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Sample records for recombinant viral protein

  1. Recombinant protein-based viral disease diagnostics in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Vinayagamurthy; Venkatesan, Gnanavel; Sen, Arnab; Annamalai, Lakshmanan; Bhanuprakash, Veerakyathappa; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2010-09-01

    Identification of pathogens or antibody response to pathogens in human and animals modulates the treatment strategies for naive population and subsequent infections. Diseases can be controlled and even eradicated based on the epidemiology and effective prophylaxis, which often depends on development of efficient diagnostics. In addition, combating newly emerging diseases in human as well as animal healthcare is challenging and is dependent on developing safe and efficient diagnostics. Detection of antibodies directed against specific antigens has been the method of choice for documenting prior infection. Other than zoonosis, development of inexpensive vaccines and diagnostics is a unique problem in animal healthcare. The advent of recombinant DNA technology and its application in the biotechnology industry has revolutionized animal healthcare. The use of recombinant DNA technology in animal disease diagnosis has improved the rapidity, specificity and sensitivity of various diagnostic assays. This is because of the absence of host cellular proteins in the recombinant derived antigen preparations that dramatically decrease the rate of false-positive reactions. Various recombinant products are used for disease diagnosis in veterinary medicine and this article discusses recombinant-based viral disease diagnostics currently used for detection of pathogens in livestock and poultry.

  2. Effect of metal catalyzed oxidation in recombinant viral protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein assemblies, such as virus-like particles, have increasing importance as vaccines, delivery vehicles and nanomaterials. However, their use requires stable assemblies. An important cause of loss of stability in proteins is oxidation, which can occur during their production, purification and storage. Despite its importance, very few studies have investigated the effect of oxidation in protein assemblies and their structural units. In this work, we investigated the role of in vitro oxidation in the assembly and stability of rotavirus VP6, a polymorphic protein. Results The susceptibility to oxidation of VP6 assembled into nanotubes (VP6NT) and unassembled VP6 (VP6U) was determined and compared to bovine serum albumin (BSA) as control. VP6 was more resistant to oxidation than BSA, as determined by measuring protein degradation and carbonyl content. It was found that assembly protected VP6 from in vitro metal-catalyzed oxidation. Oxidation provoked protein aggregation and VP6NT fragmentation, as evidenced by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Oxidative damage of VP6 correlated with a decrease of its center of fluorescence spectral mass. The in vitro assembly efficiency of VP6U into VP6NT decreased as the oxidant concentration increased. Conclusions Oxidation caused carbonylation, quenching, and destruction of aromatic amino acids and aggregation of VP6 in its assembled and unassembled forms. Such modifications affected protein functionality, including its ability to assemble. That assembly protected VP6 from oxidation shows that exposure of susceptible amino acids to the solvent increases their damage, and therefore the protein surface area that is exposed to the solvent is determinant of its susceptibility to oxidation. The inability of oxidized VP6 to assemble into nanotubes highlights the importance of avoiding this modification during the production of proteins that self-assemble. This is the first time that the role of

  3. Nonreplicative RNA Recombination of an Animal Plus-Strand RNA Virus in the Absence of Efficient Translation of Viral Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kleine Büning, Maximiliane; Meyer, Denise; Austermann-Busch, Sophia; Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Rümenapf, Tillmann; Becher, Paul

    2017-04-01

    RNA recombination is a major driving force for the evolution of RNA viruses and is significantly implicated in the adaptation of viruses to new hosts, changes of virulence, as well as in the emergence of new viruses including drug-resistant and escape mutants. However, the molecular details of recombination in animal RNA viruses are only poorly understood. In order to determine whether viral RNA recombination depends on translation of viral proteins, a nonreplicative recombination system was established which is based on cotransfection of cells with synthetic bovine viral diarrhea virus (family Flaviviridae) RNA genome fragments either lacking the internal ribosome entry site required for cap-independent translation or lacking almost the complete polyprotein coding region. The emergence of a number of recombinant viruses demonstrated that IRES-mediated translation of viral proteins is dispensable for efficient recombination and suggests that RNA recombination can occur in the absence of viral proteins. Analyses of 58 independently emerged viruses led to the detection of recombinant genomes with duplications, deletions and insertions in the 5' terminal region of the open reading frame, leading to enlarged core fusion proteins detectable by Western blot analysis. This demonstrates a remarkable flexibility of the pestivirus core protein. Further experiments with capped and uncapped genome fragments containing a luciferase gene for monitoring the level of protein translation revealed that even a ∼1,000-fold enhancement of translation of viral proteins did not increase the frequency of RNA recombination. Taken together, this study highlights that nonreplicative RNA recombination does not require translation of viral proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Nonreplicative RNA Recombination of an Animal Plus-Strand RNA Virus in the Absence of Efficient Translation of Viral Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kleine Büning, Maximiliane; Meyer, Denise; Austermann-Busch, Sophia; Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Rümenapf, Tillmann

    2017-01-01

    RNA recombination is a major driving force for the evolution of RNA viruses and is significantly implicated in the adaptation of viruses to new hosts, changes of virulence, as well as in the emergence of new viruses including drug-resistant and escape mutants. However, the molecular details of recombination in animal RNA viruses are only poorly understood. In order to determine whether viral RNA recombination depends on translation of viral proteins, a nonreplicative recombination system was established which is based on cotransfection of cells with synthetic bovine viral diarrhea virus (family Flaviviridae) RNA genome fragments either lacking the internal ribosome entry site required for cap-independent translation or lacking almost the complete polyprotein coding region. The emergence of a number of recombinant viruses demonstrated that IRES-mediated translation of viral proteins is dispensable for efficient recombination and suggests that RNA recombination can occur in the absence of viral proteins. Analyses of 58 independently emerged viruses led to the detection of recombinant genomes with duplications, deletions and insertions in the 5′ terminal region of the open reading frame, leading to enlarged core fusion proteins detectable by Western blot analysis. This demonstrates a remarkable flexibility of the pestivirus core protein. Further experiments with capped and uncapped genome fragments containing a luciferase gene for monitoring the level of protein translation revealed that even a ∼1,000-fold enhancement of translation of viral proteins did not increase the frequency of RNA recombination. Taken together, this study highlights that nonreplicative RNA recombination does not require translation of viral proteins. PMID:28338950

  5. Generation of Recombinant Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (rVHSV) Expressing Two Foreign Proteins and Effect of Lengthened Viral Genome on Viral Growth and In Vivo Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sun; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a new recombinant VHSV (rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp) was generated by insertion of a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene between N and P genes, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene between P and M genes of VHSV genome, the expression of each heterologous gene in infected cells, and effects of the lengthened recombinant VHSV's genome on the replication ability and in vivo virulence to olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) fingerlings were compared with previously generated rVHSVs (rVHSV-wild, rVHSV-Arfp, and rVHSV-Brfp). The expression of RFP and GFP in cells infected with rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp was verified through fluorescent microscopy and FACS analysis. In the viral growth analysis, rVHSV-Arfp and rVHSV-Brfp showed significantly lower viral titers than rVHSV-wild, and the replication of rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp was significantly decreased compared to that of even rVHSV-Arfp or rVHSV-Brfp. These results suggest that the genome length is a critical factor for the determination of rVHSVs replication efficiency. In the in vivo virulence experiment, the cumulative mortalities of olive flounder fingerlings infected with each rVHSV were inversely proportional to the length of the viral genome, suggesting that decreased viral growth rate due to the lengthened viral genome is accompanied with the decrease of in vivo virulence of rVHSVs. Recombinant viruses expressing multiple foreign antigens can be used for the development of combined vaccines. However, as the present rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp still possesses an ability to kill hosts (although very weakened), researches on the producing more attenuated viruses or propagation-deficient replicon particles are needed to solve safety-related problems.

  6. Canine enteric coronaviruses: emerging viral pathogens with distinct recombinant spike proteins.

    PubMed

    Licitra, Beth N; Duhamel, Gerald E; Whittaker, Gary R

    2014-08-22

    Canine enteric coronavirus (CCoV) is an alphacoronavirus infecting dogs that is closely related to enteric coronaviruses of cats and pigs. While CCoV has traditionally caused mild gastro-intestinal clinical signs, there are increasing reports of lethal CCoV infections in dogs, with evidence of both gastrointestinal and systemic viral dissemination. Consequently, CCoV is now considered to be an emerging infectious disease of dogs. In addition to the two known serotypes of CCoV, novel recombinant variants of CCoV have been found containing spike protein N-terminal domains (NTDs) that are closely related to those of feline and porcine strains. The increase in disease severity in dogs and the emergence of novel CCoVs can be attributed to the high level of recombination within the spike gene that can occur during infection by more than one CCoV type in the same host.

  7. Protection against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease with recombinant myxoma viruses expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bertagnoli, S; Gelfi, J; Le Gall, G; Boilletot, E; Vautherot, J F; Rasschaert, D; Laurent, S; Petit, F; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Milon, A

    1996-01-01

    Two myxoma virus-rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) recombinant viruses were constructed with the SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma virus-specific antibodies in rabbits after immunization. Inoculations by the intradermal route protected animals against virulent RHDV and myxoma virus challenges. PMID:8764013

  8. Protection against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease with recombinant myxoma viruses expressing rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Bertagnoli, S; Gelfi, J; Le Gall, G; Boilletot, E; Vautherot, J F; Rasschaert, D; Laurent, S; Petit, F; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Milon, A

    1996-08-01

    Two myxoma virus-rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) recombinant viruses were constructed with the SG33 strain of myxoma virus to protect rabbits against myxomatosis and rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease. These recombinant viruses expressed the RHDV capsid protein (VP60). The recombinant protein, which is 60 kDa in size, was antigenic, as revealed by its reaction in immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against RHDV. Both recombinant viruses induced high levels of RHDV- and myxoma virus-specific antibodies in rabbits after immunization. Inoculations by the intradermal route protected animals against virulent RHDV and myxoma virus challenges.

  9. Serological assays based on recombinant viral proteins for the diagnosis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Shuetsu; Tani, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Saijo, Masayuki; Morikawa, Shigeru

    2012-10-12

    The family Arenaviridae, genus Arenavirus, consists of two phylogenetically independent groups: Old World (OW) and New World (NW) complexes. The Lassa and Lujo viruses in the OW complex and the Guanarito, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Chapare viruses in the NW complex cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans, leading to serious public health concerns. These viruses are also considered potential bioterrorism agents. Therefore, it is of great importance to detect these pathogens rapidly and specifically in order to minimize the risk and scale of arenavirus outbreaks. However, these arenaviruses are classified as BSL-4 pathogens, thus making it difficult to develop diagnostic techniques for these virus infections in institutes without BSL-4 facilities. To overcome these difficulties, antibody detection systems in the form of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an indirect immunofluorescence assay were developed using recombinant nucleoproteins (rNPs) derived from these viruses. Furthermore, several antigen-detection assays were developed. For example, novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the rNPs of Lassa and Junin viruses were generated. Sandwich antigen-capture (Ag-capture) ELISAs using these mAbs as capture antibodies were developed and confirmed to be sensitive and specific for detecting the respective arenavirus NPs. These rNP-based assays were proposed to be useful not only for an etiological diagnosis of VHFs, but also for seroepidemiological studies on VHFs. We recently developed arenavirus neutralization assays using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based pseudotypes bearing arenavirus recombinant glycoproteins. The goal of this article is to review the recent advances in developing laboratory diagnostic assays based on recombinant viral proteins for the diagnosis of VHFs and epidemiological studies on the VHFs caused by arenaviruses.

  10. Expression and In Silico Analysis of the Recombinant Bovine Papillomavirus E6 Protein as a Model for Viral Oncoproteins Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J.; Carvalho, R. F.; Ruiz, R. M.; Melo, T. C.; Araldi, R. P.; Carvalho, E.; Thompson, C. E.; Sircili, M. P.; Beçak, W.; Stocco, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) are recognized as the causal agents of economical relevant diseases in cattle, associated with the development of tumors in skin and mucosa. The oncogenesis process is mainly associated with different viral oncoprotein expressions, which are involved in cell transformation. The expression and characterization of recombinant viral oncoproteins represent an attractive strategy to obtain biotechnological products as antibodies and potential vaccines, Thus, the aim of this work was to clone and express the BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins and perform in silico analysis in order to develop a strategy for the systematic study of other papillomaviruses oncoproteins. The results demonstrated that BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from bacterial system as well as its in silico analysis was performed in order to explore and predict biological characteristics of these proteins. PMID:23878806

  11. Expression and in Silico analysis of the recombinant bovine papillomavirus E6 protein as a model for viral oncoproteins studies.

    PubMed

    Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J; Carvalho, R F; Ruiz, R M; Melo, T C; Araldi, R P; Carvalho, E; Thompson, C E; Sircili, M P; Beçak, W; Stocco, R C

    2013-01-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) are recognized as the causal agents of economical relevant diseases in cattle, associated with the development of tumors in skin and mucosa. The oncogenesis process is mainly associated with different viral oncoprotein expressions, which are involved in cell transformation. The expression and characterization of recombinant viral oncoproteins represent an attractive strategy to obtain biotechnological products as antibodies and potential vaccines, Thus, the aim of this work was to clone and express the BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins and perform in silico analysis in order to develop a strategy for the systematic study of other papillomaviruses oncoproteins. The results demonstrated that BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from bacterial system as well as its in silico analysis was performed in order to explore and predict biological characteristics of these proteins.

  12. Recombinant viral protein VP1 suppresses HER-2 expression and migration/metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shao-Wen; Chiu, Ching-Feng; Chen, Tai-An; Chu, Chiao-Li; Huang, Chi-Chang; Shyur, Lie-Fen; Liang, Chi-Ming; Liang, Shu-Mei

    2012-11-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide and metastasis is the major cause of breast cancer death. Development of new therapeutic agents for inhibiting breast cancer metastasis is therefore an urgent need. We previously demonstrated that recombinant DNA-derived viral capsid protein VP1 (rVP1) of foot-and-mouth disease virus-induced apoptosis of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro. Here, we investigated whether rVP1 exhibits any inhibitory effects on migration/metastasis and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), a well-known biomarker for poor prognosis of breast cancer. The effects of rVP1 on cancer cell migration/invasion and metastasis were evaluated using Transwell migration assay and animal cancer models of metastasis. Western blotting, RT-PCR, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence staining techniques were used to investigate the effects of rVP1 on HER-2 and signal transduction mediators. Non-cytotoxic concentrations of rVP1-induced mesenchymal-epithelial transition and significantly suppressed AP-2α and HER-2 expression as well as the migration and invasion of a variety of breast cancer cell lines in a β1-integrin-dependent manner in vitro. Gross and histopathologic examinations showed that rVP1 also suppressed metastasis of several breast cancer cell lines, including HER-2-overexpressing SK-BR-3 and BT-474 cells to lung, liver, or peripheral lymph node in orthotopic allograft/xenograft murine models. In addition, rVP1 significantly prolonged survival in breast cancer-bearing mice. Notably, no apparent side effects of rVP1 were detected, as shown by normal complete blood count levels and serum biochemistry profiles, including AST, ALT, BUN, and creatine. This study demonstrates that rVP1 suppresses the migration, invasion, and metastasis of breast cancer cells via binding to β1 integrin receptor and down-regulation of AP-2α and HER-2 expression. The effectiveness of rVP1 on inhibiting migration

  13. Recombination-dependent concatemeric viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lo Piano, Ambra; Martínez-Jiménez, María I; Zecchi, Lisa; Ayora, Silvia

    2011-09-01

    The initiation of viral double stranded (ds) DNA replication involves proteins that recruit and load the replisome at the replication origin (ori). Any block in replication fork progression or a programmed barrier may act as a factor for ori-independent remodelling and assembly of a new replisome at the stalled fork. Then replication initiation becomes dependent on recombination proteins, a process called recombination-dependent replication (RDR). RDR, which is recognized as being important for replication restart and stability in all living organisms, plays an essential role in the replication cycle of many dsDNA viruses. The SPP1 virus, which infects Bacillus subtilis cells, serves as a paradigm to understand the links between replication and recombination in circular dsDNA viruses. SPP1-encoded initiator and replisome assembly proteins control the onset of viral replication and direct the recruitment of host-encoded replisomal components at viral oriL. SPP1 uses replication fork reactivation to switch from ori-dependent θ-type (circle-to-circle) replication to σ-type RDR. Replication fork arrest leads to a double strand break that is processed by viral-encoded factors to generate a D-loop into which a new replisome is assembled, leading to σ-type viral replication. SPP1 RDR proteins are compared with similar proteins encoded by other viruses and their possible in vivo roles are discussed.

  14. Development of a Recombinant Protein Vaccine Based on Cell-Free Protein Synthesis for Sevenband Grouper Epinephelus septemfasciatus Against Viral Nervous Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Jae-Ok; Kim, Wi-Sik; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2015-10-01

    Sevenband grouper, Epinephelus septemfasciatus, is becoming an important aquaculture species in Korea. However, viral nervous necrosis disease is a large problem causing mass mortality in sevenband grouper aquaculture. Recombinant protein vaccines are one of the best methods to reduce these economic losses. However, the cell-based expression method mainly produces inclusion bodies and requires additional procedures. In this study, we expressed a recombinant viral coat protein of sevenband grouper nervous necrosis virus (NNV) using a cell-free protein synthesis system. The purified recombinant NNV coat protein (rNNV-CP) was injected into sevenband grouper at different doses followed by a NNV challenge. Nonimmunized fish in the first trial (20 μg/fish) began to die 5 days post-challenge and reached 70% cumulative mortality. In contrast, immunized fish also starting dying 5 days postchallenge but lower cumulative mortality (10%) was observed. Cumulative morality in the second trial with different doses (20, 4, and 0.8 μg/fish) was 10%, 40%, and 50%, respectively. These results suggest that rNNV-CP can effectively immunize sevenband grouper depending on the dose administered. This study provides a new approach to develop a recombinant vaccine against NNV infection for sevenband grouper.

  15. Induction of Mucosal and Systemic Immunity to a Recombinant Simian Immunodeficiency Viral Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, T.; Bergmeier, L. A.; Panagiotidi, C.; Tao, L.; Brookes, R.; Klavinskis, L. S.; Walker, P.; Walker, J.; Ward, R. G.; Hussain, L.; Gearing, A. J. H.; Adams, S. E.

    1992-11-01

    Heterosexual transmission through the cervico-vaginal mucosa is the principal route of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Africa and is increasing in the United States and Europe. Vaginal immunization with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) had not yet been studied in nonhuman primates. Immune responses in macaques were investigated by stimulation of the genital and gut-associated lymphoid tissue with a recombinant, particulate SIV antigen. Vaginal, followed by oral, administration of the vaccine elicited three types of immunity: (i) gag protein p27-specific, secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the vaginal fluid, (ii) specific CD4^+ T cell proliferation and helper function in B cell p27-specific IgA synthesis in the genital lymph nodes, and (iii) specific serum IgA and IgG, with CD4^+ T cell proliferative and helper functions in the circulating blood.

  16. The HIV Tat protein transduction domain improves the biodistribution of beta-glucuronidase expressed from recombinant viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Xia, H; Mao, Q; Davidson, B L

    2001-07-01

    Treatment of inherited genetic diseases of the brain remains an intractable problem. Methods to improve the distribution of enzymes that are injected or expressed from transduced cells will be required for many human brain therapies. Recent studies showed that a peptide, the protein transduction domain (PTD) from HIV Tat, could improve the distribution of cytoplasmic reporter proteins when administered systemically as fusion proteins or cross-linked chimeras. The utility of this motif for noncytoplasmic proteins has not been determined. Here, we tested how the Tat motif affected uptake and biodistribution of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase, the protein deficient in the disease mucopolysaccharidosis VII, when expressed from viral vectors. The Tat motif allowed for mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) independent uptake in vitro and significantly increased the distribution of beta-glucuronidase secreted from transduced cells after intravenous or direct brain injection in mice of recombinant vectors. Thus, enzymes modified to contain protein transduction motifs may represent a general strategy for improving the distribution of secreted proteins following in vivo gene transfer.

  17. Dengue virus-specific murine T-lymphocyte proliferation: serotype specificity and response to recombinant viral proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, A L; Kurane, I; Zhang, Y M; Lai, C J; Ennis, F A

    1989-01-01

    Definition of the T-lymphocyte responses to dengue viruses should aid in the development of safe and effective vaccines and help to explain the pathophysiology of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. In this study, we demonstrated that dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes were detected in spleen cells from dengue virus-immune mice using an in vitro proliferation assay. Following immunization with a single dose of infectious dengue virus, murine lymphocytes showed increased proliferation when incubated in the presence of viral antigens of the same serotype but not in the presence of control antigens. Depletion experiments with antibody and complement showed that the population of responding cells expressed the Thy1+ L3T4+ Lyt2- phenotype. This indicates that the predominant proliferating cells are T lymphocytes of the helper-inducer phenotype. Dengue virus-specific memory lymphocyte responses were detectable for at least 22 weeks after immunization. The response to primary infection was primarily serotype specific, with some serotype cross-reactivity present at a low level. We demonstrated that lymphocytes from mice immunized with dengue 4 virus proliferate in response to a combination of dengue 4 virus C, pre-M, E, NS1, and NS2a proteins expressed in Sf9 cells with a recombinant baculovirus, and, to a lesser extent, to the dengue 4 virus E protein alone. PMID:2786087

  18. Rainbow trout surviving infections of viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) show lasting antibodies to recombinant G protein fragments.

    PubMed

    Encinas, P; Gomez-Casado, E; Fregeneda-Grandes; Olesen, N J; Lorenzen, N; Estepa, A; Coll, J M

    2011-03-01

    Rainbow trout antibodies (Abs) binding to recombinant fragments (frgs) derived from the protein G of the viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)-07.71 strain, could be detected by ELISA (frg-ELISA) in sera from trout surviving laboratory-controlled infections. Abs were detected not only by using sera from trout infected with the homologous VHSV isolate but also with the VHSV-DK-201433 heterologous isolate, which had 13 amino acid changes. Sera from healthy trout and/or from trout surviving infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection, were used to calculate cut-off absorbances to differentiate negative from positive sera. Specific anti-VHSV Abs could then be detected by using any of the following frgs: frg11 (56-110), frg15 (65-250), frg16 (252-450) or G21-465. While high correlations were found among the ELISA values obtained with the different frgs, no correlations between any frg-ELISA and complement-dependent 50% plaque neutralization test (PNT) titres could be demonstrated. Between 4 and 10 weeks after VHSV infection, more trout sera were detected as positives by using heterologous frg-ELISA rather than homologous PNT. Furthermore, the percentage of positive sera detected by frg11-ELISA increased with time after infection to reach 100%, while those detected by complement-dependent PNT decreased to 29.4%, thus confirming that the lack of neutralizing Abs does not mean the lack of any anti-VHSV Abs in survivor trout sera. Preliminary results with sera from field samples suggest that further refinements of the frg-ELISA could allow detection of anti-VHSV trout Abs in natural outbreaks caused by different heterologous VHSV isolates. The homologous frg-ELISA method could be useful to follow G immunization attempts during vaccine development and/or to best understand the fish Ab response during VHSV infections. The viral frgs approach might also be used with other fish species and/or viruses.

  19. Recombinant protein expression in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Nobuyuki; Davis, Keith R; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant protein pharmaceuticals are now widely used in treatment of chronic diseases, and several recombinant protein subunit vaccines are approved for human and veterinary use. With growing demand for complex protein pharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, manufacturing capacity is becoming limited. There is increasing need for safe, scalable, and economical alternatives to mammalian cell culture-based manufacturing systems, which require substantial capital investment for new manufacturing facilities. Since a seminal paper reporting immunoglobulin expression in transgenic plants was published in 1989, there have been many technological advances in plant expression systems to the present time where production of proteins in leaf tissues of nonfood crops such as Nicotiana species is considered a viable alternative. In particular, transient expression systems derived from recombinant plant viral vectors offer opportunities for rapid expression screening, construct optimization, and expression scale-up. Extraction of recombinant proteins from Nicotiana leaf tissues can be achieved by collection of secreted protein fractions, or from a total protein extract after grinding the leaves with buffer. After separation from solids, the major purification challenge is contamination with elements of the photosynthetic complex, which can be solved by application of a variety of facile and proven strategies. In conclusion, the technologies required for safe, efficient, scalable manufacture of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana leaf tissues have matured to the point where several products have already been tested in phase I clinical trials and will soon be followed by a rich pipeline of recombinant vaccines, microbicides, and therapeutic proteins.

  20. Viruses and viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R N

    2014-11-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes.

  1. Viruses and viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes. PMID:25485129

  2. Recombinant viral capsid protein VP1 suppresses lung cancer metastasis by inhibiting COX-2/PGE2 and MIG-7.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Yi; Hung, Shao-Wen; Liang, Chi-Ming; Liang, Shu-Mei

    2014-06-15

    Recombinant capsid protein VP1 (rVP1) of foot-and-mouth disease virus binds to integrins to modulate Akt/GSK3-β signaling and suppress migration/invasion and metastasis of cancer cells, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. Here, we showed that the rVP1-mediated inhibition of Akt/GSK3-β signaling and cell migration/invasion was accompanied by downregulation in phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate (PIP3), integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and IKK/NF-κB signaling as well as suppression of COX-2/PGE2 and MIG-7. Addition of PIP3 or overexpression of ILK reversed the rVP1-induced inhibition of IKK/NF-κB signaling, COX-2 and MIG-7. The rVP1-mediated downregulation of COX-2/PGE2 and MIG-7 led to not only attenuation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, MMP2 activity and invasion of lung cancer cells in vitro but also decreased tumor growth and metastasis of lung cancer in xenograft mice. Moreover, downregulation of COX-2/PGE2 and MIG-7 significantly prolonged the overall and disease-free survival of lung cancer-bearing mice. These results suggest that rVP1 inhibits cancer invasion/metastasis, partly if not mainly, via downregulating integrin/PI3K/Akt, ILK and IKK/NF-κB signaling to suppress expression of COX-2/PGE2 and MIG-7.

  3. VPDB: Viral Protein Structural Database

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Om Prakash; Jadhav, Ankush; Hussain, Afzal; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Viral Protein Database is an interactive database for three dimensional viral proteins. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive resource to the community of structural virology, with an emphasis on the description of derived data from structural biology. Currently, VPDB includes ˜1,670 viral protein structures from >277 viruses with more than 465 virus strains. The whole database can be easily accessed through the user convenience text search. Interactivity has been enhanced by using Jmol, WebMol and Strap to visualize the viral protein molecular structure. Availability The database is available for free at http://www.vpdb.bicpu.edu.in PMID:21769196

  4. Immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes nonstructural proteins of the hepatitis C virus suppresses viral protein levels in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Kimura, Kiminori; Chiyo, Tomoko; Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Tobita, Yoshimi; Tokunaga, Yuko; Yasui, Fumihiko; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Wakita, Takaji; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Mizuno, Kyosuke; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Matsushima, Kouji; Kohara, Michinori

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C, which is caused by infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), is a global health problem. Using a mouse model of hepatitis C, we examined the therapeutic effects of a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) that encodes an HCV protein. We generated immunocompetent mice that each expressed multiple HCV proteins via a Cre/loxP switching system and established several distinct attenuated rVV strains. The HCV core protein was expressed consistently in the liver after polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid injection, and these mice showed chronic hepatitis C-related pathological findings (hepatocyte abnormalities, accumulation of glycogen, steatosis), liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Immunization with one rVV strain (rVV-N25), which encoded nonstructural HCV proteins, suppressed serum inflammatory cytokine levels and alleviated the symptoms of pathological chronic hepatitis C within 7 days after injection. Furthermore, HCV protein levels in liver tissue also decreased in a CD4 and CD8 T-cell-dependent manner. Consistent with these results, we showed that rVV-N25 immunization induced a robust CD8 T-cell immune response that was specific to the HCV nonstructural protein 2. We also demonstrated that the onset of chronic hepatitis in CN2-29((+/-))/MxCre((+/-)) mice was mainly attributable to inflammatory cytokines, (tumor necrosis factor) TNF-α and (interleukin) IL-6. Thus, our generated mice model should be useful for further investigation of the immunological processes associated with persistent expression of HCV proteins because these mice had not developed immune tolerance to the HCV antigen. In addition, we propose that rVV-N25 could be developed as an effective therapeutic vaccine.

  5. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases.

  6. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  7. Expression and characterization of highly antigenic domains of chicken anemia virus viral VP2 and VP3 subunit proteins in a recombinant E. coli for sero-diagnostic applications.

    PubMed

    Lai, Guan-Hua; Lin, Ming-Kuem; Lien, Yi-Yang; Fu, Jiun-Hau; Chen, Hsi-Jien; Huang, Chi-Hung; Tzen, Jason T C; Lee, Meng-Shiou

    2013-08-13

    Chicken anemia virus (CAV) is an important viral pathogen that causes anemia and severe immunodeficiency syndrome in chickens worldwide. Generally, CAV infection occurs via vertical transmission in young chicks that are less than two weeks old, which are very susceptible to the disease. Therefore, epidemiological investigations of CAV infection and/or the evaluation of the immunization status of chickens is necessary for disease control. Up to the present, systematically assessing viral protein antigenicity and/or determining the immunorelevant domain(s) of viral proteins during serological testing for CAV infection has never been performed. The expression, production and antigenic characterization of CAV viral proteins such as VP1, VP2 and VP3, and their use in the development of diagnostic kit would be useful for CAV infection prevention. Three CAV viral proteins VP1, VP2 and VP3 was separately cloned and expressed in recombinant E. coli. The purified recombinant CAV VP1, VP2 and VP3 proteins were then used as antigens in order to evaluate their reactivity against chicken sera using indirect ELISA. The results indicated that VP2 and VP3 show good immunoreactivity with CAV-positive chicken sera, whereas VP1 was found to show less immunoreactivity than VP2 and VP3. To carry out the further antigenic characterization of the immunorelevant domains of the VP2 and VP3 proteins, five recombinant VP2 subunit proteins (VP2-435N, VP2-396N, VP2-345N, VP2-171C and VP2-318C) and three recombinant VP3 subunit proteins (VP3-123N, VP3-246M, VP3-366C), spanning the defined regions of VP2 and VP3 were separately produced by an E. coli expression system. These peptides were then used as antigens in indirect ELISAs against chicken sera. The results of these ELISAs using truncated recombinant VP2 and VP3 subunit proteins as coating antigen showed that VP2-345N, VP2-396N and VP3-246M gave good immunoreactivity with CAV-positive chicken sera compared to the other subunit proteins

  8. The live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine 17D induces broad and potent T cell responses against several viral proteins in Indian rhesus macaques – implications for recombinant vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, Philip A.; Piaskowski, Shari M.; Neves, Patricia C. Costa; Rudersdorf, Richard; Kolar, Holly L.; Eernisse, Christopher M.; Weisgrau, Kim L.; Veloso de Santana, Marlon G.; Wilson, Nancy A.; Bonaldo, Myrna C.; Galler, Ricardo; Rakasz, Eva G.; Watkins, David I.

    2011-01-01

    The yellow fever vaccine 17D (YF17D) is one of the most effective vaccines. Its wide use and favorable safety profile make it a prime candidate for recombinant vaccines. It is believed that neutralizing antibodies account for a large measure of the protection afforded to YF17D-vaccinated individuals, however cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses have been described in the setting of YF17D vaccination. YF17D is an ssRNA flavivirus that is translated as a full-length polyprotein, several domains of which pass into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The processing and presentation machinery for MHC class I-restricted CTL responses favor cytoplasmic peptides that are transported into the ER by the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) proteins. In order to inform recombinant vaccine design, we sought to determine if YF17D-induced CTL responses preferentially targeted viral domains that remain within the cytoplasm. We performed whole YF17D proteome mapping of CTL responses in 6 Indian rhesus macaques vaccinated with YF17D using overlapping YF17D peptides. We found that the ER luminal E protein was the most immunogenic viral protein followed closely by the cytoplasmic NS3 and NS5 proteins. These results suggest that antigen processing and presentation in this model system is not preferentially affected by the subcellular location of the viral proteins that are the source of CTL epitopes. The data also suggest potential immunogenic regions of YF17D that could serve as the focus of recombinant T cell vaccine development. PMID:20607226

  9. The live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine 17D induces broad and potent T cell responses against several viral proteins in Indian rhesus macaques--implications for recombinant vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Philip A; Piaskowski, Shari M; Neves, Patricia C Costa; Rudersdorf, Richard; Kolar, Holly L; Eernisse, Christopher M; Weisgrau, Kim L; de Santana, Marlon G Veloso; Wilson, Nancy A; Bonaldo, Myrna C; Galler, Ricardo; Rakasz, Eva G; Watkins, David I

    2010-09-01

    The yellow fever vaccine 17D (YF17D) is one of the most effective vaccines. Its wide use and favorable safety profile make it a prime candidate for recombinant vaccines. It is believed that neutralizing antibodies account for a large measure of the protection afforded to YF17D-vaccinated individuals, however cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses have been described in the setting of YF17D vaccination. YF17D is an ssRNA flavivirus that is translated as a full-length polyprotein, several domains of which pass into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The processing and presentation machinery for MHC class I-restricted CTL responses favor cytoplasmic peptides that are transported into the ER by the transporter associated with antigen presentation proteins. In order to inform recombinant vaccine design, we sought to determine if YF17D-induced CTL responses preferentially targeted viral domains that remain within the cytoplasm. We performed whole YF17D proteome mapping of CTL responses in six Indian rhesus macaques vaccinated with YF17D using overlapping YF17D peptides. We found that the ER luminal E protein was the most immunogenic viral protein followed closely by the cytoplasmic NS3 and NS5 proteins. These results suggest that antigen processing and presentation in this model system is not preferentially affected by the subcellular location of the viral proteins that are the source of CTL epitopes. The data also suggest potential immunogenic regions of YF17D that could serve as the focus of recombinant T cell vaccine development.

  10. The Proteasomal Rpn11 Metalloprotease Suppresses Tombusvirus RNA Recombination and Promotes Viral Replication via Facilitating Assembly of the Viral Replicase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Prasanth, K. Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a “matchmaker” that brings the viral p92pol replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. IMPORTANCE RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA

  11. An efficient approach for recombinant expression and purification of the viral capsid protein from beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Subir; Ghorashi, Seyed A; Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Khandokar, Yogesh B; Himiari, Zainab; Forwood, Jade K; Raidal, Shane R

    2015-04-01

    Structural insights into the biology of viruses such as beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) which do not replicate in cell cultures are increasingly reliant on recombinant methods for protein production and purification. Development of efficient methods for homogenous production of BFDV capsid protein is also essential for vaccine development and diagnostic purposes. In this study, two different plasmids (pMCSG21 and pMCSG24), three homologous BFDV capsid proteins, and two unique expression media (auto-induction and IPTG-induced expression) were trialled for over-expression of the BFDV in Escherichia coli. Over-expression was observed for all three recombinant targets of BFDV capsid protein using E. coli BL21 (DE3) Rosetta 2 cell lines under IPTG induction. These proteins could be purified using an optimized, two-step purification process using a buffer containing 20mM N-cyclohexyl-3-aminopropanesulfonic acid (CAPS), 500 mM NaCl and supplemented with 200 mM L-arginine at pH 10.5, to yield a soluble and stable protein of greater than 95% purity. The final concentration of purified protein was approximately fourteen-to-eighteen fold greater than that reported previously. Initial crystallization and X-ray diffraction confirm that the protein is structured in a manner consistent with icosahedral symmetry. Antigenicity of recombinant Cap was confirmed by immunoassay, verifying its validity for use in continued experimentation as a potential DNA vaccine, a reagent in diagnostic assays, and purified concentrated protein for structural and functional biology.

  12. Vaccination with recombinant adenoviruses expressing the peste des petits ruminants virus F or H proteins overcomes viral immunosuppression and induces protective immunity against PPRV challenge in sheep.

    PubMed

    Rojas, José M; Moreno, Héctor; Valcárcel, Félix; Peña, Lourdes; Sevilla, Noemí; Martín, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious disease of small ruminants caused by the Morbillivirus peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Two recombinant replication-defective human adenoviruses serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either the highly immunogenic fusion protein (F) or hemagglutinin protein (H) from PPRV were used to vaccinate sheep by intramuscular inoculation. Both recombinant adenovirus vaccines elicited PPRV-specific B- and T-cell responses. Thus, neutralizing antibodies were detected in sera from immunized sheep. In addition, we detected a significant antigen specific T-cell response in vaccinated sheep against two different PPRV strains, indicating that the vaccine induced heterologous T cell responses. Importantly, no clinical signs and undetectable virus shedding were observed after virulent PPRV challenge in vaccinated sheep. These vaccines also overcame the T cell immunosuppression induced by PPRV in control animals. The results indicate that these adenovirus constructs could be a promising alternative to current vaccine strategies for the development of PPRV DIVA vaccines.

  13. Going Viral with Fluorescent Proteins.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Lindsey M; Snapp, Erik L

    2015-10-01

    Many longstanding questions about dynamics of virus-cell interactions can be answered by combining fluorescence imaging techniques with fluorescent protein (FP) tagging strategies. Successfully creating a FP fusion with a cellular or viral protein of interest first requires selecting the appropriate FP. However, while viral architecture and cellular localization often dictate the suitability of a FP, a FP's chemical and physical properties must also be considered. Here, we discuss the challenges of and offer suggestions for identifying the optimal FPs for studying the cell biology of viruses.

  14. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  15. Viral Organization of Human Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wuchty, Stefan; Siwo, Geoffrey; Ferdig, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Although maps of intracellular interactions are increasingly well characterized, little is known about large-scale maps of host-pathogen protein interactions. The investigation of host-pathogen interactions can reveal features of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for the development of drugs and disease prevention strategies. A compilation of experimentally verified interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins and a set of HIV-dependency factors (HDF) allowed insights into the topology and intricate interplay between viral and host proteins on a large scale. We found that targeted and HDF proteins appear predominantly in rich-clubs, groups of human proteins that are strongly intertwined among each other. These assemblies of proteins may serve as an infection gateway, allowing the virus to take control of the human host by reaching protein pathways and diversified cellular functions in a pronounced and focused way. Particular transcription factors and protein kinases facilitate indirect interactions between HDFs and viral proteins. Discerning the entanglement of directly targeted and indirectly interacting proteins may uncover molecular and functional sites that can provide novel perspectives on the progression of HIV infection and highlight new avenues to fight this virus. PMID:20827298

  16. Production and titering of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors.

    PubMed

    McClure, Christina; Cole, Katy L H; Wulff, Peer; Klugmann, Matthias; Murray, Andrew J

    2011-11-27

    In recent years recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) have become increasingly valuable for in vivo studies in animals, and are also currently being tested in human clinical trials. Wild-type AAV is a non-pathogenic member of the parvoviridae family and inherently replication-deficient. The broad transduction profile, low immune response as well as the strong and persistent transgene expression achieved with these vectors has made them a popular and versatile tool for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. rAAVs can be easily and cheaply produced in the laboratory and, based on their favourable safety profile, are generally given a low safety classification. Here, we describe a method for the production and titering of chimeric rAAVs containing the capsid proteins of both AAV1 and AAV2. The use of these so-called chimeric vectors combines the benefits of both parental serotypes such as high titres stocks (AAV1) and purification by affinity chromatography (AAV2). These AAV serotypes are the best studied of all AAV serotypes, and individually have a broad infectivity pattern. The chimeric vectors described here should have the infectious properties of AAV1 and AAV2 and can thus be expected to infect a large range of tissues, including neurons, skeletal muscle, pancreas, kidney among others. The method described here uses heparin column purification, a method believed to give a higher viral titer and cleaner viral preparation than other purification methods, such as centrifugation through a caesium chloride gradient. Additionally, we describe how these vectors can be quickly and easily titered to give accurate reading of the number of infectious particles produced.

  17. Recombinant myxoma virus lacking all poxvirus ankyrin-repeat proteins stimulates multiple cellular anti-viral pathways and exhibits a severe decrease in virulence.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Stephanie A; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant

    2014-09-01

    Although the production of single gene knockout viruses is a useful strategy to study viral gene functions, the redundancy of many host interactive genes within a complex viral genome can obscure their collective functions. In this study, a rabbit-specific poxvirus, myxoma virus (MYXV), was genetically altered to disrupt multiple members of the poxviral ankyrin-repeat (ANK-R) protein superfamily, M-T5, M148, M149 and M150. A particularly robust activation of the NF-κB pathway was observed in A549 cells following infection with the complete ANK-R knockout (vMyx-ANKsKO). Also, an increased release of IL-6 was only observed upon infection with vMyx-ANKsKO. In virus-infected rabbit studies, vMyx-ANKsKO was the most extensively attenuated and produced the smallest primary lesion of all ANK-R mutant constructs. This study provides the first insights into the shared functions of the poxviral ANK-R protein superfamily in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Recombinant myxoma virus lacking all poxvirus ankyrin-repeat proteins stimulates multiple cellular anti-viral pathways and exhibits a severe decrease in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Stephanie A.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant

    2014-01-01

    Although the production of single gene knockout viruses is a useful strategy to study viral gene functions, the redundancy of many host interactive genes within a complex viral genome can obscure their collective functions. In this study, a rabbit-specific poxvirus, myxoma virus (MYXV), was genetically altered to disrupt multiple members of the poxviral ankyrin-repeat (ANK-R) protein superfamily, M-T5, M148, M149 and M150. A particularly robust activation of the NF-κB pathway was observed in A549 cells following infection with the complete ANK-R knockout (vMyx-ANKsKO). Also, an increased release of IL-6 was only observed upon infection with vMyx-ANKsKO. In virus-infected rabbit studies, vMyx-ANKsKO was the most extensively attenuated and produced the smallest primary lesion of all ANK-R mutant constructs. This study provides the first insights into the shared functions of the poxviral ANK-R protein superfamily in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25068401

  19. Vaccination with Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing the Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus F or H Proteins Overcomes Viral Immunosuppression and Induces Protective Immunity against PPRV Challenge in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, José M.; Moreno, Héctor; Valcárcel, Félix; Peña, Lourdes; Sevilla, Noemí; Martín, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious disease of small ruminants caused by the Morbillivirus peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Two recombinant replication-defective human adenoviruses serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either the highly immunogenic fusion protein (F) or hemagglutinin protein (H) from PPRV were used to vaccinate sheep by intramuscular inoculation. Both recombinant adenovirus vaccines elicited PPRV-specific B- and T-cell responses. Thus, neutralizing antibodies were detected in sera from immunized sheep. In addition, we detected a significant antigen specific T-cell response in vaccinated sheep against two different PPRV strains, indicating that the vaccine induced heterologous T cell responses. Importantly, no clinical signs and undetectable virus shedding were observed after virulent PPRV challenge in vaccinated sheep. These vaccines also overcame the T cell immunosuppression induced by PPRV in control animals. The results indicate that these adenovirus constructs could be a promising alternative to current vaccine strategies for the development of PPRV DIVA vaccines. PMID:25013961

  20. A single amino acid change resulting in loss of fluorescence of eGFP in a viral fusion protein confers fitness and growth advantage to the recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Phat X.; Panda, Debasis; Das, Phani B.; Das, Subash C.; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2012-10-25

    Using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus encoding eGFP fused in-frame with an essential viral replication protein, the phosphoprotein P, we show that during passage in culture, the virus mutates the nucleotide C289 within eGFP of the fusion protein PeGFP to A or T, resulting in R97S/C amino acid substitution and loss of fluorescence. The resultant non-fluorescent virus exhibits increased fitness and growth advantage over its fluorescent counterpart. The growth advantage of the non-fluorescent virus appears to be due to increased transcription and replication activities of the PeGFP protein carrying the R97S/C substitution. Further, our results show that the R97S/C mutation occurs prior to accumulation of mutations that can result in loss of expression of the gene inserted at the G-L gene junction. These results suggest that fitness gain is more important for the recombinant virus than elimination of expression of the heterologous gene.

  1. A single amino acid change resulting in loss of fluorescence of eGFP in a viral fusion protein confers fitness and growth advantage to the recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Phat X; Panda, Debasis; Das, Phani B; Das, Subash C; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K

    2012-10-25

    Using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus encoding eGFP fused in-frame with an essential viral replication protein, the phosphoprotein P, we show that during passage in culture, the virus mutates the nucleotide C289 within eGFP of the fusion protein PeGFP to A or T, resulting in R97S/C amino acid substitution and loss of fluorescence. The resultant non-fluorescent virus exhibits increased fitness and growth advantage over its fluorescent counterpart. The growth advantage of the non-fluorescent virus appears to be due to increased transcription and replication activities of the PeGFP protein carrying the R97S/C substitution. Further, our results show that the R97S/C mutation occurs prior to accumulation of mutations that can result in loss of expression of the gene inserted at the G-L gene junction. These results suggest that fitness gain is more important for the recombinant virus than elimination of expression of the heterologous gene.

  2. Experimental piscine alphavirus RNA recombination in vivo yields both viable virus and defective viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Petterson, Elin; Guo, Tz-Chun; Evensen, Øystein; Mikalsen, Aase B.

    2016-01-01

    RNA recombination in non-segmented RNA viruses is important for viral evolution and documented for several virus species through in vitro studies. Here we confirm viral RNA recombination in vivo using an alphavirus, the SAV3 subtype of Salmon pancreas disease virus. The virus causes pancreas disease in Atlantic salmon and heavy losses in European salmonid aquaculture. Atlantic salmon were injected with a SAV3 6K-gene deleted cDNA plasmid, encoding a non-viable variant of SAV3, together with a helper cDNA plasmid encoding structural proteins and 6K only. Later, SAV3-specific RNA was detected and recombination of viral RNA was confirmed. Virus was grown from plasmid-injected fish and shown to infect and cause pathology in salmon. Subsequent cloning of PCR products confirming recombination, documented imprecise homologous recombination creating RNA deletion variants in fish injected with cDNA plasmid, corresponding with deletion variants previously found in SAV3 from the field. This is the first experimental documentation of alphavirus RNA recombination in an animal model and provides new insight into the production of defective virus RNA. PMID:27805034

  3. Recombination and Population Mosaic of a Multifunctional Viral Gene, Adeno-Associated Virus cap

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Myers, Richard; Danos, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a dominant force in evolution and results in genetic mosaics. To detect evidence of recombination events and assess the biological significance of genetic mosaics, genome sequences for various viral populations of reasonably large size are now available in the GenBank. We studied a multi-functional viral gene, the adeno-associated virus (AAV) cap gene, which codes for three capsid proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3. VP1-3 share a common C-terminal domain corresponding to VP3, which forms the viral core structure, while the VP1 unique N-terminal part contains an enzymatic domain with phospholipase A2 activity. Our recombinant detection program (RecI) revealed five novel recombination events, four of which have their cross-over points in the N-terminal, VP1 and VP2 unique region. Comparison of phylogenetic trees for different cap gene regions confirmed discordant phylogenies for the recombinant sequences. Furthermore, differences in the phylogenetic tree structures for the VP1 unique (VP1u) region and the rest of cap highlighted the mosaic nature of cap gene in the AAV population: two dominant forms of VP1u sequences were identified and these forms are linked to diverse sequences in the rest of cap gene. This observation together with the finding of frequent recombination in the VP1 and 2 unique regions suggests that this region is a recombination hot spot. Recombination events in this region preserve protein blocks of distinctive functions and contribute to convergence in VP1u and divergence of the rest of cap. Additionally the possible biological significance of two dominant VP1u forms is inferred. PMID:18286191

  4. Serodiagnosis of equine infectious anemia by agar gel immunodiffusion and ELISA using a recombinant p26 viral protein expressed in Escherichia coli as antigen.

    PubMed

    Piza, Adriana S Toledo; Pereira, Alessandra Rael; Terreran, Maria Thereza; Mozzer, Otto; Tanuri, Amílcar; Brandão, Paulo Eduardo; Richtzenhain, Leonardo José

    2007-03-17

    We used a p26 recombinant protein (p26r) from equine infectious-anemia virus (EIAV) expressed in Escherichia coli as antigen to standardize an agar-gel immunodiffusion (AGIDp26r) test and an indirect ELISA (ELISAp26r) for the detection of antibodies against EIAV in 720 equine sera from Brazil. We evaluated the tests's relative diagnostic sensitivities (relSe) and relative diagnostic specificities (relSp) against a commercial AGID kit (Idexx, USA). We used three sera panels: panel A--196 AGID-negative sera from an AIE non-endemic controlled area; panel B--194 AGID-negative sera from an AIE endemic area and panel C--330 AGID-positive sera from an AIE endemic area. ELISAp26r cut-off value was defined with TG-ROC using sera from panels A and C. AGIDp26r showed an agreement of 100% with the commercial kit. When applied to sera from panels A and C, ELISAp26r showed an agreement of 100% with the kit, but, although relSe was 100% for panel C, the ELISAp26r had relSp of 93.3%.

  5. Recombinant protein polymers in biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wookhyun

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring protein-based materials have been found that function as critical components in biomechanical response, fibers and adhesives. A relatively small but growing number of recombinant protein-based materials that mimic the desired features of their natural sources, such as collagens, elastins and silks, are considered as an alternative to conventional synthetic polymers. Advances in genetic engineering have facilitated the synthesis of repetitive protein polymers with precise control of molecular weights which are designed by using synthetic genes encoding tandem repeats of oligopeptide originating from a modular domain of natural proteins. Many repeat sequences as protein polymer building blocks adopt a well-defined secondary structure and undergo self-assembly to result in physically cross-linked networks or with chemical cross-linking so that further form three-dimensional architectures similar to natural counterparts. In this review, recombinant protein polymers currently developed will be presented that have emerged as promising class of next generation biomaterials.

  6. The proteasomal Rpn11 metalloprotease suppresses tombusvirus RNA recombination and promotes viral replication via facilitating assembly of the viral replicase complex.

    PubMed

    Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D

    2015-03-01

    RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a "matchmaker" that brings the viral p92(pol) replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA recombination, although the role

  7. Improving recombinant protein purification yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Production of adequate amounts of recombinant proteins is essential for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. It’s technologically challenging and a limiting factor for tung oil research because analytical reagents such as high qua...

  8. Analyses of a whole-genome inter-clade recombination map of hepatitis delta virus suggest a host polymerase-driven and viral RNA structure-promoted template-switching mechanism for viral RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mei; Wang, Tzu-Chi; Lin, Chia-Chi; Yung-Liang Wang, Robert; Lin, Wen-Bin; Lee, Shang-En; Cheng, Ying-Yu; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Iang, Shan-Bei

    2017-09-22

    The genome of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a 1.7-kb single-stranded circular RNA that folds into an unbranched rod-like structure and has ribozyme activity. HDV redirects host RNA polymerase(s) (RNAP) to perform viral RNA-directed RNA transcription. RNA recombination is known to contribute to the genetic heterogeneity of HDV, but its molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we established a whole-genome HDV-1/HDV-4 recombination map using two cloned sequences coexisting in cultured cells. Our functional analyses of the resulting chimeric delta antigens (the only viral-encoded protein) and recombinant genomes provide insights into how recombination promotes the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of HDV. Our examination of crossover distribution and subsequent mutagenesis analyses demonstrated that ribozyme activity on HDV genome, which is required for viral replication, also contributes to the generation of an inter-clade junction. These data provide circumstantial evidence supporting our contention that HDV RNA recombination occurs via a replication-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, we identify an intrinsic asymmetric bulge on the HDV genome, which appears to promote recombination events in the vicinity. We therefore propose a mammalian RNAP-driven and viral-RNA-structure-promoted template-switching mechanism for HDV genetic recombination. The present findings improve our understanding of the capacities of the host RNAP beyond typical DNA-directed transcription.

  9. Analyses of a whole-genome inter-clade recombination map of hepatitis delta virus suggest a host polymerase-driven and viral RNA structure-promoted template-switching mechanism for viral RNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Mei; Wang, Tzu-Chi; Lin, Chia-Chi; Yung-Liang Wang, Robert; Lin, Wen-Bin; Lee, Shang-En; Cheng, Ying-Yu; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Iang, Shan-Bei

    2017-01-01

    The genome of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a 1.7-kb single-stranded circular RNA that folds into an unbranched rod-like structure and has ribozyme activity. HDV redirects host RNA polymerase(s) (RNAP) to perform viral RNA-directed RNA transcription. RNA recombination is known to contribute to the genetic heterogeneity of HDV, but its molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we established a whole-genome HDV-1/HDV-4 recombination map using two cloned sequences coexisting in cultured cells. Our functional analyses of the resulting chimeric delta antigens (the only viral-encoded protein) and recombinant genomes provide insights into how recombination promotes the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of HDV. Our examination of crossover distribution and subsequent mutagenesis analyses demonstrated that ribozyme activity on HDV genome, which is required for viral replication, also contributes to the generation of an inter-clade junction. These data provide circumstantial evidence supporting our contention that HDV RNA recombination occurs via a replication-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, we identify an intrinsic asymmetric bulge on the HDV genome, which appears to promote recombination events in the vicinity. We therefore propose a mammalian RNAP-driven and viral-RNA-structure-promoted template-switching mechanism for HDV genetic recombination. The present findings improve our understanding of the capacities of the host RNAP beyond typical DNA-directed transcription.

  10. A recombinant rabies virus carrying GFP between N and P affects viral transcription in vitro.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Qin; Mo, Weiyu; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the rabies virus to be a perfect potential vaccine vector to insert foreign genes into the target genome. For this study, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was cloned into the rabies virus (RABV) genome between the N and P gene. CT dinucleotide was inserted as intergenic region. The recombinant high egg passage Flury strain (HEP-Flury) of RABV, carrying GFP (rHEP-NP-GFP), was generated in BHK-21 cells using reverse genetics. According to the viral growth kinetics assay, the addition of GFP between N and P gene has little effect on the viral growth compared to the parental strain HEP-Flury. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) indicated that rHEP-NP-GFP showed different viral gene transcription, especially for G gene, compared to HEP-Flury. The same is true for one other recombinant RABV carrying GFP between G and L gene in NA cells. In addition, parent HEP-Flury showed more expression of innate immune-related molecules in NA cells. Compared to HEP-Flury, Western blotting (WB) indicated that insertion of a foreign gene following N gene enhanced the expression of M and G proteins. According to the qPCR and WB, GFP expression levels of rHEP-NP-GFP were significantly higher than rHEP-GFP. This study indicates HEP-Flury as valid vector to express exogenous genes between N and P.

  11. IFITM Proteins Restrict Viral Membrane Hemifusion

    PubMed Central

    Golfetto, Ottavia; Bungart, Brittani; Li, Minghua; Ding, Shilei; He, Yuxian; Liang, Chen; Lee, James C.; Gratton, Enrico; Cohen, Fredric S.; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2013-01-01

    The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) protein family represents a new class of cellular restriction factors that block early stages of viral replication; the underlying mechanism is currently not known. Here we provide evidence that IFITM proteins restrict membrane fusion induced by representatives of all three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins. IFITM1 profoundly suppressed syncytia formation and cell-cell fusion induced by almost all viral fusion proteins examined; IFITM2 and IFITM3 also strongly inhibited their fusion, with efficiency somewhat dependent on cell types. Furthermore, treatment of cells with IFN also markedly inhibited viral membrane fusion and entry. By using the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope and influenza A virus hemagglutinin as models for study, we showed that IFITM-mediated restriction on membrane fusion is not at the steps of receptor- and/or low pH-mediated triggering; instead, the creation of hemifusion was essentially blocked by IFITMs. Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a chemical known to promote the transition from hemifusion to full fusion, was unable to rescue the IFITM-mediated restriction on fusion. In contrast, oleic acid (OA), a lipid analog that generates negative spontaneous curvature and thereby promotes hemifusion, virtually overcame the restriction. To explore the possible effect of IFITM proteins on membrane molecular order and fluidity, we performed fluorescence labeling with Laurdan, in conjunction with two-photon laser scanning and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We observed that the generalized polarizations (GPs) and fluorescence lifetimes of cell membranes expressing IFITM proteins were greatly enhanced, indicating higher molecularly ordered and less fluidized membranes. Collectively, our data demonstrated that IFITM proteins suppress viral membrane fusion before the creation of hemifusion, and suggested that they may do so by reducing membrane fluidity and conferring a positive spontaneous

  12. Homologous recombinational repair factors are recruited and loaded onto the viral DNA genome in Epstein-Barr virus replication compartments.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, Ayumi; Iwahori, Satoko; Sato, Yoshitaka; Nakayama, Sanae; Isomura, Hiroki; Murata, Takayuki; Tsurumi, Tatsuya

    2009-07-01

    Homologous recombination is an important biological process that facilitates genome rearrangement and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The induction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic replication induces ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-dependent DNA damage checkpoint signaling, leading to the clustering of phosphorylated ATM and Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complexes to sites of viral genome synthesis in nuclei. Here we report that homologous recombinational repair (HRR) factors such as replication protein A (RPA), Rad51, and Rad52 as well as MRN complexes are recruited and loaded onto the newly synthesized viral genome in replication compartments. The 32-kDa subunit of RPA is extensively phosphorylated at sites in accordance with those with ATM. The hyperphosphorylation of RPA32 causes a change in RPA conformation, resulting in a switch from the catalysis of DNA replication to the participation in DNA repair. The levels of Rad51 and phosphorylated RPA were found to increase with the progression of viral productive replication, while that of Rad52 proved constant. Furthermore, biochemical fractionation revealed increases in levels of DNA-bound forms of these HRRs. Bromodeoxyuridine-labeled chromatin immunoprecipitation and PCR analyses confirmed the loading of RPA, Rad 51, Rad52, and Mre11 onto newly synthesized viral DNA, and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling analysis demonstrated DSBs in the EBV replication compartments. HRR factors might be recruited to repair DSBs on the viral genome in viral replication compartments. RNA interference knockdown of RPA32 and Rad51 prevented viral DNA synthesis remarkably, suggesting that homologous recombination and/or repair of viral DNA genome might occur, coupled with DNA replication to facilitate viral genome synthesis.

  13. Protein-Protein Interfaces in Viral Capsids Are Structurally Unique.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shanshan; Brooks, Charles L

    2015-11-06

    Viral capsids exhibit elaborate and symmetrical architectures of defined sizes and remarkable mechanical properties not seen with cellular macromolecular complexes. Given the uniqueness of the higher-order organization of viral capsid proteins in the virosphere, we explored the question of whether the patterns of protein-protein interactions within viral capsids are distinct from those in generic protein complexes. Our comparative analysis involving a non-redundant set of 551 inter-subunit interfaces in viral capsids from VIPERdb and 20,014 protein-protein interfaces in non-capsid protein complexes from the Protein Data Bank found 418 generic protein-protein interfaces that share similar physicochemical patterns with some protein-protein interfaces in the capsid set, using the program PCalign we developed for comparing protein-protein interfaces. This overlap in the structural space of protein-protein interfaces is significantly small, with a p-value <0.0001, based on a permutation test on the total set of protein-protein interfaces. Furthermore, the generic protein-protein interfaces that bear similarity in their spatial and chemical arrangement with capsid ones are mostly small in size with fewer than 20 interfacial residues, which results from the relatively limited choices of natural design for small interfaces rather than having significant biological implications in terms of functional relationships. We conclude based on this study that protein-protein interfaces in viral capsids are non-representative of patterns in the smaller, more compact cellular protein complexes. Our finding highlights the design principle of building large biological containers from repeated, self-assembling units and provides insights into specific targets for antiviral drug design for improved efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Generation and characterization of NV gene-knockout recombinant viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hong

    2011-11-03

    A recombinant viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (rVHSV-deltaNV-EGFP) containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene instead of the NV gene was produced using the reverse-genetics method. For use as a positive control, another recombinant virus (rVHSV-wild) was also generated, which had an identical nucleotide sequence to the wild-type VHSV genome except for a few artificially replaced nucleotides. The rVHSVs were rescued using a system controlled by T7 RNA polymerase supplied by a retroviral vector. Generation of rVHSV-deltaNV-EGFP and rVHSV-wild was confirmed by sequencing of RT-PCR products, and rescue of infectious rVHSVs was confirmed by observation of plaque formation. Replication efficiency of rVHSV-wild was distinctly lower than that of wild-type VHSV, suggesting that the artificially replaced nucleotides, especially when immediately preceding the G or NV gene start codons, might affect the replication of the virus. Replication of rVHSV-deltaNV-EGFP was slightly lower than that of rVHSV-wild when epithelioma papulosum cyprini cells were infected with multiplicity of infection (MOI) 1.0, but much lower when cells were infected with MOI 0.00001. These results suggest that the NV gene plays an important role in VHSV replication through interactions with host-cell responses, and the lower replication ability of rVHSV-wild compared to wild-type VHSV might be caused by replaced nucleotides just before the NV gene open reading frame (ORF) rather than the G gene ORF. In olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus, rVHSV-wild produced slower-progressing mortalities than wild-type VHSV, whereas rVHSV-deltaNV-EGFP pathogenesis was highly attenuated. These results suggest that the NV protein of VHSV may play an important role not only in viral replication but also in viral pathogenesis.

  15. Trapping mammalian protein complexes in viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Eyckerman, Sven; Titeca, Kevin; Van Quickelberghe, Emmy; Cloots, Eva; Verhee, Annick; Samyn, Noortje; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Timmerman, Evy; De Sutter, Delphine; Lievens, Sam; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Gevaert, Kris; Tavernier, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cell lysis is an inevitable step in classical mass spectrometry–based strategies to analyse protein complexes. Complementary lysis conditions, in situ cross-linking strategies and proximal labelling techniques are currently used to reduce lysis effects on the protein complex. We have developed Virotrap, a viral particle sorting approach that obviates the need for cell homogenization and preserves the protein complexes during purification. By fusing a bait protein to the HIV-1 GAG protein, we show that interaction partners become trapped within virus-like particles (VLPs) that bud from mammalian cells. Using an efficient VLP enrichment protocol, Virotrap allows the detection of known binary interactions and MS-based identification of novel protein partners as well. In addition, we show the identification of stimulus-dependent interactions and demonstrate trapping of protein partners for small molecules. Virotrap constitutes an elegant complementary approach to the arsenal of methods to study protein complexes. PMID:27122307

  16. Agroinfiltration contributes to VP1 recombinant protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Priyen; Kunert, Karl J; van Wyk, Stefan; Makgopa, Matome Eugene; Cullis, Christopher A; Vorster, Barend J

    2016-11-01

    There is a growing interest in applying tobacco agroinfiltration for recombinant protein production in a plant based system. However, in such a system, the action of proteases might compromise recombinant protein production. Protease sensitivity of model recombinant foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus P1-polyprotein (P1) and VP1 (viral capsid protein 1) as well as E. coli glutathione reductase (GOR) were investigated. Recombinant VP1 was more severely degraded when treated with the serine protease trypsin than when treated with the cysteine protease papain. Cathepsin L- and B-like as well as legumain proteolytic activities were elevated in agroinfiltrated tobacco tissues and recombinant VP1 was degraded when incubated with such a protease-containing tobacco extract. In silico analysis revealed potential protease cleavage sites within the P1, VP1 and GOR sequences. The interaction modeling of the single VP1 protein with the proteases papain and trypsin showed greater proximity to proteolytic active sites compared to modeling with the entire P1-polyprotein fusion complex. Several plant transcripts with differential expression were detected 24 hr post-agroinfiltration when the RNA-seq technology was applied to identify changed protease transcripts using the recently available tobacco draft genome. Three candidate genes were identified coding for proteases which included the Responsive-to-Desiccation-21 (RD21) gene and genes for coding vacuolar processing enzymes 1a (NbVPE1a) and 1b (NbVPE1b). The data demonstrates that the tested recombinant proteins are sensitive to protease action and agroinfiltration induces the expression of potential proteases that can compromise recombinant protein production.

  17. Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tokareva, Olena; Michalczechen-Lacerda, Valquíria A; Rech, Elíbio L; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is considered to be the toughest biopolymer on Earth due to an extraordinary combination of strength and elasticity. Moreover, silks are biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large-scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and material science applications. We review the current strategies to produce recombinant spider silks. PMID:24119078

  18. Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Tokareva, Olena; Michalczechen-Lacerda, Valquíria A; Rech, Elíbio L; Kaplan, David L

    2013-11-01

    Spider dragline silk is considered to be the toughest biopolymer on Earth due to an extraordinary combination of strength and elasticity. Moreover, silks are biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large-scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and material science applications. We review the current strategies to produce recombinant spider silks.

  19. Production of two vaccinating recombinant rotavirus proteins in the milk of transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Soler, Eric; Le Saux, Agnès; Guinut, Frédéric; Passet, Bruno; Cohen, Ruxandra; Merle, Christine; Charpilienne, Annie; Fourgeux, Cynthia; Sorel, Véronique; Piriou, Antoine; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Cohen, Jean; Houdebine, Louis-Marie

    2005-12-01

    Rotaviruses are the main cause of infantile viral gastroenteritis worldwide leading to approximately 500,000 deaths each year mostly in the developing world. For unknown reasons, live attenuated viruses used in classical vaccine strategies were shown to be responsible for intussusception (a bowel obstruction). New strategies allowing production of safe recombinant non-replicating rotavirus candidate vaccine are thus clearly needed. In this study we utilized transgenic rabbit milk as a source of rotavirus antigens. Individual transgenic rabbit lines were able to produce several hundreds of micrograms per ml of secreted recombinant VP2 and VP6 proteins in their milk. Viral proteins expressed in our model were immunogenic and were shown to induce a significant reduction in viral antigen shedding after challenge with virulent rotavirus in the adult mouse model. To our knowledge, this is the first report of transgenic mammal bioreactors allowing the rapid co-production of two recombinant viral proteins in milk to be used as a vaccine.

  20. Production of recombinant proteins by filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Ward, Owen P

    2012-01-01

    The initial focus of recombinant protein production by filamentous fungi related to exploiting the extraordinary extracellular enzyme synthesis and secretion machinery of industrial strains, including Aspergillus, Trichoderma, Penicillium and Rhizopus species, was to produce single recombinant protein products. An early recognized disadvantage of filamentous fungi as hosts of recombinant proteins was their common ability to produce homologous proteases which could degrade the heterologous protein product and strategies to prevent proteolysis have met with some limited success. It was also recognized that the protein glycosylation patterns in filamentous fungi and in mammals were quite different, such that filamentous fungi are likely not to be the most suitable microbial hosts for production of recombinant human glycoproteins for therapeutic use. By combining the experience gained from production of single recombinant proteins with new scientific information being generated through genomics and proteomics research, biotechnologists are now poised to extend the biomanufacturing capabilities of recombinant filamentous fungi by enabling them to express genes encoding multiple proteins, including, for example, new biosynthetic pathways for production of new primary or secondary metabolites. It is recognized that filamentous fungi, most species of which have not yet been isolated, represent an enormously diverse source of novel biosynthetic pathways, and that the natural fungal host harboring a valuable biosynthesis pathway may often not be the most suitable organism for biomanufacture purposes. Hence it is expected that substantial effort will be directed to transforming other fungal hosts, non-fungal microbial hosts and indeed non microbial hosts to express some of these novel biosynthetic pathways. But future applications of recombinant expression of proteins will not be confined to biomanufacturing. Opportunities to exploit recombinant technology to unravel the

  1. Immunological characterization of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Simionatto, Simone; Marchioro, Silvana B; Galli, Vanessa; Brum, Clarice B; Klein, Catia S; Rebelatto, Raquel; Silva, Everton F; Borsuk, Sibele; Conceição, Fabricio R; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2012-03-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the primary pathogen of enzootic pneumonia, is highly prevalent worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. Commercial vaccines are widely used in the control of this disease, however, they provide only partial protection. The aim of this study was to evaluate 34 recombinant proteins of M. hyopneumoniae expressed in Escherichia coli. Antigenic and immunogenic properties of these proteins were analyzed. For this, the proteins were tested against hyperimmune and convalescent pig sera through ELISA and Western blot. Immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was evaluated in BALB/c mice following intramuscular inoculation. Most antigens were able to induce a strong immune response and sera from inoculated mice were able to recognize native proteins by cell ELISA and Western blot. Several recombinant proteins were specifically recognized by convalescent pig sera, indicating they are expressed during infection. These data may help to develop more efficacious vaccines against M. hyopneumoniae.

  2. MosaicSolver: a tool for determining recombinants of viral genomes from pileup data

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Graham R.; Ryabov, Eugene V.; Fannon, Jessica M.; Moore, Jonathan D.; Evans, David J.; Burroughs, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Viral recombination is a key evolutionary mechanism, aiding escape from host immunity, contributing to changes in tropism and possibly assisting transmission across species barriers. The ability to determine whether recombination has occurred and to locate associated specific recombination junctions is thus of major importance in understanding emerging diseases and pathogenesis. This paper describes a method for determining recombinant mosaics (and their proportions) originating from two parent genomes, using high-throughput sequence data. The method involves setting the problem geometrically and the use of appropriately constrained quadratic programming. Recombinants of the honeybee deformed wing virus and the Varroa destructor virus-1 are inferred to illustrate the method from both siRNAs and reads sampling the viral genome population (cDNA library); our results are confirmed experimentally. Matlab software (MosaicSolver) is available. PMID:25120266

  3. Protein intrinsic disorder toolbox for comparative analysis of viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2008-01-01

    To examine the usefulness of protein disorder predictions as a tool for the comparative analysis of viral proteins, a relational database has been constructed. The database includes proteins from influenza A and HIV-related viruses. Annotations include viral protein sequence, disorder prediction, structure, and function. Location of each protein within a virion, if known, is also denoted. Our analysis reveals a clear relationship between proximity to the RNA core and the percentage of predicted disordered residues for a set of influenza A virus proteins. Neuraminidases (NA) and hemagglutinin (HA) of major influenza A pandemics tend to pair in such a way that both proteins tend to be either ordered-ordered or disordered-disordered by prediction. This may be the result of these proteins evolving from being lipid-associated. High abundance of intrinsic disorder in envelope and matrix proteins from HIV-related viruses likely represents a mechanism where HIV virions can escape immune response despite the availability of antibodies for the HIV-related proteins. This exercise provides an example showing how the combined use of intrinsic disorder predictions and relational databases provides an improved understanding of the functional and structural behaviour of viral proteins. PMID:18831795

  4. [Polyclonal antibodies against recombinant dengue virus NS3 protein].

    PubMed

    Morales, Liliana; Velandia, Myriam L; Calderon, María Angélica; Castellanos, Jaime E; Chaparro-Olaya, Jacqueline

    2017-01-24

    Dengue is a disease caused by one of four serotypes of the dengue virus (DENV) and is endemic in approximately 130 countries. The incidence of dengue has increased dramatically in recent decades, as well as the frequency and magnitude of outbreaks. Despite all efforts, there are no prophylactic or therapeutic treatments for the disease. Accordingly, research on the processes governing the DENV infection cycle is essential to develop vaccines or antiviral therapies. One of themost attractive DENV molecules to investigate is nonstructural protein 3 (NS3), which is essential for viral replication and a major immune target for infection. To produce antibodies to support future studies on NS3 and its cellular interactions with other proteins. Two recombinant proteins of the helicase domain of DENV NS3 serotype 2 were expressed, and used to immunize mice and produce polyclonal antibodies. The antibodies produced were useful in Western blot and immunofluorescence tests. We report an NS3 antibody that immunoprecipitates the viral protein and detects it in Western blot with no need to over-express it or use cell extracts with metabolic radiolabeling. The recombinant proteins expressed and the antibodies produced constitute valuable tools for studying DENV infectious processes involving NS3 and for evaluating tests designed to interfere with its functions.

  5. Influenza B virus non-structural protein 1 counteracts ISG15 antiviral activity by sequestering ISGylated viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Sridharan, Haripriya; Chen, Ran; Baker, Darren P.; Wang, Shanshan; Krug, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 and its conjugation to proteins (ISGylation) are strongly induced by type I interferon. Influenza B virus encodes non-structural protein 1 (NS1B) that binds human ISG15 and provides an appropriate model for determining how ISGylation affects virus replication in human cells. Here using a recombinant virus encoding a NS1B protein defective in ISG15 binding, we show that NS1B counteracts ISGylation-mediated antiviral activity by binding and sequestering ISGylated viral proteins, primarily ISGylated viral nucleoprotein (NP), in infected cells. ISGylated NP that is not sequestered by mutant NS1B acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of oligomerization of the more abundant unconjugated NP. Consequently formation of viral ribonucleoproteins that catalyse viral RNA synthesis is inhibited, causing decreased viral protein synthesis and virus replication. We verify that ISGylated NP is largely responsible for inhibition of viral RNA synthesis by generating recombinant viruses that lack known ISGylation sites in NP. PMID:27587337

  6. Viral and host proteins involved in picornavirus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Weng, Kuo-Feng; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Li-Lien; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2009-11-20

    Picornaviruses cause several diseases, not only in humans but also in various animal hosts. For instance, human enteroviruses can cause hand-foot-and-mouth disease, herpangina, myocarditis, acute flaccid paralysis, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, severe neurological complications, including brainstem encephalitis, meningitis and poliomyelitis, and even death. The interaction between the virus and the host is important for viral replication, virulence and pathogenicity. This article reviews studies of the functions of viral and host factors that are involved in the life cycle of picornavirus. The interactions of viral capsid proteins with host cell receptors is discussed first, and the mechanisms by which the viral and host cell factors are involved in viral replication, viral translation and the switch from translation to RNA replication are then addressed. Understanding how cellular proteins interact with viral RNA or viral proteins, as well as the roles of each in viral infection, will provide insights for the design of novel antiviral agents based on these interactions.

  7. Hydroxylation of Human Type III Collagen Alpha Chain by Recombinant Coexpression with a Viral Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingjing; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Gao, Yuan; Fan, Daidi; Zhu, Chenhui; Mi, Yu; Xue, Wenjiao

    2017-08-01

    High-level expression of recombinant collagen by genetic engineering is urgently required. Recombinant collagen is different from natural collagen in its hydroxyproline (Hyp) content and thermal stability. To obtain hydroxylated collagen for applications in biomedicine and biomaterials, the human collagen α1(III) chain was co-expressed with the viral prolyl 4-hydroxylase A085R in Escherichia coli. Unlike previous reports using human prolyl 4-hydroxylase, this study examined the hydroxylation of full-length human collagen α1(III) chain (COL3A1) by viral prolyl 4-hydroxylase. The genes encoding these two proteins were controlled by different promoters, Ptac and PRPL, on a recombinant pKK223-3 plasmid. The sequencing results verified that the target genes were successfully inserted into the recombinant vector. Based on quantitative PCR, SDS-PAGE, and western blotting, successful expression by E. coli BL21(DE3) was detected at the mRNA and protein levels for both loci. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) results suggested that the highest Hyp yield was obtained when the two proteins were induced with 0.5 mM IPTG and heat-shock treatment at 50 °C, corresponding to high enzyme expression and low human collagen α1(III) chain expression levels. A biological activity analysis indicated that the recombinant collagen with the highest hydroxylation level supported the growth of baby hamster kidney cells, similar to observations for native collagen. The production of hydroxylated collagen in this study establishes a new method for collagen hydroxylation and provides a basis for the application of recombinant collagen expressed in E. coli.

  8. APOBEC3 Proteins in Viral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Stavrou, Spyridon; Ross, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B Editing Complex (APOBEC3) family members are cytidine deaminases that play important roles in intrinsic responses to infection by retroviruses and have also been implicated in the control of other viruses such as parvoviruses, herpesviruses, papillomaviruses, hepatitis B virus and retrotransposons. While their direct effect on modification of viral DNA has been clearly demonstrated, whether they play additional roles in innate and adaptive immunity to viruses is less clear. Here we review the data regarding the various steps in the innate and adaptive immune response to virus infection in which APOBEC3 proteins have been implicated. PMID:26546688

  9. Alternative purification method for recombinant measles viral nucleoprotein expressed in insect cells by ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Saem; Kim, You-Jin; Yang, Jeongsun; Yoon, Hee Sook; Kim, Seung Tae; Kim, Kisoon

    2014-03-01

    Recombinant measles virus nucleoproteins (rMeV N) and fusion (F) proteins were characterized as major antigenic proteins expressed in insect cells mediated by recombinant baculoviruses (rBVs). Band intensities were analyzed by Western blotting to recognize IgG and IgM antibodies against the rMeV N and F proteins in human sera and cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs) from patients with measles infections. Positive results from the blots using the rMeV N were consistent with the results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in which whole viral proteins were used as antigens. Human sera and CSFs reacted more strongly with the rMeV N than with the rMeV F proteins prepared in an identical expression system. For efficient and reliable purification, ion-exchange chromatography using Source Q anion resin was applied, and high-purity rMeV N protein was harvested. To characterize the similarity with the native viral protein to purified N protein, structural mimicry of purified recombinant proteins with intact rMeV N was shown through transmission electron microscopy, and the truncation and the phosphorylation status of the expressed protein were analyzed. These results suggest that the rMeV N purified by ion-exchange chromatography has features similar to those of naïve N including a self-assembled structure, phosphorylation and antigenic function. Thus, these expression and purification methods can be applied to the large-scale production of the rMeV N, which is essential for the development of new diagnostic tools and vaccines for acute and chronic MeV infections.

  10. Serotype specificity of recombinant fusion protein containing domain III and capsid protein of dengue virus 2.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Alienys; Valdés, Iris; Gil, Lázaro; Hermida, Lisset; Gutiérrez, Sheila; García, Angélica; Bernardo, Lidice; Pavón, Alekis; Guillén, Gerardo; Guzmán, María G

    2012-07-01

    Recombinant fusion protein containing domain III of the dengue envelope protein fused to capsid protein from dengue 2 virus was immunogenic and conferred protection in mice against lethal challenge in previously report. Here, the antigenic specificity of this recombinant protein using anti-dengue antibodies from mice and humans and the cross-reactive humoral and cellular response induced in immunized mice were evaluated. The homologous anti-dengue antibodies showed a higher reactivity to the recombinant protein compared to the wide cross-reactivity observed for viral antigen as determined by ELISA. The IgG anti-dengue and functional antibodies, induced by the recombinant proteins in mice, were highly serotype specific by ELISA, hemaglutination inhibition and plaque reduction neutralizing tests. Accordingly, the cellular immune response determined by the IFNγ and TNFα secretion, was serotype specific. The specificity of serotype associated to this recombinant protein in addition to its high antigenicity, immunogenicity and protecting capacity suggest its advantage as a possible functional and safe vaccine candidate against dengue in a future tetravalent formulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Superresolution imaging of viral protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Salka, Kyle; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Yang, David

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane is closely apposed to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), which facilitates communication between these organelles. These contacts, known as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM), facilitate calcium signaling, lipid transfer, as well as antiviral and stress responses. How cellular proteins traffic to the MAM, are distributed therein, and interact with ER and mitochondrial proteins are subject of great interest. The human cytomegalovirus UL37 exon 1 protein or viral mitochondria-localized inhibitor of apoptosis (vMIA) is crucial for viral growth. Upon synthesis at the ER, vMIA traffics to the MAM and OMM, where it reprograms the organization and function of these compartments. vMIA significantly changes the abundance of cellular proteins at the MAM and OMM, including proteins that regulate calcium homeostasis and cell death. Through the use of superresolution imaging, we have shown that vMIA is distributed at the OMM in nanometer scale clusters. This is similar to the clusters reported for the mitochondrial calcium channel, VDAC, as well as electron transport chain, translocase of the OMM complex, and mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system components. Thus, aside from addressing how vMIA targets the MAM and regulates survival of infected cells, biochemical studies and superresolution imaging of vMIA offer insights into the formation, organization, and functioning of MAM. Here, we discuss these insights into trafficking, function, and organization of vMIA at the MAM and OMM and discuss how the use of superresolution imaging is contributing to the study of the formation and trafficking of viruses. PMID:25724304

  12. Designing Smart Materials with Recombinant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hollingshead, Sydney; Lin, Charng-Yu; Liu, Julie C

    2017-07-01

    Recombinant protein design allows modular protein domains with different functionalities and responsive behaviors to be easily combined. Inclusion of these protein domains can enable recombinant proteins to have complex responses to their environment (e.g., temperature-triggered aggregation followed by enzyme-mediated cleavage for drug delivery or pH-triggered conformational change and self-assembly leading to structural stabilization by adjacent complementary residues). These "smart" behaviors can be tuned by amino acid identity and sequence, chemical modifications, and addition of other components. A wide variety of domains and peptides have smart behavior. This review focuses on protein designs for self-assembly or conformational changes due to stimuli such as shifts in temperature or pH. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Extracellular recombinant protein production from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ye; Chen, Rachel

    2009-11-01

    Escherichia coli is the most commonly used host for recombinant protein production and metabolic engineering. Extracellular production of enzymes and proteins is advantageous as it could greatly reduce the complexity of a bioprocess and improve product quality. Extracellular production of proteins is necessary for metabolic engineering applications in which substrates are polymers such as lignocelluloses or xenobiotics since adequate uptake of these substrates is often an issue. The dogma that E. coli secretes no protein has been challenged by the recognition of both its natural ability to secrete protein in common laboratory strains and increased ability to secrete proteins in engineered cells. The very existence of this review dedicated to extracellular production is a testimony for outstanding achievements made collectively by the community in this regard. Four strategies have emerged to engineer E. coli cells to secrete recombinant proteins. In some cases, impressive secretion levels, several grams per liter, were reached. This secretion level is on par with other eukaryotic expression systems. Amid the optimism, it is important to recognize that significant challenges remain, especially when considering the success cannot be predicted a priori and involves much trials and errors. This review provides an overview of recent developments in engineering E. coli for extracellular production of recombinant proteins and an analysis of pros and cons of each strategy.

  14. Recombinant viral vectored vaccines for the control of avian influenza: a review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The poultry industry has been at the forefront of developing recombinant viral vectored vaccines in an attempt to improve the immune response to vaccination. With AIV, the hemagglutinin surface glycoprotein is the key antigen for protection against infection. This allows a single gene to be transf...

  15. Transient Expression and Cellular Localization of Recombinant Proteins in Cultured Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Hull, J Joe

    2017-04-20

    Heterologous protein expression systems are used for the production of recombinant proteins, the interpretation of cellular trafficking/localization, and the determination of the biochemical function of proteins at the sub-organismal level. Although baculovirus expression systems are increasingly used for protein production in numerous biotechnological, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications, nonlytic systems that do not involve viral infection have clear benefits but are often overlooked and underutilized. Here, we describe a method for generating nonlytic expression vectors and transient recombinant protein expression. This protocol allows for the efficient cellular localization of recombinant proteins and can be used to rapidly discern protein trafficking within the cell. We show the expression of four recombinant proteins in a commercially available insect cell line, including two aquaporin proteins from the insect Bemisia tabaci, as well as subcellular marker proteins specific for the cell plasma membrane and for intracellular lysosomes. All recombinant proteins were produced as chimeras with fluorescent protein markers at their carboxyl termini, which allows for the direct detection of the recombinant proteins. The double transfection of cells with plasmids harboring constructs for the genes of interest and a known subcellular marker allows for live cell imaging and improved validation of cellular protein localization.

  16. Cultivating Insect Cells To Produce Recombinant Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn; Goodwin, Thomas; Prewett, Tacey; Andrews, Angela; Francis, Karen; O'Connor, Kim

    1996-01-01

    Method of producing recombinant proteins involves growth of insect cells in nutrient solution in cylindrical bioreactor rotating about cylindrical axis, oriented horizontally and infecting cells with viruses into which genes of selected type cloned. Genes in question those encoding production of desired proteins. Horizontal rotating bioreactor preferred for use in method, denoted by acronym "HARV", described in "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662).

  17. Cultivating Insect Cells To Produce Recombinant Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn; Goodwin, Thomas; Prewett, Tacey; Andrews, Angela; Francis, Karen; O'Connor, Kim

    1996-01-01

    Method of producing recombinant proteins involves growth of insect cells in nutrient solution in cylindrical bioreactor rotating about cylindrical axis, oriented horizontally and infecting cells with viruses into which genes of selected type cloned. Genes in question those encoding production of desired proteins. Horizontal rotating bioreactor preferred for use in method, denoted by acronym "HARV", described in "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662).

  18. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  19. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  20. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  1. Recombinant adeno-associated viral vector reference standards.

    PubMed

    Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O

    2012-01-01

    Reference standard materials (RSMs) exist for a variety of biologics including vaccines but are not readily available for gene therapy vectors. To date, a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 RSM (rAAV2 RSM) has been produced and characterized and was made available to the scientific community in 2010. In addition, a rAAV8 RSM has been produced and will be characterized in the coming months. The use of these reference materials by members of the gene therapy field facilitates the calibration of individual laboratory vector-specific internal standards and the eventual comparison of preclinical and clinical data based on common dosage units. Normalization of data to determine therapeutic dose ranges of rAAV vectors for each particular tissue target and disease indication is important information that can enhance the safety and protection of patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of protein modification during anti-viral heat bioprocessing by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smales, C M; Pepper, D S; James, D C

    2001-01-01

    During the preparation of therapeutic plasma and recombinant protein biopharmaceuticals heat-treatment is routinely applied as a means of viral inactivation. However, as most proteins denature and aggregate under heat stress, it is necessary to add thermostabilizing excipients to protein formulations destined for anti-viral heat-treatment in order to prevent protein damage. Anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocessing therefore requires that a balance be found between the bioprocessing conditions, virus kill and protein integrity. In this study we have utilized a simple model protein, beta-lactoglobulin, to investigate the relationship between virucidal heat-treatment conditions (protein formulation and temperature) and the type and extent of protein modification in the liquid state. A variety of industrially relevant heat-treatments were undertaken, using formulations that included sucrose as a thermostabilizing excipient. Using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) we show here that protein modifications do occur with increasingly harsh heat-treatment. The predominant modification under these conditions was protein glycation by either glucose or fructose derived from hydrolyzed sucrose. Advanced glycation end products and additional unidentified products were also present in beta-lactoglobulin protein samples subjected to extended heat-treatment. These findings have implications for the improvement of anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocesses to ensure the safety and efficacy of protein biopharmaceuticals. CopyrightCopyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Current Good Manufacturing Practice Production of an Oncolytic Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Viral Vector for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meseck, M.; Derecho, I.; Lopez, P.; Knoblauch, C.; McMahon, R.; Anderson, J.; Dunphy, N.; Quezada, V.; Khan, R.; Huang, P.; Dang, W.; Luo, M.; Hsu, D.; Woo, S.L.C.; Couture, L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 109 plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 1010 PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 1013 PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:21083425

  4. Current good manufacturing practice production of an oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis viral vector for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ausubel, L J; Meseck, M; Derecho, I; Lopez, P; Knoblauch, C; McMahon, R; Anderson, J; Dunphy, N; Quezada, V; Khan, R; Huang, P; Dang, W; Luo, M; Hsu, D; Woo, S L C; Couture, L

    2011-04-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 10(9) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 10(10) PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 10(13) PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC.

  5. Role of RNase MRP in viral RNA degradation and RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Jaag, Hannah M; Lu, Qiasheng; Schmitt, Mark E; Nagy, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    RNA degradation, together with RNA synthesis, controls the steady-state level of viral RNAs in infected cells. The endoribonucleolytic cleavage of viral RNA is important not only for viral RNA degradation but for RNA recombination as well, due to the participation of some RNA degradation products in the RNA recombination process. To identify host endoribonucleases involved in degradation of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model host, we tested eight known endoribonucleases. Here we report that downregulation of SNM1, encoding a component of the RNase MRP, and a temperature-sensitive mutation in the NME1 gene, coding for the RNA component of RNase MRP, lead to reduced production of the endoribonucleolytically cleaved TBSV RNA in yeast. We also show that the highly purified yeast RNase MRP cleaves the TBSV RNA in vitro, resulting in TBSV RNA degradation products similar in size to those observed in yeast cells. Knocking down the NME1 homolog in Nicotiana benthamiana also led to decreased production of the cleaved TBSV RNA, suggesting that in plants, RNase MRP is involved in TBSV RNA degradation. Altogether, this work suggests a role for the host endoribonuclease RNase MRP in viral RNA degradation and recombination.

  6. Mapping the λ Integrase bridges in the nucleoprotein Holliday junction intermediates of viral integrative and excisive recombination.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wenjun; Warren, David; Seah, Nicole E; Laxmikanthan, Gurunathan; Van Duyne, Gregory D; Landy, Arthur

    2014-08-26

    The site-specific recombinase encoded by bacteriophage λ [λ Integrase (Int)] is responsible for integrating and excising the viral chromosome into and out of the chromosome of its Escherichia coli host. In contrast to the other well-studied and highly exploited tyrosine recombinase family members, such as Cre and Flp, Int carries out a reaction that is highly directional, tightly regulated, and depends on an ensemble of accessory DNA bending proteins acting on 240 bp of DNA encoding 16 protein binding sites. This additional complexity enables two pathways, integrative and excisive recombination, whose opposite, and effectively irreversible, directions are dictated by different physiological and environmental signals. Int recombinase is a heterobivalent DNA binding protein that binds via its small amino-terminal domain to high affinity arm-type DNA sites and via its large, compound carboxyl-terminal domain to core-type DNA sites, where DNA cleavage and ligation are executed. Each of the four Int protomers, within a multiprotein 400-kDa recombinogenic complex, is thought to bind and, with the aid of DNA bending proteins, bridge one arm- and one core-type DNA site. Despite a wealth of genetic, biochemical, and functional information generated by many laboratories over the last 50 y, it has not been possible to decipher the patterns of Int bridges, an essential step in understanding the architectures responsible for regulated directionality of recombination. We used site-directed chemical cross-linking of Int in trapped Holliday junction recombination intermediates and recombination reactions with chimeric recombinases, to identify the unique and monogamous patterns of Int bridges for integrative and excisive recombination.

  7. HIV-1 Subtypes and Recombinants in Northern Tanzania: Distribution of Viral Quasispecies

    PubMed Central

    Kiwelu, Ireen E.; Novitsky, Vladimir; Margolin, Lauren; Baca, Jeannie; Manongi, Rachel; Sam, Noel; Shao, John; McLane, Mary F.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Essex, M.

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed the distribution and prevalence of HIV-1 subtypes, multiplicity of HIV-1 infection, and frequency of inter-subtype recombination among HIV-1-infected female bar and hotel workers in Moshi, Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania, from 2004 to 2007. The HIV-1 viral sequences spanning the V1-C5 region of HIV-1 env gp120 were analyzed from 50 subjects by single genome amplification and sequencing (SGA/S) technique. A total of 1740 sequences were amplified and sequenced from the HIV-1 proviral DNA template. The median env sequences analyzed per subject per two time points was 38 (IQR 28–50) over one year of HIV infection. In a subset of 14 subjects, a total of 239 sequences were obtained from HIV-1 RNA template at the baseline visit. The most prevalent HIV-1 subtypes were A1 (56%) and C (30%), while HIV-1 subtype D and inter-subtype recombinant viruses were found in 6% and 8% of subjects respectively. Transmission of multiple HIV-1 variants was evident in 27% of the subjects infected with pure HIV-1 subtypes A1, C, or D. The HIV-1 inter-subtype recombinants were found in 8% including HIV-1 C/A, D/A, and complex mosaic recombinants. Multiple viral variants were found in two subjects infected with inter-subtype recombinants. One subject harbored quasispecies of both pure HIV-1 A1 and C/A recombinant. The other subject was infected with two complex mosaic inter-subtype recombinant variants belonging to subtype D. HIV-1 multiple infections and ongoing recombination contribute significantly to the genetic diversity of circulating HIV-1 in Tanzania and have important implications for vaccine design and the development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:23118882

  8. Rapid, Simple, and Versatile Manufacturing of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors at Scale

    PubMed Central

    Lock, Martin; Alvira, Mauricio; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Samanta, Arabinda; Toelen, Jaan; Debyser, Zeger

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Adeno-associated viral (AAV) manufacturing at scale continues to hinder the application of AAV technology to gene therapy studies. Although scalable systems based on AAV–adenovirus, AAV–herpesvirus, and AAV–baculovirus hybrids hold promise for clinical applications, they require time-consuming generation of reagents and are not highly suited to intermediate-scale preclinical studies in large animals, in which several combinations of serotype and genome may need to be tested. We observed that during production of many AAV serotypes, large amounts of vector are found in the culture supernatant, a relatively pure source of vector in comparison with cell-derived material. Here we describe a high-yielding, recombinant AAV production process based on polyethylenimine (PEI)-mediated transfection of HEK293 cells and iodixanol gradient centrifugation of concentrated culture supernatant. The entire process can be completed in 1 week and the steps involved are universal for a number of different AAV serotypes. Process conditions have been optimized such that final purified yields are routinely greater than 1 × 1014 genome copies per run, with capsid protein purity exceeding 90%. Initial experiments with vectors produced by the new process demonstrate equivalent or better transduction both in vitro and in vivo when compared with small-scale, CsCl gradient-purified vectors. In addition, the iodixanol gradient purification process described effectively separates infectious particles from empty capsids, a desirable property for reducing toxicity and unwanted immune responses during preclinical studies. PMID:20497038

  9. Overview of the purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Paul T

    2015-04-01

    When the first version of this unit was written in 1995, protein purification of recombinant proteins was based on a variety of standard chromatographic methods and approaches, many of which were described and mentioned throughout Current Protocols in Protein Science. In the interim, there has been a shift toward an almost universal usage of the affinity or fusion tag. This may not be the case for biotechnology manufacture where affinity tags can complicate producing proteins under regulatory conditions. Regardless of the protein expression system, questions are asked as to which and how many affinity tags to use, where to attach them in the protein, and whether to engineer a self-cleavage system or simply leave them on. We will briefly address some of these issues. Also, although this overview focuses on E.coli, protein expression and purification, other commonly used expression systems are mentioned and, apart from cell-breakage methods, protein purification methods and strategies are essentially the same. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Biochemical and genetic analysis of the role of the viral polymerase in enterovirus recombination.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Andrew; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Evans, David J

    2016-08-19

    Genetic recombination in single-strand, positive-sense RNA viruses is a poorly understand mechanism responsible for generating extensive genetic change and novel phenotypes. By moving a critical cis-acting replication element (CRE) from the polyprotein coding region to the 3' non-coding region we have further developed a cell-based assay (the 3'CRE-REP assay) to yield recombinants throughout the non-structural coding region of poliovirus from dually transfected cells. We have additionally developed a defined biochemical assay in which the only protein present is the poliovirus RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which recapitulates the strand transfer events of the recombination process. We have used both assays to investigate the role of the polymerase fidelity and nucleotide turnover rates in recombination. Our results, of both poliovirus intertypic and intratypic recombination in the CRE-REP assay and using a range of polymerase variants in the biochemical assay, demonstrate that RdRp fidelity is a fundamental determinant of recombination frequency. High fidelity polymerases exhibit reduced recombination and low fidelity polymerases exhibit increased recombination in both assays. These studies provide the basis for the analysis of poliovirus recombination throughout the non-structural region of the virus genome and provide a defined biochemical assay to further dissect this important evolutionary process. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Biochemical and genetic analysis of the role of the viral polymerase in enterovirus recombination

    PubMed Central

    Woodman, Andrew; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Evans, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic recombination in single-strand, positive-sense RNA viruses is a poorly understand mechanism responsible for generating extensive genetic change and novel phenotypes. By moving a critical cis-acting replication element (CRE) from the polyprotein coding region to the 3′ non-coding region we have further developed a cell-based assay (the 3′CRE-REP assay) to yield recombinants throughout the non-structural coding region of poliovirus from dually transfected cells. We have additionally developed a defined biochemical assay in which the only protein present is the poliovirus RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), which recapitulates the strand transfer events of the recombination process. We have used both assays to investigate the role of the polymerase fidelity and nucleotide turnover rates in recombination. Our results, of both poliovirus intertypic and intratypic recombination in the CRE-REP assay and using a range of polymerase variants in the biochemical assay, demonstrate that RdRp fidelity is a fundamental determinant of recombination frequency. High fidelity polymerases exhibit reduced recombination and low fidelity polymerases exhibit increased recombination in both assays. These studies provide the basis for the analysis of poliovirus recombination throughout the non-structural region of the virus genome and provide a defined biochemical assay to further dissect this important evolutionary process. PMID:27317698

  12. Structures and Mechanisms of Viral Membrane Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith M.; Delos, Sue E.; Brecher, Matthew; Schornberg, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Recent work has identified three distinct classes of viral membrane fusion proteins based on structural criteria. In addition, there are at least four distinct mechanisms by which viral fusion proteins can be triggered to undergo fusion-inducing conformational changes. Viral fusion proteins also contain different types of fusion peptides and vary in their reliance on accessory proteins. These differing features combine to yield a rich diversity of fusion proteins. Yet despite this staggering diversity, all characterized viral fusion proteins convert from a fusion-competent state (dimers or trimers, depending on the class) to a membrane-embedded homotrimeric prehairpin, and then to a trimer-of-hairpins that brings the fusion peptide, attached to the target membrane, and the transmembrane domain, attached to the viral membrane, into close proximity thereby facilitating the union of viral and target membranes. During these conformational conversions, the fusion proteins induce membranes to progress through stages of close apposition, hemifusion, and then the formation of small, and finally large, fusion pores. Clearly, highly divergent proteins have converged on the same overall strategy to mediate fusion, an essential step in the life cycle of every enveloped virus. PMID:18568847

  13. Intraventricular injection of myxoma virus results in transient expression of viral protein in mouse brain ependymal and subventricular cells.

    PubMed

    France, Megan R; Thomas, Diana L; Liu, Jia; McFadden, Grant; MacNeill, Amy L; Roy, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses that selectively infect and lyse cancer cells have potential as therapeutic agents. Myxoma virus, a poxvirus that is known to be pathogenic only in rabbits, has not been reported to infect normal tissues in humans or mice. We observed that when recombinant virus was injected directly into the lateral ventricle of the mouse brain, virally encoded red fluorescent protein was expressed in ependymal and subventricular cells. Cells were positive for nestin, a marker of neural stem cells. Rapamycin increased the number of cells expressing the virally encoded protein. However, protein expression was transient. Cells expressing the virally encoded protein did not undergo apoptosis and the ependymal lining remained intact. Myxoma virus appears to be safe when injected into the brain despite the transient expression of virally derived protein in a small population of periventricular cells.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide induced conversion of recombinant prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Fozia; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Ladner, Carol L; Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Ametaj, Burim N; Wishart, David S

    2014-01-01

    The conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to the β-rich infectious isoform PrPSc is considered a critical and central feature in prion pathology. Although PrPSc is the critical component of the infectious agent, as proposed in the “protein-only” prion hypothesis, cellular components have been identified as important cofactors in triggering and enhancing the conversion of PrPC to proteinase K resistant PrPSc. A number of in vitro systems using various chemical and/or physical agents such as guanidine hydrochloride, urea, SDS, high temperature, and low pH, have been developed that cause PrPC conversion, their amplification, and amyloid fibril formation often under non-physiological conditions. In our ongoing efforts to look for endogenous and exogenous chemical mediators that might initiate, influence, or result in the natural conversion of PrPC to PrPSc, we discovered that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacterial membranes interacts with recombinant prion proteins and induces conversion to an isoform richer in β sheet at near physiological conditions as long as the LPS concentration remains above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). More significant was the LPS mediated conversion that was observed even at sub-molar ratios of LPS to recombinant ShPrP (90–232). PMID:24819168

  15. Overview of the Purification of Recombinant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    When the first version of this unit was written in 1995 protein purification of recombinant proteins was based on a variety of standard chromatographic methods and approaches many of which were described and mentioned in this unit and elsewhere in the book. In the interim there has been a shift towards an almost universal usage of the affinity or fusion tag. This may not be the case for biotechnology manufacture where affinity tags can complicate producing proteins under regulatory conditions. Regardless of the protein expression system, questions are asked as to which and how many affinity tags to use, where to attach them in the protein and whether to engineer a self cleavage system or simply leave them on. We will briefly address some of these issues. Also although this overview focuses on E.coli, protein expression and purification from the other commonly used expression systems are mentioned and apart from cell breakage methods, the protein purification methods and strategies are essentially the same. PMID:25829302

  16. Toll-like receptor 2 senses hepatitis C virus core protein but not infectious viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marco; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Jilg, Nikolaus; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Wakita, Takaji; Hafkemeyer, Peter; Blum, Hubert E.; Barth, Heidi; Henneke, Philipp; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pathogen recognition molecules activating the innate immune system. Cell surface expressed TLRs, such as TLR2 and TLR4 have been shown to play an important role in human host defenses against viruses through sensing of viral structural proteins. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether TLR2 and TLR4 participate in inducing antiviral immunity against hepatitis C virus by sensing viral structural proteins. We studied TLR2 and TLR4 activation by cell-culture derived infectious virions (HCVcc) and serum-derived virions in comparison to purified recombinant HCV structural proteins and enveloped virus-like particles. Incubation of TLR2 or TLR4 transfected cell lines with recombinant core protein resulted in activation of TLR2-dependent signaling. In contrast, neither infectious virions nor enveloped HCV-like particles triggered TLR2 and TLR4 signaling. These findings suggest that monomeric HCV core protein but not intact infectious particles are sensed by TLR2. Impairment of core-TLR interaction in infectious viral particles may contribute to escape from innate antiviral immune responses. PMID:20375602

  17. General introduction: recombinant protein production and purification of insoluble proteins.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Saccardo, Paolo; Corchero, José Luis; Xu, Zhikun; García-Fruitós, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are synthesized in heterologous systems because of the impossibility to obtain satisfactory yields from natural sources. The production of soluble and functional recombinant proteins is among the main goals in the biotechnological field. In this context, it is important to point out that under stress conditions, protein folding machinery is saturated and this promotes protein misfolding and, consequently, protein aggregation. Thus, the selection of the optimal expression organism and the most appropriate growth conditions to minimize the formation of insoluble proteins should be done according to the protein characteristics and downstream requirements. Escherichia coli is the most popular recombinant protein expression system despite the great development achieved so far by eukaryotic expression systems. Besides, other prokaryotic expression systems, such as lactic acid bacteria and psychrophilic bacteria, are gaining interest in this field. However, it is worth mentioning that prokaryotic expression system poses, in many cases, severe restrictions for a successful heterologous protein production. Thus, eukaryotic systems such as mammalian cells, insect cells, yeast, filamentous fungus, and microalgae are an interesting alternative for the production of these difficult-to-express proteins.

  18. Widespread Recombination, Reassortment, and Transmission of Unbalanced Compound Viral Genotypes in Natural Arenavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Stenglein, Mark D.; Jacobson, Elliott R.; Chang, Li-Wen; Sanders, Chris; Hawkins, Michelle G.; Guzman, David S-M.; Drazenovich, Tracy; Dunker, Freeland; Kamaka, Elizabeth K.; Fisher, Debbie; Reavill, Drury R.; Meola, Linda F.; Levens, Gregory; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Arenaviruses are one of the largest families of human hemorrhagic fever viruses and are known to infect both mammals and snakes. Arenaviruses package a large (L) and small (S) genome segment in their virions. For segmented RNA viruses like these, novel genotypes can be generated through mutation, recombination, and reassortment. Although it is believed that an ancient recombination event led to the emergence of a new lineage of mammalian arenaviruses, neither recombination nor reassortment has been definitively documented in natural arenavirus infections. Here, we used metagenomic sequencing to survey the viral diversity present in captive arenavirus-infected snakes. From 48 infected animals, we determined the complete or near complete sequence of 210 genome segments that grouped into 23 L and 11 S genotypes. The majority of snakes were multiply infected, with up to 4 distinct S and 11 distinct L segment genotypes in individual animals. This S/L imbalance was typical: in all cases intrahost L segment genotypes outnumbered S genotypes, and a particular S segment genotype dominated in individual animals and at a population level. We corroborated sequencing results by qRT-PCR and virus isolation, and isolates replicated as ensembles in culture. Numerous instances of recombination and reassortment were detected, including recombinant segments with unusual organizations featuring 2 intergenic regions and superfluous content, which were capable of stable replication and transmission despite their atypical structures. Overall, this represents intrahost diversity of an extent and form that goes well beyond what has been observed for arenaviruses or for viruses in general. This diversity can be plausibly attributed to the captive intermingling of sub-clinically infected wild-caught snakes. Thus, beyond providing a unique opportunity to study arenavirus evolution and adaptation, these findings allow the investigation of unintended anthropogenic impacts on viral ecology

  19. Widespread recombination, reassortment, and transmission of unbalanced compound viral genotypes in natural arenavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Stenglein, Mark D; Jacobson, Elliott R; Chang, Li-Wen; Sanders, Chris; Hawkins, Michelle G; Guzman, David S-M; Drazenovich, Tracy; Dunker, Freeland; Kamaka, Elizabeth K; Fisher, Debbie; Reavill, Drury R; Meola, Linda F; Levens, Gregory; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2015-05-01

    Arenaviruses are one of the largest families of human hemorrhagic fever viruses and are known to infect both mammals and snakes. Arenaviruses package a large (L) and small (S) genome segment in their virions. For segmented RNA viruses like these, novel genotypes can be generated through mutation, recombination, and reassortment. Although it is believed that an ancient recombination event led to the emergence of a new lineage of mammalian arenaviruses, neither recombination nor reassortment has been definitively documented in natural arenavirus infections. Here, we used metagenomic sequencing to survey the viral diversity present in captive arenavirus-infected snakes. From 48 infected animals, we determined the complete or near complete sequence of 210 genome segments that grouped into 23 L and 11 S genotypes. The majority of snakes were multiply infected, with up to 4 distinct S and 11 distinct L segment genotypes in individual animals. This S/L imbalance was typical: in all cases intrahost L segment genotypes outnumbered S genotypes, and a particular S segment genotype dominated in individual animals and at a population level. We corroborated sequencing results by qRT-PCR and virus isolation, and isolates replicated as ensembles in culture. Numerous instances of recombination and reassortment were detected, including recombinant segments with unusual organizations featuring 2 intergenic regions and superfluous content, which were capable of stable replication and transmission despite their atypical structures. Overall, this represents intrahost diversity of an extent and form that goes well beyond what has been observed for arenaviruses or for viruses in general. This diversity can be plausibly attributed to the captive intermingling of sub-clinically infected wild-caught snakes. Thus, beyond providing a unique opportunity to study arenavirus evolution and adaptation, these findings allow the investigation of unintended anthropogenic impacts on viral ecology

  20. Protection against infectious laryngotracheitis by in ovo vaccination with commercially available viral vector recombinant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Deirdre I; Vagnozzi, Ariel; Dorea, Fernanda; Riblet, Sylva M; Mundt, Alice; Zavala, Guillermo; García, Maricarmen

    2010-12-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). The disease is mainly controlled through biosecurity and by vaccination with live-attenuated vaccines. The chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines, although proven to be effective in experimental settings, have limited efficacy in controlling the disease in dense broiler production sites due to unrestricted use and poor mass vaccination coverage. These factors allowed CEO vaccines to regain virulence, causing long lasting and, consequently, severe outbreaks of the disease. A new generation of viral vector fowl poxvirus (FPV) and herpesvirus of turkey (HVT) vaccines carrying ILTV genes has been developed and such vaccines are commercially available. These vaccines are characterized by their lack of transmission, lack of ILTV-associated latent infections, and no reversion to virulence. HVT-vectored ILTV recombinant vaccines were originally approved for subcutaneous HVT or transcutaneous (pox) delivery. The increased incidence of ILTV outbreaks in broiler production sites encouraged the broiler industry to deliver the FPV-LT and HVT-LT recombinant vaccines in ovo. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protection induced by ILTV viral vector recombinant vaccines after in ovo application in 18-day-old commercial broiler embryos. The protection induced by recombinant ILTV vaccines was assessed by their ability to prevent clinical signs and mortality; to reduce challenge virus replication in the trachea; to prevent an increase in body temperature; and to prevent a decrease in body weight gain after challenge. In this study, both recombinant-vectored ILTV vaccines provided partial protection, thereby mitigating the disease, but did not reduce challenge virus loads in the trachea.

  1. Recombinant avidin and avidin-fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Airenne, K J; Marjomäki, V S; Kulomaa, M S

    1999-12-31

    Both chicken egg-white avidin and its bacterial relative streptavidin are well known for their extraordinary high affinity with biotin (Kd approximately 10(-15) M). They are widely used as tools in a number of affinity-based separations, in diagnostic assays and in a variety of other applications. These methods have collectively become known as (strept)avidin-biotin technology. Biotin can easily and effectively be attached to different molecules, termed binders and probes, without destroying their biological activity. The exceptional stability of the avidin-biotin complex and the wide range of commercially available reagents explain the popularity of this system. In order by genetic engineering to modify the unwanted properties of avidin and to further expand the existing avidin-biotin technology, production systems for recombinant avidin and avidin-fusion proteins have been established. This review article presents an overview of the current status of these systems. Future trends in the production and applications of recombinant avidin and avidin-fusion proteins are also discussed.

  2. Recent advances in recombinant protein production

    PubMed Central

    Kunert, Renate; Casanova, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Designing appropriate expression vectors is one of the critical steps in the generation of stable cell lines for recombinant protein production. Conventional expression vectors are severely affected by the chromatin environment surrounding their integration site into the host genome, resulting in low expression levels and transgene silencing. In the past, a new generation of expression vectors and different strategies was developed to overcome the chromatin effects. Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are cloning vectors capable of accommodating up to 350 Kb. Thus, BACs can carry a whole eukaryotic locus with all the elements controlling the expression of a gene; therefore, BACs harbor their own chromatin environment. Expression vectors based on BACs containing open/permissive chromatin loci are not affected by the chromatin surrounding their integration site in the host cell genome. Consequently, BAC-based expression vectors containing the appropriate loci confer predictable and high levels of expression over time. These properties make BAC-based expression vectors a very attractive tool applied to the recombinant protein production field. PMID:23680894

  3. Recombinant Brucella abortus gene expressing immunogenic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, J.E.; Tabatabai, L.B.

    1991-06-11

    This patent describes a synthetic recombinant DNA molecule containing a DNA sequence. It comprises a gene of Brucella abortus encoding an immunogenic protein having a molecular weight of approximately 31,000 daltons as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, the protein having an isoelectric point around 4.9, and containing a twenty-five amino acid sequence from its amino terminal end consisting of Gln-Ala-Pro-Thr-Phe-Phe-Arg-Ile-Gly-Thr-Gly-Gly-Thr-Ala-Gly-Thr-Tyr-Tyr-Pro-Ile-Gly-Gly-Leu-Ile-Ala, wherein Gln, Ala, Pro, Thr, Phe, Arg, Ile, Gly, Tyr, and Leu, respectively, represent glutamine, alanine, proline, threonine, phenylalanine, arginine, isolecuine, glycine, tyrosine, and leucine.

  4. Mismatch repair proteins: key regulators of genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Surtees, J A; Argueso, J L; Alani, E

    2004-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) systems are central to maintaining genome stability in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. MMR proteins play a fundamental role in avoiding mutations, primarily by removing misincorporation errors that occur during DNA replication. MMR proteins also act during genetic recombination in steps that include repairing mismatches in heteroduplex DNA, modulating meiotic crossover control, removing 3' non-homologous tails during double-strand break repair, and preventing recombination between divergent sequences. In this review we will, first, discuss roles for MMR proteins in repairing mismatches that occur during recombination, particularly during meiosis. We will also explore how studying this process has helped to refine models of double-strand break repair, and particularly to our understanding of gene conversion gradients. Second, we will examine the role of MMR proteins in repressing homeologous recombination, i.e. recombination between divergent sequences. We will also compare the requirements for MMR proteins in preventing homeologous recombination to the requirements for these proteins in mismatch repair.

  5. Proteins involved in meiotic recombination: a role in male infertility?

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Matthew L; Hassold, Terry J; Carrell, Douglas T

    2008-01-01

    Meiotic recombination results in the formation of crossovers, by which genetic information is exchanged between homologous chromosomes during prophase I of meiosis. Recombination is a complex process involving many proteins. Alterations in the genes involved in recombination may result in infertility. Molecular studies have improved our understanding of the roles and mechanisms of the proteins and protein complexes involved in recombination, some of which have function in mitotic cells as well as meiotic cells. Human gene sequencing studies have been performed for some of these genes and have provided further information on the phenotypes observed in some infertile individuals. However, further studies are needed to help elucidate the particular role(s) of a given protein and to increase our understanding of these protein systems. This review will focus on our current understanding of proteins involved in meiotic recombination from a genomic perspective, summarizing our current understanding of known mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms that may affect male fertility by altering meiotic recombination.

  6. Cleavage of spike protein of SARS coronavirus by protease factor Xa is associated with viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Lanying; Kao, Richard Y.; Zhou, Yusen; He, Yuxian; Zhao, Guangyu; Wong, Charlotte; Jiang, Shibo; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Zheng, Bo-Jian . E-mail: bzheng@hkucc.hku.hk

    2007-07-20

    The spike (S) protein of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been known to recognize and bind to host receptors, whose conformational changes then facilitate fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membrane, leading to viral entry into target cells. However, other functions of SARS-CoV S protein such as proteolytic cleavage and its implications to viral infection are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the infection of SARS-CoV and a pseudovirus bearing the S protein of SARS-CoV was inhibited by a protease inhibitor Ben-HCl. Also, the protease Factor Xa, a target of Ben-HCl abundantly expressed in infected cells, was able to cleave the recombinant and pseudoviral S protein into S1 and S2 subunits, and the cleavage was inhibited by Ben-HCl. Furthermore, this cleavage correlated with the infectivity of the pseudovirus. Taken together, our study suggests a plausible mechanism by which SARS-CoV cleaves its S protein to facilitate viral infection.

  7. Preparation of Recombinant Viral Glycoproteins for Novel and Therapeutic Antibody Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yee-Peng; Yan, Lianying; Feng, Yan-Ru; Broder, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are a critical component in the protection or recovery from viral infections. In the absence of available vaccines or antiviral drugs for many important human viral pathogens, the identification and characterization of new human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs) able to neutralize viruses offers the possibility for effective pre- and/or post-exposure therapeutic modalities. Such hmAbs may also help in our understanding of the virus entry process, the mechanisms of virus neutralization and in the eventual development of specific entry inhibitors, vaccines and research tools. The majority of the more recently developed antiviral hmAbs have come from the use of antibody phage-display technologies using both naïve and immune libraries. Many of these agents are also enveloped viruses possessing important neutralizing determinants within their membrane-anchored envelope glycoproteins and the use of recombinant, soluble versions of these viral glycoproteins is often critical in the isolation and development of antiviral hmAbs. This chapter will detail several methods that have been successfully employed to produce, purify and characterize soluble and secreted versions of several viral envelope glycoproteins which have been successfully used as antigens to capture and isolate human phage-displayed monoclonal antibodies. PMID:19252850

  8. Recombinant HT.sub.m4 gene, protein and assays

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Bing; Adra, Chaker N.; Lelias, Jean-Michel

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT.sub.m4 protein and a recombinant HT.sub.m4 protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy.

  9. Illuminating structural proteins in viral "dark matter" with metaproteomics.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jennifer R; Ignacio-Espinoza, J Cesar; Kim, Eun-Hae; Trubl, Gareth; Jones, Robert M; Roux, Simon; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Rich, Virginia I; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-03-01

    Viruses are ecologically important, yet environmental virology is limited by dominance of unannotated genomic sequences representing taxonomic and functional "viral dark matter." Although recent analytical advances are rapidly improving taxonomic annotations, identifying functional dark matter remains problematic. Here, we apply paired metaproteomics and dsDNA-targeted metagenomics to identify 1,875 virion-associated proteins from the ocean. Over one-half of these proteins were newly functionally annotated and represent abundant and widespread viral metagenome-derived protein clusters (PCs). One primarily unannotated PC dominated the dataset, but structural modeling and genomic context identified this PC as a previously unidentified capsid protein from multiple uncultivated tailed virus families. Furthermore, four of the five most abundant PCs in the metaproteome represent capsid proteins containing the HK97-like protein fold previously found in many viruses that infect all three domains of life. The dominance of these proteins within our dataset, as well as their global distribution throughout the world's oceans and seas, supports prior hypotheses that this HK97-like protein fold is the most abundant biological structure on Earth. Together, these culture-independent analyses improve virion-associated protein annotations, facilitate the investigation of proteins within natural viral communities, and offer a high-throughput means of illuminating functional viral dark matter.

  10. Streptomyces as host for recombinant production of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins.

    PubMed

    Vallin, Carlos; Ramos, Astrid; Pimienta, Elsa; Rodríguez, Caridad; Hernández, Tairí; Hernández, Ivones; Del Sol, Ricardo; Rosabal, Grisel; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Anné, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    The 45/47 kDa APA protein (Rv1860) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was produced by Streptomyces lividans. The recombinant protein could be recovered from the culture medium of an S. lividans clone containing the apa gene under control of the promoter and signal sequence of the Streptomyces coelicolor agarase gene. The recombinant protein production was further scaled-up using fermentation conditions. The APA protein was subsequently purified from the culture supernatant by means of immunochromatography. About 80 mg of recombinant protein were obtained per liter of culture media. In vivo tests with the APA protein purified from S. lividans TK24/pRGAPA1 revealed that the recombinant protein was antigenic and could induce high titers of specific antibodies in the mouse biological model. Results obtained concerning heterologous production of APA, its immunogenic and antigenic capacity, demonstrated the potential of S. lividans as a valuable host for the production of recombinant proteins from M. tuberculosis.

  11. Recombinant protein production and insect cell culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas (Inventor); Francis, Karen (Inventor); Andrews, Angela (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using the cultured insect cells as host for a virus encoding the described polypeptide such as baculovirus. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  12. Recombinant Protein Production and Insect Cell Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Andrews, Angela D. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using virtually infected or stably transformed insect cells containing a gene encoding the described polypeptide. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  13. Effect of truncation of the N-terminal region of the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) P protein on viral replication.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Sun; Kim, Min Sun; Choi, Seung Hyuk; Kang, Yue Jai; Kim, Ki Hong

    2015-11-01

    The phosphoprotein (P) of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) plays an essential role in viral replication by interconnecting the L protein and the N protein-RNA complex. In this study, to investigate the role of the N-terminal region of the P protein in viral replication, we mutated the first or the first and second or the first, second, and third ATG codon into TGA stop codons. The respective mutants were named P1, P2, and P3. Recombinant VHSVs containing each mutated P gene (rVHSV-P1, -P2, and -P3) were successfully generated by supplying the intact P protein in trans. The rVHSV-P2 and -P3 were not generated from cells expressing truncated P proteins (P1, P2 or P3 protein), but the rVHSV-P1 produced infectious viruses, even in cells without any P-protein-expressing plasmids. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the P gene of rVHSV-P1 showed that a mutation had occurred that resulted in the fourth amino acid (isoleucine, ATT) being changed to methionine (ATG) without a frameshift (P0.5), suggesting that strong selection pressure might facilitate mutations that are advantageous or essential for virus replication. Infectious rVHSV-P2 and -P3 were produced in cells expressing the P0.5 protein, suggesting that the first three amino acids of the P protein of VHSV are dispensable for viral replication. Furthermore, although the P1 protein was shorter than the P0.5 protein by only two amino acid residues, no viruses were produced when the P1 protein was supplied indicating that the fourth and the fifth amino acid residues are indispensable for normal P protein functions involved in viral replication.

  14. Direct Head-to-Head Evaluation of Recombinant Adeno-associated Viral Vectors Manufactured in Human versus Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Kondratov, Oleksandr; Marsic, Damien; Crosson, Sean M; Mendez-Gomez, Hector R; Moskalenko, Oleksandr; Mietzsch, Mario; Heilbronn, Regine; Allison, Jonathan R; Green, Kari B; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Zolotukhin, Sergei

    2017-08-10

    The major drawback of the Baculovirus/Sf9 system for recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) manufacturing is that most of the Bac-derived rAAV vector serotypes, with few exceptions, demonstrate altered capsid compositions and lower biological potencies. Here, we describe a new insect cell-based production platform utilizing attenuated Kozak sequence and a leaky ribosome scanning to achieve a serotype-specific modulation of AAV capsid proteins stoichiometry. By way of example, rAAV5 and rAAV9 were produced and comprehensively characterized side by side with HEK293-derived vectors. A mass spectrometry analysis documented a 3-fold increase in both viral protein (VP)1 and VP2 capsid protein content compared with human cell-derived vectors. Furthermore, we conducted an extensive analysis of encapsidated single-stranded viral DNA using next-generation sequencing and show a 6-fold reduction in collaterally packaged contaminating DNA for rAAV5 produced in insect cells. Consequently, the re-designed rAAVs demonstrated significantly higher biological potencies, even in a comparison with HEK293-manufactured rAAVs mediating, in the case of rAAV5, 4-fold higher transduction of brain tissues in mice. Thus, the described system yields rAAV vectors of superior infectivity and higher genetic identity providing a scalable platform for good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade vector production. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Elastomeric Recombinant Protein-based Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, Nasim; Mithieux, Suzanne M.; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Weiss, Anthony S.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Elastomeric protein-based biomaterials, produced from elastin derivatives, are widely investigated as promising tissue engineering scaffolds due to their remarkable properties including substantial extensibility, long-term stability, self-assembly, high resilience upon stretching, low energy loss, and excellent biological activity. These elastomers are processed from different sources of soluble elastin such as animal-derived soluble elastin, recombinant human tropoelastin, and elastin-like polypeptides into various forms including three dimensional (3D) porous hydrogels, elastomeric films, and fibrous electrospun scaffolds. Elastin-based biomaterials have shown great potential for the engineering of elastic tissues such as skin, lung and vasculature. In this review, the synthesis and properties of various elastin-based elastomers with their applications in tissue engineering are described. PMID:23935392

  16. VZV ORF47 serine protein kinase and its viral substrates.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Teri K; Grose, Charles

    2010-01-01

    ORF47, a serine protein kinase of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and homolog of herpes simplex virus UL13, is an interesting modulator of VZV pathogenesis. This chapter summarizes research showing that ORF47 protein kinase activity, by virtue of phosphorylation of or binding to various viral substrates, regulates VZV proteins during all phases of viral infection and has a pronounced effect on the trafficking of gE, the predominant VZV glycoprotein, which in turn is critical for cell-to-cell spread of the virus. Casein kinase II, an ubiquitous cellular protein kinase, recognizes a similar but less stringent phosphorylation consensus sequence and can partially compensate for lack of ORF47 activity in VZV-infected cells. Differences between the phosphorylation consensus sites of the viral and cellular kinases are outlined in detail.

  17. RNA-protein interaction methods to study viral IRES elements.

    PubMed

    Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Diaz-Toledano, Rosa; Martínez-Salas, Encarnación

    2015-12-01

    Translation control often takes place through the mRNA untranslated regions, involving direct interactions with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Internal ribosome entry site elements (IRESs) are cis-acting RNA regions that promote translation initiation using a cap-independent mechanism. A subset of positive-strand RNA viruses harbor IRESs as a strategy to ensure efficient viral protein synthesis. IRESs are organized in modular structural domains with a division of functions. However, viral IRESs vary in nucleotide sequence, secondary RNA structure, and transacting factor requirements. Therefore, in-depth studies are needed to understand how distinct types of viral IRESs perform their function. In this review we describe methods to isolate and identify RNA-binding proteins important for IRES activity, and to study the impact of RNA structure and RNA-protein interactions on IRES activity.

  18. Viral capsid proteins are segregated in structural fold space.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shanshan; Brooks, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Viral capsid proteins assemble into large, symmetrical architectures that are not found in complexes formed by their cellular counterparts. Given the prevalence of the signature jelly-roll topology in viral capsid proteins, we are interested in whether these functionally unique capsid proteins are also structurally unique in terms of folds. To explore this question, we applied a structure-alignment based clustering of all protein chains in VIPERdb filtered at 40% sequence identity to identify distinct capsid folds, and compared the cluster medoids with a non-redundant subset of protein domains in the SCOP database, not including the viral capsid entries. This comparison, using Template Modeling (TM)-score, identified 2078 structural "relatives" of capsid proteins from the non-capsid set, covering altogether 210 folds following the definition in SCOP. The statistical significance of the 210 folds shared by two sets of the same sizes, estimated from 10,000 permutation tests, is less than 0.0001, which is an upper bound on the p-value. We thus conclude that viral capsid proteins are segregated in structural fold space. Our result provides novel insight on how structural folds of capsid proteins, as opposed to their surface chemistry, might be constrained during evolution by requirement of the assembled cage-like architecture. Also importantly, our work highlights a guiding principle for virus-based nanoplatform design in a wide range of biomedical applications and materials science.

  19. Viral Capsid Proteins Are Segregated in Structural Fold Space

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanshan; Brooks, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Viral capsid proteins assemble into large, symmetrical architectures that are not found in complexes formed by their cellular counterparts. Given the prevalence of the signature jelly-roll topology in viral capsid proteins, we are interested in whether these functionally unique capsid proteins are also structurally unique in terms of folds. To explore this question, we applied a structure-alignment based clustering of all protein chains in VIPERdb filtered at 40% sequence identity to identify distinct capsid folds, and compared the cluster medoids with a non-redundant subset of protein domains in the SCOP database, not including the viral capsid entries. This comparison, using Template Modeling (TM)-score, identified 2078 structural “relatives” of capsid proteins from the non-capsid set, covering altogether 210 folds following the definition in SCOP. The statistical significance of the 210 folds shared by two sets of the same sizes, estimated from 10,000 permutation tests, is less than 0.0001, which is an upper bound on the p-value. We thus conclude that viral capsid proteins are segregated in structural fold space. Our result provides novel insight on how structural folds of capsid proteins, as opposed to their surface chemistry, might be constrained during evolution by requirement of the assembled cage-like architecture. Also importantly, our work highlights a guiding principle for virus-based nanoplatform design in a wide range of biomedical applications and materials science. PMID:23408879

  20. Viral RNA-directed RNA polymerases use diverse mechanisms to promote recombination between RNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Chetverin, Alexander B; Kopein, Damir S; Chetverina, Helena V; Demidenko, Alexander A; Ugarov, Victor I

    2005-03-11

    An earlier developed purified cell-free system was used to explore the potential of two RNA-directed RNA polymerases (RdRps), Qbeta phage replicase and the poliovirus 3Dpol protein, to promote RNA recombination through a primer extension mechanism. The substrates of recombination were fragments of complementary strands of a Qbeta phage-derived RNA, such that if aligned at complementary 3'-termini and extended using one another as a template, they would produce replicable molecules detectable as RNA colonies grown in a Qbeta replicase-containing agarose. The results show that while 3Dpol efficiently extends the aligned fragments to produce the expected homologous recombinant sequences, only nonhomologous recombinants are generated by Qbeta replicase at a much lower yield and through a mechanism not involving the extension of RNA primers. It follows that the mechanisms of RNA recombination by poliovirus and Qbeta RdRps are quite different. The data favor an RNA transesterification reaction catalyzed by a conformation acquired by Qbeta replicase during RNA synthesis and provide a likely explanation for the very low frequency of homologous recombination in Qbeta phage.

  1. Transgenic birds for the production of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Kamihira, Masamichi; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Iijima, Shinji

    2004-01-01

    Transgenic birds were expected to be an excellent transgenic bioreactor for the production of recombinant pharmaceutical proteins. However, the only successful transgenic bioreactors have been based on mammals. We have developed two key techniques for obtaining transgenic birds. For bird embryo culture, we identified that the low rate of hatchability of cultured embryos is caused by limited oxygen and calcium availability. In quail embryo culture using a chicken eggshell as a culture vessel, hatchability increased to 80% by the supplement of calcium lactate in addition to oxygen aeration. A fully artificial vessel for quail embryo culture using a gas-permeable Teflon membrane was also designed. Although the hatchability was lower than that of cultures using a surrogate eggshell, we succeeded in hatching of bird embryos using a fully artificial vessel. For transgene introduction, a replication-defective pantropic retroviral vector based on Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G) was injected to laid embryos at the blastodermal stage, and the embryos were hatched in vitro to generate G0 birds. The viral vector sequence was detected in the tissues of all G0 birds. The germ-line transmission efficiency was more than 80%. Plural copies of the transgene were inserted into the genome of G1 transgenic progeny.

  2. Serotype-dependent transduction efficiencies of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors in monkey neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Gerits, Annelies; Vancraeyenest, Pascaline; Vreysen, Samme; Laramée, Marie-Eve; Michiels, Annelies; Gijsbers, Rik; Van den Haute, Chris; Moons, Lieve; Debyser, Zeger; Baekelandt, Veerle; Arckens, Lutgarde; Vanduffel, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Viral vector-mediated expression of genes (e.g., coding for opsins and designer receptors) has grown increasingly popular. Cell-type specific expression is achieved by altering viral vector tropism through crosspackaging or by cell-specific promoters driving gene expression. Detailed information about transduction properties of most recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) serotypes in macaque cortex is gradually becoming available. Here, we compare transduction efficiencies and expression patterns of reporter genes in two macaque neocortical areas employing different rAAV serotypes and promoters. A short version of the calmodulin-kinase-II (CaMKIIα0.4) promoter resulted in reporter gene expression in cortical neurons for all tested rAAVs, albeit with different efficiencies for spread: rAAV2/5>>rAAV2/7>rAAV2/8>rAAV2/9>>rAAV2/1 and proportion of transduced cells: rAAV2/1>rAAV2/5>rAAV2/7=rAAV2/9>rAAV2/8. In contrast to rodent studies, the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter appeared least efficient in macaque cortex. The human synapsin-1 promoter preceded by the CMV enhancer (enhSyn1) produced homogeneous reporter gene expression across all layers, while two variants of the CaMKIIα promoter resulted in different laminar transduction patterns and cell specificities. Finally, differences in expression patterns were observed when the same viral vector was injected in two neocortical areas. Our results corroborate previous findings that reporter-gene expression patterns and efficiency of rAAV transduction depend on serotype, promoter, cortical layer, and area. PMID:26839901

  3. Recombinant Protein Production by In Vivo Polymer Inclusion Display ▿

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Katrin; Peters, Verena; Rehm, Bernd H. A.

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach to produce purified recombinant proteins was established. The target protein is produced as polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase fusion protein, which mediates intracellular formation of PHA inclusions displaying the target protein. After isolation of the PHA inclusions, the pure target protein was released by simple enterokinase digestion. PMID:21803888

  4. Data Mining for Expressivity of Recombinant Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Satoshi; Isoai, Atsushi; Yamamura, Masayuki

    We analyzed the expressivity of recombinant proteins by using data mining methods. The expression technique of recombinant protein is a key step towards elucidating the functions of genes discovered through genomic sequence projects. We have studied the productive efficiency of recombinant proteins in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S.pombe), by mining the expression results. We gathered 57 proteins whose expression levels were known roughly in the host. Correlation analysis, principal component analysis and decision tree analysis were applied to these expression data. Analysis featuring codon usage and amino acid composition clarified that the amino acid composition affected to the expression levels of a recombinant protein strongly than the effect of codon usage. Furthermore, analysis of amino acid composition showed that protein solubility and the metabolism cost of amino acids correlated with a protein expressivity. Codon usage was often interesting in the field of recombinant expressions. However, our analysis found the weak correlation codon features with expressivities. These results indicated that ready-made indices of codon bias were irrelevant ones for modeling the expressivities of recombinant proteins. Our data driven approach was an easy and powerful method to improve recombinant protein expression, and this approach should be concentrated attention with the huge amount of expression data accumulating through the post-genome era.

  5. Baculovirus expression of the glycoprotein gene of Lassa virus and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Hummel, K B; Martin, M L; Auperin, D D

    1992-09-01

    A recombinant baculovirus was constructed that expresses the glycoprotein gene of Lassa virus (Josiah strain) under the transcriptional control of the polyhedrin promoter. The expressed protein (B-LSGPC) comigrated with the authentic viral glycoprotein as observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), was reactive with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in Western blots, and was glycosylated. Although the recombinant protein was not processed into the mature glycoproteins, G1 and G2, it demonstrated reactivity with all known epitopes as measured by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA), and it was immunogenic, eliciting antisera in rabbits that recognized whole virus in IFAs. Regarding future applications to diagnostic assays, the recombinant glycoprotein proved to be an effective substitute for Lassa virus-infected mammalian cells in IFAs and it was able to distinguish sera from several human cases of Lassa fever, against a panel of known negative sera of African origin, in an enzyme immunoassay (EIA).

  6. Recombinant pestivirus E2 glycoproteins prevent viral attachment to permissive and non permissive cells with different efficiency.

    PubMed

    Asfor, A S; Wakeley, P R; Drew, T W; Paton, D J

    2014-08-30

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important animal pathogen, which like other pestiviruses has similar molecular biological features to hepaciviruses, including human Hepatitis C virus. The pestivirus E2 glycoproteins are the major target for virus-neutralising antibodies, as well as playing a role in receptor binding and host range restriction. In this study, recombinant E2 glycoproteins (rE2) derived from three different pestivirus species were examined for their inhibitory effects on pestivirus infectivity in cell culture. Histidine-tagged rE2 glycoproteins of BVDV type 2 strain 178003, BVDV type 1 strain Oregon C24V and CSFV strain Alfort 187 were produced in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells and purified under native conditions. The ability of rE2 glycoprotein to inhibit the infection of permissive cells by both homologous and heterologous virus was compared, revealing that the inhibitory effects of rE2 glycoproteins correlated with the predicted similarity of the E2 structures in the recombinant protein and the test virus. This result suggests that the sequence and structure of E2 are likely to be involved in the host specificity of pestiviruses at their point of uptake into cells.

  7. A Versatile Viral System for Expression and Depletion of Proteins in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Campeau, Eric; Ruhl, Victoria E.; Rodier, Francis; Smith, Corey L.; Rahmberg, Brittany L.; Fuss, Jill O.; Campisi, Judith; Yaswen, Paul; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Kaufman, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to express or deplete proteins in living cells is crucial for the study of biological processes. Viral vectors are often useful to deliver DNA constructs to cells that are difficult to transfect by other methods. Lentiviruses have the additional advantage of being able to integrate into the genomes of non-dividing mammalian cells. However, existing viral expression systems generally require different vector backbones for expression of cDNA, small hairpin RNA (shRNA) or microRNA (miRNA) and provide limited drug selection markers. Furthermore, viral backbones are often recombinogenic in bacteria, complicating the generation and maintenance of desired clones. Here, we describe a collection of 59 vectors that comprise an integrated system for constitutive or inducible expression of cDNAs, shRNAs or miRNAs, and use a wide variety of drug selection markers. These vectors are based on the Gateway technology (Invitrogen) whereby the cDNA, shRNA or miRNA of interest is cloned into an Entry vector and then recombined into a Destination vector that carries the chosen viral backbone and drug selection marker. This recombination reaction generates the desired product with >95% efficiency and greatly reduces the frequency of unwanted recombination in bacteria. We generated Destination vectors for the production of both retroviruses and lentiviruses. Further, we characterized each vector for its viral titer production as well as its efficiency in expressing or depleting proteins of interest. We also generated multiple types of vectors for the production of fusion proteins and confirmed expression of each. We demonstrated the utility of these vectors in a variety of functional studies. First, we show that the FKBP12 Destabilization Domain system can be used to either express or deplete the protein of interest in mitotically-arrested cells. Also, we generate primary fibroblasts that can be induced to senesce in the presence or absence of DNA damage. Finally, we

  8. Recombinant covalently closed circular hepatitis B virus DNA induces prolonged viral persistence in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhihua; Li, Gaiyun; Hu, Hao; Yang, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiaoming; Leng, Qibin; Xie, Youhua; Yu, Demin; Zhang, Xinxin; Gao, Yueqiu; Lan, Ke; Deng, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    It remains crucial to develop a laboratory model for studying hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronic infection. We hereby produced a recombinant covalently closed circular DNA (rcccDNA) in view of the key role of cccDNA in HBV persistence. A loxP-chimeric intron was engineered into a monomeric HBV genome in a precursor plasmid (prcccDNA), which was excised using Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination into a 3.3-kb rcccDNA in the nuclei of hepatocytes. The chimeric intron was spliced from RNA transcripts without interrupting the HBV life cycle. In cultured hepatoma cells, cotransfection of prcccDNA and pCMV-Cre (encoding Cre recombinase) resulted in accumulation of nuclear rcccDNA that was heat stable and epigenetically organized as a minichromosome. A mouse model of HBV infection was developed by hydrodynamic injection of prcccDNA. In the presence of Cre recombinase, rcccDNA was induced in the mouse liver with effective viral replication and expression, triggering a compromised T-cell response against HBV. Significant T-cell hyporesponsiveness occurred in mice receiving 4 μg prcccDNA, resulting in prolonged HBV antigenemia for up to 9 weeks. Persistent liver injury was observed as elevated alanine transaminase activity in serum and sustained inflammatory infiltration in the liver. Although a T-cell dysfunction was induced similarly, mice injected with a plasmid containing a linear HBV replicon showed rapid viral clearance within 2 weeks. Collectively, our study provides an innovative approach for producing a cccDNA surrogate that established HBV persistence in immunocompetent mice. It also represents a useful model system in vitro and in vivo for evaluating antiviral treatments against HBV cccDNA. Importance: (i) Unlike plasmids that contain a linear HBV replicon, rcccDNA established HBV persistence with sustained liver injury in immunocompetent mice. This method could be a prototype for developing a mouse model of chronic HBV infection. (ii) An exogenous intron was

  9. Plum Pox Virus 6K1 Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Targets the Viral Replication Complex at the Early Stage of Infection.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2016-05-15

    The potyviral RNA genome encodes two polyproteins that are proteolytically processed by three viral protease domains into 11 mature proteins. Extensive molecular studies have identified functions for the majority of the viral proteins. For example, 6K2, one of the two smallest potyviral proteins, is an integral membrane protein and induces the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-originated replication vesicles that target the chloroplast for robust viral replication. However, the functional role of 6K1, the other smallest protein, remains uncharacterized. In this study, we developed a series of recombinant full-length viral cDNA clones derived from a Canadian Plum pox virus (PPV) isolate. We found that deletion of any of the short motifs of 6K1 (each of which ranged from 5 to 13 amino acids), most of the 6K1 sequence (but with the conserved sequence of the cleavage sites being retained), or all of the 6K1 sequence in the PPV infectious clone abolished viral replication. The trans expression of 6K1 or the cis expression of a dislocated 6K1 failed to rescue the loss-of-replication phenotype, suggesting the temporal and spatial requirement of 6K1 for viral replication. Disruption of the N- or C-terminal cleavage site of 6K1, which prevented the release of 6K1 from the polyprotein, either partially or completely inhibited viral replication, suggesting the functional importance of the mature 6K1. We further found that green fluorescent protein-tagged 6K1 formed punctate inclusions at the viral early infection stage and colocalized with chloroplast-bound viral replicase elements 6K2 and NIb. Taken together, our results suggest that 6K1 is required for viral replication and is an important viral element of the viral replication complex at the early infection stage. Potyviruses account for more than 30% of known plant viruses and consist of many agriculturally important viruses. The genomes of potyviruses encode two polyproteins that are proteolytically processed into 11 mature

  10. Plum Pox Virus 6K1 Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Targets the Viral Replication Complex at the Early Stage of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongguang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The potyviral RNA genome encodes two polyproteins that are proteolytically processed by three viral protease domains into 11 mature proteins. Extensive molecular studies have identified functions for the majority of the viral proteins. For example, 6K2, one of the two smallest potyviral proteins, is an integral membrane protein and induces the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-originated replication vesicles that target the chloroplast for robust viral replication. However, the functional role of 6K1, the other smallest protein, remains uncharacterized. In this study, we developed a series of recombinant full-length viral cDNA clones derived from a Canadian Plum pox virus (PPV) isolate. We found that deletion of any of the short motifs of 6K1 (each of which ranged from 5 to 13 amino acids), most of the 6K1 sequence (but with the conserved sequence of the cleavage sites being retained), or all of the 6K1 sequence in the PPV infectious clone abolished viral replication. The trans expression of 6K1 or the cis expression of a dislocated 6K1 failed to rescue the loss-of-replication phenotype, suggesting the temporal and spatial requirement of 6K1 for viral replication. Disruption of the N- or C-terminal cleavage site of 6K1, which prevented the release of 6K1 from the polyprotein, either partially or completely inhibited viral replication, suggesting the functional importance of the mature 6K1. We further found that green fluorescent protein-tagged 6K1 formed punctate inclusions at the viral early infection stage and colocalized with chloroplast-bound viral replicase elements 6K2 and NIb. Taken together, our results suggest that 6K1 is required for viral replication and is an important viral element of the viral replication complex at the early infection stage. IMPORTANCE Potyviruses account for more than 30% of known plant viruses and consist of many agriculturally important viruses. The genomes of potyviruses encode two polyproteins that are proteolytically

  11. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  12. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki; Gang, David R.; Sarkanen, Simo; Ford, Joshua D.

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  13. Theoretical studies of viral capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Phelps, D K; Speelman, B; Post, C B

    2000-04-01

    Recent results in structural biology and increases in computer power have prompted initial theoretical studies on capsids of nonenveloped icosahedral viruses. The macromolecular assembly of 60 to 180 protein copies into a protein shell results in a structure of considerable size for molecular dynamics simulations. Nonetheless, progress has been made in examining these capsid assemblies from molecular dynamics calculations and kinetic models. The goals of these studies are to understand capsid function and structural properties, including quarternary structural stability, effects of antiviral compounds that bind the capsid and the self-assembly process. The insight that can be gained from the detailed information provided by simulations is demonstrated in studies of human rhinovirus; an entropic basis for the antiviral activity of hydrophobic compounds, predicted from calculated compressibility values, has been corroborated by experimental measurements on poliovirus.

  14. Recombinant HT{sub m4} gene, protein and assays

    DOEpatents

    Lim, B.; Adra, C.N.; Lelias, J.M.

    1996-09-03

    The invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein, a transformed host cell which has been stably transfected with a DNA molecule which encodes a HT{sub m4} protein and a recombinant HT{sub m4} protein. The invention also relates to a method for detecting the presence of a hereditary atopy. 2 figs.

  15. Oral immunization of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) with recombinant live viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) induces protection against VHSV infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hong

    2011-08-01

    A recombinant viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP) that has enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene instead of NV gene was previously generated using reverse genetics technology. In this study, potential of the rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP to be used as a live oral vaccine candidate was assessed. The presence of the recombinant virus in internal organs of orally administered olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) was analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Although the recombinant VHSV-specific band was detected only when the number of PCR cycle was increased to 35, the band was detected from internal organs, such as kidney, spleen, and liver of fish that were reared at either 15 °C or 20 °C till even 20 days, suggesting that a few orally administered rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP might be transported to internal organs, and might keep weak replication ability in the organs. VHSV-neutralizing activity was induced by oral immunization of olive flounder with the NV gene knock-out recombinant VHSV not only in skin and intestinal mucus but also in serum, suggesting that mucosal and systemic adaptive immune responses were elicited by oral immunization. In challenge experiment, groups of fish immunized with 10⁴, 10⁵, and 2 × 10⁵ PFU of rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP/fish showed 25%, 50%, and 70% of relative percent survival (RPS), respectively. The RPSs were elevated to 60%, 75%, and 90% by a boost immunization in fish boost immunized with 10⁴, 10⁵, and 2 × 10⁵ PFU of rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP, respectively. The cumulative mortality of fish in the control groups was 100%. Conclusionly, the present results demonstrate that the NV gene knock-out recombinant VHSV administered orally to olive flounder can induce dose- and boosting-dependent VHSV-neutralizing antibody in mucus and serum, and can provide a high protection in olive flounder against a virulent VHSV challenge.

  16. Analytical Ultracentrifugation as an Approach to Characterize Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Brenda; Nass, Shelley; Kong, Elton; Mattingly, MaryEllen; Woodcock, Denise; Song, Antonius; Wadsworth, Samuel; Cheng, Seng H; Scaria, Abraham; O'Riordan, Catherine R

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors represent a novel class of biopharmaceutical drugs. The production of clinical-grade rAAV vectors for gene therapy would benefit from analytical methods that are able to monitor drug product quality with regard to homogeneity, purity, and manufacturing consistency. Here, we demonstrate the novel application of analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) to characterize the homogeneity of preparations of rAAV vectors. We show that a single sedimentation velocity run of rAAV vectors detected and quantified a number of different viral species, such as vectors harboring an intact genome, lacking a vector genome (empty particles), and containing fragmented or incomplete vector genomes. This information is obtained by direct boundary modeling of the AUC data generated from refractometric or UV detection systems using the computer program SEDFIT. Using AUC, we show that multiple parameters contributed to vector quality, including the AAV genome form (i.e., self-complementary vs. single-stranded), vector genome size, and the production and purification methods. Hence, AUC is a critical tool for identifying optimal production and purification processes and for monitoring the physical attributes of rAAV vectors to ensure their quality.

  17. Assessing ubiquitination of viral proteins: Lessons from flavivirus NS5.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R Travis; Best, Sonja M

    2011-10-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation to a substrate protein is a widely used cellular mechanism for control of protein stability and function, modulation of signal transduction pathways and antiviral responses. Identification and characterization of ubiquitinated viral proteins is an important step in understanding novel mechanisms of viral protein regulation as well as elucidating cellular antiviral strategies. Here we describe a protocol to easily detect and characterize the ubiquitination status of a viral substrate protein expressed either during infection or ectopically expressed as a fusion with a biotinylatable epitope tag. This tag provides advantages over current immunoprecipitation techniques by making use of the extremely tight biotin-streptavidin interaction. We provide an example of this protocol using the nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) from Langat virus (LGTV), a member of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) serocomplex within the Flavivirus genus. Using the protocols outlined here, we describe some of the pitfalls inherent in determination of Ub linkage and demonstrate that NS5 is modified by at least two distinct ubiquitination types, multiubiquitination and K48-linked polyubiquitin chains.

  18. Assessing ubiquitination of viral proteins: lessons from flavivirus NS5

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R. Travis; Best, Sonja M.

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation to a substrate protein is a widely used cellular mechanism for control of protein stability and function, modulation of signal transduction pathways and antiviral responses. Identification and characterization of ubiquitinated viral proteins is an important step in understanding novel mechanisms of viral protein regulation as well as elucidating cellular antiviral strategies. Here we describe a protocol to easily detect and characterize the ubiquitination status of a viral substrate protein expressed either during infection or ectopically expressed as a fusion with a biotinylatable epitope tag. This tag provides advantages over current immunoprecipitation techniques by making use of the extremely tight biotin-streptavidin interaction. We provide an example of this protocol using the nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) from Langat virus (LGTV), a member of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) serocomplex within the Flavivirus genus. Using the protocols outlined here, we describe some of the pitfalls inherent in determination of Ub linkage and demonstrate that NS5 is modified by at least two distinct ubiquitination types, multiubiquitination and K48-linked polyubiquitin chains. PMID:21855635

  19. Herpes simplex virus 1 VP22 regulates translocation of multiple viral and cellular proteins and promotes neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Michiko; Kato, Akihisa; Satoh, Yuko; Ide, Takahiro; Sagou, Ken; Kimura, Kayo; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) protein VP22, encoded by the UL49 gene, is a major virion tegument protein. In the present study, we showed that VP22 was required for efficient redistribution of viral proteins VP16, VP26, ICP0, ICP4, and ICP27 and of cellular protein Hsc-70 to the cytoplasm of infected cells. We found that two dileucine motifs in VP22, at amino acids 235 and 236 and amino acids 251 and 252, were necessary for VP22 regulation of the proper cytoplasmic localization of these viral and cellular proteins. The dileucine motifs were also required for proper cytoplasmic localization of VP22 itself and for optimal expression of viral proteins VP16, VP22, ICP0, UL41, and glycoprotein B. Interestingly, a recombinant mutant virus with alanines substituted for the dileucines at amino acids 251 and 252 had a 50% lethal dose (LD(50)) for neurovirulence in mice following intracerebral inoculation about 10(3)-fold lower than the LD(50) of the repaired virus. Furthermore, the replication and spread of this mutant virus in the brains of mice following intracerebral inoculation were significantly impaired relative to those of the repaired virus. The ability of VP22 to regulate the localization and expression of various viral and cellular proteins, as shown in this study, was correlated with an increase in viral replication and neurovirulence in the experimental murine model. Thus, HSV-1 VP22 is a significant neurovirulence factor in vivo.

  20. Expanding the recombinant protein quality in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Cano-Garrido, Olivia; Rueda, Fabian L; Sànchez-García, Laura; Ruiz-Ávila, Luis; Bosser, Ramon; Villaverde, Antonio; García-Fruitós, Elena

    2014-12-04

    Escherichia coli has been a main host for the production of recombinant proteins of biomedical interest, but conformational stress responses impose severe bottlenecks that impair the production of soluble, proteolytically stable versions of many protein species. In this context, emerging Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) bacterial hosts provide alternatives as cell factories for recombinant protein production, in which limitations associated to the use of Gram-negative microorganisms might result minimized. Among them, Lactic Acid Bacteria and specially Lactococcus lactis are Gram-positive GRAS organisms in which recombinant protein solubility is generically higher and downstream facilitated, when compared to E. coli. However, deep analyses of recombinant protein quality in this system are still required to completely evaluate its performance and potential for improvement. We have explored here the conformational quality (through specific fluorescence emission) and solubility of an aggregation-prone GFP variant (VP1GFP) produced in L. lactis. In this context, our results show that parameters such as production time, culture conditions and growth temperature have a dramatic impact not only on protein yield, but also on protein solubility and conformational quality, that are particularly favored under fermentative metabolism. Metabolic regime and cultivation temperature greatly influence solubility and conformational quality of an aggregation-prone protein in L. lactis. Specifically, the present study proves that anaerobic growth is the optimal condition for recombinant protein production purposes. Besides, growth temperature plays an important role regulating both protein solubility and conformational quality. Additionally, our results also prove the great versatility for the manipulation of this bacterial system regarding the improvement of functionality, yield and quality of recombinant proteins in this species. These findings not only confirm L. lactis as an

  1. The effect of IL-2 expression by recombinant Newcastle disease virus on host immune response, viral replication and pathogenesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) is a soluble cytokine that stimulates the cell-mediated immune response. Virus constructs, such as recombinant vaccinia virus, expressing chicken IL-2 have been shown to improve viral clearance by natural killer cells in mice. We have inserted the open-reading frame of the chi...

  2. The pEAQ vector series: the easy and quick way to produce recombinant proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Peyret, Hadrien; Lomonossoff, George P

    2013-09-01

    The pEAQ vectors are a series of plasmids designed to allow easy and quick production of recombinant proteins in plants. Their main feature is the use of the Cowpea Mosaic Virus hypertranslational "CPMV-HT" expression system, which provides high yields of recombinant protein through extremely high translational efficiency without the need for viral replication. Since their creation, the pEAQ vectors have been used to produce a wide variety of proteins in plants. Viral proteins and Virus-Like Particles (VLPs) have been of particular interest, but other types of proteins including active enzymes have also been expressed. While the pEAQ vectors have mostly been used in a transient expression context, through agroinfiltration of leaves, they have also been shown to be suitable for the production of stably transformed lines of both cell cultures and whole plants. This paper looks back on the genesis of the pEAQ vectors and reviews their use so far.

  3. In vivo imaging of alphaherpesvirus infection reveals synchronized activity dependent on axonal sorting of viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Granstedt, Andrea E; Bosse, Jens B; Thiberge, Stephan Y; Enquist, Lynn W

    2013-09-10

    A clinical hallmark of human alphaherpesvirus infections is peripheral pain or itching. Pseudorabies virus (PRV), a broad host range alphaherpesvirus, causes violent pruritus in many different animals, but the mechanism is unknown. Previous in vitro studies have shown that infected, cultured peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibited aberrant electrical activity after PRV infection due to the action of viral membrane fusion proteins, yet it is unclear if such activity occurs in infected PNS ganglia in living animals and if it correlates with disease symptoms. Using two-photon microscopy, we imaged autonomic ganglia in living mice infected with PRV strains expressing GCaMP3, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, and used the changes in calcium flux to monitor the activity of many neurons simultaneously with single-cell resolution. Infection with virulent PRV caused these PNS neurons to fire synchronously and cyclically in highly correlated patterns among infected neurons. This activity persisted even when we severed the presynaptic axons, showing that infection-induced firing is independent of input from presynaptic brainstem neurons. This activity was not observed after infections with an attenuated PRV recombinant used for circuit tracing or with PRV mutants lacking either viral glycoprotein B, required for membrane fusion, or viral membrane protein Us9, required for sorting virions and viral glycoproteins into axons. We propose that the viral fusion proteins produced by virulent PRV infection induce electrical coupling in unmyelinated axons in vivo. This action would then give rise to the synchronous and cyclical activity in the ganglia and contribute to the characteristic peripheral neuropathy.

  4. Recombination between poliovirus and coxsackie A viruses of species C: a model of viral genetic plasticity and emergence.

    PubMed

    Combelas, Nicolas; Holmblat, Barbara; Joffret, Marie-Line; Colbère-Garapin, Florence; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2011-08-01

    Genetic recombination in RNA viruses was discovered many years ago for poliovirus (PV), an enterovirus of the Picornaviridae family, and studied using PV or other picornaviruses as models. Recently, recombination was shown to be a general phenomenon between different types of enteroviruses of the same species. In particular, the interest for this mechanism of genetic plasticity was renewed with the emergence of pathogenic recombinant circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs), which were implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in several regions of the world with insufficient vaccination coverage. Most of these cVDPVs had mosaic genomes constituted of mutated poliovaccine capsid sequences and part or all of the non-structural sequences from other human enteroviruses of species C (HEV-C), in particular coxsackie A viruses. A study in Madagascar showed that recombinant cVDPVs had been co-circulating in a small population of children with many different HEV-C types. This viral ecosystem showed a surprising and extensive biodiversity associated to several types and recombinant genotypes, indicating that intertypic genetic recombination was not only a mechanism of evolution for HEV-C, but an usual mode of genetic plasticity shaping viral diversity. Results suggested that recombination may be, in conjunction with mutations, implicated in the phenotypic diversity of enterovirus strains and in the emergence of new pathogenic strains. Nevertheless, little is known about the rules and mechanisms which govern genetic exchanges between HEV-C types, as well as about the importance of intertypic recombination in generating phenotypic variation. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms of evolution of PV, in particular recombination events leading to the emergence of recombinant cVDPVs.

  5. Recombination between Poliovirus and Coxsackie A Viruses of Species C: A Model of Viral Genetic Plasticity and Emergence

    PubMed Central

    Combelas, Nicolas; Holmblat, Barbara; Joffret, Marie-Line; Colbère-Garapin, Florence; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Genetic recombination in RNA viruses was discovered many years ago for poliovirus (PV), an enterovirus of the Picornaviridae family, and studied using PV or other picornaviruses as models. Recently, recombination was shown to be a general phenomenon between different types of enteroviruses of the same species. In particular, the interest for this mechanism of genetic plasticity was renewed with the emergence of pathogenic recombinant circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs), which were implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in several regions of the world with insufficient vaccination coverage. Most of these cVDPVs had mosaic genomes constituted of mutated poliovaccine capsid sequences and part or all of the non-structural sequences from other human enteroviruses of species C (HEV-C), in particular coxsackie A viruses. A study in Madagascar showed that recombinant cVDPVs had been co-circulating in a small population of children with many different HEV-C types. This viral ecosystem showed a surprising and extensive biodiversity associated to several types and recombinant genotypes, indicating that intertypic genetic recombination was not only a mechanism of evolution for HEV-C, but an usual mode of genetic plasticity shaping viral diversity. Results suggested that recombination may be, in conjunction with mutations, implicated in the phenotypic diversity of enterovirus strains and in the emergence of new pathogenic strains. Nevertheless, little is known about the rules and mechanisms which govern genetic exchanges between HEV-C types, as well as about the importance of intertypic recombination in generating phenotypic variation. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms of evolution of PV, in particular recombination events leading to the emergence of recombinant cVDPVs. PMID:21994791

  6. [Processing and Modification of Recombinant Spider Silk Proteins].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Tao; Liu, Xiaobing; Luo, Yongen

    2015-08-01

    Due to its special sequence structure, spider silk protein has unique physical and chemical properties, mechanical properties and excellent biological properties. With the expansion of the application value of spider silk in many fields as a functional material, progress has been made in the studies on the expression of recombinant spider silk proteins through many host systems by gene recombinant techniques. Recombinant spider silk proteins can be processed into high performance fibers, and a wide range of nonfibrous morphologies. Moreover, for their excellent biocompatibility and low immune response they are ideal for biomedical applications. Here we review the process and mechanism of preparation in vitro, chemistry and genetic engineering modification on recombinant spider silk protein.

  7. A Single Amino Acid Residue Change in the P Protein of Parainfluenza Virus 5 Elevates Viral Gene Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Timani, Khalid A.; Sun, Dengyun; Sun, Minghao; Keim, Celia; Lin, Yuan; Schmitt, Phuong Tieu; Schmitt, Anthony P.; He, Biao

    2008-01-01

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a prototypical paramyxovirus. The V/P gene of PIV5 encodes two mRNA species through a process of pseudotemplated insertion of two G residues at a specific site during transcription, resulting in two viral proteins, V and P, whose N termini of 164 amino acid residues are identical. Previously it was reported that mutating six amino acid residues within this identical region results in a recombinant PIV5 (rPIV5-CPI−) that exhibits elevated viral protein expression and induces production of cytokines, such as beta interferon and interleukin 6. Because the six mutations correspond to the shared region of the V protein and the P protein, it is not clear whether the phenotypes associated with rPIV5-CPI− are due to mutations in the P protein and/or mutations in the V protein. To address this question, we used a minigenome system and recombinant viruses to study the effects of mutations on the functions of the P and V proteins. We found that the P protein with six amino acid residue changes (Pcpi−) was more efficient than wild-type P in facilitating replication of viral RNA, while the V protein with six amino acid residue changes (Vcpi−) still inhibits minigenome replication as does the wild-type V protein. These results indicate that elevated viral gene expression in rPIV5-CPI− virus-infected cells can be attributed to a P protein with an increased ability to facilitate viral RNA synthesis. Furthermore, we found that a single amino acid residue change at position 157 of the P protein from Ser (the residue in the wild-type P protein) to Phe (the residue in Pcpi−) is sufficient for elevated viral gene expression. Using mass spectrometry and 33P labeling, we found that residue S157 of the P protein is phosphorylated. Based on these results, we propose that phosphorylation of the P protein at residue 157 plays an important role in regulating viral RNA replication. PMID:18614634

  8. Protein modification during anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocessing of factor VIII concentrates, factor IX concentrates, and model proteins in the presence of sucrose.

    PubMed

    Smales, C Mark; Pepper, Duncan S; James, David C

    2002-01-05

    To ensure the optimal safety of plasma derived and new generation recombinant proteins, heat treatment is customarily applied in the manufacturing of such biopharmaceuticals as a means of viral inactivation. In subjecting proteins to anti-viral heat-treatment it is necessary to use high concentrations of thermostabilizing excipients to prevent protein damage, and it is therefore imperative that the correct balance between bioprocessing conditions, maintenance of protein integrity and virus kill is found. In this study we have utilized model proteins (lysozyme, fetuin, and human serum albumin) and plasma-derived therapeutic proteins (factor VIII and factor IX) to investigate the protein modifications that occur during anti-viral heat treatment. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between bioprocessing conditions and the type and extent of protein modification under a variety of industrially relevant wet and lyophilized heat treatments using sucrose as a thermostabilizing agent. Heat treatment led to the formation of disulfide crosslinks and aggregates in proteins containing free cysteine residues. Terminal oligosaccharide sialic acid residues were hydrolyzed from the glycan moieties of glycoproteins during anti-viral heat treatment. Heat treatment promoted sucrose hydrolysis to yield glucose and fructose, leading, in turn, to the glycation of lysine amino groups in those proteins containing di-lysine motifs. During extended hear treatments, 1,2-dicarbonyl type advanced glycation end-products were also formed. Glycation-type modifications were more prevalent in wet heat-treated protein formulations.

  9. Utilizing Protein-lean Co-products from Corn Containing Recombinant Pharmaceutical Proteins for Ethanol Production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protein-lean fractions of corn (maize) containing recombinant (r) pharmaceutical proteins were used to produce fuel ethanol and residual r-proteins in the co-product, distillers dry grains with solubles (DDGS), were determined. Transgenic corn lines containing recombinant green fluorescence protein ...

  10. Production of recombinant proteins from Plasmodium falciparum in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Ángela Patricia; Calvo, Eliana Patricia; Wasserman, Moisés; Chaparro-Olaya, Jacqueline

    2016-02-23

    The production of recombinant proteins is essential for the characterization and functional study of proteins from Plasmodium falciparum. However, the proteins of P. falciparum are among the most challenging to express, and when expression is achieved, the recombinant proteins usually fold incorrectly and lead to the formation of inclusion bodies.  To obtain and purify four recombinant proteins and to use them as antigens to produce polyclonal antibodies. The production efficiency and solubility were evaluated as the proteins were expressed in two genetically modified strains of Escherichia coli to favor the production of heterologous proteins (BL21-CodonPlus (DE3)-RIL and BL21-pG-KJE8).  The four recombinant P. falciparum proteins corresponding to partial sequences of PfMyoA (Myosin A) and PfGAP50 (gliding associated protein 50), and the complete sequences of PfMTIP (myosin tail interacting protein) and PfGAP45 (gliding associated protein 45), were produced as glutathione S-transferase-fusion proteins, purified and used for immunizing mice.  The protein expression was much more efficient in BL21-CodonPlus, the strain that contains tRNAs that are rare in wild-type E. coli, compared to the expression in BL21-pG-KJE8. In spite of the fact that BL21-pG-KJE8 overexpresses chaperones, this strain did not minimize the formation of inclusion bodies.  The use of genetically modified strains of E. coli was essential to achieve high expression levels of the four evaluated P. falciparum proteins and lead to improved solubility of two of them. The approach used here allowed us to obtain and purify four P. falciparum proteins in enough quantity to produce polyclonal antibodies in mice, and a fair amount of two pure and soluble recombinant proteins for future assays.

  11. Uncovering viral protein-protein interactions and their role in arenavirus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; D'Antuono, Alejandra; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M; López, Nora

    2012-09-01

    The Arenaviridae family includes widely distributed pathogens that cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. Replication and packaging of their single-stranded RNA genome involve RNA recognition by viral proteins and a number of key protein-protein interactions. Viral RNA synthesis is directed by the virus-encoded RNA dependent-RNA polymerase (L protein) and requires viral RNA encapsidation by the Nucleoprotein. In addition to the role that the interaction between L and the Nucleoprotein may have in the replication process, polymerase activity appears to be modulated by the association between L and the small multifunctional Z protein. Z is also a structural component of the virions that plays an essential role in viral morphogenesis. Indeed, interaction of the Z protein with the Nucleoprotein is critical for genome packaging. Furthermore, current evidence suggests that binding between Z and the viral envelope glycoprotein complex is required for virion infectivity, and that Z homo-oligomerization is an essential step for particle assembly and budding. Efforts to understand the molecular basis of arenavirus life cycle have revealed important details on these viral protein-protein interactions that will be reviewed in this article.

  12. Uncovering Viral Protein-Protein Interactions and their Role in Arenavirus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; D’Antuono, Alejandra; Levingston Macleod, Jesica M.; López, Nora

    2012-01-01

    The Arenaviridae family includes widely distributed pathogens that cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. Replication and packaging of their single-stranded RNA genome involve RNA recognition by viral proteins and a number of key protein-protein interactions. Viral RNA synthesis is directed by the virus-encoded RNA dependent-RNA polymerase (L protein) and requires viral RNA encapsidation by the Nucleoprotein. In addition to the role that the interaction between L and the Nucleoprotein may have in the replication process, polymerase activity appears to be modulated by the association between L and the small multifunctional Z protein. Z is also a structural component of the virions that plays an essential role in viral morphogenesis. Indeed, interaction of the Z protein with the Nucleoprotein is critical for genome packaging. Furthermore, current evidence suggests that binding between Z and the viral envelope glycoprotein complex is required for virion infectivity, and that Z homo-oligomerization is an essential step for particle assembly and budding. Efforts to understand the molecular basis of arenavirus life cycle have revealed important details on these viral protein-protein interactions that will be reviewed in this article. PMID:23170177

  13. Cyclophilin A binds to the viral RNA and replication proteins, resulting in inhibition of tombusviral replicase assembly.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, Nikolay; Nagy, Peter D

    2013-12-01

    Replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses is greatly affected by numerous host-encoded proteins that act as restriction factors. Cyclophilins, which are a large family of cellular prolyl isomerases, have been found to inhibit Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) replication in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model based on genome-wide screens and global proteomics approaches. In this report, we further characterize single-domain cyclophilins, including the mammalian cyclophilin A and plant Roc1 and Roc2, which are orthologs of the yeast Cpr1p cyclophilin, a known inhibitor of TBSV replication in yeast. We found that recombinant CypA, Roc1, and Roc2 strongly inhibited TBSV replication in a cell-free replication assay. Additional in vitro studies revealed that CypA, Roc1, and Roc2 cyclophilins bound to the viral replication proteins, and CypA and Roc1 also bound to the viral RNA. These interactions led to inhibition of viral RNA recruitment, the assembly of the viral replicase complex, and viral RNA synthesis. A catalytically inactive mutant of CypA was also able to inhibit TBSV replication in vitro due to binding to the replication proteins and the viral RNA. Overexpression of CypA and its mutant in yeast or plant leaves led to inhibition of tombusvirus replication, confirming that CypA is a restriction factor for TBSV. Overall, the current work has revealed a regulatory role for the cytosolic single-domain Cpr1-like cyclophilins in RNA virus replication.

  14. Differential targeting of feline photoreceptors by recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors: implications for preclinical gene therapy trials.

    PubMed

    Minella, A L; Mowat, F M; Willett, K L; Sledge, D; Bartoe, J T; Bennett, J; Petersen-Jones, S M

    2014-10-01

    The cat is emerging as a promising large animal model for preclinical testing of retinal dystrophy therapies, for example, by gene therapy. However, there is a paucity of studies investigating viral vector gene transfer to the feline retina. We therefore sought to study the tropism of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors for the feline outer retina. We delivered four rAAV serotypes: rAAV2/2, rAAV2/5, rAAV2/8 and rAAV2/9, each expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter, to the subretinal space in cats and, for comparison, mice. Cats were monitored for gene expression by in vivo imaging and cellular tropism was determined using immunohistochemistry. In cats, rAAV2/2, rAAV2/8 and rAAV2/9 vectors induced faster and stronger GFP expression than rAAV2/5 and all vectors transduced the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptors. Unlike in mice, cone photoreceptors in the cat retina were more efficiently transduced than rod photoreceptors. In mice, rAAV2/2 only transduced the RPE whereas the other vectors also transduced rods and cones. These results highlight species differences in cellular tropism of rAAV vectors in the outer retina. We conclude that rAAV serotypes are suitable for use for retinal gene therapy in feline models, particularly when cone photoreceptors are the target cell.

  15. Controlled Assembly of Viral Surface Proteins into Biological Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani-Webster, Eri

    In recent years, therapeutic use of engineered particles on the 1-1,000 nm scale has gained popularity; these nanoparticles have been developed for use in drug delivery, gene therapy, vaccine preparation, and diagnostics. Often, viral proteins are utilized in the design of such species, and outlined here are completed studies on the in vitro assembly of nanoparticles derived from two very different viral systems. The incorporation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein precursor gp160 into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs is discussed as a potential platform for vaccine design; efforts were successful, however yield currently limits the practical application of this approach. The utility of bacteriophage lambda procapsids and virus-like particles in therapeutic nanoparticle design is also outlined, as are efforts toward the structural and thermodynamic characterization of a urea-triggered capsid maturation event. It is demonstrated that lambda virus-like particles can be assembled from purified capsid and scaffolding proteins, and that these particles undergo urea-triggered maturation and in vitro decoration protein addition similar to that seen in lambda procapsids. The studies on lambda provided materials for the further development of nanoparticles potentially useful in a clinical setting, as well as shedding light on critical viral assembly and maturation events as they may take place in vivo.

  16. Application of recombinant fusion proteins for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Masato; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Hoshiba, Takashi; Akaike, Toshihiro; Cho, Chong-Su

    2010-03-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays important roles in tissue engineering because cellular growth and differentiation, in the two-dimensional cell culture as well as in the three-dimensional space of the developing organism, require ECM with which the cells can interact. Also, the development of new synthetic ECMs is very important because ECMs facilitate the localization and delivery of cells to the specific sites in the body. Therefore, the development of synthetic ECMs to replace the natural ECMs is increasingly essential and promising in tissue engineering. Recombinant genetic engineering method has enabled the synthesis of protein-based polymers with precisely controlled functionalities for the development of new synthetic ECMs. In this review, the design and construction of structure-based recombinant fusion proteins such as elastin-like polymers (ELPs) and silk-like polymers (SLPs), cell-bound growth factor-based recombinant fusion proteins such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), hybrid system composed of recombinant protein and synthetic polymer, and E-cadherin-based fusion protein by recombinant genetic engineering were explained for application of the synthetic ECMs. Modulation of mechanical properties, stimuli-sensitivity, biodegradation and cell recognition can be achieved through precise control of sequence, length, hydrophobicity and cell binding domain by recombinant genetic engineering.

  17. TDP-43 regulates endogenous retrovirus-K viral protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Manghera, Mamneet; Ferguson-Parry, Jennifer; Douville, Renée N

    2016-10-01

    The concomitant expression of neuronal TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) and human endogenous retrovirus-K (ERVK) is a hallmark of ALS. Since the involvement of TDP-43 in retrovirus replication remains controversial, we sought to evaluate whether TDP-43 exerts an effect on ERVK expression. In this study, TDP-43 bound the ERVK promoter in the context of inflammation or proteasome inhibition, with no effect on ERVK transcription. However, over-expression of ALS-associated aggregating forms of TDP-43, but not wild-type TDP-43, significantly enhanced ERVK viral protein accumulation. Human astrocytes and neurons further demonstrated cell-type specific differences in their ability to express and clear ERVK proteins during inflammation and proteasome inhibition. Astrocytes, but not neurons, were able to clear excess ERVK proteins through stress granule formation and autophagy. In vitro findings were validated in autopsy motor cortex tissue from patients with ALS and neuro-normal controls. We further confirmed marked enhancement of ERVK in cortical neurons of patients with ALS. Despite evidence of enhanced stress granule and autophagic response in ALS cortical neurons, these cells failed to clear excess ERVK protein accumulation. This highlights how multiple cellular pathways, in conjunction with disease-associated mutations, can converge to modulate the expression and clearance of viral gene products from genomic elements such as ERVK. In ALS, ERVK protein aggregation is a novel aspect of TDP-43 misregulation contributing towards the pathology of this neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors mediate efficient gene transduction in cultured neonatal and adult microglia.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei; Kang, John; Sopher, Bryce; Gillespie, James; Aloi, Macarena S; Odom, Guy L; Hopkins, Stephanie; Case, Amanda; Wang, David B; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Garden, Gwenn A

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are a specialized population of myeloid cells that mediate CNS innate immune responses. Efforts to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate microglia behaviors have been hampered by the lack of effective tools for manipulating gene expression. Cultured microglia are refractory to most chemical and electrical transfection methods, yielding little or no gene delivery and causing toxicity and/or inflammatory activation. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAVs) vectors are non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA vectors commonly used to transduce many primary cell types and tissues. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing rAAV serotype 2 (rAAV2) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia. rAAV2 yields high transduction and causes minimal toxicity or inflammatory response in both neonatal and adult microglia. To demonstrate that rAAV transduction can induce functional protein expression, we used rAAV2 expressing Cre recombinase to successfully excise a LoxP-flanked miR155 gene in cultured microglia. We further evaluated rAAV serotypes 5, 6, 8, and 9, and observed that all efficiently transduced cultured microglia to varying degrees of success and caused little or no alteration in inflammatory gene expression. These results provide strong encouragement for the application of rAAV-mediated gene expression in microglia for mechanistic and therapeutic purposes. Neonatal microglia are functionally distinct from adult microglia, although the majority of in vitro studies utilize rodent neonatal microglia cultures because of difficulties of culturing adult cells. In addition, cultured microglia are refractory to most methods for modifying gene expression. Here, we developed a novel protocol for culturing adult microglia and evaluated the feasibility and efficiency of utilizing Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus (rAAV) to modulate gene expression in cultured microglia.

  19. Cementing proteins provide extra mechanical stabilization to viral cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando-Pérez, M.; Lambert, S.; Nakatani-Webster, E.; Catalano, C. E.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    The study of virus shell stability is key not only for gaining insights into viral biological cycles but also for using viral capsids in materials science. The strength of viral particles depends profoundly on their structural changes occurring during maturation, whose final step often requires the specific binding of ‘decoration’ proteins (such as gpD in bacteriophage lambda) to the viral shell. Here we characterize the mechanical stability of gpD-free and gpD-decorated bacteriophage lambda capsids. The incorporation of gpD into the lambda shell imparts a major mechanical reinforcement that resists punctual deformations. We further interrogate lambda particle stability with molecular fatigue experiments that resemble the sub-lethal Brownian collisions of virus shells with macromolecules in crowded environments. Decorated particles are especially robust against collisions of a few kBT (where kB is the Boltzmann’s constant and T is the temperature ~300 K), which approximate those anticipated from molecular insults in the environment.

  20. Roles of serine and threonine residues of mumps virus P protein in viral transcription and replication.

    PubMed

    Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Elson, Andrew; Li, Zhuo; Zengel, James; He, Biao

    2014-04-01

    Mumps virus (MuV), a paramyxovirus containing a negative-sense nonsegmented RNA genome, is a human pathogen that causes an acute infection with symptoms ranging from parotitis to mild meningitis and severe encephalitis. Vaccination against mumps virus has been effective in reducing mumps cases. However, recently large outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. There is no anti-MuV drug. Understanding replication of MuV may lead to novel antiviral strategies. MuV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase minimally consists of the phosphoprotein (P) and the large protein (L). The P protein is heavily phosphorylated. To investigate the roles of serine (S) and threonine (T) residues of P in viral RNA transcription and replication, P was subjected to mass spectrometry and mutational analysis. P, a 392-amino acid residue protein, has 64 S and T residues. We have found that mutating nine S/T residues significantly reduced and mutating residue T at 101 to A (T101A) significantly enhanced activity in a minigenome system. A recombinant virus containing the P-T101A mutation (rMuV-P-T101A) was recovered and analyzed. rMuV-P-T101A grew to higher titers and had increased protein expression at early time points. Together, these results suggest that phosphorylation of MuV-P-T101 plays a negative role in viral RNA synthesis. This is the first time that the P protein of a paramyxovirus has been systematically analyzed for S/T residues that are critical for viral RNA synthesis. Mumps virus (MuV) is a reemerging paramyxovirus that caused large outbreaks in the United States, where vaccination coverage is very high. There is no anti-MuV drug. In this work, we have systematically analyzed roles of Ser/Thr residues of MuV P in viral RNA synthesis. We have identified S/T residues of P critical for MuV RNA synthesis and phosphorylation sites that are important for viral RNA synthesis. This work leads to a better understanding of viral RNA synthesis as well as to potential novel strategies to

  1. Roles of Serine and Threonine Residues of Mumps Virus P Protein in Viral Transcription and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Elson, Andrew; Li, Zhuo; Zengel, James

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mumps virus (MuV), a paramyxovirus containing a negative-sense nonsegmented RNA genome, is a human pathogen that causes an acute infection with symptoms ranging from parotitis to mild meningitis and severe encephalitis. Vaccination against mumps virus has been effective in reducing mumps cases. However, recently large outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. There is no anti-MuV drug. Understanding replication of MuV may lead to novel antiviral strategies. MuV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase minimally consists of the phosphoprotein (P) and the large protein (L). The P protein is heavily phosphorylated. To investigate the roles of serine (S) and threonine (T) residues of P in viral RNA transcription and replication, P was subjected to mass spectrometry and mutational analysis. P, a 392-amino acid residue protein, has 64 S and T residues. We have found that mutating nine S/T residues significantly reduced and mutating residue T at 101 to A (T101A) significantly enhanced activity in a minigenome system. A recombinant virus containing the P-T101A mutation (rMuV-P-T101A) was recovered and analyzed. rMuV-P-T101A grew to higher titers and had increased protein expression at early time points. Together, these results suggest that phosphorylation of MuV-P-T101 plays a negative role in viral RNA synthesis. This is the first time that the P protein of a paramyxovirus has been systematically analyzed for S/T residues that are critical for viral RNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE Mumps virus (MuV) is a reemerging paramyxovirus that caused large outbreaks in the United States, where vaccination coverage is very high. There is no anti-MuV drug. In this work, we have systematically analyzed roles of Ser/Thr residues of MuV P in viral RNA synthesis. We have identified S/T residues of P critical for MuV RNA synthesis and phosphorylation sites that are important for viral RNA synthesis. This work leads to a better understanding of viral RNA synthesis as well as to potential

  2. Liposomes containing recombinant E protein vaccine against duck Tembusu virus in ducks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tengfei; Liu, Yongxia; Cheng, Jia; Liu, Yanhan; Fan, Wentao; Cheng, Ziqiang; Niu, Xudong; Liu, Jianzhu

    2016-04-27

    To obtain an effective vaccine candidate against duck Tembusu viral (DTMUV) disease which causes egg-drop and great economical loss in the Chinese duck industry, liposome vaccines containing recombinant E protein were prepared and assessed in this study. The recombinant plasmid (PET28a-E) was constructed and transformed into BL21 (DE3) cells to produce E proteins. The recombinant E proteins were purified and entrapped by liposomes through reverse-phase evaporation. Eighty-four cherry valley ducks were randomly divided into seven groups and inoculated intramuscularly at one- or seven-day-old with liposomes-E protein or Freund's adjuvant-E protein vaccine. Blood samples were collected from the first week to the tenth week for serum antibody, plasma for viremia, as well as oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs for virus shedding analyses after being challenged with a 10(2.4) 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) of duck Tembusu virus. Results showed that serum antibody level of the liposomes vaccine was higher than the Freund's adjuvant vaccine, and inoculating twice was superior to once; furthermore, the viremia and virus shedding tests also proved that the liposomes vaccine can provide complete protection against DTMUV challenge. These results demonstrated that the liposomes-E protein vaccine could be used as a potential candidate vaccine to prevent DTMUV infection in ducks.

  3. Production of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors and Use in In Vitro and In Vivo Administration

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Steven J; Choi, Vivian W.; Asokan, Aravind; Haberman, Rebecca A.; McCown, Thomas J.; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2011-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus is a nonpathogenic human virus that has been developed into a gene-delivery vector due to its high efficiency of infection for many different cell types and its ability to persist and lead to long-term gene expression. This unit describes efficient methods to generate high-titer, research-grade, adenovirus-free recombinant single-stranded and self-complementary adeno-associated virus in various serotypes, along with methods to quantify the viral vectors. Two detailed methods are provided for viral vector delivery into the rodent brain and spinal cord, and for histological detection of transgene expression of GFP. PMID:21971848

  4. Meiotic recombination proteins localize to linear elements in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander; Estreicher, Anna; Kohli, Jürg; Loidl, Josef

    2006-08-01

    In fission yeast, meiotic prophase nuclei develop structures known as linear elements (LinEs), instead of a canonical synaptonemal complex. LinEs contain Rec10 protein. While Rec10 is essential for meiotic recombination, the precise role of LinEs in this process is unknown. Using in situ immunostaining, we show that Rec7 (which is required for meiosis-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation) aggregates in foci on LinEs. The strand exchange protein Rad51, which is known to mark the sites of DSBs, also localizes to LinEs, although to a lesser degree. The number of Rec7 foci corresponds well with the average number of genetic recombination events per meiosis suggesting that Rec7 marks the sites of recombination. Rec7 and Rad51 foci do not co-localize, presumably because they act sequentially on recombination sites. The localization of Rec7 is dependent on Rec10 but independent of the DSB-inducing protein Rec12/Spo11. Neither Rec7 nor Rad51 localization depends on the LinE-associated proteins Hop1 and Mek1, but the formation of Rad51 foci depends on Rec10, Rec7, and, as expected, Rec12/Spo11. We propose that LinEs form around designated recombination sites before the induction of DSBs and that most, if not all, meiotic recombination initiates within the setting provided by LinEs.

  5. Expression and in vitro functional analyses of recombinant Gam1 protein.

    PubMed

    Avila, Gustavo A; Ramirez, Daniel H; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Jacquez, Pedro; Chiocca, Susanna; Sun, Jianjun; Rosas-Acosta, German; Xiao, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Gam1, an early gene product of an avian adenovirus, is essential for viral replication. Gam1 is the first viral protein found to globally inhibit cellular SUMOylation, a critical posttranslational modification that alters the function and cellular localization of proteins. The interaction details at the interface between Gam1 and its cellular targets remain unclear due to the lack of structural information. Although Gam1 has been previously characterized, the purity of the protein was not suitable for structural investigations. In the present study, the gene of Gam1 was cloned and expressed in various bacterial expression systems to obtain pure and soluble recombinant Gam1 protein for in vitro functional and structural studies. While Gam1 was insoluble in most expression systems tested, it became soluble when it was expressed as a fusion protein with trigger factor (TF), a ribosome associated bacterial chaperone, under the control of a cold shock promoter. Careful optimization indicates that both low temperature induction and the chaperone function of TF play critical roles in increasing Gam1 solubility. Soluble Gam1 was purified to homogeneity through sequential chromatography techniques. Monomeric Gam1 was obtained via size exclusion chromatography and analyzed by dynamic light scattering. The SUMOylation inhibitory function of the purified Gam1 was confirmed in an in vitro assay. These results have built the foundation for further structural investigations that will broaden our understanding of Gam1's roles in viral replication.

  6. Transactivation of programmed ribosomal frameshifting by a viral protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhua; Treffers, Emmely E.; Napthine, Sawsan; Tas, Ali; Zhu, Longchao; Sun, Zhi; Bell, Susanne; Mark, Brian L.; van Veelen, Peter A.; van Hemert, Martijn J.; Firth, Andrew E.; Brierley, Ian; Snijder, Eric J.; Fang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting (−1 PRF) is a widely used translational mechanism facilitating the expression of two polypeptides from a single mRNA. Commonly, the ribosome interacts with an mRNA secondary structure that promotes −1 frameshifting on a homopolymeric slippery sequence. Recently, we described an unusual −2 frameshifting (−2 PRF) signal directing efficient expression of a transframe protein [nonstructural protein 2TF (nsp2TF)] of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) from an alternative reading frame overlapping the viral replicase gene. Unusually, this arterivirus PRF signal lacks an obvious stimulatory RNA secondary structure, but as confirmed here, can also direct the occurrence of −1 PRF, yielding a third, truncated nsp2 variant named “nsp2N.” Remarkably, we now show that both −2 and −1 PRF are transactivated by a protein factor, specifically a PRRSV replicase subunit (nsp1β). Embedded in nsp1β’s papain-like autoproteinase domain, we identified a highly conserved, putative RNA-binding motif that is critical for PRF transactivation. The minimal RNA sequence required for PRF was mapped within a 34-nt region that includes the slippery sequence and a downstream conserved CCCANCUCC motif. Interaction of nsp1β with the PRF signal was demonstrated in pull-down assays. These studies demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that a protein can function as a transactivator of ribosomal frameshifting. The newly identified frameshifting determinants provide potential antiviral targets for arterivirus disease control and prevention. Moreover, protein-induced transactivation of frameshifting may be a widely used mechanism, potentially including previously undiscovered viral strategies to regulate viral gene expression and/or modulate host cell translation upon infection. PMID:24825891

  7. Viral Macro Domains Reverse Protein ADP-Ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Changqing; Debing, Yannick; Jankevicius, Gytis; Neyts, Johan; Ahel, Ivan; Coutard, Bruno; Canard, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a posttranslational protein modification in which ADP-ribose is transferred from NAD(+) to specific acceptors to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. The macro domain is an ancient and highly evolutionarily conserved protein domain widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life, including viruses. The human TARG1/C6orf130, MacroD1, and MacroD2 proteins can reverse ADP-ribosylation by acting on ADP-ribosylated substrates through the hydrolytic activity of their macro domains. Here, we report that the macro domain from hepatitis E virus (HEV) serves as an ADP-ribose-protein hydrolase for mono-ADP-ribose (MAR) and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) chain removal (de-MARylation and de-PARylation, respectively) from mono- and poly(ADP)-ribosylated proteins, respectively. The presence of the HEV helicase in cis dramatically increases the binding of the macro domain to poly(ADP-ribose) and stimulates the de-PARylation activity. Abrogation of the latter dramatically decreases replication of an HEV subgenomic replicon. The de-MARylation activity is present in all three pathogenic positive-sense, single-stranded RNA [(+)ssRNA] virus families which carry a macro domain: Coronaviridae (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and human coronavirus 229E), Togaviridae (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus), and Hepeviridae (HEV), indicating that it might be a significant tropism and/or pathogenic determinant. Protein ADP-ribosylation is a covalent posttranslational modification regulating cellular protein activities in a dynamic fashion to modulate and coordinate a variety of cellular processes. Three viral families, Coronaviridae, Togaviridae, and Hepeviridae, possess macro domains embedded in their polyproteins. Here, we show that viral macro domains reverse cellular ADP-ribosylation, potentially cutting the signal of a viral infection in the cell. Various poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases which are notorious guardians of cellular integrity are demodified

  8. Viral Macro Domains Reverse Protein ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changqing; Debing, Yannick; Jankevicius, Gytis; Neyts, Johan; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ADP-ribosylation is a posttranslational protein modification in which ADP-ribose is transferred from NAD+ to specific acceptors to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. The macro domain is an ancient and highly evolutionarily conserved protein domain widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life, including viruses. The human TARG1/C6orf130, MacroD1, and MacroD2 proteins can reverse ADP-ribosylation by acting on ADP-ribosylated substrates through the hydrolytic activity of their macro domains. Here, we report that the macro domain from hepatitis E virus (HEV) serves as an ADP-ribose-protein hydrolase for mono-ADP-ribose (MAR) and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) chain removal (de-MARylation and de-PARylation, respectively) from mono- and poly(ADP)-ribosylated proteins, respectively. The presence of the HEV helicase in cis dramatically increases the binding of the macro domain to poly(ADP-ribose) and stimulates the de-PARylation activity. Abrogation of the latter dramatically decreases replication of an HEV subgenomic replicon. The de-MARylation activity is present in all three pathogenic positive-sense, single-stranded RNA [(+)ssRNA] virus families which carry a macro domain: Coronaviridae (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and human coronavirus 229E), Togaviridae (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus), and Hepeviridae (HEV), indicating that it might be a significant tropism and/or pathogenic determinant. IMPORTANCE Protein ADP-ribosylation is a covalent posttranslational modification regulating cellular protein activities in a dynamic fashion to modulate and coordinate a variety of cellular processes. Three viral families, Coronaviridae, Togaviridae, and Hepeviridae, possess macro domains embedded in their polyproteins. Here, we show that viral macro domains reverse cellular ADP-ribosylation, potentially cutting the signal of a viral infection in the cell. Various poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases which are notorious guardians of cellular

  9. The structural protein ODV-EC27 of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus is a multifunctional viral cyclin.

    PubMed

    Belyavskyi, M; Braunagel, S C; Summers, M D

    1998-09-15

    Two major characteristics of baculovirus infection are arrest of the host cell at G2/M phase of the cell cycle with continuing viral DNA replication. We show that Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes for a multifunctional cyclin that may partially explain the molecular basis of these important characteristics of AcMNPV (baculovirus) infection. Amino acids 80-110 of the viral structural protein ODV-EC27 (-EC27) demonstrate 25-30% similarity with cellular cyclins within the cyclin box. Immunoprecipitation results using antibodies to -EC27 show that -EC27 can associate with either cdc2 or cdk6 resulting in active kinase complexes that can phosphorylate histone H1 and retinoblastoma protein in vitro. The cdk6-EC27 complex also associates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and we demonstrate that PCNA is a structural protein of both the budded virus and the occlusion-derived virus. These results suggest that -EC27 can function as a multifunctional cyclin: when associated with cdc2, it exhibits cyclin B-like activity; when associated with cdk6, the complex possesses cyclin D-like activity and binds PCNA. The possible roles of such a multifunctional cyclin during the life cycle of baculovirus are discussed, along with potential implications relative to the expression of functionally authentic recombinant proteins by using baculovirus-infected cells.

  10. Demonstration of homologous recombination events in the evolution of bovine viral diarrhoea virus by in silico investigations.

    PubMed

    Kővágó, Csaba; Hornyák, Ákos; Kékesi, Violetta; Rusvai, Miklós

    2016-09-01

    Complete genome sequences of bovine viral diarrhoea virus types 1 and 2 (BVDV-1 and 2) deposited in the GenBank were submitted to bioinformatic analysis using a recombination-detecting software. The results indicate that recombination events are not rare in the case of BVDV, which frequently causes immunotolerance and, consequently, persistent infection in calves. The lack of specific immunity provides an ideal possibility for multiple infections by antigenically related but genetically different BVDV strains, and hence recombinations may occur. Among the 62 BVDV-1 genomes five recombinants and their possible parent strains, while among the 50 BVDV-2 genomes one simple recombinant and its parent strains were identified, which were supported by extremely strong probability values (P values varying between 1.26 × 10(-4) and 1.58 × 10(-310)). Besides the newly identified recombinants, recombination events described previously were confirmed, but in some of these cases former information was completed with new data, or different parent(s) were suggested by the programme (RDP 4.46 BETA) used in this study.

  11. Self-assembly of tunable protein suprastructures from recombinant oleosin

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, Kevin B.; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Using recombinant amphiphilic proteins to self-assemble suprastructures would allow precise control over surfactant chemistry and the facile incorporation of biological functionality. We used cryo-TEM to confirm self-assembled structures from recombinantly produced mutants of the naturally occurring sunflower protein, oleosin. We studied the phase behavior of protein self-assembly as a function of solution ionic strength and protein hydrophilic fraction, observing nanometric fibers, sheets, and vesicles. Vesicle membrane thickness correlated with increasing hydrophilic fraction for a fixed hydrophobic domain length. The existence of a bilayer membrane was corroborated in giant vesicles through the localized encapsulation of hydrophobic Nile red and hydrophilic calcein. Circular dichroism revealed that changes in nanostructural morphology in this family of mutants was unrelated to changes in secondary structure. Ultimately, we envision the use of recombinant techniques to introduce novel functionality into these materials for biological applications. PMID:22753512

  12. Making recombinant proteins in animals--different systems, different applications.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Michael K; Lacroix, Dan; Pothier, François; Sirard, Marc-André

    2003-09-01

    Transgenic animal bioreactors represent a powerful tool to address the growing need for therapeutic recombinant proteins. The ability of transgenic animals to produce complex, biologically active recombinant proteins in an efficient and economic manner has stimulated a great deal of interest in this area. As a result, genetically modified animals of several species, expressing foreign proteins in various tissues, are currently being developed. However, the generation of transgenic animals is a cumbersome process and remains problematic in the application of this technology. The advantages and disadvantages of different transgenic systems in relation to other bioreactor systems are discussed.

  13. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  14. Production of recombinant proteins by microbes and higher organisms.

    PubMed

    Demain, Arnold L; Vaishnav, Preeti

    2009-01-01

    Large proteins are usually expressed in a eukaryotic system while smaller ones are expressed in prokaryotic systems. For proteins that require glycosylation, mammalian cells, fungi or the baculovirus system is chosen. The least expensive, easiest and quickest expression of proteins can be carried out in Escherichia coli. However, this bacterium cannot express very large proteins. Also, for S-S rich proteins, and proteins that require post-translational modifications, E. coli is not the system of choice. The two most utilized yeasts are Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris. Yeasts can produce high yields of proteins at low cost, proteins larger than 50 kD can be produced, signal sequences can be removed, and glycosylation can be carried out. The baculoviral system can carry out more complex post-translational modifications of proteins. The most popular system for producing recombinant mammalian glycosylated proteins is that of mammalian cells. Genetically modified animals secrete recombinant proteins in their milk, blood or urine. Similarly, transgenic plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana and others can generate many recombinant proteins.

  15. Green factory: plants as bioproduction platforms for recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfeng; Dolan, Maureen C; Medrano, Giuliana; Cramer, Carole L; Weathers, Pamela J

    2012-01-01

    Molecular farming, long considered a promising strategy to produce valuable recombinant proteins not only for human and veterinary medicine, but also for agriculture and industry, now has some commercially available products. Various plant-based production platforms including whole-plants, aquatic plants, plant cell suspensions, and plant tissues (hairy roots) have been compared in terms of their advantages and limits. Effective recombinant strategies are summarized along with descriptions of scalable culture systems and examples of commercial progress and success.

  16. Recombinant single-chain Fv antibody fragment-alkaline phosphatase conjugate: a novel in vitro tool to estimate rabies viral glycoprotein antigen in vaccine manufacture.

    PubMed

    Mousli, Mohamed; Turki, Imène; Kharmachi, Habib; Saadi, Mohamed; Dellagi, Koussay

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a novel in vitro tool by using recombinant protein technology to qualify the whole reagent preparation procedure, to be used to quantify rabies viral antigen preparation in a simple and rapid format for potency control of rabies vaccines. 50AD1 is a neutralizing monoclonal antibody directed against the rabies virus glycoprotein that binds to native conformational antigenic site III. In the present study, the DNA fragments encoding the variable domains of 50AD1 were inserted into a prokaryotic expression vector so as to produce a single-chain Fv antibody fragment (scFv) genetically fused to the bacterial alkaline phosphatase (AP). The recombinant fusion protein preserved both the AP enzymatic activity and the antigen-binding activity against the rabies virus glycoprotein nearly identical to the parental antibody, and was used successfully in different assays including ELISA, dot-blot and cell culture tests. The present study shows that the genetic fusion protein provides a new tool for one-step rabies virus immunodetection, which can be produced in homogeneous bifunctional reagent, easily, quickly and reproducibly. In addition, this recombinant immunoconjugate is a promising alternative reagent for applications involving immunodetection, it presents a similar sensitivity and specificity to that obtained with classical reagents.

  17. Trends in recombinant protein use in animal production.

    PubMed

    Gifre, Laia; Arís, Anna; Bach, Àlex; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena

    2017-03-04

    Recombinant technologies have made possible the production of a broad catalogue of proteins of interest, including those used for animal production. The most widely studied proteins for the animal sector are those with an important role in reproduction, feed efficiency, and health. Nowadays, mammalian cells and fungi are the preferred choice for recombinant production of hormones for reproductive purposes and fibrolytic enzymes to enhance animal performance, respectively. However, the development of low-cost products is a priority, particularly in livestock. The study of cell factories such as yeast and bacteria has notably increased in the last decades to make the new developed reproductive hormones and fibrolytic enzymes a real alternative to the marketed ones. Important efforts have also been invested to developing new recombinant strategies for prevention and therapy, including passive immunization and modulation of the immune system. This offers the possibility to reduce the use of antibiotics by controlling physiological processes and improve the efficacy of preventing infections. Thus, nowadays different recombinant fibrolytic enzymes, hormones, and therapeutic molecules with optimized properties have been successfully produced through cost-effective processes using microbial cell factories. However, despite the important achievements for reducing protein production expenses, alternative strategies to further reduce these costs are still required. In this context, it is necessary to make a giant leap towards the use of novel strategies, such as nanotechnology, that combined with recombinant technology would make recombinant molecules affordable for animal industry.

  18. Local Production of Tumor Necrosis Factor Encoded by Recombinant Vaccinia Virus is Effective in Controlling Viral Replication in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambhi, Sharan K.; Kohonen-Corish, Maija R. J.; Ramshaw, Ian A.

    1991-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has pleiotropic effects on a wide variety of cell types. In vitro studies have demonstrated that TNF has antiviral properties and is induced in response to viral infections. However, a role for TNF in the antiviral immune response of the host has yet to be demonstrated. Here we describe the construction of and studies using a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes the gene for murine TNF-α. By comparing the replication of and immune responses elicited by the TNF-encoding virus to a similarly constructed control virus, we hoped to observe immunobiological effects of TNF in the host. The in vivo experiments with this recombinant virus demonstrate that the localized production of TNF-α during a viral infection leads to the rapid and efficient clearance of the virus in normal mice and attenuates the otherwise lethal pathogenicity of the virus in immunodeficient animals. This attenuation occurs early in the infection (by postinfection hour 24) and is not due to the enhancement of cellular or antibody responses by the vaccinia virus-encoded TNF. This evidence suggests that attenuation of the recombinant virus is due to a direct antiviral effect of TNF on cells at the site of infection. Therefore, these results support the suggestion that TNF produced by immune cells may be an important effector mechanism of viral clearance in vivo.

  19. Local production of tumor necrosis factor encoded by recombinant vaccinia virus is effective in controlling viral replication in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sambhi, S K; Kohonen-Corish, M R; Ramshaw, I A

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has pleiotropic effects on a wide variety of cell types. In vitro studies have demonstrated that TNF has antiviral properties and is induced in response to viral infections. However, a role for TNF in the antiviral immune response of the host has yet to be demonstrated. Here we describe the construction of and studies using a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes the gene for murine TNF-alpha. By comparing the replication of and immune responses elicited by the TNF-encoding virus to a similarly constructed control virus, we hoped to observe immunobiological effects of TNF in the host. The in vivo experiments with this recombinant virus demonstrate that the localized production of TNF-alpha during a viral infection leads to the rapid and efficient clearance of the virus in normal mice and attenuates the otherwise lethal pathogenicity of the virus in immunodeficient animals. This attenuation occurs early in the infection (by postinfection hour 24) and is not due to the enhancement of cellular or antibody responses by the vaccinia virus-encoded TNF. This evidence suggests that attenuation of the recombinant virus is due to a direct antiviral effect of TNF on cells at the site of infection. Therefore, these results support the suggestion that TNF produced by immune cells may be an important effector mechanism of viral clearance in vivo. Images PMID:2023951

  20. Systemic delivery of recombinant proteins by genetically modified myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, E.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1991-12-06

    The ability to stably deliver recombinant proteins to the systemic circulation would facilitate the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited diseases. To explore the feasibility of the use of genetically engineered myoblasts as a recombinant protein delivery system, stable transfectants of the murine C2C12 myoblast cell line were produced that synthesize and secrete high levels of human growth hormone (hGH) in vitro. Mice injected with hGH-transfected myoblasts had significant levels of hGH in both muscle and serum that were stable for at least 3 weeks after injection. Histological examination of muscles injected with {beta}-galactosidase-expressing C2C12 myoblasts demonstrated that many of the injected cells had fused to form multinucleated myotubes. Thus, genetically engineered myoblasts can be used for the stable delivery of recombinant proteins into the circulation.

  1. Assembly of multilayer films incorporating a viral protein cage architecture.

    PubMed

    Suci, Peter A; Klem, Michael T; Arce, Fernando T; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark

    2006-10-10

    Protein cage architectures such as viral capsids, heat shock proteins, ferritins, and DNA-binding proteins are nanoscale modular subunits that can be used to expand the structural and functional range of composite materials. Here, layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly was used to incorporate cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) into multilayer films. Three types of multilayer films were prepared. In the first type, ionic interactions were employed to assemble CCMV into triple layers. In the second type, complementary biological interactions (streptavidin/biotin) were used for this purpose. In a third variation of LbL assembly, complementary biological interactions were employed to produce nanotextured films that exhibit in-plane order over a micron scale without the need to adsorb onto a prepatterned template.

  2. Understanding Viral Transmission Behavior via Protein Intrinsic Disorder Prediction: Coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A. Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2012-01-01

    Besides being a common threat to farm animals and poultry, coronavirus (CoV) was responsible for the human severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2002–4. However, many aspects of CoV behavior, including modes of its transmission, are yet to be fully understood. We show that the amount and the peculiarities of distribution of the protein intrinsic disorder in the viral shell can be used for the efficient analysis of the behavior and transmission modes of CoV. The proposed model allows categorization of the various CoVs by the peculiarities of disorder distribution in their membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N). This categorization enables quick identification of viruses with similar behaviors in transmission, regardless of genetic proximity. Based on this analysis, an empirical model for predicting the viral transmission behavior is developed. This model is able to explain some behavioral aspects of important coronaviruses that previously were not fully understood. The new predictor can be a useful tool for better epidemiological, clinical, and structural understanding of behavior of both newly emerging viruses and viruses that have been known for a long time. A potentially new vaccine strategy could involve searches for viral strains that are characterized by the evolutionary misfit between the peculiarities of the disorder distribution in their shells and their behavior. PMID:23097708

  3. Recombinant GDNF: Tetanus toxin fragment C fusion protein produced from insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Celia, Samuel A.; Kashi, Brenda B.; Tamrazian, Eric; Matthews, Jonathan C.; Remington, Mary P.; Pepinsky, R. Blake; Fishman, Paul S.; Brown, Robert H.; Francis, Jonathan W.

    2009-07-31

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has potent survival-promoting effects on CNS motor neurons in experimental animals. Its therapeutic efficacy in humans, however, may have been limited by poor bioavailability to the brain and spinal cord. With a view toward improving delivery of GDNF to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we generated a recombinant fusion protein comprised of rat GDNF linked to the non-toxic, neuron-binding fragment of tetanus toxin. Recombinant GDNF:TTC produced from insect cells was a soluble homodimer like wild-type GDNF and was bi-functional with respect to GDNF and TTC activity. Like recombinant rat GDNF, the fusion protein increased levels of immunoreactive phosphoAkt in treated NB41A3-hGFR{alpha}-1 neuroblastoma cells. Like TTC, GDNF:TTC bound to immobilized ganglioside GT1b in vitro with high affinity and selectivity. These results support further testing of recombinant GDNF:TTC as a non-viral vector to improve delivery of GDNF to brain and spinal cord in vivo.

  4. Strand invasion promoted by recombination protein of coliphage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalchenko, Nataliya; Golub, Efim I.; Bi, Baoyuan; Radding, Charles M.

    2004-12-01

    Studies of phage in vivo have indicated that its own recombination enzymes, protein and exonuclease, are capable of catalyzing two dissimilar pathways of homologous recombination that are widely distributed in nature: single-strand annealing and strand invasion. The former is an enzymatic splicing of overlapping ends of broken homologous DNA molecules, whereas the latter is characterized by the formation of a three-stranded synaptic intermediate and subsequent strand exchange. Previous studies in vitro have shown that protein has annealing activity, and that exonuclease, acting on branched substrates, can produce a perfect splice that requires only ligation for completion. The present study shows that protein can initiate strand invasion in vitro, as evidenced both by the formation of displacement loops (D-loops) in superhelical DNA and by strand exchange between colinear single-stranded and double-stranded molecules. Thus, protein can catalyze steps that are central to both strand annealing and strand invasion pathways of recombination. These observations add protein to a set of diverse proteins that appear to promote recognition of homology by a unitary mechanism governed by the intrinsic dynamic properties of base pairs in DNA. genetic recombination | phage λ

  5. Characterization of the Recombinant BADH2 Protein

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The compound which is responsible for the flavor of aromatic rice is formed when a particular protein (BADH2) is not produced correctly in the plant. In this research, we characterize a synthetic copy of the protein using a specialized technique that will provide information on identifying specific...

  6. Rescue of avian adeno-associated virus from a recombinant plasmid containing deletions in the viral inverted terminal repeats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianye; Zhu, Liqian; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Xinjun; Tao, Jie; Duan, Qiangde; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported the complete genome sequence of avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV) strain YZ-1, isolated from healthy chickens in China. In this study, we describe the successful rescue of infectious virions from a recombinant plasmid containing the genome of YZ-1 with deletions in the viral inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). The complete genome of YZ-1 was cloned into a bacterial plasmid by a modified "A-T" cloning method. Six recombinant plasmids were selected for further experiments. Sequence analysis indicated that the six clones shared identical internal sequences except for the various deletions within ITRs at either end of the cloned genome. The recombinant plasmid pYZ525, harboring a YZ-1 genome with a 96-nt deletion at the 5' end, was used to transfect CEL or HEK293 cells in the presence of the CELO virus or a helper plasmid, and rescued virions were obtained by both of the methods despite the presence of the deletions. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence that a certain number of nt deletions in the ITRs are not lethal for the rescue of viable AAAV from recombinant plasmids. This study provides insight into the unique biology of AAAV and the mechanism of viral replication.

  7. Efficient production of dual recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors for factor VIII delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qizhao; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni; Roberts, Sean; Moore, Andrea Rossi; Cao, Wenjing; Diao, Yong; Kapranov, Philipp; Xu, Ruian; Xiao, Weidong

    2014-08-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors have gained attention for human gene therapy because of their high safety and clinical efficacy profile. For factor VIII gene delivery, splitting the coding region between two AAV vectors remains a viable strategy to avoid the packaging capacity limitation (∼5.0 kb). However, it is time-consuming and labor-intensive to produce two rAAV vectors in separate batches. Here we demonstrated successful production of dual rAAV vectors for hemophilia A gene therapy in a single preparation. When the AAV vector plasmids carrying the human factor VIII heavy chain (hHC) and the light chain (hLC) expression cassettes were cotransfected into 293 cells along with the AAV rep&cap and mini-adenovirus helper plasmids, both rAAV-hHC and rAAV-hLC were produced at the desired ratio and in high titer. Interestingly, the rAAV-hHC vectors always yielded higher titers than rAAV-hLC vectors as a result of more efficient replication of rAAV-hHC genomes. The resulting vectors were effective in transducing the tissue culture cells in vitro. When these vectors were administered to hemophilia A mice, factor VIII was detected in the mouse plasma by both the activated partial thromboplastin time assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The functional activity as well as the antigen levels of secreted factor VIII were similar to those of vectors produced by the traditional method. The dual-vector production method has been successfully extended to both AAV2 and AAV8 serotypes. In conclusion, cotransfection of vector plasmids presents an efficient method for producing dual or multiple AAV vectors at significantly reduced cost and labor.

  8. The transcriptional response of Escherichia coli to recombinant protein insolubility.

    PubMed

    Smith, Harold E

    2007-03-01

    Bacterial production of recombinant proteins offers several advantages over alternative expression methods and remains the system of choice for many structural genomics projects. However, a large percentage of targets accumulate as insoluble inclusion bodies rather than soluble protein, creating a significant bottleneck in the protein production pipeline. Numerous strategies have been reported that can improve in vivo protein solubility, but most do not scale easily for high-throughput expression screening. To understand better the host cell response to the accumulation of insoluble protein, we determined genome-wide changes in bacterial gene expression upon induction of either soluble or insoluble target proteins. By comparing transcriptional profiles for multiple examples from the soluble or insoluble class, we identified a pattern of gene expression that correlates strongly with protein solubility. Direct targets of the sigma32 heat shock sigma factor, which includes genes involved in protein folding and degradation, were highly expressed in response to induction of insoluble protein. This same group of genes was also upregulated by insoluble protein accumulation under a different growth regime, indicating that sigma32-mediated gene expression is a general response to protein insolubility. This knowledge provides a starting point for the rational design of growth parameters and host strains with improved protein solubility characteristics. Summary Problems with protein solubility are frequently encountered when recombinant proteins are expressed in E. coli. The bacterial host responds to this problem by increasing expression of the protein folding machinery via the heat shock sigma factor sigma32. Manipulation of the sigma32 regulon might provide a general mechanism for improving recombinant protein solubility.

  9. [Immunogenic and protective characteristics of recombinant Lassa virus NP protein].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, G M

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant fragment of Lassa virus (strain Josiah) nucleocapsid protein (corresponding to amino acid residues 141 + 569) constructed by Dr. Jan ter Meulen (Tropenmedizine, Hamburg) was used for immunizing CBA/calac mice. The preparation was injected intraperitoneally twice with 2-week interval in a dose of 10 micrograms. The parameters of the resultant specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity were comparable to those in reference animals immunized with inactivated Lassa virus. Challenge with Lassa virus (10,000 PFU) resulted in 100% death of the reference animals, while of 15 animals immunized with the recombinant NP protein 8 survived.

  10. Production of recombinant proteins in suspension-cultured plant cells.

    PubMed

    Plasson, Carole; Michel, Rémy; Lienard, David; Saint-Jore-Dupas, Claude; Sourrouille, Christophe; de March, Ghislaine Grenier; Gomord, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Plants have emerged in the past decade as a suitable alternative to the current production systems for recombinant pharmaceutical proteins and, today their potential for low-cost production of high quality, much safer and biologically active mammalian proteins is largely documented. Among various plant expression systems being explored, genetically modified suspension-cultured plant cells offer a promising system for production of biopharmaceuticals. Indeed, when compared to other plant-based production platforms that have been explored, suspension-cultured plant cells have the advantage of being totally devoid of problems associated with the vagaries of weather, pest, soil and gene flow in the environment. Because of short growth cycles, the timescale needed for the production of recombinant proteins in plant cell culture can be counted in days or weeks after transformation compared to months needed for the production in transgenic plants. Moreover, recovery and purification of recombinant proteins from plant biomass is an expensive and technically challenging business that may amount to 80-94% of the final product cost. One additional advantage of plant cell culture is that the recombinant protein fused with a signal sequence can be expressed and secreted into the culture medium, and therefore recovered and purified in the absence of large quantities of contaminating proteins. Consequently, the downstream processing of proteins extracted from plant cell culture medium is less expensive, which may/does balance the higher costs of fermentation. When needed for clinical use, recombinant proteins are easily produced in suspension-cultured plant cells under certified, controllable and sterile conditions that offer improved safety and provide advantages for good manufacturing practices and regulatory compliance. In this chapter, we present basic protocols for rapid generation of transgenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum, Oriza sativa and Arabidopis

  11. Genetic diversity of infectious laryngotracheitis virus during in vivo co-infection parallels viral replication and arises from recombination 'hot-spots' within the genome.

    PubMed

    Loncoman, Carlos A; Hartley, Carol A; Coppo, Mauricio J C; Vaz, Paola K; Diaz-Méndez, Andrés; Browning, Glenn F; García, Maricarmen; Spatz, Stephen; Devlin, Joanne M

    2017-09-22

    Recombination is a feature of many alphaherpesviruses that infect people and animals. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV - Gallid alphaherpesvirus 1), causes respiratory disease in chickens, resulting in significant production losses in poultry industries worldwide. Natural (field) ILTV recombination is widespread, particularly recombination between attenuated ILTV vaccine strains to create virulent viruses. These virulent recombinants have had a major impact on animal health. Recently, the development of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay for ILTV has helped to understand ILTV recombination under laboratory settings. In this study we applied this SNP genotyping assay to further examine ILTV recombination in the natural host. Following co-inoculation of specific pathogen free chickens, we examined the resultant progeny for evidence of viral recombination and characterised the diversity of the recombinants over time. The results showed that ILTV replication and recombination are closely related, and that the recombinant viral progeny are most diverse four days after co-inoculation, which is the peak of viral replication. Further, the location of recombination breakpoints in a selection of the recombinant progeny, and in field isolates of ILTV from different geographical regions, were examined following full genome sequencing and used to identify recombination hot-spots in the ILTV genome.Importance Alphaherpesviruses are common causes of disease in people and animals. Recombination enables genome diversification in many different species of alphaherpesviruses, which can lead to the evolution of higher levels of viral virulence. Using the alphaherpesvirus infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), we performed co-infections in the natural host (chickens) to demonstrate high levels of virus recombination. Higher levels of diversity in the recombinant progeny coincided with the highest levels of virus replication. In the recombinant progeny

  12. Processing of recombinant Listeria monocytogenes proteins for MHC class I presentation follows a dedicated, high-efficiency pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Benjamin J.; Princiotta, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T lymphocytes recognize short peptides of ~8–10 amino acids bound to MHC class I molecules (pMHC) on the surface of antigen presenting cells. These peptides can be generated from either endogenous proteins synthesized by the biosynthetic machinery of the presenting cell or from exogenously sourced proteins. Because much of the research characterizing the MHC class I processing pathway has focused on endogenously synthesized proteins, it is not known whether differences exist in the processing pathway followed by endogenously synthesized versus exogenously sourced proteins. To highlight potential differences in the processing of endogenous versus exogenous proteins, we developed a model system to measure the efficiency of pMHC generation from nearly identical recombinant proteins expressed from vaccinia virus and Listeria monocytogenes. In these experiments, we uncovered a striking difference in the way recombinant Listeria antigens are processed and presented when compared to endogenously synthesized viral proteins. Specifically, we find that pMHC production from secreted Listeria proteins occurs at the same rate, independent of the cellular half-life of the protein from which it is derived, whereas the rate of pMHC production from endogenously synthesized viral proteins is absolutely dependent on its protein half-life. Accordingly, our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct and highly efficient MHC class I presentation pathway used for the processing of at least some exogenously synthesized proteins. PMID:23396941

  13. Recombinant Structural Proteins and Their Use in Future Materials.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Tara D; Rapson, Trevor D; Huson, Mickey G; Church, Jeffrey S

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are polymers that offer the materials engineer absolute control over chain length and composition: key attributes required for design of advanced polymeric materials. Through this control, these polymers can be encoded to contain information that enables them to respond as the environment changes. However, despite their promise, protein-based materials are under-represented in materials science. In this chapter we investigate why this is and describe recent efforts to address this. We discuss constraints limiting rational design of structural proteins for advanced materials; advantages and disadvantages of different recombinant expression platforms; and, methods to fabricate proteins into solid-state materials. Finally, we describe the silk proteins used in our laboratory as templates for information-containing polymers.

  14. Strain engineering for improved expression of recombinant proteins in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein expression in Escherichia coli represents the most facile approach for the preparation of non-glycosylated proteins for analytical and preparative purposes. So far, the optimization of recombinant expression has largely remained a matter of trial and error and has relied upon varying parameters, such as expression vector, media composition, growth temperature and chaperone co-expression. Recently several new approaches for the genome-scale engineering of E. coli to enhance recombinant protein expression have been developed. These methodologies now enable the generation of optimized E. coli expression strains in a manner analogous to metabolic engineering for the synthesis of low-molecular-weight compounds. In this review, we provide an overview of strain engineering approaches useful for enhancing the expression of hard-to-produce proteins, including heterologous membrane proteins. PMID:21569582

  15. Inactivation and tailing during UV254 disinfection of viruses: contributions of viral aggregation, light shielding within viral aggregates, and recombination.

    PubMed

    Mattle, Michael J; Kohn, Tamar

    2012-09-18

    UV disinfection of viruses frequently leads to tailing after an initial exponential decay. Aggregation, light shielding, recombination, or resistant virus subpopulations have been proposed as explanations; however, none of these options has been conclusively demonstrated. This study investigates how aggregation affects virus inactivation by UV(254) in general, and the tailing phenomenon in particular. Bacteriophage MS2 was aggregated by lowering the solution pH before UV(254) disinfection. Aggregates were redispersed prior to enumeration to obtain the remaining fraction of individual infectious viruses. Results showed that initial inactivation kinetics were similar for viruses incorporated in aggregates (up to 1000 nm in radius) and dispersed viruses; however, aggregated viruses started to tail more readily than dispersed ones. Neither light shielding, nor the presence of resistant subpopulations could account for the tailing. Instead, tailing was consistent with recombination arising from the simultaneous infection of the host by several impaired viruses. We argue that UV(254) treatment of aggregates permanently fused a fraction of viruses, which increased the likelihood of multiple infection of a host cell and ultimately enabled the production of infective viruses via recombination.

  16. Chimeragenesis of distantly-related proteins by noncontiguous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew A; Romero, Philip A; Wu, Timothy; Brustad, Eric M; Arnold, Frances H

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a method for identifying elements of a protein structure that can be shuffled to make chimeric proteins from two or more homologous parents. Formulating recombination as a graph-partitioning problem allows us to identify noncontiguous segments of the sequence that should be inherited together in the progeny proteins. We demonstrate this noncontiguous recombination approach by constructing a chimera of β-glucosidases from two different kingdoms of life. Although the protein's alpha–beta barrel fold has no obvious subdomains for recombination, noncontiguous SCHEMA recombination generated a functional chimera that takes approximately half its structure from each parent. The X-ray crystal structure shows that the structural blocks that make up the chimera maintain the backbone conformations found in their respective parental structures. Although the chimera has lower β-glucosidase activity than the parent enzymes, the activity was easily recovered by directed evolution. This simple method, which does not rely on detailed atomic models, can be used to design chimeras that take structural, and functional, elements from distantly-related proteins. PMID:23225662

  17. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  18. The Pacific Ocean Virome (POV): A Marine Viral Metagenomic Dataset and Associated Protein Clusters for Quantitative Viral Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Bonnie L.; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria and their viruses (phage) are fundamental drivers of many ecosystem processes including global biogeochemistry and horizontal gene transfer. While databases and resources for studying function in uncultured bacterial communities are relatively advanced, many fewer exist for their viral counterparts. The issue is largely technical in that the majority (often 90%) of viral sequences are functionally ‘unknown’ making viruses a virtually untapped resource of functional and physiological information. Here, we provide a community resource that organizes this unknown sequence space into 27 K high confidence protein clusters using 32 viral metagenomes from four biogeographic regions in the Pacific Ocean that vary by season, depth, and proximity to land, and include some of the first deep pelagic ocean viral metagenomes. These protein clusters more than double currently available viral protein clusters, including those from environmental datasets. Further, a protein cluster guided analysis of functional diversity revealed that richness decreased (i) from deep to surface waters, (ii) from winter to summer, (iii) and with distance from shore in surface waters only. These data provide a framework from which to draw on for future metadata-enabled functional inquiries of the vast viral unknown. PMID:23468974

  19. The Pacific Ocean virome (POV): a marine viral metagenomic dataset and associated protein clusters for quantitative viral ecology.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Bonnie L; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria and their viruses (phage) are fundamental drivers of many ecosystem processes including global biogeochemistry and horizontal gene transfer. While databases and resources for studying function in uncultured bacterial communities are relatively advanced, many fewer exist for their viral counterparts. The issue is largely technical in that the majority (often 90%) of viral sequences are functionally 'unknown' making viruses a virtually untapped resource of functional and physiological information. Here, we provide a community resource that organizes this unknown sequence space into 27 K high confidence protein clusters using 32 viral metagenomes from four biogeographic regions in the Pacific Ocean that vary by season, depth, and proximity to land, and include some of the first deep pelagic ocean viral metagenomes. These protein clusters more than double currently available viral protein clusters, including those from environmental datasets. Further, a protein cluster guided analysis of functional diversity revealed that richness decreased (i) from deep to surface waters, (ii) from winter to summer, (iii) and with distance from shore in surface waters only. These data provide a framework from which to draw on for future metadata-enabled functional inquiries of the vast viral unknown.

  20. Potential of fragment recombination for rational design of proteins.

    PubMed

    Eisenbeis, Simone; Proffitt, William; Coles, Murray; Truffault, Vincent; Shanmugaratnam, Sooruban; Meiler, Jens; Höcker, Birte

    2012-03-07

    It is hypothesized that protein domains evolved from smaller intrinsically stable subunits via combinatorial assembly. Illegitimate recombination of fragments that encode protein subunits could have quickly led to diversification of protein folds and their functionality. This evolutionary concept presents an attractive strategy to protein engineering, e.g., to create new scaffolds for enzyme design. We previously combined structurally similar parts from two ancient protein folds, the (βα)(8)-barrel and the flavodoxin-like fold. The resulting "hopeful monster" differed significantly from the intended (βα)(8)-barrel fold by an extra β-strand in the core. In this study, we ask what modifications are necessary to form the intended structure and what potential this approach has for the rational design of functional proteins. Guided by computational design, we optimized the interface between the fragments with five targeted mutations yielding a stable, monomeric protein whose predicted structure was verified experimentally. We further tested binding of a phosphorylated compound and detected that some affinity was already present due to an intact phosphate-binding site provided by one fragment. The affinity could be improved quickly to the level of natural proteins by introducing two additional mutations. The study illustrates the potential of recombining protein fragments with unique properties to design new and functional proteins, offering both a possible pathway of protein evolution and a protocol to rapidly engineer proteins for new applications.

  1. Triatoma Virus Recombinant VP4 Protein Induces Membrane Permeability through Dynamic Pores

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Eugenia, Rubén; Goikolea, Julen; Gil-Cartón, David; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In naked viruses, membrane breaching is a key step that must be performed for genome transfer into the target cells. Despite its importance, the mechanisms behind this process remain poorly understood. The small protein VP4, encoded by the genomes of most viruses of the order Picornavirales, has been shown to be involved in membrane alterations. Here we analyzed the permeabilization activity of the natively nonmyristoylated VP4 protein from triatoma virus (TrV), a virus belonging to the Dicistroviridae family within the Picornavirales order. The VP4 protein was produced as a C-terminal maltose binding protein (MBP) fusion to achieve its successful expression. This recombinant VP4 protein is able to produce membrane permeabilization in model membranes in a membrane composition-dependent manner. The induced permeability was also influenced by the pH, being greater at higher pH values. We demonstrate that the permeabilization activity elicited by the protein occurs through discrete pores that are inserted on the membrane. Sizing experiments using fluorescent dextrans, cryo-electron microscopy imaging, and other, additional techniques showed that recombinant VP4 forms heterogeneous proteolipidic pores rather than common proteinaceous channels. These results suggest that the VP4 protein may be involved in the membrane alterations required for genome transfer or cell entry steps during dicistrovirus infection. IMPORTANCE During viral infection, viruses need to overcome the membrane barrier in order to enter the cell and replicate their genome. In nonenveloped viruses membrane fusion is not possible, and hence, other mechanisms are implemented. Among other proteins, like the capsid-forming proteins and the proteins required for viral replication, several viruses of the order Picornaviridae contain a small protein called VP4 that has been shown to be involved in membrane alterations. Here we show that the triatoma virus VP4 protein is able to produce membrane

  2. Triatoma virus recombinant VP4 protein induces membrane permeability through dynamic pores.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Eugenia, Rubén; Goikolea, Julen; Gil-Cartón, David; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Guérin, Diego M A

    2015-04-01

    In naked viruses, membrane breaching is a key step that must be performed for genome transfer into the target cells. Despite its importance, the mechanisms behind this process remain poorly understood. The small protein VP4, encoded by the genomes of most viruses of the order Picornavirales, has been shown to be involved in membrane alterations. Here we analyzed the permeabilization activity of the natively nonmyristoylated VP4 protein from triatoma virus (TrV), a virus belonging to the Dicistroviridae family within the Picornavirales order. The VP4 protein was produced as a C-terminal maltose binding protein (MBP) fusion to achieve its successful expression. This recombinant VP4 protein is able to produce membrane permeabilization in model membranes in a membrane composition-dependent manner. The induced permeability was also influenced by the pH, being greater at higher pH values. We demonstrate that the permeabilization activity elicited by the protein occurs through discrete pores that are inserted on the membrane. Sizing experiments using fluorescent dextrans, cryo-electron microscopy imaging, and other, additional techniques showed that recombinant VP4 forms heterogeneous proteolipidic pores rather than common proteinaceous channels. These results suggest that the VP4 protein may be involved in the membrane alterations required for genome transfer or cell entry steps during dicistrovirus infection. During viral infection, viruses need to overcome the membrane barrier in order to enter the cell and replicate their genome. In nonenveloped viruses membrane fusion is not possible, and hence, other mechanisms are implemented. Among other proteins, like the capsid-forming proteins and the proteins required for viral replication, several viruses of the order Picornaviridae contain a small protein called VP4 that has been shown to be involved in membrane alterations. Here we show that the triatoma virus VP4 protein is able to produce membrane permeabilization in

  3. Expression and purification of recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein and its interactions with polyomavirus proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, X.; Chang, D.; Rottinghaus, S.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448), using the recombinant expression system pFPYV2. Recombinant VP2 was purified to near homogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electroelution, and Extracti-Gel chromatography. Polyclonal serum to this protein which reacted specifically with recombinant VP2 as well as polyomavirus virion VP2 and VP3 on Western blots (immunoblots) was produced. Purified VP2 was used to establish an in vitro protein-protein interaction assay with polyomavirus structural proteins and purified recombinant VP1. Recombinant VP2 interacted with recombinant VP1, virion VP1, and the four virion histones. Recombinant VP1 coimmunoprecipitated with recombinant VP2 or truncated VP2 (delta C12VP2), which lacked the carboxy-terminal 12 amino acids. These experiments confirmed the interaction between VP1 and VP2 and revealed that the carboxyterminal 12 amino acids of VP2 and VP3 were not necessary for formation of this interaction. In vivo VP1-VP2 interaction study accomplished by cotransfection of COS-7 cells with VP2 and truncated VP1 (delta N11VP1) lacking the nuclear localization signal demonstrated that VP2 was capable of translocating delta N11VP1 into the nucleus. These studies suggest that complexes of VP1 and VP2 may be formed in the cytoplasm and cotransported to the nucleus for virion assembly to occur.

  4. Natural recombination in alphaherpesviruses: Insights into viral evolution through full genome sequencing and sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Loncoman, Carlos A; Vaz, Paola K; Coppo, Mauricio Jc; Hartley, Carol A; Morera, Francisco J; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2017-04-01

    Recombination in alphaherpesviruses was first described more than sixty years ago. Since then, different techniques have been used to detect recombination in natural (field) and experimental settings. Over the last ten years, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies and bioinformatic analyses have greatly increased the accuracy of recombination detection, particularly in field settings, thus contributing greatly to the study of natural alphaherpesvirus recombination in both human and veterinary medicine. Such studies have highlighted the important role that natural recombination plays in the evolution of many alphaherpesviruses. These studies have also shown that recombination can be a safety concern for attenuated alphaherpesvirus vaccines, particularly in veterinary medicine where such vaccines are used extensively, but also potentially in human medicine where attenuated varicella zoster virus vaccines are in use. This review focuses on the contributions that NGS and sequence analysis have made over the last ten years to our understanding of recombination in mammalian and avian alphaherpesviruses, with particular focus on attenuated live vaccine use.

  5. Construction and immunogenicity of recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing GP5 and M protein of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Reginaldo G; Dellagostin, Odir A; Barletta, Raúl G; Doster, Allan R; Nelson, Eric; Osorio, Fernando A

    2002-11-22

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG was used to express a truncated form of GP5 (lacking the first 30 NH(2)-terminal residues) and M protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The PRRSV proteins were expressed in BCG under control of the mycobacterial hsp60 gene promoter either in the mycobacterial cytoplasm (BCGGP5cyt and BCGMcyt) or as MT19-fusion proteins on the mycobacterial surface (BCGGP5surf and BCGMsurf). Mice inoculated with BCGGP5surf and BCGMsurf developed antibodies against the viral proteins at 30 days post-inoculation (dpi) as detected by ELISA and Western blot. By 60 dpi, the animals developed titer of neutralizing antibodies of 8. A PRRSV-specific gamma interferon response was also detected in splenocytes of recombinant BCG-inoculated mice at 60 and 90 dpi. These results indicate that BCG was able to express antigens of PRRSV and elicit an immune response against the viral proteins in mice.

  6. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones.

    PubMed

    Arenhart, Sandra; Silva, José Valter Joaquim; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; Weiblen, Rudi; Gil, Laura Helena Vega Gonzales

    The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3). The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Construction and immunogenicity of the recombinant Lactobacillus acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5 of bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuelan; Jiang, Lufeng; Liu, Teng; Wang, Min; Cao, Wenbo; Bao, Yongzhan; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-12-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea/mucosal disease (BVD/MD) is an infectious disease of cattle with a worldwide distribution, creating a substantial economic impact. It is caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). This research was conducted to construct the recombinant Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) pMG36e-E0-LA-5 of BVDV E0 gene and to test its immunogenicity and protective efficacy against BVDV infection in the mice model. The BVDV E0 gene was sub-cloned into the expression vector and then transformed into the L. acidophilus LA-5 strain by electroporation. The recombinant L. acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5 was confirmed by the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting. The mice were immunized orally with the recombinant L. acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5. The serum IgG antibody and fecal sIgA antibody responses, expression levels of interleukin (IL)-12 (IL-12) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) were detected respectively. On the 7th day after the last-immunization, the mice were inoculated with BVDV to evaluate the protective efficiency of the recombinant L. acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5. The results showed that the expressed products protein E0 in the L. acidophilus LA-5 resulted in single band of 27kDa by SDS-PAGE and its strong reactivity with BVDV antibody was confirmed by Western blotting. The IgG and sIgA antibodies responses, IL-12 and IFN-γ expression levels in the vaccinated mice with recombinant L. acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5 were significantly higher than those in the control mice. The protective rate of the vaccinated mice against BVDV increased significantly, and a 90.00% protection rate in virulent challenge was observed. These results indicated that the recombinant L. acidophilus pMG36e-E0-LA-5 strain was successfully constructed and it could effectively improve the immune response in mice and might provide protection against BVDV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influenza vaccines: from whole virus preparations to recombinant protein technology.

    PubMed

    Huber, Victor C

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination against influenza represents our most effective form of prevention. Historical approaches toward vaccine creation and production have yielded highly effective vaccines that are safe and immunogenic. Despite their effectiveness, these historical approaches do not allow for the incorporation of changes into the vaccine in a timely manner. In 2013, a recombinant protein-based vaccine that induces immunity toward the influenza virus hemagglutinin was approved for use in the USA. This vaccine represents the first approved vaccine formulation that does not require an influenza virus intermediate for production. This review presents a brief history of influenza vaccines, with insight into the potential future application of vaccines generated using recombinant technology.

  9. [Biosynthesis and isolation of a recombinant protein for producing genetically-engineered human proinsulin].

    PubMed

    Ivankin, A N; Mitaleva, S I; Nekliudov, A D

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of the recombinant protein from a genetically engineered Escherichia coli 1854 producer for further chemical enzymatic transformation into human insulin through proinsulin was studied. Under optimal conditions, the recombinant protein formation was more than 35% of the total cell proteins. Structures of the polypeptides obtained and purified chromatographically were confirmed by amino acid analysis. Human proinsulin was derived from the recombinant protein isolated.

  10. Recombination of protein fragments: a promising approach toward engineering proteins with novel nanomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Balamurali, M M; Sharma, Deepak; Chang, Anderson; Khor, Dingyue; Chu, Ricky; Li, Hongbin

    2008-10-01

    Combining single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) and protein engineering techniques, here we demonstrate that we can use recombination-based techniques to engineer novel elastomeric proteins by recombining protein fragments from structurally homologous parent proteins. Using I27 and I32 domains from the muscle protein titin as parent template proteins, we systematically shuffled the secondary structural elements of the two parent proteins and engineered 13 hybrid daughter proteins. Although I27 and I32 are highly homologous, and homology modeling predicted that the hybrid daughter proteins fold into structures that are similar to that of parent protein, we found that only eight of the 13 daughter proteins showed beta-sheet dominated structures that are similar to parent proteins, and the other five recombined proteins showed signatures of the formation of significant alpha-helical or random coil-like structure. Single molecule AFM revealed that six recombined daughter proteins are mechanically stable and exhibit mechanical properties that are different from the parent proteins. In contrast, another four of the hybrid proteins were found to be mechanically labile and unfold at forces that are lower than the approximately 20 pN, as we could not detect any unfolding force peaks. The last three hybrid proteins showed interesting duality in their mechanical unfolding behaviors. These results demonstrate the great potential of using recombination-based approaches to engineer novel elastomeric protein domains of diverse mechanical properties. Moreover, our results also revealed the challenges and complexity of developing a recombination-based approach into a laboratory-based directed evolution approach to engineer novel elastomeric proteins.

  11. A synthetic parvovirus B19 capsid protein can replace viral antigen in antibody-capture enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Kock, W C

    1995-09-01

    To establish a renewable source of parvovirus B19 antigens for diagnostic tests, gene sequences for the viral capsid proteins, VP1 and VP2, were cloned into baculovirus expression vectors and the recombinant viruses used to infect Sf9 insect cells. Cell lysates examined by immunoblotting demonstrated reactive proteins corresponding to the expected sizes of native VP1 (83 kDa) and VP2 (58 kDa). The VP2 protein was produced efficiently in quantity and self-assembled into empty capsids as shown by density equilibration in a CsCl step gradient. The VP2 protein was purified and used as an antigen in antibody-capture enzyme immunoassays for the detection of B19 IgG and IgM antibodies. Compared to a standard antibody-capture EIA based on whole viral antigen, the VP2-EIA gave a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 97% in detection of B19 IgM in 138 patients suspected of B19 infection. No IgM-positive specimens were missed. IgG detection yielded a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 96% in the same population. Recombinant VP2 capsid proteins expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells can substitute for serum-derived B19 virus in standard antibody-capture EIA for the detection of B19 IgG and IgM with comparable results.

  12. Using double-stranded RNA to prevent in vitro and in vivo viral infections by recombinant baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Victor Julian; Sampieri, Alicia; Sepulveda, Jorge; Vaca, Luis

    2003-05-23

    Introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into a wide variety of cells and organisms results in post-transcriptional depletion of the homologue endogenous mRNA. This well-preserved phenomenon known as RNA interference (RNAi) is present in evolutionarily diverse organisms such as plants, fungi, insects, metazoans, and mammals. Because the identification of the targeted mRNA by the RNAi machinery depends upon Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions, RNAi can be exquisitely specific. We took advantage of this powerful and flexible technique to demonstrate that selective silencing of genes essential for viral propagation prevents in vitro and in vivo viral infection. Using the baculovirus Autographa californica, a rapidly replicating and highly cytolytic double-stranded DNA virus that infects many different insect species, we show for the first time that introduction of dsRNA from gp64 and ie1, two genes essential for baculovirus propagation, results in prevention of viral infection in vitro and in vivo. This is the first report demonstrating the use of RNAi to inhibit a viral infection in animals. This inhibition was specific, because dsRNA from the polyhedrin promoter (used as control) or unrelated dsRNAs did not affect the time course of viral infection. The most relevant consequences from the present study are: 1) RNAi offers a rapid and efficient way to interfere with viral genes to assess the role of specific proteins in viral function and 2) using RNAi to interfere with viral genes essential for cell infection may provide a powerful therapeutic tool for the treatment of viral infections.

  13. Rodent Models of HAND and Drug Abuse: Exogenous Administration of Viral Protein(s) and Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Honghong

    2015-01-01

    Humans and chimpanzees are the natural hosts for HIV. Non-human primate models of SIV/SHIV infection in rhesus, cynomologus and pigtail macaques have been used extensively as excellent model systems for pathogenesis and vaccine studies. However, owing to the variability of disease progression in infected macaques, a phenomenon identical to humans, coupled with their prohibitive costs, there exists a critical need for the development of small-animal models in which to study the untoward effects of HIV-1 infection. Owing to the fact that rodents are not the natural permissive hosts for lentiviral infection, development of small animal models for studying virus infection has used strategies that circumvent the steps of viral entry and infection. Such strategies involve overexpression of toxic viral proteins, SCID mice engrafted with the human PBLs or macrophages, and EcoHIV chimeric virus wherein the gp120 of HIV-1 was replaced with the gp80 of the ecotropic murine leukemia virus. Additional strategy that is often used by investigators to study the toxic effect of viral proteins involves direct stereotactic injection of the viral protein(s) into specific brain regions. The present report is a compilation of the applications of direct administration of Tat into the striatum to mimic the effects of the viral neurotoxin in the CNS. Added advantage of this model is that it is also amenable to repeated intraperitoneal cocaine injections, thereby allowing the study of the additive/synergistic effects of both the viral protein and cocaine. Such a model system recapitulates aspects of HAND in the context of drug abuse. PMID:22447295

  14. Functional and Structural Mimicry of Cellular Protein Kinase A Anchoring Proteins by a Viral Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    King, Cason R.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Gregory J.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2016-01-01

    The oncoproteins of the small DNA tumor viruses interact with a plethora of cellular regulators to commandeer control of the infected cell. During infection, adenovirus E1A deregulates cAMP signalling and repurposes it for activation of viral gene expression. We show that E1A structurally and functionally mimics a cellular A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP). E1A interacts with and relocalizes protein kinase A (PKA) to the nucleus, likely to virus replication centres, via an interaction with the regulatory subunits of PKA. Binding to PKA requires the N-terminus of E1A, which bears striking similarity to the amphipathic α-helical domain present in cellular AKAPs. E1A also targets the same docking-dimerization domain of PKA normally bound by cellular AKAPs. In addition, the AKAP like motif within E1A could restore PKA interaction to a cellular AKAP in which its normal interaction motif was deleted. During infection, E1A successfully competes with endogenous cellular AKAPs for PKA interaction. E1A’s role as a viral AKAP contributes to viral transcription, protein expression and progeny production. These data establish HAdV E1A as the first known viral AKAP. This represents a unique example of viral subversion of a crucial cellular regulatory pathway via structural mimicry of the PKA interaction domain of cellular AKAPs. PMID:27137912

  15. Translational regulation of viral secretory proteins by the 5' coding regions and a viral RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nordholm, Johan; Petitou, Jeanne; Östbye, Henrik; da Silva, Diogo V; Dou, Dan; Wang, Hao; Daniels, Robert

    2017-08-07

    A primary function of 5' regions in many secretory protein mRNAs is to encode an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) targeting sequence. In this study, we show how the regions coding for the ER-targeting sequences of the influenza glycoproteins NA and HA also function as translational regulatory elements that are controlled by the viral RNA-binding protein (RBP) NS1. The translational increase depends on the nucleotide composition and 5' positioning of the ER-targeting sequence coding regions and is facilitated by the RNA-binding domain of NS1, which can associate with ER membranes. Inserting the ER-targeting sequence coding region of NA into different 5' UTRs confirmed that NS1 can promote the translation of secretory protein mRNAs based on the nucleotides within this region rather than the resulting amino acids. By analyzing human protein mRNA sequences, we found evidence that this mechanism of using 5' coding regions and particular RBPs to achieve gene-specific regulation may extend to human-secreted proteins. © 2017 Nordholm et al.

  16. Recombinant protein production from stable mammalian cell lines and pools.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David L; Balasubramanian, Sowmya

    2016-06-01

    We highlight recent developments for the production of recombinant proteins from suspension-adapted mammalian cell lines. We discuss the generation of stable cell lines using transposons and lentivirus vectors (non-targeted transgene integration) and site-specific recombinases (targeted transgene integration). Each of these methods results in the generation of cell lines with protein yields that are generally superior to those achievable through classical plasmid transfection that depends on the integration of the transfected DNA by non-homologous DNA end-joining. This is the main reason why these techniques can also be used for the generation of stable cell pools, heterogenous populations of recombinant cells generated by gene delivery and genetic selection without resorting to single cell cloning. This allows the time line from gene transfer to protein production to be reduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Therapeutic advances in rheumatology with the use of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Achim; Power, Barbara E; Hudson, Peter J

    2008-11-01

    Antibody engineering and protein design have led to the creation of a new era of targeted anti-inflammatory therapies in rheumatology. Recombinant DNA technologies have enabled the selection and humanization of specific antibody fragments in order to develop therapeutic reagents of any specificity that can be 'armed' to deliver effective anti-inflammatory 'payloads'. Antibodies and antibody-like proteins provide the opportunity to block key soluble mediators of inflammation in their milieu, or alternatively to block intracellular inflammation-triggering pathways by binding to an upstream cell-surface receptor. These designer proteins can be tuned for desired pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects, and represent tools for specific therapeutic intervention by delivering precisely the required immunosuppressive effect. The extent of desired and undesired effects of a particular biologic therapy, however, can be broader than initially predicted and require careful evaluation during clinical trials. This Review highlights advances in recombinant technologies for the development of novel biologic therapies in rheumatology.

  18. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to improve recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Feng, Xinjun; Ding, Yamei; Zhao, Guang; Liu, Huizhou; Xian, Mo

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most widely used strains for recombinant protein production. However, obstacles also exist in both academic researches and industrial applications, such as the metabolic burden, the carbon source waste, and the cells' physiological deterioration. This article reviews recent approaches for improving recombinant protein production in metabolic engineering, including workhorse selection, stress factor application, and carbon flux regulation. Selecting a suitable host is the first key point for recombinant protein production. In general, it all depends on characteristics of the strains and the target proteins. It will be triggered cells physiological deterioration when the medium is significantly different from the cell's natural environment. Coexpression of stress factors can help proteins to fold into their native conformation. Carbon flux regulation is a direct approach for redirecting more carbon flux toward the desirable pathways and products. However, some undesirable consequences are usually found in metabolic engineering, such as glucose transport inhibition, cell growth retardation, and useless metabolite accumulation. More efficient regulators and platform cell factories should be explored to meet a variety of production demands.

  19. Development of a reverse genetics system to generate a recombinant Ebola virus Makona expressing a green fluorescent protein

    SciTech Connect

    Albariño, César G. Wiggleton Guerrero, Lisa; Lo, Michael K.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Towner, Jonathan S.

    2015-10-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential application of reverse genetics technology in studying a broad range of aspects of viral biology, including gene regulation, protein function, cell entry, and pathogenesis. Here, we describe a highly efficient reverse genetics system used to generate recombinant Ebola virus (EBOV) based on a recent isolate from a human patient infected during the 2014–2015 outbreak in Western Africa. We also rescued a recombinant EBOV expressing a fluorescent reporter protein from a cleaved VP40 protein fusion. Using this virus and an inexpensive method to quantitate the expression of the foreign gene, we demonstrate its potential usefulness as a tool for screening antiviral compounds and measuring neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Recombinant Ebola virus (EBOV) derived from Makona variant was rescued. • New protocol for viral rescue allows 100% efficiency. • Modified EBOV expresses a green fluorescent protein from a VP40-fused protein. • Modified EBOV was tested as tool to screen antiviral compounds and measure neutralizing antibodies.

  20. Large Ribosomal Protein 4 Increases Efficiency of Viral Recoding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Green, Lisa; Houck-Loomis, Brian; Yueh, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Expression of retroviral replication enzymes (Pol) requires a controlled translational recoding event to bypass the stop codon at the end of gag. This recoding event occurs either by direct suppression of termination via the insertion of an amino acid at the stop codon (readthrough) or by alteration of the mRNA reading frame (frameshift). Here we report the effects of a host protein, large ribosomal protein 4 (RPL4), on the efficiency of recoding. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay, we found that transfection of cells with a plasmid encoding RPL4 cDNA increases recoding efficiency in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal enhancement of nearly twofold. Expression of RPL4 increases recoding of reporters containing retroviral readthrough and frameshift sequences, as well as the Sindbis virus leaky termination signal. RPL4-induced enhancement of recoding is cell line specific and appears to be specific to RPL4 among ribosomal proteins. Cotransfection of RPL4 cDNA with Moloney murine leukemia proviral DNA results in Gag processing defects and a reduction of viral particle formation, presumably caused by the RPL4-dependent alteration of the Gag-to-Gag-Pol ratio required for virion assembly and release. PMID:22718819

  1. Cyclophilin A Binds to the Viral RNA and Replication Proteins, Resulting in Inhibition of Tombusviral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay

    2013-01-01

    Replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses is greatly affected by numerous host-encoded proteins that act as restriction factors. Cyclophilins, which are a large family of cellular prolyl isomerases, have been found to inhibit Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) replication in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model based on genome-wide screens and global proteomics approaches. In this report, we further characterize single-domain cyclophilins, including the mammalian cyclophilin A and plant Roc1 and Roc2, which are orthologs of the yeast Cpr1p cyclophilin, a known inhibitor of TBSV replication in yeast. We found that recombinant CypA, Roc1, and Roc2 strongly inhibited TBSV replication in a cell-free replication assay. Additional in vitro studies revealed that CypA, Roc1, and Roc2 cyclophilins bound to the viral replication proteins, and CypA and Roc1 also bound to the viral RNA. These interactions led to inhibition of viral RNA recruitment, the assembly of the viral replicase complex, and viral RNA synthesis. A catalytically inactive mutant of CypA was also able to inhibit TBSV replication in vitro due to binding to the replication proteins and the viral RNA. Overexpression of CypA and its mutant in yeast or plant leaves led to inhibition of tombusvirus replication, confirming that CypA is a restriction factor for TBSV. Overall, the current work has revealed a regulatory role for the cytosolic single-domain Cpr1-like cyclophilins in RNA virus replication. PMID:24089553

  2. Controlled glycosylation of plant-produced recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Richard; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta

    2014-12-01

    Despite their recognized importance for therapeutic proteins, the production of structurally defined glycans is still a challenging issue. However, an increased understanding of glycosylation pathways, recent advances in analytical tools, and emerging technologies for subcellular targeting using chimeric glycosyltransferases are facilitating the rational design of new glycan biosynthetic pathways. Plants are particularly amenable to glyco-engineering approaches and thus they are increasingly being used for the production of recombinant proteins. Here we summarize the main achievements in the field of in planta glyco-engineering for the production of therapeutically relevant proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Production of recombinant TRAIL and TRAIL receptor: Fc chimeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Schneider, P

    2000-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)/TNF receptor (TNFR) families of ligands and receptors are implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes and regulate cellular functions as diverse as proliferation, differentiation, and death. Recombinant forms of these ligands and receptors can act to agonize or antagonize these functions and are therefore useful for laboratory studies and may have clinical applications. A protocol is presented for the expression and purification of dimeric soluble receptors fused to the Fc portion of human IgG1 and of soluble, N-terminally Flag-tagged ligands. Soluble recombinant proteins are easier to handle than membrane-bound proteins and the use of tags greatly facilitates their detection and purification. In addition, some tags may provide enhanced biological activity to the recombinant proteins (mainly by oligomerization and stabilization effects) and facilitate their functional characterization. Expression in bacterial (for selected ligands) and eukaryotic expression systems (for ligands and receptors) was performed using M15 pREP4 bacteria and human embryonic kidney 293 cells, respectively. The yield of purified protein is about 1 mg/liter for the mammalian expression system and several milligrams per liter for the bacterial expression system. Protocols are given for a specific ligand-receptor pair, namely TRAIL (Apo-2L) and TRAIL receptor 2 (DR5), but can be applied to other ligands and receptors of the TNF family.

  4. Using ion exchange chromatography to purify a recombinantly expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Gabelli, Sandra B

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEX) separates molecules by their surface charge, a property that can vary vastly between different proteins. There are two types of IEX, cation exhange and anion exchange chromatography. The protocol that follows was designed by the authors for anion exchange chromatography of a recombinantly expressed protein having a pI of 4.9 and containing two cysteine residues and one tryptophan residue, using an FPLC system. Prior to anion exchange, the protein had been salted out using ammonium sulfate precipitation and partially purified via hydrophobic interaction chromatography (see Salting out of proteins using ammonium sulfate precipitation and Use and Application of Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography for Protein Purification). Slight modifications to this protocol may be made to accommodate both the protein of interest and the availability of equipment.

  5. Multiple origins of viral capsid proteins from cellular ancestors

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V.

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on earth and show remarkable diversity of genome sequences, replication and expression strategies, and virion structures. Evolutionary genomics of viruses revealed many unexpected connections but the general scenario(s) for the evolution of the virosphere remains a matter of intense debate among proponents of the cellular regression, escaped genes, and primordial virus world hypotheses. A comprehensive sequence and structure analysis of major virion proteins indicates that they evolved on about 20 independent occasions, and in some of these cases likely ancestors are identifiable among the proteins of cellular organisms. Virus genomes typically consist of distinct structural and replication modules that recombine frequently and can have different evolutionary trajectories. The present analysis suggests that, although the replication modules of at least some classes of viruses might descend from primordial selfish genetic elements, bona fide viruses evolved on multiple, independent occasions throughout the course of evolution by the recruitment of diverse host proteins that became major virion components. PMID:28265094

  6. A Bacillus megaterium System for the Production of Recombinant Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Biedendieck, Rebekka

    2016-01-01

    For many years the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium has been used for the production and secretion of recombinant proteins. For this purpose it was systematically optimized. Plasmids with different inducible promoter systems, with different compatible origins, with small tags for protein purification and with various specific signals for protein secretion were combined with genetically improved host strains. Finally, the development of appropriate cultivation conditions for the production strains established this organism as a bacterial cell factory even for large proteins. Along with the overproduction of individual proteins the organism is now also used for the simultaneous coproduction of up to 14 recombinant proteins, multiple subsequently interacting or forming protein complexes. Some of these recombinant strains are successfully used for bioconversion or the biosynthesis of valuable components including vitamins. The titers in the g per liter scale for the intra- and extracellular recombinant protein production prove the high potential of B. megaterium for industrial applications. It is currently further enhanced for the production of recombinant proteins and multi-subunit protein complexes using directed genetic engineering approaches based on transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and fluxome data.

  7. SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2 UBC9 mediates viral immediate-early protein SUMOylation in crayfish to facilitate reproduction of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, An-Jing; Gao, Lu; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Successful viruses have evolved superior strategies to escape host defenses or exploit host biological pathways. Most of the viral immediate-early (ie) genes are essential for viral infection and depend solely on host proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the modification of viral IE proteins by the crayfish small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) and investigated the role of SUMOylation during the viral life cycle. SUMO and SUMO ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9) involved in SUMOylation were identified in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Both SUMO and UBC9 were upregulated in crayfish challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Replication of WSSV genes increased in crayfish injected with recombinant SUMO or UBC9, but injection of mutant SUMO or UBC9 protein had no effect. Subsequently, we analyzed the mechanism by which crayfish SUMOylation facilitates WSSV replication. Crayfish UBC9 bound to all three WSSV IE proteins tested, and one of these IE proteins (WSV051) was covalently modified by SUMO in vitro. The expression of viral ie genes was affected and that of late genes was significantly inhibited in UBC9-silenced or SUMO-silenced crayfish, and the inhibition effect was rescued by injection of recombinant SUMO or UBC9. The results of this study demonstrate that viral IE proteins can be modified by crayfish SUMOylation, prompt the expression of viral genes, and ultimately benefit WSSV replication. Understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses exploit host components will greatly improve our knowledge of the virus-host "arms race" and contribute to the development of novel methods against virulent viruses.

  8. SUMO-Conjugating Enzyme E2 UBC9 Mediates Viral Immediate-Early Protein SUMOylation in Crayfish To Facilitate Reproduction of White Spot Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, An-Jing; Gao, Lu; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2013-01-01

    Successful viruses have evolved superior strategies to escape host defenses or exploit host biological pathways. Most of the viral immediate-early (ie) genes are essential for viral infection and depend solely on host proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the modification of viral IE proteins by the crayfish small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) and investigated the role of SUMOylation during the viral life cycle. SUMO and SUMO ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9) involved in SUMOylation were identified in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Both SUMO and UBC9 were upregulated in crayfish challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Replication of WSSV genes increased in crayfish injected with recombinant SUMO or UBC9, but injection of mutant SUMO or UBC9 protein had no effect. Subsequently, we analyzed the mechanism by which crayfish SUMOylation facilitates WSSV replication. Crayfish UBC9 bound to all three WSSV IE proteins tested, and one of these IE proteins (WSV051) was covalently modified by SUMO in vitro. The expression of viral ie genes was affected and that of late genes was significantly inhibited in UBC9-silenced or SUMO-silenced crayfish, and the inhibition effect was rescued by injection of recombinant SUMO or UBC9. The results of this study demonstrate that viral IE proteins can be modified by crayfish SUMOylation, prompt the expression of viral genes, and ultimately benefit WSSV replication. Understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses exploit host components will greatly improve our knowledge of the virus-host “arms race” and contribute to the development of novel methods against virulent viruses. PMID:23097446

  9. A general method of protein purification for recombinant unstructured non-acidic proteins.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Guillén, Gabriel; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2011-11-01

    Typical late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate in response to water deficit imposed by the environment or by plant developmental programs. Because of their physicochemical properties, they can be considered as hydrophilins and as a paradigm of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs) in plants. To study their biophysical and biochemical characteristics large quantities of highly purified protein are required. In this work, we report a fast and simple purification method for non-acidic recombinant LEA proteins that does not need the addition of tags and that preserves their in vitro protective activity. The method is based on the enrichment of the protein of interest by boiling the bacterial protein extract, followed by a differential precipitation with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Using this procedure we have obtained highly pure recombinant LEA proteins of groups 1, 3, and 4 and one recombinant bacterial hydrophilin. This protocol will facilitate the purification of this type of IUPs, and could be particularly useful in proteomic projects/analyses.

  10. Viral proteins that bridge unconnected proteins and components in the human PPI network.

    PubMed

    Rachita, H R; Nagarajaram, H A

    2014-07-29

    Viruses, despite having small genomes and few proteins, make an array of interactions with host proteins as they solely depend on host machinery for their replication and reproduction. Hence, analysis of the Human-Virus Protein-Protein Interaction Network (Hu-Vir PPI network) helps us to gain certain insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the hijacking of host cell machinery by viruses for their perpetuation. Here we report an analysis of the Human-Virus Bridged PPI Networks that has led us to identify viral articulation points (VAPs) which connect unconnected components of the Human-PPI (Hu-PPI) network. VAPs cross-link peripheral nodes to the giant component of the Hu-PPI network. VAPs interact with a number of relatively lower topologically central human proteins and are conserved among related viruses. The linked nodes comprise of those that are mostly expressed during viral infection, as well as those that are found exclusively in some metabolic pathways, indicating that the novel viral mediation of certain human protein-protein interactions may form the basis for virus-specific tuning of the host machinery. The functional importance of VAPs and their interaction partners in virus replication make them potential drug targets against viral infection. Our investigations also led to the discovery of an example of a Human Endogenous Retrovirus (HERV) encoded protein, syncytin, as an Articulation Point (AP) in the Hu-PPI network, suggesting that VAPs may be retained in a genome if they result in any beneficial function in the host.

  11. Endolysosomal trafficking of viral G protein-coupled receptor functions in innate immunity and control of viral oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaonan; Cheng, Adam; Zou, Zhongju; Yang, Yih-Sheng; Sumpter, Rhea M; Huang, Chou-Long; Bhagat, Govind; Virgin, Herbert W; Lira, Sergio A; Levine, Beth

    2016-03-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system degrades viral oncoproteins and other microbial virulence factors; however, the role of endolysosomal degradation pathways in these processes is unclear. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, and a constitutively active viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) contributes to the pathogenesis of KSHV-induced tumors. We report that a recently discovered autophagy-related protein, Beclin 2, interacts with KSHV GPCR, facilitates its endolysosomal degradation, and inhibits vGPCR-driven oncogenic signaling. Furthermore, monoallelic loss of Becn2 in mice accelerates the progression of vGPCR-induced lesions that resemble human Kaposi's sarcoma. Taken together, these findings indicate that Beclin 2 is a host antiviral molecule that protects against the pathogenic effects of KSHV GPCR by facilitating its endolysosomal degradation. More broadly, our data suggest a role for host endolysosomal trafficking pathways in regulating viral pathogenesis and oncogenic signaling.

  12. Optimization of Salmonella enteritidis recombinant heat shock protein 60 production.

    PubMed

    Rainczak, K; Bajzert, J; Galli, J; Selera, A; Wieliczko, A; Borkowski, J; Stefaniak, T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to optimize conditions for producing Salmonella Enteritidis recombinant heat shock protein 60 (rHsp60). Seven Escherichia coli host strains (Rosetta, Turner, C41, C43, Origami, BL21pLys, Rosetta pLys) were transformed by a recombinant plasmid containing Hsp60 gene from Salmonella Enteritidis, and then cultured and induced by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The highest S. Enteritidis rHsp60 yield was obtained using E. coli strain C41. Induction of this strain using IPTG allowed the yield 400 microg of S. Enteritidis Hsp60 protein/2L of culture, but by autoinduction the yield exceeded 800 microg/2L.

  13. Effect of Acyclovir on Viral Protein Synthesis in Cells Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Phillip A.; McGuirt, Paul V.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the antiviral agent 9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)guanine (acyclovir) on herpes simplex virus type 1 protein synthesis during virus replication was examined. Treatment of infected cells with acyclovir markedly affected the amounts of the four major glycosylated and certain non-glycosylated viral polypeptides synthesized; other viral polypeptides were made in normal amounts. The reduced amount of late protein synthesis was most likely due to the inhibition of progeny viral DNA synthesis by acyclovir. Images PMID:6301368

  14. Visualizing viral protein structures in cells using genetic probes for correlated light and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ou, Horng D; Deerinck, Thomas J; Bushong, Eric; Ellisman, Mark H; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2015-11-15

    Structural studies of viral proteins most often use high-resolution techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, single particle negative stain, or cryo-electron microscopy (EM) to reveal atomic interactions of soluble, homogeneous viral proteins or viral protein complexes. Once viral proteins or complexes are separated from their host's cellular environment, their natural in situ structure and details of how they interact with other cellular components may be lost. EM has been an invaluable tool in virology since its introduction in the late 1940's and subsequent application to cells in the 1950's. EM studies have expanded our knowledge of viral entry, viral replication, alteration of cellular components, and viral lysis. Most of these early studies were focused on conspicuous morphological cellular changes, because classic EM metal stains were designed to highlight classes of cellular structures rather than specific molecular structures. Much later, to identify viral proteins inducing specific structural configurations at the cellular level, immunostaining with a primary antibody followed by colloidal gold secondary antibody was employed to mark the location of specific viral proteins. This technique can suffer from artifacts in cellular ultrastructure due to compromises required to provide access to the immuno-reagents. Immunolocalization methods also require the generation of highly specific antibodies, which may not be available for every viral protein. Here we discuss new methods to visualize viral proteins and structures at high resolutions in situ using correlated light and electron microscopy (CLEM). We discuss the use of genetically encoded protein fusions that oxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) into an osmiophilic polymer that can be visualized by EM. Detailed protocols for applying the genetically encoded photo-oxidizing protein MiniSOG to a viral protein, photo-oxidation of the fusion protein to yield DAB polymer staining, and

  15. Visualizing Viral Protein Structures in Cells Using Genetic Probes for Correlated Light and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Horng D.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Bushong, Eric; Ellisman, Mark H.; O’Shea, Clodagh C.

    2015-01-01

    Structural studies of viral proteins most often use high-resolution techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, single particle negative stain, or cryo-electron microscopy (EM) to reveal atomic interactions of soluble, homogeneous viral proteins or viral protein complexes. Once viral proteins or complexes are separated from their host’s cellular environment, their natural in-situ structure and details of how they interact with other cellular components may be lost. EM has been an invaluable tool in virology since its introduction in the late 1940’s and subsequent application to cells in the 1950’s. EM studies have expanded our knowledge of viral entry, viral replication, alteration of cellular components, and viral lysis. Most of these early studies were focused on conspicuous morphological cellular changes, because classic EM metal stains were designed to highlight classes of cellular structures rather than specific molecular structures. Much later, to identify viral proteins inducing specific structural configurations at the cellular level, immunostaining with a primary antibody followed by colloidal gold secondary antibody was employed to mark the location of specific viral proteins. This technique can suffer from artifacts in cellular ultrastructure due to compromises required to provide access to the immuno-reagents. Immunolocalization methods also require the generation of highly specific antibodies, which may not be available for every viral protein. Here we discuss new methods to visualize viral proteins and structures at high resolutions in-situ using correlated light and electron microscopy (CLEM). We discuss the use of genetically encoded protein fusions that oxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) into an osmiophilic polymer that can be visualized by EM. Detailed protocols for applying the genetically encoded photo-oxidizing protein MiniSOG to a viral protein, photo-oxidation of the fusion protein to yield DAB polymer staining

  16. Automated recombinant protein expression screening in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Busso, Didier; Stierlé, Matthieu; Thierry, Jean-Claude; Moras, Dino

    2008-01-01

    To fit the requirements of structural genomics programs, new as well as classical methods have been adapted to automation. This chapter describes the automated procedure developed within the Structural Biology and Genomics Platform, Strasbourg for performing recombinant protein expression screening in Escherichia coli. The procedure consists of parallel competent cells transformation, cell plating, and liquid culture inoculation, implemented for up to 96 samples at a time.

  17. A standardized framework for accurate, high-throughput genotyping of recombinant and non-recombinant viral sequences.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Junior; Cassol, Sharon; Libin, Pieter; Deforche, Koen; Pybus, Oliver G; Van Ranst, Marc; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2009-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), hepatitis B and C and other rapidly evolving viruses are characterized by extremely high levels of genetic diversity. To facilitate diagnosis and the development of prevention and treatment strategies that efficiently target the diversity of these viruses, and other pathogens such as human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), human herpes virus type-8 (HHV8) and human papillomavirus (HPV), we developed a rapid high-throughput-genotyping system. The method involves the alignment of a query sequence with a carefully selected set of pre-defined reference strains, followed by phylogenetic analysis of multiple overlapping segments of the alignment using a sliding window. Each segment of the query sequence is assigned the genotype and sub-genotype of the reference strain with the highest bootstrap (>70%) and bootscanning (>90%) scores. Results from all windows are combined and displayed graphically using color-coded genotypes. The new Virus-Genotyping Tools provide accurate classification of recombinant and non-recombinant viruses and are currently being assessed for their diagnostic utility. They have incorporated into several HIV drug resistance algorithms including the Stanford (http://hivdb.stanford.edu) and two European databases (http://www.umcutrecht.nl/subsite/spread-programme/ and http://www.hivrdb.org.uk/) and have been successfully used to genotype a large number of sequences in these and other databases. The tools are a PHP/JAVA web application and are freely accessible on a number of servers including: http://bioafrica.mrc.ac.za/rega-genotype/html/, http://lasp.cpqgm.fiocruz.br/virus-genotype/html/, http://jose.med.kuleuven.be/genotypetool/html/.

  18. Purification of recombinant nacre-associated mineralization protein AP7 fused with maltose-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Hsun-Hui; Mou, Yun; Chi, Peter; Chan, Jerry Chun Chung; Luo, Shih-Chi

    2014-08-01

    Formation of biominerals often involves specific proteins that modulate the process of matrix assembly, nucleation, and crystal growth. AP7 is an aragonite-associated protein of 7 kDa and is intrinsically disordered. The structural disorder of AP7 makes it very difficult to express in Escherchiacoli. In this work, we report the first successful expression and purification of recombinant AP7 using the maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion approach. We obtain a high-yield production of recombinant MBP-AP7 protein inE. coli (∼60 mg/L). We also establish an efficient protocol to remove the MBP fusion protein by Factor Xa, followed by purification using size-exclusion chromatography. Characterization of the recombinant AP7 protein has been carried out using MALDI-TOF, peptide mass fingerprinting, and circular dichroism (CD). The mass data confirm that the purified recombinant protein is AP7. The CD data suggest that the recombinant AP7 protein exists as partially disordered structure at neutral pH. The calcium carbonate precipitation assay shows that both MBP-AP7 and AP7 exhibit morphological modification on calcite crystallites. The co-precipitation of MBP-tagged AP7 derivatives and calcium carbonate generate different types of AP7 composite calcite and vaterite crystals. This system should be helpful to establish a model for understanding the structure/function relationship between the protein and inorganic mineral interaction.

  19. A Family of Plasmodesmal Proteins with Receptor-Like Properties for Plant Viral Movement Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Keichinger, Corinne; Fernandez-Calvino, Lourdes; Didier, Pascal; Lerich, Alexander; Mutterer, Jérome; Thomas, Carole L.; Heinlein, Manfred; Mély, Yves; Maule, Andrew J.; Ritzenthaler, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are essential but poorly understood structures in plant cell walls that provide symplastic continuity and intercellular communication pathways between adjacent cells and thus play fundamental roles in development and pathogenesis. Viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) that modify these tightly regulated pores to facilitate their spread from cell to cell. The most striking of these modifications is observed for groups of viruses whose MPs form tubules that assemble in PDs and through which virions are transported to neighbouring cells. The nature of the molecular interactions between viral MPs and PD components and their role in viral movement has remained essentially unknown. Here, we show that the family of PD-located proteins (PDLPs) promotes the movement of viruses that use tubule-guided movement by interacting redundantly with tubule-forming MPs within PDs. Genetic disruption of this interaction leads to reduced tubule formation, delayed infection and attenuated symptoms. Our results implicate PDLPs as PD proteins with receptor-like properties involved the assembly of viral MPs into tubules to promote viral movement. PMID:20886105

  20. A family of plasmodesmal proteins with receptor-like properties for plant viral movement proteins.

    PubMed

    Amari, Khalid; Boutant, Emmanuel; Hofmann, Christina; Schmitt-Keichinger, Corinne; Fernandez-Calvino, Lourdes; Didier, Pascal; Lerich, Alexander; Mutterer, Jérome; Thomas, Carole L; Heinlein, Manfred; Mély, Yves; Maule, Andrew J; Ritzenthaler, Christophe

    2010-09-23

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are essential but poorly understood structures in plant cell walls that provide symplastic continuity and intercellular communication pathways between adjacent cells and thus play fundamental roles in development and pathogenesis. Viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) that modify these tightly regulated pores to facilitate their spread from cell to cell. The most striking of these modifications is observed for groups of viruses whose MPs form tubules that assemble in PDs and through which virions are transported to neighbouring cells. The nature of the molecular interactions between viral MPs and PD components and their role in viral movement has remained essentially unknown. Here, we show that the family of PD-located proteins (PDLPs) promotes the movement of viruses that use tubule-guided movement by interacting redundantly with tubule-forming MPs within PDs. Genetic disruption of this interaction leads to reduced tubule formation, delayed infection and attenuated symptoms. Our results implicate PDLPs as PD proteins with receptor-like properties involved the assembly of viral MPs into tubules to promote viral movement.

  1. Annexin II binds to capsid protein VP1 of enterovirus 71 and enhances viral infectivity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Lin; Chou, Ying-Ting; Wu, Cheng-Nan; Ho, Mei-Shang

    2011-11-01

    Enterovirus type 71 (EV71) causes hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), which is mostly self-limited but may be complicated with a severe to fatal neurological syndrome in some children. Understanding the molecular basis of virus-host interactions might help clarify the largely unknown neuropathogenic mechanisms of EV71. In this study, we showed that human annexin II (Anx2) protein could bind to the EV71 virion via the capsid protein VP1. Either pretreatment of EV71 with soluble recombinant Anx2 or pretreatment of host cells with an anti-Anx2 antibody could result in reduced viral attachment to the cell surface and a reduction of the subsequent virus yield in vitro. HepG2 cells, which do not express Anx2, remained permissive to EV71 infection, though the virus yield was lower than that for a cognate lineage expressing Anx2. Stable transfection of plasmids expressing Anx2 protein into HepG2 cells (HepG2-Anx2 cells) could enhance EV71 infectivity, with an increased virus yield, especially at a low infective dose, and the enhanced infectivity could be reversed by pretreating HepG2-Anx2 cells with an anti-Anx2 antibody. The Anx2-interacting domain was mapped by yeast two-hybrid analysis to VP1 amino acids 40 to 100, a region different from the known receptor binding domain on the surface of the picornavirus virion. Our data suggest that binding of EV71 to Anx2 on the cell surface can enhance viral entry and infectivity, especially at a low infective dose.

  2. Arabinosylation of recombinant human immunoglobulin-based protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hossler, Patrick; Chumsae, Christopher; Racicot, Christopher; Ouellette, David; Ibraghimov, Alexander; Serna, Daniel; Mora, Alessandro; McDermott, Sean; Labkovsky, Boris; Scesney, Susanne; Grinnell, Christine; Preston, Gregory; Bose, Sahana; Carrillo, Ralf

    Protein glycosylation is arguably the paramount post-translational modification on recombinant glycoproteins, and highly cited in the literature for affecting the physiochemical properties and the efficacy of recombinant glycoprotein therapeutics. Glycosylation of human immunoglobulins follows a reasonably well-understood metabolic pathway, which gives rise to a diverse range of asparagine-linked (N-linked), or serine/threonine-linked (O-linked) glycans. In N-linked glycans, fucose levels have been shown to have an inverse relationship with the degree of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and high mannose levels have been implicated in potentially increasing immunogenicity and contributing to less favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Here, we demonstrate a novel approach to potentially reduce the presence of high-mannose species in recombinant human immunoglobulin preparations, as well as facilitate an approximate 100% replacement of fucosylation with arabinosylation in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture through media supplementation with D-arabinose, an uncommonly used mammalian cell culture sugar substrate. The replacement of fucose with arabinose was very effective and practical to implement, since no cell line engineering or cellular adaptation strategies were required. Arabinosylated recombinant IgGs and the accompanying reduction in high mannose glycans, facilitated a reduction in dendritic cell uptake, increased FcγRIIIa signaling, and significantly increased the levels of ADCC. These aforementioned effects were without any adverse changes to various structural or functional attributes of multiple recombinant human antibodies and a bispecific DVD-Ig. Protein arabinosylation represents an expansion of the N-glycan code in mammalian expressed glycoproteins.

  3. The production of recombinant proteins in transgenic barley grains.

    PubMed

    Horvath, H; Huang, J; Wong, O; Kohl, E; Okita, T; Kannangara, C G; von Wettstein, D

    2000-02-15

    The grain of the self-pollinating diploid barley species offers two modes of producing recombinant enzymes or other proteins. One uses the promoters of genes with aleurone-specific expression during germination and the signal peptide code for export of the protein into the endosperm. The other uses promoters of the structural genes for storage proteins deposited in the developing endosperm. Production of a protein-engineered thermotolerant (1, 3-1, 4)-beta-glucanase with the D hordein gene (Hor3-1) promoter during endosperm development was analyzed in transgenic plants with four different constructs. High expression of the enzyme and its activity in the endosperm of the mature grain required codon optimization to a C+G content of 63% and synthesis as a precursor with a signal peptide for transport through the endoplasmic reticulum and targeting into the storage vacuoles. Synthesis of the recombinant enzyme in the aleurone of germinating transgenic grain with an alpha-amylase promoter and the code for the export signal peptide yielded approximately 1 microgram small middle dotmg(-1) soluble protein, whereas 54 microgram small middle dotmg(-1) soluble protein was produced on average in the maturing grain of 10 transgenic lines with the vector containing the gene for the (1, 3-1, 4)-beta-glucanase under the control of the Hor3-1 promoter.

  4. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors as therapeutic tools for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, T; Graham, I R; Foster, H; Dickson, G

    2004-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal genetic muscle disorder caused by recessive mutations in the dystrophin gene. The size of the gene (2.4 Mb) and mRNA (14 kb) in addition to immunogenicity problems and inefficient transduction of mature myofibres by currently available vector systems are formidable obstacles to the development of efficient gene therapy approaches. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors overcome many of the problems associated with other vector systems (nonpathogenicity and minimal immunogenicity, extensive cell and tissue tropism) but accommodate limited transgene capacity (<5 kb). As a result of these observations, a number of laboratories worldwide have engineered a series of microdystrophin cDNAs based on genotype-phenotype relationship in Duchenne (DMD) and Becker (BMD) dystrophic patients, and transgenic studies in mdx mice. Recent progress in characterization of AAV serotypes from various species has demonstrated that alternative AAV serotypes are far more efficient in transducing muscle than the traditionally used AAV2. This article summarizes the current progress in the field of recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) delivery for DMD, including optimization of recombinant AAV-microdystrophin vector systems/cassettes targeting the skeletal and cardiac musculature.

  5. Manufacturing process used to produce long-acting recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein.

    PubMed

    McCue, Justin; Kshirsagar, Rashmi; Selvitelli, Keith; Lu, Qi; Zhang, Mingxuan; Mei, Baisong; Peters, Robert; Pierce, Glenn F; Dumont, Jennifer; Raso, Stephen; Reichert, Heidi

    2015-07-01

    Recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc) is a long-acting coagulation factor approved for the treatment of hemophilia A. Here, the rFVIIIFc manufacturing process and results of studies evaluating product quality and the capacity of the process to remove potential impurities and viruses are described. This manufacturing process utilized readily transferable and scalable unit operations and employed multi-step purification and viral clearance processing, including a novel affinity chromatography adsorbent and a 15 nm pore size virus removal nanofilter. A cell line derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293H cells was used to produce rFVIIIFc. Validation studies evaluated identity, purity, activity, and safety. Process-related impurity clearance and viral clearance spiking studies demonstrate robust and reproducible removal of impurities and viruses, with total viral clearance >8-15 log10 for four model viruses (xenotropic murine leukemia virus, mice minute virus, reovirus type 3, and suid herpes virus 1). Terminal galactose-α-1,3-galactose and N-glycolylneuraminic acid, two non-human glycans, were undetectable in rFVIIIFc. Biochemical and in vitro biological analyses confirmed the purity, activity, and consistency of rFVIIIFc. In conclusion, this manufacturing process produces a highly pure product free of viruses, impurities, and non-human glycan structures, with scale capabilities to ensure a consistent and adequate supply of rFVIIIFc. Copyright © 2015 Biogen. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Systems Biology of Recombinant Protein Production in Bacillus megaterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedendieck, Rebekka; Bunk, Boyke; Fürch, Tobias; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter

    Over the last two decades the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium was systematically developed to a useful alternative protein production host. Multiple vector systems for high yield intra- and extracellular protein production were constructed. Strong inducible promoters were combined with DNA sequences for optimised ribosome binding sites, various leader peptides for protein export and N- as well as C-terminal affinity tags for affinity chromatographic purification of the desired protein. High cell density cultivation and recombinant protein production were successfully tested. For further system biology based control and optimisation of the production process the genomes of two B. megaterium strains were completely elucidated, DNA arrays designed, proteome, fluxome and metabolome analyses performed and all data integrated using the bioinformatics platform MEGABAC. Now, solid theoretical and experimental bases for primary modeling attempts of the production process are available.

  7. Targeted Killing of Virally Infected Cells by Radiolabeled Antibodies to Viral Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dadachova, Ekaterina; Patel, Mahesh C; Toussi, Sima; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Brechbiel, Martin W; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Casadevall, Arturo; Goldstein, Harris

    2006-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic is a major threat to health in the developing and western worlds. A modality that targets and kills HIV-1-infected cells could have a major impact on the treatment of acute exposure and the elimination of persistent reservoirs of infected cells. The aim of this proof-of-principle study was to demonstrate the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy of targeting and eliminating HIV-1-infected cells with radiolabeled antibodies specific to viral proteins in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Findings Antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 labeled with radioisotopes bismuth 213 (213Bi) and rhenium 188 (188Re) selectively killed chronically HIV-1-infected human T cells and acutely HIV-1-infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) in vitro. Treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice harboring HIV-1-infected hPBMCs in their spleens with a 213Bi- or 188Re-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) to gp41 resulted in a 57% injected dose per gram uptake of radiolabeled mAb in the infected spleens and in a greater than 99% elimination of HIV-1-infected cells in a dose-dependent manner. The number of HIV-1-infected thymocytes decreased 2.5-fold in the human thymic implant grafts of SCID mice treated with the 188Re-labeled antibody to gp41 compared with those treated with the 188Re-control mAb. The treatment did not cause acute hematologic toxicity in the treated mice. Conclusions The current study demonstrates the effectiveness of HIV-targeted radioimmunotherapy and may provide a novel treatment option in combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy for the eradication of HIV. PMID:17090209

  8. Viral interference with DNA repair by targeting of the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pubali; DeJesus, Rowena; Gjoerup, Ole; Schaffhausen, Brian S

    2013-10-01

    Correct repair of damaged DNA is critical for genomic integrity. Deficiencies in DNA repair are linked with human cancer. Here we report a novel mechanism by which a virus manipulates DNA damage responses. Infection with murine polyomavirus sensitizes cells to DNA damage by UV and etoposide. Polyomavirus large T antigen (LT) alone is sufficient to sensitize cells 100 fold to UV and other kinds of DNA damage. This results in activated stress responses and apoptosis. Genetic analysis shows that LT sensitizes via the binding of its origin-binding domain (OBD) to the single-stranded DNA binding protein replication protein A (RPA). Overexpression of RPA protects cells expressing OBD from damage, and knockdown of RPA mimics the LT phenotype. LT prevents recruitment of RPA to nuclear foci after DNA damage. This leads to failure to recruit repair proteins such as Rad51 or Rad9, explaining why LT prevents repair of double strand DNA breaks by homologous recombination. A targeted intervention directed at RPA based on this viral mechanism could be useful in circumventing the resistance of cancer cells to therapy.

  9. Adenovirus protein IX sequesters host-cell promyelocytic leukaemia protein and contributes to efficient viral proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Lutz, Pierre; Dreyer, Dominique; De Thé, Hugues; Chatton, Bruno; Kedinger, Claude

    2003-01-01

    The product of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) gene IX, protein IX (pIX), is a multifunctional protein that stabilizes the viral capsid and has transcriptional activity. We show that pIX also contributes to the Ad5-induced reorganization of the host-cell nuclear ultrastructure: pIX induces the formation of specific and dynamic nuclear inclusions, and the host promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein, which is the main structural organizer of PML bodies, is stably relocated and confined within the pIX-induced inclusions late in infection. Our results suggest that Ad5 has evolved a unique strategy that leads to the sustained neutralization of PML bodies throughout infection, thereby ensuring optimal viral proliferation. PMID:14528266

  10. Adenovirus protein IX sequesters host-cell promyelocytic leukaemia protein and contributes to efficient viral proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Lutz, Pierre; Dreyer, Dominique; de Thé, Hugues; Chatton, Bruno; Kedinger, Claude

    2003-10-01

    The product of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) gene IX, protein IX (pIX), is a multifunctional protein that stabilizes the viral capsid and has transcriptional activity. We show that pIX also contributes to the Ad5-induced reorganization of the host-cell nuclear ultrastructure: pIX induces the formation of specific and dynamic nuclear inclusions, and the host promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein, which is the main structural organizer of PML bodies, is stably relocated and confined within the pIX-induced inclusions late in infection. Our results suggest that Ad5 has evolved a unique strategy that leads to the sustained neutralization of PML bodies throughout infection, thereby ensuring optimal viral proliferation.

  11. Purification of secreted recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Le, H V; Trotta, P P

    1991-01-01

    Secretion systems engineered for the expression of heterologous protein in E. coli provide several advantages for subsequent isolation of purified product. Proteins released from the periplasmic space, which represent a small fraction (i.e., 4-10%) of total cell protein, can readily be separated from other cellular proteins by centrifugation of the remaining cellular debris or cross-flow ultrafiltration. The starting material derived from secretion systems is generally of higher purity than comparable material produced from strains expressing cytoplasmically for systems exhibiting similar expression levels. The available evidence suggests that recombinant proteins derived from the periplasm are generally, but not always (44-46), soluble in a nonaggregated form. Consequently, simple purification protocols can be effectively employed for producing homogeneous product with a high yield. The majority of the secreted recombinant proteins reviewed in this chapter were purified by simple one- or two-step chromatography procedures. High-resolution techniques such as reversed phase HPLC were found necessary only in cases where the secreted polypeptides were contaminated with proteolytic degradation variants, e.g., hirudin (51) and beta-endorphin (22). The fact that a high level of biological activity has been shown to be characteristic of purified recombinant proteins secreted into the periplasmic space suggests the presence of a native conformation stabilized by the expected disulfide linkages. Intramolecular disulfide bonds most probably form either as the polypeptide is translocated through the cytoplasmic membrane into the periplasm or within the periplasmic compartment, which has a higher oxidation potential than that found in the cytoplasm (57). Studies performed with hGH (31) and muIL-2 (35) provide excellent examples of differences observed in protein folding and disulfide bond formation between heterologous proteins expressed in the cytoplasmic and periplasmic

  12. Recombination Proteins Mediate Meiotic Spatial Chromosome Organization and Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Storlazzi, Aurora; Gargano, Silvana; Ruprich-Robert, Gwenael; Falque, Matthieu; David, Michelle; Kleckner, Nancy; Zickler, Denise

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Meiotic chromosome pairing involves not only recognition of homology but also juxtaposition of entire chromosomes in a topologically regular way. Analysis of filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora reveals that recombination proteins Mer3, Msh4 and Mlh1 play direct roles in all of these aspects, in advance of their known roles in recombination. Absence of Mer3 helicase results in interwoven chromosomes, thereby revealing the existence of features that specifically ensure “entanglement avoidance”. Entanglements that remain at zygotene, i.e. “interlockings”, require Mlh1 for resolution, likely to eliminate constraining recombinational connections. Patterns of Mer3 and Msh4 foci along aligned chromosomes show that the double-strand breaks mediating homologous alignment have spatially separated ends, one localized to each partner axis, and that pairing involves interference among developing interhomolog interactions. We propose that Mer3, Msh4 and Mlh1 execute all of these roles during pairing by modulating the state of nascent double-strand break/partner DNA contacts within axis-associated recombination complexes. PMID:20371348

  13. Recombinant VSV G proteins reveal a novel raft-dependent endocytic pathway in resorbing osteoclasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mulari, Mika T.K. Nars, Martin; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Kaisto, Tuula; Metsikkoe, Kalervo; Sun Yi; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo

    2008-05-01

    Transcytotic membrane flow delivers degraded bone fragments from the ruffled border to the functional secretory domain, FSD, in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Here we show that there is also a FSD-to-ruffled border trafficking pathway that compensates for the membrane loss during the matrix uptake process and that rafts are essential for this ruffled border-targeted endosomal pathway. Replacing the cytoplasmic tail of the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein with that of CD4 resulted in partial insolubility in Triton X-100 and retargeting from the peripheral non-bone facing plasma membrane to the FSD. Recombinant G proteins were subsequently endosytosed and delivered from the FSD to the peripheral fusion zone of the ruffled border, which were both rich in lipid rafts as suggested by viral protein transport analysis and visualizing the rafts with fluorescent recombinant cholera toxin. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin impaired the ruffled border-targeted vesicle trafficking pathway and inhibited bone resorption dose-dependently as quantified by measuring the CTX and TRACP 5b secreted to the culture medium and by measuring the resorbed area visualized with a bi-phasic labeling method using sulpho-NHS-biotin and WGA-lectin. Thus, rafts are vital for membrane recycling from the FSD to the late endosomal/lysosomal ruffled border and bone resorption.

  14. Enhancing recombinant protein quality and yield by protein stability profiling.

    PubMed

    Mezzasalma, Tara M; Kranz, James K; Chan, Winnie; Struble, Geoffrey T; Schalk-Hihi, Céline; Deckman, Ingrid C; Springer, Barry A; Todd, Matthew J

    2007-04-01

    The reliable production of large amounts of stable, high-quality proteins is a major challenge facing pharmaceutical protein biochemists, necessary for fulfilling demands from structural biology, for high-throughput screening, and for assay purposes throughout early discovery. One strategy for bypassing purification challenges in problematic systems is to engineer multiple forms of a particular protein to optimize expression, purification, and stability, often resulting in a nonphysiological sub-domain. An alternative strategy is to alter process conditions to maximize wild-type construct stability, based on a specific protein stability profile (PSP). ThermoFluor, a miniaturized 384-well thermal stability assay, has been implemented as a means of monitoring solution-dependent changes in protein stability, complementing the protein engineering and purification processes. A systematic analysis of pH, buffer or salt identity and concentration, biological metals, surfactants, and common excipients in terms of an effect on protein stability rapidly identifies conditions that might be used (or avoided) during protein production. Two PSPs are presented for the kinase catalytic domains of Akt-3 and cFMS, in which information derived from a ThermoFluor PSP led to an altered purification strategy, improving the yield and quality of the protein using the primary sequences of the catalytic domains.

  15. Development of recombinant nucleocapsid protein based IgM-ELISA for the early detection of distemper infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Latha, D; Geetha, M; Ramadass, P; Narayanan, R B

    2007-10-15

    An IgM-ELISA based on a 16-kDa recombinant protein produced for the conserved and functional middle region of nucleocapsid protein of Canine distemper virus was developed. Out of 70 serum samples from distemper-suspected and vaccinated dogs analyzed, 34 serum samples (49%) were positive. The specificity of this ELISA was confirmed by blocking and adsorption experiments. The IgM-ELISA based on the recombinant nucleocapsid protein showed a strong correlation (r=0.857, p<0.0001 at 95% CI) and good agreement (kappa=0.714) with the conventional Vero cell culture distemper antigen based IgM-ELISA. The percent positivity was more in dogs with systemic signs (62%) by recombinant nucleocapsid protein IgM-ELISA. Out of 70 clinical serum samples, 69 samples were used along with 4 control sera used in the IgM-ELISA for the detection of viral RNA by Slot blot hybridization and 26 of them (36%) were positive. Fifty-one percent agreement was observed between the recombinant nucleocapsid protein IgM-ELISA and Slot blot hybridization. The analysis of clinical history of the dogs with systemic signs supported the application of IgM-ELISA over Slot blot hybridization in the early detection of distemper infection.

  16. Systems biology of recombinant protein production using Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Biedendieck, Rebekka; Borgmeier, Claudia; Bunk, Boyke; Stammen, Simon; Scherling, Christian; Meinhardt, Friedhelm; Wittmann, Christoph; Jahn, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli is the most widely used production host for recombinant proteins in both academia and industry. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium represents an increasingly used alternative for high yield intra- and extracellular protein synthesis. During the past two decades, multiple tools including gene expression plasmids and production strains have been developed. Introduction of free replicating and integrative plasmids into B. megaterium is possible via protoplasts transformation or transconjugation. Using His(6)- and StrepII affinity tags, the intra- or extracellular produced proteins can easily be purified in one-step procedures. Different gene expression systems based on the xylose controlled promoter P(xylA) and various phage RNA polymerase (T7, SP6, K1E) driven systems enable B. megaterium to produce up to 1.25g of recombinant protein per liter. Biomass concentrations of up to 80g/l can be achieved by high cell density cultivations in bioreactors. Gene knockouts and gene replacements in B. megaterium are possible via an optimized gene disruption system. For a safe application in industry, sporulation and protease-deficient as well as UV-sensitive mutants are available. With the help of the recently published B. megaterium genome sequence, it is possible to characterize bottle necks in the protein production process via systems biology approaches based on transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome data. The bioinformatical platform (Megabac, http://www.megabac.tu-bs.de) integrates obtained theoretical and experimental data.

  17. ELISA for brucellosis detection based on three Brucella recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Thepsuriyanont, Pikun; Intarapuk, Apiradee; Chanket, Panita; Tunyong, Wittawat; Kalambaheti, Thareerat

    2014-01-01

    Control of brucellosis among farm animals, wildlife and humans require reliable diagnosis. Rose Bengal serological test (RBT) is based on lipopolysaccharide antigen of Brucella, which may cross react with other gram-negative bacteria and produce false positive result. Immunoreactive proteins, such as outer-membrane protein BP26, ribosome recycling factor protein CP24 and Brucella lumazine synthase (BLS), previously reported to be recognized by infected sheep sera, were selected for production of recombinant proteins for use in an ELISA in order to investigate immune response among goats and cows, in comparison with commercial RBT. Cut-off value for ELISA was based on the immune response of in vitro fertilized goats and cows. Goats positive for Brucella culture or by RBT were ELISA positive for either IgG or IgM against at least one recombinant protein. For animals with negative RBT, animals with positive ELISA could be detected, and 61.6% possessed ELISA values as high as in infected animals. Thus, this ELISA procedure is proposed as an alternative to RBT for screening of brucellosis in farm animals.

  18. Variability in the Immunodetection of His-tagged Recombinant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Debeljak, Nataša; Feldman, Laurie; Davis, Kerry L.; Komel, Radovan; Sytkowski, Arthur J.

    2006-01-01

    Labeling of recombinant proteins with polypeptide fusion partners, or affinity tagging, is a useful method to facilitate subsequent protein purification and detection. Poly-histidine tags (His-tags) are among the most commonly used affinity tags. We report strikingly variable immunodetection of two His-tagged recombinant human erythropoietins (Epo), wild type Epo (Epowt) and Epo containing an R103A mutation (EpoR103A). Both were engineered to contain a C-terminal six residue His-tag. The cDNA constructs were stably transfected into CHO cells and COS-7 cells. Clones from the CHO cell transfections were selected for further characterization and larger-scale protein expression. Three chromatographic steps were utilized to achieve pharmacologically pure Epo. Conditioned media from the Epo-expressing cell lines and protein-containing samples from each step of purification were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and dot blot, using both monoclonal anti-human Epo antibody (AE7A5) and anti-His antibodies. While the successful incorporation of the His-tag into our constructs was confirmed by Epo binding to Ni2+-NTA resin and by μLC/MS/MS amino acid sequencing, the levels of immunodetection of His-tagged protein varied markedly depending on the particular anti His-tag antibody used. Such variability in His-tag immunorecognition can lead to critical adverse effects on several analytical methods. PMID:17081490

  19. Going against the Tide: Selective Cellular Protein Synthesis during Virally Induced Host Shutoff.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shuai; Dhungel, Pragyesh; Yang, Zhilong

    2017-09-01

    Many viral infections cause host shutoff, a state in which host protein synthesis is globally inhibited. Emerging evidence from vaccinia and influenza A virus infections indicates that subsets of cellular proteins are resistant to host shutoff and continue to be synthesized. Remarkably, the proteins of oxidative phosphorylation, the cellular-energy-generating machinery, are selectively synthesized in both cases. Identifying mechanisms that drive selective protein synthesis should facilitate understanding both viral replication and fundamental cell biology. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. A potyvirus vector efficiently targets recombinant proteins to chloroplasts, mitochondria and nuclei in plant cells when expressed at the amino terminus of the polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Majer, Eszter; Navarro, José-Antonio; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Plant virus-based expression systems allow quick and efficient production of recombinant proteins in plant biofactories. Among them, a system derived from tobacco etch virus (TEV; genus potyvirus) permits coexpression of equimolar amounts of several recombinant proteins. This work analyzed how to target recombinant proteins to different subcellular localizations in the plant cell using this system. We constructed TEV clones in which green fluorescent protein (GFP), with a chloroplast transit peptide (cTP), a nuclear localization signal (NLS) or a mitochondrial targeting peptide (mTP) was expressed either as the most amino-terminal product or embedded in the viral polyprotein. Results showed that cTP and mTP mediated efficient translocation of GFP to the corresponding organelle only when present at the amino terminus of the viral polyprotein. In contrast, the NLS worked efficiently at both positions. Viruses expressing GFP in the amino terminus of the viral polyprotein produced milder symptoms. Untagged GFPs and cTP and NLS tagged amino-terminal GFPs accumulated to higher amounts in infected tissues. Finally, viral progeny from clones with internal GFPs maintained the extra gene better. These observations will help in the design of potyvirus-based vectors able to coexpress several proteins while targeting different subcellular localizations, as required in plant metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Cloning, expression and characterization of potential immunogenic recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Romero, Julieta Sandra; Rivera-Benítez, José Francisco; Hernández-Baumgarten, Eliseo; Hernández-Jaúregui, Pablo; Vega, Marco; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Berg, Mikael; Baule, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Blue eye disease caused by Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) is an endemic viral infection of swine causing neurological and respiratory disease in piglets, and reproductive failure in sows and boars. The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein of PorPV is the most abundant component in the viral envelope and the main target of the immune response in infected animals. In this study, we expressed the HN-PorPV-recombinant (rHN-PorPV) protein in an Escherichia coli system and analyzed the immune responses in mice. The HN gene was cloned from the reference strain PorPV-La Piedad Michoacan Virus (GenBank accession number BK005918), into the pDual expression vector. The expressed protein was identified at a molecular weight of 61.7 kDa. Three-dimensional modeling showed that the main conformational and functional domains of the rHN-PorPV protein were preserved. The antigenicity of the expressed protein was confirmed by Western blot with a monoclonal antibody recognizing the HN, and by testing against serum samples from pigs experimentally infected with PorPV. The immunogenicity of the rHN-PorPV protein was tested by inoculation of BALB/c mice with AbISCO-100(®) as adjuvant. Analysis of the humoral immune responses in mice showed an increased level of specific antibodies 14 days after the first immunization, compared to the control group (P < 0.0005). The results show the ability of the rHN-PorPV protein to induce an antibody response in mice. Due to its immunogenic potential, the rHN-PorPV protein will be further evaluated in pig trials for its suitability for prevention and control of blue eye disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The roles of host factors in tombusvirus RNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    RNA viruses are the champions of evolution due to high frequency mutations and genetic recombination occurring during virus replication. These genetic events are due to the error-prone nature of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp). Recently emerging models on viral RNA recombination, however, also include key roles for host and environmental factors. Accordingly, genome-wide screens and global proteomics approaches with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) as a model host have identified 38 host proteins affecting viral RNA recombination. Follow-up studies have identified key host proteins and cellular pathways involved in TBSV RNA recombination. In addition, environmental factors, such as salt stress, have been shown to affect TBSV recombination via influencing key host or viral factors involved in the recombination process. These advances will help build more accurate models on viral recombination, evolution, and adaptation.

  3. Graphical representation and mathematical characterization of protein sequences and applications to viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ambarnil; Nandy, Ashesh

    2011-01-01

    Graphical representation and numerical characterization (GRANCH) of nucleotide and protein sequences is a new field that is showing a lot of promise in analysis of such sequences. While formulation and applications of GRANCH techniques for DNA/RNA sequences started just over a decade ago, analyses of protein sequences by these techniques are of more recent origin. The emphasis is still on developing the underlying technique, but significant results have been achieved in using these methods for protein phylogeny, mass spectral data of proteins and protein serum profiles in parasites, toxicoproteomics, determination of different indices for use in QSAR studies, among others. We briefly mention these in this chapter, with some details on protein phylogeny and viral diseases. In particular, we cover a systematic method developed in GRANCH to determine conserved surface exposed peptide segments in selected viral proteins that can be used for drug and vaccine targeting. The new GRANCH techniques and applications for DNAs and proteins are covered briefly to provide an overview to this nascent field.

  4. Generation of a recombinant viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) expressing olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) interferon-γ and its effects on type I interferon response and virulence.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jun Soung; Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Ki Hong

    2017-09-01

    Rhabdoviruses including viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) are highly susceptible to type I interferon (IFN) responses, and IFN-γ that is belonging to the type II IFN has been known to enhance type I IFN responses in mammals. In this study, we generated a recombinant VHSV that can express olive flounder IFN-γ (rVHSV-A-IFNγ) using reverse genetics technology, and analyzed the effect of rVHSV-A-IFNγ infection on type I IFN response in Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells. Furthermore, the virulence of rVHSV-A-IFNγ was evaluated by infection to olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). Using a recombinant VHSV full genome vector in which the olive flounder IFN-γ ORF was inserted between N and P genes, rVHSV-A-IFNγ was successfully rescued, and the recombinant virus was grown well in EPC cells. On the other hand, the growth of rVHSV-A-IFNγ rescued from EPC cells was severely retarded when infected into hirame natural embryo (HINAE) cells that were originated from olive flounder. These results indicate that the EPC cell's IFN-γ receptor could not bind to olive flounder IFN-γ, but the species-specific binding of IFN-γ in HINAE cells induced antiviral responses. The expression of Mx1 gene in EPC cells infected with rVHSV-A-IFNγ was not greatly different from cells infected with rVHSV-Arfp (a recombinant VHSV harboring red fluorescent protein gene between N and P genes of the genome), however, in HINAE cells, rVHSV-A-IFNγ infection induced distinctively higher Mx1 gene expression compared to other recombinant viruses. These results suggest that olive flounder IFN-γ produced from rVHSV-A-IFNγ effectively enhanced type I IFN response in HINAE cells. In the present study, the lowest mortality of olive flounder fingerlings was recorded in the group of fish challenged with rVHSV-A-IFNγ, suggesting that the recombinant VHSV was attenuated by production of IFN-γ by itself. However, although rVHSV-A-IFNγ induced significantly lower mortality, the

  5. Chemotherapy targeting by DNA capture in viral protein particles

    PubMed Central

    Agadjanian, Hasmik; Chu, David; Hwang, Jae Youn; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Rentsendorj, Altan; Song, Lei; Valluripalli, Vinod; Lubow, Jay; Ma, Jun; Sharifi, Behrooz; Farkas, Daniel L; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K

    2012-01-01

    Aim This study tests the hypothesis that DNA intercalation and electrophilic interactions can be exploited to noncovalently assemble doxorubicin in a viral protein nanoparticle designed to target and penetrate tumor cells through ligand-directed delivery. We further test whether this new paradigm of doxorubicin targeting shows therapeutic efficacy and safety in vitro and in vivo. Materials & methods We tested serum stability, tumor targeting and therapeutic efficacy in vitro and in vivo using biochemical, microscopy and cytotoxicity assays. Results Self-assembly formed approximately 10-nm diameter serum-stable nanoparticles that can target and ablate HER2+ tumors at >10× lower dose compared with untargeted doxorubicin, while sparing the heart after intravenous delivery. The targeted nanoparticle tested here allows doxorubicin potency to remain unaltered during assembly, transport and release into target cells, while avoiding peripheral tissue damage and enabling lower, and thus safer, drug dose for tumor killing. Conclusion This nanoparticle may be an improved alternative to chemical conjugates and signal-blocking antibodies for tumor-targeted treatment. PMID:22385197

  6. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  7. Metabolic engineering of recombinant protein secretion by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jin; Tyo, Keith E J; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used cell factory for the production of fuels and chemicals, and it is also provides a platform for the production of many heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. Therefore, many studies have focused on metabolic engineering S. cerevisiae to improve the recombinant protein production, and with the development of systems biology, it is interesting to see how this approach can be applied both to gain further insight into protein production and secretion and to further engineer the cell for improved production of valuable proteins. In this review, the protein post-translational modification such as folding, trafficking, and secretion, steps that are traditionally studied in isolation will here be described in the context of the whole system of protein secretion. Furthermore, examples of engineering secretion pathways, high-throughput screening and systems biology applications of studying protein production and secretion are also given to show how the protein production can be improved by different approaches. The objective of the review is to describe individual biological processes in the context of the larger, complex protein synthesis network.

  8. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals.

    PubMed

    Avgousti, Daphne C; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J; Reyes, Emigdio D; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H; Worthen, G Scott; Black, Ben E; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-07-07

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important part in innate immune responses. Viral-encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes, but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles, it is unknown whether protein VII affects cellular chromatin. Here we show that protein VII alters cellular chromatin, leading us to hypothesize that this has an impact on antiviral responses during adenovirus infection in human cells. We find that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter the protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in the chromatin of members of the high-mobility-group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2 and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together, our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling.

  9. A core viral protein binds host nucleosomes to sequester immune danger signals

    PubMed Central

    Avgousti, Daphne C.; Herrmann, Christin; Kulej, Katarzyna; Pancholi, Neha J.; Sekulic, Nikolina; Petrescu, Joana; Molden, Rosalynn C.; Blumenthal, Daniel; Paris, Andrew J.; Reyes, Emigdio D.; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Hearing, Patrick; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Worthen, G. Scott; Black, Ben E.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Weitzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Viral proteins mimic host protein structure and function to redirect cellular processes and subvert innate defenses1. Small basic proteins compact and regulate both viral and cellular DNA genomes. Nucleosomes are the repeating units of cellular chromatin and play an important role in innate immune responses2. Viral encoded core basic proteins compact viral genomes but their impact on host chromatin structure and function remains unexplored. Adenoviruses encode a highly basic protein called protein VII that resembles cellular histones3. Although protein VII binds viral DNA and is incorporated with viral genomes into virus particles4,5, it is unknown whether protein VII impacts cellular chromatin. Our observation that protein VII alters cellular chromatin led us to hypothesize that this impacts antiviral responses during adenovirus infection. We found that protein VII forms complexes with nucleosomes and limits DNA accessibility. We identified post-translational modifications on protein VII that are responsible for chromatin localization. Furthermore, proteomic analysis demonstrated that protein VII is sufficient to alter protein composition of host chromatin. We found that protein VII is necessary and sufficient for retention in chromatin of members of the high-mobility group protein B family (HMGB1, HMGB2, and HMGB3). HMGB1 is actively released in response to inflammatory stimuli and functions as a danger signal to activate immune responses6,7. We showed that protein VII can directly bind HMGB1 in vitro and further demonstrated that protein VII expression in mouse lungs is sufficient to decrease inflammation-induced HMGB1 content and neutrophil recruitment in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Together our in vitro and in vivo results show that protein VII sequesters HMGB1 and can prevent its release. This study uncovers a viral strategy in which nucleosome binding is exploited to control extracellular immune signaling. PMID:27362237

  10. Identification of Essential Genetic Baculoviral Elements for Recombinant Protein Expression by Transactivation in Sf21 Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang-Fang; Yen, Zen-Zen; Lindemann, Nils; Meyer, Steffen; Spehr, Johannes; van den Heuvel, Joop

    2016-01-01

    The Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) is widely used to produce high amounts of recombinant proteins. Nevertheless, generating recombinant baculovirus in high quality is rather time-consuming and labor-intensive. Alternatively, virus-free expression in insect cells did not achieve similar expression levels for most proteins so far. The transactivation method is a promising approach for protein expression in Sf21 cells. It combines advantages of BEVS and plasmid-based expression by activating strong virus-dependent promoters on a transfected plasmid by baculoviral coinfection. Here, we identified expression elements required for transactivation. Therefore, we designed several vectors comprising different viral promoters or promoter combinations and tested them for eGFP expression using the automated BioLector microcultivation system. Remarkably, only the combination of the very late promoter p10 together with the homologous region 5 (hr5) could boost expression during transactivation. Other elements, like p10 alone or the late viral promoter polH, did not respond to transactivation. A new combination of hr5 and p10 with the strongest immediate early OpMNPV viral promoter OpIE2 improved the yield of eGFP by ~25% in comparison to the previous applied hr5-IE1-p10 expression cassette. Furthermore, we observed a strong influence of the transcription termination sequence and vector backbone on the level of expression. Finally, the expression levels for transactivation, BEVS and solely plasmid-based expression were compared for the marker protein eGFP, underlining the potential of transactivation for fast recombinant protein expression in Sf21 cells. In conclusion, essential elements for transactivation could be identified. The optimal elements were applied to generate an improved vector applicable in virus-free plasmid-based expression, transactivation and BEVS. PMID:26934632

  11. Recombinant nucleocapsid-like particles from dengue-2 virus induce protective CD4+ and CD8+ cells against viral encephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gil, Lázaro; López, Carlos; Lazo, Laura; Valdés, Iris; Marcos, Ernesto; Alonso, Ruby; Gambe, Ailyn; Martín, Jorge; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2009-10-01

    Virus-like particles are a highly effective type of subunit vaccine that mimics the overall structure of virus particles without containing infectious genetic material. In this work, a particulate form of the recombinant capsid protein from dengue-2 was evaluated in mice to determine the level of protection against viral challenge and to measure the antigen-induced cell-mediated immunity (CMI). The nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) adjuvanted with alum did not induce antiviral antibodies. However, splenocytes from the immunized animals secreted high levels of IFN-gamma upon virus stimulation, and a significant protection rate was achieved after challenge with lethal dengue-2 virus. Finally, both IFN-gamma secretion and protection against viral encephalitis were demonstrated to be dependent on CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. This study provides new evidences regarding the protective role of the CMI in the mouse model without the induction of neutralizing antibodies. Further studies in non-human primates or humanized mice should be carried out to elucidate the usefulness of the NLPs as a potential vaccine candidate against dengue disease.

  12. Expression and purification of recombinant human EGFL7 protein.

    PubMed

    Picuric, Srdjan; Friedrich, Matthias; Oess, Stefanie

    2009-11-01

    The secreted epidermal growth factor-like protein 7 (EGFL7) plays an important role in angiogenesis, especially in the recruitment of endothelial and smooth muscle cells to the site of the nascent vessel and their ordered assembly into functional vasculature. However, progress in the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is to date greatly hindered by the lack of recombinant EGFL7 protein in a stable, soluble, native state, thus preventing e.g. the characterization of the proposed functional receptor as well as investigation of additional biological effects of EGFL7. So far all attempts to produce sufficient amounts of recombinant EGFL7 protein by various groups have failed. In this study we describe a procedure for the expression and purification of human EGFL7 from Sf9 cells and for the first time provide means to isolate biologically functional EGFL7 protein in sufficient quantities for its further biological characterization. We believe that the availability of EGFL7 will greatly accelerate our understanding of the precise role of EGFL7 and the underlying molecular mechanisms of EGFL7 action in the fundamentally important process of angiogenesis.

  13. Tailoring recombinant protein quality by rational media design.

    PubMed

    Brühlmann, David; Jordan, Martin; Hemberger, Jürgen; Sauer, Markus; Stettler, Matthieu; Broly, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Clinical efficacy and safety of recombinant proteins are closely associated with their structural characteristics. The major quality attributes comprise glycosylation, charge variants (oxidation, deamidation, and C- & N-terminal modifications), aggregates, low-molecular-weight species (LMW), and misincorporation of amino acids in the protein backbone. Cell culture media design has a great potential to modulate these quality attributes due to the vital role of medium in mammalian cell culture. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the way both classical cell culture medium components and novel supplements affect the quality attributes of recombinant therapeutic proteins expressed in mammalian hosts, allowing rational and high-throughput optimization of mammalian cell culture media. A selection of specific and/or potent inhibitors and activators of oligosaccharide processing as well as components affecting multiple quality attributes are presented. Extensive research efforts in this field show the feasibility of quality engineering through media design, allowing to significantly modulate the protein function. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. Transfection of primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein synthesis and secretion of recombinant erythropoietin: a strategy to enable protein delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Annette; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Aigner, Achim; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    2017-03-14

    Treatment of chronic disorders affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is complicated by the inability of drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Non-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints in this passage, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion further into the brain. The present study aims to investigate the possibility of transfecting primary rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs) for recombinant protein synthesis and secretion of the neuroprotective protein erythropoietin (EPO). We previously showed that 4% of RBECs with BBB properties can be transfected without disrupting the BBB integrity in vitro, but it can be questioned whether this is sufficient to enable protein secretion at therapeutic levels. The present study examined various transfection vectors, with regard to increasing the transfection efficiency without disrupting the BBB integrity. Lipofectamine 3000™ was the most potent vector compared to polyethylenimine (PEI) and Turbofect. When co-cultured with astrocytes, the genetically modified RBECs secreted recombinant EPO into the cell culture medium both luminally and abluminally, and despite lower levels of EPO reaching the abluminal chamber, the amount of recombinant EPO was sufficient to evolve a biological effect on astrocytes cultured at the abluminal side in terms of upregulated gene expression of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). In conclusion, non-viral gene therapy to RBECs leads to protein secretion and signifies a method for therapeutic proteins to target cells inside the CNS otherwise omitted due to the BBB.

  15. Recombinant Newcastle disease viral vector expressing hemagglutinin or fusion of canine distemper virus is safe and immunogenic in minks.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jinying; Wang, Xijun; Tian, Meijie; Gao, Yuwei; Wen, Zhiyuan; Yu, Guimei; Zhou, Weiwei; Zu, Shulong; Bu, Zhigao

    2015-05-15

    Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) infects many carnivores and cause several high-mortality disease outbreaks. The current CDV live vaccine cannot be safely used in some exotic species, such as mink and ferret. Here, we generated recombinant lentogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota expressing either envelope glycoproyein, heamagglutinine (H) or fusion protein (F), named as rLa-CDVH and rLa-CDVF, respectively. The feasibility of these recombinant NDVs to serve as live virus-vectored CD vaccine was evaluated in minks. rLa-CDVH induced significant neutralization antibodies (NA) to CDV and provided solid protection against virulent CDV challenge. On the contrast, rLa-CDVF induced much lower NA to CDV and fail to protected mink from virulent CDV challenge. Results suggest that recombinant NDV expressing CDV H is safe and efficient candidate vaccine against CDV in mink, and maybe other host species.

  16. Cysteine residues in the Vif protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 are essential for viral infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, X Y; Sova, P; Chao, W; Volsky, D J

    1994-01-01

    The infectivity factor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), Vif, contains two cysteine residues which are highly conserved among animal lentiviruses. We introduced substitutions of leucine for cysteine residues in the vif gene of a full-length HIV-1 clone to analyze their roles in viral infection. Mutant viruses containing substitutions in either Cys-114, Cys-133, or both displayed a vif-negative infection phenotype similar to that of an isogeneic vif deletion mutant, namely, a cell-dependent complete to partial loss of infectivity. The vif defect could be complemented by cotransfection of mutant viral DNA with a Vif expression vector, and there was no evidence that recombination contributed to the repair of the vif deficiency. The viral protein profile, as determined by immunoblotting, in cells infected with cysteine substitution mutants and that in wild-type virus were similar, including the presence of the 23-kDa Vif polypeptide. In addition, immunoblotting with an antiserum directed against the carboxyl terminus of gp41 revealed that gp41 was intact in cells infected with either wild-type or vif mutant HIV-1, excluding that Vif cleaves the C terminus of gp41. Our results indicate that the cysteines in HIV-1 Vif are critical for Vif function in viral infectivity. Images PMID:8107232

  17. Tat is a multifunctional viral protein that modulates cellular gene expression and functions.

    PubMed

    Clark, Evan; Nava, Brenda; Caputi, Massimo

    2017-02-07

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) has developed several strategies to condition the host environment to promote viral replication and spread. Viral proteins have evolved to perform multiple functions, aiding in the replication of the viral genome and modulating the cellular response to the infection. Tat is a small, versatile, viral protein that controls transcription of the HIV genome, regulates cellular gene expression and generates a permissive environment for viral replication by altering the immune response and facilitating viral spread to multiple tissues. Studies carried out utilizing biochemical, cellular, and genomic approaches show that the expression and activity of hundreds of genes and multiple molecular networks are modulated by Tat via multiple mechanisms.

  18. A recombinant influenza virus vaccine expressing the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Wendy; Ozawa, Makoto; Hatta, Masato; Orozco, Esther; Martínez, Máximo B; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Infections with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) rank high among the most common human respiratory diseases worldwide. Previously, we developed a replication-incompetent influenza virus by replacing the coding sequence of the PB2 gene, which encodes one of the viral RNA polymerase subunits, with that of a reporter gene. Here, we generated a PB2-knockout recombinant influenza virus expressing the F protein of RSV (PB2-RSVF virus) and tested its potential as a bivalent vaccine. In mice intranasally immunized with the PB2-RSVF virus, we detected high levels of antibodies against influenza virus, but not RSV. PB2-RSVF virus-immunized mice were protected from a lethal challenge with influenza virus but experienced severe body weight loss when challenged with RSV, indicating that PB2-RSVF vaccination enhanced RSV-associated disease. These results highlight one of the difficulties of developing an effective bivalent vaccine against influenza virus and RSV infections. PMID:24292020

  19. Enhancing effect of a protein from Lonomia obliqua hemolymph on recombinant protein production

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Katia N.; Sousa, Alvaro P. B.; Moraes, Roberto H. P.; Astray, Renato M.; Pereira, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression in animal cells allows large scale production of proteins used for either structure and function studies or therapeutic purposes. Maximizing recombinant protein production is necessary to optimize cell growth and protein expression. Some studies have demonstrated the presence of pharmacologically active substances in insect hemolymph. In this work, we have identified and purified a protein from Lonomia obliqua hemolymph able to increase the production of the rabies virus glycoprotein, expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, by about 59%. PMID:19003176

  20. Expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins from plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Urvee A.; Sur, Gargi; Daunert, Sylvia; Babbitt, Ruth; Li, Qingshun

    2002-01-01

    With recent advances in plant biotechnology, transgenic plants have been targeted as an inexpensive means for the mass production of proteins for biopharmaceutical and industrial uses. However, the current plant purification techniques lack a generally applicable, economic, large-scale strategy. In this study, we demonstrate the purification of a model protein, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), by employing the protein calmodulin (CaM) as an affinity tag. In the proposed system, CaM is fused to GUS. In the presence of calcium, the calmodulin fusion protein binds specifically to a phenothiazine-modified surface of an affinity column. When calcium is removed with a complexing agent, e.g., EDTA, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change allowing the dissociation of the calmodulin-phenothiazine complex and, therefore, permitting the elution of the GUS-CaM fusion protein. The advantages of this approach are the fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the target protein under mild elution conditions, thus preserving the activity of the target protein. Two types of transformation methods were used in this study, namely, the Agrobacterium-mediated system and the viral-vector-mediated transformation system. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  1. Expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins from plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Urvee A.; Sur, Gargi; Daunert, Sylvia; Babbitt, Ruth; Li, Qingshun

    2002-01-01

    With recent advances in plant biotechnology, transgenic plants have been targeted as an inexpensive means for the mass production of proteins for biopharmaceutical and industrial uses. However, the current plant purification techniques lack a generally applicable, economic, large-scale strategy. In this study, we demonstrate the purification of a model protein, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), by employing the protein calmodulin (CaM) as an affinity tag. In the proposed system, CaM is fused to GUS. In the presence of calcium, the calmodulin fusion protein binds specifically to a phenothiazine-modified surface of an affinity column. When calcium is removed with a complexing agent, e.g., EDTA, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change allowing the dissociation of the calmodulin-phenothiazine complex and, therefore, permitting the elution of the GUS-CaM fusion protein. The advantages of this approach are the fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the target protein under mild elution conditions, thus preserving the activity of the target protein. Two types of transformation methods were used in this study, namely, the Agrobacterium-mediated system and the viral-vector-mediated transformation system. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  2. Determination of immune status in dogs against CPV-2 by recombinant protein based latex agglutination test.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jobin; Singh, Mithilesh; Goswami, T K; Glora, Philma; Chakravarti, Soumendu; Chander, Vishal; Upmanyu, Vikramaditya; Verma, Suman; Sharma, Chhavi; Mahendran, K

    2017-09-01

    Canine parvoviral enteritis is a highly contagious viral illness caused by canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2) which affects puppies of mainly 6-20 weeks of age. Vaccination is pivotal in preventing and controlling CPV-2 infection. Determination of antibody status is a critical determinant for successful vaccination. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is 'gold standard' test for quantification of antibodies specific to CPV-2, although the execution of this test is not feasible under field conditions. The present study was undertaken to develop a point of care testing to determine immune status prior to CPV-2 vaccination or to detect seroconversion in immunized dogs by latex agglutination test (LAT) using recombinant antigen. Truncated portion of VP2 protein (tVP2) of CPV-2 was selected on the basis of antigenic indices, overexpressed the recombinant protein in E. coli system and was subsequently used in development of LAT. A total of 59 serum samples obtained from vaccinated (n = 54) and healthy unvaccinated (n = 5) dogs were tested. The positivity was observed in 85% (46/54) of these dogs with varying agglutination pattern. The overall sensitivity and specificity of latex agglutination test in comparison to HI test was recorded as 90% and 88% respectively with an agreement value of 90% (CI = 95%). Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent advances in production of recombinant spider silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hannah; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-12-01

    Spider silk has been drawing much attention as a great biomaterial having many applications in biotechnology and biomedicine owing to its several desired material characteristics such as outstanding strength, toughness, and elasticity as well as biodegradability and biocompatibility. With various applications foreseeable in industry, there has been much effort to produce recombinant spider silk protein in large amounts. However, owing to the difficulties in its production using spiders, alternative host systems and engineering methods have been investigated to develop suitable production systems that can efficiently produce spider silk protein. Here, we review recent advances in production of spider silk proteins in various heterologous host systems with focus given on the development of metabolic and cellular engineering strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High-throughput process development for recombinant protein purification.

    PubMed

    Rege, Kaushal; Pepsin, Mike; Falcon, Brandy; Steele, Landon; Heng, Meng

    2006-03-05

    Methods development in chromatographic purification processes is a complex operation and has traditionally relied on trial and error approaches. The availability of a large number of commercial media, choice of different modes of chromatography, and diverse operating conditions contribute to the challenging task of accelerating methods development. In this paper, we describe a novel microtiter-plate based screening method to identify the appropriate sequence of chromatographic steps that result in high purities of bioproducts from their respective culture broths. Protein mixtures containing the bioproduct were loaded on aliquots of different chromatographic media in microtiter plates. Serial step elution of the proteins, in concert with bioproduct-specific assays, resulted in the identification of "active fractions" containing the bioproduct. The identification of a successful chromatographic step was based on the purity of the active fractions, which were then pooled and used as starting material for screening the next chromatographic dimension. This procedure was repeated across subsequent dimensions until single band purities of the protein were obtained. The sequence of chromatographic steps and the corresponding operating conditions identified from the screen were validated under scaled-up conditions. Various modes of chromatography including hydrophobic interaction, ion exchange (cation and anion exchange) and hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography (HCIC), and different operating conditions (pH, salt concentration and type, etc.) were employed in the screen. This approach was employed to determine the sequence of chromatographic steps for the purification of recombinant alpha-amylase from its cell-free culture broth. Recommendations from the screen resulted in single-band purity of the protein under scaled-up conditions. Similar results were observed for an scFv-beta-lactamase fusion protein. The use of a miniaturized screen enables the parallel

  5. [Human bone morphogenetic protein-2: recombinant expression in E. coli].

    PubMed

    Ma, Q; Dang, G; Ma, D

    1998-04-01

    To explore the way of producing human bone morphogenetic protein-2(hBMP-2) for bone healing by using the gene engeneering techniques. hBMP-2 cDNA fragment, which consists of 3' end partial propeptide and mature peptide sequence, was inserted into the multiple cloning site of expression vector pkpL-3a via ligation. The recombinant plasmid pkpL-3a/hBMP-2 was transformed into E. coli pOp2136. By the method of restriction map, the positive expression clone was selected. SDS-PAGE analysis showed a new foreign protein band near 27,000 after induction. The yield of induced hBMP-2 accouned for 10% of the total bacterial proteins. The partial purified recombinant hBMP-2 was implanted into Wistar rat thigh. After 4 weeks, histological analysis showed that it induced the proliferation of mesenchymal type cells and formation of new cartilage and bone in the implantation area. The hBMP-2 produced by gene engeneering techniques has the biologic capacity of ectopic bone formation.

  6. Engineering Globular Protein Vesicles through Tunable Self-Assembly of Recombinant Fusion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yeongseon; Choi, Won Tae; Heller, William T; Ke, Zunlong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Champion, Julie A

    2017-07-27

    Vesicles assembled from folded, globular proteins have potential for functions different from traditional lipid or polymeric vesicles. However, they also present challenges in understanding the assembly process and controlling vesicle properties. From detailed investigation of the assembly behavior of recombinant fusion proteins, this work reports a simple strategy to engineer protein vesicles containing functional, globular domains. This is achieved through tunable self-assembly of recombinant globular fusion proteins containing leucine zippers and elastin-like polypeptides. The fusion proteins form complexes in solution via high affinity binding of the zippers, and transition through dynamic coacervates to stable hollow vesicles upon warming. The thermal driving force, which can be tuned by protein concentration or temperature, controls both vesicle size and whether vesicles are single or bi-layered. These results provide critical information to engineer globular protein vesicles via self-assembly with desired size and membrane structure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bobrovsky, Pavel; Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection.

  8. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis. Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection. PMID:27160295

  9. High-throughput purification of affinity-tagged recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, Simone C; Weinzierl, Robert O J

    2012-08-26

    X-ray crystallography is the method of choice for obtaining a detailed view of the structure of proteins. Such studies need to be complemented by further biochemical analyses to obtain detailed insights into structure/function relationships. Advances in oligonucleotide- and gene synthesis technology make large-scale mutagenesis strategies increasingly feasible, including the substitution of target residues by all 19 other amino acids. Gain- or loss-of-function phenotypes then allow systematic conclusions to be drawn, such as the contribution of particular residues to catalytic activity, protein stability and/or protein-protein interaction specificity. In order to attribute the different phenotypes to the nature of the mutation--rather than to fluctuating experimental conditions--it is vital to purify and analyse the proteins in a controlled and reproducible manner. High-throughput strategies and the automation of manual protocols on robotic liquid-handling platforms have created opportunities to perform such complex molecular biological procedures with little human intervention and minimal error rates. Here, we present a general method for the purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins in a high-throughput manner. In a recent study, we applied this method to a detailed structure-function investigation of TFIIB, a component of the basal transcription machinery. TFIIB is indispensable for promoter-directed transcription in vitro and is essential for the recruitment of RNA polymerase into a preinitiation complex. TFIIB contains a flexible linker domain that penetrates the active site cleft of RNA polymerase. This linker domain confers two biochemically quantifiable activities on TFIIB, namely (i) the stimulation of the catalytic activity during the 'abortive' stage of transcript initiation, and (ii) an additional contribution to the specific recruitment of RNA polymerase into the preinitiation complex. We exploited the high-throughput purification method to

  10. Fat grafting as a vehicle for the delivery of recombinant adenoassociated viral vectors to achieve gene modification of muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Katherine H; During, Matthew J; Muravlev, Alexander; Wang, Chuansong; Kocak, Ergun

    2013-06-01

    The combination of gene therapy and plastic surgery may have the potential to improve the specificity that is needed to achieve clinically applicable treatment regimens. Our goal was to develop a method for gene modification that would yield sustainable production of gene products but would be less time consuming than existing protocols. An adenoassociated virus was used to deliver gene products to pectoralis muscle flaps. Gene modification was accomplished via either direct injection or novel fat grafting techniques. The production of gene product was observable by both in vivo imaging and immunohistochemical staining. Gene products were not detected in tissues that were not in contact with the fat grafts that were incubated with the viral vector, indicating that the transduction stayed local to the flap. Using novel recombinant adenoassociated virus vectors, we have developed a method for gene delivery that is highly efficient and applicable to muscle flaps.

  11. Access of viral proteins to mitochondria via mitochondria-associated membranes.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Chad D; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M

    2009-05-01

    By exploiting host cell machineries, viruses provide powerful tools for gaining insight into cellular pathways. Proteins from two unrelated viruses, human CMV (HCMV) and HCV, are documented to traffic sequentially from the ER into mitochondria, probably through the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) compartment. The MAM are sites of ER-mitochondrial contact enabling the direct transfer of membrane bound lipids and the generation of high calcium (Ca2+) microdomains for mitochondria signalling and responses to cellular stress. Both HCV core protein and HCMV UL37 proteins are associated with Ca2+ regulation and apoptotic signals. Trafficking of viral proteins to the MAM may allow viruses to manipulate a variety of fundamental cellular processes, which converge at the MAM, including Ca2+ signalling, lipid synthesis and transfer, bioenergetics, metabolic flow, and apoptosis. Because of their distinct topologies and targeted MAM sub-domains, mitochondrial trafficking (albeit it through the MAM) of the HCMV and HCV proteins predictably involves alternative pathways and, hence, distinct targeting signals. Indeed, we found that multiple cellular and viral proteins, which target the MAM, showed no apparent consensus primary targeting sequences. Nonetheless, these viral proteins provide us with valuable tools to access the poorly characterised MAM compartment, to define its cellular constituents and describe how virus infection alters these to its own end. Furthermore, because proper trafficking of viral proteins is necessary for their function, discovering the requirements for MAM to mitochondrial trafficking of essential viral proteins may provide novel targets for the rational design of anti-viral drugs.

  12. Specific transduction and labeling of pancreatic ducts by targeted recombinant viral infusion into mouse pancreatic ducts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Xiao, Xiangwei; El-Gohary, Yousef; Criscimanna, Angela; Prasadan, Krishna; Rymer, Christopher; Shiota, Chiyo; Wiersch, John; Gaffar, Iliana; Esni, Farzad; Gittes, George K

    2013-11-01

    Specific labeling of pancreatic ducts has proven to be quite difficult. Such labeling has been highly sought after because of the power it would confer to studies of pancreatic ductal carcinogenesis, as well as studies of the source of new insulin-producing β-cells. Cre-loxp recombination could, in theory, lineage-tag pancreatic ducts, but results have been conflicting, mainly due to low labeling efficiencies. Here, we achieved a high pancreatic duct labeling efficiency using a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) with a duct-specific sox9 promoter infused into the mouse common biliary/pancreatic duct. We saw rapid, diffuse duct-specific labeling, with 50 and 89% labeling in the pancreatic tail and head region, respectively. This highly specific labeling of ducts should greatly enhance our ability to study the role of pancreatic ducts in numerous aspects of pancreatic growth, development and function.

  13. Diagnosis of Oropouche virus infection using a recombinant nucleocapsid protein-based enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Saeed, M F; Nunes, M; Vasconcelos, P F; Travassos Da Rosa, A P; Watts, D M; Russell, K; Shope, R E; Tesh, R B; Barrett, A D

    2001-07-01

    Oropouche (ORO) virus is an emerging infectious agent that has caused numerous outbreaks of an acute febrile (dengue-like) illness among humans in Brazil, Peru, and Panama. Diagnosis of ORO virus infection is based mainly on serology. Two different antigens, hamster serum antigen (HSA) and Vero cell lysate antigen (VCLA), are currently used in enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) in Brazil and Peru, respectively, to investigate the epidemiology of ORO virus infection. Both antigens involve use of infectious virus, and for this reason their use is restricted. Consequently, the frequency and distribution of ORO virus infection are largely unexplored in other countries of South America. This report describes the use of a bacterially expressed recombinant nucleocapsid (rN) protein of ORO virus in EIAs for the diagnosis of ORO virus infection. The data revealed that the purified rN protein is comparable to the authentic viral N protein in its antigenic characteristics and is highly sensitive and specific in EIAs. Among 183 serum samples tested, a high degree of concordance was found between rN protein-based EIA and HSA- and VCLA-based EIAs for the detection of both ORO virus-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies. The high sensitivity, specificity, and safety of the rN protein-based EIA make it a useful diagnostic technique that can be widely used to detect ORO virus infection in South America.

  14. Diagnosis of Oropouche Virus Infection Using a Recombinant Nucleocapsid Protein-Based Enzyme Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohammad F.; Nunes, Marcio; Vasconcelos, Pedro F.; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Watts, Douglas M.; Russell, Kevin; Shope, Robert E.; Tesh, Robert B.; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2001-01-01

    Oropouche (ORO) virus is an emerging infectious agent that has caused numerous outbreaks of an acute febrile (dengue-like) illness among humans in Brazil, Peru, and Panama. Diagnosis of ORO virus infection is based mainly on serology. Two different antigens, hamster serum antigen (HSA) and Vero cell lysate antigen (VCLA), are currently used in enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) in Brazil and Peru, respectively, to investigate the epidemiology of ORO virus infection. Both antigens involve use of infectious virus, and for this reason their use is restricted. Consequently, the frequency and distribution of ORO virus infection are largely unexplored in other countries of South America. This report describes the use of a bacterially expressed recombinant nucleocapsid (rN) protein of ORO virus in EIAs for the diagnosis of ORO virus infection. The data revealed that the purified rN protein is comparable to the authentic viral N protein in its antigenic characteristics and is highly sensitive and specific in EIAs. Among 183 serum samples tested, a high degree of concordance was found between rN protein-based EIA and HSA- and VCLA-based EIAs for the detection of both ORO virus-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies. The high sensitivity, specificity, and safety of the rN protein-based EIA make it a useful diagnostic technique that can be widely used to detect ORO virus infection in South America. PMID:11427552

  15. High expression of functional adenovirus DNA polymerase and precursor terminal protein using recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Stunnenberg, H G; Lange, H; Philipson, L; van Miltenburg, R T; van der Vliet, P C

    1988-01-01

    Initiation of Adenovirus (Ad) DNA replication occurs by a protein-priming mechanism in which the viral precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (pol) as well as two nuclear DNA-binding proteins from uninfected HeLa cells are required. Biochemical studies on the pTP and DNA polymerase proteins separately have been hampered due to their low abundance and their presence as a pTP-pol complex in Ad infected cells. We have constructed a genomic sequence containing the large open reading frame from the Ad5 pol gene to which 9 basepairs from a putative exon were ligated. When inserted behind a modified late promoter of vaccinia virus the resulting recombinant virus produced enzymatically active 140 kDa Ad DNA polymerase. The same strategy was applied to express the 80 kDa pTP gene in a functional form. Both proteins were overexpressed at least 30-fold compared to extracts from Adenovirus infected cells and, when combined, were fully active for initiation in an in vitro Adenovirus DNA replication system. Images PMID:3362670

  16. Thermal adaptability of Kluyveromyces marxianus in recombinant protein production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kluyveromyces marxianus combines the ease of genetic manipulation and fermentation with the ability to efficiently secrete high molecular weight proteins, performing eukaryotic post-translational modifications. It is able to grow efficiently in a wide range of temperatures. The secretion performances were analyzed in the host K. marxianus L3 in the range between 5°C and 40°C by means of 3 different reporter proteins, since temperature appears a key parameter for production and secretion of recombinant proteins. Results The recombinant strains were able to grow up to 40°C and, along the tested temperature interval (5-40°C), the specific growth rates (μ) were generally lower as compared to those of the untransformed strain. Biomass yields were slightly affected by temperature, with the highest values reached at 15°C and 30°C. The secretion of the endogenous β-fructofuranosidase, used as an internal control, was efficient in the range of the tested temperature, as evaluated by assaying the enzyme activity in the culture supernatants. The endogenous β-fructofuranosidase production was temperature dependent, with the highest yield at 30°C. The heterologous proteins HSA, GAA and Sod1p were all successfully produced and secreted between 5°C and 40°C, albeit each one presented a different optimal production temperature (15, 40, 5-30°C for HSA, GAA and Sod1p, respectively). Conclusions K. marxianus L3 has been identified as a promising and flexible cell factory. In a sole host, the optimization of growth temperatures for the efficient secretion of each individual protein can be carried out over a wide range of temperatures. PMID:23587421

  17. Identification of a Novel Viral Protein Expressed from the PB2 Segment of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Mariko; Goto, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Over the past 2 decades, several novel influenza virus proteins have been identified that modulate viral infections in vitro and/or in vivo. The PB2 segment, which is one of the longest influenza A virus segments, is known to encode only one viral protein, PB2. In the present study, we used reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) targeting viral mRNAs transcribed from the PB2 segment to look for novel viral proteins encoded by spliced mRNAs. We identified a new viral protein, PB2-S1, encoded by a novel spliced mRNA in which the region corresponding to nucleotides 1513 to 1894 of the PB2 mRNA is deleted. PB2-S1 was detected in virus-infected cells and in cells transfected with a protein expression plasmid encoding PB2. PB2-S1 localized to mitochondria, inhibited the RIG-I-dependent interferon signaling pathway, and interfered with viral polymerase activity (dependent on its PB1-binding capability). The nucleotide sequences around the splicing donor and acceptor sites for PB2-S1 were highly conserved among pre-2009 human H1N1 viruses but not among human H1N1pdm and H3N2 viruses. PB2-S1-deficient viruses, however, showed growth kinetics in MDCK cells and virulence in mice similar to those of wild-type virus. The biological significance of PB2-S1 to the replication and pathogenicity of seasonal H1N1 influenza A viruses warrants further investigation. IMPORTANCE Transcriptome analysis of cells infected with influenza A virus has improved our understanding of the host response to viral infection, because such analysis yields considerable information about both in vitro and in vivo viral infections. However, little attention has been paid to transcriptomes derived from the viral genome. Here we focused on the splicing of mRNA expressed from the PB2 segment and identified a spliced viral mRNA encoding a novel viral protein. This result suggests that other, as yet unidentified viral proteins encoded by spliced mRNAs could be expressed in virus-infected cells. A viral

  18. Viral protein R of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 induces retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Kenta; Okudaira, Noriyuki; Tamura, Masato; Doi, Akihiro; Saito, Yoshikazu; Shimura, Mari; Goto, Motohito; Matsunaga, Akihiro; Kawamura, Yuki I; Otsubo, Takeshi; Dohi, Taeko; Hoshino, Shigeki; Kano, Shigeyuki; Hagiwara, Shotaro; Tanuma, Junko; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Baba, Masanori; Iguchi, Taku; Yanagita, Motoko; Oka, Shinichi; Okamura, Tadashi; Ishizaka, Yukihito

    2013-08-05

    Viral protein R (Vpr), a protein of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) with various biological functions, was shown to be present in the blood of HIV-1-positive patients. However, it remained unclear whether circulating Vpr in patients' blood is biologically active. Here, we examined the activity of blood Vpr using an assay system by which retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1 (L1-RTP) was detected. We also investigated the in vivo effects of recombinant Vpr (rVpr) by administrating it to transgenic mice harboring human L1 as a transgene (hL1-Tg mice). Based on our data, we discuss the involvement of blood Vpr in the clinical symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We first discovered that rVpr was active in induction of L1-RTP. Biochemical analyses revealed that rVpr-induced L1-RTP depended on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β. By using a sensitive L1-RTP assay system, we showed that 6 of the 15 blood samples from HIV-1 patients examined were positive for induction of L1-RTP. Of note, the L1-RTP-inducing activity was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for Vpr. Moreover, L1-RTP was reproducibly induced in various organs, including the kidney, when rVpr was administered to hL1-Tg mice. Blood Vpr is biologically active, suggesting that its monitoring is worthwhile for clarification of the roles of Vpr in the pathogenesis of AIDS. This is the first report to demonstrate a soluble factor in patients' blood active for L1-RTP activity, and implies the involvement of L1-RTP in the development of human diseases.

  19. Viral protein R of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 induces retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Viral protein R (Vpr), a protein of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) with various biological functions, was shown to be present in the blood of HIV-1-positive patients. However, it remained unclear whether circulating Vpr in patients’ blood is biologically active. Here, we examined the activity of blood Vpr using an assay system by which retrotransposition of long interspersed element-1 (L1-RTP) was detected. We also investigated the in vivo effects of recombinant Vpr (rVpr) by administrating it to transgenic mice harboring human L1 as a transgene (hL1-Tg mice). Based on our data, we discuss the involvement of blood Vpr in the clinical symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Results We first discovered that rVpr was active in induction of L1-RTP. Biochemical analyses revealed that rVpr-induced L1-RTP depended on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β. By using a sensitive L1-RTP assay system, we showed that 6 of the 15 blood samples from HIV-1 patients examined were positive for induction of L1-RTP. Of note, the L1-RTP-inducing activity was blocked by a monoclonal antibody specific for Vpr. Moreover, L1-RTP was reproducibly induced in various organs, including the kidney, when rVpr was administered to hL1-Tg mice. Conclusions Blood Vpr is biologically active, suggesting that its monitoring is worthwhile for clarification of the roles of Vpr in the pathogenesis of AIDS. This is the first report to demonstrate a soluble factor in patients’ blood active for L1-RTP activity, and implies the involvement of L1-RTP in the development of human diseases. PMID:23915234

  20. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  1. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development. PMID:27278133

  2. Coexpression of the simian immunodeficiency virus Env and Rev proteins by a recombinant human adenovirus host range mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S M; Lee, S G; Ronchetti-Blume, M; Virk, K P; Mizutani, S; Eichberg, J W; Davis, A; Hung, P P; Hirsch, V M; Chanock, R M

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human adenoviruses (Ads) that replicate in the intestinal tract offer a novel, yet practical, means of immunoprophylaxis against a wide variety of viral and bacterial pathogens. For some infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the potential for residual infectious material in vaccine preparations must be eliminated. Therefore, recombinant human Ads that express noninfectious HIV or other microbial proteins are attractive vaccine candidates. To test such an approach for HIV, we chose an experimental model of AIDS based on simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of macaques. Our data demonstrate that the SIV Env gene products are expressed in cultured cells after infection with a recombinant Ad containing both SIV env and rev genes. An E3 deletion vector derived from a mutant of human Ad serotype 5 that efficiently replicates in both human and monkey cells was used to bypass the usual host range restriction of Ad infection. In addition, we show that the SIV rev gene is properly spliced from a single SIV subgenomic DNA fragment and that the Rev protein is expressed in recombinant Ad-SIV-infected human as well as monkey cells. The expression of SIV gene products in suitable live Ad vectors provides an excellent system for studying the regulation of SIV gene expression in cultured cells and evaluating the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of SIV proteins in macaques. Images PMID:1404612

  3. The adhesive properties of coacervated recombinant hybrid mussel adhesive proteins.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seonghye; Choi, Yoo Seong; Kang, Dong Gyun; Song, Young Hoon; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2010-05-01

    Marine mussels attach to substrates using adhesive proteins. It has been suggested that complex coacervation (liquid-liquid phase separation via concentration) might be involved in the highly condensed and non-water dispersed adhesion process of mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). However, as purified natural MAPs are difficult to obtain, it has not been possible to experimentally validate the coacervation model. In the present work, we demonstrate complex coacervation in a system including recombinant MAPs and hyaluronic acid (HA). Our recombinant hybrid MAPs, fp-151 and fp-131, can be produced in large quantities, and are readily purified. We observed successful complex coacervation using cationic fp-151 or fp-131, and an anionic HA partner. Importantly, we found that highly condensed complex coacervates significantly increased the bulk adhesive strength of MAPs in both dry and wet environments. In addition, oil droplets were successfully engulfed using a MAP-based interfacial coacervation process, to form microencapsulated particles. Collectively, our results indicate that a complex coacervation system based on MAPs shows superior adhesive properties, combined with additional valuable features including liquid/liquid phase separation and appropriate viscoelasticity. Our microencapsulation system could be useful in the development of new adhesive biomaterials, including self-adhesive microencapsulated drug carriers, for use in biotechnological and biomedical applications.

  4. Multi-bit biomemory consisting of recombinant protein variants, azurin.

    PubMed

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Kim, Sang-Uk; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2009-01-01

    In this study a protein-based multi-bit biomemory device consisting of recombinant azurin with its cysteine residue modified by site-directed mutagenesis method has been developed. The recombinant azurin was directly immobilized on four different gold (Au) electrodes patterned on a single silicon substrate. Using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and open circuit potential amperometry (OCPA) methods the memory function of the fabricated biodevice was validated. The charge transfer occurs between protein molecules and Au electrode enables a bi-stable electrical conductivity allowing the system to be used as a digital memory device. Data storage is achieved by applying redox potentials which are within the range of 200mV. Oxidation and open circuit potentials with current sensing were used for writing and reading operations respectively. Applying oxidation potentials in different combinations to each Au electrodes, multi-bit information was stored in to the azurin molecules. Finally, the switching robustness and reliability of the proposed device has been examined. The results suggest that the proposed device has a function of memory and can be used for the construction of nano-scale multi-bit information storage device.

  5. Utilizing protein-lean coproducts from corn containing recombinant pharmaceutical proteins for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Paraman, Ilankovan; Moeller, Lorena; Scott, M Paul; Wang, Kan; Glatz, Charles E; Johnson, Lawrence A

    2010-10-13

    Protein-lean fractions of corn (maize) containing recombinant (r) pharmaceutical proteins were evaluated as a potential feedstock to produce fuel ethanol. The levels of residual r-proteins in the coproduct, distillers dry grains with solubles (DDGS), were determined. Transgenic corn lines containing recombinant green fluorescence protein (r-GFP) and a recombinant subunit vaccine of Escherichia coli enterotoxin (r-LTB), primarily expressed in endosperm, and another two corn lines containing recombinant human collagen (r-CIα1) and r-GFP, primarily expressed in germ, were used as model systems. The kernels were either ground and used for fermentation or dry fractionated to recover germ-rich fractions prior to grinding for fermentation. The finished beers of whole ground kernels and r-protein-spent endosperm solids contained 127-139 and 138-155 g/L ethanol concentrations, respectively. The ethanol levels did not differ among transgenic and normal corn feedstocks, indicating the residual r-proteins did not negatively affect ethanol production. r-Protein extraction and germ removal also did not negatively affect fermentation of the remaining mass. Most r-proteins were inactivated during the mashing process used to prepare corn for fermentation. No functionally active r-GFP or r-LTB proteins were found after fermentation of the r-protein-spent solids; however, a small quantity of residual r-CIα1 was detected in DDGS, indicating that the safety of DDGS produced from transgenic grain for r-protein production needs to be evaluated for each event. Protease treatment during fermentation completely hydrolyzed the residual r-CIα1, and no residual r-proteins were detectable in DDGS.

  6. Quality assessment of recombinant proteins produced in plants.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Giuliana; Dolan, Maureen C; Condori, Jose; Radin, David N; Cramer, Carole L

    2012-01-01

    Plant-based expression technologies for recombinant proteins have begun to receive acceptance for pharmaceuticals and other commercial markets. Protein products derived from plants offer safer, more cost-effective, and less capital-intensive alternatives to traditional manufacturing systems using microbial fermentation or animal cell culture bioreactors. Moreover, plants are now known to be capable of expressing bioactive proteins from a diverse array of species including animals and humans. Methods development to assess the quality and performance of proteins manufactured in plants are essential to support the QA/QC demands as plant-produced protein products transition to the commercial marketplace. Within the pharmaceutical arena, process validation and acceptance criteria for biological products must comply with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and ICH Q6B guidelines in order to initiate the regulatory approval process. Detailed product specifications will also need to be developed and validated for plant-made proteins for the bioenergy, food, chemical synthesis, or research reagent markets.We have, therefore, developed assessment methods for important qualitative and quantitative parameters of the products and the manufacturing methods utilized in plant-based production systems. In this chapter, we describe a number of procedures to validate product identity and characteristics including mass analyses, antibody cross-reactivity, N-terminal sequencing, and bioactivity. We also address methods for routine assessment of yield, recovery, and purity. The methods presented are those developed for the synthesis and recovery of the avian cytokine, chicken interleukin-12 (ChIL-12), produced in the leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. The ChIL-12 protein used as a model for this chapter includes a C-terminal histidine epitope (HIS-tag) and, thus, these methods may be directly applicable to other HIS-tagged proteins produced in plants. However, the overall strategy

  7. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Robert Y.L.; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone. - Highlights: • Hsp90β is associated with EV71 virion and is secreted with the release virus. • Hsp90β effects on the correct assembly of viral particles. • Viral titer of cultured medium was reduced in the presence of geldanamycin. • Viral titer was also reduced when Hsp90β was suppressed by siRNA treatment. • The extracellular Hsp90β was also observed in other RNA viruses-infected cells.

  8. Purification of IFT particle proteins and preparation of recombinant proteins for structural and functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Behal, Robert H; Betleja, Ewelina; Cole, Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is characterized by a robust bidirectional movement of large proteinaceous particles along the length of eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Essential for the assembly and function of the organelle, IFT is believed to transport a large array of ciliary components in and out of the organelle. Biochemical analysis of the proteins involved with this transport has been largely dependent on the ability to isolate suitable quantities of intact cilia or flagella. One model organism, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, has proven to be especially well-suited for such endeavors. Indeed, many of the IFT particle proteins were initially identified through biochemical analysis of green algae. This chapter describes some of the most effective methods for the purification of IFT particle proteins from Chlamydomonas flagella. This chapter also describes complementary approaches where recombinant IFT proteins are generated with affinity tags that allow rapid and specific purification. The recombinant proteins can be used to analyze protein-protein interactions and can be directly delivered to mutant cells to analyze functional domains. Although the techniques described here are focused entirely on Chlamydomonas IFT proteins, the approaches, especially regarding recombinant proteins, should be applicable to the study of IFT machinery in other model organisms.

  9. Tolerance and immune response to the porcine endogenous retrovirus in German landrace pigs immunised with viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim; Petersen, Björn; Niemann, Heiner

    2015-10-02

    Immunisation of goats, mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and hamsters with the recombinant ectodomain of the porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) transmembrane envelope (TM) protein (p15E) induced binding and neutralising immune antibodies in all animals. In contrast, no antibodies were induced when pigs were immunised with p15E, indicating that pigs are tolerant to their endogenous retroviruses, at least to the TM protein. To answer the question of whether pigs are tolerant to other structural proteins of PERV, we immunised German landrace pigs with p15E, this time in conjunction with the surface envelope proteins gp70 and the core capsid Gag protein p27CA. To ensure that the pigs were immunocompetent and that immunisation was successful, all animals also received an injection of an unrelated protein, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Whereas all animals produced antibodies against KLH, no animals produced antibodies against the viral envelope proteins, thus confirming previous results for p15E and extending them to the other envelope protein, gp70. However, the pigs did produce antibodies against p27CA, indicating that there is no tolerance to the core capsid protein of PERV.

  10. Recombinant probes for visualizing endogenous synaptic proteins in living neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Garrett G.; Junge, Jason A.; Mora, Rudy J.; Kwon, Hyung-Bae; Olson, C. Anders; Takahashi, Terry T.; Liman, Emily R.; Ellis-Davies, Graham C.R.; McGee, Aaron W.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.; Roberts, Richard W.; Arnold, Don B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The ability to visualize endogenous proteins in living neurons provides a powerful means to interrogate neuronal structure and function. Here we generate recombinant antibody-like proteins, termed FingRs (Fibronectin intrabodies generated with mRNA display), that bind endogenous neuronal proteins PSD-95 and Gephyrin with high affinity and which, when fused to GFP, allow excitatory and inhibitory synapses to be visualized in living neurons. Design of the FingR incorporates a novel transcriptional regulation system that ties FingR expression to the level of the target and reduces background fluorescence. In dissociated neurons and brain slices FingRs generated against PSD-95 and Gephyrin did not affect the expression patterns of their endogenous target proteins or the number or strength of synapses. Together, our data indicate that PSD-95 and Gephyrin FingRs can report the localization and amount of endogenous synaptic proteins in living neurons and thus may be used to study changes in synaptic strength in vivo. PMID:23791193

  11. Assessment of the structure of pegylated-recombinant protein therapeutics by the NMR fingerprint assay.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Derek J; Aubin, Yves

    2017-05-10

    A number of recombinant protein therapeutic products, such as filgrastim (methionyl granulocyte colony stimulating factor [Met-GCSF] used to boost the immune system in chemotherapy treated cancer patients), and interferon alpha-2 (used for the treatment of various viral infections), have been chemically modified with the addition of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain. This modification prolongs residency of the drug in the body and reduces metabolic degradation, which allows less frequent administration of the products. Here we show how NMR spectroscopy methods can assess the higher order structure (HOS) of pegylated-filgrastim (Neulasta®), pegylated interferon-α2a (Pegasys®) pegylated interferon-α2b (PEG-Intron®) purchased from the marketplace. The addition of the PEG moiety effectively doubles the molecular weight of the three products. This presents a significant challenge for the application of NMR techniques. Nevertheless, the results showed that high-resolution spectra could be recorded for two of the three products. Comparison of the spectra of the pegylated protein and the non-pegylated protein shows that the chemical modification did not alter the HOS of these proteins.

  12. Effect of DNA Repair Protein Rad18 on Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Aliza G; Tateishi, Satoshi; Bieniasz, Paul D; Muesing, Mark A; Yamaizumi, Masaru; Mulder, Lubbertus C. F

    2006-01-01

    Host factors belonging to the DNA repair machineries are assumed to aid retroviruses in the obligatory step of integration. Here we describe the effect of DNA repair molecule Rad18, a component of the post-replication repair pathway, on viral infection. Contrary to our expectations, cells lacking Rad18 were consistently more permissive to viral transduction as compared to Rad18+/+ controls. Remarkably, such susceptibility was integration independent, since retroviruses devoid of integration activity also showed enhancement of the initial steps of infection. Moreover, the elevated sensitivity of the Rad18−/− cells was also observed with adenovirus. These data indicate that Rad18 suppresses viral infection in a non-specific fashion, probably by targeting incoming DNA. Furthermore, considering data published recently, it appears that the interactions between DNA repair components with incoming viruses, often result in inhibition of the infection rather than cooperation toward its establishment. PMID:16710452

  13. Attenuation of Recombinant Yellow Fever 17D Viruses Expressing Foreign Protein Epitopes at the Surface

    PubMed Central

    Bonaldo, Myrna C.; Garratt, Richard C.; Marchevsky, Renato S.; Coutinho, Evandro S. F.; Jabor, Alfredo V.; Almeida, Luís F. C.; Yamamura, Anna M. Y.; Duarte, Adriana S.; Oliveira, Prisciliana J.; Lizeu, Jackeline O. P.; Camacho, Luiz A. B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is a live attenuated virus. Three-dimensional (3D) homology modeling of the E protein structure from YF 17D virus and its comparison with that from tick-borne encephalitis virus revealed that it is possible to accommodate inserts of different sizes and amino acid compositions in the flavivirus E protein fg loop. This is consistent with the 3D structures of both the dimeric and trimeric forms in which the fg loop lies exposed to solvents. We demonstrate here that YF 17D viruses bearing foreign humoral (17D/8) and T-cell (17D/13) epitopes, which vary in sequence and length, displayed growth restriction. It is hypothesized that interference with the dimer-trimer transition and with the formation of a ring of such trimers in order to allow fusion compromises the capability of the E protein to induce fusion of viral and endosomal membranes, and a slower rate of fusion may delay the extent of virus production. This would account for the lower levels of replication in cultured cells and of viremia in monkeys, as well as for the more attenuated phenotype of the recombinant viruses in monkeys. Testing of both recombinant viruses (17D/8 and 17D/13) for monkey neurovirulence also suggests that insertion at the 17D E protein fg loop does not compromise the attenuated phenotype of YF 17D virus, further confirming the potential use of this site for the development of new live attenuated 17D virus-based vaccines. PMID:15956601

  14. Antigenic and immunosuppressive properties of a trimeric recombinant transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Mühle, Michael; Lehmann, Melissa; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Stern, Daniel; Kroniger, Tobias; Luttmann, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The transmembrane envelope (TM) protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus—1 (HIV-1) plays an important role during virus infection inducing the fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. In addition, there are indications that the TM protein plays a role in the immunopathogenesis leading to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Inactivated virus particles and recombinant gp41 have been reported to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation, as well as to alter cytokine release and gene expression. The same was shown for a peptide corresponding to a highly conserved domain of all retroviral TM proteins, the immunosuppressive domain. Due to its propensity to aggregate and to be expressed at low levels, studies comprising authentic gp41 produced in eukaryotic cells are extremely rare. Here we describe the production of a secreted, soluble recombinant gp41 in 293 cells. The antigen was purified to homogeneity and characterised thoroughly by various biochemical and immunological methods. It was shown that the protein was glycosylated and assembled into trimers. Binding studies by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies implied a six-helix bundle conformation. The low binding of broadly neutralising antibodies (bnAb) directed against the membrane proximal external region (MPER) suggested that this gp41 is probably not suited as vaccine to induce such bnAb. Purified gp41 bound to monocytes and to a lesser extent to lymphocytes and triggered the production of specific cytokines when added to normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, gp41 expressed on target cells inhibited the antigen-specific response of murine CD8+ T cells by drastically impairing their IFNγ production. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of a gp41 produced in eukaryotic cells including its immunosuppressive properties. Our data provide another line of evidence that gp41 might be directly involved in HIV-1

  15. Antigenic and immunosuppressive properties of a trimeric recombinant transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Mühle, Michael; Lehmann, Melissa; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Stern, Daniel; Kroniger, Tobias; Luttmann, Werner; Denner, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The transmembrane envelope (TM) protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) plays an important role during virus infection inducing the fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. In addition, there are indications that the TM protein plays a role in the immunopathogenesis leading to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Inactivated virus particles and recombinant gp41 have been reported to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation, as well as to alter cytokine release and gene expression. The same was shown for a peptide corresponding to a highly conserved domain of all retroviral TM proteins, the immunosuppressive domain. Due to its propensity to aggregate and to be expressed at low levels, studies comprising authentic gp41 produced in eukaryotic cells are extremely rare. Here we describe the production of a secreted, soluble recombinant gp41 in 293 cells. The antigen was purified to homogeneity and characterised thoroughly by various biochemical and immunological methods. It was shown that the protein was glycosylated and assembled into trimers. Binding studies by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies implied a six-helix bundle conformation. The low binding of broadly neutralising antibodies (bnAb) directed against the membrane proximal external region (MPER) suggested that this gp41 is probably not suited as vaccine to induce such bnAb. Purified gp41 bound to monocytes and to a lesser extent to lymphocytes and triggered the production of specific cytokines when added to normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, gp41 expressed on target cells inhibited the antigen-specific response of murine CD8+ T cells by drastically impairing their IFNγ production. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of a gp41 produced in eukaryotic cells including its immunosuppressive properties. Our data provide another line of evidence that gp41 might be directly involved in HIV-1

  16. Transient expression and cellular localization of recombinant proteins in cultured insect cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heterologous protein expression systems are used for production of recombinant proteins, interpretation of cellular trafficking/localization, and for the determination of biochemical function of proteins at the sub-organismal level. Although baculovirus expression systems are increasingly used for ...

  17. Cleavage of Grb2-Associated Binding Protein 2 by Viral Proteinase 2A during Coxsackievirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Haoyu; Fung, Gabriel; Qiu, Ye; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Jingchun; Jin, Zheng-Gen; Luo, Honglin

    2017-01-01

    Coxsackievirus type B3 (CV-B3), an enterovirus associated with the pathogenesis of several human diseases, subverts, or employs the host intracellular signaling pathways to support effective viral infection. We have previously demonstrated that Grb2-associated binding protein 1 (GAB1), a signaling adaptor protein that serves as a platform for intracellular signaling assembly and transduction, is cleaved upon CV-B3 infection, resulting in a gain-of-pro-viral-function via the modification of GAB1-mediated ERK1/2 pathway. GAB2 is a mammalian homolog of GAB1. In this study, we aim to address whether GAB2 plays a synergistic role with GAB1 in the regulation of CV-B3 replication. Here, we reported that GAB2 is also a target of CV-B3-encoded viral proteinase. We showed that GAB2 is cleaved at G238 during CV-B3 infection by viral proteinase 2A, generating two cleaved fragments of GAB2-N1−237 and GAB2-C238−676. Moreover, knockdown of GAB2 significantly inhibits the synthesis of viral protein and subsequent viral progeny production, accompanied by reduced levels of phosphorylated p38, suggesting a pro-viral function for GAB2 linked to p38 activation. Finally, we examined whether the cleavage of GAB2 can promote viral replication as observed for GAB1 cleavage. We showed that expression of neither GAB2-N1−237 nor GAB2-C238−676 results in enhanced viral infectivity, indicating a loss-of-function, rather than a gain-of-function of GAB2 cleavage in mediating virus replication. Taken together, our findings in this study suggest a novel host defense machinery through which CV-B3 infection is limited by the cleavage of a pro-viral protein. PMID:28361043

  18. Protein solubility and differential proteomic profiling of recombinant Escherichia coli overexpressing double-tagged fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chung-Hsien; Lee, Wen-Chien

    2010-08-28

    Overexpression of recombinant proteins usually triggers the induction of heat shock proteins that regulate aggregation and solubility of the overexpressed protein. The two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)-mass spectrometry approach was used to profile the proteome of Escherichia coli overexpressing N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase (GlcNAc 2-epimerase) and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid aldolase (Neu5Ac aldolase), both fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) and polyionic peptide (5D or 5R). Overexpression of fusion proteins by IPTG induction caused significant differential expression of numerous cellular proteins; most of these proteins were down-regulated, including enzymes connected to the pentose phosphate pathway and the enzyme LuxS that could lead to an inhibition of tRNA synthesis. Interestingly, when plasmid-harboring cells were cultured in LB medium, gluconeogenesis occurred mainly through MaeB, while in the host strain, gluconeogenesis occurred by a different pathway (by Mdh and PckA). Significant up-regulation of the chaperones ClpB, HslU and GroEL and high-level expression of two protective small heat shock proteins (IbpA and IbpB) were found in cells overexpressing GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D but not in GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R-expressing E. coli. Although most of the recombinant protein was present in insoluble aggregates, the soluble fraction of GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D was higher than that of GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R. Also, in cells overexpressing recombinant GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D, the expression of σ32 was maintained at a higher level following induction. Differential expression of metabolically functional proteins, especially those in the gluconeogenesis pathway, was found between host and recombinant cells. Also, the expression patterns of chaperones/heat shock proteins differed among the plasmid-harboring bacteria in response to overproduction of recombinant proteins. In conclusion, the solubility of overexpressed recombinant proteins could

  19. Protein solubility and differential proteomic profiling of recombinant Escherichia coli overexpressing double-tagged fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Overexpression of recombinant proteins usually triggers the induction of heat shock proteins that regulate aggregation and solubility of the overexpressed protein. The two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)-mass spectrometry approach was used to profile the proteome of Escherichia coli overexpressing N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase (GlcNAc 2-epimerase) and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid aldolase (Neu5Ac aldolase), both fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) and polyionic peptide (5D or 5R). Results Overexpression of fusion proteins by IPTG induction caused significant differential expression of numerous cellular proteins; most of these proteins were down-regulated, including enzymes connected to the pentose phosphate pathway and the enzyme LuxS that could lead to an inhibition of tRNA synthesis. Interestingly, when plasmid-harboring cells were cultured in LB medium, gluconeogenesis occurred mainly through MaeB, while in the host strain, gluconeogenesis occurred by a different pathway (by Mdh and PckA). Significant up-regulation of the chaperones ClpB, HslU and GroEL and high-level expression of two protective small heat shock proteins (IbpA and IbpB) were found in cells overexpressing GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D but not in GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R-expressing E. coli. Although most of the recombinant protein was present in insoluble aggregates, the soluble fraction of GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D was higher than that of GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R. Also, in cells overexpressing recombinant GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D, the expression of σ32 was maintained at a higher level following induction. Conclusions Differential expression of metabolically functional proteins, especially those in the gluconeogenesis pathway, was found between host and recombinant cells. Also, the expression patterns of chaperones/heat shock proteins differed among the plasmid-harboring bacteria in response to overproduction of recombinant proteins. In conclusion, the solubility of

  20. Transduction of human recombinant proteins into mitochondria as a protein therapeutic approach for mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Lefkothea C; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios S

    2011-11-01

    Protein therapy is considered an alternative approach to gene therapy for treatment of genetic-metabolic disorders. Human protein therapeutics (PTs), developed via recombinant DNA technology and used for the treatment of these illnesses, act upon membrane-bound receptors to achieve their pharmacological response. On the contrary, proteins that normally act inside the cells cannot be developed as PTs in the conventional way, since they are not able to "cross" the plasma membrane. Furthermore, in mitochondrial disorders, attributed either to depleted or malfunctioned mitochondrial proteins, PTs should also have to reach the subcellular mitochondria to exert their therapeutic potential. Nowadays, there is no effective therapy for mitochondrial disorders. The development of PTs, however, via the Protein Transduction Domain (PTD) technology offered new opportunities for the deliberate delivery of human recombinant proteins inside eukaryotic subcellular organelles. To this end, mitochondrial disorders could be clinically encountered with the delivery of human mitochondrial proteins (engineered via recombinant DNA and PTD technologies) at specific intramitochondrial sites to exert their function. Overall, PTD-mediated Protein Replacement Therapy emerges as a suitable model system for the therapeutic approach for mitochondrial disorders.

  1. Evaluating the Role of Viral Proteins in HIV-Mediated Neurotoxicity Using Primary Human Neuronal Cultures.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vasudev R; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Prasad, Vinayaka R

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inability of HIV-1 to infect neurons, over half of the HIV-1-infected population in the USA suffers from neurocognitive dysfunction. HIV-infected immune cells in the periphery enter the central nervous system by causing a breach in the blood-brain barrier. The damage to the neurons is mediated by viral and host toxic products released by activated and infected immune and glial cells. To evaluate the toxicity of any viral isolate, viral protein, or host inflammatory protein, we describe a protocol to assess the neuronal apoptosis and synaptic compromise in primary cultures of human neurons and astrocytes.

  2. Evaluating the Role of Viral Proteins in HIV-Mediated Neurotoxicity Using Primary Human Neuronal Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vasudev R.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Prasad, Vinayaka R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inability of HIV-1 to infect neurons, over half of the HIV-1-infected population in the USA suffers from neurocognitive dysfunction. HIV-infected immune cells in the periphery enter the central nervous system by causing a breach in the blood–brain barrier. The damage to the neurons is mediated by viral and host toxic products released by activated and infected immune and glial cells. To evaluate the toxicity of any viral isolate, viral protein, or host inflammatory protein, we describe a protocol to assess the neuronal apoptosis and synaptic compromise in primary cultures of human neurons and astrocytes. PMID:26714725

  3. Production of Recombinant Proteins in the Chloroplast of the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Zapata, Daniel; Macedo-Osorio, Karla Soledad; Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Durán-Figueroa, Noé; Badillo-Corona, Jesus Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be used for the production of valuable recombinant proteins. Here, we describe chloroplast transformation of C. reinhardtii followed by protein detection. Genes of interest integrate stably by homologous recombination into the chloroplast genome following introduction by particle bombardment. Genes are inherited and expressed in lines recovered after selection in the presence of an antibiotic. Recombinant proteins can be detected by conventional techniques like immunoblotting and purified from liquid cultures.

  4. Purification of recombinant C-reactive protein mutants

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Avinash; Singh, Sanjay K.; Hammond, David J.; Gang, Toh B.; Ngwa, Donald N.; Pathak, Asmita; Agrawal, Alok

    2017-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an evolutionarily conserved protein, a component of the innate immune system, and an acute phase protein in humans. In addition to its raised level in blood in inflammatory states, CRP is also localized at sites of inflammation including atherosclerotic lesions, arthritic joints and amyloid plaque deposits. Results of in vivo experiments in animal models of inflammatory diseases indicate that CRP is an anti-pneumococcal, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-arthritic and an anti-amyloidogenic molecule. The mechanisms through which CRP functions in inflammatory diseases are not fully defined; however, the ligand recognition function of CRP in its native and non-native pentameric structural conformations and the complement-activating ability of ligand-complexed CRP have been suggested to play a role. One tool to understand the structure-function relationships of CRP and determine the contributions of the recognition and effector functions of CRP in host defense is to employ site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants for experimentation. For example, CRP mutants incapable of binding to phosphocholine are generated to investigate the importance of the phosphocholine-binding property of CRP in mediating host defense. Recombinant CRP mutants can be expressed in mammalian cells and, if expressed, can be purified from the cell culture media. While the methods to purify wild-type CRP are well established, different purification strategies are needed to purify various mutant forms of CRP if the mutant does not bind to either calcium or phosphocholine. In this article, we report the methods used to purify pentameric recombinant wild-type and mutant CRP expressed in and secreted by mammalian cells. PMID:1460031

  5. Production of a recombinant industrial protein using barley cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Ritala, A; Wahlström, E H; Holkeri, H; Hafren, A; Mäkeläinen, K; Baez, J; Mäkinen, K; Nuutila, A M

    2008-06-01

    The use of recombinant DNA-based protein production using genetically modified plants could provide a reproducible, consistent quality, safe, animal-component free, origin-traceable, and cost-effective source for industrial proteins required in large amounts (1000s of metric tons) and at low cost (below US$100/Kg). The aim of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of using barley suspension cell culture to support timely testing of the genetic constructs and early product characterization to detect for example post-translational modifications within the industrial protein caused by the selected recombinant system. For this study the human Collagen I alpha 1 (CIa1) chain gene encoding the complete helical region of CIa1 optimized for monocot expression was fused to its N- and C-terminal telopeptide and to a bacteriophage T4 fibritin foldon peptide encoding sequences. The CIa1 accumulation was targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by fusing the CIa1 gene to an ER-directing signal peptide sequence and an ER retention signal HDEL. The construct containing the CIa1 gene was then introduced into immature barley half embryos or barley cells by particle bombardment. Transgenic barley cells resulting from these transformations were grown as suspension cultures in flasks and in a Wave bioreactor producing CIa1 similar to CIa1 purified from the yeast Pichia pastoris based on Western blotting, pepsin resistance, and mass spectroscopy analysis. The barley cell culture derived-CIa1 intracellular accumulation levels ranged from 2 to 9 microg/l illustrating the need for further process improvement in order to use this technology to supply material for product development activities.

  6. Biological roles and functional mechanisms of arenavirus Z protein in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jialong; Danzy, Shamika; Kumar, Naveen; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying

    2012-09-01

    Arenaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever diseases in humans, with limited prophylactic or therapeutic measures. A small RING-domain viral protein Z has been shown to mediate the formation of virus-like particles and to inhibit viral RNA synthesis, although its biological roles in an infectious viral life cycle have not been directly addressed. By taking advantage of the available reverse genetics system for a model arenavirus, Pichinde virus (PICV), we provide the direct evidence for the essential biological roles of the Z protein's conserved residues, including the G2 myristylation site, the conserved C and H residues of RING domain, and the poorly characterized C-terminal L79 and P80 residues. Dicodon substitutions within the late (L) domain (PSAPPYEP) of the PICV Z protein, although producing viable mutant viruses, have significantly reduced virus growth, a finding suggestive of an important role for the intact L domain in viral replication. Further structure-function analyses of both PICV and Lassa fever virus Z proteins suggest that arenavirus Z proteins have similar molecular mechanisms in mediating their multiple functions, with some interesting variations, such as the role of the G2 residue in blocking viral RNA synthesis. In summary, our studies have characterized the biological roles of the Z protein in an infectious arenavirus system and have shed important light on the distinct functions of its domains in virus budding and viral RNA regulation, the knowledge of which may lead to the development of novel antiviral drugs.

  7. Viral Proteins Acquired from a Host Converge to Simplified Domain Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Rappoport, Nadav; Linial, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The infection cycle of viruses creates many opportunities for the exchange of genetic material with the host. Many viruses integrate their sequences into the genome of their host for replication. These processes may lead to the virus acquisition of host sequences. Such sequences are prone to accumulation of mutations and deletions. However, in rare instances, sequences acquired from a host become beneficial for the virus. We searched for unexpected sequence similarity among the 900,000 viral proteins and all proteins from cellular organisms. Here, we focus on viruses that infect metazoa. The high-conservation analysis yielded 187 instances of highly similar viral-host sequences. Only a small number of them represent viruses that hijacked host sequences. The low-conservation sequence analysis utilizes the Pfam family collection. About 5% of the 12,000 statistical models archived in Pfam are composed of viral-metazoan proteins. In about half of Pfam families, we provide indirect support for the directionality from the host to the virus. The other families are either wrongly annotated or reflect an extensive sequence exchange between the viruses and their hosts. In about 75% of cross-taxa Pfam families, the viral proteins are significantly shorter than their metazoan counterparts. The tendency for shorter viral proteins relative to their related host proteins accounts for the acquisition of only a fragment of the host gene, the elimination of an internal domain and shortening of the linkers between domains. We conclude that, along viral evolution, the host-originated sequences accommodate simplified domain compositions. We postulate that the trimmed proteins act by interfering with the fundamental function of the host including intracellular signaling, post-translational modification, protein-protein interaction networks and cellular trafficking. We compiled a collection of hijacked protein sequences. These sequences are attractive targets for manipulation of viral

  8. Extraction and downstream processing of plant-derived recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Buyel, J F; Twyman, R M; Fischer, R

    2015-11-01

    glycans, the ability to scale up production rapidly for emergency responses and the ability to produce commodity recombinant proteins on an agricultural scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Blanié, Sophie; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle

    2010-03-08

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the nucleus of TNFalpha-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein.

  10. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-κB in the nucleus of TNFα-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein. PMID:20211013

  11. BRCT-domain protein BRIT1 influences class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wei-Feng; Chaudhry, Ashutosh; Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Yewdell, William T; Pucella, Joseph N; Sharma, Rahul; Liang, Yulong; Li, Kaiyi; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2017-07-19

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) serve as obligatory intermediates for Ig heavy chain (Igh) class switch recombination (CSR). The mechanisms by which DSBs are resolved to promote long-range DNA end-joining while suppressing genomic instability inherently associated with DSBs are yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we use a targeted short-hairpin RNA screen in a B-cell lymphoma line to identify the BRCT-domain protein BRIT1 as an effector of CSR. We show that conditional genetic deletion of BRIT1 in mice leads to a marked increase in unrepaired Igh breaks and a significant reduction in CSR in ex vivo activated splenic B cells. We find that the C-terminal tandem BRCT domains of BRIT1 facilitate its interaction with phosphorylated H2AX and that BRIT1 is recruited to the Igh locus in an activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and H2AX-dependent fashion. Finally, we demonstrate that depletion of another BRCT-domain protein, MDC1, in BRIT1-deleted B cells increases the severity of CSR defect over what is observed upon loss of either protein alone. Our results identify BRIT1 as a factor in CSR and demonstrate that multiple BRCT-domain proteins contribute to optimal resolution of AID-induced DSBs.

  12. Assessment of stable isotope incorporation into recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Luo, Quanzhou; Apostol, Izydor; Luo, Shun; Jerums, Matthew; Huang, Gang; Jiang, Xinzhao Grace; Gastwirt, Jessica; Savjani, Nimesh; Lewis, Jeffrey; Keener, Ronald; Wypych, Jette

    2013-02-15

    Stable isotope labeling combined with mass spectrometry has been widely used in a diverse set of applications in the biochemistry and biomedical fields. When stable isotope-labeled proteins are produced via metabolic labeling of cell culture, a comprehensive assessment of the labeling pattern is imperative. In this study, we present a set of mass spectrometry-based bioanalytical tools developed for quantitatively tracing the levels of the stable isotopes incorporated into the recombinant proteins (monoclonal antibodies and Fc fusion proteins expressed in different host systems) that include total mass analysis, peptide mapping analysis, and amino acid analysis. We show that these three mass spectrometry-based analytical methods have distinctive advantages and limitations and that they are mutually complementary in evaluating the quality of stable isotope-labeled proteins. In addition, we show that the analytical techniques developed here are powerful tools to provide valuable insights into studying cell metabolism and performing flux analysis during cell culture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Manufacturing of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Clément, Nathalie; Grieger, Joshua C

    2016-01-01

    The ability to elicit robust and long-term transgene expression in vivo together with minimal immunogenicity and little to no toxicity are only a few features that make recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors ideally suited for many gene therapy applications. Successful preclinical studies have encouraged the use of rAAV for therapeutic gene transfer to patients in the clinical setting. Nevertheless, the use of rAAV in clinical trials has underscored the need for production and purification systems capable of generating large amounts of highly pure rAAV particles. To date, generating vector quantities sufficient to meet the expanding clinical demand is still a hurdle when using current production systems. In this chapter, we will provide a description of the current methods to produce clinical grade of rAAV under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) settings. PMID:27014711

  14. Rinderpest Viruses Lacking the C and V Proteins Show Specific Defects in Growth and Transcription of Viral RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Michael D.; Barrett, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Rinderpest virus is a morbillivirus and the causative agent of an important disease of cattle and wild bovids. The P genes of all morbilliviruses give rise to two proteins in addition to the P protein itself: use of an alternate start translation site, in a second open reading frame, gives rise to the C protein, while cotranscriptional insertion of an extra base gives rise to the V protein, a fusion of the amino-terminal half of P to a short, highly conserved, cysteine-rich zinc binding domain. Little is known about the function of either of these two proteins in the rinderpest virus life cycle. We have constructed recombinant rinderpest viruses in which the expression of these proteins has been suppressed, individually and together, and studied the replication of these viruses in tissue culture. We show that the absence of the V protein has little effect on the replication rate of the virus but does lead to an increase in synthesis of genome and antigenome RNAs and a change in cytopathic effect to a more syncytium-forming phenotype. Virus that does not express the C protein, on the other hand, is clearly defective in growth in all cell lines tested, and this defect appears to be related to a decreased transcription of mRNA from viral genes. The phenotypes of both individual mutant virus types are both expressed in the double mutant expressing neither V nor C. PMID:10684274

  15. Self-Assembled Materials Made from Functional Recombinant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yeongseon; Champion, Julie A

    2016-10-18

    Proteins are potent molecules that can be used as therapeutics, sensors, and biocatalysts with many advantages over small-molecule counterparts due to the specificity of their activity based on their amino acid sequence and folded three-dimensional structure. However, they also have significant limitations in their stability, localization, and recovery when used in soluble form. These opportunities and challenges have motivated the creation of materials from such functional proteins in order to protect and present them in a way that enhances their function. We have designed functional recombinant fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into materials with unique structures that maintain or improve the functionality of the protein. Fusion of either a functional protein or an assembly domain to a leucine zipper domain makes the materials design strategy modular, based on the high affinity between leucine zippers. The self-assembly domains, including elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) and defined-sequence random coil polypeptides, can be fused with a leucine zipper motif in order to promote assembly of the fusion proteins into larger structures upon specific stimuli such as temperature and ionic strength. Fusion of other functional domains with the counterpart leucine zipper motif endows the self-assembled materials with protein-specific functions such as fluorescence or catalytic activity. In this Account, we describe several examples of materials assembled from functional fusion proteins as well as the structural characterization, functionality, and understanding of the assembly mechanism. The first example is zipper fusion proteins containing ELPs that assemble into particles when introduced to a model extracellular matrix and subsequently disassemble over time to release the functional protein for drug delivery applications. Under different conditions, the same fusion proteins can self-assemble into hollow vesicles. The vesicles display a functional protein on

  16. The nucleolar protein GLTSCR2 is required for efficient viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Meng, Wen; Han, Shi-Chong; Li, Cui-Cui; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Glioma tumor suppressor candidate region gene 2 protein (GLTSCR2) is a nucleolar protein. In the investigation of the role of GLTSCR2 that played in the cellular innate immune response to viral infection, we found GLTSCR2 supported viral replication of rhabdovirus, paramyxovirus, and coronavirus in cells. Viral infection induced translocation of GLTSCR2 from nucleus to cytoplasm that enabled GLTSCR2 to attenuate type I interferon IFN-β and support viral replication. Cytoplasmic GLTSCR2 was able to interact with retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and the ubiquitin-specific protease 15 (USP15), and the triple interaction induced USP15 activity to remove K63-linked ubiquitination of RIG-I, leading to attenuation of RIG-I and IFN-β. Blocking cytoplasmic translocation of GLTSCR2, by deletion of its nuclear export sequence (NES), abrogated its ability to attenuate IFN-β and support viral replication. GLTSCR2-mediated attenuation of RIG-I and IFN-β led to alleviation of host cell innate immune response to viral infection. Our findings suggested that GLTSCR2 contributed to efficient viral replication, and GLTSCR2 should be considered as a potential target for therapeutic control of viral infection. PMID:27824081

  17. Use of Cre/loxP recombination to swap cell binding motifs on the adenoviral capsid protein IX

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Vorobyova, Olga; Pool, Madeline; Kothary, Rashmi; Parks, Robin J.

    2011-11-25

    We used Cre/loxP recombination to swap targeting ligands present on the adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX). A loxP-flanked sequence encoding poly-lysine (pK-binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans) was engineered onto the 3'-terminus of pIX, and the resulting fusion protein allowed for routine virus propagation. Growth of this virus on Cre-expressing cells removed the pK coding sequence, generating virus that could only infect through alternative ligands, such as a tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA)-binding motif engineered into the capsid fibre protein for enhanced infection of neuronal cells. We used a similar approach to swap the pK motif on pIX for a sequence encoding a single-domain antibody directed towards CD66c for targeted infection of cancer cells; Cre-mediated removal of the pK-coding sequence simultaneously placed the single-domain antibody coding sequence in frame with pIX. Thus, we have developed a simple method to propagate virus lacking native viral tropism but containing cell-specific binding ligands. - Highlights: > We describe a method to grow virus lacking native tropism but containing novel cell-binding ligands. > Cre/loxP recombination was used to modify the adenovirus genome. > A targeting ligand present on capsid protein IX was removed or replaced using recombination. > Cre-loxP was also used to 'swap' the identity of the targeting ligand present on pIX.

  18. Visualization of feline calicivirus replication in real-time with recombinant viruses engineered to express fluorescent reporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Abente, Eugenio J; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Bok, Karin; Green, Kim Y

    2010-04-25

    Caliciviruses are non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses with a single-stranded, positive sense RNA genome. Transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis was used to insert a transprimer sequence into random sites of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of the feline calicivirus (FCV) genome. A site in the LC gene (encoding the capsid leader protein) of the FCV genome was identified that could tolerate foreign insertions, and two viable recombinant FCV variants expressing LC fused either to AcGFP, or DsRedFP were recovered. The effects of the insertions on LC processing, RNA replication, and stability of the viral genome were analyzed, and the progression of a calicivirus single infection and co-infection were captured by real-time imaging fluorescent microscopy. The ability to engineer viable recombinant caliciviruses expressing foreign markers enables new approaches to investigate virus and host cell interactions, as well as studies of viral recombination, one of the driving forces of calicivirus evolution. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Separation and isolation of BTV dsRNA segments and viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Joseph K-K; Huang, I-Jen; Hayama, Emiko

    2012-05-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) genome contains ten double-stranded RNA segments. The sequence of the plus strand of each of the BTV genomic double-stranded RNAs is the same as that of its mRNA, which encodes for a single viral protein, except the smallest S4 segment which can encode for two nonstructural proteins, primarily for the release assistance of the viral progeny. The separation and isolation of each BTV dsRNA segment and viral protein have provided extensive data related to its viral infection, pathology, suppression of host cellular functions, and eventual apoptosis of the infected host cells. This cytoplasmic virus is also an animal killer that costs the U.S. livestock industry at least $125 million yearly. However, this virus has no known effect on humans. Thus, it is very safe to carry out investigation with the virus, preferably in a BSL-2 laboratory.

  20. Characterization of EBV gB indicates properties of both class I and class II viral fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Backovic, Marija; Leser, George P.; Lamb, Robert A.; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2007-11-10

    To gain insight into Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B (gB), recombinant, secreted variants were generated. The role of putative transmembrane regions, the proteolytic processing and the oligomerization state of the gB variants were investigated. Constructs containing 2 of 3 C-terminal hydrophobic regions were secreted, indicating that these do not act as transmembrane anchors. The efficiency of cleavage of the gB furin site was found to depend on the nature of C-terminus. All of the gB constructs formed rosette structures reminiscent of the postfusion aggregates formed by other viral fusion proteins. However, substitution of putative fusion loop residues, WY{sup 112-113} and WLIY{sup 193-196}, with less hydrophobic amino acids from HSV-1 gB, produced trimeric protein and abrogated the ability of the EBV gB ectodomains to form rosettes. These data demonstrate biochemical features of EBV gB that are characteristic of other class I and class II viral fusion proteins, but not of HSV-1 gB.

  1. Antigenic and immunogenic analysis of group A and group B respiratory syncytial virus G proteins expressed from recombinant baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sullender, W M; Britt, W J

    1996-04-01

    The attachment glycoprotein G plays a major role in the antigenic variability of respiratory syncytial (RS) virus. We have expressed from recombinant baculoviruses antigenic group A and group B RS virus G proteins (designated bacAG for the group A and bacBG for the group B virus G protein). The insect cell-produced G proteins migrated more rapidly in SDS-PAGE as compared to HEp-2 cell derived G proteins owing to glycosylation differences. Antigenicity was tested by immunofluorescence; five or five group cross-reactive, five or six group A-specific, and six of six group B-specific MAbs reacted appropriately with bacAG and/or bacBG. In addition, bacAG and bacBG reacted with human polyclonal antibodies to RS virus. Cotton rats were immunized with bacAG, bacBG or a control lysate and challenged intranasally with a group A RS virus. The bacAG-immunized group had a statistically significant reduction in viral replication in the lungs (lung titres as mean log10 p.f.u./g +/- SD, bacAG = 3.1 +/- 1.2; control = 4.8 +/- 0.6, P = 0.013). The bacBG-immunized group showed less reduction in viral titres (bacBG lung titres = 4.1 +/- 0.6, P = 0.13 for bacBG compared to control). Thus, as expected, homologous protein (bacAG) immunization provided more protection against viral replication than immunization with the heterologous protein (bacBG). The G protein of RS virus expressed in insect cells had antigenic and immunogenic features which were similar to that of the G protein expressed in mammalian cells. The baculovirus-expressed G proteins should be useful for the study of immune responses to RS viruses.

  2. Virion-associated viral proteins of a Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus) iridovirus (genus Ranavirus) and functional study of the major capsid protein (MCP).

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Weng, Shaoping; Zhao, Gaoxiang; He, Jianguo; Dong, Chuanfu

    2014-08-06

    Chinese giant salamander iridovirus (CGSIV) is the emerging causative agent to farmed Chinese giant salamanders in nationwide China. CGSIV is a member of the common midwife toad ranavirus (CMTV) subset of the amphibian-like ranavirus (ALRV) in the genus Ranavirus of Iridoviridae family. However, viral protein information on ALRV is lacking. In this first proteomic analysis of ALRV, 40 CGSIV viral proteins were detected from purified virus particles by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The transcription products of all 40 identified virion proteins were confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Temporal expression pattern analysis combined with drug inhibition assay indicated that 37 transcripts of the 40 virion protein genes could be classified into three temporal kinetic classes, namely, 5 immediate early, 12 delayed early, and 20 late genes. The presence of major capsid proteins (MCP, ORF019L) and a proliferating cell nuclear antigen (ORF025L) was further confirmed by Western blot analysis. The functions of MCP were also determined by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based knockdown assay and anti-recombinant MCP serum-based neutralization testing. At low dosages of CGSIV, siRNA-based knockdown of the MCP gene effectively inhibited CGSIV replication in fathead minnow cells. The antiviral effect observed in the anti-MCP serum-based neutralization test confirms the crucial function of the MCP gene in CGSIV replication. Taken together, detailed information on the virion-associated viral proteins of ALRV is presented for the first time. Our results also provide evidence that MCP is essential for CGSIV replication in vitro.

  3. Characterization and recombinant protein expression of ferritin light chain homologue in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sun Mee; Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2014-04-01

    The silkworm genome encodes three iron storage proteins or ferritins, Fer1HCH, Fer2LCH, and Fer3HCH. Probing our EST library constructed from 1-day-old silkworm eggs revealed only Fer2LCH mRNA, which encoded for a protein with a predicted putative N-glycosylation site. Developmental and tissue expression analyses during embryogenesis revealed that Fer2LCH mRNA was abundant from 6 h to 6 days after oviposition. Transcriptional expression of Fer2LCH during the postembryonic stage is also high in the larval fat body and mid-gut, and then is upregulated in all pupal tissues tested. We found that Fer2LCH mRNA contains an iron-responsive element, suggesting this ferritin subunit is subject to translational control. Although ferritin expression has been shown to increase following immune challenge in other insects, the levels of Fer2LCH mRNA were not significantly induced following viral or bacterial infection of Bombyx mori. Using a baculovirus expression system we expressed recombinant BmFer2LCH protein, which was detectable in the cytoplasmic fraction, likely in a compartment of the secretory pathway, and was shown to undergo posttranslational modifications including N-glycosylation. In particular, rBmFer2LCH carbohydrate chains were composed of mannose and GlcNAc. We suggest that Fer2LCH is important for iron homeostasis and maintaining normal organ function in silkworms.

  4. Marked Variability in the Extent of Protein Disorder within and between Viral Families

    PubMed Central

    Pushker, Ravindra; Mooney, Catherine; Davey, Norman E.; Jacqué, Jean-Marc; Shields, Denis C.

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered regions in eukaryotic proteomes contain key signaling and regulatory modules and mediate interactions with many proteins. Many viral proteomes encode disordered proteins and modulate host factors through the use of short linear motifs (SLiMs) embedded within disordered regions. However, the degree of viral protein disorder across different viruses is not well understood, so we set out to establish the constraints acting on viruses, in terms of their use of disordered protein regions. We surveyed predicted disorder across 2,278 available viral genomes in 41 families, and correlated the extent of disorder with genome size and other factors. Protein disorder varies strikingly between viral families (from 2.9% to 23.1% of residues), and also within families. However, this substantial variation did not follow the established trend among their hosts, with increasing disorder seen across eubacterial, archaebacterial, protists, and multicellular eukaryotes. For example, among large mammalian viruses, poxviruses and herpesviruses showed markedly differing disorder (5.6% and 17.9%, respectively). Viral families with smaller genome sizes have more disorder within each of five main viral types (ssDNA, dsDNA, ssRNA+, dsRNA, retroviruses), except for negative single-stranded RNA viruses, where disorder increased with genome size. However, surveying over all viruses, which compares tiny and enormous viruses over a much bigger range of genome sizes, there is no strong association of genome size with protein disorder. We conclude that there is extensive variation in the disorder content of viral proteomes. While a proportion of this may relate to base composition, to extent of gene overlap, and to genome size within viral types, there remain important additional family and virus-specific effects. Differing disorder strategies are likely to impact on how different viruses modulate host factors, and on how rapidly viruses can evolve novel instances of SLi

  5. Factors that contribute to the immmunogenicity of therapeutic recombinant human proteins.

    PubMed

    Mukovozov, Ilya; Sabljic, Thomas; Hortelano, Gonzalo; Ofosu, Frederick A

    2008-05-01

    Use of recombinant human proteins has revolutionized medicine by providing over 200 highly purified hormones and proteins that effectively treat many inherited and acquired peptide hormone and protein deficiencies. With the exception of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, these biological medicines are synthesized by cultured cells using DNA sequences that would yield proteins with identical amino acid sequences as endogenous human proteins. Therefore, there was the broad expectation that recombinant human biological medicines would be non-immunogenic in patients capable of synthesizing even sub-optimal levels of these therapeutic proteins to which they are innately tolerant. However, the widespread clinical use of recombinant human proteins has demonstrated that nearly all of them are immunogenic. This observation suggests that factors additional to differences in amino acid sequences of endogenous and biotherapeutic proteins contribute to the immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins. The main aim of this review is to summarize some of the factors that are known to contribute to the immunogenicity of recombinant therapeutic proteins.

  6. Viral Protein Kinetics of Piscine Orthoreovirus Infection in Atlantic Salmon Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haatveit, Hanne Merethe; Wessel, Øystein; Markussen, Turhan; Lund, Morten; Thiede, Bernd; Nyman, Ingvild Berg; Braaen, Stine; Dahle, Maria Krudtaa; Rimstad, Espen

    2017-01-01

    Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) is ubiquitous in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and the cause of heart and skeletal muscle inflammation. Erythrocytes are important target cells for PRV. We have investigated the kinetics of PRV infection in salmon blood cells. The findings indicate that PRV causes an acute infection of blood cells lasting 1–2 weeks, before it subsides into persistence. A high production of viral proteins occurred initially in the acute phase which significantly correlated with antiviral gene transcription. Globular viral factories organized by the non-structural protein µNS were also observed initially, but were not evident at later stages. Interactions between µNS and the PRV structural proteins λ1, µ1, σ1 and σ3 were demonstrated. Different size variants of µNS and the outer capsid protein µ1 appeared at specific time points during infection. Maximal viral protein load was observed five weeks post cohabitant challenge and was undetectable from seven weeks post challenge. In contrast, viral RNA at a high level could be detected throughout the eight-week trial. A proteolytic cleavage fragment of the µ1 protein was the only viral protein detectable after seven weeks post challenge, indicating that this µ1 fragment may be involved in the mechanisms of persistent infection. PMID:28335455

  7. Viral Protein Kinetics of Piscine Orthoreovirus Infection in Atlantic Salmon Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Haatveit, Hanne Merethe; Wessel, Øystein; Markussen, Turhan; Lund, Morten; Thiede, Bernd; Nyman, Ingvild Berg; Braaen, Stine; Dahle, Maria Krudtaa; Rimstad, Espen

    2017-03-18

    Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) is ubiquitous in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and the cause of heart and skeletal muscle inflammation. Erythrocytes are important target cells for PRV. We have investigated the kinetics of PRV infection in salmon blood cells. The findings indicate that PRV causes an acute infection of blood cells lasting 1-2 weeks, before it subsides into persistence. A high production of viral proteins occurred initially in the acute phase which significantly correlated with antiviral gene transcription. Globular viral factories organized by the non-structural protein µNS were also observed initially, but were not evident at later stages. Interactions between µNS and the PRV structural proteins λ1, µ1, σ1 and σ3 were demonstrated. Different size variants of µNS and the outer capsid protein µ1 appeared at specific time points during infection. Maximal viral protein load was observed five weeks post cohabitant challenge and was undetectable from seven weeks post challenge. In contrast, viral RNA at a high level could be detected throughout the eight-week trial. A proteolytic cleavage fragment of the µ1 protein was the only viral protein detectable after seven weeks post challenge, indicating that this µ1 fragment may be involved in the mechanisms of persistent infection.

  8. Effects of NV gene knock-out recombinant viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) on Mx gene expression in Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells and olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Ki Hong

    2012-03-01

    To determine whether the NV gene of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is related to the type I interferon response of hosts, expression of Mx gene in Epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells and in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) in response to infection with either wild-type VHSV or recombinant VHSVs (rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP and rVHSV-wild) was investigated. A reporter vector was constructed for measuring Mx gene expression using olive flounder Mx promoter, in which the reporter Metridia luciferase was designed to be excreted to culture medium to facilitate measurement. The highest increase of luciferase activity was detected from supernatant of cells infected with rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP. In contrast cells infected with wild-type VHSV showed a slight increase of the luciferase activity. Interestingly, cells infected with rVHSV-wild that has artificially changed nucleotides just before and after the NV gene ORF, also showed highly increased luciferase activity, but the increased amplitude was lower than that by rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP. These results strongly suggest that the NV protein of VHSV plays an important role in suppressing interferon response in host cells, which provides a condition for the viruses to efficiently proliferate in host cells. In an in vivo experiment, the Mx gene expression in olive flounder challenged with the rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP was clearly higher than fish challenged with rVHSV-wild or wild-type VHSV, suggesting that lacking of the NV gene in the genome of rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP brought to strong interferon response that subsequently inhibit viral replication in fish.

  9. Live cell imaging reveals the relocation of dsRNA binding proteins upon viral infection.

    PubMed

    Barton, Deborah; Roovers, Elke; Gouil, Quentin; C da Fonseca, Guilherme; Reis, Rodrigo S; Jackson, Craig; Overall, Robyn; Fusaro, Adriana; Waterhouse, Peter

    2017-03-15

    Viral infection triggers a range of plant responses such as the activation of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The double-stranded RNA binding (DRB) proteins, DRB3 and DRB4, are part of this pathway and aid in defending against DNA and RNA viruses, respectively. Using live cell imaging, we show that DRB2, DRB3 and DRB5 relocate from their uniform cytoplasmic distribution to concentrated accumulation in nascent viral replication complexes (VRCs) that develop following cell invasion by viral RNA. Inactivation of the DRB3 gene in Arabidopsis, by T-DNA insertion, rendered these plants less able to repress RNA viral replication. We propose a model for the early stages of virus defense in which DRB2, DRB3 and DRB5 are invasion sensors that relocate to nascent VRCs, where they bind to viral RNA and inhibit virus replication.

  10. Illuminating structural proteins in viral “dark matter” with metaproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Brum, Jennifer R.; Ignacio-Espinoza, J. Cesar; Kim, Eun-Hae; Trubl, Gareth; Jones, Robert M.; Roux, Simon; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Rich, Virginia I.; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are ecologically important, yet environmental virology is limited by dominance of unannotated genomic sequences representing taxonomic and functional “viral dark matter.” Although recent analytical advances are rapidly improving taxonomic annotations, identifying functional dark matter remains problematic. Here, we apply paired metaproteomics and dsDNA-targeted metagenomics to identify 1,875 virion-associated proteins from the ocean. Over one-half of these proteins were newly functionally annotated and represent abundant and widespread viral metagenome-derived protein clusters (PCs). One primarily unannotated PC dominated the dataset, but structural modeling and genomic context identified this PC as a previously unidentified capsid protein from multiple uncultivated tailed virus families. Furthermore, four of the five most abundant PCs in the metaproteome represent capsid proteins containing the HK97-like protein fold previously found in many viruses that infect all three domains of life. The dominance of these proteins within our dataset, as well as their global distribution throughout the world’s oceans and seas, supports prior hypotheses that this HK97-like protein fold is the most abundant biological structure on Earth. Together, these culture-independent analyses improve virion-associated protein annotations, facilitate the investigation of proteins within natural viral communities, and offer a high-throughput means of illuminating functional viral dark matter. PMID:26884177

  11. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kuan Rong; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Bestagno, Marco; Ooi, Eng Eong; Burrone, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII) of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE) in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well. PMID:26218926

  12. Hepatitis C viral protein translation: mechanisms and implications in developing antivirals.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Brett; Liu, Qiang

    2011-11-01

    Hepatitis C viral protein translation occurs in a cap-independent manner through the use of an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) present within the viral 5'-untranslated region. The IRES is composed of highly conserved structural domains that directly recruit the 40S ribosomal subunit to the viral genomic RNA. This frees the virus from relying on a large number of translation initiation factors that are required for cap-dependent translation, conferring a selective advantage to the virus especially in times when the availability of such factors is low. Although the mechanism of translation initiation on the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) IRES is well established, modulation of the HCV IRES activity by both cellular and viral factors is not well understood. As the IRES is essential in the HCV life cycle and as such remains well conserved in an otherwise highly heterogenic virus, the process of HCV protein translation represents an attractive target in the development of novel antivirals. This review will focus on the mechanisms of HCV protein translation and how this process is postulated to be modulated by cis-acting viral factors, as well as trans-acting viral and cellular factors. Numerous therapeutic approaches investigated in targeting HCV protein translation for the development of novel antivirals will also be discussed.

  13. Use of DNA and recombinant canarypox viral (ALVAC) vectors for equine herpes virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Minke, J M; Fischer, L; Baudu, Ph; Guigal, P M; Sindle, T; Mumford, J A; Audonnet, J C

    2006-05-15

    In this study, experimental canarypox virus (ALVAC) and plasmid DNA recombinant vaccines expressing the gB, gC and gD glycoproteins of EHV-1 were assessed for their ability to protect conventional ponies against a respiratory challenge with EHV-1. In addition, potential means of enhancing serological responses in horses to ALVAC and DNA vaccination were explored. These included co-administration of the antigen with conventional adjuvants, complexation with DMRIE-DOPE and co-expression of the antigen along with equine GM-CSF. Groups of EHV primed ponies were vaccinated twice intra-muscularly with one dose of the appropriate test vaccine at an interval of 5 weeks. Two to 3 weeks after the second vaccination, ponies were infected intra-nasally with the virulent Ab4 strain of EHV-1 after which they were observed clinically and sampled for virological investigations. The results demonstrated that DNA and ALVAC vaccination markedly reduced virus excretion after challenge in terms of duration and magnitude, but failed to protect against cell-associated viremia. Noteworthy was the almost complete absence of virus excretion in the group of ponies vaccinated with ALVAC-EHV in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant or DNA plasmid formulated with aluminium phosphate. The administration of the DNA vaccine in the presence of GM-CSF and formulated in DMRIE-DOPE and of the ALVAC vaccine in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant significantly improved virus neutralising antibody responses to EHV-1. These findings indicate that DNA and ALVAC vaccination is a promising approach for the immunological control of EHV-1 infection, but that more research is needed to identify the immunodominant protective antigens of EHV-1 and their interaction with the equine immune system.

  14. Heat Shock Protein 90 Ensures Efficient Mumps Virus Replication by Assisting with Viral Polymerase Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Tahara, Maino; Kidokoro, Minoru; Takeda, Makoto

    2017-03-15

    Paramyxoviral RNAs are synthesized by a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) consisting of the large (L) protein and its cofactor phosphoprotein (P protein). The L protein is a multifunctional protein that catalyzes RNA synthesis, mRNA capping, and mRNA polyadenylation. Growing evidence shows that the stability of several paramyxovirus L proteins is regulated by heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). In this study, we demonstrated that Hsp90 activity was important for mumps virus (MuV) replication. The Hsp90 activity was required for L-protein stability and activity because an Hsp90-specific inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), destabilized the MuV L protein and suppressed viral RNA synthesis. However, once the L protein formed a mature polymerase complex with the P protein, Hsp90 activity was no longer required for the stability and activity of the L protein. When the Hsp90 activity was inhibited, the MuV L protein was degraded through the CHIP (C terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein)-mediated proteasomal pathway. High concentrations of 17-AAG showed strong cytotoxicity to certain cell types, but combined use of an Hsp70 inhibitor, VER155008, potentiated degradation of the L protein, allowing a sufficient reduction of 17-AAG concentration to block MuV replication with minimum cytotoxicity. Regulation of the L protein by Hsp90 and Hsp70 chaperones was also demonstrated for another paramyxovirus, the measles virus. Collectively, our data show that the Hsp90/Hsp70 chaperone machinery assists in the maturation of the paramyxovirus L protein and thereby in the formation of a mature RdRp complex and efficient viral replication.IMPORTANCE Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is nearly universally required for viral protein homeostasis. Here, we report that Hsp90 activity is required for efficient propagation of mumps virus (MuV). Hsp90 functions in the maintenance of the catalytic subunit of viral polymerase, the large (L) protein, prior to formation of a

  15. Active cAMP-dependent protein kinase incorporated within highly purified HIV-1 particles is required for viral infectivity and interacts with viral capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Christine; Hemonnot, Bénédicte; Gay, Bernard; Bardy, Martine; Sanchiz, Céline; Devaux, Christian; Briant, Laurence

    2003-09-12

    Host cell components, including protein kinases such as ERK-2/mitogen-activated protein kinase, incorporated within human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions play a pivotal role in the ability of HIV to infect and replicate in permissive cells. The present work provides evidence that the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (C-PKA) is packaged within HIV-1 virions as demonstrated using purified subtilisin-digested viral particles. Virus-associated C-PKA was shown to be enzymatically active and able to phosphorylate synthetic substrate in vitro. Suppression of virion-associated C-PKA activity by specific synthetic inhibitor had no apparent effect on viral precursor maturation and virus assembly. However, virus-associated C-PKA activity was demonstrated to regulate HIV-1 infectivity as assessed by single round infection assays performed by using viruses produced from cells expressing an inactive form of C-PKA. In addition, virus-associated C-PKA was found to co-precipitate with and to phosphorylate the CAp24gag protein. Altogether our results indicate that virus-associated C-PKA regulates HIV-1 infectivity, possibly by catalyzing phosphorylation of the viral CAp24gag protein.

  16. Common principles and intermediates of viral protein-mediated fusion: the HIV-1 paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Melikyan, Gregory B

    2008-01-01

    Enveloped viruses encode specialized fusion proteins which promote the merger of viral and cell membranes, permitting the cytosolic release of the viral cores. Understanding the molecular details of this process is essential for antiviral strategies. Recent structural studies revealed a stunning diversity of viral fusion proteins in their native state. In spite of this diversity, the post-fusion structures of these proteins share a common trimeric hairpin motif in which the amino- and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic domains are positioned at the same end of a rod-shaped molecule. The converging hairpin motif, along with biochemical and functional data, implies that disparate viral proteins promote membrane merger via a universal "cast-and-fold" mechanism. According to this model, fusion proteins first anchor themselves to the target membrane through their hydrophobic segments and then fold back, bringing the viral and cellular membranes together and forcing their merger. However, the pathways of protein refolding and the mechanism by which this refolding is coupled to membrane rearrangements are still not understood. The availability of specific inhibitors targeting distinct steps of HIV-1 entry permitted the identification of key conformational states of its envelope glycoprotein en route to fusion. These studies provided functional evidence for the direct engagement of the target membrane by HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein prior to fusion and revealed the role of partially folded pre-hairpin conformations in promoting the pore formation. PMID:19077194

  17. DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A associates with viral proteins and impacts HSV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Rowles, Daniell L; Tsai, Yuan-Chin; Greco, Todd M; Lin, Aaron E; Li, Minghao; Yeh, Justin; Cristea, Ileana M

    2015-06-01

    Viral infections can alter the cellular epigenetic landscape, through modulation of either DNA methylation profiles or chromatin remodeling enzymes and histone modifications. These changes can act to promote viral replication or host defense. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a prominent human pathogen, which relies on interactions with host factors for efficient replication and spread. Nevertheless, the knowledge regarding its modulation of epigenetic factors remains limited. Here, we used fluorescently-labeled viruses in conjunction with immunoaffinity purification and MS to study virus-virus and virus-host protein interactions during HSV-1 infection in primary human fibroblasts. We identified interactions among viral capsid and tegument proteins, detecting phosphorylation of the capsid protein VP26 at sites within its UL37-binding domain, and an acetylation within the major capsid protein VP5. Interestingly, we found a nuclear association between viral capsid proteins and the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), which we confirmed by reciprocal isolations and microscopy. We show that drug-induced inhibition of DNA methyltransferase activity, as well as siRNA- and shRNA-mediated DNMT3A knockdowns trigger reductions in virus titers. Altogether, our results highlight a functional association of viral proteins with the mammalian DNA methyltransferase machinery, pointing to DNMT3A as a host factor required for effective HSV-1 infection.

  18. Synthesis of bluetongue virus (BTV) corelike particles by a recombinant baculovirus expressing the two major structural core proteins of BTV.

    PubMed Central

    French, T J; Roy, P

    1990-01-01

    The L3 and M7 genes of bluetongue virus (BTV), which encode the two major core proteins of the virus (VP3 and VP7, respectively), were inserted into a baculovirus dual-expression transfer vector and a recombinant baculovirus expressing both foreign genes isolated following in vivo recombination with wild-type Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA. Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells infected with the recombinant synthesized large amounts of BTV corelike particles. These particles have been shown to be similar to authentic BTV cores in terms of size, appearance, stoichiometric arrangement of VP3 to VP7 (ratio, 2:15), and the predominance of VP7 on the surface of the particles. In infected insect cells, the corelike particles were observed in paracrystalline arrays. The formation of these structures indicates that neither the BTV double-stranded viral RNA species nor the associated minor core proteins are necessary for assembly of cores in insect cells. Furthermore, the three BTV nonstructural proteins NS1, NS2, and NS3, are not required to assist or direct the formation of empty corelike particles from VP3 and VP7. Images PMID:2157041

  19. Purification of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) protein from transplastomic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Abdoli Nasab, Maryam; Jalali Javaran, Mokhtar; Cusido, Rosa M; Palazon, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Plants are low cost platforms for the production of recombinant proteins, but their complexity renders the purification of plant recombinant proteins more difficult than proteins expressed in yeast or bacteria. Plastid transformation enables high-level expression of foreign genes and the accumulation of recombinant proteins in plastid organelles. Histidine (His) tags are widely used for affinity purification of recombinant proteins in a nickel column. The human tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is one of the most important pharmaceutical recombinant proteins involved in the breakdown of blood clots in different parts of the body. The truncated form of the tissue plasminogen activator (K2S) has a longer plasma half-life, better diffusion into the clot, and higher fibrinolytic activity. In a construct designed to insert the K2S gene in the tobacco chloroplast, the sequence of six histidines and a factor Xa protease site was fused to the C-terminus of the K2S protein. The presence and amount of tPA recombinant protein in transplastomic tobacco plants was estimated by ELISA analysis using a specific antibody. The protein was purified from total soluble protein, insoluble protein aggregates and the protein was extracted from the isolated chloroplast using nickel resin and a chromatography column. After digestion of the purified protein with factor Xa, the presence of the purified tPA protein was confirmed by western blot analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Production and purification of two recombinant proteins from transgenic corn.

    PubMed

    Kusnadi, A R; Hood, E E; Witcher, D R; Howard, J A; Nikolov, Z L

    1998-01-01

    This study reports the production, purification, and characterization of recombinant Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase (GUS) and chicken egg-white avidin from transgenic corn seed. The avidin and gus genes were stably integrated in the genome and expressed over seven generations. The accumulation levels of avidin and GUS in corn kernel were 5.7% and 0.7% of extractable protein, respectively. Within the kernel, avidin and GUS accumulation was mainly localized to the germ, indicating possible tissue preference of the ubiquitin promoter. The storage-stability studies demonstrated that processed transgenic seed containing GUS or avidin can be stored at 10 degrees C for at least 3 months and at 25 degrees C for up to 2 weeks without a significant loss of activity. The heat-stability experiments indicated that GUS and avidin in the whole kernels were stable at 50 degrees C for up to 1 week. The buffer composition also had an affect on the aqueous extraction of avidin and GUS from ground kernels. Avidin was purified in one step by using 2-iminobiotin agarose, whereas GUS was purified in four steps consisting of adsorption, ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and size-exclusion chromatography. Biochemical properties of purified avidin and GUS were similar to those of the respective native proteins.

  1. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  2. Host SAMHD1 Protein Promotes HIV-1 Recombination in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Laura A.; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Daly, Michele B.; Allan, Kevin C.; Kim, Baek

    2014-01-01

    Template switching can occur during the reverse transcription of HIV-1. Deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) concentrations have been biochemically shown to impact HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-mediated strand transfer. Lowering the dNTP concentrations promotes RT pausing and RNA template degradation by RNase H activity of the RT, subsequently leading to strand transfer. Terminally differentiated/nondividing macrophages, which serve as a key HIV-1 reservoir, contain extremely low dNTP concentrations (20–50 nm), which results from the cellular dNTP hydrolyzing sterile α motif and histidine aspartic domain containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) protein, when compared with activated CD4+ T cells (2–5 μm). In this study, we first observed that HIV-1 template switching efficiency was nearly doubled in human primary macrophages when compared with activated CD4+ T cells. Second, SAMHD1 degradation by viral protein X (Vpx), which elevates cellular dNTP concentrations, decreased HIV-1 template switching efficiency in macrophages to the levels comparable with CD4+ T cells. Third, differentiated SAMHD1 shRNA THP-1 cells have a 2-fold increase in HIV-1 template switching efficiency. Fourth, SAMHD1 degradation by Vpx did not alter HIV-1 template switching efficiency in activated CD4+ T cells. Finally, the HIV-1 V148I RT mutant that is defective in dNTP binding and has DNA synthesis delay promoted RT stand transfer when compared with wild type RT, particularly at low dNTP concentrations. Here, we report that SAMHD1 regulation of the dNTP concentrations influences HIV-1 template switching efficiency, particularly in macrophages. PMID:24352659

  3. Transcriptome analysis of rainbow trout in response to non-virion (NV) protein of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV).

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Blanca; Encinas, Paloma; Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio M; Gomez-Casado, Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    The non-virion (NV) protein of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an economically important fish novirhabdovirus, has been implicated in the interference of some host innate mechanisms (i.e. apoptosis) in vitro. This work aimed to characterise the immune-related transcriptome changes in rainbow trout induced by NV protein that have not yet been established in vivo. For that purpose, immune-targeted microarrays were used to analyse the transcriptomes from head kidney and spleen of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) after injection of recombinant NV (rNV). Results showed the extensive downregulation (and in some cases upregulation) of many innate and adaptive immune response genes not related previously to VHSV infection. The newly identified genes belonged to VHSV-induced genes (vigs), tumour necrosis factors, Toll-like receptors, antigen processing and presentation, immune co-stimulatory molecules, interleukins, macrophage chemotaxis, transcription factors, etc. Classification of differentially downregulated genes into rainbow trout immune pathways identified stat1 and jun/atf1 transcription factor genes as the most representative of the multipath gene targets of rNV. Altogether, these results contribute to define the role and effects of NV in trout by orchestrating an immunosuppression of the innate immune responses for favouring viral replication upon VHSV infection. Finally, these transcriptome results open up the possibility to find out new strategies against VHSV and better understand the interrelationships between some immune pathways in trout.

  4. Dengue virus nonstructural protein 3 redistributes fatty acid synthase to sites of viral replication and increases cellular fatty acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Nicholas S.; Perera, Rushika; Berger, Kristi L.; Khadka, Sudip; LaCount, Douglas J.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Randall, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) modifies cellular membranes to establish its sites of replication. Although the 3D architecture of these structures has recently been described, little is known about the cellular pathways required for their formation and expansion. In this report, we examine the host requirements for DENV replication using a focused RNAi analysis combined with validation studies using pharmacological inhibitors. This approach identified three cellular pathways required for DENV replication: autophagy, actin polymerization, and fatty acid biosynthesis. Further characterization of the viral modulation of fatty acid biosynthesis revealed that a key enzyme in this pathway, fatty acid synthase (FASN), is relocalized to sites of DENV replication. DENV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is responsible for FASN recruitment, inasmuch as (i) NS3 expressed in the absence of other viral proteins colocalizes with FASN and (ii) NS3 interacts with FASN in a two-hybrid assay. There is an associated increase in the rate of fatty acid biosynthesis in DENV-infected cells, and de novo synthesized lipids preferentially cofractionate with DENV RNA. Finally, purified recombinant NS3 stimulates the activity of FASN in vitro. Taken together, these experiments suggest that DENV co-opts the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway to establish its replication complexes. This study provides mechanistic insight into DENV membrane remodeling and highlights the potential for the development of therapeutics that inhibit DENV replication by targeting the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway. PMID:20855599

  5. At the crossroads of autophagy and infection: Noncanonical roles for ATG proteins in viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Solvik, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy-related (ATG) proteins have increasingly demonstrated functions other than cellular self-eating. In this issue, Mauthe et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201602046) conduct an unbiased RNA interference screen of the ATG proteome to reveal numerous noncanonical roles for ATG proteins during viral infection. PMID:27573461

  6. Detection of viral proteins in human cells lines by xeno-proteomics: elimination of the last valid excuse for not testing every cellular proteome dataset for viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Chernobrovkin, Alexey L; Zubarev, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    Cell cultures used routinely in proteomic experiments may contain proteins from other species because of infection, transfection or just contamination. Since infection or contamination may affect the results of a biological experiment, it is important to test the samples for the presence of "alien" proteins. Usually cells are tested only for the most common infections, and most of the existing tests are targeting specific contaminations. Here we describe a three-step procedure for reliable untargeted detection of viral proteins using proteomics data, and recommend this or similar procedure to be applied to every proteomics dataset submitted for publication.

  7. Post-translational modifications of hepatitis C viral proteins and their biological significance.

    PubMed

    Hundt, Jana; Li, Zhubing; Liu, Qiang

    2013-12-21

    Replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) depends on the interaction of viral proteins with various host cellular proteins and signalling pathways. Similar to cellular proteins, post-translational modifications (PTMs) of HCV proteins are essential for proper protein function and regulation, thus, directly affecting viral life cycle and the generation of infectious virus particles. Cleavage of the HCV polyprotein by cellular and viral proteases into more than 10 proteins represents an early protein modification step after translation of the HCV positive-stranded RNA genome. The key modifications include the regulated intramembranous proteolytic cleavage of core protein, disulfide bond formation of core, glycosylation of HCV envelope proteins E1 and E2, methylation of nonstructural protein 3 (NS3), biotinylation of NS4A, ubiquitination of NS5B and phosphorylation of core and NS5B. Other modifications like ubiquitination of core and palmitoylation of core and NS4B proteins have been reported as well. For some modifications such as phosphorylation of NS3 and NS5A and acetylation of NS3, we have limited understanding of their effects on HCV replication and pathogenesis while the impact of other modifications is far from clear. In this review, we summarize the available information on PTMs of HCV proteins and discuss their relevance to HCV replication and pathogenesis.

  8. Temporal proteomic analysis and label-free quantification of viral proteins of an invertebrate iridovirus.

    PubMed

    İnce, İkbal Agah; Boeren, Sjef; van Oers, Monique M; Vlak, Just M

    2015-01-01

    Invertebrate iridescent virus 6 (IIV-6) is a nucleocytoplasmic virus with a ~212 kb linear dsDNA genome that encodes 215 putative ORFs. The IIV-6 virion-associated proteins consist of at least 54 virally encoded proteins. One of our previous findings showed that most of these proteins are encoded by genes from the early transcriptional class. This indicated that these structural proteins may not only function in the formation of the virion, but also in the initial stage of viral infection. In the current study, we followed the protein expression profile of IIV-6 over time in Drosophila S2 cells by label-free quantification using a proteomic approach. A total of 95 virally encoded proteins were detected in infected cells, of which 37 were virion proteins. The expressed IIV-6 virion proteins could be categorized into three main clusters based on their expression profiles: proteins with stably low expression levels during infection, proteins with exponentially increasing expression levels during infection and proteins that were initially highly abundant, but showed slightly reduced levels after 48 h post-infection. We thus provided novel information on the kinetics of virion and infected cell-specific protein levels that assists in our understanding of gene regulation in this lesser-known DNA virus model.

  9. Phosphorylation of human respiratory syncytial virus P protein at serine 54 regulates viral uncoating

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, Ana; Gonzalez-Armas, Juan C.; Villanueva, Nieves

    2008-10-10

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) structural P protein, phosphorylated at serine (S) and threonine (T) residues, is a co-factor of viral RNA polymerase. The phosphorylation of S54 is controlled by the coordinated action of two cellular enzymes: a lithium-sensitive kinase, probably glycogen synthetase kinase (GSK-3) {beta} and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Inhibition of lithium-sensitive kinase, soon after infection, blocks the viral growth cycle by inhibiting synthesis and/or accumulation of viral RNAs, proteins and extracellular particles. P protein phosphorylation at S54 is required to liberate viral ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) from M protein, during the uncoating process. Kinase inhibition, late in infection, produces a decrease in genomic RNA and infectious viral particles. LiCl, intranasally applied to mice infected with HRSV A2 strain, reduces the number of mice with virus in their lungs and the virus titre. Administration of LiCl to humans via aerosol should prevent HRSV infection, without secondary effects.

  10. Lipids as modulators of membrane fusion mediated by viral fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Teissier, Elodie; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle

    2007-11-01

    Enveloped viruses infect host cells by fusion of viral and target membranes. This fusion event is triggered by specific glycoproteins in the viral envelope. Fusion glycoproteins belong to either class I, class II or the newly described third class, depending upon their arrangement at the surface of the virion, their tri-dimensional structure and the location within the protein of a short stretch of hydrophobic amino acids called the fusion peptide, which is able to induce the initial lipid destabilization at the onset of fusion. Viral fusion occurs either with the plasma membrane for pH-independent viruses, or with the endosomal membranes for pH-dependent viruses. Although, viral fusion proteins are parted in three classes and the subcellular localization of fusion might vary, these proteins have to act, in common, on lipid assemblies. Lipids contribute to fusion through their physical, mechanical and/or chemical properties. Lipids can thus play a role as chemically defined entities, or through their preferential partitioning into membrane microdomains called "rafts", or by modulating the curvature of the membranes involved in the fusion process. The purpose of this review is to make a state of the art on recent findings on the contribution of cholesterol, sphingolipids and glycolipids in cell entry and membrane fusion of a number of viral families, whose members bear either class I or class II fusion proteins, or fusion proteins of the recently discovered third class.

  11. Selective Advantage of Recombination in Evolving Protein Populations:. a Lattice Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul D.; Pollock, David D.; Goldstein, Richard A.

    Recent research has attempted to clarify the contributions of several mutational processes, such as substitutions or homologous recombination. Simplistic, tractable protein models, which determine the compact native structure phenotype from the sequence genotype, are well-suited to such studies. In this paper, we use a lattice-protein model to examine the effects of point mutation and homologous recombination on evolving populations of proteins. We find that while the majority of mutation and recombination events are neutral or deleterious, recombination is far more likely to be beneficial. This results in a faster increase in fitness during evolution, although the final fitness level is not significantly changed. This transient advantage provides an evolutionary advantage to subpopulations that undergo recombination, allowing fixation of recombination to occur in the population.

  12. Bioinformatics approaches for improved recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli: protein solubility prediction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catherine Ching Han; Song, Jiangning; Tey, Beng Ti; Ramanan, Ramakrishnan Nagasundara

    2014-11-01

    The solubility of recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli often represents the production yield. However, up-to-date, instances of successful production of soluble recombinant proteins in E. coli expression system with high yield remain scarce. This is mainly due to the difficulties in improving the overall production capacity, as most of the well-established strategies usually involve a series of trial and error steps with unguaranteed success. One way to concurrently improve the production yield and minimize the production cost would be incorporating the potency of bioinformatics tools to conduct in silico studies, which forecasts the outcome before actual experimental work. In this article, we review and compare seven prediction tools available, which predict the solubility of protein expressed in E. coli, using the following criteria: prediction performance, usability, utility, prediction tool development and validation methodologies. This comprehensive review will be a valuable resource for researchers with limited prior experience in bioinformatics tools. As such, this will facilitate their choice of appropriate tools for studies related to enhancement of intracellular recombinant protein production in E. coli. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Self-assembly studies of native and recombinant fibrous proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Donna Lucille

    unmodified silk protein. A sequence block from the native primary structure of collagen IV, as well as sequences of selected collagen-modifying enzymes, were manipulated through recombinant DNA technology. Collagen IV is found primarily in the basement membrane of cells and typically characterized by a loose "chicken-mesh" network of individual molecules assembled via their end regions. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  14. A duplex recombinant viral nucleoprotein microbead immunoassay for simultaneous detection of seroresponses to human respiratory syncytial virus and metapneumovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yange; Brooks, W Abdullah; Goswami, Doli; Rahman, Mustafizur; Luby, Stephen P; Erdman, Dean D

    2014-09-01

    Serologic diagnosis of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections has been shown to complement virus detection methods in epidemiologic studies. Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) using cultured virus lysate antigens are often used to diagnose infection by demonstration of a ≥4-fold rises in antibody titer between acute and convalescent serum pairs. In this study, hRSV and hMPV nucleocapsid (recN) proteins were expressed in a baculovirus system and their performance compared with virus culture lysate antigen in EIAs using paired serum specimens collected from symptomatic children. The recN proteins were also used to develop a duplex assay based on the Luminex microbead-based suspension array technology, where diagnostic rises in antibody levels could be determined simultaneously at a single serum dilution. Antibody levels measured by the recN and viral lysate EIAs correlated moderately (hRSV, r(2)=0.72; hMPV, r(2)=0.76); the recN EIAs identified correctly 35 of 37 (94.6%) and 48 of 50 (96%) serum pairs showing diagnostic antibody rises by viral lysate EIAs. Purified recN proteins were then coupled to microbeads and serum pairs were tested at a single dilution on a Luminex MAGPIX(®) analyzer. The duplex recN assay identified correctly 33 of 39 (85%) and 41 of 47 (86.7%) serum pairs showing diagnostic rises to hRSV and hMPV, respectively. The recN assay permits simultaneous testing for acute hRSV and hMPV infections and offers a platform for expanded multiplexing of other respiratory virus assays.

  15. The Role of F-Box Proteins during Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Régis Lopes; Bruckner, Fernanda Prieto; de Souza Cascardo, Renan; Alfenas-Zerbini, Poliane

    2013-01-01

    The F-box domain is a protein structural motif of about 50 amino acids that mediates protein–protein interactions. The F-box protein is one of the four components of the SCF (SKp1, Cullin, F-box protein) complex, which mediates ubiquitination of proteins targeted for degradation by the proteasome, playing an essential role in many cellular processes. Several discoveries have been made on the use of the ubiquitin–proteasome system by viruses of several families to complete their infection cycle. On the other hand, F-box proteins can be used in the defense response by the host. This review describes the role of F-box proteins and the use of the ubiquitin–proteasome system in virus–host interactions. PMID:23429191

  16. The Effects of the Recombinant CCR5 T4 Lysozyme Fusion Protein on HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qingwen; Chen, Hong; Wang, Xingxia; Zhao, Liandong; Xu, Qingchen; Wang, Huijuan; Li, Guanyu; Yang, Xiaofan; Ma, Hongming; Wu, Haoquan; Ji, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Background Insertion of T4 lysozyme (T4L) into the GPCR successfully enhanced GPCR protein stability and solubilization. However, the biological functions of the recombinant GPCR protein have not been analyzed. Methods We engineered the CCR5-T4L mutant and expressed and purified the soluble recombinant protein using an E.coli expression system. The antiviral effects of this recombinant protein in THP-1 cell lines, primary human macrophages, and PBMCs from different donors were investigated. We also explored the possible mechanisms underlying the observed antiviral effects. Results Our data showed the biphasic inhibitory and promotion effects of different concentrations of soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L protein on R5 tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection in THP-1 cell lines, human macrophages, and PBMCs from clinical isolates. We demonstrated that soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L acts as a HIV-1 co-receptor, interacts with wild type CCR5, down-regulates the surface CCR5 expression in human macrophages, and interacts with CCL5 to inhibit macrophage migration. Using binding assays, we further determined that recombinant CCR5-T4L and [125I]-CCL5 compete for the same binding site on wild type CCR5. Conclusions Our results suggest that recombinant CCR5-T4L protein marginally promotes HIV-1 infection at low concentrations and markedly inhibits infection at higher concentrations. This recombinant protein may be helpful in the future development of anti-HIV-1 therapeutic agents. PMID:26154172

  17. A role for homologous recombination proteins in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Kostyrko, Kaja; Bosshard, Sandra; Urban, Zuzanna; Mermod, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to DNA breaks, especially double-stranded breaks (DSBs), by activating the DNA damage response (DDR), which encompasses DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint signaling. The DNA damage signal is transmitted to the checkpoint machinery by a network of specialized DNA damage-recognizing and signal-transducing molecules. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA repair proteins themselves may also directly contribute to the checkpoint control. Here, we investigated the role of homologous recombination (HR) proteins in normal cell cycle regulation in the absence of exogenous DNA damage. For this purpose, we used Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing the Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators (Fucci). Systematic siRNA-mediated knockdown of HR genes in these cells demonstrated that the lack of several of these factors alters cell cycle distribution, albeit differentially. The knock-down of MDC1, Rad51 and Brca1 caused the cells to arrest in the G2 phase, suggesting that they may be required for the G2/M transition. In contrast, inhibition of the other HR factors, including several Rad51 paralogs and Rad50, led to the arrest in the G1/G0 phase. Moreover, reduced expression of Rad51B, Rad51C, CtIP and Rad50 induced entry into a quiescent G0-like phase. In conclusion, the lack of many HR factors may lead to cell cycle checkpoint activation, even in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, indicating that these proteins may play an essential role both in DNA repair and checkpoint signaling.

  18. Production of polyclonal antibody to a recombinant non-structural protein Nsp1a of human astrovirus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Wen-Hui; Kan, Li-Li; Li, Xin; Li, Yong-gang; Zhao, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) are important pathogens that cause acute viral diarrhea in infants. Little is known about the mechanisms of astrovirus-induced diarrhea. Previous studies have suggested that an apoptosis inducer may be encoded in the non-structural protein (nsP1a) of astrovirus and contribute to virus-induced diarrhea. To study the biological function of nsP1a and to gain further insight into nsP1a protein-host cell interactions, good quality antibodies must be produced. The nsP1agene of HAstV-1 was cloned into a bacterial expression vector Pgex-6P-1. The recombinant plasmid Pgex-6P-nsP1a was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and expressed as a fusion protein that contains N-terminal GST tags. The expressed recombinant protein was purified and used as an antigen to produce an nsP1a antiserum in rabbits. ELISA was used to detect the titer of specific antibodies. Specificity activity was detected by Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis. The titer of specific antibodies was up to 1:30,000. Western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the polyclonal antibody could recognize specifically the HAstV-1 nsP1a protein.

  19. Expression, purification, and immunogenic characterization of Epstein-Barr virus recombinant EBNA1 protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man; Jiang, Shuai; Liu, Xiaoying; Wang, Yefu

    2013-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous human herpesvirus associated with the development of both lymphoid and epithelial tumors. EBNA1 is the only viral protein expressed in all EBV-associated malignancies and plays important roles in EBV latency. Thus, EBNA1 is thought to be a promising antigen for immunotherapy of all EBV-associated malignancies. This study was undertaken to produce recombinant EBNA1 protein in Pichia pastoris and evaluate its immunogenicity. The truncated EBNA1 (E1ΔGA, codons 390-641) was expressed as a secretory protein with an N-terminal histidine tag in the methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified proteins were then used as antigens to immunize BALB/c mice for production of polyclonal antibodies. Western blot analysis showed that the polyclonal antibodies specifically recognized the EBNA1 protein in B95-8 cell lysates. The recombinant E1ΔGA also induced strong lymphoproliferative and Th1 cytokine responses in mice. Furthermore, mice immunized with E1ΔGA developed CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. These findings showed that the yeast-expressed E1ΔGA retained good immunogenicity and might be a promising vaccine candidate against EBV-associated malignancies.

  20. Statistical approaches to maximize recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: a general review.

    PubMed

    Papaneophytou, Christos P; Kontopidis, George

    2014-02-01

    The supply of many valuable proteins that have potential clinical or industrial use is often limited by their low natural availability. With the modern advances in genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics, the number of proteins being produced using recombinant techniques is exponentially increasing and seems to guarantee an unlimited supply of recombinant proteins. The demand of recombinant proteins has increased as more applications in several fields become a commercial reality. Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most widely used expression system for the production of recombinant proteins for structural and functional studies. However, producing soluble proteins in E. coli is still a major bottleneck for structural biology projects. One of the most challenging steps in any structural biology project is predicting which protein or protein fragment will express solubly and purify for crystallographic studies. The production of soluble and active proteins is influenced by several factors including expression host, fusion tag, induction temperature and time. Statistical designed experiments are gaining success in the production of recombinant protein because they provide information on variable interactions that escape the "one-factor-at-a-time" method. Here, we review the most important factors affecting the production of recombinant proteins in a soluble form. Moreover, we provide information about how the statistical design experiments can increase protein yield and purity as well as find conditions for crystal growth.

  1. Prediction of Interactions between Viral and Host Proteins Using Supervised Machine Learning Methods

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Ranjan Kumar; Saha, Sudipto; Das, Santasabuj

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral-host protein-protein interaction plays a vital role in pathogenesis, since it defines viral infection of the host and regulation of the host proteins. Identification of key viral-host protein-protein interactions (PPIs) has great implication for therapeutics. Methods In this study, a systematic attempt has been made to predict viral-host PPIs by integrating different features, including domain-domain association, network topology and sequence information using viral-host PPIs from VirusMINT. The three well-known supervised machine learning methods, such as SVM, Naïve Bayes and Random Forest, which are commonly used in the prediction of PPIs, were employed to evaluate the performance measure based on five-fold cross validation techniques. Results Out of 44 descriptors, best features were found to be domain-domain association and methionine, serine and valine amino acid composition of viral proteins. In this study, SVM-based method achieved better sensitivity of 67% over Naïve Bayes (37.49%) and Random Forest (55.66%). However the specificity of Naïve Bayes was the highest (99.52%) as compared with SVM (74%) and Random Forest (89.08%). Overall, the SVM and Random Forest achieved accuracy of 71% and 72.41%, respectively. The proposed SVM-based method was evaluated on blind dataset and attained a sensitivity of 64%, specificity of 83%, and accuracy of 74%. In addition, unknown potential targets of hepatitis B virus-human and hepatitis E virus-human PPIs have been predicted through proposed SVM model and validated by gene ontology enrichment analysis. Our proposed model shows that, hepatitis B virus “C protein” binds to membrane docking protein, while “X protein” and “P protein” interacts with cell-killing and metabolic process proteins, respectively. Conclusion The proposed method can predict large scale interspecies viral-human PPIs. The nature and function of unknown viral proteins (HBV and HEV), interacting partners of host protein

  2. Field safety assessment of recombination in transgenic grapevines expressing the coat protein gene of Grapevine fanleaf virus.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Emmanuelle; Komar, Véronique; Fuchs, Marc

    2004-04-01

    One of the major environmental safety issues over transgenic crops containing virus-derived genes relates to the outcome of recombination events between viral transgene transcripts and RNAs from indigenous virus populations. We addressed this issue by assessing the emergence of viable Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) recombinants in transgenic grapevines expressing the GFLV coat protein (CP) gene. Test plants consisted of nontransgenic scions grafted onto transgenic and nontransgenic rootstocks that were exposed over 3 years to nematode-mediated GFLV infection in two distinct vineyard sites. The CP gene of challenging GFLV isolates was amplified from scions by IC-RT-PCR, and characterized by RFLP and nucleotide sequencing using strain F13 as reference since it provided the CP transgene. Analysis of EcoRI and StyI RFLP banding patterns from 347 challenging GFLV isolates and sequence data from 85 variants revealed no characteristics similar to strain F13 and no difference in the molecular variability among isolates from 190 transgenic and 157 nontransgenic plants, or from plants within (253 individuals) or outside (94 individuals) of the two sites. Interestingly, five GFLV recombinants were identified in three nontransgenic plants located outside of the two field settings. This survey indicates that transgenic grapevines did not assist the emergence of viable GFLV recombinants to detectable levels nor did they affect the molecular diversity of indigenous GFLV populations during the trial period. This is the first report on safety assessment of recombination with a transgenic crop expressing a CP gene under field conditions of heavy disease pressure but low, if any, selection pressure against recombinant viruses.

  3. Interactions between p27 and p88 replicase proteins of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus play an essential role in viral RNA replication and suppression of RNA silencing via the 480-kDa viral replicase complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Mine, Akira; Hyodo, Kiwamu; Takeda, Atsushi; Kaido, Masanori; Mise, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Tetsuro

    2010-11-25

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV), a positive-sense RNA virus with a bipartite genome, encodes p27 and p88 replicase proteins that are required for viral RNA replication and suppression of RNA silencing. In this study, we identified domains in p27 and p88 responsible for their protein-protein interactions using in vitro pull-down assays with the purified recombinant proteins. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis in combination with blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using mutated p27 proteins showed that both p27-p27 and p27-p88 interactions are essential for the formation of the 480-kDa complex, which has RCNMV-specific RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity. Furthermore, we found a good correlation between the accumulated levels of the 480-kDa complex and replication levels and the suppression of RNA silencing activity. Our results indicate that interactions between RCNMV replicase proteins play an essential role in viral RNA replication and in suppressing RNA silencing via the 480-kDa replicase complex assembly.

  4. Protein body-inducing fusions for high-level production and purification of recombinant proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Conley, Andrew J; Joensuu, Jussi J; Richman, Alex; Menassa, Rima

    2011-05-01

    For the past two decades, therapeutic and industrially important proteins have been expressed in plants with varying levels of success. The two major challenges hindering the economical production of plant-made recombinant proteins include inadequate accumulation levels and the lack of efficient purification methods. To address these limitations, several fusion protein strategies have been recently developed to significantly enhance the production yield of plant-made recombinant proteins, while simultaneously assisting in their subsequent purification. Elastin-like polypeptides are thermally responsive biopolymers composed of a repeating pentapeptide 'VPGXG' sequence that are valuable for the purification of recombinant proteins. Hydrophobins are small fungal proteins capable of altering the hydrophobicity of their respective fusion partner, thus enabling efficient purification by surfactant-based aqueous two-phase systems. Zera, a domain of the maize seed storage protein γ-zein, can induce the formation of protein storage bodies, thus facilitating the recovery of fused proteins using density-based separation methods. These three novel protein fusion systems have also been shown to enhance the accumulation of a range of different recombinant proteins, while concurrently inducing the formation of protein bodies. The packing of these fusion proteins into protein bodies may exclude the recombinant protein from normal physiological turnover. Furthermore, these systems allow for quick, simple and inexpensive nonchromatographic purification of the recombinant protein, which can be scaled up to industrial levels of protein production. This review will focus on the similarities and differences of these artificial storage organelles, their biogenesis and their implication for the production of recombinant proteins in plants and their subsequent purification.

  5. Analysis of astrovirus serotype 1 RNA, identification of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase motif, and expression of a viral structural protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, T L; Greenberg, H B; Herrmann, J E; Smith, L S; Matsui, S M

    1994-01-01

    We report the results from sequence analysis and expression studies of the gastroenteritis agent astrovirus serotype 1. We have cloned and sequenced 5,944 nucleotides (nt) of the estimated 7.2-kb RNA genome and have identified three open reading frames (ORFs). ORF-3, at the 3' end, is 2,361 nt in length and is fully encoded in both the genomic and subgenomic viral RNAs. Expression of ORF-3 in vitro yields an 87-kDa protein that is immunoprecipitated with a monoclonal antibody specific for viral capsids. This protein comigrates with an authentic 87-kDa astrovirus protein immunoprecipitated from infected cells, indicating that this region encodes a viral structural protein. The adjacent upstream ORF (ORF-2) is 1,557 nt in length and contains a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase motif. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase motifs from four astrovirus serotypes are compared. Partial sequence (2,018 nt) of the most 5' ORF (ORF-1) reveals a 3C-like serine protease motif. The ORF-1 sequence is incomplete. These results indicate that the astrovirus genome is organized with nonstructural proteins encoded at the 5' end and structural proteins at the 3' end. ORF-2 has no start methionine and is in the -1 frame compared with ORF-1. We present sequence evidence for a ribosomal frameshift mechanism for expression of the viral polymerase. Images PMID:8254779

  6. Generation of Recombinant Oropouche Viruses Lacking the Nonstructural Protein NSm or NSs

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Richard E.; Elliott, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oropouche virus (OROV) is a midge-borne human pathogen with a geographic distribution in South America. OROV was first isolated in 1955, and since then, it has been known to cause recurring outbreaks of a dengue-like illness in the Amazonian regions of Brazil. OROV, however, remains one of the most poorly understood emerging viral zoonoses. Here we describe the successful recovery of infectious OROV entirely from cDNA copies of its genome and generation of OROV mutant viruses lacking either the NSm or the NSs coding region. Characterization of the recombinant viruses carried out in vitro demonstrated that the NSs protein of OROV is an interferon (IFN) antagonist as in other NSs-encoding bunyaviruses. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of the nine C-terminal amino acids of OROV NSs in IFN antagonistic activity. OROV was also found to be sensitive to IFN-α when cells were pretreated; however, the virus was still capable of replicating at doses as high as 10,000 U/ml of IFN-α, in contrast to the family prototype BUNV. We found that OROV lacking the NSm protein displayed characteristics similar to those of the wild-type virus, suggesting that the NSm protein is dispensable for virus replication in the mammalian and mosquito cell lines that were tested. IMPORTANCE Oropouche virus (OROV) is a public health threat in Central and South America, where it causes periodic outbreaks of dengue-like illness. In Brazil, OROV is the second most frequent cause of arboviral febrile illness after dengue virus, and with the current rates of urban expansion, more cases of this emerging viral zoonosis could occur. To better understand the molecular biology of OROV, we have successfully rescued the virus along with mutants. We have established that the C terminus of the NSs protein is important in interferon antagonism and that the NSm protein is dispensable for virus replication in cell culture. The tools described in this paper are important in terms of

  7. Generation of Recombinant Oropouche Viruses Lacking the Nonstructural Protein NSm or NSs.

    PubMed

    Tilston-Lunel, Natasha L; Acrani, Gustavo Olszanski; Randall, Richard E; Elliott, Richard M

    2015-12-23

    Oropouche virus (OROV) is a midge-borne human pathogen with a geographic distribution in South America. OROV was first isolated in 1955, and since then, it has been known to cause recurring outbreaks of a dengue-like illness in the Amazonian regions of Brazil. OROV, however, remains one of the most poorly understood emerging viral zoonoses. Here we describe the successful recovery of infectious OROV entirely from cDNA copies of its genome and generation of OROV mutant viruses lacking either the NSm or the NSs coding region. Characterization of the recombinant viruses carried out in vitro demonstrated that the NSs protein of OROV is an interferon (IFN) antagonist as in other NSs-encoding bunyaviruses. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of the nine C-terminal amino acids of OROV NSs in IFN antagonistic activity. OROV was also found to be sensitive to IFN-α when cells were pretreated; however, the virus was still capable of replicating at doses as high as 10,000 U/ml of IFN-α, in contrast to the family prototype BUNV. We found that OROV lacking the NSm protein displayed characteristics similar to those of the wild-type virus, suggesting that the NSm protein is dispensable for virus replication in the mammalian and mosquito cell lines that were tested. Oropouche virus (OROV) is a public health threat in Central and South America, where it causes periodic outbreaks of dengue-like illness. In Brazil, OROV is the second most frequent cause of arboviral febrile illness after dengue virus, and with the current rates of urban expansion, more cases of this emerging viral zoonosis could occur. To better understand the molecular biology of OROV, we have successfully rescued the virus along with mutants. We have established that the C terminus of the NSs protein is important in interferon antagonism and that the NSm protein is dispensable for virus replication in cell culture. The tools described in this paper are important in terms of understanding this important yet

  8. The YXXL Sequences of a Transmembrane Protein of Bovine Leukemia Virus Are Required for Viral Entry and Incorporation of Viral Envelope Protein into Virions

    PubMed Central

    Inabe, Kazunori; Nishizawa, Masako; Tajima, Shigeru; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Aida, Yoko

    1999-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of an envelope transmembrane glycoprotein (gp30) of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) has two overlapping copies of the (YXXL)2 motif. The N-terminal motif has been implicated in in vitro signal transduction pathways from the external to the intracellular compartment and is also involved in infection and maintenance of high viral loads in sheep that have been experimentally infected with BLV. To determine the role of YXXL sequences in the replication of BLV in vitro, we changed the tyrosine or leucine residues of the N-terminal motif in an infectious molecular clone of BLV, pBLV-IF, to alanine to produce mutated proviruses designated Y487A, L490A, Y498A, L501A, and Y487/498A. Transient transfection of African green monkey kidney COS-1 cells with proviral DNAs that encoded wild-type and mutant sequences revealed that all of the mutated proviral DNAs synthesized mature envelope proteins and released virus particles into the growth medium. However, serial passages of fetal lamb kidney (FLK) cells, which are sensitive to infection with BLV, after transient transfection revealed that mutation of a second tyrosine residue in the N-terminal motif completely prevented the propagation of the virus. Similarly, Y498A and Y487/498A mutant BLV that was produced by the stably transfected COS-1 cells exhibited significantly reduced levels of cell-free virion-mediated transmission. Analysis of the protein compositions of mutant viruses demonstrated that lower levels of envelope protein were incorporated by two of the mutant virions than by wild-type and other mutant virions. Furthermore, a mutation of a second tyrosine residue decreased the specific binding of BLV particles to FLK cells and the capacity for viral penetration. Our data indicate that the YXXL sequences play critical roles in both viral entry and the incorporation of viral envelope protein into the virion during the life cycle of BLV. PMID:9882334

  9. Protein transfer-mediated surface engineering to adjuvantate virus-like nanoparticles for enhanced anti-viral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaina M; Kim, Min-Chul; Vartabedian, Vincent F; Lee, Yu-Na; He, Sara; Song, Jae-Min; Choi, Hyo-Jick; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Amaram, Nikhil; Lukacher, Anna; Montemagno, Carlo D; Compans, Richard W; Kang, Sang-Moo; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2015-07-01

    Recombinant virus-like nanoparticles (VLPs) are a promising nanoparticle platform to develop safe vaccines for many viruses. Herein, we describe a novel and rapid protein transfer process to enhance the potency of enveloped VLPs by decorating influenza VLPs with exogenously added glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored immunostimulatory molecules (GPI-ISMs). With protein transfer, the level of GPI-ISM incorporation onto VLPs is controllable by varying incubation time and concentration of GPI-ISMs added. ISM incorporation was dependent upon the presence of a GPI-anchor and incorporated proteins were stable and functional for at least 4weeks when stored at 4°C. Vaccinating mice with GPI-granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-incorporated-VLPs induced stronger antibody responses and better protection against a heterologous influenza virus challenge than unmodified VLPs. Thus, VLPs can be enriched with ISMs by protein transfer to increase the potency and breadth of the immune response, which has implications in developing effective nanoparticle-based vaccines against a broad spectrum of enveloped viruses. The inherent problem with current influenza vaccines is that they do not generate effective cross-protection against heterologous viral strains. In this article, the authors described the development of virus-like nanoparticles (VLPs) as influenza vaccines with enhanced efficacy for cross-protection, due to an easy protein transfer modification process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. HSC70 interactions with SV40 viral proteins differ between permissive and nonpermissive mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Sainis, Ioannis; Angelidis, Charalambos; Pagoulatos, Gerasimos N.; Lazaridis, Ioannis

    2000-01-01

    SV40 belongs to a group of DNA tumor viruses which induce the expression of the 70 Kd heat shock proteins, but the meaning of this induction remains unclear. Investigating the role of hsc70 in the SV40 life cycle, we found that the protein translocates to the nucleus late in infection of permissive CV1 cells, in contrast to infected nonpermissive BALB/3T3 and NIH/3T3 cells in which hsc70 remains cytoplasmic. Moreover, the pattern of hsc70 nuclear staining was diffused and clearly distinguishable from that observed after heat shock. In addition hsc70 late in infection coimmunoprecipitated with the viral capsid protein VP1, suggesting a role in the process of viral packaging. Interactions of hsc70 with the early viral oncoprotein T antigen were observed only in nonpermissive cells, indicating that the binding of the above proteins is specific to cells that do not support viral propagation. Finally, treatment of permissive CV1 cells with interferon γ, a known antiviral cytokine, resulted in hsc70 binding to T antigen. Our results suggest that the role of hsc70 in the process of SV40 infection is directly related to the ability of the host cells to support viral propagation and is clearly different between permissive and nonpermissive cell lines. PMID:11147964

  11. The anaphase promoting complex: a critical target for viral proteins and anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Heilman, Destin W; Green, Michael R; Teodoro, Jose G

    2005-04-01

    The study of animal viruses has provided extraordinary insights into cell cycle dynamics and tumor biology. The significance of the p53 and Rb tumor suppressor proteins, for example, was discovered due to their interactions with viral oncogenes. In the past several years, investigations with four viral proteins, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vpr, adenovirus E4orf4, chicken anemia virus (CAV) apoptin and human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax, have indicated that there are also critical viral targets involved in G2/M control. In particular, recent studies with E4orf4 and apoptin have shown that they induce G2/M arrest by targeting and inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Notably, these two viral proteins induce apoptosis selectively in transformed cells in a p53-independent manner; thus pathways affected by these proteins are of significant therapeutic interest. Further investigation of the underlying mechanism of G2/M arrest and subsequent apoptosis induced by viral APC/C inhibitors may shed light on the mechanisms of current cancer therapies and provide the foundation for developing novel therapeutic targets.

  12. Two potential recombinant rabies vaccines expressing canine parvovirus virion protein 2 induce immunogenicity to canine parvovirus and rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Shi, Hehe; Tan, Yeping; Niu, Xuefeng; Long, Teng; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Qin; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-17

    Both rabies virus (RABV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) cause lethal diseases in dogs. In this study, both high egg passage Flury (HEP-Flury) strains of RABV and recombinant RABV carrying double RABV glycoprotein (G) gene were used to express the CPV virion protein 2 (VP2) gene, and were designated rHEP-VP2 and, rHEP-dG-VP2 respectively. The two recombinant RABVs maintained optimal virus titration according to their viral growth kinetics assay compared with the parental strain HEP-Flury. Western blotting indicated that G protein and VP2 were expressed in vitro. The expression of VP2 in Crandell feline kidney cells post-infection by rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay with antibody against VP2. Immunogenicity of recombinant rabies viruses was tested in Kunming mice. Both rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 induced high levels of rabies antibody compared with HEP-Flury. Mice immunized with rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 both had a high level of antibodies against VP2, which can protect against CPV infection. A challenge experiment indicated that more than 80% mice immunized with recombinant RABVs survived after infection of challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24). Together, this study showed that recombinant RABVs expressing VP2 induced protective immune responses to RABV and CPV. Therefore, rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 might be potential combined vaccines for RABV and CPV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Manipulation of Plant Host Susceptibility: An Emerging Role for Viral Movement Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Khalid; Vazquez, Franck; Heinlein, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing, a major antiviral defense response in plants. Recent studies indicate a role of virus-derived siRNAs in manipulating the expression of specific host genes and that certain plant viral movement proteins (MPs) can act as viral enhancers of RNA silencing (VERs) by stimulating the spread of silencing between cells. This suggests that viruses have evolved complex responses capable to efficiently hijack the host RNA silencing machinery to their own advantage. We draw here a dynamic model of the interaction of plant viruses with the silencing machinery during invasion of the host. The model proposes that cells at the spreading front of infection, where infection starts from zero and the VSR levels are supposedly low, represent potential sites for viral manipulation of host gene expression by using virus- and host-derived small RNAs. Viral MPs may facilitate the spread of silencing to produce a wave of small RNA-mediated gene expression changes ahead of the infection to increase host susceptibility. When experimentally ascertained, this hypothetical model will call for re-defining viral movement and the function of viral MPs. PMID:22639637

  14. Manipulation of plant host susceptibility: an emerging role for viral movement proteins?

    PubMed

    Amari, Khalid; Vazquez, Franck; Heinlein, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing, a major antiviral defense response in plants. Recent studies indicate a role of virus-derived siRNAs in manipulating the expression of specific host genes and that certain plant viral movement proteins (MPs) can act as viral enhancers of RNA silencing (VERs) by stimulating the spread of silencing between cells. This suggests that viruses have evolved complex responses capable to efficiently hijack the host RNA silencing machinery to their own advantage. We draw here a dynamic model of the interaction of plant viruses with the silencing machinery during invasion of the host. The model proposes that cells at the spreading front of infection, where infection starts from zero and the VSR levels are supposedly low, represent potential sites for viral manipulation of host gene expression by using virus- and host-derived small RNAs. Viral MPs may facilitate the spread of silencing to produce a wave of small RNA-mediated gene expression changes ahead of the infection to increase host susceptibility. When experimentally ascertained, this hypothetical model will call for re-defining viral movement and the function of viral MPs.

  15. Zinc finger antiviral protein inhibits coxsackievirus B3 virus replication and protects against viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Yan, Kepeng; Wei, Lin; Yang, Jie; Lu, Chenyu; Xiong, Fei; Zheng, Chunfu; Xu, Wei

    2015-11-01

    The host Zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP) has been reported exhibiting antiviral activity against positive-stranded RNA viruses (Togaviridae), negative-stranded RNA viruses (Filoviridae) and retroviruses (Retroviridae). However, whether ZAP restricts the infection of enterovirus and the development of enterovirus mediated disease remains unknown. Here, we reported the antiviral properties of ZAP against coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a single-stranded RNA virus of the Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae as a major causative agent of viral myocarditis (VMC). We found that the expression of ZAP was significantly induced after CVB3 infection in heart tissues of VMC mice. ZAP potently inhibited CVB3 replication in cells after infection, while overexpression of ZAP in mice significantly increased the resistance to CVB3 replication and viral myocarditis by significantly reducing cardiac inflammatory cytokine production. The ZAP-responsive elements (ZREs) were mapped to the 3'UTR and 5'UTR of viral RNA. Taken together, ZAP confers resistance to CVB3 infection via directly targeting viral RNA and protects mice from acute myocarditis by suppressing viral replication and cardiac inflammatory cytokine production. Our finding further expands ZAP's range of viral targets, and suggests ZAP as a potential therapeutic target for viral myocarditis caused by CVB3.

  16. Recombinant rabies virus expressing the H protein of canine distemper virus protects dogs from the lethal distemper challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Xue; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Yang, Yong; Sun, Na; Tan, Bin; Li, Zhen-Guang; Cheng, Shi-Peng; Fu, Zhen F; Wen, Yong-Jun

    2014-12-05

    The rabies virus (RV) vector LBNSE expressing foreign antigens have shown considerable promise as vaccines against viral and bacteria diseases, which is effective and safe. We produced a new RV-based vaccine vehicle expressing 1.824 kb hemagglutinin (H) gene of the canine distemper virus (CDV) by reverse genetics technology. The recombinant virus LBNSE-CDV-H retained growth properties similar to those of vector LBNSE both in BSR and mNA cell culture. The H gene of CDV was expressed and detected by immunostaining. To compare the immunogenicity of LBNSE-CDV-H, dogs were immunized with each of these recombinant viruses by intramuscular (i.m.). The dogs were bled at third weeks after the immunization for the measurement of virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) and then challenged with virulent virus (ZJ 7) at fourth weeks. The parent virus (LBNSE) without expression of any foreign molecules was included for comparison. Dogs inoculated with LBNSE-CDV-H showed no any signs of disease and exhibited seroconversion against both RV and CDV H protein. The LBNSE-CDV-H did not cause disease in dogs and conferred protection from challenge with a lethal wild type CDV strain, demonstrating its potential value for wildlife conservation efforts. Together, these studies suggest that recombinant RV expressing H protein from CDV stimulated high levels of adaptive immune responses (VNA), and protected all dogs challenge infection.

  17. Specificity of recombination of H and L chains from human gamma-G-myeloma proteins.

    PubMed

    Grey, H M; Mannik, M

    1965-09-01

    Dissociated H and L chains of human gammaG-myeloma proteins were recombined by removal of conditions interrupting non-covalent interactions. In the process of recombination 7S molecules were formed. It was demonstrated that the H chains from individual gammaG-myeloma proteins recombine with their own L chains but also with L chains derived from other myeloma proteins. In some instances, however, the L chains from other myeloma proteins did not recombine as avidly with the H chains as the autologous L chains. The specificity of the non-covalent interactions of H and L chains was particularly well brought out by competitive recombination experiments where an individual H chain had a choice of recombining with its own L chain or with the L chain obtained from another myeloma protein. In this manner a spectrum of affinities between individual H chains and several L chains was demonstrated. In the vast majority of recombinations there was a clearcut preference for recombination to take place between the H and L chains derived from the same protein. It is postulated that this specificity is related to differences in the primary structure, which cause differences in configuration of these homogeneous H and L chains and that these configurations then dictate on thermodynamic grounds the pairing of H chains with particular L chains.

  18. Sendai virus assembly: M protein binds to viral glycoproteins in transit through the secretory pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, C M; McQueen, N L; Nayak, D P

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the relative ability of Sendai virus M (matrix) protein to associate with membranes containing viral glycoproteins at three distinct stages of the exocytic pathway prior to cell surface appearance. By the use of selective low-temperature incubations or the ionophore monensin, the transport of newly synthesized viral glycoproteins was restricted to either the pre-Golgi intermediate compartment (by incubation at 15 degrees C), the medial Golgi (in the presence of monensin), or the trans-Golgi network (by incubation at 20 degrees C). All three of these treatments resulted in a marked accumulation of the M protein on perinuclear Golgi-like membranes which in each case directly reflected the distribution of the viral F protein. Subsequent redistribution of the F protein to the plasma membrane by removal of the low-temperature (20 degrees C) block resulted in a concomitant redistribution of the M protein, thus implying association of the two components during intracellular transit. The extent of M protein-glycoprotein association was further examined by cell fractionation studies performed under each of the three restrictive conditions. Following equilibrium sedimentation of membranes derived from monensin-treated cells, approximately 40% of the recovered M protein was found to cofractionate with membranes containing the viral glycoproteins. Also, by flotation analyses, a comparable subpopulation of M protein was found to be membrane associated whether viral glycoproteins were restricted to the trans-Golgi network, the medial Golgi, or the pre-Golgi intermediate compartment. Additionally, transient expression of M protein alone from cloned cDNA showed that neither membrane association nor Golgi localization occurs in the absence of Sendai virus glycoproteins. Images PMID:8380460

  19. Integration-free reprogramming of human somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) without viral vectors, recombinant DNA, and genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are envisaged to be integral components of multicellular systems engineered for therapeutic applications. The reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via recombinant expression of a limited number of transcription factors, which was first achieved by Yamanaka and colleagues in 2007, heralded a major breakthrough in the stem cell field. Since then, there has been rapid progress in the field of iPSC generation, including the identification of various small molecules that can enhance reprogramming efficiency and reduce the number of different transcription factors required for reprogramming. Nevertheless, the major obstacles facing clinical applications of iPSCs are safety concerns associated with the use of viral vectors and recombinant DNA for expressing the appropriate transcription factors during reprogramming. In particular, permanent genetic modifications to newly reprogrammed iPSCs have to be avoided in order to meet stringent safety requirements for clinical therapy. These safety challenges can be overcome by new technology platforms that enable cellular reprogramming to iPSCs without the need to utilize either recombinant DNA or viral vectors. The use of recombinant cell-penetrating peptides and direct transfection of synthetic mRNA encoding appropriate transcription factors have both been shown to successfully reprogram somatic cells to iPSCs. It has also been shown more recently that the direct transfection of certain miRNA species can reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency without the need for any of the transcription factors commonly utilized for iPSC generation. This chapter describes protocols for iPSC generation with these new techniques, which would obviate the use of recombinant DNA and viral vectors in cellular reprogramming, thus avoiding permanent genetic modification to the reprogrammed cells.

  20. An integrated map of HIV-human protein complexes that facilitate viral infection.

    PubMed

    Emig-Agius, Dorothea; Olivieri, Kevin; Pache, Lars; Shih, Hsin Ling; Pustovalova, Olga; Bessarabova, Marina; Young, John A T; Chanda, Sumit K; Ideker, Trey

    2014-01-01

    Recent proteomic and genetic studies have aimed to identify a complete network of interactions between HIV and human proteins and genes. This HIV-human interaction network provides invaluable information as to how HIV exploits the host machinery and can be used as a starting point for further functional analyses. We integrated this network with complementary datasets of protein function and interaction to nominate human protein complexes with likely roles in viral infection. Based on our approach we identified a global map of 40 HIV-human protein complexes with putative roles in HIV infection, some of which are involved in DNA replication and repair, transcription, translation, and cytoskeletal regulation. Targeted RNAi screens were used to validate several proteins and complexes for functional impact on viral infection. Thus, our HIV-human protein complex map provides a significant resource of potential HIV-host interactions for further study.

  1. Molecular mechanisms deployed by virally encoded G protein-coupled receptors in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Montaner, Silvia; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface molecules involved in signal transduction. Surprisingly, open reading frames for multiple GPCRs were hijacked in the process of coevolution between Herpesviridae family viruses and their human and mammalian hosts. Virally encoded GPCRs (vGPCRs) evolved as parts of viral genomes, and this evolution allowed the power of host GPCR signaling circuitries to be harnessed in order to ensure viral replicative success. Phylogenetically, vGPCRs are distantly related to human chemokine receptors, although they feature several unique characteristics. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying vGPCR-mediated viral pathogenesis. These mechanisms include constitutive activity, aberrant coupling to human G proteins and β-arrestins, binding and activation by human chemokines, and dimerization with other GPCRs expressed in infected cells. The likely structural basis for these molecular events is described for the two closest viral homologs of human GPCRs. This information may aid in the development of novel targeted therapeutic strategies against viral diseases.

  2. The S-layer protein from Campylobacter rectus: sequence determination and function of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, M; Maeda, H; Kitanaka, M; Kokeguchi, S; Takashiba, S; Murayama, Y

    1998-09-15

    The gene encoding the crystalline surface layer (S-layer) protein from Campylobacter rectus, designated slp, was sequenced and the recombinant gene product was expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene consisted of 4086 nucleotides encoding a protein with 1361 amino acids. The N-terminal amino acid sequence revealed that Slp did not contain a signal sequence, but that the initial methionine residue was processed. The deduced amino acid sequence displayed some common characteristic features of S-layer proteins previously reported. A homology search showed a high similarity to the Campylobacter fetus S-layer proteins, especially in their N-terminus. The C-terminal third of Slp exhibited homology with the RTX toxins from Gram-negative bacteria via the region including the glycine-rich repeats. The Slp protein had the same N-terminal sequence as a 104-kDa cytotoxin isolated from the culture supernatants of C. rectus. However, neither native nor recombinant Slp showed cytotoxicity against HL-60 cells or human peripheral white blood cells. These data support the idea that the N-terminus acts as an anchor to the cell surface components and that the C-terminus is involved in the assembly and/or transport of the protein.

  3. The enzymes LSD1 and Set1A cooperate with the viral protein HBx to establish an active hepatitis B viral chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, Valentina; Hernández, Sergio; Rubio, Lorena; Alvarez, Francisca; Flores, Yvo; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V.; Kann, Michael; Villanueva, Rodrigo A.; Loyola, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    With about 350 million people chronically infected around the world hepatitis B is a major health problem. Template for progeny HBV synthesis is the viral genome, organized as a minichromosome (cccDNA) inside the hepatocyte nucleus. How viral cccDNA gene expression is regulated by its chromatin structure; more importantly, how the modulation of this structure impacts on viral gene expression remains elusive. Here, we found that the enzyme SetDB1 contributes to setting up a repressed cccDNA chromatin state. This repressive state is activated by the histone lysine demethylase-1 (LSD1). Consistently, inhibiting or reducing LSD1 levels led to repression of viral gene expression. This correlates with the transcriptionally repressive mark H3K9 methylation and reduction on the activating marks H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation on viral promoters. Investigating the importance of viral proteins we found that LSD1 recruitment to viral promoters was dependent on the viral transactivator protein HBx. Moreover, the histone methyltransferase Set1A and HBx are simultaneously bound to the core promoter, and Set1A expression correlates with cccDNA H3K4 methylation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms of HBV regulation mediated by the cccDNA chromatin structure, offering new therapeutic targets to develop drugs for the treatment of chronically infected HBV patients. PMID:27174370

  4. The enzymes LSD1 and Set1A cooperate with the viral protein HBx to establish an active hepatitis B viral chromatin state.

    PubMed

    Alarcon, Valentina; Hernández, Sergio; Rubio, Lorena; Alvarez, Francisca; Flores, Yvo; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V; Kann, Michael; Villanueva, Rodrigo A; Loyola, Alejandra

    2016-05-13

    With about 350 million people chronically infected around the world hepatitis B is a major health problem. Template for progeny HBV synthesis is the viral genome, organized as a minichromosome (cccDNA) inside the hepatocyte nucleus. How viral cccDNA gene expression is regulated by its chromatin structure; more importantly, how the modulation of this structure impacts on viral gene expression remains elusive. Here, we found that the enzyme SetDB1 contributes to setting up a repressed cccDNA chromatin state. This repressive state is activated by the histone lysine demethylase-1 (LSD1). Consistently, inhibiting or reducing LSD1 levels led to repression of viral gene expression. This correlates with the transcriptionally repressive mark H3K9 methylation and reduction on the activating marks H3 acetylation and H3K4 methylation on viral promoters. Investigating the importance of viral proteins we found that LSD1 recruitment to viral promoters was dependent on the viral transactivator protein HBx. Moreover, the histone methyltransferase Set1A and HBx are simultaneously bound to the core promoter, and Set1A expression correlates with cccDNA H3K4 methylation. Our results shed light on the mechanisms of HBV regulation mediated by the cccDNA chromatin structure, offering new therapeutic targets to develop drugs for the treatment of chronically infected HBV patients.

  5. Recombination promoted by DNA viruses: phage λ to herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Weller, Sandra K; Sawitzke, James A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for understanding viral origins as well as the dynamic nature of viral-host interactions. Both bacteriophage λ and herpes simplex virus (HSV) display high rates of recombination, both utilizing their own proteins and commandeering cellular proteins to promote recombination reactions. We focus primarily on λ and HSV, as they have proven amenable to both genetic and biochemical analysis and have recently been shown to exhibit some surprising similarities that will guide future studies.

  6. Recombination Promoted by DNA Viruses: Phage λ to Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Sandra K.; Sawitzke, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for understanding viral origins as well as the dynamic nature of viral-host interactions. Both bacteriophage λ and herpes simplex virus (HSV) display high rates of recombination, both utilizing their own proteins and commandeering cellular proteins to promote recombination reactions. We focus primarily on λ and HSV, as they have proven amenable to both genetic and biochemical analysis and have recently been shown to exhibit some surprising similarities that will guide future studies. PMID:25002096

  7. Protein folding and conformational stress in microbial cells producing recombinant proteins: a host comparative overview

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, Brigitte; Saloheimo, Markku; Rinas, Ursula; Dragosits, Martin; Rodríguez-Carmona, Escarlata; Baumann, Kristin; Giuliani, Maria; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Branduardi, Paola; Lang, Christine; Porro, Danilo; Ferrer, Pau; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Mattanovich, Diethard; Villaverde, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Different species of microorganisms including yeasts, filamentous fungi and bacteria have been used in the past 25 years for the controlled production of foreign proteins of scientific, pharmacological or industrial interest. A major obstacle for protein production processes and a limit to overall success has been the abundance of misfolded polypeptides, which fail to reach their native conformation. The presence of misfolded or folding-reluctant protein species causes considerable stress in host cells. The characterization of such adverse conditions and the elicited cell responses have permitted to better understand the physiology and molecular biology of conformational stress. Therefore, microbial cell factories for recombinant protein production are depicted here as a source of knowledge that has considerably helped to picture the extremely rich landscape of in vivo protein folding, and the main cellular players of this complex process are described for the most important cell factories used for biotechnological purposes. PMID:18394160

  8. Recombinant Swinepox Virus Expressing Glycoprotein E2 of Classical Swine Fever Virus Confers Complete Protection in Pigs upon Viral Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huixing; Ma, Zhe; Chen, Lei; Fan, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and serious viral disease that affects the pig industry worldwide. The glycoprotein E2 of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) can induce neutralizing antibodies, and it is widely used for novel vaccine development. To explore the development of a vaccine against CSFV infections, the gene of glycoprotein E2 was inserted into the swinepox virus (SPV) genome by homologous recombination. The culture titers of rSPV-E2 remained at about 4.3 × 106 TCID50 for more than 60 passages in PK15 and swine testis cell lines. The rSPV-E2 could not be replicated in Vero, MDBK or other non-porcine cell lines. After two to three passages, the SPV specific gene of rSPV-E2 could not been detected in the non-porcine cell culture. To evaluate the immunogenicity of rSPV-E2, 20 CSFV seronegative minipigs were immunized with rSPV-E2, a commercial C-strain vaccine, wild-type SPV (wtSPV; negative control), or PBS (a no-challenge control). After challenge with CSFV, pigs in the rSPV-E2-immunized group showed significantly shorter fever duration compared with the wtSPV-treated group (P < 0.05). E2-specific antibodies in the rSPV-E2-immunized group increased dramatically after vaccination and increased continuously over time. CSFV genomic copies in the serum of rSPV-E2-immunized pigs were significantly less compared with the wtSPV-treated group at all time points after challenge (P < 0.01). Significant reduction in gross lung lesion scores, histopathological liver, spleen, lung, and kidney lesion scores were noted in the rSPV-E2-immunized group compared with the wtSPV-treated group (P < 0.01). The results suggested that the recombinant rSPV-E2 provided pigs with significant protection from CSFV infections; thus, rSPV-E2 offers proof of principle for the development of a vaccine for the prevention of CSFV infections in pigs. PMID:28612010

  9. Recombinant Swinepox Virus Expressing Glycoprotein E2 of Classical Swine Fever Virus Confers Complete Protection in Pigs upon Viral Challenge.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huixing; Ma, Zhe; Chen, Lei; Fan, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and serious viral disease that affects the pig industry worldwide. The glycoprotein E2 of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) can induce neutralizing antibodies, and it is widely used for novel vaccine development. To explore the development of a vaccine against CSFV infections, the gene of glycoprotein E2 was inserted into the swinepox virus (SPV) genome by homologous recombination. The culture titers of rSPV-E2 remained at about 4.3 × 10(6) TCID50 for more than 60 passages in PK15 and swine testis cell lines. The rSPV-E2 could not be replicated in Vero, MDBK or other non-porcine cell lines. After two to three passages, the SPV specific gene of rSPV-E2 could not been detected in the non-porcine cell culture. To evaluate the immunogenicity of rSPV-E2, 20 CSFV seronegative minipigs were immunized with rSPV-E2, a commercial C-strain vaccine, wild-type SPV (wtSPV; negative control), or PBS (a no-challenge control). After challenge with CSFV, pigs in the rSPV-E2-immunized group showed significantly shorter fever duration compared with the wtSPV-treated group (P < 0.05). E2-specific antibodies in the rSPV-E2-immunized group increased dramatically after vaccination and increased continuously over time. CSFV genomic copies in the serum of rSPV-E2-immunized pigs were significantly less compared with the wtSPV-treated group at all time points after challenge (P < 0.01). Significant reduction in gross lung lesion scores, histopathological liver, spleen, lung, and kidney lesion scores were noted in the rSPV-E2-immunized group compared with the wtSPV-treated group (P < 0.01). The results suggested that the recombinant rSPV-E2 provided pigs with significant protection from CSFV infections; thus, rSPV-E2 offers proof of principle for the development of a vaccine for the prevention of CSFV infections in pigs.

  10. A Narcissus mosaic viral vector system for protein expression and flavonoid production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaibi; Wang, Lei; Hunter, Donald; Voogd, Charlotte; Joyce, Nigel; Davies, Kevin

    2013-07-13

    With the explosive numbers of sequences generated by next generation sequencing, the demand for high throughput screening to understand gene function has grown. Plant viral vectors have been widely used as tools in down-regulating plant gene expression. However, plant viral vectors can also express proteins in a very efficient manner and, therefore, can also serve as a valuable tool for characterizing proteins and their functions in metabolic pathways in planta. In this study, we have developed a Gateway®-based high throughput viral vector cloning system from Narcissus Mosaic Virus (NMV). Using the reporter genes of GFP and GUS, and the plant genes PAP1 (an R2R3 MYB which activates the anthocyanin pathway) and selenium-binding protein 1 (SeBP), we show that NMV vectors and the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana can be used for efficient protein expression, protein subcellular localization and secondary metabolite production. Our results suggest that not only can the plant viral vector system be employed for protein work but also can potentially be amenable to producing valuable secondary metabolites on a large scale, as the system does not require plant regeneration from seed or calli, which are stages where certain secondary metabolites can interfere with development.

  11. A Narcissus mosaic viral vector system for protein expression and flavonoid production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the explosive numbers of sequences generated by next generation sequencing, the demand for high throughput screening to understand gene function has grown. Plant viral vectors have been widely used as tools in down-regulating plant gene expression. However, plant viral vectors can also express proteins in a very efficient manner and, therefore, can also serve as a valuable tool for characterizing proteins and their functions in metabolic pathways in planta. Results In this study, we have developed a Gateway®-based high throughput viral vector cloning system from Narcissus Mosaic Virus (NMV). Using the reporter genes of GFP and GUS, and the plant genes PAP1 (an R2R3 MYB which activates the anthocyanin pathway) and selenium-binding protein 1 (SeBP), we show that NMV vectors and the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana can be used for efficient protein expression, protein subcellular localization and secondary metabolite production. Conclusions Our results suggest that not only can the plant viral vector system be employed for protein work but also can potentially be amenable to producing valuable secondary metabolites on a large scale, as the system does not require plant regeneration from seed or calli, which are stages where certain secondary metabolites can interfere with development. PMID:23849589

  12. Protective Vaccination against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus with Whole Recombinant Kluyveromyces lactis Yeast Expressing the Viral VP2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Marina; Durairaj, Vijay; Mundt, Egbert; Schulze, Katja; Breunig, Karin D.; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Here we report on vaccination approaches against infectious bursal disease (IBD) of poultry that were performed with complete yeast of the species Kluyveromyces lactis (K. lactis). Employing a genetic system that enables the rapid production of stably transfected recombinant K. lactis, we generated yeast strains that expressed defined quantities of the virus capsid forming protein VP2 of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Both, subcutaneous as well as oral vaccination regiments with the heat-inactivated but otherwise untreated yeast induced IBDV-neutralizing antibodies in mice and chickens. A full protection against a subsequent IBDV infection was achieved by subcutaneous inoculation of only milligram amounts of yeast per chicken. Oral vaccination also generated protection: while mortality was observed in control animals after virus challenge, none of the vaccinees died and ca. one-tenth were protected as indicated by the absence of lesions in the bursa of Fabricius. Recombinant K. lactis was thus indicated as a potent tool for the induction of a protective immune response by different applications. Subcutaneously applied K. lactis that expresses the IBDV VP2 was shown to function as an efficacious anti-IBD subunit vaccine. PMID:23024743

  13. Presence of viral proteins in drinkable water--sufficient condition to consider water a vector of viral transmission?

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M F; Alvarado, M V; Martínez, E; Ajami, N J

    2007-01-01

    In order to determine the role of water as a possible vector for transmission of the most prevalent enteric viruses affecting infantile populations, 226 water samples were collected from Facatativa's (Colombian municipality located 30km away from Bogotá) water works in the years 2000, 2002, and 2005. The samples were clarified and virus was concentrated by filtering and ultrafiltering techniques. The presence of viral protein (VP) was assessed by enzyme immunoassay method (EIA) and viral RNA presence was detected by reverse trascriptase and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Using these techniques, one sample positive for Astrovirus (HAstV) was found in a sample collected from the river that supplies the aqueduct, two samples positive for Norovirus (NV) from fresh treated potable water and 13 samples positive for Rotavirus (RV), some in water from the plant during treatment and others from treated fresh water. RT-PCR inhibitors were also found in water samples obtained from the plant and in the fresh treated water. No inhibitors were found in the river water. VP, but no nucleic acid, was detected in the water samples at different stages of treatment, thus suggesting that the virus might have been complete and infectious at some stage prior to water purification.

  14. Protective Effect of Surfactant Protein D in Pulmonary Vaccinia Virus Infection: Implication of A27 Viral Protein

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Perino; Thielens, Nicole M.; Crouch, Erika; Spehner, Danièle; Crance, Jean-Marc; Favier, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) was used as a surrogate of variola virus (VARV) (genus Orthopoxvirus), the causative agent of smallpox, to study Orthopoxvirus infection. VARV is principally transmitted between humans by aerosol droplets. Once inhaled, VARV first infects the respiratory tract where it could encounter surfactant components, such as soluble pattern recognition receptors. Surfactant protein D (SP-D), constitutively present in the lining fluids of the respiratory tract, plays important roles in innate host defense against virus infection. We investigated the role of SP-D in VACV infection and studied the A27 viral protein involvement in the interaction with SP-D. Interaction between SP-D and VACV caused viral inhibition in a lung cell model. Interaction of SP-D with VACV was mediated by the A27 viral protein. Binding required Ca2+ and interactions were blocked in the presence of excess of SP-D saccharide ligands. A27, which lacks glycosylation, directly interacted with SP-D. The interaction between SP-D and the viral particle was also observed using electron microscopy. Infection of mice lacking SP-D (SP-D-/-) resulted in increased mortality compared to SP-D+/+ mice. Altogether, our data show that SP-D participates in host defense against the vaccinia virus infection and that the interaction occurs with the viral surface protein A27. PMID:23518578

  15. Comprehensive Analysis of LANA Interacting Proteins Essential for Viral Genome Tethering and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Subhash C.; Cai, Qiliang; Kreider, Edward; Lu, Jie; Robertson, Erle S.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpesvirus is tightly linked to multiple human malignancies including Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS), Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL) and Multicentric Castleman’s Disease (MCD). KSHV like other herpesviruses establishes life-long latency in the infected host by persisting as chromatin and tethering to host chromatin through the virally encoded protein Latency Associated Nuclear Antigen (LANA). LANA, a multifunctional protein, is capable of binding to a large number of cellular proteins responsible for transcriptional regulation of various cellular and viral pathways involved in blocking cell death and promoting cell proliferation. This leads to enhanced cell division and replication of the viral genome, which segregates faithfully in the dividing tumor cells. The mechanism of genome segregation is well known and the binding of LANA to nucleosomal proteins, throughout the cell cycle, suggests that these interactions play an important role in efficient segregation. Various biochemical methods have identified a large number of LANA binding proteins, including histone H2A/H2B, histone H1, MeCP2, DEK, CENP-F, NuMA, Bub1, HP-1, and Brd4. These nucleosomal proteins may have various functions in tethering of the viral genome during specific phases of the viral life cycle. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive analysis of their interaction with LANA using a number of different assays. We show that LANA binds to core nucleosomal histones and also associates with other host chromatin proteins including histone H1 and high mobility group proteins (HMGs). We used various biochemical assays including co-immunoprecipitation and in-vivo localization by split GFP and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to demonstrate their association. PMID:24040311

  16. Host Cellular Protein TRAPPC6AΔ Interacts with Influenza A Virus M2 Protein and Regulates Viral Propagation by Modulating M2 Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pengyang; Liang, Libin; Shao, Xinyuan; Luo, Weiyu; Jiang, Shuitao; Zhao, Qingqing; Sun, Nan; Zhao, Yuhui; Li, Junping; Wang, Jinguang; Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Guangwen; Jiang, Li; Chen, Hualan; Li, Chengjun

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) matrix protein 2 (M2) plays multiple roles in the early and late phases of viral infection. Once synthesized, M2 is translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), travels to the Golgi apparatus, and is sorted at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) for transport to the apical plasma membrane, where it functions in virus budding. We hypothesized that M2 trafficking along with its secretory pathway must be finely regulated, and host factors could be involved in this process. However, no studies examining the role of host factors in M2 posttranslational transport have been reported. Here, we used a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system to screen for host proteins that interact with the M2 protein and identified transport protein particle complex 6A (TRAPPC6A) as a potential binding partner. We found that both TRAPPC6A and its N-terminal internal-deletion isoform, TRAPPC6A delta (TRAPPC6AΔ), interact with M2. Truncation and mutation analyses showed that the highly conserved leucine residue at position 96 of M2 is critical for mediating this interaction. The role of TRAPPC6AΔ in the viral life cycle was investigated by the knockdown of endogenous TRAPPC6AΔ with small interfering RNA (siRNA) and by generating a recombinant virus that was unable to interact with TRAPPC6A/TRAPPC6AΔ. The results indicated that TRAPPC6AΔ, through its interaction with M2, slows M2 trafficking to the apical plasma membrane, favors viral replication in vitro, and positively modulates virus virulence in mice. The influenza A virus M2 protein regulates the trafficking of not only other proteins but also itself along the secretory pathway. However, the host factors involved in the regulation of the posttranslational transport of M2 are largely unknown. In this study, we identified TRAPPC6A and its N-terminal internal-deletion isoform, TRAPPC6AΔ, as interacting partners of M2. We found that the leucine (L) residue at position 96 of M2 is critical for mediating this interaction

  17. Host Cellular Protein TRAPPC6AΔ Interacts with Influenza A Virus M2 Protein and Regulates Viral Propagation by Modulating M2 Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pengyang; Liang, Libin; Shao, Xinyuan; Luo, Weiyu; Jiang, Shuitao; Zhao, Qingqing; Sun, Nan; Zhao, Yuhui; Li, Junping; Wang, Jinguang; Zhou, Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Guangwen; Jiang, Li

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A virus (IAV) matrix protein 2 (M2) plays multiple roles in the early and late phases of viral infection. Once synthesized, M2 is translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), travels to the Golgi apparatus, and is sorted at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) for transport to the apical plasma membrane, where it functions in virus budding. We hypothesized that M2 trafficking along with its secretory pathway must be finely regulated, and host factors could be involved in this process. However, no studies examining the role of host factors in M2 posttranslational transport have been reported. Here, we used a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system to screen for host proteins that interact with the M2 protein and identified transport protein particle complex 6A (TRAPPC6A) as a potential binding partner. We found that both TRAPPC6A and its N-terminal internal-deletion isoform, TRAPPC6A delta (TRAPPC6AΔ), interact with M2. Truncation and mutation analyses showed that the highly conserved leucine residue at position 96 of M2 is critical for mediating this interaction. The role of TRAPPC6AΔ in the viral life cycle was investigated by the knockdown of endogenous TRAPPC6AΔ with small interfering RNA (siRNA) and by generating a recombinant virus that was unable to interact with TRAPPC6A/TRAPPC6AΔ. The results indicated that TRAPPC6AΔ, through its interaction with M2, slows M2 trafficking to the apical plasma membrane, favors viral replication in vitro, and positively modulates virus virulence in mice. IMPORTANCE The influenza A virus M2 protein regulates the trafficking of not only other proteins but also itself along the secretory pathway. However, the host factors involved in the regulation of the posttranslational transport of M2 are largely unknown. In this study, we identified TRAPPC6A and its N-terminal internal-deletion isoform, TRAPPC6AΔ, as interacting partners of M2. We found that the leucine (L) residue at position 96 of M2 is critical for mediating

  18. Limited efficacy of topical recombinant feline interferon-omega for treatment of cats with acute upper respiratory viral disease.

    PubMed

    Ballin, Anne C; Schulz, Bianka; Helps, Christopher; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Mueller, Ralf S; Hartmann, Katrin

    2014-12-01

    Despite a lack of controlled studies confirming its efficacy, recombinant feline interferon-omega (rfeIFN-ω) is used in the treatment of feline upper respiratory tract disease (FURTD), which is usually caused by feline calicivirus (FCV) or feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1). The aims of the present study were to investigate whether administration of rfeIFN-ω improves clinical signs in cats with acute FURTD and whether this treatment reduces shedding of FCV. Thirty-seven cats affected with acute FURTD were recruited into a prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. The presence of FCV and/or FHV-1 was determined by performing quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on oropharyngeal and conjunctival swabs. Cats were randomly assigned to treatment groups, receiving either placebo or rfeIFN-ω (2.5 MU/kg) subcutaneously, followed by 0.5 MU topically at 8-h intervals via the conjunctiva, intranasally, and orally for 21 days. All cats received additional treatment with antibiotics, expectorants, and inhalation of nebulised physiological saline with camomile. Clinical signs and FCV shedding were evaluated over 42 days. All cats demonstrated improvement in clinical signs during the course of the study, with no significant difference in any of the assessed variables when comparing the two groups. FCV copy numbers decreased more rapidly in cats receiving rfeIFN-ω. Treatment with rfeIFN-ω was not effective in ameliorating clinical signs of acute viral FURTD compared to placebo, but might accelerate a reduction in FCV load in infected cats.

  19. Oligomeric viral proteins: small in size, large in presence

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Bhargavi; Smith, Amber M.; Fernandes, Jason D.; Frankel, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are obligate parasites that rely heavily on host cellular processes for replication. The small number of proteins typically encoded by a virus is faced with selection pressures that lead to the evolution of distinctive structural properties, allowing each protein to maintain its function under constraints such as small genome size, high mutation rate, and rapidly changing fitness conditions. One common strategy for this evolution is to utilize small building blocks to generate protein oligomers that assemble in multiple ways, thereby diversifying protein function and regulation. In this review, we discuss specific cases that illustrate how oligomerization is used to generate a single defined functional state, to modulate activity via different oligomeric states, or to generate multiple functional forms via different oligomeric states. PMID:27685368

  20. A Herpesviral Lytic Protein Regulates the Structure of Latent Viral Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Priya; Lee, Jennifer S.; Pan, Dongli; Pesola, Jean M.; Coen, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent infections by viruses usually involve minimizing viral protein expression so that the host immune system cannot recognize the infected cell through the viral peptides presented on its cell surface. Herpes simplex virus (HSV), for example, is thought to express noncoding RNAs such as latency-associated transcripts (LATs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) as the only abundant viral gene products during latent infection. Here we describe analysis of HSV-1 mutant viruses, providing strong genetic evidence that HSV-infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) is expressed during establishment and/or maintenance of latent infection in murine sensory neurons in vivo. Studies of an ICP0 nonsense mutant virus showed that ICP0 promotes heterochromatin and latent and lytic transcription, arguing that ICP0 is expressed and functional. We propose that ICP0 promotes transcription of LATs during establishment or maintenance of HSV latent infection, much as it promotes lytic gene transcription. This report introduces the new concept that a lytic viral protein can be expressed during latent infection and can serve dual roles to regulate viral chromatin to optimize latent infection in addition to its role in epigenetic regulation during lytic infection. An additional implication of the results is that ICP0 might serve as a target for an antiviral therapeutic acting on lytic and latent infections. PMID:27190217

  1. Regulation of Viral RNA Synthesis by the V Protein of Parainfluenza Virus 5.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zengel, James; Sun, Minghao; Sleeman, Katrina; Timani, Khalid Amine; Aligo, Jason; Rota, Paul; Wu, Jianguo; He, Biao

    2015-12-01

    Paramyxoviruses include many important animal and human pathogens. The genome of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5), a prototypical paramyxovirus, encodes a V protein that inhibits viral RNA synthesis. In this work, the mechanism of inhibition was investigated. Using mutational analysis and a minigenome system, we identified regions in the N and C termini of the V protein that inhibit viral RNA synthesis: one at the very N terminus of V and the second at the C terminus of V. Furthermore, we determined that residues L16 and I17 are critical for the inhibitory function of the N-terminal region of the V protein. Both regions interact with the nucleocapsid protein (NP), an essential component of the viral RNA genome complex (RNP). Mutations at L16 and I17 abolished the interaction between NP and the N-terminal domain of V. This suggests that the interaction between NP and the N-terminal domain plays a critical role in V inhibition of viral RNA synthesis by the N-terminal domain. Both the N- and C-terminal regions inhibited viral RNA replication. The C terminus inhibited viral RNA transcription, while the N-terminal domain enhanced viral RNA transcription, suggesting that the two domains affect viral RNA through different mechanisms. Interestingly, V also inhibited the synthesis of the RNA of other paramyxoviruses, such as Nipah virus (NiV), human parainfluenza virus 3 (HPIV3), measles virus (MeV), mumps virus (MuV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This suggests that a common host factor may be involved in the replication of these paramyxoviruses. We identified two regions of the V protein that interact with NP and determined that one of these regions enhances viral RNA transcription via its interaction with NP. Our data suggest that a common host factor may be involved in the regulation of paramyxovirus replication and could be a target for broad antiviral drug development. Understanding the regulation of paramyxovirus replication will enable the rational design of

  2. Regulation of Viral RNA Synthesis by the V Protein of Parainfluenza Virus 5

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zengel, James; Sun, Minghao; Sleeman, Katrina; Timani, Khalid Amine; Aligo, Jason; Rota, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses include many important animal and human pathogens. The genome of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5), a prototypical paramyxovirus, encodes a V protein that inhibits viral RNA synthesis. In this work, the mechanism of inhibition was investigated. Using mutational analysis and a minigenome system, we identified regions in the N and C termini of the V protein that inhibit viral RNA synthesis: one at the very N terminus of V and the second at the C terminus of V. Furthermore, we determined that residues L16 and I17 are critical for the inhibitory function of the N-terminal region of the V protein. Both regions interact with the nucleocapsid protein (NP), an essential component of the viral RNA genome complex (RNP). Mutations at L16 and I17 abolished the interaction between NP and the N-terminal domain of V. This suggests that the interaction between NP and the N-terminal domain plays a critical role in V inhibition of viral RNA synthesis by the N-terminal domain. Both the N- and C-terminal regions inhibited viral RNA replication. The C terminus inhibited viral RNA transcription, while the N-terminal domain enhanced viral RNA transcription, suggesting that the two domains affect viral RNA through different mechanisms. Interestingly, V also inhibited the synthesis of the RNA of other paramyxoviruses, such as Nipah virus (NiV), human parainfluenza virus 3 (HPIV3), measles virus (MeV), mumps virus (MuV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This suggests that a common host factor may be involved in the replication of these paramyxoviruses. IMPORTANCE We identified two regions of the V protein that interact with NP and determined that one of these regions enhances viral RNA transcription via its interaction with NP. Our data suggest that a common host factor may be involved in the regulation of paramyxovirus replication and could be a target for broad antiviral drug development. Understanding the regulation of paramyxovirus replication will enable the

  3. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein K interacts with Sindbis virus nonstructural proteins and viral subgenomic mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, Andrew J.; Gong, Lei; Hardy, Richard W.

    2007-10-10

    Alphaviruses are a group of arthropod-borne human and animal pathogens that can cause epidemics of significant public health and economic consequence. Alphavirus RNA synthesis requires four virally encoded nonstructural proteins and probably a number of cellular proteins. Using comparative two-dimensional electrophoresis we were able to identify proteins enriched in cytoplasmic membrane fractions containing viral RNA synthetic complexes following infection with Sindbis virus. Our studies demonstrated the following: (i) the host protein hnRNP K is enriched in cytoplasmic membrane fractions following Sindbis virus infection, (ii) viral nonstructural proteins co-immunoprecipitate with hnRNP K, (iii) nsP2 and hnRNP K co-localize in the cytoplasm of Sindbis virus infected cells, (iv) Sindbis virus subgenomic mRNA, but not genomic RNA co-immunoprecipitates with hnRNP K, (v) viral RNA does not appear to be required for the interaction of hnRNP K with the nonstructural proteins. Potential functions of hnRNP K during virus replication are discussed.

  4. The influenza virus NEP (NS2 protein) mediates the nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, R E; Talon, J; Palese, P

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear import and export of viral nucleic acids is crucial for the replication cycle of many viruses, and elucidation of the mechanism of these steps may provide a paradigm for understanding general biological processes. Influenza virus replicates its RNA genome in the nucleus of infected cells. The influenza virus NS2 protein, which had no previously assigned function, was shown to mediate the nuclear export of virion RNAs by acting as an adaptor between viral ribonucleoprotein complexes and the nuclear export machinery of the cell. A functional domain on the NS2 with characteristics of a nuclear export signal was mapped: it interacts with cellular nucleoporins, can functionally replace the effector domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev protein and mediates rapid nuclear export when cross-linked to a reporter protein. Microinjection of anti-NS2 antibodies into infected cells inhibited nuclear export of viral ribonucleoproteins, suggesting that the Rev-like NS2 mediates this process. Therefore, we have renamed this Rev-like factor the influenza virus nuclear export protein or NEP. We propose a model by which NEP acts as a protein adaptor molecule bridging viral ribonucleoproteins and the nuclear pore complex. PMID:9427762

  5. Host and viral proteins in the virion of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Jill T; Winant, Richard C; Ganem, Don

    2005-04-01

    Infection of cultured cells with Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) typically establishes a latent infection, in which only a few viral genes are expressed. Recently, it has been reported that a subset of lytic genes are transiently expressed very early after viral entry but that this burst of abortive lytic gene expression is terminated with the supervention of latency (H. H. Krishnan, P. P. Naranatt, M. S. Smith, L. Zeng, C. Bloomer, and B. Chandran, J. Virol. 78:3601-3620, 2004). To identify molecules imported into cells by KSHV that might influence this gene expression program, we have examined the protein composition of the KSHV particle. Immunoblotting of virus particles demonstrated that RTA, the lytic switch protein, and RAP, a viral protein that is a transcriptional and cell cycle modulator, were both incorporated into virus particles. In a second approach, polypeptides isolated from purified virions were identified by mass-spectrometric analysis of their constituent tryptic peptides. With this approach we were able to identify 18 major virion proteins, including structural, regulatory, and signaling proteins of both viral and cellular origin.

  6. Heat shock protein-90-beta facilitates enterovirus 71 viral particles assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Y L; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Ma, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Hsing-I; Yu, Jau-Song; Yen, Sih-Min; Huang, Chi-Ruei; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2013-09-01

    Molecular chaperones are reported to be crucial for virus propagation, but are not yet addressed in Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71). Here we describe the specific association of heat shock protein-90-beta (Hsp90β), but not alpha form (Hsp90α), with EV71 viral particles by the co-purification with virions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and by the colocalization with viral particles, as assessed by immunogold electron microscopy. The reduction of the Hsp90β protein using RNA interference decreased the correct assembly of viral particles, without affecting EV71 replication levels. Tracking ectopically expressed Hsp90β protein associated with EV71 virions revealed that Hsp90β protein was transmitted to new host cells through its direct association with infectious viral particles. Our findings suggest a new antiviral strategy in which extracellular Hsp90β protein is targeted to decrease the infectivity of EV71 and other enteroviruses, without affecting the broader functions of this constitutively expressed molecular chaperone.

  7. iLIR@viral: A web resource for LIR motif-containing proteins in viruses.

    PubMed

    Jacomin, Anne-Claire; Samavedam, Siva; Charles, Hannah; Nezis, Ioannis P

    2017-10-03

    Macroautophagy/autophagy has been shown to mediate the selective lysosomal degradation of pathogenic bacteria and viruses (xenophagy), and to contribute to the activation of innate and adaptative immune responses. Autophagy can serve as an antiviral defense mechanism but also as a proviral process during infection. Atg8-family proteins play a central role in the autophagy process due to their ability to interact with components of the autophagy machinery as well as selective autophagy receptors and adaptor proteins. Such interactions are usually mediated through LC3-interacting region (LIR) motifs. So far, only one viral protein has been experimentally shown to have a functional LIR motif, leaving open a vast field for investigation. Here, we have developed the iLIR@viral database ( http://ilir.uk/virus/ ) as a freely accessible web resource listing all the putative canonical LIR motifs identified in viral proteins. Additionally, we used a curated text-mining analysis of the literature to identify novel putative LIR motif-containing proteins (LIRCPs) in viruses. We anticipate that iLIR@viral will assist with elucidating the full complement of LIRCPs in viruses.

  8. Mechanisms of coronavirus cell entry mediated by the viral spike protein.

    PubMed

    Belouzard, Sandrine; Millet, Jean K; Licitra, Beth N; Whittaker, Gary R

    2012-06-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped positive-stranded RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm. To deliver their nucleocapsid into the host cell, they rely on the fusion of their envelope with the host cell membrane. The spike glycoprotein (S) mediates virus entry and is a primary determinant of cell tropism and pathogenesis. It is classified as a class I fusion protein, and is responsible for binding to the receptor on the host cell as well as mediating the fusion of host and viral membranes-A process driven by major conformational changes of the S protein. This review discusses coronavirus entry mechanisms focusing on the different triggers used by coronaviruses to initiate the conformational change of the S protein: receptor binding, low pH exposure and proteolytic activation. We also highlight commonalities between coronavirus S proteins and other class I viral fusion proteins, as well as distinctive features that confer distinct tropism, pathogenicity and host interspecies transmission characteristics to coronaviruses.

  9. Mutational analysis of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) immediate early protein (IE62) subdomains and their importance in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Che, Xibing; Sung, Phillip; Sommer, Marvin H; Hay, John; Arvin, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    VZV IE62 is an essential, immediate-early, tegument protein and consists of five domains. We generated recombinant viruses carrying mutations in the first three IE62 domains and tested their influence on VZV replication kinetics. The mutations in domain I did not affect replication kinetics while domain II mutations, disrupting the DNA binding and dimerization domain (DBD), were lethal for VZV replication. Mutations in domain III of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the two phosphorylation sites S686A/S722A resulted in slower growth in early and late infection respectively and were associated with IE62 accumulation in the cytoplasm and nucleus respectively. This study mapped the functional domains of IE62 in context of viral infection, indicating that DNA binding and dimerization domain is essential for VZV replication. In addition, the correct localization of IE62, whether nuclear or cytoplasmic, at different points in the viral life cycle, is important for normal progression of VZV replication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutational analysis of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) immediate early protein (IE62) subdomains and their importance in viral replication

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Mohamed I.; Che, Xibing; Sung, Phillip; Sommer, Marvin H.; Hay, John; Arvin, Ann M.

    2016-05-15

    VZV IE62 is an essential, immediate-early, tegument protein and consists of five domains. We generated recombinant viruses carrying mutations in the first three IE62 domains and tested their influence on VZV replication kinetics. The mutations in domain I did not affect replication kinetics while domain II mutations, disrupting the DNA binding and dimerization domain (DBD), were lethal for VZV replication. Mutations in domain III of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the two phosphorylation sites S686A/S722A resulted in slower growth in early and late infection respectively and were associated with IE62 accumulation in the cytoplasm and nucleus respectively. This study mapped the functional domains of IE62 in context of viral infection, indicating that DNA binding and dimerization domain is essential for VZV replication. In addition, the correct localization of IE62, whether nuclear or cytoplasmic, at different points in the viral life cycle, is important for normal progression of VZV replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of IE62 domain I did not affect VZV replication in melanoma cells. • IE62 domain II and III are important for VZV replication in melanoma cells. • Mutations of IE62 domain II (DBD) were lethal for virus replication. • Mutations of IE62 NLS and phosphorylation sites inhibited VZV replication. • NLS and S686A/S722A mutations altered localization of IE62 during early and late infection.

  11. Production of a recombinant full-length prion protein in a soluble form without refolding or detergents.

    PubMed

    Arii, Yasuhiro; Oshiro, Satoshi; Wada, Keita; Fukuoka, Shin-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant prion protein has been produced in insoluble form and refolded following solubilization with denaturants. It is, however, preferable to use a soluble recombinant protein prepared without artificial solubilization. In this study, a soluble recombinant prion protein was produced in Escherichia coli cells by coexpression of neuregulin I-β1 and purified to high purity.

  12. A predictor for toxin-like proteins exposes cell modulator candidates within viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Naamati, Guy; Askenazi, Manor; Linial, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Animal toxins operate by binding to receptors and ion channels. These proteins are short and vary in sequence, structure and function. Sporadic discoveries have also revealed endogenous toxin-like proteins in non-venomous organisms. Viral proteins are the largest group of quickly evolving proteomes. We tested the hypothesis that toxin-like proteins exist in viruses and that they act to modulate functions of their hosts. Results: We updated and improved a classifier for compact proteins resembling short animal toxins that is based on a machine-learning method. We applied it in a large-scale setting to identify toxin-like proteins among short viral proteins. Among the ∼26 000 representatives of such short proteins, 510 sequences were positively identified. We focused on the 19 highest scoring proteins. Among them, we identified conotoxin-like proteins, growth factors receptor-like proteins and anti-bacterial peptides. Our predictor was shown to enhance annotation inference for many ‘uncharacterized’ proteins. We conclude that our protocol can expose toxin-like proteins in unexplored niches including metagenomics data and enhance the systematic discovery of novel cell modulators for drug development. Availability: ClanTox is available at http://www.clantox.cs.huji.ac.il Contact: michall@cc.huji.ac.il PMID:20823311

  13. Non-human Primate Schlafen11 Inhibits Production of Both Host and Viral Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stabell, Alex C; Hawkins, John; Li, Manqing; Gao, Xia; David, Michael; Press, William H; Sawyer, Sara L

    2016-12-01

    Schlafen11 (encoded by the SLFN11 gene) has been shown to inhibit the accumulation of HIV-1 proteins. We show that the SLFN11 gene is under positive selection in simian primates and is species-specific in its activity against HIV-1. The activity of human Schlafen11 is relatively weak compared to that of some other primate versions of this protein, with the versions encoded by chimpanzee, orangutan, gibbon, and marmoset being particularly potent inhibitors of HIV-1 protein production. Interestingly, we find that Schlafen11 is functional in the absence of infection and reduces protein production from certain non-viral (GFP) and even host (Vinculin and GAPDH) transcripts. This suggests that Schlafen11 may just generally block protein production from non-codon optimized transcripts. Because Schlafen11 is an interferon-stimulated gene with a broad ability to inhibit protein production from many host and viral transcripts, its role may be to create a general antiviral state in the cell. Interestingly, the strong inhibitors such as marmoset Schlafen11 consistently block protein production better than weak primate Schlafen11 proteins, regardless of the virus or host target being analyzed. Further, we show that the residues to which species-specific differences in Schlafen11 potency map are distinct from residues that have been targeted by positive selection. We speculate that the positive selection of SLFN11 could have been driven by a number of different factors, including interaction with one or more viral antagonists that have yet to be identified.

  14. Towards protein-based viral mimetics for cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Unzueta, Ugutz; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Vázquez, Esther; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Mangues, Ramón; Villaverde, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    High resistance and recurrence rates, together with elevated drug clearance, compel the use of maximum-tolerated drug doses in cancer therapy, resulting in high-grade toxicities and limited clinical applicability. Promoting active drug accumulation in tumor tissues would minimize such issues and improve therapeutic outcomes. A new class of therapeutic drugs suitable for the task has emerged based on the concept of virus-mimetic nanocarriers, or 'artificial viruses'. Among the spectrum of materials under exploration in nanocarrier research, proteins offer unparalleled structural and functional versatility for designing virus-like molecular vehicles. By exhibiting 'smart' functions and biomimetic traits, protein-based nanocarriers will be a step ahead of the conventional drug-protein conjugates already in the clinic in ensuring efficient delivery of passenger antitumor drugs.

  15. Bovine viral diarrhea virus structural protein E2 as a complement regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Ostachuk, Agustín

    2016-07-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the genus Pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, and is one of the most widely distributed viruses in cattle worldwide. Approximately 60 % of cattle in endemic areas without control measures are infected with BVDV during their lifetime. This wide prevalence of BVDV in cattle populations results in significant economic losses. BVDV is capable of establishing persistent infections in its host due to its ability to infect fetuses, causing immune tolerance. However, this cannot explain how the virus evades the innate immune system. The objective of the present work was to test the potential activity of E2 as a complement regulatory protein. E2 glycoprotein, produced both in soluble and transmembrane forms in stable CHO-K1 cell lines, was able to reduce complement-mediated cell lysis up to 40 % and complement-mediated DNA fragmentation by 50 %, in comparison with cell lines not expressing the glycoprotein. This work provides the first evidence of E2 as a complement regulatory protein and, thus, the finding of a mechanism of immune evasion by BVDV. Furthermore, it is postulated that E2 acts as a self-associated molecular pattern (SAMP), enabling the virus to avoid being targeted by the immune system and to be recognized as self.

  16. HCMV protein LUNA is required for viral reactivation from latently infected primary CD14⁺ cells.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Lisa R; Hargett, Danna; Soland, Melisa; Bego, Mariana G; Rossetto, Cyprian C; Almeida-Porada, Graca; St Jeor, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a member of the Herpesviridae family that infects individuals throughout the world. Following an initial lytic stage, HCMV can persist in the individual for life in a non-active (or latent) form. During latency, the virus resides within cells of the myeloid lineage. The mechanisms controlling HCMV latency are not completely understood. A latency associated transcript, UL81-82ast, encoding the protein LUNA (Latency Unique Natural Antigen) was identified from latently infected donors in vivo. To address the role of the UL81-82ast protein product LUNA, in the context of the viral genome, we developed a recombinant HCMV bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) that does not express LUNA. This construct, LUNA knockout FIX virus (FIX-ΔLUNA), was used to evaluate LUNA's role in HCMV latency. The FIX-ΔLUNA virus was able to lytically infect Human Fibroblast (HF) cells, showing that LUNA is not required to establish a lytic infection. Interestingly, we observed significantly higher viral copy numbers in HF cells infected with FIX-ΔLUNA when compared to FIX-WT virus. Furthermore, FIX-WT and FIX-ΔLUNA genomic DNA and transcription of UL81-82ast persisted over time in primary monocytes. In contrast, the levels of UL138 transcript expression in FIX-ΔLUNA infected HF and CD14⁺ cells was 100 and 1000 fold lower (respectively) when compared to the levels observed for FIX-WT infection. Moreover, FIX-ΔLUNA virus failed to reactivate from infected CD14⁺ cells following differentiation. This lack of viral reactivation was accompanied by a lack of lytic gene expression, increase in viral copy numbers, and lack of the production of infectious units following differentiation of the cells. Our study suggests that the LUNA protein is involved in regulating HCMV reactivation, and that in the absence of LUNA, HCMV may not be able to enter a proper latent state and therefore cannot be rescued from the established persistent infection in CD14⁺ cells.

  17. Western Blot Detection of Human Anti-Chikungunya Virus Antibody with Recombinant En