BIOREACTOR DESIGN - OUTER LOOP LANDFILL, LOUISVILLE, KY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioreactor field demonstration projects are underway at the Outer Loop Landfill in Louisville, KY, USA. The research effort is a cooperative research effort between US EPA and Waste Management Inc. Two primary kinds of municipal waste bioreactors are under study at this site. ...

  12. THE ORBITS OF THE OUTER URANIAN SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Brozovic, M.; Jacobson, R. A.

    2009-04-15

    We report on the numerically integrated orbits for the nine outer Uranian satellites. The orbits are calculated based on fits to the astrometric observations for the period from 1984 to 2006. The results include the state vectors, post-fit residuals, and mean orbital elements. We also assess the accuracy of the orbital fits and discuss the need for future measurements.

  13. The magnetospheres of the outer planets

    SciTech Connect

    Mcnutt, R.L., Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on the magnetospheres of all of the outer planets including Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto is reviewed for the 1987-1990 time period. Particular attention is given to magnetospheric structure, plasma transport, Jovian aurora, Io and the plasma torus, Titan and its magnetospheric interactions, rings and dusty plasmas, magnetospheric convection, and satellite interactions.

  14. Ground Based Studies of the Outer Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, Laurence M.

    2005-01-01

    This report covers progress to date under this grant on our continuing program to conduct ground based studies of the outer solar system planets and satellites, with emphasis on spectroscopy and atmospheric phenomena. The research continues under our new PAST grant, NNG04G131G beginning 5/1/2004. The original period of performance of the subject grant was 3/1/2001 to 2/28/2004, but was extended one year at no cost. Although there is some overlap in the scientific projects conducted during the extended year with those of the new grant, this report is confined to the portion of the work funded under NAG5-10435. The primary goals for this grant period were a comparative study of outer planet thermospheres/ionospheres near solar maximum, extended to the mid-IR, and the investigation of molecular dimers in outer solar system atmospheres. This project supports NASA's planned space missions, Jupiter Polar Orbiter, outer Planet Microprobes, and the recent Cassini flyby of Jupiter. It also supports the OSS strategic plan themes, The Exploration of the Solar System and The Sun-Earth Connection/ Understanding comparative planetary space environments.

  15. [Chemistry in Outer Solar System and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    During the three years of the NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NAG51 1032, we have developed photochemical models for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Io, and extrasolar giant planets. We have compared the Io and outer planet model predictions with various infrared and microwave observations.

  16. Dissociative recombination in planetary ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Ionization in planetary atmospheres can be produced by solar photoionization, photoelectron impact ionization, and, in auroral regions, by impact of precipitating particles. This ionization is lost mainly in dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions. Although atomic ions cannot undergo DR, they can be transformed locally through ion-molecule reactions into molecular ions, or they may be transported vertically or horizontally to regions of the atmosphere where such transformations are possible. Because DR reactions tend to be very exothermic, they can be an important source of kinetically or internally excited fragments. In interplanetary thermospheres, the neutral densities decrease exponentially with altitude. Below the homopause (or turbopause), the atmosphere is assumed to be throughly mixed by convection and/or turbulence. Above the homopause, diffusion is the major transport mechanism, and each species is distributed according to its mass, with the logarithmic derivative of the density with repect to altitude given approximately by -1/H, where H = kT/mg is the scale height. In this expression, T is the neutral temperature, g is the local acceleratiion of gravity, and m is the mass of the species. Thus lighter species become relatively more abundant, and heavier species less abundant, as the altitude increases. This variation of the neutral composition can lead to changes in the ion composition; furthermore, as the neutral densities decrease, dissociative recombination becomes more important relative to ion-neutral reactions as a loss mechanism for molecular ions.

  17. Recombination in viruses: mechanisms, methods of study, and evolutionary consequences.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Arenas, Miguel; Galán, Juan Carlos; Palero, Ferran; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Recombination is a pervasive process generating diversity in most viruses. It joins variants that arise independently within the same molecule, creating new opportunities for viruses to overcome selective pressures and to adapt to new environments and hosts. Consequently, the analysis of viral recombination attracts the interest of clinicians, epidemiologists, molecular biologists and evolutionary biologists. In this review we present an overview of three major areas related to viral recombination: (i) the molecular mechanisms that underlie recombination in model viruses, including DNA-viruses (Herpesvirus) and RNA-viruses (Human Influenza Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus), (ii) the analytical procedures to detect recombination in viral sequences and to determine the recombination breakpoints, along with the conceptual and methodological tools currently used and a brief overview of the impact of new sequencing technologies on the detection of recombination, and (iii) the major areas in the evolutionary analysis of viral populations on which recombination has an impact. These include the evaluation of selective pressures acting on viral populations, the application of evolutionary reconstructions in the characterization of centralized genes for vaccine design, and the evaluation of linkage disequilibrium and population structure.

  18. Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase II is associated with the outer membrane when overexpressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Abdeljabbar, Diya M; Song, Hank J; Link, A James

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose degradation is essential for the future production of many advanced biofuels. Cellulases from the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei are among the most efficient enzymes for the hydrolysis of cellulosic materials. One of the cellulases from T. reesei, cellobiohydrolase II (CBH2), was studied because of its industrial relevance and proven enzymatic activity. Using both crude and rigorous membrane fractionation methods we show that full length T. reesei CBH2 is exclusively localized to the outer membrane when expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli. Even fusing signal sequence-free maltose-binding protein to the N-terminus of CBH2, which has been shown to increase solubility of other proteins, did not prevent the outer membrane localization of CBH2. These results highlight the difficulties in producing fungal cellulases in bacterial hosts and provide a stepping stone for future cellulase engineering efforts.

  19. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt

  20. Production of Recombinant Injectosome and Outer Membrane Proteins from Yersinia Pestis KIM5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    7 2.2 Threat Assessment from WMD ............................................................ 7 2.3 Bacterial Based Biological Weapons (BBBW...Introduction 1.1 Chapter Overview Yersinia pestis, formerly Pasteurella pestis, has long been a blight upon the human species. As the causative agent of...Centers for Disease Control has classified Y. pestis as a Category A Agent (CDC 2009). This bacterial disease is endemic in a large portion of the

  1. An improved recombineering approach by adding RecA to lambda Red recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Sarov, Mihail; Rientjes, Jeanette; Fu, Jun; Hollak, Heike; Kranz, Harald; Xie, Wei; Stewart, A Francis; Zhang, Youming

    2006-01-01

    Recombineering is the use of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli for DNA engineering. Of several approaches, use of the lambda phage Red operon is emerging as the most reliable and flexible. The Red operon includes three components: Redalpha, a 5' to 3' exonuclease, Redbeta, an annealing protein, and Redgamma, an inhibitor of the major E. coli exonuclease and recombination complex, RecBCD. Most E. coli cloning hosts are recA deficient to eliminate recombination and therefore enhance the stability of cloned DNAs. However, loss of RecA also impairs general cellular integrity. Here we report that transient RecA co-expression enhances the total number of successful recombinations in bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), mostly because the E. coli host is more able to survive the stresses of DNA transformation procedures. We combined this practical improvement with the advantages of a temperature-sensitive version of the low copy pSC101 plasmid to develop a protocol that is convenient and more efficient than any recombineering procedure, for use of either double- or single-stranded DNA, published to date.

  2. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  3. The dissociative recombination of ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubé, S.; Lehfaoui, L.; Rowe, B. R.; Mitchell, J. B. A.

    1998-09-01

    The dissociative recombination rate coefficient for 0953-4075/31/18/016/img2 has been measured at 300 K using a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe-mass spectrometer apparatus. A value of 0953-4075/31/18/016/img3 has been found.

  4. Introduction to dissociative recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.; Mitchell, J. Brian A.

    1989-01-01

    Dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions with electrons has important consequences in many areas of physical science. Ab-initio calculations coupled with resonant scattering theory and multichannel quantum defect studies have produced detailed results illuminating the role of ion vibrational excitation, the quantum yields of the DR products, and the role of Rydberg states. The theoretical and experimental results are discussed.

  5. Recombineering linear BACs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingwen; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Recombineering is a powerful genetic engineering technique based on homologous recombination that can be used to accurately modify DNA independent of its sequence or size. One novel application of recombineering is the assembly of linear BACs in E. coli that can replicate autonomously as linear plasmids. A circular BAC is inserted with a short telomeric sequence from phage N15, which is subsequently cut and rejoined by the phage protelomerase enzyme to generate a linear BAC with terminal hairpin telomeres. Telomere-capped linear BACs are protected against exonuclease attack both in vitro and in vivo in E. coli cells and can replicate stably. Here we describe step-by-step protocols to linearize any BAC clone by recombineering, including inserting and screening for presence of the N15 telomeric sequence, linearizing BACs in vivo in E. coli, extracting linear BACs, and verifying the presence of hairpin telomere structures. Linear BACs may be useful for functional expression of genomic loci in cells, maintenance of linear viral genomes in their natural conformation, and for constructing innovative artificial chromosome structures for applications in mammalian and plant cells.

  6. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  7. Rapid outer-surface protein C DNA tattoo vaccination protects against Borrelia afzelii infection.

    PubMed

    Wagemakers, A; Mason, L M K; Oei, A; de Wever, B; van der Poll, T; Bins, A D; Hovius, J W R

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia afzelii is the predominant Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis in Europe. Currently there is no human vaccine against Lyme borreliosis, and most research focuses on recombinant protein vaccines against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. DNA tattooing is a novel vaccination method that can be applied in a rapid vaccination schedule. We vaccinated C3H/HeN mice with B. afzelii strain PKo OspC (outer-surface protein C) using a codon-optimized DNA vaccine tattoo and compared this with recombinant protein vaccination in a 0-2-4 week vaccination schedule. We also assessed protection by DNA tattoo in a 0-3-6 day schedule. DNA tattoo and recombinant OspC vaccination induced comparable total IgG responses, with a lower IgG1/IgG2a ratio after DNA tattoo. Two weeks after syringe-challenge with 5 × 10(5) B. afzelii spirochetes most vaccinated mice had negative B. afzelii tissue DNA loads and all were culture negative. Furthermore, DNA tattoo vaccination in a 0-3-6 day regimen also resulted in negative Borrelia loads and cultures after challenge. To conclude, DNA vaccination by tattoo was fully protective against B. afzelii challenge in mice in a rapid vaccination protocol, and induces a favorable humoral immunity compared to recombinant protein vaccination. Rapid DNA tattoo is a promising vaccination strategy against spirochetes.

  8. The DarkSide-50 outer detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerdale, S.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; D'Angelo, D.; D'Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Foster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K. R.; Hungerford, E. V.; Aldo, Ianni; Andrea, Ianni; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; DSkorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detection experiment searching for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), in Gran Sasso National Laboratory. For experiments like DarkSide-50, neutrons are one of the primary backgrounds that can mimic WIMP signals. The experiment consists of three nested detectors: a liquid argon time projection chamber surrounded by two outer detectors. The outermost detector is a 10 m by 11 m cylindrical water Cherenkov detector with 80 PMTs, designed to provide shielding and muon vetoing. Inside the water Cherenkov detector is the 4 m diameter spherical boron-loaded liquid scintillator veto, with a cocktail of pseudocumene, trimethyl borate, and PPO wavelength shifter, designed to provide shielding, neutron vetoing, and in situ measurements of the TPC backgrounds. We present design and performance details of the DarkSide-50 outer detectors.

  9. Cryovolcanism in the outer solar system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Cryovolcanism is defined as the extrusion of liquids and vapors of materials that would be frozen solid at the planetary surface temperatures of the icy bodies of the outer solar system. Active cryovolcanism is now known to occur on Saturn's moon Enceladus and on Neptune's moon Triton and is suspected on Jupiter's moon Europa, while evidence for past cryovolcanic activity is widespread throughout the outer solar system. This chapter examines the mechanisms and manifestations of cryovolcanism, beginning with a review of the materials that make up these unusual ‘‘magmas’’ and the means by which they might erupt and concluding with a volcanologist's tour of the farthest reaches of the solar system.

  10. The outer mitochondrial membrane in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Owen; van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Daley, Daniel O; Whelan, James

    2013-04-01

    The acquisition and integration of intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria and plastids, were important steps in the emergence of complex multicellular life. Although the outer membranes of these organelles have lost many of the functions of their free-living bacterial ancestor, others were acquired during organellogenesis. To date, the biological roles of these proteins have not been systematically characterized. In this review, we discuss the evolutionary origins and functions of outer membrane mitochondrial (OMM) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our analysis, using phylogenetic inference, indicates that several OMM proteins either acquired novel functional roles or were recruited from other subcellular localizations during evolution in Arabidopsis. These observations suggest the existence of novel communication routes and functions between organelles within plant cells.

  11. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüster, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  12. Outer spiral structure in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsis, P. A.

    2017-03-01

    In several grand design barred-spiral galaxies it is observed a second, fainter, outer set of spiral arms. Typical examples of objects of this morphology can be considered NGC 1566 and NGC 5248. I suggest that such an overall structure can be the result of two dynamical mechanisms acting in the disc. The bar and both spiral systems rotate with the same pattern speed. The inner spiral is reinforced by regular orbits trapped around the stable, elliptical, periodic orbits of the central family, while the outer system of spiral arms is supported by chaotic orbits. Chaotic orbits are also responsible for a rhomboidal area surrounding the inner barred-spiral region. In general there is a discontinuity between the two spiral structures at the corotation region.

  13. Evidence for an oxygen-depleted liquid outer core of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haijun; Fei, Yingwei; Cai, Lingcang; Jing, Fuqian; Hu, Xiaojun; Xie, Hongsen; Zhang, Lianmeng; Gong, Zizheng

    2011-11-23

    On the basis of geophysical observations, cosmochemical constraints, and high-pressure experimental data, the Earth's liquid outer core consists of mainly liquid iron alloyed with about ten per cent (by weight) of light elements. Although the concentrations of the light elements are small, they nevertheless affect the Earth's core: its rate of cooling, the growth of the inner core, the dynamics of core convection, and the evolution of the geodynamo. Several light elements-including sulphur, oxygen, silicon, carbon and hydrogen-have been suggested, but the precise identity of the light elements in the Earth's core is still unclear. Oxygen has been proposed as a major light element in the core on the basis of cosmochemical arguments and chemical reactions during accretion. Its presence in the core has direct implications for Earth accretion conditions of oxidation state, pressure and temperature. Here we report new shockwave data in the Fe-S-O system that are directly applicable to the outer core. The data include both density and sound velocity measurements, which we compare with the observed density and velocity profiles of the liquid outer core. The results show that we can rule out oxygen as a major light element in the liquid outer core because adding oxygen into liquid iron would not reproduce simultaneously the observed density and sound velocity profiles of the outer core. An oxygen-depleted core would imply a more reduced environment during early Earth accretion.

  14. Differential Rotation within the Earth's Outer Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hide, R.; Boggs, D. H.; Dickey, J. O.

    1998-01-01

    Non-steady differential rotation drive by bouyancy forces within the Earth's liquid outer core (OC) plays a key role not only in the generation of the main geomagnetic field by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo process but also in the excitation of irregular fluctuations in the angular speed of rotation of the overlying solid mantle, as evidenced by changes in the length of the day (LOD) on decadal and longer timescales (1-8).

  15. Ocean worlds in the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2016-08-01

    Many outer solar system bodies are thought to harbor liquid water oceans beneath their ice shells. This article first reviews how such oceans are detected. We then discuss how they are maintained, when they formed, and what the oceans' likely characteristics are. We focus in particular on Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, Titan, and Enceladus, bodies for which there is direct evidence of subsurface oceans. We also consider candidate ocean worlds such as Pluto and Triton.

  16. Planetary magnetism in the outer solar system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonett, C. P.

    1973-01-01

    A brief review of the salient considerations which apply to the existence of magnetic fields in connection with planetary and subplanetary objects in the outer solar system is given. Consideration is given to internal dynamo fields, fields which might originate from interaction with the solar wind or magnetospheres (externally driven dynamos) and lastly fossil magnetic fields such as have been discovered on the moon. Where possible, connection is made between magnetism, means of detection, and internal body properties.

  17. Photopolarimetry team outer planets mission definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The work is reported of the Photopolarimetry Team in identifying scientific objectives for photometer/polarimeter experiments for outer planet flyby missions. A discussion of the scientific objectives which can be attained with a photometer/polarimeter experiment, and summaries of the special studies which were performed for the Photopolarimetry Team are presented along with a description of the photometer/polarimeter design which was developed for the Meteoroid Detection Team.

  18. A model environment for outer zone electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singley, G. W.; Vette, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    A brief morphology of outer zone electrons is given to illustrate the nature of the phenomena that we are attempting to model. This is followed by a discussion of the data processing that was done with the various data received from the experimenters before incorporating it into the data base from which this model was ultimately derived. The details of the derivation are given, and several comparisons of the final model with the various experimental measurements are presented.

  19. A photometric survey of outer belt asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimartino, M.; Gonano-Beurer, M.; Mottola, Stefano; Neukum, G.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1989, we have been conducting a research program devoted to the study of the Trojans and outer belt asteroids (Hilda and Cybele groups), in order to characterize their rotational properties and shapes. As an outcome of several observational campaigns, we determined rotational periods and lightcurve amplitudes for 23 distant asteroids, using both CCD and photoelectric photometry. In this paper, we compare the rotational properties of main belt asteroids and Trojans, based on the preliminary results of this survey.

  20. Outer membrane proteins of pathogenic spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul A.; Haake, David A.; Adler, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are the causative agents of several important diseases including syphilis, Lyme disease, leptospirosis, swine dysentery, periodontal disease and some forms of relapsing fever. Spirochetal bacteria possess two membranes and the proteins present in the outer membrane are at the site of interaction with host tissue and the immune system. This review describes the current knowledge in the field of spirochetal outer membrane protein (OMP) biology. What is known concerning biogenesis and structure of OMPs, with particular regard to the atypical signal peptide cleavage sites observed amongst the spirochetes, is discussed. We examine the functions that have been determined for several spirochetal OMPs including those that have been demonstrated to function as adhesins, porins or to have roles in complement resistance. A detailed description of the role of spirochetal OMPs in immunity, including those that stimulate protective immunity or that are involved in antigenic variation, is given. A final section is included which covers experimental considerations in spirochetal outer membrane biology. This section covers contentious issues concerning cellular localization of putative OMPs, including determination of surface exposure. A more detailed knowledge of spirochetal OMP biology will hopefully lead to the design of new vaccines and a better understanding of spirochetal pathogenesis. PMID:15449605

  1. CLOSURE WELD DEVELOPMENT FOR 3013 OUTER CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Howard, S.; Peterson, K.; Stokes, M.

    2009-11-10

    Excess plutonium materials in the DOE complex are packaged and stored in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies requirements for the stabilization of such materials and subsequent packaging in dual nested seal-welded containers. Austenitic stainless steels have been selected for container fabrication. The inner 3013 container provides contamination control while the outer 3013 container is the primary containment vessel and is the focus of this paper. Each packaging site chose a process for seal welding the outer 3013 containers in accordance with its needs and expertise. The two processes chosen for weld closure were laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Following development efforts, each system was qualified in accordance with DOE-STD-3013 prior to production use. The 3013 outer container closure weld joint was designed to accommodate the characteristics of a laser weld. This aspect of the joint design necessitated some innovative process and equipment considerations in the application of the GTAW process. Details of the weld requirements and the development processes are presented and several potential enhancements for the GTAW system are described.

  2. Imaging of the outer planets and satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, B. C.

    1973-01-01

    Imaging is the most widely applicable single means of exploring the outer planets and their satellites and also complements other planet-oriented instruments. Photography of Jupiter from terrestrial telescopes has revealed features which were neither predictable or predicted. Close-up imaging from fly-bys and orbiters affords the opportunity for discovery of atmospheric phenomena on the outer planets forever beyond the reach of terrestrial laboratories and intuition. On the other hand, a large number of specific applications of close-up imaging to study the giant planets are suggested by experience in photography from Earth and Mars orbit, and by ground-based telescopic studies of Jupiter and Saturn. The satellites of the outer planets actually constitute three distinct classes: lunar-sized objects, asteroidal-sized objects, and particulate rings. Imaging promises to be the primary observational tool for each category with results that could impact scientific thinking in the late 70's and 80's as significantly as has close-up photography of Mars and the Moon in the last 10 yr.

  3. Outer membrane proteome and antigens of Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Veith, Paul D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Tan, Yan; Djatmiko, Deasy C; Dashper, Stuart G; Reynolds, Eric C

    2009-09-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative, anaerobic, fusiform bacterium implicated as a periodontal pathogen. With use of 2D PAGE, SDS PAGE, and LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, 221 proteins of T. forsythia outer membrane preparations were identified, of which 197 were predicted to be localized to the cell envelope. Fifty-six proteins were reproducibly mapped by 2D PAGE and included several highly abundant proteins in the MW range 140-250 kDa that exhibited C-terminal sequence similarity to the CTD family of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Two-dimensional Western blot analyses revealed that these CTD family proteins together with several other outer membrane proteins were antigenic. The CTD family proteins exhibited a higher than expected MW, and were strongly reactive with the fluorescent glycoprotein stain, ProQ Emerald. This group included BspA and surface layer proteins A and B. TonB-dependent receptors (TDRs) (46) were identified together with 28 putative lipoproteins whose genes are immediately downstream of a TDR gene. The major OmpA-like protein was found to be TF1331. Uniquely, it was found to exist as a homodimer held together by up to three disulfide bridges as demonstrated by MS/MS of a tryptic peptide derived from unreduced TF1331.

  4. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  5. Evidence of Recombination in Intrapatient Populations of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sentandreu, Vicente; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Torres-Puente, Manuela; Bracho, María Alma; Valero, Ana; Gosalbes, María José; Ortega, Enrique; Moya, Andrés; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide and a potential cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in the future. HCV is characterized by a high level of genetic heterogeneity. Although homologous recombination has been demonstrated in many members of the family Flaviviridae, to which HCV belongs, there are only a few studies reporting recombination on natural populations of HCV, suggesting that these events are rare in vivo. Furthermore, these few studies have focused on recombination between different HCV genotypes/subtypes but there are no reports on the extent of intra-genotype or intra-subtype recombination between viral strains infecting the same patient. Given the important implications of recombination for RNA virus evolution, our aim in this study has been to assess the existence and eventually the frequency of intragenic recombination on HCV. For this, we retrospectively have analyzed two regions of the HCV genome (NS5A and E1-E2) in samples from two different groups: (i) patients infected only with HCV (either treated with interferon plus ribavirin or treatment naïve), and (ii) HCV-HIV co-infected patients (with and without treatment against HIV). The complete data set comprised 17712 sequences from 136 serum samples derived from 111 patients. Recombination analyses were performed using 6 different methods implemented in the program RDP3. Recombination events were considered when detected by at least 3 of the 6 methods used and were identified in 10.7% of the amplified samples, distributed throughout all the groups described and the two genomic regions studied. The resulting recombination events were further verified by detailed phylogenetic analyses. The complete experimental procedure was applied to an artificial mixture of relatively closely viral populations and the ensuing analyses failed to reveal artifactual recombination. From these results we conclude that recombination should be considered as a potentially

  6. Heterogeneity in the Frequency and Characteristics of Homologous Recombination in Pneumococcal Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hanage, William P.; Harris, Simon R.; Bentley, Stephen; Fraser, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is one of the most important human bacterial pathogens, and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pneumococcus is also known for undergoing extensive homologous recombination via transformation with exogenous DNA. It has been shown that recombination has a major impact on the evolution of the pathogen, including acquisition of antibiotic resistance and serotype-switching. Nevertheless, the mechanism and the rates of recombination in an epidemiological context remain poorly understood. Here, we proposed several mathematical models to describe the rate and size of recombination in the evolutionary history of two very distinct pneumococcal lineages, PMEN1 and CC180. We found that, in both lineages, the process of homologous recombination was best described by a heterogeneous model of recombination with single, short, frequent replacements, which we call micro-recombinations, and rarer, multi-fragment, saltational replacements, which we call macro-recombinations. Macro-recombination was associated with major phenotypic changes, including serotype-switching events, and thus was a major driver of the diversification of the pathogen. We critically evaluate biological and epidemiological processes that could give rise to the micro-recombination and macro-recombination processes. PMID:24786281

  7. Heterogeneity in the frequency and characteristics of homologous recombination in pneumococcal evolution.

    PubMed

    Mostowy, Rafal; Croucher, Nicholas J; Hanage, William P; Harris, Simon R; Bentley, Stephen; Fraser, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is one of the most important human bacterial pathogens, and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pneumococcus is also known for undergoing extensive homologous recombination via transformation with exogenous DNA. It has been shown that recombination has a major impact on the evolution of the pathogen, including acquisition of antibiotic resistance and serotype-switching. Nevertheless, the mechanism and the rates of recombination in an epidemiological context remain poorly understood. Here, we proposed several mathematical models to describe the rate and size of recombination in the evolutionary history of two very distinct pneumococcal lineages, PMEN1 and CC180. We found that, in both lineages, the process of homologous recombination was best described by a heterogeneous model of recombination with single, short, frequent replacements, which we call micro-recombinations, and rarer, multi-fragment, saltational replacements, which we call macro-recombinations. Macro-recombination was associated with major phenotypic changes, including serotype-switching events, and thus was a major driver of the diversification of the pathogen. We critically evaluate biological and epidemiological processes that could give rise to the micro-recombination and macro-recombination processes.

  8. The recombination epoch revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, Julian H.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies of cosmological recombination have shown that this process produces as a by-product a highly superthermal population of Ly-alpha photons which retard completion of recombination. Cosmological redshifting was thought to determine the frequency distribution of the photons, while two-photon decay of hydrogen's 2s state was thought to control their numbers. It is shown here that frequency diffusion due to photon scattering dominate the cosmological redshift in the frequency range near line center which fixes the ratio of ground state to excited state population, while incoherent scattering into the far-red damping wing effectively destroys Ly-alpha photons as a rate which is competitive with two-photon decay. The former effect tends to hold back recombination, while the latter tends to accelerate it; the net results depends on cosmological parameters, particularly the combination Omega(b) h/sq rt (2q0), where Omega(b) is the fraction of the critical density provided by baryons.

  9. Cell biology of mitotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-03-02

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect to capacity of homologous recombination.

  10. Cell Biology of Mitotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect to capacity of homologous recombination. PMID:25731763

  11. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas,...

  12. Protective immunity induced by the vaccination of recombinant Proteus mirabilis OmpA expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongbing; Yang, Shifa; Dai, Xiumei; Liu, Liping; Jiang, Xiaodong; Shao, Mingxu; Chi, Shanshan; Wang, Chuanwen; Yu, Cuilian; Wei, Kai; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis) is a zoonotic pathogen that has recently presented a rising infection rate in the poultry industry. To develop an effective vaccine to protect chickens against P. mirabilis infection, OmpA, one of the major outer membrane proteins of P. mirabilis, was expressed in Pichia pastoris. The concentration of the expressed recombinant OmpA protein reached 8.0μg/mL after induction for 96h with 1.0% methanol in the culture. In addition, OmpA protein was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis using the antibody against Escherichia coli-expressed OmpA protein. Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide, a known plant-derived adjuvant, was mixed into the recombinant OmpA protein to prepare the OmpA subunit vaccine. We then subcutaneously inoculated this vaccine into chickens to examine the immunoprotective effects. ELISA analysis indicated that an excellent antibody response against OmpA was elicited in the vaccinated chickens. Moreover, a high protection rate of 80.0% was observed in the vaccinated group, which was subsequently challenged with P. mirabilis. The results suggest that the eukaryotic P. mirabilis OmpA was an ideal candidate protein for developing an effective subunit vaccine against P. mirabilis infection.

  13. Recombination and microdiversity in coastal marine cyanophages.

    PubMed

    Marston, Marcia F; Amrich, Christopher G

    2009-11-01

    Genetic exchange is an important process in bacteriophage evolution. Here, we examine the role of homologous recombination in the divergence of closely related cyanophage isolates from natural marine populations. Four core-viral genes (coliphage T4 homologues g20, g23, g43 and a putative tail fibre gene) and four viral-encoded bacterial-derived genes (psbA, psbD, cobS and phoH) were analysed for 60 cyanophage isolates belonging to five Rhode Island Myovirus (RIM) strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the 60 concatenated sequences revealed well-resolved sequence clusters corresponding to the RIM strain designations. Viral isolates within a strain shared an average nucleotide identity of 99.3-99.8%. Nevertheless, extensive microdiversity was observed within each cyanophage strain; only three of the 60 isolates shared the same nucleotide haplotype. Microdiversity was generated by point mutations, homologous recombination within a strain, and intragenic recombination between RIM strains. Intragenic recombination events between distinct RIM strains were detected most often in host-derived photosystem II psbA and psbD genes, but were also identified in some major capsid protein g23 genes. Within a strain, more variability was observed at the psbA locus than at any of the other seven loci. Although most of the microdiversity within a strain was neutral, some amino acid substitutions were identified, and thus microdiversity within strains has the potential to influence the population dynamics of viral-host interactions.

  14. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination.

  15. Recombinant CBM-fusion technology - Applications overview.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Carvalho, Vera; Domingues, Lucília; Gama, Francisco M

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are small components of several enzymes, which present an independent fold and function, and specific carbohydrate-binding activity. Their major function is to bind the enzyme to the substrate enhancing its catalytic activity, especially in the case of insoluble substrates. The immense diversity of CBMs, together with their unique properties, has long raised their attention for many biotechnological applications. Recombinant DNA technology has been used for cloning and characterizing new CBMs. In addition, it has been employed to improve the purity and availability of many CBMs, but mainly, to construct bi-functional CBM-fused proteins for specific applications. This review presents a comprehensive summary of the uses of CBMs recombinantly produced from heterologous organisms, or by the original host, along with the latest advances. Emphasis is given particularly to the applications of recombinant CBM-fusions in: (a) modification of fibers, (b) production, purification and immobilization of recombinant proteins, (c) functionalization of biomaterials and (d) development of microarrays and probes.

  16. Replication and recombination factors contributing to recombination-dependent bypass of DNA lesions by template switch.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Fabio; Fumasoni, Marco; Szakal, Barnabas; Maloisel, Laurent; Branzei, Dana

    2010-11-11

    Damage tolerance mechanisms mediating damage-bypass and gap-filling are crucial for genome integrity. A major damage tolerance pathway involves recombination and is referred to as template switch. Template switch intermediates were visualized by 2D gel electrophoresis in the proximity of replication forks as X-shaped structures involving sister chromatid junctions. The homologous recombination factor Rad51 is required for the formation/stabilization of these intermediates, but its mode of action remains to be investigated. By using a combination of genetic and physical approaches, we show that the homologous recombination factors Rad55 and Rad57, but not Rad59, are required for the formation of template switch intermediates. The replication-proficient but recombination-defective rfa1-t11 mutant is normal in triggering a checkpoint response following DNA damage but is impaired in X-structure formation. The Exo1 nuclease also has stimulatory roles in this process. The checkpoint kinase, Rad53, is required for X-molecule formation and phosphorylates Rad55 robustly in response to DNA damage. Although Rad55 phosphorylation is thought to activate recombinational repair under conditions of genotoxic stress, we find that Rad55 phosphomutants do not affect the efficiency of X-molecule formation. We also examined the DNA polymerase implicated in the DNA synthesis step of template switch. Deficiencies in translesion synthesis polymerases do not affect X-molecule formation, whereas DNA polymerase δ, required also for bulk DNA synthesis, plays an important role. Our data indicate that a subset of homologous recombination factors, together with DNA polymerase δ, promote the formation of template switch intermediates that are then preferentially dissolved by the action of the Sgs1 helicase in association with the Top3 topoisomerase rather than resolved by Holliday Junction nucleases. Our results allow us to propose the choreography through which different players contribute to

  17. Peaceful Use of Outer Space: principles of Japanese Policies on Utilization and Activities in Outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuge, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    " P e aceful use of outer space of outer space.....Principles of exploitation of outer space was passed in the Japanese Diet. It clearly mentioned that any activity of launching space object into outer space and developing launching rocket should be exclusively for peaceful purpose. NASDA was also established based upon the same principles of the public law. Japanese interpretation of Space Treaty and other related international agreements has been more strict on peaceful use of outer space, like non-military use rather than non-aggressive, because of influence of Japanese Constitution. Treaty and other agreements is analyzed through rapid development of its space activities, technologies and international cooperation with other space powers. Through more than thirty years experiences in space activities in public and private sectors, Japanese domestic laws and policies have not been changed in relation with basic principles. and laws relating to space activities in order to develop new space law and more international cooperation for space utilization rather than military use in new century.

  18. Comparison of marine productivity among Outer Continental Shelf planning areas

    SciTech Connect

    Darnell, R.M.

    1991-04-01

    Continental Shelf Associates was contracted to update and expand an earlier work on a comparison of primary productivity among Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) planning areas. The update consists of four general objectives. This report addresses the fourth objective, the potential to use measures of marine secondary productivity in determining relative rankings of the OCS planning area. Ideally, comparisons of secondary productivity among diverse geographic areas would take an ecosystem perspective. However, there is not enough ecosystem-level understanding to allow a comparison on that basis. The report focuses on individual species and group of species. Zooplankton and benthic communities represent major portions of the marine ecosystems and would be the preferred subjects for comparative studies. At this time comparisons of secondary productivity among planning areas would be difficult with existing databases. It is unlikely this situation will improve in the near future.

  19. Diversity of Debris Disks - Constraining the Disk Outer Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Smith, Paul; Su, Kate

    2008-03-01

    Existing Spitzer observations of debris disks show a wide range of diversity in disk morphologies and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The majority of debris disks observed with Spitzer are not resolved, resulting in very few direct constraints on disk extent. In general, SEDs alone have little diagnostic power beyond some basic statistics. However, as demonstrated by some Spitzer observations of nearby systems (beta Leo and gamma Oph), the spectra of the excess emission in the IRS and MIPS-SED wavelength range can help to put tighter constraints on disk properties such as minimum/maximum grain sizes and inner/outer disk radii. The dust continuum slopes are very useful to differentiate between various disk structures and constrain the dust mass. We need to study sufficient numbers of disks to explore their characteristics systematically. Therefore, we propose to obtain MIPS-SED observations of 27 debris disks that already have IRS-LL spectra and MIPS 24 and 70 micron photometry.

  20. The outer mucus layer hosts a distinct intestinal microbial niche

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; Limenitakis, Julien P.; Fuhrer, Tobias; Geuking, Markus B.; Lawson, Melissa A.; Wyss, Madeleine; Brugiroux, Sandrine; Keller, Irene; Macpherson, Jamie A.; Rupp, Sandra; Stolp, Bettina; Stein, Jens V.; Stecher, Bärbel; Sauer, Uwe; McCoy, Kathy D.; Macpherson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The overall composition of the mammalian intestinal microbiota varies between individuals: within each individual there are differences along the length of the intestinal tract related to host nutrition, intestinal motility and secretions. Mucus is a highly regenerative protective lubricant glycoprotein sheet secreted by host intestinal goblet cells; the inner mucus layer is nearly sterile. Here we show that the outer mucus of the large intestine forms a unique microbial niche with distinct communities, including bacteria without specialized mucolytic capability. Bacterial species present in the mucus show differential proliferation and resource utilization compared with the same species in the intestinal lumen, with high recovery of bioavailable iron and consumption of epithelial-derived carbon sources according to their genome-encoded metabolic repertoire. Functional competition for existence in this intimate layer is likely to be a major determinant of microbiota composition and microbial molecular exchange with the host. PMID:26392213

  1. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  2. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay. 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay. The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  3. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay. 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay. The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  4. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  5. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  6. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  7. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  8. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  9. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  10. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  11. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  12. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  13. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  14. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  15. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  16. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  17. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  18. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  19. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  20. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  1. Recombineering: genetic engineering in bacteria using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Lynn C; Sawitzke, James A; Li, Xintian; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2014-04-14

    The bacterial chromosome and bacterial plasmids can be engineered in vivo by homologous recombination using PCR products and synthetic oligonucleotides as substrates. This is possible because bacteriophage-encoded recombination proteins efficiently recombine sequences with homologies as short as 35 to 50 bases. Recombineering allows DNA sequences to be inserted or deleted without regard to location of restriction sites. This unit first describes preparation of electrocompetent cells expressing the recombineering functions and their transformation with dsDNA or ssDNA. It then presents support protocols that describe several two-step selection/counter-selection methods of making genetic alterations without leaving any unwanted changes in the targeted DNA, and a method for retrieving onto a plasmid a genetic marker (cloning by retrieval) from the Escherichia coli chromosome or a co-electroporated DNA fragment. Additional protocols describe methods to screen for unselected mutations, removal of the defective prophage from recombineering strains, and other useful techniques.

  2. The Young Outer Disk of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M K >= -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages <=1 Gyr. The specific star formation rate (SFR) during the past few Gyr estimated from AGB star counts is consistent with that computed from mid-infrared observations of star clusters at similar radii, and it is concluded that the disruption timescale for star clusters in the outer disk is Lt1 Gyr. The LF and specific frequency of AGB stars vary with galactocentric radius, in a manner that is indicative of lower luminosity-weighted ages at larger radii. Modest numbers of red supergiants are also found, indicating that there has been star formation during the past 100 Myr, while the ratio of C stars to M giants is consistent with that expected for a solar metallicity system that has experienced a constant SFR for the past few Gyr. The results drawn from the properties of resolved AGB stars are broadly consistent with those deduced from integrated light observations in the UV. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a co-operative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council of Canada (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), the Ministerio da Ciencia e Technologia (Brazil), and the Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion Productiva (Argentina).

  3. Dark matter in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.; Cruikshank, D.; De Bergh, C.; Geballe, T.

    1994-01-01

    There are now a large number of small bodies in the outer solar system that are known to be covered with dark material. Attempts to identify that material have been thwarted by the absence of discrete absorption features in the reflection spectra of these planetesimals. An absorption at 2.2 micrometers that appeared to be present in several objects has not been confirmed by new observations. Three absorptions in the spectrum of the unusually red planetesimal 5145 Pholus are well-established, but their identity remains a mystery.

  4. Overview of 2008 Outer Planet Flagship Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reh, Kim R.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the process involved in the Phase-2 studies for the next Outer Planets Flagship (OPF). These studies will be a cooperative effort with ESA and JAXA in partnership with NASA. The annoucement of oppurtunity (AO) for the science instruments and the launch approval/planetary protection processes are reviewed. There is also discussion about capturing relevant lessons from the Cassini team, supporting international collaboration, and support for science definition teams. Some mission specific tasks are also reviewed, for the three missions being proposed: (1) Europa Explorer, (2) Jupiter System Observer and (3) Titan Explorer. A timeline for the studies is also included.

  5. Meridional plasma flow in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarus, A. J.; Yedidia, B.; Villanueva, L.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.; Belcher, J. W.; Villante, U.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1988-01-01

    Voyager 2 observations made in the outer heliosphere near 25 AU and within 2 deg of the heliographic equatorial plane show periodic variations in the meridional (North/South) flow velocities that are much more prominent than the East/West variations. An autocorrelation analysis shows that the flow variation has a period of about 25.5 days in the latter half of 1986, in approximate agreement with the solar rotation period. The results suggest that increased pressure in interaction regions remains the best candidate for the driver of the nonradial flows.

  6. Dishwasher For Earth Or Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tromble, Jon D.

    1991-01-01

    Dishwashing machine cleans eating utensils in either Earth gravity or zero gravity of outer space. Cycle consists of three phases: filling, washing, and draining. Rotation of tub creates artificial gravity aiding recirculation of water during washing phase in absence of true gravity. Centrifugal air/water separator helps system function in zero gravity. Self-cleaning filter contains interdigitating blades catching solid debris when water flows between them. Later, blades moved back and forth in scissor-like manner to dislodge debris, removed by backflow of water.

  7. Outer atmospheres of giant and supergiant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of the chromospheres, transition regions and coronas of cool evolved stars are reviewed based primarily on recent ultraviolet and X-ray studies. Determinations of mass loss rates using new observational techniques in the ultraviolet and radio spectral regions are discussed and observations indicating general atmospheric motions are considered. The techniques available for the quantitative modeling of these atmospheres are outlined and recent results discussed. Finally, the current rudimentary understanding of the evolution of these outer atmospheres and its causes are considered.

  8. The heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans: relationship to OmpA proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M E

    1991-01-01

    The outer membrane of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans contains a 29-kDa protein which exhibits heat modifiability on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and represents a major target for immunoglobulin G antibody in sera of periodontitis patients colonized by this organism. In the present study, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 29-kDa outer membrane protein was determined and compared with reported sequences for other known proteins. The heat-modifiable outer membrane protein of A. actinomycetemcomitans was found to exhibit significant N-terminal homology with the OmpA proteins of other gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, this protein reacted with antiserum raised against the purified OmpA protein of Escherichia coli K-12. Whether the heat-modifiable OMP of A. actinomycetemcomitans also shares functional properties of OmpA proteins, particularly with respect to bacteriophage receptor activity, is presently under investigation. Images PMID:2050416

  9. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  10. Atmospheric entry probes for outer planet exploration. Outer planet entry probe technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of unmanned space probes for investigating the conditions existing on and around the outer planets of the solar system is discussed. The subjects included in the report are: (1) the design of a common entry probe for outer planet missions, (2) the significant trades related to the development of a common probe design, (3) the impact of bus selection on probe design, (4) the impact of probe requirements on bus modifications, and (5) the key technology elements recommended for advanced development. Drawings and illustrations of typical probes are included to show the components and systems used in the space probes.

  11. Homologous recombination drives both sequence diversity and gene content variation in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying; Ma, Jennifer H; Warren, Keisha; Tsang, Raymond S W; Low, Donald E; Jamieson, Frances B; Alexander, David C; Hao, Weilong

    2013-01-01

    The study of genetic and phenotypic variation is fundamental for understanding the dynamics of bacterial genome evolution and untangling the evolution and epidemiology of bacterial pathogens. Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is among the most intriguing bacterial pathogens in genomic studies due to its dynamic population structure and complex forms of pathogenicity. Extensive genomic variation within identical clonal complexes (CCs) in Nm has been recently reported and suggested to be the result of homologous recombination, but the extent to which recombination contributes to genomic variation within identical CCs has remained unclear. In this study, we sequenced two Nm strains of identical serogroup (C) and multi-locus sequence type (ST60), and conducted a systematic analysis with an additional 34 Nm genomes. Our results revealed that all gene content variation between the two ST60 genomes was introduced by homologous recombination at the conserved flanking genes, and 94.25% or more of sequence divergence was caused by homologous recombination. Recombination was found in genes associated with virulence factors, antigenic outer membrane proteins, and vaccine targets, suggesting an important role of homologous recombination in rapidly altering the pathogenicity and antigenicity of Nm. Recombination was also evident in genes of the restriction and modification systems, which may undermine barriers to DNA exchange. In conclusion, homologous recombination can drive both gene content variation and sequence divergence in Nm. These findings shed new light on the understanding of the rapid pathoadaptive evolution of Nm and other recombinogenic bacterial pathogens.

  12. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.; Grin, Daniel

    2010-12-15

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-{alpha} line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, we compute the impact of some radiative transfer effects that were previously ignored, or for which previous treatments were incomplete. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-{alpha} line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-{alpha} line blueward of the hydrogen line is investigated with an analytic approximation. It is shown that both effects are negligible during cosmological hydrogen recombination. Second, the importance of high-lying, nonoverlapping Lyman transitions is assessed. It is shown that escape from lines above Ly{gamma} and frequency diffusion in Ly{beta} and higher lines can be neglected without loss of accuracy. Third, a formalism generalizing the Sobolev approximation is developed to account for the overlap of the high-lying Lyman lines, which is shown to lead to negligible changes to the recombination history. Finally, the possibility of a cosmological hydrogen recombination maser is investigated. It is shown that there is no such maser in the purely radiative treatment presented here.

  13. Outer-rise stress regime post 2004 mega-thrust rupture: Constraints from source process of selected Sumatra - Andaman outer-rise earthquakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnest, A.; K, S.

    2014-12-01

    The outer-rise region of a subducting margin will be in a compressional state prior to a megathrust event and in a tensional state afterwards due to the large co-seismic displacements. In coupled subduction zones, tensional earthquakes are occasionally observed post a megathrust rupture, as tensional stress from slab pull is temporarily transmitted to the outer-rise. In this study we analyze some of the significant outer-rise events along the Sumatra-Andaman margin post 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, like those occurred on January 2005 (Mw=6.5), July 2005 (Mw=7.1), August 2009 (Mw=7.5 ), March 2010 (Mw=6.6) and June 2010 (Mw=7.5). We will be discussing the source parameters,kinematic rupture process, directivity and the average stress drop of these events which are derived using seismic body wave inversion. We adopted teleseismic body wave inversion methodology of Kikuchi and Kanamori (1982, 1986 and 1991). We will be discussing the stress drop patterns and a possible asperity model for this margin and compare with other major outer-rise events post Tohoku-Oki (2011) and Maule (2010) events. The stress regimes inferred from the P & T axis orientations and its temporal evolution from inter-seismic to post-seismic phase also will be discussed.

  14. Environments in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Iess, L.; Lainey, V.; Cassidy, T. A.; Burger, M.; Sotin, C.; Neubauer, F.

    2010-06-01

    The outer planets of our solar system Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are fascinating objects on their own. Their intrinsic magnetic fields form magnetic environments (so called magnetospheres) in which charged and neutral particles and dust are produced, lost or being transported through the system. These magnetic environments of the gas giants can be envisaged as huge plasma laboratories in space in which electromagnetic waves, current systems, particle transport mechanisms, acceleration processes and other phenomena act and interact with the large number of moons in orbit around those massive planets. In general it is necessary to describe and study the global environments (magnetospheres) of the gas giants, its global configuration with its large-scale transport processes; and, in combination, to study the local environments of the moons as well, e.g. the interaction processes between the magnetospheric plasma and the exosphere/atmosphere/magnetosphere of the moon acting on time scales of seconds to days. These local exchange processes include also the gravity, shape, rotation, astrometric observations and orbital parameters of the icy moons in those huge systems. It is the purpose of this chapter of the book to describe the variety of the magnetic environments of the outer planets in a broad overview, globally and locally, and to show that those exchange processes can dramatically influence the surfaces and exospheres/atmospheres of the moons and they can also be used as a tool to study the overall physics of systems as a whole.

  15. OSSOS: The Outer Solar System Origins Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladman, Brett; Bannister, Michele; Kavelaars, Jj; Petit, Jean-Marc; Gwyn, Stephen; Chen, Ying-Tung

    2014-11-01

    We present the first detection set from the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS) which is a mammoth 560-hour CFHT Large Program over 4 years (finishing January 2017). This is likely to be the largest Kuiper Belt survey before LSST comes on line (in terms of the number of precise transneptunian object (TNO) orbits it provides).OSSOS studies gradually-slewing 21-square degree blocks of sky that are repeatedly imaged in many dark runs over two semesters. This strategy is designed to detect and track TNOs in order to provide extremely high-quality orbits in a short amount of time; in 16-18 month arcs we are obtaining fractional semimajor axis uncertainties in the range 0.01-0.1% and accuracies in the libration amplitudes of resonant objects better than 10 degrees, due to mean astrometric residuals routinely being of order 50-100 milliarcseconds.This talk will present the survey design and full detection sample for objects observed in the first half of 2013 and 2014. We will report how adding these detections to those from the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS) modifies conclusions about the orbital and size distribution of main classical Kuiper Belt, as well as other non-resonant sub-populations. In particular, because OSSOS is sensitive to, and has detected objects, from 8 AU to beyond 60 AU, we will report on how the combined distance and magnitude distribution impact dicsussions of the absolute magnitude distribution of outer Solar System objects.

  16. Stellar evolution in the outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerba, Ryszard; Siódmiak, Natasza; Leśniewska, Aleksandra; Karska, Agata; Sewiło, Marta

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the distribution of different classes of spectroscopically identified sources and theoretical models in the color-color diagrams (CCDs) combining the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) data to develop a method to classify Outer Galaxy sources detected with the Spitzer Space Telescope (hereafter Spitzer) SMOG survey in the IRAC 3.68.0 µm and MIPS 24 µm bands. We supplement the Spitzer data with the data from other satellite and ground-based surveys. The main goal of our study is to discover and characterize the population of intermediate- and low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Outer Galaxy and use it to study star formation in a significantly different environment than the Galaxy inside the solar circle. Since the YSOs can be confused with evolved stars in the MIR, these classes of objects need to be carefully separated. Here we present the initial results of our analysis using the Ks-[8.0] vs. Ks-[24] CCD as an example. The evolved stars separated from YSOs in the YSO selection process will be investigated in detail in the follow-up study.

  17. SDC conceptual design: Scintillating fiber outer tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Baumbaugh, A.; Bird, F.; SDC Collaboration

    1992-01-22

    The authors propose an all-scintillating fiber detector for the purpose of outer tracking for the SDC. The objectives of this tracking system are to: (1) provide a first level trigger for {vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} < 2.3 with sharp p{sub T} threshold with the ability to resolve individual beam crossings; (2) provide pattern recognition capability and momentum resolution which complements and extends the capabilities of the inner silicon tracking system; (3) provide three dimensional linkage with outer detection systems including the shower maximum detector, muon detectors, and calorimetry; (4) provide robust tracking and track-triggering at the highest luminosities expected at the SSC. The many attractive features of a fiber tracker include good position resolution, low occupancy, low mass in the active volume, and excellent resistance to radiation damage. An additional important feature, especially at the SSC, is the intrinsically prompt response time of a scintillating fiber. This property is exploited in the construction of a level 1 trigger sensitive to individual beam crossings.

  18. A transient assay for recombination demonstrates that Arabidopsis SNM1 and XRCC3 enhance non-homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R A; Hellens, R P; Love, D R

    2011-09-16

    Replacement of endogenous genes by homologous recombination is rare in plants; the majority of genetic modifications are the result of transforming DNA molecules undergoing random genomic insertion by way of non-homologous recombination. Factors that affect chromatin remodeling and DNA repair are thought to have the potential to enhance the frequency of homologous recombination in plants. Conventional tools to study the frequencies of genetic recombination often rely on stable transformation-based approaches, with these systems being rarely capable of high-throughput or combinatorial analysis. We developed a series of vectors that use chemiluminescent (LUC and REN) reporter genes to assay the relative frequency of homologous and non-homologous recombination in plants. These transient assay vectors were used to screen 14 candidate genes for their effects on recombination frequencies in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Over-expression of Arabidopsis genes with sequence similarity to SNM1 from yeast and XRCC3 from humans enhanced the frequency of non-homologous recombination when assayed using two different donor vectors. Transient N. benthamiana leaf systems were also used in an alternative assay for preliminary measurements of homologous recombination frequencies, which were found to be enhanced by over-expression of RAD52, MIM and RAD51 from yeast, as well as CHR24 from Arabidopsis. The findings for the assays described here are in line with previous studies that analyzed recombination frequencies using stable transformation. The assays we report have revealed functions in non-homologous recombination for the Arabidopsis SNM1 and XRCC3 genes, so the suppression of these genes' expression offers a potential means to enhance the gene targeting frequency in plants. Furthermore, our findings also indicate that plant gene targeting frequencies could be enhanced by over-expression of RAD52, MIM, CHR24, and RAD51 genes.

  19. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  20. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  1. Formulation, characterization, and expression of a recombinant MOMP Chlamydia trachomatis DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cambridge, Chino D; Singh, Shree R; Waffo, Alain B; Fairley, Stacie J; Dennis, Vida A

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Previous vaccination attempts have employed the recombinant major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of C. trachomatis nonetheless, with limited success, perhaps, due to stability, degradation, and delivery issues. In this study we cloned C. trachomatis recombinant MOMP DNA (DMOMP) and encapsulated it in chitosan nanoparticles (DMCNP) using the complex coacervation technique. Physiochemical characterizations of DMCNP included transmission and scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and zeta potential. Encapsulated DMOMP was 167–250 nm, with a uniform spherical shape and homogenous morphology, and an encapsulation efficiency > 90%. A slow release pattern of encapsulated DMOMP, especially in acidic solution, was observed over 7 days. The zeta potential of DMCNP was ~8.80 mV, which indicated that it was highly stable. Toxicity studies of DMCNP (25–400 μg/mL) to Cos-7 cells using the MTT assay revealed minimal toxicity over 24–72 hours with >90% viable cells. Ultra-violet visible (UV-vis) spectra indicated encapsulated DMOMP protection by chitosan, whereas agarose gel electrophoresis verified its protection from enzymatic degradation. Expression of MOMP protein in DMCNP-transfected Cos-7 cells was demonstrated via Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Significantly, intramuscular injection of BALB/c mice with DMCNP confirmed the delivery of encapsulated DMOMP, and expression of the MOMP gene transcript in thigh muscles and spleens. Our data show that encapsulation of DMOMP in biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles imparts stability and protection from enzymatic digestion, and enhances delivery and expression of DMOMP in vitro and in mice. Further investigations of the nanoencapsulated DMCNP vaccine formulation against C. trachomatis in mice are warranted. PMID:23690681

  2. Formulation, characterization, and expression of a recombinant MOMP Chlamydia trachomatis DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cambridge, Chino D; Singh, Shree R; Waffo, Alain B; Fairley, Stacie J; Dennis, Vida A

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Previous vaccination attempts have employed the recombinant major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of C. trachomatis nonetheless, with limited success, perhaps, due to stability, degradation, and delivery issues. In this study we cloned C. trachomatis recombinant MOMP DNA (DMOMP) and encapsulated it in chitosan nanoparticles (DMCNP) using the complex coacervation technique. Physiochemical characterizations of DMCNP included transmission and scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and zeta potential. Encapsulated DMOMP was 167-250 nm, with a uniform spherical shape and homogenous morphology, and an encapsulation efficiency > 90%. A slow release pattern of encapsulated DMOMP, especially in acidic solution, was observed over 7 days. The zeta potential of DMCNP was ~8.80 mV, which indicated that it was highly stable. Toxicity studies of DMCNP (25-400 μg/mL) to Cos-7 cells using the MTT assay revealed minimal toxicity over 24-72 hours with >90% viable cells. Ultra-violet visible (UV-vis) spectra indicated encapsulated DMOMP protection by chitosan, whereas agarose gel electrophoresis verified its protection from enzymatic degradation. Expression of MOMP protein in DMCNP-transfected Cos-7 cells was demonstrated via Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Significantly, intramuscular injection of BALB/c mice with DMCNP confirmed the delivery of encapsulated DMOMP, and expression of the MOMP gene transcript in thigh muscles and spleens. Our data show that encapsulation of DMOMP in biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles imparts stability and protection from enzymatic digestion, and enhances delivery and expression of DMOMP in vitro and in mice. Further investigations of the nanoencapsulated DMCNP vaccine formulation against C. trachomatis in mice are warranted.

  3. SurA Is Involved in the Targeting to the Outer Membrane of a Tat Signal Sequence-Anchored Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rondelet, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway exports folded proteins from the cytoplasm to the periplasm of bacteria. The targeting of the exported proteins to the Tat pathway relies on a specific amino-terminal signal sequence, which is cleaved after exportation. In the phytopathogen Dickeya dadantii, the pectin lyase homologue PnlH is exported by the Tat pathway without cleavage of its signal sequence, which anchors PnlH into the outer membrane. In proteobacteria, the vast majority of outer membrane proteins consists of β-barrel proteins and lipoproteins. Thus, PnlH represents a new kind of outer membrane protein. In Escherichia coli, periplasmic chaperones SurA, Skp, and DegP work together with the β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) to target and insert β-barrel proteins into the outer membrane. In this work, we showed that SurA is required for an efficient targeting of PnlH to the outer membrane. Moreover, we were able to detect an in vitro interaction between SurA and the PnlH signal sequence. Since the PnlH signal sequence contains a highly hydrophobic region, we propose that SurA protects it from the hydrophobic periplasm during targeting of PnlH to the outer membrane. We also studied the nature of the information carried by the PnlH signal sequence responsible for its targeting to the outer membrane after exportation by the Tat system. PMID:22961852

  4. Radio seismology of the outer solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoliy; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Konovalenko, Alexander; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Rucker, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Observed oscillations of coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines have been successfully used to estimate plasma parameters in the inner corona (< 0.2R0, where R0 is the solar radius). However, coronal seismology in EUV lines fails for higher altitudes because of rapid decrease in line intensity. We aim to use radio observations to estimate the plasma parameters of the outer solar corona (> 0.2R0). We used the large Ukrainian radio telescope URAN-2 to observe type IV radio bursts at the frequency range of 8-32 MHz during the time interval of 09:50-12:30 UT on April 14, 2011. The burst was connected to C2.3 flare, which occurred in AR 11190 during 09:38-09:49 UT. The dynamic spectrum of radio emission shows clear quasi-periodic variations in the emission intensity at almost all frequencies. Wavelet analysis at four different frequencies (29 MHz, 25 MHz, 22 MHz, and 14 MHz) shows the quasi-periodic variation of emission intensity with periods of ~ 34 min and ~ 23 min. The periodic variations can be explained by the first and second harmonics of vertical kink oscillation of transequatorial coronal loops, which were excited by the same flare. The apex of transequatorial loops may reach up to 1.2 R0 altitude. We derive and solve the dispersion relation of trapped magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a longitudinally inhomogeneous magnetic slab. The analysis shows that a thin (with width to length ratio of 0.1), dense (with the ratio of internal and external densities of ≥ 20) magnetic slab with weak longitudinal inhomogeneity may trap the observed oscillations. Seismologically estimated Alfvén speed inside the loop at the height of ~ 1 R0 is ~ 1000 km s-1. The magnetic field strength at this height is estimated as ~ 0.9 G. Extrapolation of magnetic field strength to the inner corona gives ~ 10 G at the height of 0.1 R0. Radio observations can be successfully used for the sounding of the outer solar corona, where EUV observations of coronal loops fail

  5. Radio seismology of the outer solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Panchenko, M.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Franzuzenko, A. V.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Rucker, H. O.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Observed oscillations of coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines have been successfully used to estimate plasma parameters in the inner corona (<0.2 R0, where R0 is the solar radius). However, coronal seismology in EUV lines fails for higher altitudes because of rapid decrease in line intensity. Aims: We aim to use radio observations to estimate the plasma parameters of the outer solar corona (>0.2 R0). Methods: We used the large Ukrainian radio telescope URAN-2 to observe type IV radio bursts at the frequency range of 8-32 MHz during the time interval of 09:50-12:30 UT on April 14, 2011. The burst was connected to C2.3 flare, which occurred in AR 11190 during 09:38-09:49 UT. The dynamic spectrum of radio emission shows clear quasi-periodic variations in the emission intensity at almost all frequencies. Results: Wavelet analysis at four different frequencies (29 MHz, 25 MHz, 22 MHz, and 14 MHz) shows the quasi-periodic variation of emission intensity with periods of ~34 min and ~23 min. The periodic variations can be explained by the first and second harmonics of vertical kink oscillation of transequatorial coronal loops, which were excited by the same flare. The apex of transequatorial loops may reach up to 1.2 R0 altitude. We derive and solve the dispersion relation of trapped magnetohydrodynamic oscillations in a longitudinally inhomogeneous magnetic slab. The analysis shows that a thin (with width to length ratio of 0.1), dense (with the ratio of internal and external densities of ≥20) magnetic slab with weak longitudinal inhomogeneity of the Alfvén speed may trap the observed oscillations. Seismologically estimated Alfvén speed inside the loop at the height of ~1 R0 is ~1000 km s-1. The magnetic field strength at this height is estimated as ~0.9 G. Extrapolation of magnetic field strength to the inner corona gives ~10 G at the height of 0.1 R0. Conclusions: Radio observations can be successfully used for the sounding of the outer solar

  6. THE OUTER DISKS OF DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Massey, Philip; Wilsey, Nick; Riabokin, Malanka; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Oh, Se-Heon; Anderson, Ed; Nordgren, Tyler E. E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu E-mail: riabokin@msu.edu E-mail: seheon-oh@ast.uct.ac.za E-mail: tyler_nordgren@redlands.edu

    2011-10-15

    In order to explore the properties of extreme outer stellar disks, we obtained ultra-deep V and GALEX ultraviolet (UV) images of four dwarf irregular galaxies and one blue compact dwarf galaxy, and ultra-deep B images of three of these. Our V-band surface photometry extends to 29.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}. We convert the FUV and V-band photometry, along with H{alpha} photometry obtained in a larger survey, into radial star formation rate profiles that are sensitive to timescales from 10 Myr to the lifetime of the galaxy. We also obtained H I-line emission data and compare the stellar distributions, surface brightness profiles, and star formation rate profiles to H I-line emission maps, gas surface density profiles, and gas kinematics. Our data lead us to two general observations. First, the exponential disks in these irregular galaxies are extraordinarily regular. We observe that the stellar disks continue to decline exponentially as far as our measurements extend. In spite of lumpiness in the distribution of young stars and H I distributions and kinematics that have significant unordered motions, sporadic processes that have built the disks-star formation, radial movement of stars, and perhaps even perturbations from the outside-have, nevertheless, conspired to produce standard disk profiles. Second, there is a remarkable continuity of star formation throughout these disks over time. In four out of five of our galaxies the star formation rate in the outer disk measured from the FUV tracks that determined from the V-band, to within factors of five, requiring star formation at a fairly steady rate over the galaxy's lifetime. Yet, the H I surface density profiles generally decline with radius more shallowly than the stellar light, and the gas is marginally gravitationally stable against collapse into clouds. Outer stellar disks are challenging our concepts of star formation and disk growth and provide a critical environment in which to understand processes that mold

  7. Iron ionization and recombination rates and ionization equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, M.; Raymond, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the past few years important progress has been made on the knowledge of ionization and recombination rates of iron, an astrophysically abundant heavy element and a major impurity in laboratory fusion devices. We make a critical review of the existing data on ionization and dielectronic recombination and present new computations of radiative recombination rate coefficients of Fe(+14) through Fe(+25) using the photoionization cross sections of Clark et al. (1986). We provide analytical fits to the recommended data (direct ionization and excitation-autoionization cross sections; radiative and dielectronic recombination rate coefficients). Finally we determine the iron ionic fractions at ionization equilibrium and compare them with previous computations as well as with observational data.

  8. Sex influence on recombination frequency in Secale cereale L.

    PubMed

    Benito, C; Romero, M P; Henriques-Gil, N; Llorente, F; Figueiras, A M

    1996-10-01

    The variation in recombination frequency (rf) is important to plant breeders since their major objective is to obtain favorable recombinants of linked genes. One source of variation in rf is sex. Sex differences for recombination frequencies were studied in four of the seven chromosomes of Secale cereale L. cv 'Ailés' using isozyme and storage protein loci and were determined on the basis of reciprocal crosses between heterozygous plants of cv. 'Ailés' and homozygous plants of the inbred line 'Riodeva'. The differences were found to be strongly segmentspecific. In some cases the level of crossing-over in male and female meiosis was about the same (between Pgm1 and Ndh1 loci on chromosome arm 4RS). However, for most of the chromosome segments in 1R, 3RL and 6RL the male rf was significantly higher than the female rf. Different hypotheses about the mechanisms of plant sex differences for recombination are discussed.

  9. Seismic characteristics of outer-rise earthquakes in the different seismic coupling subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsin-Hua; Lin, Jing-Yi

    2013-04-01

    Characterizing the seismogenic zone of major subduction plate boundaries provides us a possible to reduce large earthquakes hazard. In the past several decades, many scientists have analyzed various geophysical methods and datasets, such as seismic and geodetic ground motion data, historical tsunami deposits, aftershock distributions, and seafloor bathymetry, trying to understand the mechanisms behind great devastating earthquakes, and to estimate the probability of a major earthquake occurrence in the future. In this study, by using the global earthquake catalog (GCMT) from January 1, 1976 to December 31, 2011. We firstly re-examines the outer-rise earthquake model proposed by the Christensen (1988) at the subduction zones suggested to have different coupling levels. The compressive stress cumulated during the subducting processes are often reflected by the occurrence of compressional outer-rise earthquakes. Thus, in the region where the compressional outer-rise earthquakes take place without any corresponding large underthrusting earthquakes, the seismic potential is usually considered to be high. We re-examined the high seismic potential areas determined by this criteria in Christensen (1988) and confirm that the large underthrusting earthquakes did really occur in the 30 years following the appearance of compressional outer-rise events, such as in Tonga region in the vicinity of 20S, a Mw 8.3 large earthquake occurred in 2006. This result represents that the outer-rise earthquake model could be an indicator for the generation of large earthquakes along subduction zones. In addition, to have a more accurate estimation for the seismic potential, we discuss the relationship between the generation of earthquakes and the change of cumulative gravitational potential energy caused by earthquakes (ΔGPE) over time. Our result shows an acceleration of ΔGPE before large earthquakes. Our result also shows that the extensional outer-rise events for strong seismic coupling

  10. Dynamical constraints on outer planets in super-Earth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Matthew J.; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2016-03-01

    This paper considers secular interactions within multi-planet systems. In particular, we consider dynamical evolution of known planetary systems resulting from an additional hypothetical planet on an eccentric orbit. We start with an analytical study of a general two-planet system, showing that a planet on an elliptical orbit transfers all of its eccentricity to an initially circular planet if the two planets have comparable orbital angular momenta. Application to the single super-Earth system HD 38858 shows that an additional hypothetical planet below current radial velocity (RV) constraints with M sini = 3-10 M⊕, semi-major axis 1-10 au and eccentricity 0.2-0.8 is unlikely to be present from the eccentricity that would be excited in the known planet (albeit cyclically). However, additional planets in proximity to the known planet could stabilize the system against secular perturbations from outer planets. Moreover, these additional planets can have an M sini below RV sensitivity and still affect their neighbours. For example, application to the two super-Earth system 61 Vir shows that an additional hypothetical planet cannot excite high eccentricities in the known planets, unless its mass and orbit lie in a restricted area of parameter space. Inner planets in HD 38858 below RV sensitivity would also modify conclusions above about excluded parameter space. This suggests that it may be possible to infer the presence of additional stabilizing planets in systems with an eccentric outer planet and an inner planet on an otherwise suspiciously circular orbit. This reinforces the point that the full complement of planets in a system is needed to assess its dynamical state.

  11. Variability in the outer planet aurorae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the aurorae of the outer planets are reviewed emphasizing the findings on physical processes derived from specific wavelengths. The review examines features of the auroral zones such as ionospheric currents, atmospheric heating, and compositional changes in the aurorae of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and the earth for comparison. Jupiter's multiwavelength aurora receives special attention since recent observations shed light on the distribution of the UV auroral ovals, the spectroscopy of the UV auroral emissions, auroral dynamics and ion upwelling, and IR emission from auroral latitudes. The observational data on Jupiter facilitate the modeling of variability and detailed thermospheric and magnetospheric processes. Saturn can be studied by extending findings fron Jupiter's aurora, and deficiencies are found in the observational datasets for Neptune and Uranus.

  12. Formation of the outer planets and satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1977-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of the outer planets is proposed, the basis of which is the idea that the giant planets contain an excess of chemically condensable materials over solar composition. Planetary cores were formed by the clumping together of chemically condensed bodies forming a thin disk in the solar nebula. Gas surrounding a core becomes unstable against collapse onto the core. In the case of Jupiter and Saturn, much of the collapsing gas goes into orbit about the formed planet, forming a relatively thin circumplanetary disks with differential rotation in the prograde sense. For Uranus and Neptune, the dynamical collapse mechanism is unlikely. A disk of gas around Uranus may have been formed during a collision of the protoplanet with a large body. The circumplanetary disks then form the basis for formation of satellite systems, in which the Goldreich-Ward instability mechanism plays a role.

  13. Outer solar system for 200 million years

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, J.H.; Douglas, M.R.; Gursel, Y.; Sussman, G.J.; Wisdom, J.

    1986-07-01

    A special-purpose computer is used to integrate the orbits of the outer five planets for more than 100 Myr into the future and more than 100 Myr into the past. The strongest features in the Fourier transforms of the orbital elements of the Jovian planets can be identified with the frequencies predicted by linear secular theory. Many of the weaker features in the Fourier spectra are identified as linear combinations of the basic frequencies. Serious differences are noted between the present measurements and the predictions of Bretagnon (1974). The amplitude of the 3.796 Myr period libration of Pluto's longitude of perihelion is modulated with a period of 34 Myr. Very long periods, on the order of 137 Myr, are also seen. The orbit of Pluto is stable for the duration of the integration; the maximum Liapunov characteristic exponent is less than 10 to the -6.8 power/yr. 21 references.

  14. Outer Hair Cell Electromotility in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of outer hair cell (OHC) electro-motility in vivo has been challenged by the expected low-pass filtering of the transmembrane potential due to the cell's own capacitance. The OHC electromotility is characterized here by an electromechanical ratio defined as the ratio of the OHC contraction to the transmembrane potential. This ratio has been measured in isolated cells to be approximately 26 nm/mV. We estimate the OHC electromechanical ratio in vivo from the recently measured displacements of the reticular lamina and the basilar membrane near the 19 kHz characteristic frequency in the basal region of guinea pig cochlea. Our analysis strongly suggests OHC electromotility process is effective for cochlear amplification in vivo at least around the characteristic frequency of the basal location in spite of the low-pass filtering.

  15. Organic Matter in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruiskshank, Dale P.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many solid bodies in the outer Solar System are covered with ices of various compositions, including water, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen, and other molecules that are solid at the low temperatures that prevail there. These ices have all been detected by remote sensing observations made with telescopes on Earth, or more recently, spacecraft in orbit (notably Galileo at Jupiter). The data also reveal other solid materials that could be minerals or complex carbon-bearing organic molecules. A study in progress using large ground-based telescopes to acquire infrared spectroscopic data, and laboratory results on the optical properties of complex organic matter, seeks to identify the non-icy materials on several satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The work on the satellites of Saturn is in part preparatory to the Cassini spacecraft investigation of the Saturn system, which will begin in 2004 and extend for four years.

  16. ONE-DIMENSIONAL ACCELERATOR IN PULSAR OUTER MAGNETOSPHERE REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G. F.; Zhang, L.

    2009-07-10

    We re-examine the one-dimensional (1D) vacuum and nonvacuum accelerators in the outer magnetosphere of rotation-powered pulsars by considering the limit of trans-field height through pair-production process. In the original 1D nonvacuum outer gap model, both the Poisson equation for electrical potential and the Boltzmann equations of particles and gamma-rays are solved self-consistently by assuming the trans-field height as a free parameter, usually resulting in a narrow outer gap (i.e., gap length along magnetic field lines is short). In the modified 1D nonvacuum outer gap model, two improvements have been made: the trans-field height is limited by photon-photon pair production process and the outer boundary of the outer gap can be extended outside the light cylinder. Under the above assumptions, we self-consistently solve the Poisson equation for electrical potential, and the Boltzmann equations of electrons/positrons and gamma-rays in both vacuum and nonvacuum outer gaps for the parameters of both Vela and Geminga pulsars. We obtain an approximate geometry of the outer gap, i.e., the trans-field height is limited by the pair-production process and increases with the radial distance to the star, and the width of the outer gap starts at the inner boundary (near the null charge surface in the vacuum case) and ends at the outer boundary which is located inside or outside the light cylinder depending on the inclination angle. Our calculated results also indicate that gamma-ray spectrum from a wide outer gap is flatter than the one from a narrow outer gap and the relation between the electric field and trans-field height has an important effect on the structure of the outer gap.

  17. The Outer Planetary Mission Design Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benfield, Michael; Turner, M. W.

    2010-10-01

    With the recent focus from the planetary science community on the outer planets of the solar system, The University of Alabama in Huntsville Integrated Product Team program is embarking on a new challenge to develop an outer planetary mission for the academic year 2010-2011. Currently four bodies are of interest for this mission: Titan, Europa, Triton, and Enceledus, with one body being chosen by the instructors by the beginning of the fall semester. This project will use the 2010 Discovery Announcement of Opportunity as its Request for Proposal (RFP). All of the teams competing in this project will use the AO to respond with a proposal to the instructors for their proposed mission and spacecraft concept. The project employs the two-semester design sequence of the IPT program to provide a framework for the development of this mission. This sequence is divided into four phases. Phase 1 - Requirements Development - focuses on the development of both the scientific and engineering requirements of the mission. During this phase the teams work very closely with the PI organization, represented by the College of Charleston. Phase 2 - Team Formation and Architecture Development - concentrates on the assessment of the overall mission architecture from the launch vehicle to the ground operations of the proposed spacecraft. Phase 3 - System Definition - provides for spacecraft subsystem trade studies and further refinement of the specific spacecraft to meet the scientific requirements and objectives developed in Phase 1. Phase 4 - Design - is the phase where the engineers provide the spacecraft design that is required for the mission of interest. At the conclusion of Phases 2 and 4, an external review board evaluates the proposed designs and chooses one winner of the competition.

  18. Is the Outer Solar System Really Chaotic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Wayne B.

    2006-09-01

    The existence of chaos among the system of Jovian planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) is not yet firmly established. Although Laskar originally found no chaos in the outer Solar System, his "averaged" integrations did not account for the possibility of mean-motion resonances. Once full n-body integrations were performed, a dichotomy arose. On one hand, many investigators (Sussman, Wisdom, Murray, Holman, among many others) consistently measured a Lyapunov time of between 5 and 12 million years in the outer Solar System; the chaos can even be explained as the overlap of three-body resonances (Murray + Holman, Science 283, 1999). Furthermore, Murray + Holman's theory has been recently corroborated across a wide range of system parameters (Guzzo 2005), and the chaos does not disappear with decreasing timestep. On the other hand, some other investigators (Newman, Grazier, and Varadi, among several others) have compelling evidence against chaos. Namely, they have convincingly demonstrated that a sympletic integration using the famous Wisdom + Holman (1992) symplectic mapping with a 400-day timestep reproduces the chaos seen by others, but that the chaos disappears and the orbit converges to being regular as the timestep decreases. Their integration remains regular, showing beautiful convergence with decreasing timestep, down to a 2 day timestep. The resolution of this apparent paradox is simple. The orbital positions of the Jovian planets is known only to a few parts in 107, and it turns out that within that observational error ball, there exist both chaotic and regular solutions. I will demonstrate this fact using several initial conditions and several accurate integration algorithms. Thus, whether a particular investigator will see chaos or not depends (essentially randomly) upon the details of how that investigator draws their initial conditions. Thus, some investigators legitimately find chaos, while others legitimately find no chaos.

  19. FBL Outer Can Welder Acquisition Software

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Susan L.

    2004-01-16

    The Outer Can Welder Data Acquisition Software (OCWDAS) was originally developed by SRTC for use at Hanford to assist in the storage of their excess plutonium in the DOE standard 3013 containers until it can be properly dispositioned using one of the approved DOE methods. After Hanford OCWDAS software was the starting point for the new version developed for FB-Line. New graphical display formats and features were added to this software to make it more robust and operator friendly. Several hardware changes were also made at this time and the software was modified to accommodate these as well. During the welding process, critical weld parameters such as weld current and voltage, can give valuable information about the weld. In the past, weld data from the TIG welding process, such as the bagless transfer system in FB-Line, has been monitored using strip chart recorders. The data from the weld process, recorded on the strip chart recorder traces, are reviewed to analyze the weld. The OCWDAS improves this technology by digitizing the weld data which allows for automation of the analysis process. The OCWDAS performs the necessary functions to perform the data acquisition functions during the 3013 Outer Can Welding Process. It is important to monitor the critical weld parameters, current and voltage, during a weld as they can be used to set acceptance criteria for weld acceptance. The software monitors and records the weld current, voltage, and RPM data. It also records the absolute position of the weld head during the weld process from a quadrature encoder. Digital handshaking between the AMI Welding unit and the OCWDAS ensure that both systems are operational and ready prior to the weld initiation taking place.

  20. Lateral interactions in the outer retina.

    PubMed

    Thoreson, Wallace B; Mangel, Stuart C

    2012-09-01

    Lateral interactions in the outer retina, particularly negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones and direct feed-forward input from horizontal cells to bipolar cells, play a number of important roles in early visual processing, such as generating center-surround receptive fields that enhance spatial discrimination. These circuits may also contribute to post-receptoral light adaptation and the generation of color opponency. In this review, we examine the contributions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways to early visual processing. We begin by reviewing the properties of bipolar cell receptive fields, especially with respect to modulation of the bipolar receptive field surround by the ambient light level and to the contribution of horizontal cells to the surround. We then review evidence for and against three proposed mechanisms for negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones: 1) GABA release by horizontal cells, 2) ephaptic modulation of the cone pedicle membrane potential generated by currents flowing through hemigap junctions in horizontal cell dendrites, and 3) modulation of cone calcium currents (I(Ca)) by changes in synaptic cleft proton levels. We also consider evidence for the presence of direct horizontal cell feed-forward input to bipolar cells and discuss a possible role for GABA at this synapse. We summarize proposed functions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways. Finally, we examine the mechanisms and functions of two other forms of lateral interaction in the outer retina: negative feedback from horizontal cells to rods and positive feedback from horizontal cells to cones.

  1. Outer Planet Mission Studies Neptune Aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wercinski, Paul F.; Langhoff, Steven R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current and previous studies of orbiter missions to the outer planets have clearly identified high-energy aerocapture as a critical and enabling technology. Aerocapture involves the use of aerodynamic lift to fly a trajectory through a planet's atmosphere to sufficiently decelerate an entry vehicle to capture into planetary orbit. In the past, numerous studies of different configurations of lifting entry vehicles were studied for various planetary orbiter missions which identified aerocapture as a feasible concept yet complex and technically challenging. In order to determine the feasibility of high-speed aerocapture at the outer planets, an accurate trajectory simulation of the flight vehicle is the critical first step in the proposed research. Vehicle response to aerodynamic loading must be predicted accurately in the trajectory simulations. For several Neptune orbiter missions currently under study at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), entry velocities relative to the rotating atmosphere ranging from 25 to 30 km/sec, are to be expected. Preliminary trajectory analysis has identified the various flow regimes the entry vehicle is expected to fly in the 8 1% H2 and 19% He atmosphere of Neptune. The size and mass of the vehicle are also determined by the launch vehicle constraints and orbiter spacecraft requirements. For a given baseline arrival conditions of an inertial entry velocity of 28 km/sec and an entry mass of 400 kg, a medium lift (L/D = 1), axisymmetric biconic shaped vehicle was selected in order to satisfy entry corridor width requirements expected for Neptune aerocapture. The analysis summarized in this study indicates that a biconic entry vehicle is a feasible concept for a Neptune aerocapture orbiter mission. The preliminary entry trajectory simulations has demonstrated adequate entry corridor control authority. Furthermore, estimates of the stagnation point heating environment has enabled the preliminary selection of candidate lightweight ceramic

  2. Nuclear Electric Propulsion for Outer Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Today we know of 66 moons in our very own Solar System, and many of these have atmospheres and oceans. In addition, the Hubble (optical) Space Telescope has helped us to discover a total of 100 extra-solar planets, i.e., planets going around other suns, including several solar systems. The Chandra (X-ray) Space Telescope has helped us to discover 33 Black Holes. There are some extremely fascinating things out there in our Universe to explore. In order to travel greater distances into our Universe, and to reach planetary bodies in our Solar System in much less time, new and innovative space propulsion systems must be developed. To this end NASA has created the Prometheus Program. When one considers space missions to the outer edges of our Solar System and far beyond, our Sun cannot be relied on to produce the required spacecraft (s/c) power. Solar energy diminishes as the square of the distance from the Sun. At Mars it is only 43% of that at Earth. At Jupiter, it falls off to only 3.6% of Earth's. By the time we get out to Pluto, solar energy is only .066% what it is on Earth. Therefore, beyond the orbit of Mars, it is not practical to depend on solar power for a s/c. However, the farther out we go the more power we need to heat the s/c and to transmit data back to Earth over the long distances. On Earth, knowledge is power. In the outer Solar System, power is knowledge. It is important that the public be made aware of the tremendous space benefits offered by Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and the minimal risk it poses to our environment. This paper presents an overview of the reasons for NEP systems, along with their basic components including the reactor, power conversion units (both static and dynamic), electric thrusters, and the launch safety of the NEP system.

  3. Lateral interactions in the outer retina

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Wallace B.; Mangel, Stuart C.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral interactions in the outer retina, particularly negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones and direct feed-forward input from horizontal cells to bipolar cells, play a number of important roles in early visual processing, such as generating center-surround receptive fields that enhance spatial discrimination. These circuits may also contribute to post-receptoral light adaptation and the generation of color opponency. In this review, we examine the contributions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways to early visual processing. We begin by reviewing the properties of bipolar cell receptive fields, especially with respect to modulation of the bipolar receptive field surround by the ambient light level and to the contribution of horizontal cells to the surround. We then review evidence for and against three proposed mechanisms for negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones: 1) GABA release by horizontal cells, 2) ephaptic modulation of the cone pedicle membrane potential generated by currents flowing through hemigap junctions in horizontal cell dendrites, and 3) modulation of cone calcium currents (ICa) by changes in synaptic cleft proton levels. We also consider evidence for the presence of direct horizontal cell feed-forward input to bipolar cells and discuss a possible role for GABA at this synapse. We summarize proposed functions of horizontal cell feedback and feed-forward pathways. Finally, we examine the mechanisms and functions of two other forms of lateral interaction in the outer retina: negative feedback from horizontal cells to rods and positive feedback from horizontal cells to cones. PMID:22580106

  4. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  5. Fast Dissemination of New HIV-1 CRF02/A1 Recombinants in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Hora, Bhavna; DeMarco, Todd; Shah, Sharaf Ali; Ahmed, Manzoor; Sanchez, Ana M.; Su, Chang; Carter, Meredith; Stone, Mars; Hasan, Rumina; Hasan, Zahra; Busch, Michael P.; Denny, Thomas N.; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A number of HIV-1 subtypes are identified in Pakistan by characterization of partial viral gene sequences. Little is known whether new recombinants are generated and how they disseminate since whole genome sequences for these viruses have not been characterized. Near full-length genome (NFLG) sequences were obtained by amplifying two overlapping half genomes or next generation sequencing from 34 HIV-1-infected individuals in Pakistan. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the newly characterized sequences were 16 subtype As, one subtype C, and 17 A/G recombinants. Further analysis showed that all 16 subtype A1 sequences (47%), together with the vast majority of sequences from Pakistan from other studies, formed a tight subcluster (A1a) within the subtype A1 clade, suggesting that they were derived from a single introduction. More in-depth analysis of 17 A/G NFLG sequences showed that five shared similar recombination breakpoints as in CRF02 (15%) but were phylogenetically distinct from the prototype CRF02 by forming a tight subcluster (CRF02a) while 12 (38%) were new recombinants between CRF02a and A1a or a divergent A1b viruses. Unique recombination patterns among the majority of the newly characterized recombinants indicated ongoing recombination. Interestingly, recombination breakpoints in these CRF02/A1 recombinants were similar to those in prototype CRF02 viruses, indicating that recombination at these sites more likely generate variable recombinant viruses. The dominance and fast dissemination of new CRF02a/A1 recombinants over prototype CRF02 suggest that these recombinant have more adapted and may become major epidemic strains in Pakistan. PMID:27973597

  6. “Genome-wide recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes and embryos reveal selection for maternal recombination rates”

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Senthilkumar A.; Joshi, Hrishikesh A.; Cimadomo, Danilo; Griffin, Darren K.; Sage, Karen; Summers, Michael C.; Thornhill, Alan R.; Housworth, Elizabeth; Herbert, Alex D.; Rienzi, Laura; Ubaldi, Filippo M.; Handyside, Alan H.; Hoffmann, Eva R.

    2015-01-01

    Crossover recombination reshuffles genes and prevents errors in segregation that lead to extra or missing chromosomes (aneuploidy) in human eggs, a major cause of pregnancy failure and congenital disorders. Here, we generate genome-wide maps of crossovers and chromosome segregation patterns by recovering all three products of single female meioses. Genotyping > 4 million informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 23 complete meioses allowed us to map 2,032 maternal and 1,342 paternal crossovers and to infer the segregation patterns of 529 chromosome pairs. We uncover a novel reverse chromosome segregation pattern in which both homologs separate their sister chromatids at meiosis I; detect selection for higher recombination rates in the female germline by the elimination of aneuploid embryos; and report chromosomal drive against non-recombinant chromatids at meiosis II. Collectively, our findings reveal that recombination not only affects homolog segregation at meiosis I but also the fate of sister chromatids at meiosis II. PMID:25985139

  7. Auger recombination in sodium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Andrew; Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Åberg, Daniel; Schleife, André

    2014-03-01

    Scintillators are an important tool used to detect high energy radiation - both in the interest of national security and in medicine. However, scintillator detectors currently suffer from lower energy resolutions than expected from basic counting statistics. This has been attributed to non-proportional light yield compared to incoming radiation, but the specific mechanism for this non-proportionality has not been identified. Auger recombination is a non-radiative process that could be contributing to the non-proportionality of scintillating materials. Auger recombination comes in two types - direct and phonon-assisted. We have used first-principles calculations to study Auger recombination in sodium iodide, a well characterized scintillating material. Our findings indicate that phonon-assisted Auger recombination is stronger in sodium iodide than direct Auger recombination. Computational resources provided by LLNL and NERSC. Funding provided by NA-22.

  8. Diversity, Mutation and Recombination Analysis of Cotton Leaf Curl Geminiviruses.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Huma; Nahid, Nazia; Shakir, Sara; Ijaz, Sehrish; Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Asif Ali; Mubin, Muhammad; Nawaz-Ul-Rehman, Muhammad Shah

    2016-01-01

    The spread of cotton leaf curl disease in China, India and Pakistan is a recent phenomenon. Analysis of available sequence data determined that there is a substantial diversity of cotton-infecting geminiviruses in Pakistan. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that recombination between two major groups of viruses, cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMuV) and cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV), led to the emergence of several new viruses. Recombination detection programs and phylogenetic analyses showed that CLCuMuV and CLCuKoV are highly recombinant viruses. Indeed, CLCuKoV appeared to be a major donor virus for the coat protein (CP) gene, while CLCuMuV donated the Rep gene in the majority of recombination events. Using recombination free nucleotide datasets the substitution rates for CP and Rep genes were determined. We inferred similar nucleotide substitution rates for the CLCuMuV-Rep gene (4.96X10-4) and CLCuKoV-CP gene (2.706X10-4), whereas relatively higher substitution rates were observed for CLCuMuV-CP and CLCuKoV-Rep genes. The combination of sequences with equal and relatively low substitution rates, seemed to result in the emergence of viral isolates that caused epidemics in Pakistan and India. Our findings also suggest that CLCuMuV is spreading at an alarming rate, which can potentially be a threat to cotton production in the Indian subcontinent.

  9. Diversity, Mutation and Recombination Analysis of Cotton Leaf Curl Geminiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Huma; Nahid, Nazia; Shakir, Sara; Ijaz, Sehrish; Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Asif Ali; Mubin, Muhammad; Nawaz-ul-Rehman, Muhammad Shah

    2016-01-01

    The spread of cotton leaf curl disease in China, India and Pakistan is a recent phenomenon. Analysis of available sequence data determined that there is a substantial diversity of cotton-infecting geminiviruses in Pakistan. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that recombination between two major groups of viruses, cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMuV) and cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV), led to the emergence of several new viruses. Recombination detection programs and phylogenetic analyses showed that CLCuMuV and CLCuKoV are highly recombinant viruses. Indeed, CLCuKoV appeared to be a major donor virus for the coat protein (CP) gene, while CLCuMuV donated the Rep gene in the majority of recombination events. Using recombination free nucleotide datasets the substitution rates for CP and Rep genes were determined. We inferred similar nucleotide substitution rates for the CLCuMuV-Rep gene (4.96X10-4) and CLCuKoV-CP gene (2.706X10-4), whereas relatively higher substitution rates were observed for CLCuMuV-CP and CLCuKoV-Rep genes. The combination of sequences with equal and relatively low substitution rates, seemed to result in the emergence of viral isolates that caused epidemics in Pakistan and India. Our findings also suggest that CLCuMuV is spreading at an alarming rate, which can potentially be a threat to cotton production in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:26963635

  10. Differential compartmentalization of HIV-targeting immune cells in inner and outer foreskin tissue.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiping; Yang, Yu; Liu, Lu; Meng, Zhefeng; Li, Liangzhu; Qiu, Chao; Xu, Jianqing; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Ex vivo foreskin models have demonstrated that inner foreskin is more susceptible to HIV-1 infection than outer foreskin. In the present study we characterized the compartition of HIV-1 target cells and quantified these cells in the epidermis and dermis of inner and outer foreskins using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Our data showed that the epidermis of the inner foreskin was more enriched with CD4(+) T cells and Langerhans cells (LCs), with the co-expression of CCR5 and α4β7 receptors, than the outer foreskin. Interestingly, the vast majority of CD4(+) T cells and LCs expressed CCR5, but not CXCR4, indicating that the inner foreskin might capture and transmit R5-tropic HIV strains more efficiently. In addition, lymphoid aggregates, composed of T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in the dermis, were closer to the epithelial surface in the inner foreskin than in the outer foreskin. As dendritic cells are able to capture and pass HIV particles to susceptible target cells, HIV may be able to more efficiently infect the inner foreskin by hijacking the augmented immune communication pathways in this tissue. After the inoculation of HIV-1 particles in a foreskin explant culture model, the level of p24 antigen in the supernatant from the inner foreskin was slightly higher than that from the outer foreskin, although this difference was not significant. The present study is the first to employ both CCR5 and α4β7 to identify HIV target cells in the foreskin. Our data demonstrated that the inner foreskin was more enriched with HIV target immune cells than the outer foreskin, and this tissue was structured for efficient communication among immune cells that may promote HIV transmission and replication. In addition, our data suggests the R5-tropism of HIV sexual transmission is likely shaped through the inherent receptor composition on HIV target cells in the mucosa.

  11. Corrugated outer sheath gas-insulated transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Kemeny, George A.; Cookson, Alan H.

    1981-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes two transmission line sections each of which are formed of a corrugated outer housing enclosing an inner high-voltage conductor disposed therein, with insulating support means supporting the inner conductor within the outer housing and an insulating gas providing electrical insulation therebetween. The outer housings in each section have smooth end sections at the longitudinal ends thereof which are joined together by joining means which provide for a sealing fixed joint.

  12. Development of Prototype Filovirus Recombinant Antigen Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Boisen, Matt L.; Oottamasathien, Darin; Jones, Abigail B.; Millett, Molly M.; Nelson, Diana S.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Oda, Shun-ichiro; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Akdag, Marjan; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohammed; Baimba, Francis; Gbakie, Michael; Safa, Sadiki; Fonnie, Richard; Kanneh, Lansana; Cross, Robert W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Kulakosky, Peter C.; Grant, Donald S.; Shaffer, Jeffery G.; Schieffelin, John S.; Wilson, Russell B.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.; Khan, S. Humarr; Pitts, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Throughout the 2014–2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, major gaps were exposed in the availability of validated rapid diagnostic platforms, protective vaccines, and effective therapeutic agents. These gaps potentiated the development of prototype rapid lateral flow immunodiagnostic (LFI) assays that are true point-of-contact platforms, for the detection of active Ebola infections in small blood samples. Methods. Recombinant Ebola and Marburg virus matrix VP40 and glycoprotein (GP) antigens were used to derive a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Antibodies were tested using a multivariate approach to identify antibody-antigen combinations suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and LFI assay development. Results. Polyclonal antibodies generated in goats were superior reagents for capture and detection of recombinant VP40 in test sample matrices. These antibodies were optimized for use in antigen-capture ELISA and LFI assay platforms. Prototype immunoglobulin M (IgM)/immunoglobulin G (IgG) ELISAs were similarly developed that specifically detect Ebola virus–specific antibodies in the serum of experimentally infected nonhuman primates and in blood samples obtained from patients with Ebola from Sierra Leone. Conclusions. The prototype recombinant Ebola LFI assays developed in these studies have sensitivities that are useful for clinical diagnosis of acute ebolavirus infections. The antigen-capture and IgM/IgG ELISAs provide additional confirmatory assay platforms for detecting VP40 and other ebolavirus-specific immunoglobulins. PMID:26232440

  13. Recombinant vaccine for canine parvovirus in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    López de Turiso, J A; Cortés, E; Martínez, C; Ruiz de Ybáñez, R; Simarro, I; Vela, C; Casal, I

    1992-01-01

    VP2 is the major component of canine parvovirus (CPV) capsids. The VP2-coding gene was engineered to be expressed by a recombinant baculovirus under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A transfer vector that contains the lacZ gene under the control of the p10 promoter was used in order to facilitate the selection of recombinants. The expressed VP2 was found to be structurally and immunologically indistinguishable from authentic VP2. The recombinant VP2 shows also the capability to self-assemble, forming viruslike particles similar in size and appearance to CPV virions. These viruslike particles have been used to immunize dogs in different doses and combinations of adjuvants, and the anti-CPV responses have been measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, monolayer protection assays, and an assay for the inhibition of hemagglutination. A dose of ca. 10 micrograms of VP2 was able to elicit a good protective response, higher than that obtained with a commercially available, inactivated vaccine. The results indicate that these viruslike particles can be used to protect dogs from CPV infection. Images PMID:1313899

  14. Insertional mutagenesis and illegitimate recombination in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, G V; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1991-01-01

    Mycobacteria, particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and Mycobacterium avium, are major pathogens of man. Although insertional mutagenesis has been an invaluable genetic tool for analyzing the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis, it has not yet been possible to apply it to the mycobacteria. To overcome intrinsic difficulties in directly manipulating the genetics of slow-growing mycobacteria, including M. tuberculosis and bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine strains, we developed a system for random shuttle mutagenesis. A genomic library of Mycobacterium smegmatis was subjected to transposon mutagenesis with Tn5 seq1, a derivative of Tn5, in Escherichia coli and these transposon-containing recombinant plasmids were reintroduced into mycobacterial chromosomes by homologous recombination. This system has allowed us to isolate several random auxotrophic mutants of M. smegmatis. To extend this strategy to M. tuberculosis and BCG, targeted mutagenesis was performed using a cloned BCG methionine gene that was subjected to Tn5 seq1 mutagenesis in E. coli and reintroduced into the mycobacteria. Surprisingly for prokaryotes, both BCG and M. tuberculosis were found to incorporate linear DNA fragments into illegitimate sites throughout the mycobacterial genomes at a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-4) relative to the number of transformants obtained with autonomously replicating vectors. Thus the efficient illegitimate recombination of linear DNA fragments provides the basis for an insertional mutagenesis system for M. tuberculosis and BCG. Images PMID:2052623

  15. The Impact of Recombination Hotspots on Genome Evolution of a Fungal Plant Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Croll, Daniel; Lendenmann, Mark H; Stewart, Ethan; McDonald, Bruce A

    2015-11-01

    Recombination has an impact on genome evolution by maintaining chromosomal integrity, affecting the efficacy of selection, and increasing genetic variability in populations. Recombination rates are a key determinant of the coevolutionary dynamics between hosts and their pathogens. Historic recombination events created devastating new pathogens, but the impact of ongoing recombination in sexual pathogens is poorly understood. Many fungal pathogens of plants undergo regular sexual cycles, and sex is considered to be a major factor contributing to virulence. We generated a recombination map at kilobase-scale resolution for the haploid plant pathogenic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici. To account for intraspecific variation in recombination rates, we constructed genetic maps from two independent crosses. We localized a total of 10,287 crossover events in 441 progeny and found that recombination rates were highly heterogeneous within and among chromosomes. Recombination rates on large chromosomes were inversely correlated with chromosome length. Short accessory chromosomes often lacked evidence for crossovers between parental chromosomes. Recombination was concentrated in narrow hotspots that were preferentially located close to telomeres. Hotspots were only partially conserved between the two crosses, suggesting that hotspots are short-lived and may vary according to genomic background. Genes located in hotspot regions were enriched in genes encoding secreted proteins. Population resequencing showed that chromosomal regions with high recombination rates were strongly correlated with regions of low linkage disequilibrium. Hence, genes in pathogen recombination hotspots are likely to evolve faster in natural populations and may represent a greater threat to the host.

  16. The Impact of Recombination Hotspots on Genome Evolution of a Fungal Plant Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Croll, Daniel; Lendenmann, Mark H.; Stewart, Ethan; McDonald, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Recombination has an impact on genome evolution by maintaining chromosomal integrity, affecting the efficacy of selection, and increasing genetic variability in populations. Recombination rates are a key determinant of the coevolutionary dynamics between hosts and their pathogens. Historic recombination events created devastating new pathogens, but the impact of ongoing recombination in sexual pathogens is poorly understood. Many fungal pathogens of plants undergo regular sexual cycles, and sex is considered to be a major factor contributing to virulence. We generated a recombination map at kilobase-scale resolution for the haploid plant pathogenic fungus Zymoseptoria tritici. To account for intraspecific variation in recombination rates, we constructed genetic maps from two independent crosses. We localized a total of 10,287 crossover events in 441 progeny and found that recombination rates were highly heterogeneous within and among chromosomes. Recombination rates on large chromosomes were inversely correlated with chromosome length. Short accessory chromosomes often lacked evidence for crossovers between parental chromosomes. Recombination was concentrated in narrow hotspots that were preferentially located close to telomeres. Hotspots were only partially conserved between the two crosses, suggesting that hotspots are short-lived and may vary according to genomic background. Genes located in hotspot regions were enriched in genes encoding secreted proteins. Population resequencing showed that chromosomal regions with high recombination rates were strongly correlated with regions of low linkage disequilibrium. Hence, genes in pathogen recombination hotspots are likely to evolve faster in natural populations and may represent a greater threat to the host. PMID:26392286

  17. Outer contour extraction of skull from CT scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulinuha, M. A.; Yuniarno, E. M.; Nugroho, S. M. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Extraction of the outer contour of the skull is an important step in craniofacial reconstruction. The outer contour is required for surface reconstruction of the skull. In this paper, we propose a method to extract the outer contour of the skull. The extraction process consists of four stages: defining the region of interest, segmentation of the bone, noise removal and extraction of the outer contour based on scanning from the four sides of the image. The proposed method successfully extracts the outermost contour of the skull and avoids redundant data.

  18. Tectonics of the Outer Planet Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Collins, G. C.; Moore, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Prockter, L. M.; Schenk, P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Tectonic features on the satellites of the outer planets range from the familiar, such as clearly recognizable graben on many satellites, to the bizarre, such as the ubiquitous double ridges on Europa, the twisting sets of ridges on Triton, or the isolated giant mountains rising from Io's surface. All of the large and middle-sized outer planet satellites except Io are dominated by water ice near their surfaces. Though ice is a brittle material at the cold temperatures found in the outer solar system, the amount of energy it takes to bring it close to its melting point is lower than for a rocky body. Therefore, some unique features of icy satellite tectonics may be influenced by a near-surface ductile layer beneath the brittle surface material, and several of the icy satellites may possess subsurface oceans. Sources of stress to drive tectonism are commonly dominated by the tides that deform these satellites as they orbit their primary giant planets. On several satellites, the observed tectonic features may be the result of changes in their tidal figures, or motions of their solid surfaces with respect to their tidal figures. Other driving mechanisms for tectonics include volume changes due to ice or water phase changes in the interior, thermoelastic stress, deformation of the surface above rising diapirs of warm ice, and motion of subsurface material toward large impact basins as they fill in and relax. Most satellites exhibit evidence for extensional deformation, and some exhibit strike-slip faulting, whereas contractional tectonism appears to be rare. Io s surface is unique, exhibiting huge isolated mountains that may be blocks of crust tilting and foundering into the rapidly emptying interior as the surface is constantly buried by deposits from hyperactive volcanoes. Of the satellites, diminutive Enceladus is spectacularly active; its south polar terrain is a site of young tectonism, copious heat flow, and tall plumes venting into space. Europa's surface is

  19. Antitruncated stellar light profiles in the outer regions of STAGES spiral galaxies: bulge or disc related?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltby, David T.; Hoyos, Carlos; Gray, Meghan E.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Wolf, Christian

    2012-03-01

    We present a comparison of azimuthally averaged radial surface brightness μ(r) profiles and analytical bulge-disc decompositions (de Vaucouleurs, r1/4 bulge plus exponential disc) for spiral galaxies using Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys V-band imaging from the Space Telescope A901/2 Galaxy Evolution Survey (STAGES). In the established classification scheme, antitruncated μ(r) profiles (Type III) have a broken exponential disc with a shallower region beyond the break radius rbrk. The excess light at large radii (r > rbrk) can either be caused by an outer exponential disc (Type III-d) or an extended spheroidal component (Type III-s). Using our comparisons, we determine the contribution of bulge light at r > rbrk for a large sample of 78 (barred/unbarred, Sa-Sd) spiral galaxies with outer disc antitruncations (?). In the majority of cases (˜85 per cent), evidence indicates that excess light at r > rbrk is related to an outer shallow disc (Type III-d). Here, the contribution of bulge light at r > rbrk is either negligible (˜70 per cent) or too little to explain the antitruncation (˜15 per cent). However in the latter cases, bulge light can affect the measured disc properties (e.g. μbrk, outer scalelength). In the remaining cases (˜15 per cent), light at r > rbrk is dominated by the bulge (Type III-s). Here, for most cases the bulge profile dominates at all radii and only occasionally (? galaxies, ˜5 per cent) extends beyond that of a dominant disc and explains the excess light at r > rbrk. We thus conclude that in the vast majority of cases antitruncated outer discs cannot be explained by bulge light and thus remain a pure disc phenomenon.

  20. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  1. Purification and Bicelle Crystallization for Structure Determination of the E. coli Outer Membrane Protein TamA.

    PubMed

    Gruss, Fabian; Hiller, Sebastian; Maier, Timm

    2015-01-01

    TamA is an Omp85 protein involved in autotransporter assembly in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. It comprises a C-terminal 16-stranded transmembrane β-barrel as well as three periplasmic POTRA domains, and is a challenging target for structure determination. Here, we present a method for crystal structure determination of TamA, including recombinant expression in E. coli, detergent extraction, chromatographic purification, and bicelle crystallization in combination with seeding. As a result, crystals in space group P21212 are obtained, which diffract to 2.3 Å resolution. This protocol also serves as a template for structure determination of other outer membrane proteins, in particular of the Omp85 family.

  2. Depositional history of Louisiana-Mississippi outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, J.L.; Miller, R.J.; Stelting, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    A geological study was undertaken in 1981 in the Louisiana-Mississippi outer continental shelf for the Bureau of Land Management. The study included a high-resolution seismic reflection survey, surficial sediment sampling and surface current drifter sampling. Approximately 7100 sq km of the Louisiana-Mississippi shelf and upper slope were surveyed. The sea floor of the entire area is relatively smooth except for occasional areas of uplift produced by diapiric intrusion along the upper slope. Characteristics of the topography and subsurface shelf sediments are the result of depositional sequences due to delta outbuilding over transgressive sediments with intervening periods of erosion during low sea level stands. Little evidence of structural deformation such as faults, diapirs, and shallow gas is present on the shelf and only a few minor faults and scarps are found on the slope. Minisparker seismic records in combination with air gun (40 and 5 cu in) and 3.5-kHz subbottom profile records reveal that seven major stages of shelf development have occurred since the middle Pleistocene. The shelf development has been controlled by the rise and fall of sea level. These stages are defined by four major unconformities, several depositions of transgressive sediments, sequences of river channeling and progradational delta deposits. Surficial sediment sample and seismic records indicate tat the last major depositional event was the progradation of the St. Bernard Delta lobe. This delta lobe covered the northwestern and central regions. Surficial sediments in most of the study area are the product of the reworking of the San Bernard Delta lobe and previous progradations.

  3. Testing for recombinant erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Bollen, Mathieu; Beullens, Monique

    2008-03-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is a glycoprotein hormone that promotes the production of red blood cells. Recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) is illicitly used to improve performance in endurance sports. Doping in sports is discouraged by the screening of athletes for rhEpo. Both direct tests (indicating the presence of exogeneous Epo isoforms) and indirect tests (indicating hematological changes induced by exogenous Epo administration) can be used for Epo detection. At present, the test adopted by the World Anti Doping Agency is based on a combination of isoelectric focusing and double immunoblotting, and distinguishes between endogenous and rhEpo. However, the adopted monoclonal anti-Epo antibodies are not monospecific. Therefore, the test can occasionally lead to the false-positive detection of rhEpo (epoetin-beta) in post-exercise, protein-rich urine, or in case of contamination of the sample with microorganisms. An improved preanalytical care may counteract a lot of these problems. Adaptation of the criteria may be helpful to further refine direct Epo testing. Indirect tests have the disadvantage that they require blood instead of urine samples, but they can be applied to detect a broader range of performance improving techniques which are illicitly used in sports.

  4. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  5. THE OUTER MAGNETIC FIELD OF L183

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Dan P.

    2012-03-20

    The L183 (= L134N) dark molecular cloud has been probed using deep near-infrared imaging polarimetry of stars to beyond 14 mag in H band (1.6 {mu}m), using the Mimir instrument on the 1.83 m Perkins Telescope. Nearly 400 arcmin{sup 2} were surveyed, including the dense core in L183, as seen in WISE Band 3 (12 {mu}m) extinction, and the near surroundings, revealing 35 stars with either detected polarizations or significant upper limits. Stars with detected polarizations are reddened if closer than 8 arcmin (0.25 pc at the 110 pc cloud distance) and unreddened beyond. The polarimetric sample probes as close to the core as 3 arcmin (0.1 pc), where A{sub V} {approx} 14 mag. Compared to the relatively unextincted surrounding stars, the reddened stars show no increase in polarization with extinction, suggesting that all of the polarization is induced in the outer layers of the cloud. This 0.25 pc radius envelope magnetic field does show a strong interaction with the L183 dark cloud. The envelope field is also virtually perpendicular, on the plane of the sky, to the field seen at 850 {mu}m, though more closely aligned with the rotation axis of the dense gas core. The physical size scale at which the envelope and the core magnetic fields either decouple from each other or strongly modify their directions must be inside the 0.1 pc region probed here.

  6. Substructure of the outer dynein arm

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The substructure of the outer dynein arm has been analyzed in quick- frozen deep-etch replicas of Tetrahymena and Chlamydomonas axonemes. Each arm is found to be composed of five morphologically discrete components: an elliptical head; two spherical feet; a slender stalk; and an interdynein linker. The feet make contact with the A microtubule of each doublet; the stalk contacts the B microtubule; the head lies between the feet and stalk; and the linker associates each arm with its neighbor. The spatial relationships between these five components are found to be distinctly different in rigor (ATP-depleted) versus relaxed (ATP- or vanadate plus ATP-treated) axonemes, and the stalk appears to alter its affinity for the B microtubule in the relaxed state. Images of living cilia attached to Tetrahymena cells show that the relaxed configuration is adopted in vivo. We relate our observations to morphological and experimental studies reported by others and propose several models that suggest how this newly described dynein morphology may relate to dynein function. PMID:6218174

  7. The Outer Heliosphere: The Next Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, K.; Fichtner, Horst; Fahr, Hans Jörg; Marsch, Eckart

    The 11th COSPAR Colloquium "The Outer Heliosphere: The Next Frontiers" was held in Potsdam, Germany, from July 24 to 28, 2000, and is the second dedicated to this subject after the first one held in Warsaw, Poland in 1989. Roughly a century has passed after the first ideas by Oliver Lodge, George Francis Fitzgerald and Kristan Birkeland about particle clouds emanating from the Sun and interacting with the Earth environment. Only a few decades after the formulation of the concepts of a continuous solar corpuscular radiation by Ludwig Bierman and a solar wind by Eugene Parker, heliospheric physics has evolved into an important branch of astrophysical research. Numerous spacecraft missions have increased the knowledge about the heliosphere tremendously. Now, at the beginning of a new millenium it seems possible, by newly developed propulasion technologies to send a spacecraft beyond the boundaries of the heliosphere. Such an Interstellar Proce will start the in-situ exploration of interstellar space and, thus, can be considered as the first true astrophysical spacecraft. The year 2000 appeared to be a highly welcome occassion to review the achievements since the last COSPAR Colloquia 11 years ago, to summarize the present developments and to give new impulse for future activities in heliospheric research.

  8. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles and vaccine applications.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates.

  9. Outer membrane vesicles as platform vaccine technology

    PubMed Central

    Stork, Michiel; van der Ley, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released spontaneously during growth by many Gram‐negative bacteria. They present a range of surface antigens in a native conformation and have natural properties like immunogenicity, self‐adjuvation and uptake by immune cells which make them attractive for application as vaccines against pathogenic bacteria. In particular with Neisseria meningitidis, they have been investigated extensively and an OMV‐containing meningococcal vaccine has recently been approved by regulatory agencies. Genetic engineering of the OMV‐producing bacteria can be used to improve and expand their usefulness as vaccines. Recent work on meningitis B vaccines shows that OMVs can be modified, such as for lipopolysaccharide reactogenicity, to yield an OMV product that is safe and effective. The overexpression of crucial antigens or simultaneous expression of multiple antigenic variants as well as the expression of heterologous antigens enable expansion of their range of applications. In addition, modifications may increase the yield of OMV production and can be combined with specific production processes to obtain high amounts of well‐defined, stable and uniform OMV particle vaccine products. Further improvement can facilitate the development of OMVs as platform vaccine product for multiple applications. PMID:26912077

  10. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles and Vaccine Applications

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A.; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates. PMID:24715891

  11. Inner and outer horizons of time experience.

    PubMed

    Wackermann, Jirí

    2007-05-01

    Human experience of temporal durations exhibits a multi-regional structure, with more or less distinct boundaries, or horizons, on the scale of physical duration. The inner horizons are imposed by perceptual thresholds for simultaneity (approximately equal to 3 ms) and temporal order (approximatly equal to 30 ms), and are determined by the dynamical properties of the neural substrate integrating sensory information. Related to the inner horizon of experienced time are perceptual or cognitive "moments." Comparative data on autokinetic times suggest that these moments may be relatively invariant (approximately equal to 10(2) ms) across a wide range of species. Extension of the "sensible present" (approximately equal to 3 s) defines an intermediate horizon, beyond which the generic experience of duration develops. The domain of immediate duration experience is delimited by the ultimate outer horizon at about = 10(2) s, as evidenced by analysis of duration reproduction experiments (reproducibility horizon), probably determined by relaxation times of "neural accumulators." Beyond these phenomenal horizons, time is merely cognitively (re)constructed, not actually experienced or "perceived," a fact that is frequently ignored by contemporary time perception research. The nyocentric organization of time experience shows an interesting analogy with the egocentric organization of space, suggesting that structures of subjective space and time are derived from active motion as a common experiential basis.

  12. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair.

  13. Homologous recombination prevents methylation-induced toxicity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nowosielska, Anetta; Smith, Stephen A; Engelward, Bevin P; Marinus, M G

    2006-01-01

    Methylating agents such as N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) produce a wide variety of N- and O-methylated bases in DNA, some of which can block replication fork progression. Homologous recombination is a mechanism by which chromosome replication can proceed despite the presence of lesions. The two major recombination pathways, RecBCD and RecFOR, which repair double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-strand gaps respectively, are needed to protect against toxicity with the RecBCD system being more important. We find that recombination-deficient cell lines, such as recBCD recF, and ruvC recG, are as sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of MMS and MNNG as the most base excision repair (BER)-deficient (alkA tag) isogenic mutant strain. Recombination and BER-deficient double mutants (alkA tag recBCD) were more sensitive to MNNG and MMS than the single mutants suggesting that homologous recombination and BER play essential independent roles. Cells deleted for the polA (DNA polymerase I) or priA (primosome) genes are as sensitive to MMS and MNNG as alkA tag bacteria. Our results suggest that the mechanism of cytotoxicity by alkylating agents includes the necessity for homologous recombination to repair DSBs and single-strand gaps produced by DNA replication at blocking lesions or single-strand nicks resulting from AP-endonuclease action.

  14. Newborns' Face Recognition: Role of Inner and Outer Facial Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turati, Chiara; Macchi Cassia, Viola; Simion, Francesca; Leo, Irene

    2006-01-01

    Existing data indicate that newborns are able to recognize individual faces, but little is known about what perceptual cues drive this ability. The current study showed that either the inner or outer features of the face can act as sufficient cues for newborns' face recognition (Experiment 1), but the outer part of the face enjoys an advantage…

  15. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  16. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, H.; Ledjeff, K.

    1984-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive the discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  17. Recombination device for storage batteries

    DOEpatents

    Kraft, Helmut; Ledjeff, Konstantin

    1985-01-01

    A recombination device including a gas-tight enclosure connected to receive he discharge gases from a rechargeable storage battery. Catalytic material for the recombination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water is supported within the enclosure. The enclosure is sealed from the atmosphere by a liquid seal including two vertical chambers interconnected with an inverted U-shaped overflow tube. The first chamber is connected at its upper portion to the enclosure and the second chamber communicates at its upper portion with the atmosphere. If the pressure within the enclosure differs as overpressure or vacuum by more than the liquid level, the liquid is forced into one of the two chambers and the overpressure is vented or the vacuum is relieved. The recombination device also includes means for returning recombined liquid to the battery and for absorbing metal hydrides.

  18. Perovskite photovoltaics: Slow recombination unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Jacques-E.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most salient features of hybrid lead halide perovskites is the extended lifetime of their photogenerated charge carriers. This property has now been shown experimentally to originate from a slow, thermally activated recombination process.

  19. Stable recombination hotspots in birds.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sonal; Leffler, Ellen M; Sannareddy, Keerthi; Turner, Isaac; Venn, Oliver; Hooper, Daniel M; Strand, Alva I; Li, Qiye; Raney, Brian; Balakrishnan, Christopher N; Griffith, Simon C; McVean, Gil; Przeworski, Molly

    2015-11-20

    The DNA-binding protein PRDM9 has a critical role in specifying meiotic recombination hotspots in mice and apes, but it appears to be absent from other vertebrate species, including birds. To study the evolution and determinants of recombination in species lacking the gene that encodes PRDM9, we inferred fine-scale genetic maps from population resequencing data for two bird species: the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, and the long-tailed finch, Poephila acuticauda. We found that both species have recombination hotspots, which are enriched near functional genomic elements. Unlike in mice and apes, most hotspots are shared between the two species, and their conservation seems to extend over tens of millions of years. These observations suggest that in the absence of PRDM9, recombination targets functional features that both enable access to the genome and constrain its evolution.

  20. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  1. Combinatorics in Recombinational Population Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, Laxmi

    The work that I will discuss is motivated by the need for understanding, and processing, the manifestations of recombination events in chromosome sequences. In this talk, we focus on two related problems. First, we explore the very general problem of reconstructability of pedigree history. How plausible is it to unravel the history of a complete unit (chromosome) of inheritance? The second problem deals with reconstructing the recombinational history of a collection of chromosomes.

  2. Far Outer Galaxy H II Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, A. L.; deGues, E. J.; Brand, J.; Wouterloot, J. G. A.; Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have made a multifrequency (6, 3.6, and 2 cm), high-resolution (3"-6"), radio continuum survey of IRAS selected sources from the catalogue of Wouterloot & Brand (1989) to search for and study H II regions in the far outer Galaxy. We identified 31 sources in this catalog with well determined galactocentric distances, and with R approx.. greater than 15 kpc and L(sub FIR) approx.greater than 10(exp 4) solar luminosity, indicating the presence of high-mass star-formation. We have observed 11 of these sources with the Very Large Array (VLA). We observed the sources at 6 and 2 cm using "scaled arrays", making possible a direct and reliable comparison of the data at these two wavelengths for the determination of spectral indices. We detected a total of 12 radio sources, of which 10 have spectral indices consistent with optically-thin free-free emission from H II regions. Combined with previous VLA observations by other investigators, we have data on a total of 15 H II regions at galactocentric distances of 15 to 18.2kpc, among the most remote H II regions found in our Galaxy. The sizes of the H II regions range from approx. less than 0.10 to 2.3 pc. Using the measured fluxes and sizes, we determine the electron densities, emission measures, and excitation parameters of the H II regions, as well as the fluxes of Lyman continuum photons needed to keep the nebulae ionized. The sizes and electron densities are consistent with most of the sources detected in this survey being compact or ultracompact H II regions. Seven of the fifteen H II regions have sizes approx. less than 0.20 pc. Assuming simple pressure-driven expansion of the H II regions, these sizes indicate ages approx. less than 5 x 10(exp 4) yr, or only 1% of the lifetime of an O star, which implies an unlikely overabundance of O stars in the outer Galaxy. Thus, the large number of compact H II regions suggests that the time these regions spend in a compact phase must be much longer than their dynamical

  3. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  4. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  5. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  6. Selective Advantage of Recombination in Evolving Protein Populations:. a Lattice Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul D.; Pollock, David D.; Goldstein, Richard A.

    Recent research has attempted to clarify the contributions of several mutational processes, such as substitutions or homologous recombination. Simplistic, tractable protein models, which determine the compact native structure phenotype from the sequence genotype, are well-suited to such studies. In this paper, we use a lattice-protein model to examine the effects of point mutation and homologous recombination on evolving populations of proteins. We find that while the majority of mutation and recombination events are neutral or deleterious, recombination is far more likely to be beneficial. This results in a faster increase in fitness during evolution, although the final fitness level is not significantly changed. This transient advantage provides an evolutionary advantage to subpopulations that undergo recombination, allowing fixation of recombination to occur in the population.

  7. Modification by chloramphenicol of diethyl sulphate-induced male recombination frequency in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Miglani, G S; Kaur, N P

    1995-06-01

    To study the effect of chloramphenicol (CPL, an inhibitor of protein synthesis) on diethyl sulphate (DES, a potent mutagen) induced male recombination frequency, the F1 (+/aristaless dumpy black cinnabar, al dp b cn) larvae of D. melanogaster were given a pre- or post-treatment of CPL with DES during the first or second half of larval life. In order to determine sensitivity of different germ cell stages to the induction and modification of male recombination frequency, five 3-day broods were taken from every F1 male. DES showed toxic effect on egg-to-adult development. DES was found to be a potent recombinogen. Several cases of non-reciprocal male recombination were recorded. The most frequent recombinant phenotype observed was b cn followed by cn and al. Majority of the recombinants appeared in clusters suggesting their pre-meiotic origin. DES produced male recombination at a stage where only primary spermatocytes were present in the larval testes. CPL when given as a pre- or post-treatment with DES revealed highest frequency of male recombination in broods that represented effect of treatment on spermatogonia predominantly. CPL enhanced the overall level of male recombination produced by DES in both pre- and post-treatments. The results suggested the role of protein synthesis in induction of male recombination in D. melanogaster. In addition, the present experiments give a methodology of enhancing the frequency of chemically-induced male recombination.

  8. Statistical Analysis on Detecting Recombination Sites in DNA-β Satellites Associated with Old World Geminiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai; Yoshida, Ruriko

    2010-01-01

    Although exchange of genetic information by recombination plays an important role in the evolution of viruses, it is not clear how it generates diversity. Understanding recombination events helps with the study of the evolution of new virus strains or new viruses. Geminiviruses are plant viruses which have ambisense single-stranded circular DNA genomes and are one of the most economically important plant viruses in agricultural production. Small circular single-stranded DNA satellites, termed DNA-β, have recently been found to be associated with some geminivirus infections. In this paper we analyze several DNA-β sequences of geminiviruses for recombination events using phylogenetic and statistical analysis and we find that one strain from ToLCMaB has a recombination pattern and is a recombinant molecule between two strains from two species, PaLCuB-[IN:Chi:05] (major parent) and ToLCB-[IN:CP:04] (minor parent). We propose that this recombination event contributed to the evolution of the strain of ToLCMaB in South India. The Hidden Markov Chain (HMM) method developed by Webb et al. (2009) estimating phylogenetic tree through out the whole alignment provide us a recombination history of these DNA-β strains. It is the first time that this statistic method has been used on DNA-β recombination study and give a clear recombination history of DNA-β recombination. PMID:21423447

  9. Proteomic analysis of Lawsonia intracellularis reveals expression of outer membrane proteins during infection.

    PubMed

    Watson, Eleanor; Alberdi, M Pilar; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Porter, Megan E; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Mclean, Kevin; Smith, David G E

    2014-12-05

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the aetiological agent of the commercially significant porcine disease, proliferative enteropathy. Current understanding of host-pathogen interaction is limited due to the fastidious microaerophilic obligate intracellular nature of the bacterium. In the present study, expression of bacterial proteins during infection was investigated using a mass spectrometry approach. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of two isolates of L. intracellularis from heavily-infected epithelial cell cultures and database mining using fully annotated L. intracellularis genome sequences identified 19 proteins. According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional classification, proteins were identified with roles in cell metabolism, protein synthesis and oxidative stress protection; seven proteins with putative or unknown function were also identified. Detailed bioinformatic analyses of five uncharacterised proteins, which were expressed by both isolates, identified domains and motifs common to other outer membrane-associated proteins with important roles in pathogenesis including adherence and invasion. Analysis of recombinant proteins on Western blots using immune sera from L. intracellularis-infected pigs identified two proteins, LI0841 and LI0902 as antigenic. The detection of five outer membrane proteins expressed during infection, including two antigenic proteins, demonstrates the potential of this approach to interrogate L. intracellularis host-pathogen interactions and identify novel targets which may be exploited in disease control.

  10. High-Mass Star Formation in the Outer Scutum-Centaurus Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armentrout, William P.; Anderson, Loren D.; Balser, Dana S.; Bania, Thomas M.; Dame, Thomas M.; Wenger, Trey

    2016-01-01

    The HII Region Discovery Survey (HRDS; Bania et al., 2010) has discovered nearly 1000 HII regions by detecting their radio recombination line (RRL) emission using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and the Arecibo Observatory. Observations of RRLs allow us to measure source velocities and determine positions within the Galaxy using a rotation curve model, but until recently our sample in the far outer Galaxy was incomplete. Using HI and CO data, Dame & Thaddeus (2011) identified an extension of the Scutum-Centaurus spiral arm, deemed the Outer Scutum-Centaurus arm, or OSC. This arm offers a new laboratory for the study of Galactic structure, high-mass star formation, and chemistry of the outer Galaxy. We searched for new Galactic HII regions in the OSC by targeting infrared-identified candidates that have an (l,b) location consistent with this arm. We have discovered 10 OSC HII regions thus far, using observations of: (1) VLA 9 GHz continuum to identify thermally emitting sources, (2) GBT RRLs to detect evolved HII regions, and (3) GBT NH3 to detect younger HII regions. Detected regions lie at an average Heliocentric distance of 20.0 ± 1.4 kpc and an average Galactocentric distance of 14.5 ± 1.4 kpc. The most distant region detected has a Heliocentric distance of 23.5 kpc and a Galactocentric distance of 17.0 kpc. These are the most distant known Galactic high-mass star formation regions. We will present the results of ongoing NH3 observations with the GBT, which will likely increase the sample of OSC HII regions further.

  11. Horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis

    PubMed Central

    McNeilly, Celia L.; McMillan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) is a human pathogen that colonizes the skin or throat, and causes a range of diseases from relatively benign pharyngitis to potentially fatal invasive diseases. While not as virulent as the close relative Streptococcus pyogenes the two share a number of virulence factors and are known to coexist in a human host. Both pre- and post-genomic studies have revealed that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and recombination occurs between these two organisms and plays a major role in shaping the population structure of SDSE. This review summarizes our current knowledge of HGT and recombination in the evolution of SDSE. PMID:25566202

  12. Genome-wide analyses of recombination suggest that Giardia intestinalis assemblages represent different species.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feifei; Jerlström-Hultqvist, Jon; Andersson, Jan O

    2012-10-01

    Giardia intestinalis is a major cause of waterborne enteric disease in humans. The species is divided into eight assemblages suggested to represent separate Giardia species based on host specificities and the genetic divergence of marker genes. We have investigated whether genome-wide recombination occurs between assemblages using the three available G. intestinalis genomes. First, the relative nonsynonymous substitution rates of the homologs were compared for 4,009 positional homologs. The vast majority of these comparisons indicate genetic isolation without interassemblage recombinations. Only a region of 6 kbp suggests genetic exchange between assemblages A and E, followed by gene conversion events. Second, recombination-detecting software fails to identify within-gene recombination between the different assemblages for most of the homologs. Our results indicate very low frequency of recombination between the syntenic core genes, suggesting that G. intestinalis assemblages are genetically isolated lineages and thus should be viewed as separated Giardia species.

  13. Optogenetic Control of Mouse Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Wilson, Teresa; Chen, Fangyi; Porsov, Edward; Subhash, Hrebesh; Foster, Sarah; Zhang, Yuan; Omelchenko, Irina; Bateschell, Michael; Wang, Lingyan; Brigande, John V.; Jiang, Zhi-Gen; Mao, Tianyi; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2016-01-01

    Normal hearing in mammals depends on sound amplification by outer hair cells (OHCs) presumably by their somatic motility and force production. However, the role of OHC force production in cochlear amplification and frequency tuning are not yet fully understood. Currently, available OHC manipulation techniques for physiological or clinical studies are limited by their invasive nature, lack of precision, and poor temporal-spatial resolution. To overcome these limitations, we explored an optogenetic approach based on channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR-2), a direct light-activated nonselective cation channel originally discovered in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Three approaches were compared: 1) adeno-associated virus-mediated in utero transfer of the ChR-2 gene into the developing murine otocyst, 2) expression of ChR-2(H134R) in an auditory cell line (HEI-OC1), and 3) expression of ChR-2 in the OHCs of a mouse line carrying a ChR-2 conditional allele. Whole cell recording showed that blue light (470 nm) elicited the typical nonselective cation current of ChR-2 with reversal potential around zero in both mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and generated depolarization in both cell types. In addition, pulsed light stimulation (10 Hz) elicited a 1:1 repetitive depolarization and ChR-2 currents in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells, respectively. The time constant of depolarization in OHCs, 1.45 ms, is 10 times faster than HEI-OC1 cells, which allowed light stimulation up to rates of 10/s to elicit corresponding membrane potential changes. Our study demonstrates that ChR-2 can successfully be expressed in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and that these present a typical light-sensitive current and depolarization. However, the amount of ChR-2 current induced in our in vivo experiments was insufficient to result in measurable cochlear effects. PMID:26789771

  14. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  15. Recombination Drives Vertebrate Genome Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kiwoong; Ellegren, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Selective and/or neutral processes may govern variation in DNA content and, ultimately, genome size. The observation in several organisms of a negative correlation between recombination rate and intron size could be compatible with a neutral model in which recombination is mutagenic for length changes. We used whole-genome data on small insertions and deletions within transposable elements from chicken and zebra finch to demonstrate clear links between recombination rate and a number of attributes of reduced DNA content. Recombination rate was negatively correlated with the length of introns, transposable elements, and intergenic spacer and with the rate of short insertions. Importantly, it was positively correlated with gene density, the rate of short deletions, the deletion bias, and the net change in sequence length. All these observations point at a pattern of more condensed genome structure in regions of high recombination. Based on the observed rates of small insertions and deletions and assuming that these rates are representative for the whole genome, we estimate that the genome of the most recent common ancestor of birds and lizards has lost nearly 20% of its DNA content up until the present. Expansion of transposable elements can counteract the effect of deletions in an equilibrium mutation model; however, since the activity of transposable elements has been low in the avian lineage, the deletion bias is likely to have had a significant effect on genome size evolution in dinosaurs and birds, contributing to the maintenance of a small genome. We also demonstrate that most of the observed correlations between recombination rate and genome contraction parameters are seen in the human genome, including for segregating indel polymorphisms. Our data are compatible with a neutral model in which recombination drives vertebrate genome size evolution and gives no direct support for a role of natural selection in this process. PMID:22570634

  16. The development of the mammalian outer and middle ear.

    PubMed

    Anthwal, Neal; Thompson, Hannah

    2016-02-01

    The mammalian ear is a complex structure divided into three main parts: the outer; middle; and inner ear. These parts are formed from all three germ layers and neural crest cells, which have to integrate successfully in order to form a fully functioning organ of hearing. Any defect in development of the outer and middle ear leads to conductive hearing loss, while defects in the inner ear can lead to sensorineural hearing loss. This review focuses on the development of the parts of the ear involved with sound transduction into the inner ear, and the parts largely ignored in the world of hearing research: the outer and middle ear. The published data on the embryonic origin, signalling, genetic control, development and timing of the mammalian middle and outer ear are reviewed here along with new data showing the Eustachian tube cartilage is of dual embryonic origin. The embryonic origin of some of these structures has only recently been uncovered (Science, 339, 2013, 1453; Development, 140, 2013, 4386), while the molecular mechanisms controlling the growth, structure and integration of many outer and middle ear components are hardly known. The genetic analysis of outer and middle ear development is rather limited, with a small number of genes often affecting either more than one part of the ear or having only very small effects on development. This review therefore highlights the necessity for further research into the development of outer and middle ear structures, which will be important for the understanding and treatment of conductive hearing loss.

  17. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  18. [Analysis of the 4th generation outer space bred Angelica dahurica by FTIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan-ying; Wu, Peng-le; Liu, Mei-yi; Wang, Zhi-zhou; Guo, Xi-hua; Guan, Ying

    2012-03-01

    The major components of the 4th generation outer space bred angelica and the ground group were determined and analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and second derivative spectrum, considering the large mutation of the plants with space mutagenesis. The results show that the content of the coumarin (1741 cm(-1)), which is the main active components of the space angelica dahurica increased, and the content of the protein (1 459, 1 419 cm(-1)) and the fat (930 cm(-1)) increased slightly, whereas the content of the starch and the dietary fiber reduced drastically. There are obvious differences between the peak values of the second derivative spectra of the plants, revealing that the outer space angelica dahurica contained amine component at 1 279 cm(-1). Space mutation breeding is favor of breeding angelica with better idiosyncrasy.

  19. Outer membrane proteins can be simply identified using secondary structure element alignment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are frequently found in the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts and have been found to play diverse functional roles. Computational discrimination of OMPs from globular proteins and other types of membrane proteins is helpful to accelerate new genome annotation and drug discovery. Results Based on the observation that almost all OMPs consist of antiparallel β-strands in a barrel shape and that their secondary structure arrangements differ from those of other types of proteins, we propose a simple method called SSEA-OMP to identify OMPs using secondary structure element alignment. Through intensive benchmark experiments, the proposed SSEA-OMP method is better than some well-established OMP detection methods. Conclusions The major advantage of SSEA-OMP is its good prediction performance considering its simplicity. The web server implements the method is freely accessible at http://protein.cau.edu.cn/SSEA-OMP/index.html. PMID:21414186

  20. The role of outer membrane in Serratia marcescens intrinsic resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L; Ruiz, N; Leranoz, S; Viñas, M; Puig, M

    1997-09-01

    Three different porins from Serratia marcescens were described. They were named Omp1, Omp2 and Omp3 and their molecular weights were 42, 40 and 39 kDa respectively. Omp2 and Omp3 showed osmoregulation and thermoregulation in a similar way to OmpC and OmpF of Escherichia coli. Permeability coefficients of the outer membrane of this species were calculated following the Zimmermann and Rosselet method. P values were similar to those obtained in Escherichia coli, which suggests that the chromosomal beta-lactamase would play a major role in the resistance of Serratia marcescens to beta-lactam antibiotics. Both MIC values and permeabilities were modified by salycilates and acetylsalycilate. Synergism between the outer membrane and the beta-lactamase was also evaluated. When bacteria grew in the presence of a beta-lactam in the medium, the beta-lactamase accounted for most of the resistance.

  1. Biochemical characteristics of the outer membranes of plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Mannella, C A; Bonner, W D

    1975-12-01

    Like the outer membranes of liver mitochondria, those of plant mitochondria are impermeable to cytochrome c when intact and can be ruptured by osmotic shock. Isolated plant outer mitochondrial membranes are also similar to the corresponding liver membranes in terms of phospholipid and sterol content. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a single class of proteins (apparent molecular weight 30 000) comprises the bulk of the plant outer membrane protein. There are also considerable amounts of polysaccharide associated with these membranes, which may contribute to their osmotic stability.

  2. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    PubMed

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.

  3. Radioisotope Reduction Using Solar Power for Outer Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincannon, James

    2008-01-01

    Radioisotope power systems have historically been (and still are) the power system of choice from a mass and size perspective for outer planetary missions. High demand for and limited availability of radioisotope fuel has made it necessary to investigate alternatives to this option. Low mass, high efficiency solar power systems have the potential for use at low outer planetary temperatures and illumination levels. This paper documents the impacts of using solar power systems instead of radioisotope power for all or part of the power needs of outer planetary spacecraft and illustrates the potential fuel savings of such an approach.

  4. It's Major! College Major Selection & Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Jenny; Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.; Springall, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Presented at the College Board National Forum, October 26, 2011. Choosing a college major is challenging enough, without stopping to consider the impact it has on a student's college experience and career choice. To provide support during this major decision, participants in this session will develop strategies to facilitate students in making an…

  5. Mineral resource management of the Outer Continental Shelf : leasing procedures, evaluation of resources, and supervision of production operations on leased lands of the Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Maurice V.; John, C.B.; Kelly, R.F.; LaPointe, A.E.; Meurer, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    An important function of the Geological Survey is the evaluation and management of the mineral resources of the Outer Continental Shelf, particularly with respect to oil and gas, salt, and sulfur. Production of oil and gas from the Outer Continental Shelf of the United States has increased substantially over the past 20 years and represents an increasing percentage of total United States production. As discovery of major onshore production of oil and gas has become more difficult, the search has moved into the surrounding waters where submerged sedimentary formations are conducive to the accumulation of oil and gas. Increased energy demands of recent years have accelerated the pace of offshore operations with a corresponding improvement in technology as exploration and development have proceeded farther from shore and into deeper water. While improved technology and enforcement of more stringent regulations have made offshore operations safer, it is unrealistic to believe that completely accident-free operations can ever be achieved. Only slightly more than six percent of the world's continental terrace is adjacent to the United States, but less than one percent has been explored for oil and gas. Since the lead time for the development of offshore oil and gas resources can be as much as a decade, they do not provide an immediate energy supply but should be viewed in the light of a near-term source with a potential of becoming a medium-range source of supply pending the development of alternative energy sources. Revenues from the Outer Continental Shelf are deposited to the general fund of the United States Treasury. A major portion of these funds is allocated to the Land and Water Conservation Fund, the largest Federal grant-in-aid program of assistance to States, counties, and cities for the acquisition and development of public parks, open space, and recreation lands and water.

  6. Analysis of HIV type 1 BF recombinant sequences from South America dates the origin of CRF12_BF to a recombination event in the 1970s.

    PubMed

    Dilernia, Dario A; Jones, Leandro R; Pando, Maria A; Rabinovich, Roberto D; Damilano, Gabriel D; Turk, Gabriela; Rubio, Andrea E; Pampuro, Sandra; Gomez-Carrillo, Manuel; Salomón, Horacio

    2011-05-01

    HIV-1 epidemics in South America are believed to have originated in part from the subtype B epidemic initiated in the Caribbean/North America region. However, circulation of BF recombinants in similar proportions was extensively reported. Information currently shows that many BF recombinants share a recombination structure similar to that found in the CRF12_BF. In the present study, analyzing a set of 405 HIV sequences, we identified the most likely origin of the BF epidemic in an early event of recombination. We found that the subtype B epidemics in South America analyzed in the present study were initiated by a founder event that occurred in the early 1970s, a few years after the introduction of these strains in the Americas. Regarding the F/BF recombinant epidemics, by analyzing a subtype F genomic segment within the viral gene gag present in the majority of the BF recombinants, we found evidence of a geographic divergence very soon after the introduction of subtype F strains in South America. Moreover, through analysis of a subtype B segment present in all the CRF12_BF-like recombination structure, we estimated the circulation of the subtype B strain that gave rise to that recombinant structure around the same time period estimated for the introduction of subtype F strains. The HIV epidemics in South America were initiated in part through a founder event driven by subtype B strains coming from the previously established epidemic in the north of the continent. A second introduction driven by subtype F strains is likely to have encountered the incipient subtype B epidemic that soon after their arrival recombined with them, originating the BF epidemic in the region. These results may explain why in South America the majority of F sequences are found as BF recombinants.

  7. Telomere Recombination Accelerates Cellular Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Fen; Meng, Fei-Long; Zhou, Jin-Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures located at the linear ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomere integrity is required for cell proliferation and survival. Although the vast majority of eukaryotic species use telomerase as a primary means for telomere maintenance, a few species can use recombination or retrotransposon-mediated maintenance pathways. Since Saccharomyces cerevisiae can use both telomerase and recombination to replicate telomeres, budding yeast provides a useful system with which to examine the evolutionary advantages of telomerase and recombination in preserving an organism or cell under natural selection. In this study, we examined the life span in telomerase-null, post-senescent type II survivors that have employed homologous recombination to replicate their telomeres. Type II recombination survivors stably maintained chromosomal integrity but exhibited a significantly reduced replicative life span. Normal patterns of cell morphology at the end of a replicative life span and aging-dependent sterility were observed in telomerase-null type II survivors, suggesting the type II survivors aged prematurely in a manner that is phenotypically consistent with that of wild-type senescent cells. The shortened life span of type II survivors was extended by calorie restriction or TOR1 deletion, but not by Fob1p inactivation or Sir2p over-expression. Intriguingly, rDNA recombination was decreased in type II survivors, indicating that the premature aging of type II survivors was not caused by an increase in extra-chromosomal rDNA circle accumulation. Reintroduction of telomerase activity immediately restored the replicative life span of type II survivors despite their heterogeneous telomeres. These results suggest that telomere recombination accelerates cellular aging in telomerase-null type II survivors and that telomerase is likely a superior telomere maintenance pathway in sustaining yeast replicative life span. PMID:19557187

  8. The Dissociative Recombination of OH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum chemical calculations of the cross sections and rates for the dissociative recombination of the upsilon = 0 level of the ground state of OH(+) show that recombination occurs primarily along the 2 (2)Pi diabatic route. The products are 0((1)D) and a hot H atom with 6.1 eV kinetic energy. The coupling to the resonances is very small and the indirect recombination mechanism plays only a minor role. The recommended value for the rate coefficient is (6.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp -9)x (T(e)/1300)(exp -0.48) cu.cm/s for 10 less than T(e) less than 1000 K.

  9. DNA recombination: the replication connection.

    PubMed

    Haber, J E

    1999-07-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise after exposure to ionizing radiation or enzymatic cleavage, but especially during the process of DNA replication itself. Homologous recombination plays a critical role in repair of such DSBs. There has been significant progress in our understanding of two processes that occur in DSB repair: gene conversion and recombination-dependent DNA replication. Recent evidence suggests that gene conversion and break-induced replication are related processes that both begin with the establishment of a replication fork in which both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis occur. There has also been much progress in characterization of the biochemical roles of recombination proteins that are highly conserved from yeast to humans.

  10. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  11. Variation in Recombination Rate: Adaptive or Not?

    PubMed

    Ritz, Kathryn R; Noor, Mohamed A F; Singh, Nadia D

    2017-03-27

    Rates of meiotic recombination are widely variable both within and among species. However, the functional significance of this variation remains largely unknown. Is the observed within-species variation in recombination rate adaptive? Recent work has revealed new insight into the scale and scope of population-level variation in recombination rate. These data indicate that the magnitude of within-population variation in recombination is similar among taxa. The apparent similarity of the variance in recombination rate among individuals between distantly related species suggests that the relative costs and benefits of recombination that establish the upper and lower bounds may be similar across species. Here we review the current data on intraspecific variation in recombination rate and discuss the molecular and evolutionary costs and benefits of recombination frequency. We place this variation in the context of adaptation and highlight the need for more empirical studies focused on the adaptive value of variation in recombination rate.

  12. Radioisotope Electric Propulsion for Fast Outer Planetary Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven; Benson, Scott; Gefert, Leon; Patterson, Michael; Schreiber, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Recent interest in outer planetary targets by the Office of Space Science has spurred the search for technology options to enable relatively quick missions to outer planetary targets. Several options are being explored including solar electric propelled stages combined with aerocapture at the target and nuclear electric propulsion. Another option uses radioisotope powered electric thrusters to reach the outer planets. Past work looked at using this technology to provide faster flybys. A better use for this technology is for outer planet orbiters. Combined with medium class launch vehicles and a new direct trajectory these small, sub-kilowatt ion thrusters and Stirling radioisotope generators were found to allow missions as fast as 5 to 12 years for objects from Saturn to Pluto, respectively. Key to the development is light spacecraft and science payload technologies.

  13. Star-formation efficiency in the outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Natsuko; Kobayashi, Naoto; Yasui, Chikako; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Saito, Masao; Hamano, Satoshi

    2017-03-01

    We report the results of new survey of star-forming regions in the outer Galaxy at Galactocentric radius of more than 13.5 kpc, where the environment is significantly different from that in the solar neighborhood.

  14. Decreasing Outer Hair Cell Membrane Cholesterol Increases Cochlear Electromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, William E.; Jacob, Stefan; Hakizimana, Pierre; Ulfendahl, Mats; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    The effect of decreasing membrane cholesterol on the mechanical response of the cochlea to acoustic and/or electrical stimulation was monitored using laser interferometry. In contrast to pharmacological interventions that typically decrease cochlear electromechanics, reducing membrane cholesterol increased the response. The electromechanical response in untreated preparations was asymmetric with greater displacements in response to positive currents and cholesterol depletion increased the asymmetry. The results confirm that outer hair cell electromotility is enhanced by low membrane cholesterol. The asymmetry of the response indicates the outer hair cell resting membrane potential is hyperpolarized relative to the voltage of maximum gain for the outer hair cell voltage-displacement function. The magnitude of the response increase suggests a non-uniform distribution of cholesterol along the lateral wall of normal adult outer hair cells.

  15. OUTER RIM OF CIRCLE, WITH LIVE OAK TREE AT LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OUTER RIM OF CIRCLE, WITH LIVE OAK TREE AT LEFT FOREGROUND AND CEMETERY SECTION 25 IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO WEST. - Barrancas National Cemetery, Naval Air Station, 80 Hovey Road, Pensacola, Escambia County, FL

  16. Nuclear fuel spacer grid with improved outer straps

    SciTech Connect

    De Mario, E.E.; Knott, R.P.

    1986-04-29

    A grid is described for the spacing of fuel rods in a nuclear reactor fuel assembly, comprising: a plurality of interleaved grid straps arranged in an egg-crate configuration defining cells therein for the separate enclosure of each of the fuel rods; and four outer straps attached together in a generally square-shaped array surrounding the heightwise edges of the grid straps. The outer straps each has a central portion and a top and a bottom resilient lengthwise border portion, with the heightwise edges of the grid straps attached to the central portions of their associated outer straps and with the border portions extending vertically beyond and projecting horizontally outwardly beyond their associated central portions of their common outer straps.

  17. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing/Production Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This annual report on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing and Production program summarizes receipts and expenditures, and includes information on OCS safety violations as reported by the US Coast Guard. 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. 35. OUTER DRAWBRIDGE, ENTRY TO THE PROTECTIVE CORRIDOR BETWEEN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. OUTER DRAWBRIDGE, ENTRY TO THE PROTECTIVE CORRIDOR BETWEEN THE RAVELIN AND THE CASTILLO, AS SEEN FROM WITHIN THE CORRIDOR - Castillo de San Marcos, 1 Castillo Drive, Saint Augustine, St. Johns County, FL

  19. 6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. Recombination Hotspots and Population Structure in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Jianbing; Duan, Junhui; McGee, Kate M; Joy, Deirdre A; McVean, Gilean A. T

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the influences of population structure, selection, and recombination on polymorphism and linkage disequilibrium (LD) is integral to mapping genes contributing to drug resistance or virulence in Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite's short generation time, coupled with a high cross-over rate, can cause rapid LD break-down. However, observations of low genetic variation have led to suggestions of effective clonality: selfing, population admixture, and selection may preserve LD in populations. Indeed, extensive LD surrounding drug-resistant genes has been observed, indicating that recombination and selection play important roles in shaping recent parasite genome evolution. These studies, however, provide only limited information about haplotype variation at local scales. Here we describe the first (to our knowledge) chromosome-wide SNP haplotype and population recombination maps for a global collection of malaria parasites, including the 3D7 isolate, whose genome has been sequenced previously. The parasites are clustered according to continental origin, but alternative groupings were obtained using SNPs at 37 putative transporter genes that are potentially under selection. Geographic isolation and highly variable multiple infection rates are the major factors affecting haplotype structure. Variation in effective recombination rates is high, both among populations and along the chromosome, with recombination hotspots conserved among populations at chromosome ends. This study supports the feasibility of genome-wide association studies in some parasite populations. PMID:16144426

  1. Epistasis and the selective advantage of sex and recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Viviane M.; da Silva, Juliana K.; Campos, Paulo R. A.

    2008-09-01

    The understanding of the central mechanisms favoring sex and recombination in real populations is one of the fundamental issues in evolutionary biology. Based on a previous stochastic formulation for the study of sex, here we aim to investigate the conditions under which epistasis favors the fixation of the sexual mode of reproduction in a given population. In addition, we try to identify the evolutionary forces which contribute to this process. One considers a finite population model which assumes the existence of a recombination modifier allele that can activate the recombination mechanism. We have found that sex is very little favored in a scenario of antagonistic epistasis, and this advantage only occurs in a narrow range of values of the selection coefficient sd . On the other hand, synergistic epistasis favors recombination in a very broad domain. However, the major mechanism contributing to the spreading of the modifier allele depends on the range of values of sd . At large sd , background selection favors recombination since it increases the efficacy of selection, while at low sd Muller’s ratchet is the leading mechanism.

  2. Characterization of hepatic low-K(m) outer-ring deiodination in red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus).

    PubMed

    VanPutte, C L; MacKenzie, D S; Eales, J G

    2001-03-01

    The more biologically active thyroid hormone 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T(3)), is primarily derived from peripheral deiodination of thyroxine (T(4)). We characterized hepatic deiodination for a commercially important, warm water teleost fish, the red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). Low K(m) outer-ring deiodination (ORD) activity was determined by production of free iodide ((125)I) upon incubation of hepatic microsomes with radiolabeled T(4). HPLC analysis demonstrated that (125)I, and T(3) were produced in equal amounts, thereby validating 125I as a measure of T(3) production. A small amount of 3,3',5'-triiodothyronine (reverse T(3)) was also produced by inner-ring deiodination. Production of (125)I was linear over a range of 0--100 microg protein/ml and for incubations of 30 min--4 h. Maximal ORD activity was measured at pH 6.6, 50 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) and an incubation temperature of 20 degrees C. Double reciprocal plots demonstrated that the average apparent K(m) was 5.1 nM and the average V(max) was 3.7 pmol T(4) converted/h per mg protein. ORD was not inhibited by propylthiouracil but was 50% inhibited by 90 microM of iodoacetic acid and 7 microM of gold thioglucose. The substrate analog preference was T(4) = tetraiodoacetic acid = reverse T(3) > triiodoacetic acid > T(3). In relation to other tissues, ORD for liver>gill>intestine>kidney. Similar hepatic deiodination activity was present in adult wild, aquacultured and laboratory-reared red drum, but in adult wild red drum the optimum temperature was higher. Red drum hepatic low-K(m) deiodination activity appears to most closely resemble rainbow trout hepatic and mammalian Type II deiodination. Evidence of inner-ring T(4) deiodination suggests a more active hepatic iodothyronine catabolic pathway than in other teleost species.

  3. TRACING THE OUTER HALO IN A GIANT ELLIPTICAL TO 25 R {sub eff}

    SciTech Connect

    Rejkuba, M.; Harris, W. E.; Greggio, L.; Harris, G. L. H.; Jerjen, H.; Gonzalez, O. A.

    2014-08-10

    We have used the Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 cameras on board the Hubble Space Telescope to resolve stars in the halo of the nearest giant elliptical (gE) galaxy NGC 5128 out to a projected distance of 140 kpc (25 effective radii, R {sub eff}) along the major axis and 90 kpc (16 R {sub eff}) along the minor axis. This data set provides an unprecedented radial coverage of the stellar halo properties in any gE galaxy. Color-magnitude diagrams clearly reveal the presence of the red giant branch stars belonging to the halo of NGC 5128, even in our most distant fields. The star counts demonstrate increasing flattening of the outer halo, which is elongated along the major axis of the galaxy. The V – I colors of the red giants enable us to measure the metallicity distribution in each field and so map the gradient out to ∼16 R {sub eff} from the galaxy center along the major axis. A median metallicity is obtained even for the outermost fields along both axes. We observe a smooth transition from a metal-rich ([M/H] ∼0.0) inner galaxy to lower metallicity in the outer halo, with the metallicity gradient slope along the major axis of Δ[M/H]/ΔR ≅ –0.0054 ± 0.0006 dex kpc{sup –1}. In the outer halo, beyond ∼10 R {sub eff}, the number density profile follows a power law, but also significant field-to-field metallicity and star count variations are detected. The metal-rich component dominates in all observed fields, and the median metallicity is [M/H] >–1 dex in all fields.

  4. Tracing the Outer Halo in a Giant Elliptical to 25 R eff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejkuba, M.; Harris, W. E.; Greggio, L.; Harris, G. L. H.; Jerjen, H.; Gonzalez, O. A.

    2014-08-01

    We have used the Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 cameras on board the Hubble Space Telescope to resolve stars in the halo of the nearest giant elliptical (gE) galaxy NGC 5128 out to a projected distance of 140 kpc (25 effective radii, R eff) along the major axis and 90 kpc (16 R eff) along the minor axis. This data set provides an unprecedented radial coverage of the stellar halo properties in any gE galaxy. Color-magnitude diagrams clearly reveal the presence of the red giant branch stars belonging to the halo of NGC 5128, even in our most distant fields. The star counts demonstrate increasing flattening of the outer halo, which is elongated along the major axis of the galaxy. The V - I colors of the red giants enable us to measure the metallicity distribution in each field and so map the gradient out to ~16 R eff from the galaxy center along the major axis. A median metallicity is obtained even for the outermost fields along both axes. We observe a smooth transition from a metal-rich ([M/H] ~0.0) inner galaxy to lower metallicity in the outer halo, with the metallicity gradient slope along the major axis of Δ[M/H]/ΔR ~= -0.0054 ± 0.0006 dex kpc-1. In the outer halo, beyond ~10 R eff, the number density profile follows a power law, but also significant field-to-field metallicity and star count variations are detected. The metal-rich component dominates in all observed fields, and the median metallicity is [M/H] >-1 dex in all fields.

  5. Influence of sequence identity and unique breakpoints on the frequency of intersubtype HIV-1 recombination

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Heather A; Gao, Yong; Galetto, Román; Lalonde, Matthew; Anthony, Reshma M; Giacomoni, Véronique; Abreha, Measho; Destefano, Jeffrey J; Negroni, Matteo; Arts, Eric J

    2006-01-01

    Background HIV-1 recombination between different subtypes has a major impact on the global epidemic. The generation of these intersubtype recombinants follows a defined set of events starting with dual infection of a host cell, heterodiploid virus production, strand transfers during reverse transcription, and then selection. In this study, recombination frequencies were measured in the C1-C4 regions of the envelope gene in the presence (using a multiple cycle infection system) and absence (in vitro reverse transcription and single cycle infection systems) of selection for replication-competent virus. Ugandan subtypes A and D HIV-1 env sequences (115-A, 120-A, 89-D, 122-D, 126-D) were employed in all three assay systems. These subtypes co-circulate in East Africa and frequently recombine in this human population. Results Increased sequence identity between viruses or RNA templates resulted in increased recombination frequencies, with the exception of the 115-A virus or RNA template. Analyses of the recombination breakpoints and mechanistic studies revealed that the presence of a recombination hotspot in the C3/V4 env region, unique to 115-A as donor RNA, could account for the higher recombination frequencies with the 115-A virus/template. Single-cycle infections supported proportionally less recombination than the in vitro reverse transcription assay but both systems still had significantly higher recombination frequencies than observed in the multiple-cycle virus replication system. In the multiple cycle assay, increased replicative fitness of one HIV-1 over the other in a dual infection dramatically decreased recombination frequencies. Conclusion Sequence variation at specific sites between HIV-1 isolates can introduce unique recombination hotspots, which increase recombination frequencies and skew the general observation that decreased HIV-1 sequence identity reduces recombination rates. These findings also suggest that the majority of intra- or intersubtype A

  6. Selenium incorporation using recombinant techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, Helen

    2010-04-01

    An overview of techniques for recombinant incorporation of selenium and subsequent purification and crystallization of the resulting labelled protein. Using selenomethionine to phase macromolecular structures is common practice in structure determination, along with the use of selenocysteine. Selenium is consequently the most commonly used heavy atom for MAD. In addition to the well established recombinant techniques for the incorporation of selenium in prokaryal expression systems, there have been recent advances in selenium labelling in eukaryal expression, which will be discussed. Tips and things to consider for the purification and crystallization of seleno-labelled proteins are also included.

  7. Comparison of Protection in Rabbits against Host-Adapted and Cultivated Borrelia burgdorferi following Infection-Derived Immunity or Immunization with Outer Membrane Vesicles or Outer Surface Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ellen S.; Champion, Cheryl I.; Wu, Xiao-Yang; Skare, Jonathan T.; Blanco, David R.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, infection-derived immunity in the rabbit model of Lyme disease was compared to immunity following immunization with purified outer membrane vesicles (OMV) isolated from Borrelia burgdorferi and recombinant outer surface protein A (OspA). Immunization of rabbits with OMV isolated from virulent strain B31 and its avirulent derivative B313 (lacking OspA and DbpA) conferred highly significant protection against intradermal injection with 6 × 104 in vitro-cultivated virulent B. burgdorferi. This is the first demonstration of protective immunogenicity induced by OMV. While immunization with OspA and avirulent B31 OMV provided far less protection against this challenge, rabbits with infection-derived immunity were completely protected. Protection against host-adapted B. burgdorferi was assessed by implantation of skin biopsies taken from rabbit erythema migrans (a uniquely rich source of B. burgdorferi in vertebrate tissue) containing up to 108 spirochetes. While all of the OMV- and OspA-immunized rabbits were fully susceptible to skin and disseminated infection, rabbits with infection-derived immunity were completely protected. Analysis of the antibody responses to outer membrane proteins, including DbpA, OspA, and OspC, suggests that the remarkable protection exhibited by the infection-immune rabbits is due to antibodies directed at antigens unique to or markedly up-regulated in host-adapted B. burgdorferi. PMID:10858236

  8. Science payload. [of outer planet atmospheric entry probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, H.

    1974-01-01

    The representative science payload of an outer planet atmospheric entry probe is described. The instrumental details are based on experiments that have been successfully flown in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus. The incorporation of these instruments into an outer planet probe requires a strong interaction between instrument designer and probe designer. The installation of the instruments into a 250 lb entry probe is illustrated.

  9. Molecular gas in the outer disks of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braine, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    Molecular gas has still only been detected beyond the R25 radius in a few galaxies. Is this due to the low H2 content or to the difficulty of using Carbon Monoxide (CO) to trace H2? Similarly, star formation (SF) decreases sharply in the outer disks of spirals although HI is often plentiful; is the decrease in SF because there is little H2 or because the SF is very inefficient in the outer disk environment? Existing observations suggest that while outer disk clouds tend to be smaller (steeper mass function), their CO brightness temperature is only slightly lower than in the inner disk, at least when observed with sufficiently high angular resolution. In near-solar metallicity galaxies (Z >= 0.5Zsol ), the CO does not become intrinsically difficult to detect when H2 is present, even in the outer disk. While more observations of CO or other means of tracing H2 in the outer disks are necessary, current data tend to show that the SF rate per unit H2 remains approximately constant with galactocentric distance, indicating that the star formation proceeds normally but the transformation of HI into H2 is very slow in the outer disk.

  10. Dissecting Escherichia coli Outer Membrane Biogenesis Using Differential Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Martorana, Alessandra M.; Motta, Sara; Di Silvestre, Dario; Falchi, Federica; Dehò, Gianni; Mauri, Pierluigi; Sperandeo, Paola; Polissi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria is a complex multi-layered structure comprising an inner cytoplasmic membrane and an additional asymmetric lipid bilayer, the outer membrane, which functions as a selective permeability barrier and is essential for viability. Lipopolysaccharide, an essential glycolipid located in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane, greatly contributes to the peculiar properties exhibited by the outer membrane. This complex molecule is transported to the cell surface by a molecular machine composed of seven essential proteins LptABCDEFG that form a transenvelope complex and function as a single device. While advances in understanding the mechanisms that govern the biogenesis of the cell envelope have been recently made, only few studies are available on how bacterial cells respond to severe envelope biogenesis defects on a global scale. Here we report the use of differential proteomics based on Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) to investigate how Escherichia coli cells respond to a block of lipopolysaccharide transport to the outer membrane. We analysed the envelope proteome of a lptC conditional mutant grown under permissive and non permissive conditions and identified 123 proteins whose level is modulated upon LptC depletion. Most such proteins belong to pathways implicated in cell envelope biogenesis, peptidoglycan remodelling, cell division and protein folding. Overall these data contribute to our understanding on how E. coli cells respond to LPS transport defects to restore outer membrane functionality. PMID:24967819

  11. Assembly of outer-membrane proteins in bacteria and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tommassen, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria consists of two membranes separated by the periplasm. In contrast with most integral membrane proteins, which span the membrane in the form of hydrophobic alpha-helices, integral outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) form beta-barrels. Similar beta-barrel proteins are found in the outer membranes of mitochondria and chloroplasts, probably reflecting the endosymbiont origin of these eukaryotic cell organelles. How these beta-barrel proteins are assembled into the outer membrane has remained enigmatic for a long time. In recent years, much progress has been reached in this field by the identification of the components of the OMP assembly machinery. The central component of this machinery, called Omp85 or BamA, is an essential and highly conserved bacterial protein that recognizes a signature sequence at the C terminus of its substrate OMPs. A homologue of this protein is also found in mitochondria, where it is required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins into the outer membrane as well. Although accessory components of the machineries are different between bacteria and mitochondria, a mitochondrial beta-barrel OMP can be assembled into the bacterial outer membrane and, vice versa, bacterial OMPs expressed in yeast are assembled into the mitochondrial outer membrane. These observations indicate that the basic mechanism of OMP assembly is evolutionarily highly conserved.

  12. Proteome analysis of mitochondrial outer membrane from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Simone; Prokisch, Holger; Schlunk, Tilman; Camp, David G.; Ahting, Uwe; Waizenegger, Thomas; Scharfe, Curt M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Imhof, Axel; Neupert, Walter; Oefner, Peter J.; Rapaport, Doron

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane mediates numerous interactions between the metabolic and genetic systems of mitochondria and the rest of the eukaryotic cell. We performed a proteomic study to discover novel functions of components of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Proteins of highly pure outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Neurospora crassa were identified by a combination of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of tryptic peptide digests and gel electrophoresis of solubilized OMV proteins, followed by their identification using MALDI-MS peptide fingerprinting. Among the 30 proteins found in at least three of four separate analyses were 23 proteins with known functions in the outer membrane. These included components of the import machinery (the TOM and TOB complexes), a pore-forming component (Porin), and proteins that control fusion and fission of the organelle. In addition, proteins playing a role in various biosynthetic pathways, whose intracellular location had not been established previously, could be localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Thus, the proteome of the outer membrane can help in identifying new mitochondria-related functions.

  13. Recombinational Repair of DNA Damage in Escherichia coli and Bacteriophage λ

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    1999-01-01

    Although homologous recombination and DNA repair phenomena in bacteria were initially extensively studied without regard to any relationship between the two, it is now appreciated that DNA repair and homologous recombination are related through DNA replication. In Escherichia coli, two-strand DNA damage, generated mostly during replication on a template DNA containing one-strand damage, is repaired by recombination with a homologous intact duplex, usually the sister chromosome. The two major types of two-strand DNA lesions are channeled into two distinct pathways of recombinational repair: daughter-strand gaps are closed by the RecF pathway, while disintegrated replication forks are reestablished by the RecBCD pathway. The phage λ recombination system is simpler in that its major reaction is to link two double-stranded DNA ends by using overlapping homologous sequences. The remarkable progress in understanding the mechanisms of recombinational repair in E. coli over the last decade is due to the in vitro characterization of the activities of individual recombination proteins. Putting our knowledge about recombinational repair in the broader context of DNA replication will guide future experimentation. PMID:10585965

  14. Technical Guidance from the International Safety Framework for Nuclear Power Source Applications in Outer Space for Design and Development Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerer, Leopold

    2014-08-01

    In 2009, the International Safety Framework for Nuclear Power Source Applications in Outer Space [1] has been adopted, following a multi-year process that involved all major space faring nations in the frame of the International Atomic Energy Agency and the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. The safety framework reflects an international consensus on best practices. After the older 1992 Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space, it is the second document at UN level dedicated entirely to space nuclear power sources.This paper analyses aspects of the safety framework relevant for the design and development phases of space nuclear power sources. While early publications have started analysing the legal aspects of the safety framework, its technical guidance has not yet been subject to scholarly articles. The present paper therefore focuses on the technical guidance provided in the safety framework, in an attempt to assist engineers and practitioners to benefit from these.

  15. Exploring the Outer Neptune Resonances: Constraints on Solar System Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Rosemary E.; Kavelaars, JJ; Shankman, Cory J.; Petit, Jean-Marc; Brett, Gladman; Volk, Kat; Alexandersen, Mike

    2015-11-01

    The long-term evolution of objects in the outer n:1 resonances with Neptune provide clues to the evolutionary history of the Solar System. Based on 4 objects with semi-major axes near the 5:1 resonance, we estimate a substantial and previously unrecognized population of objects, perhaps more significant than the population in the 3:2 (Plutino) resonance. These external resonances are largely unexplored in both observations and dynamical simulations. However, understanding the characteristics and trapping history for objects in these populations is critical for constraining the dynamical history of the solar system. The 4 objects detected in the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS) were classified using dynamical integrations. Three are resonant, and the fourth appears to be a resonance diffusion object, part of a population which exited the resonance through chaotic diffusion. The 3 resonant objects are taken to be representative of the resonant population, so by using these detections and the CFEPS characterization (pointings and detection limits) we calculate a population estimate for this resonance at ~1900(+3300 -1400) objects with Hg<8 [Pike et al. 2015]. This is at least as large as the Plutinos (3:2 resonance) at 90% confidence. The small number of detected objects results in such a large population estimate due to the numerous biases against detecting objects with semimajor axes at ~88AU. The dynamical behavior of the known objects, suggests that the trapping mechanism for the 5:1 resonance is resonance sticking from the scattering objects. Based on our results from the 5:1 resonance, we have begun a project to examine the long term evolution of the other n:1 resonances to determine the importance of resonance diffusion and transfer between libration islands among the scattering-captured members of those populations.

  16. 76 FR 7518 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska AGENCY... of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources..., Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate...

  17. Patterns of recombination on human chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Schlumpf, K.S.; Kim, D.; Haines, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    Virtually all genetic linkage maps generated to date are gross averages across individuals, ages, and (often) sexes. In addition, although some level of positive interference has been assumed, until recently little evidence to support this in humans has been available. The major stumbling block has been the quality of the data available, since even a few genotypic errors can have drastic effects on both the map length and the number of apparent recombinants. In addition, variation in recombination by factors other than sex have pretty much been ignored. To explore recombination in more detail, we have generated a microsatellite marker map of human chromosome 22. This map includes 32 markers genotyped through 46 sibships of the Venezuelan Reference Pedigree (VRP). Extensive error checking and regenotyping was performed to remove as many genotypic errors as possible, but no genotypes were removed simply because they created unlikely events. The following 1000:1 odds map has been obtained: cen--F8VWFP1--11--S264--3-S311--4--S257--2--TOP1P2--3--S156--1--CRYB2--1--S258--2--S310--6--S193--1--S275--3--S268--1--S280--4--S304--3--S283--2--LiR1--3--IL2RB--3--S299--1--S302--1--S537--2--S270--4--PDGF--8--S274--qter. The female map (91 cM) is twice as long as the male map (46 cM) and the log-likelihood difference in the maps (22.3) is highly significant (P=0.001, df=22) and appears constant across the chromosome. Analysis of recombination with age showed no particular trends for either males or females when chromosomes were grouped into three categories (20, 20-30, 30+) by parental age at birth of child. Positive interference was found in maternally derived chromosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=30.5 (4), p<0.005), but not in paternally derived chromosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=6.24 (3), P=0.10). This contrasts to data from chromosomes 9 and 21 where positive interference was found for both sexes. More detailed analyses are in progress.

  18. Recombinant expression and epitope mapping of grass pollen allergens.

    PubMed

    Suphioglu, C; Smith, P M; Ong, E K; Knox, R B; Singh, M B

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the expression of recombinant forms of Group 1 allergens from rye-grass and Bermuda grass pollens. Recombinant Lol p 1 expressed in bacteria bound serum IgE from allergic patients. Based on analysis of fragments of the Lol p 1 cDNA clone, the major IgE-reactive epitope has been mapped to the C-terminus. However, although SDS-denatured natural Cyn d 1 (from Bermuda grass) bound IgE, the full or partial recombinant proteins expressed in bacteria did not bind IgE. We have since expressed Cyn d 1 in the yeast Pichia pastoris and restored IgE binding. cDNA clones encoding two isoforms of Lol p 5, Lol p 5A and Lol p 5B, have been expressed in bacteria and resulting polypeptides show IgE-binding. Random fragments of these clones have been generated and when expressed as partial recombinant proteins in bacteria, allowed us to identify the major IgE-binding epitopes. The allergenic epitopes were localised towards the C-terminal half of the molecule. Although both isoforms shared similar IgE-reactive epitopes, Lol p 5B did not recognise the Lol p 5A-specific monoclonal antibody A7. At sequence level, there appear to be several amino acid differences between the antigenic epitopes of these two isoallergens. These results aid in the design of diagnostics and in grass pollen immunotherapy.

  19. A Pedigree-Based Map of Recombination in the Domestic Dog Genome

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher L.; Bhérer, Claude; Morrow, Bernice E.; Boyko, Adam R.; Auton, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination in mammals has been shown to largely cluster into hotspots, which are targeted by the chromatin modifier PRDM9. The canid family, including wolves and dogs, has undergone a series of disrupting mutations in this gene, rendering PRDM9 inactive. Given the importance of PRDM9, it is of great interest to learn how its absence in the dog genome affects patterns of recombination placement. We have used genotypes from domestic dog pedigrees to generate sex-specific genetic maps of recombination in this species. On a broad scale, we find that placement of recombination events in dogs is consistent with that in mice and apes, in that the majority of recombination occurs toward the telomeres in males, while female crossing over is more frequent and evenly spread along chromosomes. It has been previously suggested that dog recombination is more uniform in distribution than that of humans; however, we found that recombination in dogs is less uniform than in humans. We examined the distribution of recombination within the genome, and found that recombination is elevated immediately upstream of the transcription start site and around CpG islands, in agreement with previous studies, but that this effect is stronger in male dogs. We also found evidence for positive crossover interference influencing the spacing between recombination events in dogs, as has been observed in other species including humans and mice. Overall our data suggests that dogs have similar broad scale properties of recombination to humans, while fine scale recombination is similar to other species lacking PRDM9. PMID:27591755

  20. A Pedigree-Based Map of Recombination in the Domestic Dog Genome.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Christopher L; Bhérer, Claude; Morrow, Bernice E; Boyko, Adam R; Auton, Adam

    2016-09-02

    Meiotic recombination in mammals has been shown to largely cluster into hotspots, which are targeted by the chromatin modifier PRDM9. The canid family, including wolves and dogs, has undergone a series of disrupting mutations in this gene, rendering PRDM9 inactive. Given the importance of PRDM9 it is of great interest to learn how its absence in the dog genome affects patterns of recombination placement. We have used genotypes from domestic dog pedigrees to generate sex-specific genetic maps of recombination in this species. On a broad scale, we find that placement of recombination events in dogs is consistent with that in mice and apes, in that the majority of recombination occurs toward the telomeres in males, while female crossing over is more frequent and evenly spread along chromosomes. It has been previously suggested that dog recombination is more uniform in distribution than that of humans, however, we found that recombination in dogs is less uniform than humans. We examined the distribution of recombination within the genome, and find that recombination is elevated immediately upstream of the transcription start site, and around CpG islands, in agreement with previous studies, but find that this effect is stronger in male dogs. We also find evidence for positive crossover interference influencing the spacing between recombination events in dogs, as has been observed in other species including humans and mice. Overall our data suggests that dogs have similar broad scale properties of recombination to humans, while fine-scale recombination is similar to other species lacking PRDM9.

  1. Effect of monovalent cations and G-quadruplex structures on the outcome of intramolecular homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Barros, Paula; Boán, Francisco; Blanco, Miguel G; Gómez-Márquez, Jaime

    2009-06-01

    Homologous recombination is a very important cellular process, as it provides a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. This complex process is affected by many factors within cells. Here, we have studied the effect of monovalent cations (K+, Na+, and NH4+) on the outcome of recombination events, as their presence affects the biochemical activities of the proteins involved in recombination as well as the structure of DNA. For this purpose, we used an in vitro recombination system that includes a protein nuclear extract, as a source of recombination machinery, and two plasmids as substrates for intramolecular homologous recombination, each with two copies of different alleles of the human minisatellite MsH43. We found that the presence of monovalent cations induced a decrease in the recombination frequency, accompanied by an increase in the fidelity of the recombination. Moreover, there is an emerging consensus that secondary structures of DNA have the potential to induce genomic instability. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of the sequences capable of forming G-quadruplex on the production of recombinant molecules, taking advantage of the capacity of some MsH43 alleles to generate these kinds of structure in the presence of K+. We observed that the MsH43 recombinants containing duplications, generated in the presence of K+, did not include the repeats located towards the 5'-side of the G-quadruplex motif, suggesting that this structure may be involved in the recombination events leading to duplications. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the recombination of repetitive sequences.

  2. The tidal action of the homogeneous field of Galactic-disc matter and population of the outer Oort cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neslušan, L.; Jakubík, M.

    2004-06-01

    The dynamical evolution of the comets in the Oort comet cloud under the exclusive perturbation by the dominant term of the Galactic tide is studied. The purpose of this work is mapping the major effects caused by the outer perturber of the cloud and sketching a new procedure to estimate the population of the outer part of the cloud. Though the analysis of the dominant term can say a lot of a general concept of the dynamics of bodies in the cloud, it is found that other outer perturbers have to be taken into account when we deal with bringing the cometary perihelia into the planetary region. Even some subtle effects appear to be very important in this respect. If only a single main term of the Galactic tide is considered, then only ≈ 0.6 × 1011 outer-Oort-cloud comets, with minimum perihelia within the libration cycle below 35 AU, appear to be sufficient to explain the current flux of new comets into the planetary region. The real population of the entire outer cloud is, however, expected to be more numerous.

  3. Activation of the Complement Classical Pathway (C1q Binding) by Mesophilic Aeromonas hydrophila Outer Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Nogueras, Maria Mercedes; Aguilar, Alicia; Rubires, Xavier; Albertí, Sebastian; Benedí, Vicente Javier; Tomás, Juan M.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of killing of Aeromonas hydrophila serum-sensitive strains in nonimmune serum by the complement classical pathway has been studied. The bacterial cell surface component that binds C1q more efficiently was identified as a major outer membrane protein of 39 kDa, presumably the porin II described by D. Jeanteur, N. Gletsu, F. Pattus, and J. T. Buckley (Mol. Microbiol. 6:3355–3363, 1992), of these microorganisms. We have demonstrated that the purified form of porin II binds C1q and activates the classical pathway in an antibody-independent manner, with the subsequent consumption of C4 and reduction of the serum total hemolytic activity. Activation of the classical pathway has been observed in human nonimmune serum and agammaglobulinemic serum (both depleted of factor D). Binding of C1q to other components of the bacterial outer membrane, in particular to rough lipopolysaccharide, could not be demonstrated. Activation of the classical pathway by this lipopolysaccharide was also much less efficient than activation by the outer membrane protein. The strains possessing O-antigen lipopolysaccharide bind less C1q than the serum-sensitive strains, because the outer membrane protein is less accessible, and are resistant to complement-mediated killing. Finally, a similar or identical outer membrane protein (presumably porin II) that binds C1q was shown to be present in strains from the most common mesophilic Aeromonas O serogroups. PMID:9673268

  4. Dissociative Recombination of Complex Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. Brian A.

    1999-10-01

    The FALP-MS apparatus at the University of Rennes allows the measurement of rate coefficients for the recombination of molecular ions to be made (at 300K) even though several ions may be present in the afterglow. The recombination of a number of hydrocarbon ions derived from alkane ( Lehfaoui et al. J. Chem. Phys. 106, 5406, 1997.), alkene ( Rebrion-Rowe et al. J. Chem. Phys. 108, 7185, 1998.) and aromatic (Rebrion-Rowe et al. (Submitted to J. Chem. Phys.)) parent molecules has been studied. Despite the wide range of complexity of these compounds, the measured recombination rates are remarkably similar having values in the range of 4-10-7 cm^3.s-1. Plans are being laid for a new version of this apparatus that will allow pre-prepared ions to be injected into the inert buffer gas flow. This will allow reactive ions to be studied as well as halogen containing ions whose recombination rates would normally be masked by electron attachment to their parent gases in a conventional flowing afterglow apparatus. A high temperature modification to the CRESU supersonic flow apparatus (J.L. Le Garrec et al. J. Chem. Phys. 107, 54, 1997.) in our laboratory will allow electron attachment to radicals to be studied by means of the mass spectrometric detection of products, Langmuir probe measurement of the electron density in the flow and Laser Induced Fluorescent identification of the radical species. Such measurements are needed for the modeling of semiconductor processing plasmas.

  5. CRMAGE: CRISPR Optimized MAGE Recombineering

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Sommer, Morten O. A.; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2016-01-01

    A bottleneck in metabolic engineering and systems biology approaches is the lack of efficient genome engineering technologies. Here, we combine CRISPR/Cas9 and λ Red recombineering based MAGE technology (CRMAGE) to create a highly efficient and fast method for genome engineering of Escherichia coli. Using CRMAGE, the recombineering efficiency was between 96.5% and 99.7% for gene recoding of three genomic targets, compared to between 0.68% and 5.4% using traditional recombineering. For modulation of protein synthesis (small insertion/RBS substitution) the efficiency was increased from 6% to 70%. CRMAGE can be multiplexed and enables introduction of at least two mutations in a single round of recombineering with similar efficiencies. PAM-independent loci were targeted using degenerate codons, thereby making it possible to modify any site in the genome. CRMAGE is based on two plasmids that are assembled by a USER-cloning approach enabling quick and cost efficient gRNA replacement. CRMAGE furthermore utilizes CRISPR/Cas9 for efficient plasmid curing, thereby enabling multiple engineering rounds per day. To facilitate the design process, a web-based tool was developed to predict both the λ Red oligos and the gRNAs. The CRMAGE platform enables highly efficient and fast genome editing and may open up promising prospective for automation of genome-scale engineering. PMID:26797514

  6. Improving recombinant protein purification yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of adequate amounts of recombinant proteins is essential for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. It’s technologically challenging and a limiting factor for tung oil research because analytical reagents such as high qua...

  7. Meiotic recombination in mammals: localization and regulation.

    PubMed

    Baudat, Frédéric; Imai, Yukiko; de Massy, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    During meiosis, a programmed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leads to the exchange of genetic material between homologous chromosomes. These exchanges increase genome diversity and are essential for proper chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. Recent findings have highlighted an unexpected molecular control of the distribution of meiotic DSBs in mammals by a rapidly evolving gene, PR domain-containing 9 (PRDM9), and genome-wide analyses have facilitated the characterization of meiotic DSB sites at unprecedented resolution. In addition, the identification of new players in DSB repair processes has allowed the delineation of recombination pathways that have two major outcomes, crossovers and non-crossovers, which have distinct mechanistic roles and consequences for genome evolution.

  8. A possible formation process of outer lobes of Double Layered Ejecta craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Baratoux, D.; Kurita, K.

    2008-12-01

    Martian impact ejecta are famous for their morphologies suggesting ejecta would be formed by radial ground- hugging flows in the late stage of the impact. The atmosphere [Schultz, 1992] and/or the subsurface volatiles [Carr et al., 1977] have been suggested as causes of fluidization. Examining the process to generate and emplace the radial flow would allow us to understand the nature of the entrained fluid. Double Layered Ejecta (DLE), one of the major subclasses of martian ejecta, have many unique features. Most enigmatic is the presence of two distinct layers of ejecta: a thick inner lobe and a thin outer lobe. The striking differences between the two lobes suggest that two different processes occur independently during ejecta emplacement, a case implausible by a single ballistic trajectory. In this study, based on the hypothesis that an impact- induced vortex ring modifies surface materials in the late stage of the impact to produce the outer lobe, the volumes of displaced particles by the vortex ring were measured in laboratory experiments to compare the volumes of the outer lobes. We utilized the experimental situation of a vortex ring impacting on a particle layer. Two dimensionless numbers based on particle size (Shields' and Reynolds number) in lab fall within the same ranges as those on Mars [Suzuki et al., 2007], it is thus possible to compare the relationships between volumes and Γ, a parameter expressing the strength of a vortex ring. We fit the dependence of Vdisplaced on Gamma using a power law Vdisplaced = a Γb and we found b = 1.25 ± 0.17. The volumes of the outer lobes were measured, selecting 7 fresh craters larger than 5km in diameter in the survey area (0N-60N, 90E-150E). In the case of impact cratering, the vortex strength Γ can be scaled with the crater diameter [Barnouin-Jha and Schultz, 1998] as Γ ∝ D⅔. Using also a power law Vouter = c Γd, we obtained d = 1.42 ± 0.24 for the volume of outer lobes of DLE. As the power indices of

  9. Use of gene fusions to study outer membrane protein localization in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Silhavy, T J; Shuman, H A; Beckwith, J; Schwartz, M

    1977-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains have been isolated that produce hybrid proteins comprised of an NH2-terminal sequence from the lamB gene product (an outer membrane protein) and a major portion of the COOH-terminal sequence of beta-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23; a cytoplasmic protein). These proteins exhibit beta-galactosidase activity. One such strain, pop 3105, produces a hybrid protein containing very little of the lamB gene protein; the protein is found in the cytoplasm. The protein found in a second strain, pop 3186, contains much more of the lamB gene protein; a substantial fraction of the beta-galactosidase activity is found in the outer membrane, probably facing outward. These results indicate that information necessary to direct the lamB gene product to its outer membrane location is located within the lamB gene itself. The properties of such fusion strains open up the prospect of a precise genetic analysis of the genetic components involved in protein transport. Images PMID:414221

  10. Modification of Salmonella Lipopolysaccharides Prevents the Outer Membrane Penetration of Novobiocin

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Thatyane M.; Martynowycz, Michael W.; Andreev, Konstantin; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Gidalevitz, David

    2015-01-01

    Small hydrophilic antibiotics traverse the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria through porin channels. Large lipophilic agents traverse the outer membrane through its bilayer, containing a majority of lipopolysaccharides in its outer leaflet. Genes controlled by the two-component regulatory system PhoPQ modify lipopolysaccharides. We isolate lipopolysaccharides from isogenic mutants of Salmonella sp., one lacking the modification, the other fully modified. These lipopolysaccharides were reconstituted as monolayers at the air-water interface, and their properties, as well as their interaction with a large lipophilic drug, novobiocin, was studied. X-ray reflectivity showed that the drug penetrated the monolayer of the unmodified lipopolysaccharides reaching the hydrophobic region, but was prevented from this penetration into the modified lipopolysaccharides. Results correlate with behavior of bacterial cells, which become resistant to antibiotics after PhoPQ-regulated modifications. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction showed that novobiocin produced a striking increase in crystalline coherence length, and the size of the near-crystalline domains. PMID:26682812

  11. RND transporters protect Corynebacterium glutamicum from antibiotics by assembling the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Lu, Shuo; Belardinelli, Juan; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Jones, Victoria; Jackson, Mary; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2014-08-01

    Corynebacterium-Mycobacterium-Nocardia (CMN) group are the causative agents of a broad spectrum of diseases in humans. A distinctive feature of these Gram-positive bacteria is the presence of an outer membrane of unique structure and composition. Recently, resistance-nodulation-division (RND) transporters (nicknamed MmpLs, Mycobacterial membrane protein Large) have emerged as major contributors to the biogenesis of the outer membranes in mycobacteria and as promising drug targets. In this study, we investigated the role of RND transporters in the physiology of Corynebacterium glutamicum and analyzed properties of these proteins. Our results show that in contrast to Gram-negative species, in which RND transporters actively extrude antibiotics from cells, in C. glutamicum and relatives these transporters protect cells from antibiotics by playing essential roles in the biogenesis of the low-permeability barrier of the outer membrane. Conditional C. glutamicum mutants lacking RND proteins and with the controlled expression of either NCgl2769 (CmpL1) or NCgl0228 (CmpL4) are hypersusceptible to multiple antibiotics, have growth deficiencies in minimal medium and accumulate intracellularly trehalose monocorynomycolates, free corynomycolates, and the previously uncharacterized corynomycolate-containing lipid. Our results also suggest that similar to other RND transporters, Corynebacterial membrane proteins Large (CmpLs) functions are dependent on a proton-motive force.

  12. Accretion of Low-albedo Dust by the Outer Satellites of the Gas Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Lawrence, K. J.

    2009-05-01

    The origin and nature of the low-albedo hemisphere of Iapetus represents one of the most intriguing problems in planetary science. Observations of the satellite have shown that the two hemispheres of the satellite are wholly different. The trailing hemisphere has an albedo, composition, and morphology typical of the other icy Saturnian satellites, while the surface of the leading side is composed of an extraordinarily low-albedo, reddish material that includes organic material and carbon. The study of pathological objects such as Iapetus offers clues to general alteration processes that might act throughout the outer Solar System. Bell et al. (1985, Icarus 61, 192) proposed just that by suggesting that Callisto was the Iapetus of the Jovian system in a less extreme manifestation. Unlike the other Galilean satellites, Callisto is darker on its leading side (except right at opposition), suggesting it may have swept up low-albedo dust in a process similar to that occurring on Iapetus. Our recent work seeking hemispheric diversity on the Uranian satellites also shows that the outermost satellites (Titania and Oberon) tend to be darker and redder on the leading side. Our hypothesis is that all of the outermost major satellites of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus accrete reddish, low-albedo dust from the small, captured, outer retrograde satellites of these planets. The dust is kicked off by meteoritic impacts and spirals in by Poynting-Robertson drag to impact the leading sides of the outer larger satellites, including Iapetus, Callisto, Titania, and Oberon. Work funded by NASA.

  13. Epidemiology of virulence-associated plasmids and outer membrane protein patterns within seven common Salmonella serotypes.

    PubMed

    Helmuth, R; Stephan, R; Bunge, C; Hoog, B; Steinbeck, A; Bulling, E

    1985-04-01

    Antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella isolates belonging to seven common serotypes and originating from 29 different countries from all continents were investigated for their plasmid DNA content (337 isolates) and their outer membrane protein profiles (216 isolates). Of the S. typhimurium, S. enteritidis, S. dublin, and S. choleraesuis isolates, 90% or more carried a serotype-specific plasmid. The molecular sizes of the plasmids were 60 megadaltons (Md) for S. typhimurium, 37 Md for S. enteritidis, 56 Md for S. dublin, and 30 Md for S. choleraesuis. The outer membrane protein profiles were homogeneous within each of the seven serotypes, except that a minority of S. enteritidis and S. dublin strains were lacking one major outer membrane protein. Virulence studies were performed with 39 representative strains by measuring the 50% lethal doses (LD50S) after oral infection of mice. The LD50 values obtained for plasmid-positive strains of S. typhimurium, S. enteritidis, and S. dublin were up to 10(6)-fold lower than the values obtained for the plasmid-free strains of the same serotype. Only the plasmid-positive strains could invade the livers of orally infected mice, and only they were resistant to the bactericidal activity of 90% guinea pig serum. Strains of S. infantis were generally plasmid free, whereas S. panama and S. heidelberg isolates carried heterogeneous plasmid populations. The virulence properties of the latter three serotypes could not be correlated with the predominant plasmids found in these strains.

  14. Modification of Salmonella Lipopolysaccharides Prevents the Outer Membrane Penetration of Novobiocin.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Thatyane M; Martynowycz, Michael W; Andreev, Konstantin; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Gidalevitz, David

    2015-12-15

    Small hydrophilic antibiotics traverse the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria through porin channels. Large lipophilic agents traverse the outer membrane through its bilayer, containing a majority of lipopolysaccharides in its outer leaflet. Genes controlled by the two-component regulatory system PhoPQ modify lipopolysaccharides. We isolate lipopolysaccharides from isogenic mutants of Salmonella sp., one lacking the modification, the other fully modified. These lipopolysaccharides were reconstituted as monolayers at the air-water interface, and their properties, as well as their interaction with a large lipophilic drug, novobiocin, was studied. X-ray reflectivity showed that the drug penetrated the monolayer of the unmodified lipopolysaccharides reaching the hydrophobic region, but was prevented from this penetration into the modified lipopolysaccharides. Results correlate with behavior of bacterial cells, which become resistant to antibiotics after PhoPQ-regulated modifications. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction showed that novobiocin produced a striking increase in crystalline coherence length, and the size of the near-crystalline domains.

  15. Accumulation of non-outer segment proteins in the outer segment underlies photoreceptor degeneration in Bardet–Biedl syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Poppy; Allamargot, Chantal; Hudson, Joseph S.; Andersen, Emily K.; Bhattarai, Sajag; Drack, Arlene V.; Sheffield, Val C.; Seo, Seongjin

    2015-01-01

    Compartmentalization and polarized protein trafficking are essential for many cellular functions. The photoreceptor outer segment (OS) is a sensory compartment specialized for phototransduction, and it shares many features with primary cilia. As expected, mutations disrupting protein trafficking to cilia often disrupt protein trafficking to the OS and cause photoreceptor degeneration. Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS) is one of the ciliopathies associated with defective ciliary trafficking and photoreceptor degeneration. However, precise roles of BBS proteins in photoreceptor cells and the underlying mechanisms of photoreceptor degeneration in BBS are not well understood. Here, we show that accumulation of non-OS proteins in the OS underlies photoreceptor degeneration in BBS. Using a newly developed BBS mouse model [Leucine zipper transcription factor-like 1 (Lztfl1)/Bbs17 mutant], isolated OSs, and quantitative proteomics, we determined 138 proteins that are enriched more than threefold in BBS mutant OS. In contrast, only eight proteins showed a more than threefold reduction. We found striking accumulation of Stx3 and Stxbp1/Munc18-1 and loss of polarized localization of Prom1 within the Lztfl1 and Bbs1 mutant OS. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that large vesicles are formed in the BBS OS, disrupting the lamellar structure of the OS. Our findings suggest that accumulation (and consequent sequestration) of non-OS proteins in the OS is likely the primary cause of photoreceptor degeneration in BBS. Our data also suggest that a major function of BBS proteins in photoreceptors is to transport proteins from the OS to the cell body or to prevent entry of non-OS proteins into the OS. PMID:26216965

  16. Recommended Exploration Strategy for the Outer Planets 2013-2022: Goals and Priorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, W. B.; Johnson, T. V.

    2009-12-01

    Important scientific discoveries continue to be made in the outer solar system through NASA missions and research programs (for example, via the ongoing Cassini mission at Saturn, the New Horizons encounter with Jupiter in 2007, and earth-based studies of Uranus and Neptune). The Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) was established by NASA to identify scientific priorities and pathways for outer solar system exploration, because the outer solar system provides critical clues to unraveling the mysteries of how solar systems form and evolve, how planetary systems become habitable, and how life has evolved in our solar system. Addressing such scientific questions requires a balanced strategy of outer solar system exploration that includes steady support for vigorous programs of basic research, data analysis, and technology development. Fundamental new discoveries are best made with a mixture of mission sizes that includes large (flagship) missions, along with medium-sized and smaller-sized (as practical) missions. Such a strategy is most efficiently implemented as a coherent Outer Planets Exploration Program. Missions to the outer solar system are major undertakings, requiring large and expensive launch vehicles, long mission durations, highly reliable (frequently radiation hard) and autonomous spacecraft, and radioisotope power sources in most cases. OPAG recommends that the Decadal Survey explore the possibilities for a program structure/categorization that could allow ‘small flagship’ class missions to be considered, providing a greater range of choice and capabilities in the mix to balance program size and science return. With the Galileo mission concluded, the Cassini equinox mission in progress, and Juno in development, OPAG strongly endorses the competitive selection by NASA of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) as the next Outer Planets Flagship and as part of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) with ESA, a collaboration that includes a Ganymede

  17. Meiotic Recombination: The Essence of Heredity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Neil

    2015-10-28

    The study of homologous recombination has its historical roots in meiosis. In this context, recombination occurs as a programmed event that culminates in the formation of crossovers, which are essential for accurate chromosome segregation and create new combinations of parental alleles. Thus, meiotic recombination underlies both the independent assortment of parental chromosomes and genetic linkage. This review highlights the features of meiotic recombination that distinguish it from recombinational repair in somatic cells, and how the molecular processes of meiotic recombination are embedded and interdependent with the chromosome structures that characterize meiotic prophase. A more in-depth review presents our understanding of how crossover and noncrossover pathways of meiotic recombination are differentiated and regulated. The final section of this review summarizes the studies that have defined defective recombination as a leading cause of pregnancy loss and congenital disease in humans.

  18. Super-dissociative recombination of H2+?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. B. A.; Yousif, F. B.; van der Donk, P. J. T.; Morgan, T. J.; Chibisov, M. I.

    1995-11-01

    The dissociative recombination of vibrationally excited H2+ ions to form products in high Rydberg states has been measured. Surprisingly large cross-sections are found for this channel. This seems to be an example of super-dissociative recombination.

  19. Recombinant DNA: History of the Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigue, Charles L.; Stanziale, William G.

    1979-01-01

    The hazards assoc