Science.gov

Sample records for recovery heat production

  1. Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, W.R.; Cassano, A.A.; Dunbobbin, B.R.; Rao, P.; Erickson, D.C.

    1986-10-14

    A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange. 4 figs.

  2. Cascade heat recovery with coproduct gas production

    DOEpatents

    Brown, William R.; Cassano, Anthony A.; Dunbobbin, Brian R.; Rao, Pradip; Erickson, Donald C.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the integration of a chemical absorption separation of oxygen and nitrogen from air with a combustion process is set forth wherein excess temperature availability from the combustion process is more effectively utilized to desorb oxygen product from the absorbent and then the sensible heat and absorption reaction heat is further utilized to produce a high temperature process stream. The oxygen may be utilized to enrich the combustion process wherein the high temperature heat for desorption is conducted in a heat exchange preferably performed with a pressure differential of less than 10 atmospheres which provides considerable flexibility in the heat exchange.

  3. RTO heat recovery system decreases production costs and provides payback

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, P.R.

    1999-07-01

    Application of a heat recovery system to an existing regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) was considered, tested, and selected for decreasing production costs at a pressure sensitive tape manufacturing facility. Heat recovery systems on RTO's are less common than those on other thermal oxidizers (e.g., recuperative) because RTO's, by the nature of the technology, usually provide high thermal efficiencies (without the application of external heat recovery systems). In this case, the production processes were integrated with the emission controls by applying an external heat recovery system and by optimizing the design and operation of the existing drying and cure ovens, RTO system, and ductwork collection system. Integration of these systems provides an estimated annual production cost savings of over $400,000 and a simplified capital investment payback of less than 2 years, excluding possible savings from improved dryer operations. These additional process benefits include more consistent and simplified control of seasonal dryer performance and possibly production throughput increases. The production costs savings are realized by substituting excess RTO heat for a portion of the infrared (IR) electrical heat input to the dryers/ovens. This will be accomplished by preheating the supply air to the oven zones with the excess RTO heat (i.e., heat at the RTO exceeding auto-thermal conditions). Several technologies, including direct air-to-air, indirect air-to-air, hot oil-to-air, waste heat boiler (steam-to-air) were evaluated for transferring the excess RTO heat (hot gas) to the ovens. A waste heat boiler was selected to transfer the excess RTO heat to the ovens because this technology provided the most economical, reliable, and feasible operation. Full-scale production test trials on the coating lines were performed and confirmed the IR electrical costs could be reduced up to 70%.

  4. Metabolic heat production of neonatal calves during hypothermia and recovery.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J B; Young, B A

    1988-10-01

    Metabolic heat production and rectal temperature were measured in 19 newborn calves (41.8 +/- 3.7 kg) during hypothermia and recovery when four different means of assistance were provided. Hypothermia of 30 degrees C rectal temperature was induced by immersion in 18 degrees C water. Calves were rewarmed in a 20 to 25 degree C air environment where thermal assistance was provided by added thermal insulation or by supplemental heat from infrared lamps. Other calves were rewarmed by immersion in warm water (38 degrees C), with or without a 40-ml drench of 20% ethanol in water. Resting (prehypothermia) and cold-induced summit metabolism of the calves was 2.5 +/- .1 and 8.2 +/- .22 W/kg and occurred at rectal temperatures of 39.5 +/- .06 and 36.2 +/- .26 degrees C, respectively. During cooling, metabolic heat production declined at the rate of .65 W/kg per degrees C decline in rectal temperature. The time required to regain euthermia from a rectal temperature of 30 degrees C was longer for calves with added insulation and those exposed to heat lamps than for the calves in the warm water and warm water plus ethanol treatments (90 and 92 vs 59 and 63 +/- 6.4 min, respectively). During recovery, the calves rewarmed with the added insulation and heat lamps produced more heat metabolically than the calves rewarmed in warm water. Total heat production during recovery was 34.1, 31.1, 18.3, 16.9 +/- 1.07 kJ/kg for the calves with added insulation, exposed to the heat lamps, in warm water and in warm water plus an oral drench of ethanol, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Geothermal Energy Production With Innovative Methods Of Geothermal Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, Allen; Darlow, Rick; Sanchez, Angel; Pierce, Michael; Sellers, Blake

    2014-12-19

    The ThermalDrive™ Power System (“TDPS”) offers one of the most exciting technological advances in the geothermal power generation industry in the last 30 years. Using innovations in subsurface heat recovery methods, revolutionary advances in downhole pumping technology and a distributed approach to surface power production, GeoTek Energy, LLC’s TDPS offers an opportunity to change the geothermal power industry dynamics.

  6. The recovery heat production in non-myelinated garfish olfactory nerve fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, J V; Ritchie, J M

    1979-01-01

    1. The recovery heat production of the non-myelinated fibres of garfish olfactory nerve has been measured. 2. At about 20 degrees C the total recovery heat was 381 +/- 26 microcal g-1 impulse-1 at a stimulation frequency of 2 sec-1. 3. The time constant of decay of the recovery heat production after a brief period of stimulation was 78.7 +/- 3.1 sec at about 20 degrees C. 4. Changing the temperature (by +/- 5 degress C) had little effect on the total recovery heat produced. 5. However, lowering the temperature reduced both the rate of rise, and the maximum rate of recovery heat production whereas the time constant of decay was increased. Raising the temperature produced corresponding changes in the opposite direction. 6. the recovery heat production measured in the present experiments is consistent with the previously measured oxygen consumption in the same preparation. PMID:490341

  7. Biodiesel production process from microalgae oil by waste heat recovery and process integration.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunfeng; Chen, Guanyi; Ji, Na; Liu, Qingling; Kansha, Yasuki; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the optimization of microalgae oil (MO) based biodiesel production process is carried out by waste heat recovery and process integration. The exergy analysis of each heat exchanger presented an efficient heat coupling between hot and cold streams, thus minimizing the total exergy destruction. Simulation results showed that the unit production cost of optimized process is 0.592$/L biodiesel, and approximately 0.172$/L biodiesel can be avoided by heat integration. Although the capital cost of the optimized biodiesel production process increased 32.5% and 23.5% compared to the reference cases, the operational cost can be reduced by approximately 22.5% and 41.6%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Heat Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ball Metal's design of ducting and controls for series of roof top heat exchangers was inspired by Tech Briefs. Heat exchangers are installed on eight press and coating lines used to decorate sheet metal. The heat recovery system provides an estimated energy savings of more than $250,000 per year.

  9. Waste heat recovery boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Taiji Inui, H.; Makoto Sasaki, M.

    1984-08-21

    A waste heat recovery boiler for generating steam by utilizing a flue gas discharged from a gas turbine as a heat source comprises an economizer for preheating feedwater by the flue gas, an evaporator for evaporating the preheated feedwater, and a superheater for generating a steam for driving a steam prime mover by heating the evaporated feedwater. The economizer, the evaporator and the superheater are successively arranged in the direction from a downstream side to an upstream side of flue gas passage. The evaporator itself is divided into two sections and an apparatus for removing NO /SUB x/ is provided in a space between the divided two sections of the evaporator in the flue gas passage to remove NO /SUB x/ from the flue gas. An NO /SUB x/ concentration of a flue gas discharged from a combined cycle power plant including the gas turbine can be stably abated at any of full and partial loads.

  10. Heat pipe waste heat recovery boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littwin, D. A.; McCurley, J.

    The use of heat pipes as transport devices in waste heat recovery boilers is examined. Test results show that heat pipes can efficiently extract heat from the hot gas stream and transfer it inside the pressure vessel for the steam generation process. The benefits of incorporating heat pipes into the design of waste heat recovery boilers include a highly compact package, a significant reduction in thermally induced stresses, double isolation of the steam from the heat source, an extended surface for improved efficiency in heat extraction, improved circulation and stability in the boiling regime, easy cleaning, individually replaceable tubes, and low flue gas pressure drop.

  11. Wastewater heat recovery apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

  12. Wastewater heat recovery apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

  13. Solar Thermochemical Fuels Production: Solar Fuels via Partial Redox Cycles with Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-19

    HEATS Project: The University of Minnesota is developing a solar thermochemical reactor that will efficiently produce fuel from sunlight, using solar energy to produce heat to break chemical bonds. The University of Minnesota is envisioning producing the fuel by using partial redox cycles and ceria-based reactive materials. The team will achieve unprecedented solar-to-fuel conversion efficiencies of more than 10% (where current state-of-the-art efficiency is 1%) by combined efforts and innovations in material development, and reactor design with effective heat recovery mechanisms and demonstration. This new technology will allow for the effective use of vast domestic solar resources to produce precursors to synthetic fuels that could replace gasoline.

  14. Heat recovery in building envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-08-01

    Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to contribute to the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Some studies have indicated that application of such a simple formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building envelope. The major objective of this study was to provide an improved prediction of the energy load due to infiltration by introducing a correction factor that multiplies the expression for the conventional load. This paper discusses simplified analytical modeling and CFD simulations that examine infiltration heat recovery (IHR) in an attempt to quantify the magnitude of this effect for typical building envelopes. For comparison, we will also briefly examine the results of some full-scale field measurements of IHR based on infiltration rates and energy use in real buildings. The results of this work showed that for houses with insulated walls the heat recovery is negligible due to the small fraction of the envelope that participates in heat exchange with the infiltrating air. However; there is the potential for IHR to have a significant effect for higher participation dynamic walls/ceilings or uninsulated walls. This result implies that the existing methods for evaluating infiltration related building loads provide adequate results for typical buildings.

  15. Textile dryer heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J. S.

    1985-08-06

    A textile dryer heat recovery system includes a textile dryer and a heat exchanger. A duct is provided for directing dryer exhaust gas to the heat exchanger for preheating dryer input air. A cleaning system within the heat exchanger removes dryer exhaust gas contaminants deposited in the heat exchanger.

  16. Heat recovery method

    SciTech Connect

    Richarts, F.

    1985-04-16

    Heat is recovered by combining a heat transfer system including heat exchangers interconnected in a circulatory system, with a heat pump system. The heat pump system is preferably operated in accordance with the Lorenz-Principle. It is not necessary to divide the heat carrier circuit of the heat pump into two or three separate circulatory circuits. The heat carrier circuit of the heat pump can thus continue to operate unchanged even if the heat pump is switched off. For this purpose the warm heat carrier coming from a discharge fluid cooler, is heated further in a condenser of the heat pump and the cold heat carrier coming from a preheater or cooler group, is cooled further in an evaporator of the heat pump.

  17. Automotive Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Gregory P.

    2015-03-01

    Considerable fuel energy, as much as 70%, is not converted to useful work by internal combustion engines but is instead rejected as waste heat, and more than half of the waste heat, nearly 40% of fuel energy, is contained in vehicle exhaust gas. This provides an opportunity to recover some of the wasted fuel energy and convert it from heat into useful work, subject to the laws of thermodynamics, and thereby improve vehicle energy efficiency. Thermoelectric (TE) materials have been extensively researched and TE devices are now being developed for operation at high temperatures corresponding to automotive exhaust gases for direct solid-state conversion of heat into electricity. This has stimulated substantial progress in the development of practical TE generator (TEG) systems for large-scale commercialization. A significant enabler of this progress has been the US Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program through funding for low cost solutions for automotive TE waste heat recovery to improve fuel economy. Our current project at General Motors has culminated in the identification of the potential supply chain for all components and assembly of an automotive TEG. A significant focus has been to develop integrated and iterative modeling tools for a fully optimized TEG design that includes all components and subsystems (TE modules, heat exchangers, thermal interfaces, electrical interconnects, power conditioning, and vehicle integration for maximal use of TEG power). We have built and tested a new, low-cost Initial TEG prototype based on state-of-the-art production-scale skutterudite TE modules, novel heat exchanger designs, and practical solutions to the many technical challenges for optimum TEG performance. We will use the results for our Initial TEG prototype to refine our modeling and design tools for a Final automotive TEG system prototype. Our recent results will be presented. Thanks to: J.R. Salvador, E.R. Gundlach, D. Thompson, N.K. Bucknor, M

  18. Ceramic heat recuperators for industrial heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    Results are presented from a continuing program whose purpose is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of using ceramic heat recuperators for industrial heat recovery. The information presented can be used by engineers in industry to evaluate their specific furnace applications and to estimate the technical requirements and economic benefits from the use of ceramic heat recuperators. Chapter 2 presents methods that can be used to estimate the amount of energy savings by recuperation. Chapter 3 gives a brief background in heat exchanger design theory so that the reader can understand the procedures involved in designing and sizing heat exchangers for a given application. The specific GTE core design and the recuperator fabrication, housing and installation are discussed in Chapter 4. The demonstration project results are presented in Chapter 5. Each demonstration is described and the results, economics and problem areas discussed. The Appendices provide details that will allow the engineer in industry to select a core, size a heat exchanger, calculate the performance, determine energy saved and estimate the economics of using a ceramic recuperator for a specific industrial application. (LCL)

  19. Thermodynamic and heat transfer analysis of LNG energy recovery for power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A.; Casarosa, C.

    2014-11-01

    An important option to transport the gas is to convert it into liquid natural gas (LNG) and convey it using insulated LNG tankers. At receiving terminals, the LNG is offloaded into storage tanks and then pumped at the required pressure and vaporized for final transmission to the pipeline. The LNG production process consumes a considerable amount of energy, while the cold availability, as also known as cold energy, has been stored in LNG. At a receiving terminal, LNG needs to be evaporated into gas at environmental temperature before fed into the gas distribution system. Seawater is commonly used for the regasification process of the LNG. In the present paper, after a general analysis of the perspectives of the various thermodynamic schemes proposed for power production from the regasification, a detailed analysis of enhanced direct expansion system is carried out in order to identify the upper level of the energy that can be recovered. The analysis outlines that power production typical of optimized ORC plant configurations (120 kJ/kg) can be obtained with direct expansion solutions.

  20. Gas engine heat recovery unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubasco, A. J.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of Gas Engine Heat Recovery Unit was to design, fabricate, and test an efficient, compact, and corrosion resistant heat recovery unit (HRU) for use on exhaust of natural gas-fired reciprocating engine-generator sets in the 50-500 kW range. The HRU would be a core component of a factory pre-packaged cogeneration system designed around component optimization, reliability, and efficiency. The HRU uses finned high alloy, stainless steel tubing wound into a compact helical coil heat exchanger. The corrosion resistance of the tubing allows more heat to be taken from the exhaust gas without fear of the effects of acid condensation. One HRU is currently installed in a cogeneration system at the Henry Ford Hospital Complex in Dearborn, Michigan. A second unit underwent successful endurance testing for 850 hours. The plan was to commercialize the HRU through its incorporation into a Caterpillar pre-packaged cogeneration system. Caterpillar is not proceeding with the concept at this time because of a downturn in the small size cogeneration market.

  1. Energy recovery heat exchanger installation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, N.F.

    1983-08-16

    An installation is disclosed for energy recovery heat exchangers arranged to transfer heat into or out of air exhausted from an air handling system for paint spray booths. The system includes a collection chamber about which the intakes of a series of exhaust fans are arranged to draw exhaust air into an exhaust stack. Pairs of inclined wetted surface coil sets are mounted in the walls of the enclosures, each in communication with the intake of an exhaust fan so as to receive airflow of each exhaust fan. Each of the enclosures is provided with an access door to enable cleaning and other maintenance chores to be carried out on the coil sets and pivotally mounted blocking panels may be positioned to close off air flow across the coils and bypassing of the exhaust flow through the access doors in the event excessive overspray solids are present in the exhaust flow.

  2. Validation and recovery rates of an indirect calorimetry headbox system used to measure heat production of cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A headbox system was constructed at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to determine heat production from dairy cattle using indirect calorimetry. The system was designed for use in a tie-stall barn to allow the animal to be comfortable and was mounted on wheels to transport between animals between s...

  3. CFD Simulation of Infiltration Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, C.R.; Sherman, M.H.

    1998-07-01

    Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to affect the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the sensible enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Results from detailed computational fluid dynamics simulations of five wall geometries over a range of infiltration rates show that heat transfer between the infiltrating air and walls can be substantial, reducing the impact of infiltration. Factors affecting the heat recovery are leakage path length, infiltration flow rate, and wall construction. The classical method for determination of the infiltration energy load was found to over-predict the amount by as much as 95 percent and by at least 10 percent. However, the air flow paths typical of building envelopes give over-predictions at the low end of this range.

  4. Low cost process heat recovery. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Theisen, P.; McCray, J.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to analyze waste heat recovery potential, economic analysis, heat exchanger and system design, and computer analysis programs. The heating demand and heat recovery potential at a Madison neighborhood bakery was conducted. The building has steam heat and natural gas is used in the hot water heater, the cooking stoves, and in the baking oven. Heat recovery potential was analyzed based upon fuel consumption in the baking oven, flue gas temperature, mass flow rate, and hours of oven operation. The feasibility of waste heat recovery systems is analyzed using life cycle cost and life cycle savings. For a first approximation, hand calculations were performed for air-to-air flat plate, fin-plate, and liquid-to-air tube type heat exchangers using the temperature and mass flow data from a pizza restaurant in Madison. Then a heat exchanger analysis program was written in interactive BASIC. The analysis indicates that heat recovery using the flat-plate and fin-plate exchanger designs is technically feasible and yields high effectiveness. (MCW)

  5. Heat pipes for industrial waste heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    Development work on the high temperature ceramic recuperator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described and involved material investigations, fabrication methods development, compatibility tests, heat pipe operation, and the modeling of application conditions based on current industrial usage. Solid ceramic heat pipes, ceramic coated refractory pipes, and high-temperature oxide protected metallic pipes have been investigated. Economic studies of the use of heat-pipe based recuperators in industrial furnaces have been conducted and payback periods determined as a function of material, fabrication, and installation cost.

  6. Design manual. [High temperature heat pump for heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, T.E.; Chancellor, P.D.; Dyer, D.F.; Maples, G.

    1980-01-01

    The design and performance of a waste heat recovery system which utilizes a high temperature heat pump and which is intended for use in those industries incorporating indirect drying processes are described. It is estimated that use of this heat recovery system in the paper, pulp, and textile industries in the US could save 3.9 x 10/sup 14/ Btu/yr. Information is included on over all and component design for the heat pump system, comparison of prime movers for powering the compressor, control equipment, and system economics. (LCL)

  7. Applications guide for waste heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, P. I.

    1983-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of commercially available organic Rankine cycle (ORC) hardware from a literature search and industry survey is assessed. Engineering criteria for applying ORC technology are established, and a set of nomograms to enable the rapid sizing of the equipment is presented. A comparison of an ORC system with conventional heat recovery techniques can be made with a nomogram developed for a recuperative heat exchanger. A graphical technique for evaluating the economic aspects of an ORC system and conventional heat recovery method is discussed: also included is a description of anticipated future trends in organic Rankine cycle R&D.

  8. Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-03-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total U.S. VOC emissions. The 'Toxic-Release Inventory' of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing, refrigerant production, and wood products production. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase 1 report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. The Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient, and economically priced.

  9. High-performance heat pipes for heat recovery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Hartl, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Methods to improve the performance of reflux heat pipes for heat recovery applications were examined both analytically and experimentally. Various models for the estimation of reflux heat pipe transport capacity were surveyed in the literature and compared with experimental data. A high transport capacity reflux heat pipe was developed that provides up to a factor of 10 capacity improvement over conventional open tube designs; analytical models were developed for this device and incorporated into a computer program HPIPE. Good agreement of the model predictions with data for R-11 and benzene reflux heat pipes was obtained.

  10. Boiler Stack Gas Heat Recovery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    Based upon "economic analysis of available options, three cost- effective methods of recovering waste heat were identified: the conventional economizer...upon economic analysis of available options, three cost- effective methods of Continued DO I IA.N1 1473 EDITION OF I NOV AS IS OBSOLETE S Y C O OF...energy loss in a boiler is attributable to the hot flue gas leaving the stack. Thus, the most effective method to save fuel is to recover as much

  11. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2015-09-22

    A waste heat recovery (WHR) system connects a working fluid to fluid passages formed in an engine block and/or a cylinder head of an internal combustion engine, forming an engine heat exchanger. The fluid passages are formed near high temperature areas of the engine, subjecting the working fluid to sufficient heat energy to vaporize the working fluid while the working fluid advantageously cools the engine block and/or cylinder head, improving fuel efficiency. The location of the engine heat exchanger downstream from an EGR boiler and upstream from an exhaust heat exchanger provides an optimal position of the engine heat exchanger with respect to the thermodynamic cycle of the WHR system, giving priority to cooling of EGR gas. The configuration of valves in the WHR system provides the ability to select a plurality of parallel flow paths for optimal operation.

  12. Automatic flue gas heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, D.A.

    1983-02-22

    An automatic flue gas heat recovery system for supplementing or replacing a conventional, separate hot water system. In the example described, the heat recovery system is applied to a pizza restaurant where large quantities of heat energy are normally wasted up an oven chimney stack, and large quantities of hot water also are required for restaurant operations. An electric motor driven pump circulates water in a closed loop between a storage tank and a heat exchanger tube located in the oven chimney stack. A thermostat control automatically starts the pump when the oven heats the chimney stack to an effective water heating temperature. When temperature in the storage tank reaches a predetermined maximum, the thermostat control stops the pump, opens a drain valve, and dumps water quickly and completely from the heat exchanger tube. Three different embodiments are shown and described illustrating systems with one or more storage tanks and one or more pumps. In the plural storage tank embodiments, an existing hot water heating tank may be converted for use to augment a main tank supplied with the present system.

  13. Waste incineration and heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.E.; Ting, A.P.

    1982-02-01

    A recent project includes the incineration of organic and aqueous waste streams. The waste streams represent a gross heating valyue of 26 million kcal/h (100 million Btu/h). A system designed to generate approximately 36,000 kg/h (79,366 lb/h) of 1138 kPa (165 psig) steam for plant use, would save $5.5 million a year if the steam produced is valued at $20/1000 kg ($9/1000 lb). The presence of certain components, such as inorganic salts, chlorinated and nitrogen-containing organic compounds, sulfur compounds, and phospho-organics, is critical to the design, and each deserves special considerations, as described in this paper.

  14. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-08-12

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  15. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2016-05-10

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  16. Plant Utility Improvements Increase Profits and Productivity at a Clothing Manufacturing Complex (MJ Soffee's Wastewater Heat Recovery System)

    SciTech Connect

    2000-11-01

    In response to increased marketplace competition and the need for expanded production capacity, MJ Soffee's manufacturing facility in Fayetteville, North Carolina implemented several energy improvement projects,

  17. Teton Coin Op Laundry: heat recovery unit. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-16

    Experience with a heat recovery unit using Freon 11 refrigerant as a transfer medium is reported. Heat exchangers were fabricated for use in dryer stacks and the waste heat was used in heating the water for the laundry. (MHR)

  18. Arrangement in a heat recovery unit

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsson, K.A.; Jansson, K.A.; Kruse, R.A.

    1983-03-22

    A heat recovery unit is adapted for installing in a cookery cupboard or the like space in a dwelling. Within a casing the unit has a lamella heat exchanger, which is arranged on one corner edge and has two of its defining surfaces provided with openings for passages facing upwards and two downwards. The heat exchanger has its end walls oriented in vertical planes. It is adapted for heating supply air through heat take-up from exhaust air. Four vertical wall portions form a cross above the heat exchanger, thus providing four chambers for the ingoing and outgoing air flows. By means of portions airtightly sealed against the casing and wall portions the heat exchanger is divided into two portions, each having a cross-stream course between supply air and exhaust air, with its passages for supply air and exhaust air arranged in series with the corresponding passages of the other portion. The heat exchanger is removable as a unit after opening the front of the casing.

  19. Process for the recovery of coke oven waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Flockenhaus, C.; Meckel, J.F.; Wagener, D.

    1981-01-20

    This invention is directed to a process for making coke and recovering the heat therefrom for preheating the firing gas to the coke oven. The process involves the use of the coke oven firing gas to extract the sensible heat from the hot coke from the coking oven to both preheat the firing gas for the coke oven and cool the hot coke. Significant economies are achieved in the two-fold function of coke production and heat recovery in accordance with the method disclosed.

  20. Short review on heat recovery from exhaust gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber, Hassan; Khaled, Mahmoud; Lemenand, Thierry; Ramadan, Mohamad

    2016-07-01

    The increasing growth of energy demand leads to issues associated with energy demand reduction and propose new energy efficient solutions. Heat recovery consists the most promising solution especially in regions where renewable energy resources are not available. That is why the domain of heat recovery has shown a tremendous improvement during the recent years. On the other hand, few works have been dedicated to heat recovery from exhaust gas. This paper presents a review on heat recovery from exhaust gas. The authors propose to classify exhaust gas heat recovery systems within three different classifications that are exhaust gas temperature, utilized equipment and recovery purposes.

  1. Technology profile: Residential greywater heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Proskiw, G.

    1998-12-31

    This report profiles residential greywater heat recovery (GWHR) systems, beginning with a background review of residential hot water consumption patterns, usage characteristics, and the technology currently used for residential water heating systems. This is followed by a generic description of the various types of residential GWHR systems and the benefits they produce, a summary of the technical obstacles which GWHR technology faces and the barriers to widespread GWHR commercialization, and a description of commercially available GWHR systems. The types of applications for which the technology is best suited are discussed, and the potential markets for GWHR systems are assessed. An action plan concludes the report, suggesting how those markets might be successfully developed.

  2. MHD heat and seed recovery technology project

    SciTech Connect

    Petrick, M.; Johnson, T. R.

    1980-08-01

    The MHD Heat and Seed Recovery Technology Project at Argonne National Laboratory is obtaining information for the design and operation of the steam plant downstream of the MHD channel-diffuser, and of the seed regeneration process. The project goal is to supply the engineering data required in the design of components for prototype and demonstration MHD facilities. The work is being done in close cooperation with the Heat Recovery-Seed Recovery facility, which will be a 20-MW pilot plant of the MHD steam bottoming system. The primary effort of the HSR Technology Project is directed toward experimental investigations of critical issues, such as 1) NO/sub x/ behavior in the radiant boiler and secondary combustor; 2) radiant boiler design to meet the multiple requirements of steam generation, NO/sub x/ decomposition, and seed slag separation; 3) effects of solid or liquid seed deposits on heat transfer and gas flow in the steam and air heaters; 4) formation, growth, and deposition of seed-slag particles, 5) character of the combustion gas effluents, and 6) the corrosion and erosion of ceramic and metallic materials of construction. These investigations are performed primarily in a 2-MW test facility, Argonne MHD Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL). Other project activities are related to studies of the thermochemistry of the seed-slag combustion gas system, identification of ceramic and metallic materials for service in the MHD-steam plant, and evaluation of seed regeneration processes. Progress is reported.

  3. Kaolin calciner waste heat and feed recovery system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, C.S.; Hudson, J.R.

    1988-01-05

    In the method for producing a calcined kaolin pigment product, by feeding an aqueous slurry of kaolin to a spray drier which is provided with heated gases from a combustor, feeding the dried kaolin product from the spray drier to a calciner; and recovering the calcined product; the improvement is described enabling recovery of heat energy and calciner dust from the calciner, comprising: cycling the hot exhaust gases and entrained calciner dust from the calciner back to the spray drier by joining the exhaust gases and calciner dust with the heated combustor gases being provided to the calciner; and collecting the calciner dust from the drier and providing same together with the dried kaolin product as feed to the calciner.

  4. Cogeneration from glass furnace waste heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hnat, J.G.; Cutting, J.C.; Patten, J.S.

    1982-06-01

    In glass manufacturing 70% of the total energy utilized is consumed in the melting process. Three basic furnaces are in use: regenerative, recuperative, and direct fired design. The present paper focuses on secondary heat recovery from regenerative furnaces. A diagram of a typical regenerative furnace is given. Three recovery bottoming cycles were evaluated as part of a comparative systems analysis: steam Rankine Cycle (SRC), Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), and pressurized Brayton cycle. Each cycle is defined and schematicized. The net power capabilities of the three different systems are summarized. Cost comparisons and payback period comparisons are made. Organic Rankine cycle provides the best opportunity for cogeneration for all the flue gas mass flow rates considered. With high temperatures, the Brayton cycle has the shortest payback period potential, but site-specific economics need to be considered.

  5. Wastewater heat recovery method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

  6. Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

  7. Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Petroleum Refining.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, William Gale

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the analysis presented here is improved recovery (and use) of waste heat at existing petroleum refineries. The major energy-conservation opportunities associated with waste heat are systematically examined both physically and in terms of cost. The opportunities at the Study Refinery are systematically examined in detail. The presentation begins with an overview of the processes carried out in contemporary petroleum refineries including discussion of typical energy use. There follows a brief thermodynamic description of refinery energy flows with an emphasis on heat and on energy-efficiency analysis. The heart of the thesis is Chapters 3-5 describing heat recovery opportunities involving, respectively: extraction and use of heat from combustion gases being discharged through stacks, the exchange of heat between product streams, and uses for low-temperature waste heat. In Chapter 6, a unifying economic concept is introduced (with details in the Appendix): a "supply curve" for saved energy. This describes the potential rate of energy savings in barrels of oil-equivalent per year (in analogy with production capacity of oil or gas fields), as a function of the cost of saved energy in dollars per barrel (in analogy with the production cost of energy). The nature of the distribution is, of course, for the cost of saved energy to increase with increasing energy savings. In this chapter, estimates are presented for the energy conservation opportunities other than waste heat at the Study Refinery. All the opportunities are then summarized in a single supply curve. The extraordinary result in a cost-effective opportunity to reduce refinery energy use by some 26% at 1984 prices. This translates into roughly a 1 energy-cost reduction per 42-gallon barrel of petroleum input. Of course, investments are required; the net benefit would be about 1.5 cents per gallon of product. This would be a major benefit in relation to typical refinery earnings. The concluding

  8. Power generation using sugar cane bagasse: A heat recovery analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguro, Jean Vittorio

    The sugar industry is facing the need to improve its performance by increasing efficiency and developing profitable by-products. An important possibility is the production of electrical power for sale. Co-generation has been practiced in the sugar industry for a long time in a very inefficient way with the main purpose of getting rid of the bagasse. The goal of this research was to develop a software tool that could be used to improve the way that bagasse is used to generate power. Special focus was given to the heat recovery components of the co-generation plant (economizer, air pre-heater and bagasse dryer) to determine if one, or a combination, of them led to a more efficient co-generation cycle. An extensive review of the state of the art of power generation in the sugar industry was conducted and is summarized in this dissertation. Based on this models were developed. After testing the models and comparing the results with the data collected from the literature, a software application that integrated all these models was developed to simulate the complete co-generation plant. Seven different cycles, three different pressures, and sixty-eight distributions of the flue gas through the heat recovery components can be simulated. The software includes an economic analysis tool that can help the designer determine the economic feasibility of different options. Results from running the simulation are presented that demonstrate its effectiveness in evaluating and comparing the different heat recovery components and power generation cycles. These results indicate that the economizer is the most beneficial option for heat recovery and that the use of waste heat in a bagasse dryer is the least desirable option. Quantitative comparisons of several possible cycle options with the widely-used traditional back-pressure turbine cycle are given. These indicate that a double extraction condensing cycle is best for co-generation purposes. Power generation gains between 40 and

  9. Economical photovoltaic power generation with heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascher, G.

    1977-01-01

    Three designs for conversion of solar radiation to electricity and thermal energy are analyzed. The objective of these converters is to increase the electric and thermal output for each photovoltaic array so as to lower the cell cost relative to the amount of energy delivered. An analysis of the economical aspects of conversion by photovoltaic cells with heat recovery is carried out in terms of hypothetical examples. Thus, it is shown that the original cost of say $40,000 per generated kilowat can be reduced to $572.00 per kilowatt by increasing the original electric output of 1 kW to 10 kW in electricity and 60 kW in thermal energy. The newly derived specific cost is only 1.4 percent of the original one. It is expected that a cost reduction of roughly 2% of the present specific cost per kilowatt will greatly stimulate public acceptance of photovoltaic terrestrial conversion to electricity.

  10. Crystallization of Synthetic Blast Furnace Slags Pertaining to Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahani, Shaghayegh

    Heat recovery from blast furnace slags is often contradicted by another requirement, to generate amorphous slag for its use in cement production. As both the rate and extent of heat recovery and slag structure are determined by its cooling rate, a relation between the crystallization kinetics and the cooling conditions is highly desired. In this study, CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO (CSAM) slags with different basicities were studied by Single Hot Thermocouple Technique (SHTT) during isothermal treatment and non-isothermal cooling. Their time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams were plotted and compared with each other. Furthermore, kinetic parameters such as the Avrami exponent (n), rate coefficient (K) and effective activation energy of crystallization (EA) were found by analysis of data obtained from in-situ observation of glassy to crystalline transformation and image analysis. Also, the dependence of nucleation and growth rates of crystalline phases were quantified as a function of time, temperature, and slag basicity. Together with the observations of crystallization front, they facilitated establishing the dominant mechanisms of crystallization. In addition to the experimental work, a mathematical model was developed and validated that predicts the amount of crystallization during cooling. A second mathematical model that calculates temperature history of slag during its cooling was coupled with the above model, to allow studying the effect of parameters such as the slag/air ratio and granule size on the heat recovery and glass content of slag.

  11. Combined heat recovery and make-up water heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.Y.

    1988-05-24

    A cogeneration plant is described comprising in combination: a first stage source of hot gas; a duct having an inlet for receiving the hot gas and an outlet stack open to the atmosphere; a second stage recovery heat steam generator including an evaporator situated in the duct, and economizer in the duct downstream of the evaporator, and steam drum fluidly connected to the evaporator and the economizer; feedwater supply means including a deaerator heater and feedwater pump for supplying deaerated feedwater to the steam drum through the economizer; makeup water supply means including a makeup pump for delivering makeup water to the deaerator heater; means fluidly connected to the steam drum for supplying auxiliary steam to the deaerator heater; and heat exchanger means located between the deaerator and the economizer, for transferring heat from the feedwater to the makeup water, thereby increasing the temperature of the makeup water delivered to the deaerator and decreasing the temperature of the feedwater delivered to the economizer, without fluid exchange.

  12. Waste water heat recovery appliance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chapin, H.D.; Armstrong, P.R.; Chapin, F.A.W.

    1983-11-21

    An efficient convective waste heat recovery heat exchanger was designed and tested. The prototype appliance was designed for use in laundromats and other small commercial operations which use large amounts of hot water. Information on general characteristics of the coin-op laundry business, energy use in laundromats, energy saving resources already in use, and the potential market for energy saving devices in laundromats was collected through a literature search and interviews with local laundromat operators in Fort Collins, Colorado. A brief survey of time-use patterns in two local laundromats was conducted. The results were used, with additional information from interviews with owners, as the basis for the statistical model developed. Mathematical models for the advanced and conventional types were developed and the resulting computer program listed. Computer simulations were made using a variety of parameters; for example, different load profiles, hold-up volumes, wall resistances, and wall areas. The computer simulation results are discussed with regard to the overall conclusions. Various materials were explored for use in fabricating the appliance. Resistance to corrosion, workability, and overall suitability for laundromat installations were considered for each material.

  13. Study of fuel cell powerplant with heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. M.; Grasso, A. P.; Clausi, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    It was shown that heat can be recovered from fuel cell power plants by replacing the air-cooled heat exchangers in present designs with units which transfer the heat to the integrated utility system. Energy availability for a 40-kW power plant was studied and showed that the total usable energy at rated power represents 84 percent of the fuel lower heating value. The effects of design variables on heat availability proved to be small. Design requirements were established for the heat recovery heat exchangers, including measurement of the characteristics of two candidate fuel cell coolants after exposure to fuel cell operating conditions. A heat exchanger test program was defined to assess fouling and other characteristics of fuel cell heat exchangers needed to confirm heat exchanger designs for heat recovery.

  14. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal energy storage systems designed for energy conservation through the recovery, storage, and reuse of industrial process waste heat are reviewed. Consideration is given to systems developed for primary aluminum, cement, the food processing industry, paper and pulp, and primary iron and steel. Projected waste-heat recovery and energy savings are listed for each category.

  15. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal energy storage systems designed for energy conservation through the recovery, storage, and reuse of industrial process waste heat are reviewed. Consideration is given to systems developed for primary aluminum, cement, the food processing industry, paper and pulp, and primary iron and steel. Projected waste-heat recovery and energy savings are listed for each category.

  16. Analysis of Water Recovery Rate from the Heat Melt Compactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Hegde, U.; Gokoglu, S.

    2013-01-01

    Human space missions generate trash with a substantial amount of plastic (20% or greater by mass). The trash also contains water trapped in food residue and paper products and other trash items. The Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) under development by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) compresses the waste, dries it to recover water and melts the plastic to encapsulate the compressed trash. The resulting waste disk or puck represents an approximately ten-fold reduction in the volume of the initial trash loaded into the HMC. In the current design concept being pursued, the trash is compressed by a piston after it is loaded into the trash chamber. The piston face, the side walls of the waste processing chamber and the end surface in contact with the waste can be heated to evaporate the water and to melt the plastic. Water is recovered by the HMC in two phases. The first is a pre-process compaction without heat or with the heaters initially turned on but before the waste heats up. Tests have shown that during this step some liquid water may be expelled from the chamber. This water is believed to be free water (i.e., not bound with or absorbed in other waste constituents) that is present in the trash. This phase is herein termed Phase A of the water recovery process. During HMC operations, it is desired that liquid water recovery in Phase A be eliminated or minimized so that water-vapor processing equipment (e.g., condensers) downstream of the HMC are not fouled by liquid water and its constituents (i.e., suspended or dissolved matter) exiting the HMC. The primary water recovery process takes place next where the trash is further compacted while the heated surfaces reach their set temperatures for this step. This step will be referred to herein as Phase B of the water recovery process. During this step the waste chamber may be exposed to different selected pressures such as ambient, low pressure (e.g., 0.2 atm), or vacuum. The objective for this step is to remove both bound and

  17. Thermodynamic and heat transfer analysis of heat recovery from engine test cell by Organic Rankine Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokati, Naser; Mohammadkhani, Farzad; Farrokhi, Navid; Ranjbar, Faramarz

    2014-12-01

    During manufacture of engines, evaluation of engine performance is essential. This is accomplished in test cells. During the test, a significant portion of heat energy released by the fuel is wasted. In this study, in order to recover these heat losses, Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is recommended. The study has been conducted assuming the diesel oil to be composed of a single hydrocarbon such as C12H26. The composition of exhaust gases (products of combustion) have been computed (and not determined experimentally) from the stoichiometric equation representing the combustion reaction. The test cell heat losses are recovered in three separate heat exchangers (preheater, evaporator and superheater). These heat exchangers are separately designed, and the whole system is analyzed from energy and exergy viewpoints. Finally, a parametric study is performed to investigate the effect of different variables on the system performance characteristics such as the ORC net power, heat exchangers effectiveness, the first law efficiency, exergy destruction and heat transfer surfaces. The results of the study show that by utilizing ORC, heat recovery equivalent to 8.85 % of the engine power is possible. The evaporator has the highest exergy destruction rate, while the pump has the lowest among the system components. Heat transfer surfaces are calculated to be 173.6, 58.7, and 11.87 m2 for the preheater, evaporator and superheater, respectively.

  18. Nuclear-enhanced geothermal heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.H. II

    1995-12-31

    This report proposes the testing of an abandoned drill well for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel rods. The well need not be in a geothermal field, since the downhole assembly takes advantage of only the natural thermal gradient. The water in the immediate vicinity of the fuel will be chemically treated for corrosion resistance. Above this will be a long column of viscous fluid insoluble in water, to act as a fluid barrier. The remainder of the well bore, up to the surface, will be the working fluid for the power turbine at the surface. There will be a low-pressure region in the immediate vicinity of the fuel, encouraging the flashing of steam. Due to the low level of heat emitted by the fuel rods, the radioactive material will be surrounded by a secondary casing that will reduce the water it contacts directly, thus causing it to heat up quickly and to maximize the steam-generating process, and the formation of air nuclides. These will percolate upward through the viscous column where steadily decreasing pressure causes expansion. The nuclear fuel`s thermal energy will have been transferred through the high radioactive zone as pressure, then it will flash to steam and heat the water in the top of the wellbore. The drill well, a minimum of 10,000 ft. in depth, will naturally heat any circulating fluid. The fuel is not used as a thermal source, but only to produce a few spontaneous bubbles, sufficient to increase the fluid pressure by expansion as it rises in the wellbore. The additional thermal energy from the nuclear source will superheat the water for use in the power-generation apparatus at the surface. This equipment, operating on very-low radioactive fluid, will be protected by a secondary containment. The typical drill well is ideally suited for the insertion of spent fuel rods, which are smaller than downhole tools and instrumentation regularly installed in production wells.

  19. Heat recovery and air preheating apparatus for textile dryer ovens

    SciTech Connect

    Hebrank, W.H.

    1982-07-06

    Heat recovery and replacement air preheating apparatus for use in textile heat treatment machinery is disclosed as including a pair of thermal recovery and storage units wherein each storage unit contains a plurality of thermal mass disks which operate as heat sponges to pick up heat from exhausts as it leaves the dryer and subsequently to put that heat into entering replacement air whereby the cost in elevating the replacement air is greatly reduced. A control valve connected between the two thermal storage units cycles the reverse exhaust and replacement air flows alternately through the thermal storage units in a manner that a substantial amount of the exhaust heat does not reach the ambient environment and the alternating replacement air flow maintains the thermal heat recovery and storage units and associated apparatus cool and clean of lint and the like residuals.

  20. Investigation and optimization of the depth of flue gas heat recovery in surface heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, V. V.; Bespalov, V. I.; Melnikov, D. V.

    2017-09-01

    Economic issues associated with designing deep flue gas heat recovery units for natural gas-fired boilers are examined. The governing parameter affecting the performance and cost of surface-type condensing heat recovery heat exchangers is the heat transfer surface area. When firing natural gas, the heat recovery depth depends on the flue gas temperature at the condenser outlet and determines the amount of condensed water vapor. The effect of the outlet flue gas temperature in a heat recovery heat exchanger on the additionally recovered heat power is studied. A correlation has been derived enabling one to determine the best heat recovery depth (or the final cooling temperature) maximizing the anticipated reduced annual profit of a power enterprise from implementation of energy-saving measures. Results of optimization are presented for a surface-type condensing gas-air plate heat recovery heat exchanger for the climatic conditions and the economic situation in Tomsk. The predictions demonstrate that it is economically feasible to design similar heat recovery heat exchangers for a flue gas outlet temperature of 10°C. In this case, the payback period for the investment in the heat recovery heat exchanger will be 1.5 years. The effect of various factors on the optimal outlet flue gas temperature was analyzed. Most climatic, economical, or technological factors have a minor effect on the best outlet temperature, which remains between 5 and 20°C when varying the affecting factors. The derived correlation enables us to preliminary estimate the outlet (final) flue gas temperature that should be used in designing the heat transfer surface of a heat recovery heat exchanger for a gas-fired boiler as applied to the specific climatic conditions.

  1. 36. VIEW EAST OF WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM IN BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. VIEW EAST OF WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM IN BUILDING 43A; THIS WAS PART OF A SYSTEM WHICH PROVIDED HOT WATER FOR OFFICE AND FACTORY BUILDING HEATING IN THE WEST PLANT; NOTE FACTORY WHISTLE TIMER ON TOP OF HEAT EXCHANGER - Scovill Brass Works, 59 Mill Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT

  2. Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10°C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GM’s shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

  3. Open-loop heat-recovery dryer

    SciTech Connect

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward Evan

    2013-11-05

    A drying apparatus is disclosed that includes a drum and an open-loop airflow pathway originating at an ambient air inlet, passing through the drum, and terminating at an exhaust outlet. A passive heat exchanger is included for passively transferring heat from air flowing from the drum toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the ambient air inlet toward the drum. A heat pump is also included for actively transferring heat from air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the exhaust outlet to air flowing from the passive heat exchanger toward the drum. A heating element is also included for further heating air flowing from the heat pump toward the drum.

  4. Increase of unit efficiency by improved waste heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.; Lankes, F.

    1998-07-01

    For coal-fired power plants with flue gas desulfurization by wet scrubbing and desulfurized exhaust gas discharge via cooling tower, a further improvement of new power plant efficiency is possible by exhaust gas heat recovery. The waste heat of exhaust gas is extracted in a flue gas cooler before the wet scrubber and recovered for combustion air and/or feedwater heating by either direct or indirect coupling of heat transfer. Different process configurations for heat recovery system are described and evaluated with regard to net unit improvement. For unite firing bituminous coal an increase of net unit efficiency of 0.25 to 0.7 percentage points and for lignite 0.7 to 1.6 percentage points can be realized depending on the process configurations of the heat recovery systems.

  5. The mobile compressor unit heat losses recovery system compactness improving possibility evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusha, V. L.; Chernov, G. I.; Medkova, E. Ju.

    2017-08-01

    The mobile compressor unit heat losses recovery system compactness improving possibility by means of removing the condenser from the recuperative Rankine cycle is considered in the paper. In this case circulating in the Rankine circuit heat carrier (water) losses are compensated by the humidity supplied from the compressed air, air consumed by the internal combustion engine and humidity as the ICE fuel combustion product.

  6. Minewater heat recovery project. Final Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-01

    This report consists of three sections: (1) Design, experimental testing and performance analysis of the 20-ft long DBHE (Downhole Bundle Heat Exchanger); (2) Modified design of mine water heat exchanger; and (3) Performance tests on mine water heat exchanger. Appendices summarize design calculations, discuss the scope of the work tasks, and present a diary of the progress throughout the research and development project.

  7. Rock Smelting of Copper Ores with Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norgate, Terry; Jahanshahi, Sharif; Haque, Nawshad

    It is generally recognised that the grades of metallic ores are falling globally. This trend can be expected to increase the life cycle-based energy requirement for primary metal production due to the additional amount of material that must be handled and treated in the mining and mineral processing stages of the metal production life cycle. Rock (or whole ore) smelting has been suggested as a possible alternative processing route for low grade ores with a potentially lower energy intensity and environmental impact than traditional processing routes. In this processing route, the beneficiation stage is eliminated along with its associated energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, but this is partially offset by the need for more solid material to be handled and heated up to smelting temperatures. A life cycle assessment study was carried out to assess the potential energy and greenhouse gas benefits of a conceptual flowsheet of the rock smelting process, using copper ore as an example. Recovery and utilisation of waste heat in the slag (via dry slag granulation) and offgas streams from the smelting step was also included in the study, with the waste heat being utilised either for thermal applications or electricity generation.

  8. Identification of existing waste heat recovery and process improvement technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, R.L.; Dodge, R.E.; Smith, S.A.; Ames, K.R.

    1984-03-01

    General information is provided on waste heat recovery opportunities. The currently available equipment for high- and low-temperature applications are described. Other equipment related to wasteheat recovery equipment such as components, instruments and controls, and cleaning equipment is discussed briefly. A description of the microcomputer data base is included. Suppliers of waste heat equipment are mentioned throughout the report, with specific contacts, addresses, and telephone numbers provided in an Appendix.

  9. Direct contact heat recovery from molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Technological deficiencies associated with efficient and economical retrieval of heat energy from molten salt systems are addressed. The large latent heat of fusion stored in molten salt hydrates and other candidate phase change materials (PCM) is removed by internal boiling of a volatile heat transfer fluid (HTF). This procedure eliminates the conventional use of submerged heat exchangers which are costly and, in crystallizing salts, ineffective. The thermochemical conditions and material properties that are critical for application of this concept in environments that yield significant energy savings are investigated and defined.

  10. Exhaust bypass flow control for exhaust heat recovery

    DOEpatents

    Reynolds, Michael G.

    2015-09-22

    An exhaust system for an engine comprises an exhaust heat recovery apparatus configured to receive exhaust gas from the engine and comprises a first flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas and a second flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas. A heat exchanger/energy recovery unit is disposed in the second flow passage and has a working fluid circulating therethrough for exchange of heat from the exhaust gas to the working fluid. A control valve is disposed downstream of the first and the second flow passages in a low temperature region of the exhaust heat recovery apparatus to direct exhaust gas through the first flow passage or the second flow passage.

  11. Survey of Small Scale Heat Recovery Incinerators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    designs are available. Air and auxiliary fuel flow can be preset in accordance with feedstock throughput and heating value or continuously modulated in...organic gases and particulates generated in the primary combus- tion chamber. In most cases, steam for process heating is generated. If the feedstock ...unit design capacity (ii) manufacturing methods and marketing strategy (iii) materials of construction (iv) inclusion of feedstock preparation and/or air

  12. Waste Heat Recovery from High Temperature Off-Gases from Electric Arc Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U; Thekdi, Arvind; Keiser, James R; Storey, John Morse

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study and review of available waste heat in high temperature Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) off gases and heat recovery techniques/methods from these gases. It gives details of the quality and quantity of the sensible and chemical waste heat in typical EAF off gases, energy savings potential by recovering part of this heat, a comprehensive review of currently used waste heat recovery methods and potential for use of advanced designs to achieve a much higher level of heat recovery including scrap preheating, steam production and electric power generation. Based on our preliminary analysis, currently, for all electric arc furnaces used in the US steel industry, the energy savings potential is equivalent to approximately 31 trillion Btu per year or 32.7 peta Joules per year (approximately $182 million US dollars/year). This article describes the EAF off-gas enthalpy model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate available and recoverable heat energy for a given stream of exhaust gases coming out of one or multiple EAF furnaces. This Excel based model calculates sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases during tap to tap time accounting for variation in quantity and quality of off gases. The model can be used to estimate energy saved through scrap preheating and other possible uses such as steam generation and electric power generation using off gas waste heat. This article includes a review of the historical development of existing waste heat recovery methods, their operations, and advantages/limitations of these methods. This paper also describes a program to develop and test advanced concepts for scrap preheating, steam production and electricity generation through use of waste heat recovery from the chemical and sensible heat contained in the EAF off gases with addition of minimum amount of dilution or cooling air upstream of pollution control equipment such as bag houses.

  13. Use of photovoltaics for waste heat recovery

    DOEpatents

    Polcyn, Adam D

    2013-04-16

    A device for recovering waste heat in the form of radiated light, e.g. red visible light and/or infrared light includes a housing having a viewing window, and a photovoltaic cell mounted in the housing in a relationship to the viewing window, wherein rays of radiated light pass through the viewing window and impinge on surface of the photovoltaic cell. The housing and/or the cell are cooled so that the device can be used with a furnace for an industrial process, e.g. mounting the device with a view of the interior of the heating chamber of a glass making furnace. In this manner, the rays of the radiated light generated during the melting of glass batch materials in the heating chamber pass through the viewing window and impinge on the surface of the photovoltaic cells to generate electric current which is passed onto an electric load.

  14. Enhancement of automotive exhaust heat recovery by thermoelectric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Essam; Szybist, James P; Parks, II, James E

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to improve automobile fuel economy, an experimental study is undertaken to explore practical aspects of implementing thermoelectric devices for exhaust gas energy recovery. A highly instrumented apparatus consisting of a hot (exhaust gas) and a cold (coolant liquid) side rectangular ducts enclosing the thermoelectric elements has been built. Measurements of thermoelectric voltage output and flow and surface temperatures were acquired and analyzed to investigate the power generation and heat transfer properties of the apparatus. Effects of inserting aluminum wool packing material inside the hot side duct on augmentation of heat transfer from the gas stream to duct walls were studied. Data were collected for both the unpacked and packed cases to allow for detection of packing influence on flow and surface temperatures. Effects of gas and coolant inlet temperatures as well as gas flow rate on the thermoelectric power output were examined. The results indicate that thermoelectric power production is increased at higher gas inlet temperature or flow rate. However, thermoelectric power generation decreases with a higher coolant temperature as a consequence of the reduced hot-cold side temperature differential. For the hot-side duct, a large temperature gradient exists between the gas and solid surface temperature due to poor heat transfer through the gaseous medium. Adding the packing material inside the exhaust duct enhanced heat transfer and hence raised hot-side duct surface temperatures and thermoelectric power compared to the unpacked duct, particularly where the gas-to-surface temperature differential is highest. Therefore it is recommended that packing of exhaust duct becomes common practice in thermoelectric waste energy harvesting applications.

  15. Modelling the heat stress and the recovery of bacterial spores.

    PubMed

    Mafart, P; Leguérinel, I

    1997-07-22

    After heat treatment, the temperature incubation and the medium composition, (pH and sodium chloride content) influence the capacity of injured spores to repair heat damage. The concept of heat resistance D- (decimal reduction time) and z-values (temperature increase which results in a ten fold reduction of the D value) is not sufficient and the ratio of spore recovery after incubation should be considered in calculations used in thermal processing of food. This paper aims to derive a model describing the recovery of injured spores as a function of both the heat treatment intensity and the environmental conditions. According to data from numerous investigators, when spores are incubated in unfavorable conditions, the ratio of cell recovery and the apparent D-value are reduced. Moreover the ratio of the apparent D-value and the estimated in optimal incubation D-value is constant and independent of the heat treatment conditions. Beyond these observations it is shown that the ratio of cell recovery with respect to the heat treatment F-value (exposure time, in minutes, at 121.1 degrees C which results in the same destruction ratio that the considered heat treatment does) is linear and can be quantified by using two factors independent of the heat treatment: the gamma-factor reflects the degree of precariousness due to the heat stress while the epsilon-factor reflects more intrinsically the incubation conditions without previous heat treatment. The gamma-factor varies as a function of the incubation temperature according to an Arrhenius law.

  16. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2006-06-16

    Electricity produced by distributed energy resources (DER)located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumerrequirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid.Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associatedwith transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricitydelivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities topurchase energy when attractive. On-site, single-cycle thermal powergeneration is typically less efficient than central station generation,but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and by utilizing combinedheat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scaleon-site thermal generation to displace fuel purchases, DER can becomeattractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts,the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressedusing a mixed-integer linear program, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, andinformation (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies,DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selectingthe units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. Inthis paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion ofthe option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep aninventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lowercosts even further by reducing lucrative peak-shaving generation whilerelying on storage to meet heat loads. This and other effects of storageare demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in SanFrancisco, California, USA, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacityof heat storage is calculated.

  17. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2005-07-29

    Electricity generated by distributed energy resources (DER) located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumer requirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid. Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associated with transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricity delivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities to purchase energy when attractive. On-site thermal power generation is typically less efficient than central station generation, but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and utilizing combined heat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scale on-site generation to displace fuel purchases, then DER can become attractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts, the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressed using a mixed-integer linear programme, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, and information (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies, DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selecting the units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. In this paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion of the option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep an inventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lower costs even further by reducing off-peak generation and relying on storage. This and other effects of storages are demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in San Francisco, California, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacity of heat storage is calculated.

  18. Energy Recovery Linacs for Commercial Radioisotope Production

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, Amy; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Johnson, Rolland; Roberts, Tom; Boulware, Chase; Hollister, Jerry

    2015-09-01

    Photonuclear reactions with bremsstrahlung photon beams from electron linacs can generate radioisotopes of critical interest. An SRF Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) provides a path to a more diverse and reliable domestic supply of short-lived, high-value, high-demand isotopes in a more compact footprint and at a lower cost than those produced by conventional reactor or ion accelerator methods. Use of an ERL enables increased energy efficiency of the complex through energy recovery of the waste electron beam, high electron currents for high production yields, and reduced neutron production and shielding activation at beam dump components. Simulation studies using G4Beamline/GEANT4 and MCNP6 through MuSim, as well as other simulation codes, will design an ERL-based isotope production facility utilizing bremsstrahlung photon beams from an electron linac. Balancing the isotope production parameters versus energy recovery requirements will inform a choice of isotope production target for future experiments.

  19. Experience with organic Rankine cycles in heat recovery power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bronicki, L.Y.; Elovic, A.; Rettger, P.

    1996-11-01

    Over the last 30 years, organic Rankine cycles (ORC) have been increasingly employed to produce power from various heat sources when other alternatives were either technically not feasible or economical. These power plants have logged a total of over 100 million turbine hours of experience demonstrating the maturity and field proven technology of the ORC cycle. The cycle is well adapted to low to moderate temperature heat sources such as waste heat from industrial plants and is widely used to recover energy from geothermal resources. The above cycle technology is well established and applicable to heat recovery of medium size gas turbines and offers significant advantages over conventional steam bottoming cycles.

  20. A Review on Electroactive Polymers for Waste Heat Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kolasińska, Ewa; Kolasiński, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews materials for thermoelectric waste heat recovery, and discusses selected industrial and distributed waste heat sources as well as recovery methods that are currently applied. Thermoelectric properties, especially electrical conductivity, thermopower, thermal conductivity and the thermoelectric figures of merit, are considered when evaluating thermoelectric materials for waste heat recovery. Alloys and oxides are briefly discussed as materials suitable for medium- and high-grade sources. Electroactive polymers are presented as a new group of materials for low-grade sources. Polyaniline is a particularly fitting polymer for these purposes. We also discuss types of modifiers and modification methods, and their influence on the thermoelectric performance of this class of polymers. PMID:28773605

  1. Effect of thymol in heating and recovery media on the isothermal and non-isothermal heat resistance of Bacillus spores.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Maria-Dolores; Conesa, Raquel; Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-06-01

    Members of the genus Bacillus include important food-borne pathogen and spoilage microorganisms for food industry. Essential oils are natural products extracted from herbs and spices, which can be used as natural preservatives in many foods because of their antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic properties. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of the addition of different concentrations of thymol to the heating and recovery media on the thermal resistance of spores of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis at different temperatures. While the heat resistance was hardly reduced when thymol was present in the heating medium, the effect in the recovery medium was greater, reducing the D100 °C values down to one third for B. subtilis and B. cereus when 0.5 mM thymol was added. This effect was dose dependent and was also observed at other heating temperatures.

  2. Cost/Benefit Analysis of the Heat Recovery Incinerator (HRI).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    RD-0169 272 COST/BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF THE HEAT RECOVERY INCINERAR ill (HRI)(U) NAVAL CIVIL ENGINEERING LAO PORT HUENEME CA R M ROBERTS ET AL. SEP 85...Roberts & K. T. C. SwansonN O EL Sponsored By Naval Facilities Technical Note Engineering Command -:. NCOST/BENEFIT ANALYSIS 8 OF THE HEAT RECOVERY...with the HRI computer model. These sensitivity data are presented in a form to aid in the conceptual design of the optimum HRI facility for a given Navy

  3. Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

    2013-06-11

    A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

  4. Waste Heat Recovery from Blast Furnace Slag by Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuelin; Lv, Xuewei; Bai, Chenguang; Qiu, Guibao; Chen, Pan

    2012-08-01

    Blast furnace (BF) slag, which is the main byproduct in the ironmaking process, contains large amounts of sensible heat. To recover the heat, a new waste heat-recovery system—granulating molten BF slag by rotary multinozzles cup atomizer and pyrolyzing printed circuited board with obtained hot BF slag particle—was proposed in this study. The feasibility of the waste heat-recovery system was verified by dry granulation and pyrolyzation experiments. The energy of hot BF slag could be converted to chemical energy through the pyrolysis reaction, and a large amount of combustible gas like CO, H2, C m H n , and CH4 can be generated during the process.

  5. Resource recovery waste heat boiler upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Kuten, P.; McClanahan, D.E.; Gehring, P.R.; Toto, M.L.; Davis, J.J.

    1996-09-01

    The waste heat boilers installed in a 360 TPD waste to energy plant were identified as the bottle neck for an effort to increase plant capacity. These boilers were successfully modified to accommodate the increase of plant capacity to 408 TPD, improve steam cycle performance and reduce boiler tube failures. The project demonstrated how engineering and operation can work together to identify problems and develop solutions that satisfy engineering, operation, and financial objectives. Plant checking and testing, design review and specification development, installation and operation results are presented.

  6. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Kovscek

    2002-07-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from April 1 through June 30, 2002, for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' We investigate a broad spectrum of topics related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. Significant results were obtained in the areas of multiphase flow and rock properties, hot-fluid injection, improved primary heavy oil recovery, and reservoir definition. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. Briefly, experiments were conducted to image at the pore level matrix-to-fracture production of oil from a fractured porous medium. This project is ongoing. A simulation studied was completed in the area of recovery processes during steam injection into fractured porous media. We continued to study experimentally heavy-oil production mechanisms from relatively low permeability rocks under conditions of high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased oil recovery rate and decreased residual oil saturation. Also in the area of imaging production processes in laboratory-scale cores, we use CT to study the process of gas-phase formation during solution gas drive in viscous oils. Results from recent experiments are reported here. Finally, a project was completed that uses the producing water-oil ratio to define reservoir heterogeneity and integrate production history into a reservoir model using streamline properties.

  7. Consolidated processes for product recovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Currently, fermentation industries are structured on individual unit operations for production of biofuels such as ethanol, butanol, and 2,3-butanediol which result in increased capital and operational costs. Such increased costs result in low profitability and increased consumer price. With the d...

  8. Natural analogs for enhanced heat recovery from geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Dennis L.

    1996-01-24

    well as others that develop methods for the mining of heat past the stage of primary production, will be termed Enhanced Heat Recovery (EHR). Examples of the evolution of natural systems suggest the methods by which deep geothermal systems can be exploited. The key to the exploitation of deep geothermal systems is successful injection of water into rocks above the brittle-ductile transition, producing steam, cooling the rocks and driving the brittle-ductile transition to deeper levels. Under this scenario, injection wells may be more expensive and require more thoughtful planning than production wells.

  9. Performance and Reliability of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Recovery Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    materials (steel, copper , Inconel, and ceramic) on heat recovery performance, exhaust side pressure drop, and temperature profile in the exhaust gas...diameter (D/d) ratio, coolant inlet and outlet placements, exhaust gas swirling conditions, and tube materials (steel, copper , Inconel, and ceramic...Temperature Profile ..................................80 a. Inconel 625 Tube ....................................................................80 b. Copper

  10. Energy recovery from waste incineration: Assessing the importance of district heating networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fruergaard, T.; Christensen, T.H.; Astrup, T.

    2010-07-15

    Municipal solid waste incineration contributes with 20% of the heat supplied to the more than 400 district heating networks in Denmark. In evaluation of the environmental consequences of this heat production, the typical approach has been to assume that other (fossil) fuels could be saved on a 1:1 basis (e.g. 1 GJ of waste heat delivered substitutes for 1 GJ of coal-based heat). This paper investigates consequences of waste-based heat substitution in two specific Danish district heating networks and the energy-associated interactions between the plants connected to these networks. Despite almost equal electricity and heat efficiencies at the waste incinerators connected to the two district heating networks, the energy and CO{sub 2} accounts showed significantly different results: waste incineration in one network caused a CO{sub 2} saving of 48 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ energy input while in the other network a load of 43 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ. This was caused mainly by differences in operation mode and fuel types of the other heat producing plants attached to the networks. The paper clearly indicates that simple evaluations of waste-to-energy efficiencies at the incinerator are insufficient for assessing the consequences of heat substitution in district heating network systems. The paper also shows that using national averages for heat substitution will not provide a correct answer: local conditions need to be addressed thoroughly otherwise we may fail to assess correctly the heat recovery from waste incineration.

  11. Heat recovery and seed recovery development project: preliminary design report (PDR)

    SciTech Connect

    Arkett, A. H.; Alexander, K. C.; Bolek, A. D.; Blackman, B. K.; Kurrle, P. E.; Tram, S. V.; Warren, A. M.; Ziobrowski, A. J.

    1981-06-01

    The preliminary design and performance characteristics are described of the 20 MWt heat recovery and seed recovery (HRSR) system to be fabricated, installed, and evaluated to provide a technological basis for the design of commercial size HRSR systems for coal-fired open-cycle MHD power plants. The system description and heat and material balances, equipment description and functional requirements, controls, interfacing systems, and operation and maintenance are detailed. Appendices include: (1) recommended environmental requirements for compliance with federal and state of Tennessee regulations, (2) channel and diffuser simulator, (3) equipment arrangement drawings, and (4) channel and diffuser simulator barrel drawings. (WHK)

  12. Modelling the viability of heat recovery from combined sewers.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, M; Smits, R; Mohamed, M; De Gussem, K; Schellart, A; Tait, S

    2014-01-01

    Modelling of wastewater temperatures along a sewer pipe using energy balance equations and assuming steady-state conditions was achieved. Modelling error was calculated, by comparing the predicted temperature drop to measured ones in three combined sewers, and was found to have an overall root mean squared error of 0.37 K. Downstream measured wastewater temperature was plotted against modelled values; their line gradients were found to be within the range of 0.9995-1.0012. The ultimate aim of the modelling is to assess the viability of recovering heat from sewer pipes. This is done by evaluating an appropriate location for a heat exchanger within a sewer network that can recover heat without impacting negatively on the downstream wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Long sewers may prove to be more viable for heat recovery, as heat lost can be reclaimed before wastewater reaching the WWTP.

  13. Final Report, Materials for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems, Tasks 3 and 4 Materials for Heat Recovery in Recovery Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R.; Kish, Joseph R.; Singh, Preet M.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Yuan, Jerry; Gorog, J. Peter; Frederick, Laurie A.; Jette, Francois R.; Meisner, Roberta A.; Singbeil, Douglas L.

    2007-12-31

    The DOE-funded project on materials for industrial heat recovery systems included four research tasks: materials for aluminum melting furnace recuperator tubes, materials and operational changes to prevent cracking and corrosion of the co-extruded tubes that form primary air ports in black liquor recovery boilers, the cause of and means to prevent corrosion of carbon steel tubes in the mid-furnace area of recovery boilers, and materials and operational changes to prevent corrosion and cracking of recovery boiler superheater tubes. Results from studies on the latter two topics are given in this report while separate reports on results for the first two tasks have already been published. Accelerated, localized corrosion has been observed in the mid-furnace area of kraft recovery boilers. This corrosion of the carbon steel waterwall tubes is typically observed in the vicinity of the upper level of air ports where the stainless clad co-extruded wall tubes used in the lower portion of the boiler are welded to the carbon steel tubes that extend from this transition point or “cut line” to the top of the boiler. Corrosion patterns generally vary from one boiler to another depending on boiler design and operating parameters, but the corrosion is almost always found within a few meters of the cut line and often much closer than that. This localized corrosion results in tube wall thinning that can reach the level where the integrity of the tube is at risk. Collection and analysis of gas samples from various areas near the waterwall surface showed reducing and sulfidizing gases were present in the areas where corrosion was accelerated. However, collection of samples from the same areas at intervals over a two year period showed the gaseous environment in the mid-furnace section can cycle between oxidizing and reducing conditions. These fluctuations are thought to be due to gas flow instabilities and they result in an unstable or a less protective scale on the carbon steel

  14. A Thermoelectric Waste-Heat-Recovery System for Portland Cement Rotary Kilns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qi; Li, Peng; Cai, Lanlan; Zhou, Pingwang; Tang, Di; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie

    2015-06-01

    Portland cement is produced by one of the most energy-intensive industrial processes. Energy consumption in the manufacture of Portland cement is approximately 110-120 kWh ton-1. The cement rotary kiln is the crucial equipment used for cement production. Approximately 10-15% of the energy consumed in production of the cement clinker is directly dissipated into the atmosphere through the external surface of the rotary kiln. Innovative technology for energy conservation is urgently needed by the cement industry. In this paper we propose a novel thermoelectric waste-heat-recovery system to reduce heat losses from cement rotary kilns. This system is configured as an array of thermoelectric generation units arranged longitudinally on a secondary shell coaxial with the rotary kiln. A mathematical model was developed for estimation of the performance of waste heat recovery. Discussions mainly focus on electricity generation and energy saving, taking a Φ4.8 × 72 m cement rotary kiln as an example. Results show that the Bi2Te3-PbTe hybrid thermoelectric waste-heat-recovery system can generate approximately 211 kW electrical power while saving 3283 kW energy. Compared with the kiln without the thermoelectric recovery system, the kiln with the system can recover more than 32.85% of the energy that used to be lost as waste heat through the kiln surface.

  15. Thermochemical recovery of heat contained in flue gases by means of bioethanol conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchenko, D. I.

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper consideration is being given to the use of bioethanol in the schemes of thermochemical recovery of heat contained in exit flue gases. Schematic diagrams illustrate the realization of thermochemical heat recovery by implementing ethanol steam conversion and conversion of ethanol by means of products of its complete combustion. The feasibility of attaining a high degree of recovery of heat contained in flue gases at the moderate temperature (up to 450°C) of combustion components is demonstrated in the example of the energy balance of the system for thermochemical heat recovery. The simplified thermodynamic analysis of the process of ethanol steam conversion was carried out in order to determine possible ranges of variation of process variables (temperature, pressure, composition) of a reaction mixture providing the efficient heat utilization. It was found that at the temperature above 600 K the degree of ethanol conversion is near unity. The equilibrium composition of products of reaction of ethanol steam conversion has been identified for different temperatures at which the process occurs at the ratio H2O/EtOH = 1 and at the pressure of 0.1 MPa. The obtained results of calculation agree well with the experimental data.

  16. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Willigan, Rhonda

    2009-09-30

    The primary objectives of Phase I were: (a) carry out cost, performance and system level models, (b) quantify the cost benefits of cathodic arc and heterogeneous nanocomposites over sputtered material, (c) evaluate the expected power output of the proposed thermoelectric materials and predict the efficiency and power output of an integrated TE module, (d) define market acceptance criteria by engaging Caterpillar's truck OEMs, potential customers and dealers and identify high-level criteria for a waste heat thermoelectric generator (TEG), (e) identify potential TEG concepts, and (f) establish cost/kWatt targets as well as a breakdown of subsystem component cost targets for the commercially viable TEG.

  17. Assessment of thermal efficiency of heat recovery coke making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, H. P.; Saxena, V. K.; Haldar, S. K.; Sriramoju, S. K.

    2017-08-01

    The heat recovery stamp charge coke making process is quite complicated due to the evolved volatile matter during coking, is partially combusted in oven crown and sole flue in a controlled manner to provide heat for producing metallurgical coke. Therefore, the control and efficient utilization of heat in the oven crown, and sole flue is difficult, which directly affects the operational efficiency. Considering the complexity and importance of thermal efficiency, evolution of different gases, combustion of gasses in oven crown and sole flue, and heating process of coke oven has been studied. A nonlinear regression methodology was used to predict temperature profile of different depth of coal cake during the coking. It was observed that the predicted temperature profile is in good agreement with the actual temperature profile (R2 = 0.98) and is validated with the actual temperature profile of other ovens. A complete study is being done to calculate the material balance, heat balance, and heat losses. This gives an overall understanding of heat flow which affects the heat penetration into the coal cake. The study confirms that 60% heat was utilized during coking.

  18. Assessment of thermal efficiency of heat recovery coke making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, H. P.; Saxena, V. K.; Haldar, S. K.; Sriramoju, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    The heat recovery stamp charge coke making process is quite complicated due to the evolved volatile matter during coking, is partially combusted in oven crown and sole flue in a controlled manner to provide heat for producing metallurgical coke. Therefore, the control and efficient utilization of heat in the oven crown, and sole flue is difficult, which directly affects the operational efficiency. Considering the complexity and importance of thermal efficiency, evolution of different gases, combustion of gasses in oven crown and sole flue, and heating process of coke oven has been studied. A nonlinear regression methodology was used to predict temperature profile of different depth of coal cake during the coking. It was observed that the predicted temperature profile is in good agreement with the actual temperature profile (R2 = 0.98) and is validated with the actual temperature profile of other ovens. A complete study is being done to calculate the material balance, heat balance, and heat losses. This gives an overall understanding of heat flow which affects the heat penetration into the coal cake. The study confirms that 60% heat was utilized during coking.

  19. Ceramic heat recuperators for industrial heat recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, J.J.; Gonzalez, J.M.; Kohnken, K.H.

    1980-08-01

    Development of a GTE ceramic recuperator, designed for relatively small furnaces with firing rates of 0.3 to 0.6 MM Btu/h and with exhaust gas temperatures of 1500 to 2600 F, is described. The ceramic selected as the material of construction is cordierite, a magnesium aluminum silicate. Details of the ceramic recuperator design are presented in Chapter 2. Also results of tests and measurements, system economics, and cost performance analyses are presented. Five demonstration programs were performed to determine the heat transfer performance of the recuperator, establish the energy savings by recuperation, demonstrate minimum maintenance requirements in typical furnace operation, determine the durability of the ceramic core, determine the operating requirements of the burners and controls with recuperation, and establish the overall system costs and payback period. Demonstration programs and results of the Bliss Mill Furnace, Tungsten Reduction Furnace, Glass Tank, Pilot Plant US Smelting Furnace, and Rotary Calciner Furnace are given in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 develops the methodology and shows how an impact analysis may be performed. Industrial applications are implied and a process flow diagram for smelting and refining primary copper is shown. Concluding chapters present conclusions and recommendations, a bibliography, and additional information in appendices. (MCW)

  20. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The potential is examined for waste heat recovery and reuse through thermal energy storage in five specific industrial categories: (1) primary aluminum, (2) cement, (3) food processing, (4) paper and pulp, and (5) iron and steel. Preliminary results from Phase 1 feasibility studies suggest energy savings through fossil fuel displacement approaching 0.1 quad/yr in the 1985 period. Early implementation of recovery technologies with minimal development appears likely in the food processing and paper and pulp industries; development of the other three categories, though equally desirable, will probably require a greater investment in time and dollars.

  1. 78 FR 10262 - Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures-Productivity Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Surface Transportation Board Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures--Productivity Adjustment AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Proposed railroad cost recovery procedures productivity adjustment. SUMMARY... of average change in railroad productivity for the 2007-2011 (5-year) averaging period. This...

  2. New industrial heat pump applications to phosphate fertilizer production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    In this study Process Integration techniques based on Pinch Technology have been applied to Chevron's fertilizer complex in Rock Springs, Wyoming. The objectives of the study were to: identify heat pump opportunities and to determine the cost effectiveness of heat pumping compared to other process improvements. Significance of this Work Chevron's fertilizer complex is an example of an exothermic process. The sulfuric acid plant produces more heat than is needed for the rest of the site. The complex has, therefore, no need for a heating utility. The heat created in the sulfuric acid plant is used to produce high pressure steam, which is let down through a turbo generator satisfying most of the site's electrical needs. This type of process would normally not be considered for heat pumping because there is no heating utility load to reduce. However, reducing the requirements for extraction steam will liberate more steam for power generation. Heat recovery and heat pumping, therefore, have the unusual effect of an increase in electricity production, resulting in a reduction in electricity import, rather than a reduction in fuel consumption. Heat recovery opportunities show promise at both the sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid plants. No economically attractive opportunities were found for heat pumps in the process units when they were considered individually; however, the study identified that significant energy savings can be achieved by heat integration between the sulfuric acid plant and the phosphoric acid plant. 16 figs.

  3. Recov'Heat: An estimation tool of urban waste heat recovery potential in sustainable cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goumba, Alain; Chiche, Samuel; Guo, Xiaofeng; Colombert, Morgane; Bonneau, Patricia

    2017-02-01

    Waste heat recovery is considered as an efficient way to increase carbon-free green energy utilization and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. Especially in urban area, several sources such as sewage water, industrial process, waste incinerator plants, etc., are still rarely explored. Their integration into a district heating system providing heating and/or domestic hot water could be beneficial for both energy companies and local governments. EFFICACITY, a French research institute focused on urban energy transition, has developed an estimation tool for different waste heat sources potentially explored in a sustainable city. This article presents the development method of such a decision making tool which, by giving both energetic and economic analysis, helps local communities and energy service companies to make preliminary studies in heat recovery projects.

  4. Waste heat recovery systems in the sugar industry: An Indian perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Madnaik, S.D.; Jadhav, M.G.

    1996-04-01

    This article identifies the key role of the sugar industry in the rural development of developing countries. The Indian sugar industry, already second largest among the country`s processing industries, shows even greater potential, according to the Plan Documents (shown in a table). The potential of waste heat in sugar processing plants, which produce white crystal sugar using the double sulphitation clarification process, is estimated at 5757.9 KJ/kg of sugar. Efficient waste heat recovery (WHR) systems could help arrest the trend of increasing production costs. This would help the sugar industry not only in India, but in many other countries as well. The innovative methods suggested and discussed briefly in this article include dehydration of prepared cane, bagasse drying, and juice heating using waste heat. These methods can reduce the cost of energy in sugar production by at least 10% and improve efficiency and productivity.

  5. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  6. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-03-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  7. Waste Heat Recovery. Technology and Opportunities in U.S. Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Ilona; Choate, William T.; Davidson, Amber

    2008-03-01

    This study was initiated in order to evaluate RD&D needs for improving waste heat recovery technologies. A bottomup approach is used to evaluate waste heat quantity, quality, recovery practices, and technology barriers in some of the largest energyconsuming units in U.S. manufacturing. The results from this investigation serve as a basis for understanding the state of waste heat recovery and providing recommendations for RD&D to advance waste heat recovery technologies.

  8. Heat-recovery incinerator for a community hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, D.

    1996-12-01

    This article describes a project which features a heat recovery boiler that uses incinerator exhaust gas to produce free steam for a not-for-profit hospital in Boca Raton, Fla. Free steam is also used to reheat scrubber exhaust gas to provide for plume suppression and improved pollutant dispersion. The project saves $266,129 in annual energy and waste hauling costs. The project also has a simple payback of five years.

  9. Heavy Duty Roots Expander Heat Energy Recovery (HD-REHER)

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Swami

    2015-10-01

    Eaton Corporation proposed a comprehensive project to develop and demonstrate advanced component technology that will reduce the cost of implementing Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) systems to Heavy-Duty Diesel engines, making adaptation of this fuel efficiency improving technology more commercially attractive to end-users in the next 5 to 10 year time period. Accelerated adaptation and implementation of new fuel efficiency technology into service is critical for reduction of fuel used in the commercial vehicle segment.

  10. Recuperator with microjet technology as a proposal for heat recovery from low-temperature sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajs, Jan; Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Fornalik-Wajs, Elżbieta; Bajor, Michał

    2015-12-01

    A tendency to increase the importance of so-called dispersed generation, based on the local energy sources and the working systems utilizing both the fossil fuels and the renewable energy resources is observed nowadays. Generation of electricity on industrial or domestic scale together with production of heat can be obtained for example through employment of the ORC systems. It is mentioned in the EU directive 2012/27/EU for cogenerative production of heat and electricity. For such systems the crucial points are connected with the heat exchangers, which should be small in size but be able to transfer high heat fluxes. In presented paper the prototype microjet heat exchanger dedicated for heat recovery systems is introduced. Its novel construction is described together with the systematical experimental analysis of heat transfer and flow characteristics. Reported results showed high values of the overall heat transfer coefficient and slight increase in the pressure drop. The results of microjet heat exchanger were compared with the results of commercially available compact plate heat exchanger.

  11. IEA Annex 26: Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, VAN

    2003-05-19

    With increased concern about the impact of refrigerant leakage on global warming, a number of new supermarket refrigeration system configurations requiring significantly less refrigerant charge are being considered. In order to help promote the development of advanced systems and expand the knowledge base for energy-efficient supermarket technology, the International Energy Agency (IEA) established IEA Annex 26 (Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems) under the ''IEA Implementing Agreement on Heat Pumping Technologies''. Annex 26 focuses on demonstrating and documenting the energy saving and environmental benefits of advanced systems design for food refrigeration and space heating and cooling for supermarkets. Advanced in this context means systems that use less energy, require less refrigerant and produce lower refrigerant emissions. Stated another way, the goal is to identify supermarket refrigeration and HVAC technology options that reduce the total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of supermarkets by reducing both system energy use (increasing efficiency) and reducing total refrigerant charge. The Annex has five participating countries: Canada, Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The working program of the Annex has involved analytical and experimental investigation of several candidate system design approaches to determine their potential to reduce refrigerant usage and energy consumption. Advanced refrigeration system types investigated include the following: distributed compressor systems--small parallel compressor racks are located in close proximity to the food display cases they serve thus significantly shortening the connecting refrigerant line lengths; secondary loop systems--one or more central chillers are used to refrigerate a secondary coolant (e.g. brine, ice slurry, or CO2) that is pumped to the food display cases on the sales floor; self-contained display cases--each food display case has its own

  12. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Kovscek

    2003-04-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from January 1 through March 31, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history matching techniques. During this period, previous analysis of experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation was verified by comparison among analytic, dual-porosity simulation, and fine-grid simulation. We continued to study the mechanisms by which oil is produced from fractured porous media at high pressure and high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. A new experiment was conducted on diatomite core. Significantly, we show that elevated temperature induces fines release in sandstone cores and this behavior may be linked to wettability. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.

  13. Recovery Temperature, Transition, and Heat Transfer Measurements at Mach 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinich, Paul F.

    1961-01-01

    Schlieren, recovery temperature, and heat-transfer measurements were made on a hollow cylinder and a cone with axes alined parallel to the stream. Both the cone and cylinder were equipped with various bluntnesses, and the tests covered a Reynolds number range up to 20 x 10(exp 6) at a free-stream Mach number of 4.95 and wall to free-stream temperature ratios from 1.8 to 5.2 (adiabatic). A substantial transition delay due to bluntness was found for both the cylinder and the cone. For the present tests (Mach 4.95), transition was delayed by a factor of 3 on the cylinder and about 2 on the cone, these delays being somewhat larger than those observed in earlier tests at Mach 3.1. Heat-transfer tests on the cylinder showed only slight effects of wall temperature level on transition location; this is to be contrasted to the large transition delays observed on conical-type bodies at low surface temperatures at Mach 3.1. The schlieren and the peak-recovery-temperature methods of detecting transition were compared with the heat-transfer results. The comparison showed that the first two methods identified a transition point which occurred just beyond the end of the laminar run as seen in the heat-transfer data.

  14. Thermoelectric waste heat recovery from an M1 Abrams tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, C. David; Thomas, Peter M.; Baldasaro, Nicholas G.; Mantini, Michael J.; Venkatasubramanian, Rama; Barton, Michael D.; Cardine, Christopher V.; Walker, Grayson W.

    2012-06-01

    The addition of advanced sensors, targeting systems and electronic countermeasures to military vehicles has created a strategic need for additional electric power. By incorporating a thermoelectric (TE) waste heat recovery system to convert available exhaust heat to electricity, increased electric power needs can be met without reducing the energy efficiency of the vehicle. This approach allows existing vehicles to be upgraded without requiring a complete re-design of the engine and powertrain to support the integration of advanced electronic sensors and systems that keep the performance at the state of the art level. RTI has partnered with General Dynamics Land Systems and Creare, Inc. under an Army Research Lab program to develop a thermoelectric exhaust waste heat recovery system for the M1 Abrams tank. We have designed a reduced-scale system that was retrofitted to the tank and generated 80W of electric power on the vehicle operating on a test track by capturing a portion of the exhaust heat from the Honeywell/Lycoming AGT-1500 gas turbine engine.

  15. Parametric Optimization of Thermoelectric Generators for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shouyuan; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a methodology for design optimization of thermoelectric-based waste heat recovery systems called thermoelectric generators (TEGs). The aim is to maximize the power output from thermoelectrics which are used as add-on modules to an existing gas-phase heat exchanger, without negative impacts, e.g., maintaining a minimum heat dissipation rate from the hot side. A numerical model is proposed for TEG coupled heat transfer and electrical power output. This finite-volume-based model simulates different types of heat exchangers, i.e., counter-flow and cross-flow, for TEGs. Multiple-filled skutterudites and bismuth-telluride-based thermoelectric modules (TEMs) are applied, respectively, in higher and lower temperature regions. The response surface methodology is implemented to determine the optimized TEG size along and across the flow direction and the height of thermoelectric couple legs, and to analyze their covariance and relative sensitivity. A genetic algorithm is employed to verify the globality of the optimum. The presented method will be generally useful for optimizing heat-exchanger-based TEG performance.

  16. Annual production report: enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.

    1984-04-02

    Results of the 1984 Oil Gas J. enhanced oil recovery survey reveal a large increase over totals of the 1982 survey in both barrels per day of total production and total number of active projects. EOR now represents over 5.3% of total U.S. daily oil production. Active U.S. projects reported a productive capacity of 461,000 bpd attributable to enhanced oil recovery methods (thermal, chemical, gas) which equates to an increase of 23% over the 1982 survey. The number of active U.S. projects in the survey totals 373 and represents an increase of 36%. Steam injection now accounts for 77.7% of total domestic EOR with 358,000 bpd. Chemical projects are up 62% and chemical EOR production has leaped an impressive 204% to 13,400 bpd. Gas projects (miscible and immiscible) have increased 68%, but gas EOR production has increased only 15.4%, to 83,000 bpd. Tables of data present these trends and conclusions.

  17. Parametric Analysis of the feasibility of low-temperature geothermal heat recovery in sedimentary basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomac, I.; Caulk, R.

    2016-12-01

    The current study explored the feasibility of heat recovery through the installation of heat exchangers in abandoned oil and gas wells. Finite Element Methods (FEM) were employed to determine the effects of various site specific parameters on production fluid temperature. Specifically, the study parameterized depth of well, subsurface temperature gradient, sedimentary rock conductivity, and flow rate. Results show that greater well depth is associated with greater heat flow, with the greatest returns occurring between depths of 1.5 km and 7 km. Beyond 7 km, the rate of return decreases due to a non-linear increase of heat flow combined with a continued linear increase of pumping cost. One cause for the drop of heat flow was the loss of heat as the fluid travels from depth to the surface. Further analyses demonstrated the benefit of an alternative heat exchanger configuration characterized by thermally insulated sections of the upward heat exchanger. These simulations predict production fluid temperature gains between 5 - 10 oC, which may be suitable for geothermal heat pump applications.

  18. Heat recovery and pollutant cleanup from low grade fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, W.; Butcher, T.A.; Carbonara, J.C.; Heaphy, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    Technical development efforts and field testing have pointed to outstanding economy and environmental benefits contemplated in revamping of fueling for reduced cost of power generation. Flue gas cleaning technologies detailed herein are expected to vitally support this objective and strongly contribute to long-term efforts for regional ozone compliance within the favorable economic framework made possible by avoidance of clean, high-cost, steam boiler fuels otherwise necessary in meeting environmental goals. With adequate control of emissions, abundance and attractive price of high-sulfur residium or coal provides the realistic basis for cost-effective power generation in decades ahead. A key element is the design of by-product yielding, wet flue gas desulfurization processes. The choice is among those using lime, ammonia, or sodium alkali reagents, or limestone in highly oxygen-inhibited process operation, with SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of 98+% as a result of dissolved sulfite alkalinity. Integrated use of condensing heat exchangers provides low-level heat recovery and water-condensing-mode scrubbing. SO{sub 3} gas & PM-10 particulates including trace metals are effectively removed in conjunction with optimal, ultra-efficient, simultaneous multi-pollutant reduction. DeNO{sub x} may be accomplished by combining advantageous recirculation of highly-cooled, low-humidity, clean flue gas to burner windboxes with conventional selective non-catalytic reduction. Stack NO{sub x} at 18 to 30 ppM, (60% O{sub 2} basis), i.e. 0.03 to 0.05 lb NO{sub 2}-equivalent/MM Btu, may be achieved by injection of methanol in dilute solution or highly air-diluted, into the rear boiler cavity upstream of the economizer, converting flue-gas NO to NO{sub 2}, thereafter efficiently absorbed and chemically reduced to N{sub 2} by the dissolved-sulfite scrubbing agent to gain colorless discharge with NO{sub 2} concentration less than 15 ppM, i.e. 0.025 lb/MM Btu.

  19. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

    2004-03-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from July 1 through September, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, work focused on completing project tasks in the area of multiphase flow and rock properties. The area of interest is the production mechanisms of oil from porous media at high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on oil recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. Work continued to delineate how the wettability of reservoir rock shifts from mixed and intermediate wet conditions to more water-wet conditions as temperature increases. One mechanism for the shift toward water-wet conditions is the release of fines coated with oil-wet material from pore walls. New experiments and theory illustrate the role of temperature on fines release.

  20. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebilcox, G. J.; Lundberg, W. L.

    1981-03-01

    The canning segment of the food processing industry is a major energy user within that industry. Most of its energy demand is met by hot water and steam and those fluids, in addition to product cooling water, eventually flow from the processes as warm waste water. To minimize the possibility of product contamination, a large percentage of that waste water is sent directly to factory drains and sewer systems without being recycled and in many cases the thermal energy contained by the waste streams also goes unreclaimed and is lost from further use. Waste heat recovery in canning facilities can be performed economically using systems that employ thermal energy storage (TES). A project was proposed in which a demonstration waste heat recovery system, including a TES feature, would be designed, installed and operated.

  1. Modeling a Thermoelectric Generator Applied to Diesel Automotive Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, N.; Lazard, M.; Aixala, L.; Scherrer, H.

    2010-09-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are outstanding devices for automotive waste heat recovery. Their packaging, lack of moving parts, and direct heat to electrical conversion are the main benefits. Usually, TEGs are modeled with a constant hot-source temperature. However, energy in exhaust gases is limited, thus leading to a temperature decrease as heat is recovered. Therefore thermoelectric properties change along the TEG, affecting performance. A thermoelectric generator composed of Mg2Si/Zn4Sb3 for high temperatures followed by Bi2Te3 for low temperatures has been modeled using engineering equation solver (EES) software. The model uses the finite-difference method with a strip-fins convective heat transfer coefficient. It has been validated on a commercial module with well-known properties. The thermoelectric connection and the number of thermoelements have been addressed as well as the optimum proportion of high-temperature material for a given thermoelectric heat exchanger. TEG output power has been estimated for a typical commercial vehicle at 90°C coolant temperature.

  2. The heat recovery with heat transfer methods from solar photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özakın, A. N.; Karsli, S.; Kaya, F.; Güllüce, H.

    2016-04-01

    Although there are many fluctuations in energy prices, they seems like rising day by day. Thus energy recovery systems have increasingly trend. Photovoltaic systems converts solar radiation directly into electrical energy thanks to semiconductors. But due to the nature of semiconductors, whole of solar energy cannot turn into electrical energy and the remaining energy turns into waste heat. The aim of this research is evaluate this waste heat energy by air cooling system. So, the energy efficiency of the system will be increased using appropriate heat transfer technologies such as fin, turbulator etc.

  3. Effect of Heat Exchanger Material and Fouling on Thermoelectric Exhaust Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Norman; Szybist, James P; Sluder, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This study is conducted in an effort to better understand and improve the performance of thermoelectric heat recovery systems for automotive use. For this purpose an experimental investigation of thermoelectrics in contact with clean and fouled heat exchangers of different materials is performed. The thermoelectric devices are tested on a bench-scale thermoelectric heat recovery apparatus that simulates automotive exhaust. The thermoelectric apparatus consists of a series of thermoelectric generators contacting a hot-side and a cold-side heat exchanger. The thermoelectric devices are tested with two different hot-side heat exchanger materials, stainless steel and aluminum, and at a range of simulated exhaust gas flowrates (40 to 150 slpm), exhaust gas temperatures (240 C and 280 C), and coolant-side temperatures (40 C and 80 C). It is observed that for higher exhaust gas flowrates, thermoelectric power output increases while overall system efficiency decreases. Degradation of the effectiveness of the EGR-type heat exchangers over a period of driving is also simulated by exposing the heat exchangers to diesel engine exhaust under thermophoretic conditions to form a deposit layer. For the fouled EGR-type heat exchangers, power output and system efficiency is observed to be significantly lower for all conditions tested. The study found, however, that heat exchanger material is the dominant factor in the ability of the system to convert heat to electricity with thermoelectric generators. This finding is thought to be unique to the heat exchangers used for this study, and not a universal trend for all system configurations.

  4. Regulation of heat-shock protein synthesis in chicken muscle culture during recovery from heat shock.

    PubMed

    Bag, J

    1983-10-03

    Exposure of chick myotube cultures to a temperature (45 degrees C) higher than their normal growing temperature (37 degrees C) caused extensive synthesis of three major polypeptides of Mr = 25 000, 65 000 and 81 000 referred to as 'heat-shock polypeptides' (hsps). When these cells were allowed to recover from heat-shock treatment at 37 degrees C for 6-8 h, the rate of accumulation of isotope into the 65 000-Mr and 81 000-Mr hsps declined to levels comparable to those in control cultures maintained at 37 degrees C. However, incorporation of isotope in the 25 000-Mr hsp continued at an elevated rate for a longer period than the 65 000-Mr and 81 000-Mr hsps. When heat-shocked cells were allowed to recover at 37 degrees C in the presence of actinomycin D to block new mRNA synthesis, the hsp synthesis as measured by the incorporation of radioactive isotope in these polypeptides continued at levels comparable to those in heat-shocked cells prior to recovery. The block of recovery by actinomycin D was due to the presence of a greater amount of functional hsp mRNAs in the polysomes as compared to untreated controls. The role of competition between the mRNAs for hsps and normal cellular proteins for the translation machinery in regulating protein synthesis during the recovery from heat shock has been discussed.

  5. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Kovscek

    2003-01-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from October 1 through December 31, 2002 , for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition was analyzed to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation. It is shown that the usual assumption of constant, time-independent shape factors is incorrect. In other work, we continued to study the mechanisms by which oil is produced from fractured media at high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased the apparent wettability and affected water relative permeability of cores used in previous experiments. A phenomenological and mechanistic cause for this behavior is sought. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.

  6. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

    2002-09-30

    The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) conducts a broad spectrum of research intended to help improve the recovery efficiency from difficult to produce reservoirs including heavy oil and fractured low permeability systems. Our scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. The primary functions of the group are to conduct direction-setting research, transfer research results to industry, and educate and train students for careers in industry. Presently, research in SUPRI-A is divided into 5 main project areas. These projects and their goals include: (1) Multiphase flow and rock properties--to develop better understanding of the physics of displacement in porous media through experiment and theory. This category includes work on imbibition, flow in fractured media, and the effect of temperature on relative permeability and capillary pressure. (2) Hot fluid injection--to improve the application of nonconventional wells for enhanced oil recovery and elucidate the mechanisms of steamdrive in low permeability, fractured porous media. (3) Mechanisms of primary heavy oil recovery--to develop a mechanistic understanding of so-called ''foamy oil'' and its associated physical chemistry. (4) In-situ combustion--to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the insitu combustion process. (5) Reservoir definition--to develop and improve techniques for evaluating formation properties from production information. What follows is a report on activities for the past year. Significant progress was made in all areas.

  7. Advanced Energy and Water Recovery Technology from Low Grade Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect

    Dexin Wang

    2011-12-19

    The project has developed a nanoporous membrane based water vapor separation technology that can be used for recovering energy and water from low-temperature industrial waste gas streams with high moisture contents. This kind of exhaust stream is widely present in many industrial processes including the forest products and paper industry, food industry, chemical industry, cement industry, metal industry, and petroleum industry. The technology can recover not only the sensible heat but also high-purity water along with its considerable latent heat. Waste heats from such streams are considered very difficult to recover by conventional technology because of poor heat transfer performance of heat-exchanger type equipment at low temperature and moisture-related corrosion issues. During the one-year Concept Definition stage of the project, the goal was to prove the concept and technology in the laboratory and identify any issues that need to be addressed in future development of this technology. In this project, computational modeling and simulation have been conducted to investigate the performance of a nanoporous material based technology, transport membrane condenser (TMC), for waste heat and water recovery from low grade industrial flue gases. A series of theoretical and computational analyses have provided insight and support in advanced TMC design and experiments. Experimental study revealed condensation and convection through the porous membrane bundle was greatly improved over an impermeable tube bundle, because of the membrane capillary condensation mechanism and the continuous evacuation of the condensate film or droplets through the membrane pores. Convection Nusselt number in flue gas side for the porous membrane tube bundle is 50% to 80% higher than those for the impermeable stainless steel tube bundle. The condensation rates for the porous membrane tube bundle also increase 60% to 80%. Parametric study for the porous membrane tube bundle heat transfer

  8. Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries

    SciTech Connect

    Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

    1980-11-01

    The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

  9. Fabrication of Wire Mesh Heat Exchangers for Waste Heat Recovery Using Wire-Arc Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaey, R.; Salavati, S.; Pershin, L.; Coyle, T.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.

    2014-04-01

    Waste heat can be recovered from hot combustion gases using water-cooled heat exchangers. Adding fins to the external surfaces of the water pipes inserted into the hot gases increases their surface area and enhances heat transfer, increasing the efficiency of heat recovery. A method of increasing the heat transfer surface area has been developed using a twin wire-arc thermal spray system to generate a dense, high-strength coating that bonds wire mesh to the outside surfaces of stainless steel pipes through which water passes. At the optimum spray distance of 150 mm, the oxide content, coating porosity, and the adhesion strength of the coating were measured to be 7%, 2%, and 24 MPa, respectively. Experiments were done in which heat exchangers were placed inside a high-temperature oven with temperature varying from 300 to 900 °C. Several different heat exchanger designs were tested to estimate the total heat transfer in each case. The efficiency of heat transfer was found to depend strongly on the quality of the bond between the wire meshes and pipes and the size of openings in the wire mesh.

  10. Analysis of IECC2003 Chiller Heat Recovery for Service Water Heating Requirement for New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Winiarski, David W.

    2004-08-15

    The state of New York asked the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the requirement for Heat Recovery for Service Water Heating that exists in the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code to determine whether this requirement should be adopted into the New York State Energy Code. A typical hotel application that would trigger this requirement was examined using whole building simulation software to generate baseline annual chiller and service hot water loads, and a spreadsheet was used to examine the energy savings potential for heat recovery using hourly load files from the simulation. An example application meeting the code requirement was developed, and the energy savings, energy cost savings, and first costs for the heat recovery installation were developed. The calculated payback for this application was 6.3 years using 2002 New York state average energy costs. This payback met the minimum requirements for cost effectiveness established for the state of New York for updating the commercial energy conservation code.

  11. Trends in Timber Use and Product Recovery in New York

    Treesearch

    Eric H. Wharton; Thomas W. Birch; Thomas W. Birch

    1999-01-01

    High demand for a variety of timber products from New York's forests has stimulated increased timber utilization and product recovery. Utilization studies in New York suggest that the recovery of timber has improved over the years. Although current methods of multiproduct harvesting have improved recovery of residual material, an estimated 38.6 million cubic feet...

  12. Optimal Number of Thermoelectric Couples in a Heat Pipe Assisted Thermoelectric Generator for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tongjun; Wang, Tongcai; Luan, Weiling; Cao, Qimin

    2017-01-01

    Waste heat recovery through thermoelectric generators is a promising way to improve energy conversion efficiency. This paper proposes a type of heat pipe assisted thermoelectric generator (HP-TEG) system. The expandable evaporator and condenser surface of the heat pipe facilitates the intensive assembly of thermoelectric (TE) modules to compose a compact device. Compared with a conventional layer structure thermoelectric generator, this system is feasible for the installment of more TE couples, thus increasing power output. To investigate the performance of the HP-TEG and the optimal number of TE couples, a theoretical model was presented and verified by experiment results. Further theoretical analysis results showed the performance of the HP-TEG could be further improved by optimizing the parameters, including the inlet air temperature, the thermal resistance of the heating section, and thermal resistance of the cooling structure. Moreover, applying a proper number of TE couples is important to acquire the best power output performance.

  13. Recovery and use of fission product noble metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.A.; Rohmann, C.A.; Perrigo, L.D.

    1980-06-01

    Noble metals in fission products are of strategic value. Market prices for noble metals are rising more rapidly than recovery costs. A promising concept has been developed for recovery of noble metals from fission product waste. Although the assessment was made only for the three noble metal fission products (Rh, Pd, Ru), there are other fission products and actinides which have potential value. (DLC)

  14. Weight Penalty Incurred in Thermoelectric Recovery of Automobile Exhaust Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, D. M.; Smith, J.; Thomas, G.; Min, G.

    2011-05-01

    Thermoelectric recovery of automobile waste exhaust heat has been identified as having potential for reducing fuel consumption and environmentally unfriendly emissions. Around 35% of combustion energy is discharged as heat through the exhaust system, at temperatures which depend upon the engine's operation and range from 800°C to 900°C at the outlet port to less than 50°C at the tail-pipe. Beneficial reduction in fuel consumption of 5% to 10% is widely quoted in the literature. However, comparison between claims is difficult due to nonuniformity of driving conditions. In this paper the available waste exhaust heat energy produced by a 1.5 L family car when undergoing the new European drive cycle was measured and the potential thermoelectric output estimated. The work required to power the vehicle through the drive cycle was also determined and used to evaluate key parameters. This enabled an estimate to be made of the engine efficiency and additional work required by the engine to meet the load of a thermoelectric generating system. It is concluded that incorporating a thermoelectric generator would attract a penalty of around 12 W/kg. Employing thermoelectric modules fabricated from low-density material such as magnesium silicide would considerably reduce the generator weight penalty.

  15. Product Recovery From Hemlock "Pulpwood" From Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Thomas D. Fahey

    1983-01-01

    A total of 363 western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) logs from Alaska were sawn to compare recovery at a stud mill and at a dimension mill. Recovery at both mills varied by log diameters and by log scaling system. Lumber grade recovery was primarily in Stud grade at the stud mill and in Standard and Construction grade at the dimension...

  16. Heat production due to intracellular killing activity.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Masuda, S; Miyamae, T; Yamamura, M

    1990-09-01

    Using Saccharomyces ceravisiae, Candida albicans and Stapylococcus aureus, heat production during phagocytosis was measured in U937 cells which are capable of differentiating to monocytic phagocytes. No increase in heat production of non-differentiated U937 was observed since they were not phagocytic cells. However after differentiation to monocytic phagocytes by lymphokine, U937 cells produced a remarkable amount of heat during phagocytosis. Although Ehrlich ascites tumor cells sensitized with antibody were capable of engulfing S. aureus, no increase in heat nor in superoxide anion production during phagocytosis was detected. It was also found that no heat increase occurred in neutrophils from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). It can thus be concluded that the heat production during phagocytosis is due to the intercellular killing process of phagocytic cells.

  17. 75 FR 5170 - Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures-Productivity Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... Surface Transportation Board Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures--Productivity Adjustment AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Proposed Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures Productivity Adjustment. SUMMARY... of average change in railroad productivity for the 2004-2008 (5-year) averaging period. This is a...

  18. 77 FR 7237 - Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures-Productivity Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... Surface Transportation Board Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures--Productivity Adjustment AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Proposed railroad cost recovery procedures productivity adjustment. SUMMARY: In a... change in railroad productivity for the 2006-2010 (5-year) averaging period. This represents a 0.6...

  19. Waste heat recovery: Textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning descriptions and evaluations of waste heat recovery operations used in the textile industry. Heat recovery and utilization from wastewater streams, flue gas, finishing processes, dyeing operations, and air jet systems are presented. The use of waste heat for space heating and process preheating is considered. (Contains a minimum of 162 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Transcriptomic analysis of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves during and after recovery from heat stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Grapes are a major fruit crop around the world. Heat stress can significantly reduce grape yield and quality. Changes at the molecular level in response to heat stress and subsequent recovery are poorly understood. To elucidate the effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery on expression of genes by grape leaves representing the classic heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms, transcript abundance of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves was quantified using the Affymetrix Grape Genome oligonucleotide microarray (15,700 transcripts), followed by quantitative Real-Time PCR validation for some transcript profiles. Results We found that about 8% of the total probe sets were responsive to heat stress and/or to subsequent recovery in grape leaves. The heat stress and recovery responses were characterized by different transcriptional changes. The number of heat stress-regulated genes was almost twice the number of recovery-regulated genes. The responsive genes identified in this study belong to a large number of important traits and biological pathways, including cell rescue (i.e., antioxidant enzymes), protein fate (i.e., HSPs), primary and secondary metabolism, transcription factors, signal transduction, and development. We have identified some common genes and heat shock factors (HSFs) that were modulated differentially by heat stress and recovery. Most HSP genes were upregulated by heat stress but were downregulated by the recovery. On the other hand, some specific HSP genes or HSFs were uniquely responsive to heat stress or recovery. Conclusion The effect of heat stress and recovery on grape appears to be associated with multiple processes and mechanisms including stress-related genes, transcription factors, and metabolism. Heat stress and recovery elicited common up- or downregulated genes as well as unique sets of responsive genes. Moreover, some genes were regulated in opposite directions by heat stress and recovery. The results indicated

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves during and after recovery from heat stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Tian; Wang, Jun-Fang; Cramer, Grant; Dai, Zhan-Wu; Duan, Wei; Xu, Hong-Guo; Wu, Ben-Hong; Fan, Pei-Ge; Wang, Li-Jun; Li, Shao-Hua

    2012-09-28

    Grapes are a major fruit crop around the world. Heat stress can significantly reduce grape yield and quality. Changes at the molecular level in response to heat stress and subsequent recovery are poorly understood. To elucidate the effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery on expression of genes by grape leaves representing the classic heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms, transcript abundance of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves was quantified using the Affymetrix Grape Genome oligonucleotide microarray (15,700 transcripts), followed by quantitative Real-Time PCR validation for some transcript profiles. We found that about 8% of the total probe sets were responsive to heat stress and/or to subsequent recovery in grape leaves. The heat stress and recovery responses were characterized by different transcriptional changes. The number of heat stress-regulated genes was almost twice the number of recovery-regulated genes. The responsive genes identified in this study belong to a large number of important traits and biological pathways, including cell rescue (i.e., antioxidant enzymes), protein fate (i.e., HSPs), primary and secondary metabolism, transcription factors, signal transduction, and development. We have identified some common genes and heat shock factors (HSFs) that were modulated differentially by heat stress and recovery. Most HSP genes were upregulated by heat stress but were downregulated by the recovery. On the other hand, some specific HSP genes or HSFs were uniquely responsive to heat stress or recovery. The effect of heat stress and recovery on grape appears to be associated with multiple processes and mechanisms including stress-related genes, transcription factors, and metabolism. Heat stress and recovery elicited common up- or downregulated genes as well as unique sets of responsive genes. Moreover, some genes were regulated in opposite directions by heat stress and recovery. The results indicated HSPs, especially small HSPs

  2. Fractal behavior in continental crustal heat production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedanti, N.; Srivastava, R. P.; Pandey, O. P.; Dimri, V. P.

    2011-02-01

    The distribution of crustal heat production, which is the most important component in the elucidation of continental thermal structure, still remains a theoretical assumption. In general the heat production values must decrease with depth, but the form of decrease of heat production in the crust is not well understood. The commonly used heat production models are: "block model", in which heat production is constant from the surface to a given depth and the "exponential model", in which heat production diminishes as an exponential function of depth. The exponential model is more widely used wherein sources of the errors are heterogeneity of rock and long wavelength changes due to changes in lithology and tectonic elements, and as such exponential distribution does not work satisfactorily for the entire crust. In the present study, we analyze for the first time, deep crustal heat production data of six global areas namely Dharwar craton (India), Kaapvaal craton (South Africa), Baltic shield (Kola, Russia), Hidaka metamorphic belt (Japan), Nissho pluton (Japan) and Continental Deep Drilling site (KTB, Germany). The power spectrum of all the studied data sets exhibits power law behaviour. This would mean slower decay of heat production with depth, which conforms to the known geologic composition of the crust. Minimum value of the scaling exponent has been found for the KTB borehole, which is apparently related to higher heat production of gneisses, however for other study areas, scaling exponent is almost similar. We also found that the lower values of scaling exponents are related to higher heat production in the crust as is the case in KTB. Present finding has a direct relevance in computation of temperature-depth profiles in continental regions.

  3. Heating production fluids in a wellbore

    DOEpatents

    Orrego, Yamila; Jankowski, Todd A.

    2016-07-12

    A method for heating a production fluid in a wellbore. The method can include heating, using a packer fluid, a working fluid flowing through a first medium disposed in a first section of the wellbore, where the first medium transfers heat from the packer fluid to the working fluid. The method can also include circulating the working fluid into a second section of the wellbore through a second medium, where the second medium transfers heat from the working fluid to the production fluid. The method can further include returning the working fluid to the first section of the wellbore through the first medium.

  4. Bacteriocin production and different strategies for their recovery and purification.

    PubMed

    Garsa, Anita Kumari; Kumariya, Rashmi; Sood, S K; Kumar, Anil; Kapila, Suman

    2014-03-01

    Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a diverse group of antimicrobial proteins/peptides, offering potential as biopreservatives, and exhibit a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity at low concentrations along with thermal as well as pH stability in foods. High bacteriocin production usually occurs in complex media. However, such media are expensive for an economical production process. For effective use of bacteriocins as food biopreservatives, there is a need to have heat-stable wide spectrum bacteriocins produced with high-specific activity in food-grade medium. The main hurdles concerning the application of bacteriocins as food biopreservatives is their low yield in food-grade medium and time-consuming, expensive purification processes, which are suitable at laboratory scale but not at industrial scale. So, the present review focuses on the bacteriocins production using complex and food-grade media, which mainly emphasizes on the bacteriocin producer strains, media used, different production systems used and effect of different fermentation conditions on the bacteriocin production. In addition, this review emphasizes the purification processes designed for efficient recovery of bacteriocins at small and large scale.

  5. Bypass valve and coolant flow controls for optimum temperatures in waste heat recovery systems

    DOEpatents

    Meisner, Gregory P

    2013-10-08

    Implementing an optimized waste heat recovery system includes calculating a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a heat exchanger of a waste heat recovery system, and predicting a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a material flowing through a channel of the waste heat recovery system. Upon determining the rate of change in the temperature of the material is predicted to be higher than the rate of change in the temperature of the heat exchanger, the optimized waste heat recovery system calculates a valve position and timing for the channel that is configurable for achieving a rate of material flow that is determined to produce and maintain a defined threshold temperature of the heat exchanger, and actuates the valve according to the calculated valve position and calculated timing.

  6. System and method for determining the net output torque from a waste heat recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Tricaud, Christophe; Ernst, Timothy C.; Zigan, James A.

    2016-12-13

    The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery system with a system and method for calculation of the net output torque from the waste heat recovery system. The calculation uses inputs from existing pressure and speed sensors to create a virtual pump torque sensor and a virtual expander torque sensor, and uses these sensors to provide an accurate net torque output from the WHR system.

  7. Heat Index in Migrant Farmworker Housing: Implications for Rest and Recovery From Work-Related Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Melinda F.; Chen, Haiying; Bischoff, Werner E.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Although the health risk to farmworkers of working in hot conditions is recognized, potential for excessive heat exposure in housing affecting rest and recovery has been ignored. We assessed heat index in common and sleeping rooms in 170 North Carolina farmworker camps across a summer and examined associations with time of summer and air conditioning use. We recorded dangerous heat indexes in most rooms, regardless of time or air conditioning. Policies to reduce heat indexes in farmworker housing should be developed. PMID:23763392

  8. Heat index in migrant farmworker housing: implications for rest and recovery from work-related heat stress.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Sara A; Wiggins, Melinda F; Chen, Haiying; Bischoff, Werner E; Arcury, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    Although the health risk to farmworkers of working in hot conditions is recognized, potential for excessive heat exposure in housing affecting rest and recovery has been ignored. We assessed heat index in common and sleeping rooms in 170 North Carolina farmworker camps across a summer and examined associations with time of summer and air conditioning use. We recorded dangerous heat indexes in most rooms, regardless of time or air conditioning. Policies to reduce heat indexes in farmworker housing should be developed.

  9. Assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report documents Phase 1 of a project conducted by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for the assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of VOC solvents from process gas streams. In Phase 1, MTI has evaluated solvent recovery applications within New York State (NYS), identified host sites willing to implement their application, and conducted a preliminary design of the equipment required. The design and applications were evaluated for technical and economic feasibility. The solvent recovery heat pump system concept resulting from the Phase 1 work is one of a mobile unit that would service multiple stationary adsorbers. A large percentage of solvent recovery applications within the state can be serviced by on-site carbon bed adsorbers that are desorbed at frequencies ranging from once per to once per month. In this way, many users can effectively share'' the substantial capital investment associated with the system's reverse Brayton hardware, providing it can be packaged as a mobile unit. In a typical operating scenario, a carbon adsorption module will be located permanently at the industrial site. The SLA will be ducted through the adsorber and the solvents removed, thus eliminating an air emission problem. Prior to VOC breakthrough, by schedule or by request, the mobile unit would arrive at the site to recover the concentrated solvent. An engine driven, natural gas fueled system, the mobile unit utilizes conditioned engine exhaust gases as the inert gas for desorption. Hot inert gas is directed through the carbon bed, heating it and volatilizing the adsorbed solvent. Using a revere Brayton-cycle refrigeration system to create low temperatures, the solvent vapors are condensed and collected from the inert gas stream. The solvent can then be recycled to the production process or sold for other uses and the adsorber returned to service.

  10. Assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report documents Phase 1 of a project conducted by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for the assessment and development of an advanced heat pump for recovery of VOC solvents from process gas streams. In Phase 1, MTI has evaluated solvent recovery applications within New York State (NYS), identified host sites willing to implement their application, and conducted a preliminary design of the equipment required. The design and applications were evaluated for technical and economic feasibility. The solvent recovery heat pump system concept resulting from the Phase 1 work is one of a mobile unit that would service multiple stationary adsorbers. A large percentage of solvent recovery applications within the state can be serviced by on-site carbon bed adsorbers that are desorbed at frequencies ranging from once per to once per month. In this way, many users can effectively ``share`` the substantial capital investment associated with the system`s reverse Brayton hardware, providing it can be packaged as a mobile unit. In a typical operating scenario, a carbon adsorption module will be located permanently at the industrial site. The SLA will be ducted through the adsorber and the solvents removed, thus eliminating an air emission problem. Prior to VOC breakthrough, by schedule or by request, the mobile unit would arrive at the site to recover the concentrated solvent. An engine driven, natural gas fueled system, the mobile unit utilizes conditioned engine exhaust gases as the inert gas for desorption. Hot inert gas is directed through the carbon bed, heating it and volatilizing the adsorbed solvent. Using a revere Brayton-cycle refrigeration system to create low temperatures, the solvent vapors are condensed and collected from the inert gas stream. The solvent can then be recycled to the production process or sold for other uses and the adsorber returned to service.

  11. Development of a passive waste heat recovery system. Final report. [Air to air heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Garriss, J.E.

    1984-02-15

    The invention described operates as an effective waste heat reclamation device without the disadvantages of requiring operating power or imposing spatial requirements on equipment location. Electrical power, if used at all, is only for control purposes. The two air streams can be far apart, and may have significantly different elevations. Accordingly, this invention offers some distinct advantages over existing concepts. The first step in this project was to review the basic concept, as described by the patent, for its applicability to industrial waste heat recovery systems. System specifications for a demonstration unit were then developed. A simplified mathematical model was developed to study system performance and size certain equipment items. To facilitate this work, the mathematical model was programmed for use on a Texas Instruments-59 programmable calculator. Following this, specific equipment was specified and layout drawings were prepared. The discussion details these efforts. The equipment was then built and its performance measured.

  12. Alterations in heat loss and heat production mechanisms in rat exposed to hypergravic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.; Oyama, J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of studies investigating the thermal response of rats exposed to hypergravic fields well below maximum tolerance levels is presented. It is concluded that several lines of evidence indicate that the neural switching network for temperature regulation and cardiovascular channeling of blood flow is transiently affected during the first hour a rat is exposed to hypergravity. Moreover, even after one hour of exposure, when the core temperature has fallen several degrees, shivering and nonshivering thermogenesis are not fully activated. Only after prolonged exposure to hypergravic fields do heat production mechanisms recover sufficiently to bring the core temperature back to a normal level. Thus, the data indicate a more rapid recovery of effector mechanisms for heat loss than for heat production.

  13. Process and apparatus for the recovery of waste heat from a coke oven operation

    SciTech Connect

    Flockenhaus, C.

    1980-09-23

    The waste heat resulting from a coke oven operation is recovered in a two-stage proceeding. The waste gas is first cooled to not more than about 400/sup 0/C. In a recuperator or regenerator of the oven to principally utilize the heat radiation of the gas. Then, in a second stage, the gas is subjected to further cooling in a separate heat exchanger to principally exploit the heat convection of the gas. The process permits to recover waste gas on both basic principles of waste recovery, that is the recovery by radiation and the recovery by convection.

  14. Heat and moisture production of modern swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The heat and moisture production (HP and MP) values that are currently published in the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) standards are from data collected in either the 1970’s (nursery piglets) or the 1950’s (growing-finishing pigs). This series of ...

  15. Effects of heat recovery for district heating on waste incineration health impact: a simulation study in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Michele; Vincenzi, Simone; De Leo, Giulio A

    2013-02-01

    The construction of waste incinerators in populated areas always causes substantial public concern. Since the heat from waste combustion can be recovered to power district heating networks and allows for the switch-off of domestic boilers in urbanized areas, predictive models for health assessment should also take into account the potential benefits of abating an important source of diffuse emission. In this work, we simulated the dispersion of atmospheric pollutants from a waste incinerator under construction in Parma (Italy) into different environmental compartments and estimated the potential health effect of both criteria- (PM(10)) and micro-pollutants (PCDD/F, PAH, Cd, Hg). We analyzed two emission scenarios, one considering only the new incinerator, and the other accounting for the potential decrease in pollutant concentrations due to the activation of a district heating network. We estimated the effect of uncertainty in parameter estimation on health risk through Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, we analyzed the robustness of health risk to alternative assumptions on: a) the geographical origins of the potentially contaminated food, and b) the dietary habits of the exposed population. Our analysis showed that under the specific set of assumptions and emission scenarios explored in the present work: (i) the proposed waste incinerator plant appears to cause negligible harm to the resident population; (ii) despite the net increase in PM(10) mass balance, ground-level concentration of fine particulate matter may be curbed by the activation of an extensive district heating system powered through waste combustion heat recovery and the concurrent switch-off of domestic/industrial heating boilers. In addition, our study showed that the health risk caused by waste incineration emissions is sensitive to assumptions about the typical diet of the resident population, and the geographical origins of food production.

  16. Impact of Heat Stress on Poultry Production.

    PubMed

    Lara, Lucas J; Rostagno, Marcos H

    2013-04-24

    Understanding and controlling environmental conditions is crucial to successful poultry production and welfare. Heat stress is one of the most important environmental stressors challenging poultry production worldwide. The detrimental effects of heat stress on broilers and laying hens range from reduced growth and egg production to decreased poultry and egg quality and safety. Moreover, the negative impact of heat stress on poultry welfare has recently attracted increasing public awareness and concern. Much information has been published on the effects of heat stress on productivity and immune response in poultry. However, our knowledge of basic mechanisms associated to the reported effects, as well as related to poultry behavior and welfare under heat stress conditions is in fact scarce. Intervention strategies to deal with heat stress conditions have been the focus of many published studies. Nevertheless, effectiveness of most of the interventions has been variable or inconsistent. This review focuses on the scientific evidence available on the importance and impact of heat stress in poultry production, with emphasis on broilers and laying hens.

  17. Application Guide for Waste Heat Recovery with Organic Rankine Cycle Equipment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-15

    organic Rankine cycle technology could greatly expand waste heat recovery opportunities because of its ability to produce mechanical or electrical work...efficiency of an engine receiving heat from a 200OF source and rejecting to a 70OF sink is only 19.7 percent). The organic Rankine cycle offers a...estimate organic Rankine cycle (ORC) equipment for waste-heat recovery applications. The intention is to provide a technique whereby the field engineer

  18. Innovative use of membrane contactor as condenser for heat recovery in carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuiping; Zhao, Shuaifei; Wardhaugh, Leigh; Feron, Paul H M

    2015-02-17

    The gas-liquid membrane contactor generally used as a nonselective gas absorption enhancement device is innovatively proposed as a condenser for heat recovery in liquid-absorbent-based carbon capture. The membrane condenser is used as a heat exchanger to recover the latent heat of the exiting vapor from the desorber, and it can help achieve significant energy savings when proper membranes with high heat-transfer coefficients are used. Theoretical thermodynamic analysis of mass and heat transfer in the membrane condensation system shows that heat recovery increases dramatically as inlet gas temperature rises and outlet gas temperature falls. The optimal split mass flow rate is determined by the inlet gas temperature and the overall heat-transfer coefficient in the condensation system. The required membrane area is also strongly dependent on the overall heat-transfer coefficient, particularly at higher inlet gas temperatures. Mass transfer across the membrane has an insignificant effect on heat transfer and heat recovery, suggesting that membrane wetting may not be an issue when a membrane condenser is used for heat recovery. Our analysis provides important insights into the energy recovery performance of the membrane condensation system as well as selection of operational parameters, such as split mass flow rate and membrane area, thickness, and thermal conductivity.

  19. Design and evaluation of fluidized bed heat recovery for diesel engine systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamm, J. R.; Newby, R. A.; Vidt, E. J.; Lippert, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The potential of utilizing fluidized bed heat exchangers in place of conventional counter-flow heat exchangers for heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engine exhaust gas streams was studied. Fluidized bed heat recovery systems were evaluated in three different heavy duty transport applications: (1) heavy duty diesel truck; (2) diesel locomotives; and (3) diesel marine pushboat. The three applications are characterized by differences in overall power output and annual utilization. For each application, the exhaust gas source is a turbocharged-adiabatic diesel core. Representative subposed exhaust gas heat utilization power cycles were selected for conceptual design efforts including design layouts and performance estimates for the fluidized bed heat recovery heat exchangers. The selected power cycles were: organic rankine with RC-1 working fluid, turbocompound power turbine with steam injection, and stirling engine. Fuel economy improvement predictions are used in conjunction with capital cost estimates and fuel price data to determine payback times for the various cases.

  20. Changes in transcription during recovery from heat injury in Salmonella typhimurium and effects of BCAA on recovery.

    PubMed

    Hsu-Ming, Wen; Naito, Kimitaka; Kinoshita, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Honjoh, Ken-ichi; Tashiro, Kousuke; Miyamoto, Takahisa

    2012-06-01

    Mechanisms of recovery from heat injury in Salmonella typhimurium were elucidated. Recovery of the heat-injured S. typhimurium cells in TSB resulted in full recovery after 3 h of incubation at 37°C. The DNA microarray analysis of 30- and 60-min recovering cells resulted in an increase in transcription of 89 and 141 genes, respectively. Among them, 15 genes, with known function, seemed to be somewhat involved in recovery. They encoded proteins involved in branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) transport (livJ, livH), cell envelope integrity (ddg), heat-shock response (cpxP, rrmJ), phage shock protein (pspA), ribosome modulation factor (rmf), virulence (sseB) transcriptional regulation (rpoE, rpoH, rseA, rseB, rseC) and ArcB signal transduction (sixA) and cytoplasmic membrane protein (fxsA). Among them, the effects of BCAA supplementation on recovery from heat injury were studied to confirm the importance of the BCAA transport liv genes during recovery. It was found that supplementation of TSB with 0.1% BCAA resulted in an enhanced recovery of injured cells in comparison to those recovered in TSB without BCAA. Supplementation of BCAA at 0.1% resulted in a cell count increase 4.4-fold greater than that of the control after 1 h incubation. It seems that BCAA promoted the recovery by promoting protein synthesis either directly through their use in translation or indirectly through stimulation of protein synthesis by activation of the Lrp protein.

  1. Heat recovery/thermal energy storage for energy conservation in food processing

    SciTech Connect

    Combes, R.S.; Boykin, W.B.

    1981-01-01

    Based on energy consumption data compiled for 1974, 59% of the total energy consumed in the US food processing industry was thermal energy. The energy-consuming processes which utilize this thermal energy reject significant quantities of waste heat, usually to the atmosphere or to the wastewater discharged from the plant. Design considerations for waste heat recovery systems in the food processing industry are discussed. A systematic analysis of the waste heat source, in terms of quantity and quality is explored. Other aspects of the waste heat source, such as contamination, are addressed as potential impediments to practical heat recovery. The characteristics of the recipient process which will utilize the recovered waste heat are discussed. Thermal energy storage, which can be used as a means of allowing the waste eat recovery process to operate independent of the subsequent utilization of the recovered energy, is discussed. The project included the design, installation and monitoring of two heat recovery systems in a Gold Kist broiler processing plant. These systems recover waste heat from a poultry scalder overflow (heated wastewater) and from a refrigeration condenser utilizing ammonia as the refrigerant. The performance and economic viability of the heat recovery systems are presented.

  2. Universal constant for heat production in protists

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew D.; Völker, Jens; Moeller, Holly V.; Laws, Edward; Breslauer, Kenneth J.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2009-01-01

    Using a high sensitivity differential scanning calorimeter in isothermal mode, we directly measured heat production in eukaryotic protists from 5 phyla spanning over 5 orders of magnitude in carbon biomass and 8 orders of magnitude in cell volume. Our results reveal that metabolic heat production normalized to cell mass is virtually constant in these organisms, with a median of 0.037 pW pg C−1 (95% confidence interval = 0.022–0.061 pW pg C−1) at 5 °C. Contrary to allometric models, the relationship between heat production and cell carbon content or surface area is isometric (scaling exponents, 1.056 and 1.057, respectively). That heat production per unit cell surface area is constant suggests that heat flux through the cell surface is effectively instantaneous, and hence that cells are isothermal with their environment. The results further suggest that allometric models of metabolism based on metazoans are not applicable to protists, and that the underlying metabolic processes in the latter polyphyletic group are highly constrained by evolutionary selection. We propose that the evolutionary constraint leading to a universally constant heat production in single-celled eukaryotes is related to cytoplasmic packaging of organelles and surface area to volume relationships controlling diffusion of resources to these organelles. PMID:19346469

  3. Radiogenic heat production in the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, Claude; Mareschal, Jean-Claude; Iarotsky, Lidia

    2016-10-01

    The thermal structure and evolution of continents depend strongly on the amount and distribution of radioactive heat sources in the crust. Determining the contribution of crustal rocks beneath a superficial layer is a major challenge because heat production depends weakly on major element composition and physical properties such as seismic wavespeed and density. Enriched granitic intrusives that lie at the current erosion level have a large impact on the surface heat flux but little influence on temperatures in the deep crust. Many lower crustal rocks that are poor in heat producing elements are restites from ancient orogenic events, implying that enrichment of the upper crust was achieved at the expense of deeper crustal levels. For the same total heat production, concentrating heat sources in an upper layer acts to reduce temperatures in the lower crust, thereby allowing stabilization of the crust. The present-day structure of the crust is a consequence of orogeny and should not be adopted for thermal models of the orogenic event itself. This review summarizes information extracted from large data sets on heat flow and heat production and provides estimates of crustal stratification and heat production in several geological provinces. Analysis of global and regional data sets reveals the absence of a positive correlation between surface heat flow and crustal thickness, showing that the average crustal heat production is not constant. Differences of heat flow between geological provinces are due in large part to changes of crustal structure and bulk composition. Collating values of the bulk crustal heat production in a few age intervals reveals a clear trend of decrease with increasing age. This trend can be accounted for by radioactive decay, indicating that thermal conditions at the time of crustal stabilization have not changed significantly. For the average crustal thickness of 40 km, Moho temperatures are near solidus values at the time of stabilization

  4. Infiltration heat recovery in building walls: Computational fluid dynamics investigations results

    SciTech Connect

    Abadie, Marc O.; Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2002-08-05

    Conventional calculations of heating (and cooling) loads for buildings assume that conduction heat loss (or gain) through walls is independent of air infiltration heat loss (or gain). During passage through the building envelope, infiltrating air substantially exchanges heat wall insulation leading to partial recovery of heat conducted through the wall. The Infiltration Heat Recovery (IHR) factor was introduced to quantify the heat recovery and correct the conventional calculations. In this study, Computational Fluid Dynamics was used to calculate infiltration heat recovery under a range of idealized conditions, specifically to understand factors that influence it, and assess its significance in building heat load calculations. This study shows for the first time the important effect of the external boundary layers on conduction and infiltration heat loads. Results show (under the idealized conditions studied here) that (1) the interior details of the wall encountered in the leakage pa th (i.e., insulated or empty walls) do not greatly influence the IHR, the overall relative location of the cracks (i.e., inlet and outlet locations on the wall) has the largest influence on the IHR magnitude, (2) external boundary layers on the walls substantially contribute to IHR and (3) the relative error in heat load calculations resulting from the use of the conventional calculational method (i.e., ignoring IHR) is between 3 percent and 13 percent for infiltrating flows typically found in residential buildings.

  5. Arkoma exploration heats production builds

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-01-21

    This paper reports that exploratory drilling continues with fervor to Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle targets, especially in Arkansas. Pennsylvanian zones continue to yield significant gas discoveries. Gas production from Arkoma basin counties in both states has been rising and stands to climb even further with startup of several new pipelines, assuming gas prices and takes hold up.

  6. Effect of Water Activities of Heating and Recovery Media on Apparent Heat Resistance of Bacillus cereus Spores

    PubMed Central

    Coroller, Louis; Leguérinel, Ivan; Mafart, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus cereus were heated and recovered in order to investigate the effect of water activity of media on the estimated heat resistance (i.e., the D value) of spores. The water activity (ranging from 0.9 to 1) of the heating medium was first successively controlled with three solutes (glycerol, glucose, and sucrose), while the water activity of the recovery medium was kept near 1. Reciprocally, the water activity of the heating medium was then kept at 1, while the water activity of the recovery medium was controlled from 0.9 to 1 with the same depressors. Lastly, in a third set of experiments, the heating medium and the recovery medium were adjusted to the same activity. As expected, added depressors caused an increase of the heat resistance of spores with a greater efficiency of sucrose with respect to glycerol and glucose. In contrast, when solutes were added to the recovery medium, under an optimal water activity close to 0.98, a decrease of water activity caused a decrease in the estimated D values. This effect was more pronounced when sucrose was used as a depressor instead of glycerol or glucose. When the heating and the recovery media were adjusted to the same water activity, a balancing effect was observed between the protective influence of the solutes during heat treatment and their negative effect during the recovery of injured cells, so that the overall effect of water activity was reduced, with an optimal value near 0.96. The difference between the efficiency of depressors was also less pronounced. It may then be concluded that the overall protective effect of a decrease in water activity is generally overestimated. PMID:11133461

  7. Split radiator design for heat rejection optimization for a waste heat recovery system

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2016-10-18

    A cooling system provides improved heat recovery by providing a split core radiator for both engine cooling and condenser cooling for a Rankine cycle (RC). The cooling system includes a radiator having a first cooling core portion and a second cooling core portion. An engine cooling loop is fluidly connected the second cooling core portion. A condenser of an RC has a cooling loop fluidly connected to the first cooling core portion. A valve is provided between the engine cooling loop and the condenser cooling loop adjustably control the flow of coolant in the condenser cooling loop into the engine cooling loop. The cooling system includes a controller communicatively coupled to the valve and adapted to determine a load requirement for the internal combustion engine and adjust the valve in accordance with the engine load requirement.

  8. Patterns of Gene Expression Associated with Recovery and Injury in Heat-stressed Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-03

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Patterns of gene expression associated with recovery and injury in heat-stressed rats Jonathan D Stallings1*, Danielle L...characterization of the gene response to heat stress using an in vivo conscious rat model. Results: We heated rats until implanted thermal probes indicated a maximal...all four organs at Tc,Max. Self-organizing maps identified gene-specific signatures corresponding to protein-folding disorders in heat-stressed rats

  9. Recovery of waste heat from industrial slags via modified float glass process

    SciTech Connect

    Serth, R.W.; Ctvrtnicek, T.E.; McCormick, R.J.; Zanders, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    A novel process for recovering waste heat from molten slags produced as by-products in the steel, copper, and elemental phosphorus industries is investigated. The process is based on technology developed in the glass industry for the commercial production of flat glass. In this process, energy is recovered from molten slag as it cools and solidifies on the surface of a pool of molten tin. In order to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the process, an energy recovery facility designed to handle the slag from a large elemental phosphorus plant is studied. Results indicate that the process is marginally economical at current energy price levels. A number of technical uncertainties in the process design are also identified. 9 refs.

  10. Identification of factors involved in recovery of heat-injured Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Takahisa; Hashimoto, Yoshikazu; Kiriki, Madoka; Motomatsu, Ai; Honjoh, Ken-Ichi; Iio, Masayoshi

    2005-05-01

    Proteins and genes involved in the recovery of heat-injured Salmonella Enteritidis were investigated. Salmonella Enteritidis cells cultured overnight in tryptic soy broth (TSB; nonselective medium) were suspended in citric acid-disodium hydrogen phosphate buffer (pH 6). After heat treatment at 55 degrees C for 15 min, the culturable counts measured by tryptic soy agar (TSA; nonselective medium) decreased from 10(8) to 10(7) CFU/ml. On the other hand, culturable counts measured by desoxycholate-hydrogen sulfite-lactose (DHL) agar (selective medium) were decreased from 10(8) to 10(4) CFU/ml by the same treatment. The results suggest that 99.9% of Salmonella Enteritidis detected on TSA were injured but recoverable. When injured Salmonella Enteritidis was incubated in TSB, the culturable count measured by TSA did not increase for 2 h, whereas that by DHL agar increased after incubation for 30 min. After incubation for 2 h, the culturable count measured by DHL agar reached a similar level with that by TSA, indicating that Salmonella Enteritidis had recovered. The two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that elongation factor G (FusA) and pyruvate kinase (PykF) specifically increased in the cells just after heat treatment and in the recovery cells. The levels of transcription of 86 stress-inducible genes were also investigated by reverse transcription PCR. Nineteen heat-inducible (clpB, clpX, degP, dnaJ, fkpA, ftsJ, gapA, hflB, hslJ, hslU, hslV, htpG, htrA, lon, mopA, mopB, mreB, rpoE, and ppiD), and 12 oxidative-stress and DNA damage-inducible (ahpC, ahpF, fldB, fur, grxA, dinF, katG, mutM, recA, soxR, trxC, and zwf) genes were transcribed extensively during recovery in TSB. The results obtained in this study will be used to develop the media or culture conditions that will promote recovery for the detection of food poisoning bacteria, including injured cells from food products.

  11. Influence of heat treatment on FVIII:C recovery from freeze dried cryoprecipitate.

    PubMed Central

    Benny, A G; Ockelford, P A; Johns, A S; Scott, R H; Woodfield, D G; Berry, E W

    1988-01-01

    A standard lyophilised triple cryoprecipitate preparation, stabilised by the addition of Synthamin 17, was heat treated at 60 degrees C for 48 hours. The total protein content, factor VIII concentration, and factor VIII recovery were not affected by the heat treatment procedure. Heat treatment did not influence the reconstitution characteristics of the freeze dried preparation and there were no side effects during or after administration. The mean in vivo rise of factor VIII from infused heat treated triple cryoprecipitate was 2.5 (SD 0.9)%/unit/kg with a half life of 13.1 (3.1) hours. These results compare favourably with those obtained using non-heated triple cryoprecipitate. Cryoprecipitate can be heat treated without adversely influencing factor VIII recovery, and the ability to prepare a heat treated cryoprecipitate means that a small pool high yield factor VIII preparation can again be used in routine clinical practice. PMID:3142936

  12. Wettability modified nanoporous ceramic membrane for simultaneous residual heat and condensate recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hu, H. W.; Tang, G. H.; Niu, D.

    2016-01-01

    Recovery of both latent heat and condensate from boiler flue gas is significant for improving boiler efficiency and water conservation. The condensation experiments are carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer across the nanoporous ceramic membranes (NPCMs) which are treated to be hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using the semicontinuous supercritical reactions. The effects of typical parameters including coolant flow rate, vapor/nitrogen gas mixture temperature, water vapor volume fraction and transmembrane pressure on heat and mass transfer performance are studied. The experimental results show that the hydrophilic NPCM exhibits higher performances of condensation heat transfer and condensate recovery. However, the hydrophobic modification results in remarkable degradation of heat and condensate recovery from the mixture. Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to establish a hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore/water liquid system, and the infiltration characteristics of the single hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore is revealed. PMID:27270997

  13. Wettability modified nanoporous ceramic membrane for simultaneous residual heat and condensate recovery.

    PubMed

    Hu, H W; Tang, G H; Niu, D

    2016-06-07

    Recovery of both latent heat and condensate from boiler flue gas is significant for improving boiler efficiency and water conservation. The condensation experiments are carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer across the nanoporous ceramic membranes (NPCMs) which are treated to be hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using the semicontinuous supercritical reactions. The effects of typical parameters including coolant flow rate, vapor/nitrogen gas mixture temperature, water vapor volume fraction and transmembrane pressure on heat and mass transfer performance are studied. The experimental results show that the hydrophilic NPCM exhibits higher performances of condensation heat transfer and condensate recovery. However, the hydrophobic modification results in remarkable degradation of heat and condensate recovery from the mixture. Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to establish a hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore/water liquid system, and the infiltration characteristics of the single hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore is revealed.

  14. Wettability modified nanoporous ceramic membrane for simultaneous residual heat and condensate recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H. W.; Tang, G. H.; Niu, D.

    2016-06-01

    Recovery of both latent heat and condensate from boiler flue gas is significant for improving boiler efficiency and water conservation. The condensation experiments are carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer across the nanoporous ceramic membranes (NPCMs) which are treated to be hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using the semicontinuous supercritical reactions. The effects of typical parameters including coolant flow rate, vapor/nitrogen gas mixture temperature, water vapor volume fraction and transmembrane pressure on heat and mass transfer performance are studied. The experimental results show that the hydrophilic NPCM exhibits higher performances of condensation heat transfer and condensate recovery. However, the hydrophobic modification results in remarkable degradation of heat and condensate recovery from the mixture. Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to establish a hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore/water liquid system, and the infiltration characteristics of the single hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore is revealed.

  15. RECOVERY OF ALUMINUM FROM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.; Higgins, I.R.

    1962-11-20

    A method is given for recovertng aluminum values from aqueous solutions containing said values together with fission products. A mixture of Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ and MnO/sub 2/ is added to a solution containing aluminum and fission products. The resulting aluminum-containing supernatant is then separated from the fission product-bearing metal oxide precipitate and is contacted with a cation exchange resin. The aluminum sorbed on the resin is then eluted and recovered. (AEC)

  16. Validation of a Waste Heat Recovery Model for a 1kW PEM Fuel Cell using Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saufi Sulaiman, M.; Mohamed, W. A. N. W.; Singh, B.; Fitrie Ghazali, M.

    2017-08-01

    Fuel cell is a device that generates electricity through electrochemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. A major by-product of the exothermic reaction is waste heat. The recovery of this waste heat has been subject to research on order to improve the overall energy utilization. However, nearly all of the studies concentrate on high temperature fuel cells using advanced thermodynamic cycles due to the high quality of waste heat. The method, characteristics and challenges in harvesting waste heat from a low temperature fuel cell using a direct energy conversion device is explored in this publication. A heat recovery system for an open cathode 1kW Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEM FC) was developed using a single unit of thermoelectric generator (TEG) attached to a heat pipe. Power output of the fuel cell was varied to obtain the performance of TEG at different stack temperatures. Natural and forced convections modes of cooling were applied to the TEG cold side. This is to simulate the conditions of a mini fuel cell vehicle at rest and in motion. The experimental results were analysed and a mathematical model based on the thermal circuit analogy was developed and compared. Forced convection mode resulted in higher temperature difference, output voltage and maximum power which are 3.3°C, 33.5 mV, and 113.96mW respectively. The heat recovery system for 1 kW Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEM FC) using single TEG was successfully established and improved the electrical production of fuel cell. Moreover, the experimental results obtained was in a good agreement with theoretical results.

  17. Biomass recycling heat technology and energy products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakaev, R. B.; Gergelizhiu, P. S.; Kazakov, A. V.; Zavorin, A. S.

    2014-10-01

    Relevance is determined by necessity of utilizing of local low-grade fuels by energy equpment. Most widespread Tomsk oblast (Russian Federation region) low-grade fuels are described and listed. Capability of utilizing is analysed. Mass balances of heat-technology conversion materials and derived products are described. As a result, recycling capability of low-grade fuels in briquette fuel is appraised.

  18. Heat production of nursery and growing piglets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat and moisture production (HMP) values are used to size ventilation fans in animal housing. The HMP values that are currently published in the ASABE standards were from data published in 1975. This study is one of a series of studies being conducted to update the HMP values for the ASABE and ASHR...

  19. Enhanced solvent recovery process boosts PTA production, saves energy

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-16

    Two producers of purified terephthalic acid (PTA) have licensed a new enhanced solvent-recovery process. The process uses a proprietary solvent that boosts the capacity of the acetic acid recovery system while reducing energy usage. Because acid recovery is usually the limiting step in PTA production, increasing it can boost PTA capacity 5--10%. The solvent recovery enhancement (SRE) technology is licensed by Glitsch Technology Corp. (GTC), Houston, The GT-SRE process can be applied in grassroots or existing plants. The GT-SRE process replaces the water used in high and low-pressure absorbers with a phosphine oxide-based solvent. The solvent is most selective to acetic acid, but is also selective to methyl acetate and, to a lesser extent, paraxylene. This selectivity increases recovery of these components from vent streams.

  20. Energy-efficient heat recovery systems for air conditioning of indoor swimming pools

    SciTech Connect

    Elsayed, M.M.; El-Refaee, M.M.; Borhan, Y.A.

    1997-12-31

    Analysis of a conventional air-conditioning system for indoor swimming pools during the summer season is presented. The analysis showed that the cooling load is characterized by a large latent heat fraction. As a result, a reheating process must be used downstream of the cooling coil to achieve the proper design comfort condition in the pool area. This, in turn, increases the energy requirement per unit cooling load of the pool. Two heat recovery systems are proposed to reduce this energy. In the first system, ambient air is used for the reheating process in an air-to-air heat exchanger. In the second system, mixed air--recirculated and ambient air--is used for the reheating process. Heat recovery efficiency is defined as an index of the energy savings resulting from the use of the heat recovery system compared to that of a conventional air-conditioning system. At a wide range of ambient conditions it is found that the energy savings could be up to 70% of the energy required to operate a conventional air-conditioning system. A parametric study was carried out to size the air-to-air heat exchanger associated with these heat recovery systems, and the results showed that a heat exchanger having an effectiveness of 0.5 would give satisfactory results. The proposed heat recovery systems are also compared to the case of reheating using the heat rejection from the condenser of the refrigeration machine. The comparison showed that the proposed systems save more energy than reheating using the condenser heat. A typical case study is given to demonstrate the savings in energy consumption when these systems are used.

  1. Applied in situ product recovery in ABE fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Lalander, Carl‐Axel; Lee, Jonathan G. M.; Davies, E. Timothy; Harvey, Adam P.

    2017-01-01

    The production of biobutanol is hindered by the product's toxicity to the bacteria, which limits the productivity of the process. In situ product recovery of butanol can improve the productivity by removing the source of inhibition. This paper reviews in situ product recovery techniques applied to the acetone butanol ethanol fermentation in a stirred tank reactor. Methods of in situ recovery include gas stripping, vacuum fermentation, pervaporation, liquid–liquid extraction, perstraction, and adsorption, all of which have been investigated for the acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation. All techniques have shown an improvement in substrate utilization, yield, productivity or both. Different fermentation modes favored different techniques. For batch processing gas stripping and pervaporation were most favorable, but in fed‐batch fermentations gas stripping and adsorption were most promising. During continuous processing perstraction appeared to offer the best improvement. The use of hybrid techniques can increase the final product concentration beyond that of single‐stage techniques. Therefore, the selection of an in situ product recovery technique would require comparable information on the energy demand and economics of the process. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:563–579, 2017 PMID:28188696

  2. Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

    2009-04-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

  3. Experimental study on heat transfer performance of fin-tube exchanger and PSHE for waste heat recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Bae, Kyung Jin; Kwon, Oh Kyung

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, heat transfer characteristics of fin-tube heat exchanger and primary surface heat exchanger (PSHE) used in waste heat recovery were investigated experimentally. The flow in the fin-tube heat exchanger is cross flow and in PSHE counter flow. The variations of friction factor and Colburn j factor with air mass flow rate, and Nu number with Re number are presented. Various comparison methods are used to evaluate heat transfer performance, and the results show that the heat transfer rate of the PSHE is on average 17.3% larger than that of fin-tube heat exchanger when air mass flow rate is ranging from 1.24 to 3.45 kg/min. However, the PSHE causes higher pressure drop, and the fin-tube heat exchanger has a wider application range which leads to a 31.7% higher value of maximum heat transfer rate compared to that of the PSHE. Besides, under the same fan power per unit frontal surface, a higher heat transfer rate value is given in the fin-tube heat exchanger.

  4. An environmental friendly recovery production line of waste toner cartridges.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jujun; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhenming

    2011-01-30

    Quantity of waste toner cartridges has been generated following the increasing demand for printer and duplicator. Waste toner cartridge contains abundant valuable metals, plastics as well as toxic residual toner. Therefore, the recovery of waste toner cartridges is a meaningful subject, not only from waste treatment but also from environment protection. This study proposed a mechanical production line for recovering waste toner cartridges. The recovery process involved shearing process, magnetic separation, and eddy current separation. The recovery rates of steel (magnet), toner, aluminum, and plastic were 98.4%, 95%, 97.5%, and 98.8%, respectively. The results of the comparison between the production line and full manual dismantling indicated that the production line succeed in recovering waste toner cartridges. In addition, the proposed production line is an efficient and environmental friendly way for recovering waste toner cartridges.

  5. Interactions of electrolysis cell and product recovery operations

    SciTech Connect

    King, C.J.H.

    1983-01-01

    A key feature for the economic success of an organic electrosynthesis process is product recovery. Electrolyte composition and cell operation which simplify product separation, salt and/or reactant recycle lead to significant cost savings. This feature is discussed in general terms with selected examples.

  6. Economic comparison of emission control systems for glass manufacturing furnaces with heat recovery.

    PubMed

    Caputo, A C; Pelagagge, P M

    2001-07-01

    Glass manufacturing, like other process industries, is faced with air pollution compliance problems due to ever stricter emission limits. Several waste gas cleaning equipment options are available for air pollution control (APC) in glass plants, the most common arrangements being based on electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or fabric filter (FF) dust collectors and semi-wet or dry processes for acid gas removal. However, several counteracting aspects affect the choice of gas cleaning technologies, which are confirmed by the discrepancies encountered in actual suppliers' bids. In this paper, the main pollution control options are analyzed by carrying out a critical comparison under the cost-effectiveness point of view to select the lowest cost arrangement considering capital investment, operating expenses, and energy-saving revenues from heat recovery processes. The analysis is carried out with reference to a case study involving actual float glass production lines at Pilkington plants in Italy.

  7. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery - Potential Applications, Available Technologies and Crosscutting R&D Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Thekdi, Arvind; Nimbalkar, Sachin U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to explore key areas and characteristics of industrial waste heat and its generation, barriers to waste heat recovery and use, and potential research and development (R&D) opportunities. The report also provides an overview of technologies and systems currently available for waste heat recovery and discusses the issues or barriers for each. Also included is information on emerging technologies under development or at various stages of demonstrations, and R&D opportunities cross-walked by various temperature ranges, technology areas, and energy-intensive process industries.

  8. Applications guide for waste heat recovery. Final Report, May-Dec. 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Moynihan, P.I.

    1983-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of commercially available organic Rankine cycle (ORC) hardware from a literature search and industry survey is assessed. Engineering criteria for applying ORC technology are established, and a set of nomograms to enable the rapid sizing of the equipment is presented. A comparison of an ORC system with conventional heat recovery techniques can be made with a nomogram developed for a recuperative heat exchanger. A graphical technique for evaluating the economic aspects of an ORC system and conventional heat recovery method is discussed: also included is a description of anticipated future trends in organic Rankine cycle R D.

  9. Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage in the flue gases.

  10. A solid agar overlay method for recovery of heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhinong; Gurtler, Joshua B; Kornacki, Jeffrey L

    2006-02-01

    A solid agar overlay method was developed for recovery of heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes. Presolidified nonselective tryptic soy agar with 0.6% yeast extract (TSAYE, 2% agar) was overlaid on top of solidified modified Oxford agar (MOX). Heat injury of L. monocytogenes was conducted at 58 degrees C for 6 min in a jacketed flask filled with tryptic soy broth. Both noninjured and heat-treated L. monocytogenes cells were plated onto TSAYE, MOX, and TSAYE-MOX plates. No significant differences (P > 0.05) in recovery were found among the three media for noninjured bacterial cells. Recovery of heat-injured L. monocytogenes cells on TSAYE-MOX overlay plates was equivalent to that on the nonselective TSAYE medium, whereas recovery on the selective MOX medium was significantly lower (P < 0.05) compared with both TSAYE and the overlay plates. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) among the overlay plates prepared 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 16, and 24 h prior to plating heat-injured bacterial cells. The TSAYE-MOX overlay also allowed differentiation of L. monocytogenes from a mixture of four other types of foodborne pathogens. This solid agar overlay method for recovery of heat-injured L. monocytogenes cells is less time-consuming and less complicated than the conventional overlay-underlay technique and the double overlay modification of the thin agar layer method and may allow for greater laboratory plating efficiencies.

  11. The Role of Heat Tolerance Testing in Recovery and Return to Duty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    The Role of Heat Tolerance Testing in Recovery and Return to Duty Maj. Yuval Heled, PhD The Institute of Military Physiology Heller Institute of...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) The Institute of Military Physiology Heller Institute of Medical...heat intolerant, without manifesting apparent disease process” Factors underlying heat intolerance Pathological perspective Physiological

  12. Metabolic heat production and evaporation of poultry.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Sheila T; Maia, Alex S C; Gebremedhin, Kifle G; Nascimento, Carolina C N

    2017-05-03

    Accurate measurements of gas exchange between an animal and its environment is critical in determining metabolic heat production and respiratory functions of broilers. Information on non-invasive methods to measure gas exchange of broiler chicks and chickens under uncontrolled environmental conditions is lacking in the literature. The aims of this study were: (1) to develop an indirect calorimetric system including a hood that allows gas exchange for chickens, (2) to measure gas exchange and respiratory functions (respiration rate, ventilation rate, and tidal volume) of broiler chickens weighing greater than 250 g, and (3) to calculate heat production and respiratory evaporation of the birds based on measured gas and vapor exchanges. We conducted two trials. The first trial involved 6 broiler chicks evaluated for 6 days in 6 different schedules (6 × 6 Latin square). The chicks were kept inside a heat exchanger with a continuous air flow of 150 mL min-1. The second trial involved 12 birds evaluated for 12 days in 12 different schedules (12 × 12 Latin square). Metabolic heat production and evaporation were influenced by live weight of chicks, varying between evaluation days (P < 0.05). The respiratory functions (tidal volume, ventilation rate, and respiratory rate) varied between days, and were strongly influenced by live weight of the broilers (P < 0.05). © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  13. Thermally Activated Desiccant Technology for Heat Recovery and Comfort

    SciTech Connect

    Jalalzadeh, A. A.

    2005-11-01

    Desiccant cooling is an important part of the diverse portfolio of Thermally Activated Technologies (TAT) designed for conversion of heat for the purpose of indoor air quality control. Thermally activated desiccant cooling incorporates a desiccant material that undergoes a cyclic process involving direct dehumidification of moist air and thermal regeneration. Desiccants fall into two categories: liquid and solid desiccants. Regardless of the type, solid or liquid, the governing principles of desiccant dehumidification systems are the same. In the dehumidification process, the vapor pressure of the moist air is higher than that of the desiccant, leading to transfer of moisture from the air to the desiccant material. By heating the desiccant, the vapor pressure differential is reversed in the regeneration process that drives the moisture from the desiccant. Figure 1 illustrates a rotary solid-desiccant dehumidifier. A burner or a thermally compatible source of waste heat can provide the required heat for regeneration.

  14. Constraints on Crustal Heat Production from Heat Flow Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C.; Mareschal, J.-C.

    2003-12-01

    between variations in heat flow and crustal heat production has been investigated systematically ( England et al., 1980; Jaupart, 1983a; Vasseur and Singh, 1986; Ketcham, 1996; Jaupart and Mareschal, 1999). Heat flow determinations on continents have been multiplied by almost a factor of 10 between the compilations by Jessop et al. (1976) and Pollack et al. (1993). Since the last compilation, a large number of high-quality data have been obtained for the poorly studied Precambrian Shield areas of Canada and India ( Mareschal et al., 2000a, b; Roy and Rao, 2000; Rolandone et al., 2002; Lewis et al., 2003).

  15. Heat Recovery at Army Materiel Command (AMC) Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    were directed toward closing energy balances and determining the opera- tional excess air levels for the rotary hearth furnace , oil incinerator, water...spray cooler, rotary hearth furnace natural draft stack, and Area C boiler plant. Gas analysis and temperature monitoring equipment were brought to the...the greatest potential for heat reco- very: 1. Area C condensing heat exchanger, score = 42 2. Rotary hearth furnace recuperator, score = 33 3. Draw

  16. Air Pollution Aspects of Modular Heat-Recovery Incinerators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    standards Fort Rucker .. Area: Coffee , AL Better than national standards Area: Dale, AL Better than national standards Fort Sill Area: Comanche, OK...included particulate removal from lead blast furnaces, smelting furnaces, ore roasters , cement kilns, pulp dryers, and paper recovery boilers. Currently

  17. Highly efficient heat recovery system for phosphoric acid fuel cells used for cooling telecommunication equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, Maki; Okada, Shigeru; Yamashita, Takashi

    To protect the global environment by using energy more efficiently, NTT is developing a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) energy system for telecommunication cogeneration systems. Fuel cells are used to provide electrical power to telecommunication equipment and the heat energy is used by absorption refrigerators to cool the telecommunication rooms throughout the year. We have recently developed a highly efficient system for recovering heat and water from the exhaust gases of a 200-kW (rated power) fuel cell. It is composed of a shell-and-tube type heat exchanger to recover high-temperature heat and a direct-contact cooler to recover the water efficiently and simply. The reformer and cathode exhaust gases from the fuel cell are first supplied to the heat exchanger and then to the cooler. The high-temperature (85-60°C) heat can be recovered, and the total efficiency including the heat recovered from the fuel-cell stack coolant can be improved by supplying the recovered heat to the dual-heat-input absorption refrigerator. The water needed for operating the fuel cell is also recovered from the exhaust gases. We are currently applying this heat and water recovery system to the PC25C-type fuel cell. Maximum total efficiency including electrical power efficiency is estimated to be 78% at the rated power of 200 kW: composed of 17% heat recovery for the fuel-cell stack coolant, 21% from the exhaust gas by improving the heat exchanger, and 40% from electrical conversion. Next, we plan to evaluate the usefulness of this heat recovery system for cooling telecommunication equipment.

  18. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Are duct burners and waste heat... Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam generating units...

  19. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Are duct burners and waste heat... Stationary Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam...

  20. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Are duct burners and waste heat... Stationary Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam...

  1. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Are duct burners and waste heat... Stationary Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam...

  2. 40 CFR 63.6092 - Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Are duct burners and waste heat... Combustion Turbines What This Subpart Covers § 63.6092 Are duct burners and waste heat recovery units covered by subpart YYYY? No, duct burners and waste heat recovery units are considered steam generating units...

  3. A Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Thomas E; Wagner, Robert M; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Curran, Scott; Nafziger, Eric J

    2010-01-01

    In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 44.4%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.

  4. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

    2009-01-06

    The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

  5. Determinants of heat production in newborn lambs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eales, F. A.; Small, J.

    1980-06-01

    Measurement of summit metabolism (the maximum rate of heat production) in lambs aged 1 or 4h revealed considerable between animal variation. Summit metabolism per unit body weight decreased as body weight increased whereas summit metabolism per unit body surface area was independent of body weight. Severe pre-partum hypoxia was apparently associated with a low summit metabolism at 1 or 4h of age which made such lambs very susceptible to hypothermia. This deficiency in heat production capacity did not appear to be a permanent featuresince most lambs so affected recovered full thermoregulatory ability by 12h of age. Feeding of colostrum conferred an immediate 18% increase in summit metabolism. The significance of these findings to the prevention of hypothermia in the newborn lamb is discussed.

  6. Effect of foam on temperature prediction and heat recovery potential from biological wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Corbala-Robles, L; Volcke, E I P; Samijn, A; Ronsse, F; Pieters, J G

    2016-05-15

    Heat is an important resource in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) which can be recovered. A prerequisite to determine the theoretical heat recovery potential is an accurate heat balance model for temperature prediction. The insulating effect of foam present on the basin surface and its influence on temperature prediction were assessed in this study. Experiments were carried out to characterize the foam layer and its insulating properties. A refined dynamic temperature prediction model, taking into account the effect of foam, was set up. Simulation studies for a WWTP treating highly concentrated (manure) wastewater revealed that the foam layer had a significant effect on temperature prediction (3.8 ± 0.7 K over the year) and thus on the theoretical heat recovery potential (30% reduction when foam is not considered). Seasonal effects on the individual heat losses and heat gains were assessed. Additionally, the effects of the critical basin temperature above which heat is recovered, foam thickness, surface evaporation rate reduction and the non-absorbed solar radiation on the theoretical heat recovery potential were evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of pH on Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571 growth, spore heat resistance and recovery.

    PubMed

    Mtimet, Narjes; Guégan, Stéphanie; Durand, Lucile; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are potential contaminants in several industrial sectors involving high temperatures (40-65 °C) in the manufacturing process. Among those thermophilic spore-forming bacteria, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum, called "the swelling canned food spoiler", has generated interest over the last decade in the food sector. The aim of this study was to investigate and to model pH effect on growth, heat resistance and recovery abilities after a heat-treatment of T. thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571. Growth and sporulation were conducted on reinforced clostridium media and liver broth respectively. The highest spore heat resistances and the greatest recovery ability after a heat-treatment were obtained at pH condition allowing maximal growth rate. Growth and sporulation boundaries were estimated, then models using growth limits as main parameters were extended to describe and quantify the effect of pH on recovery of injured spores after a heat-treatment. So, cardinal values were used as a single set of parameters to describe growth, sporulation and recovery abilities. Besides, this work suggests that T. thermosaccharolyticum preserve its ability for germination and outgrowth after a heat-treatment at a low pH where other high resistant spore-forming bacteria like Geobacillus stearothermophilus are unable to grow.

  8. Cost Scaling of a Real-World Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Generator: A Deeper Dive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Yee, Shannon; LeBlanc, Saniya

    2015-01-01

    Cost is equally important to power density or efficiency for the adoption of waste heat recovery thermoelectric generators (TEG) in many transportation and industrial energy recovery applications. In many cases the system design that minimizes cost (e.g., the $/W value) can be very different than the design that maximizes the system's efficiency or power density, and it is important to understand the relationship between those designs to optimize TEG performance-cost compromises. Expanding on recent cost analysis work and using more detailed system modeling, an enhanced cost scaling analysis of a waste heat recovery thermoelectric generator with more detailed, coupled treatment of the heat exchangers has been performed. In this analysis, the effect of the heat lost to the environment and updated relationships between the hot-side and cold-side conductances that maximize power output are considered. This coupled thermal and thermoelectric treatment of the exhaust waste heat recovery thermoelectric generator yields modified cost scaling and design optimization equations, which are now strongly dependent on the heat leakage fraction, exhaust mass flow rate, and heat exchanger effectiveness. This work shows that heat exchanger costs most often dominate the overall TE system costs, that it is extremely difficult to escape this regime, and in order to achieve TE system costs of $1/W it is necessary to achieve heat exchanger costs of $1/(W/K). Minimum TE system costs per watt generally coincide with maximum power points, but Preferred TE Design Regimes are identified where there is little cost penalty for moving into regions of higher efficiency and slightly lower power outputs. These regimes are closely tied to previously-identified low cost design regimes. This work shows that the optimum fill factor Fopt minimizing system costs decreases as heat losses increase, and increases as exhaust mass flow rate and heat exchanger effectiveness increase. These findings have

  9. Cost Scaling of a Real-World Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Generator: A Deeper Dive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Yee, Shannon; LeBlanc, Saniya

    2016-03-01

    Cost is equally important to power density or efficiency for the adoption of waste heat recovery thermoelectric generators (TEG) in many transportation and industrial energy recovery applications. In many cases, the system design that minimizes cost (e.g., the /W value) can be very different than the design that maximizes the system's efficiency or power density, and it is important to understand the relationship between those designs to optimize TEG performance-cost compromises. Expanding on recent cost analysis work and using more detailed system modeling, an enhanced cost scaling analysis of a waste heat recovery TEG with more detailed, coupled treatment of the heat exchangers has been performed. In this analysis, the effect of the heat lost to the environment and updated relationships between the hot-side and cold-side conductances that maximize power output are considered. This coupled thermal and thermoelectric (TE) treatment of the exhaust waste heat recovery TEG yields modified cost scaling and design optimization equations, which are now strongly dependent on the heat leakage fraction, exhaust mass flow rate, and heat exchanger effectiveness. This work shows that heat exchanger costs most often dominate the overall TE system costs, that it is extremely difficult to escape this regime, and in order to achieve TE system costs of 1/W it is necessary to achieve heat exchanger costs of 1/(W/K). Minimum TE system costs per watt generally coincide with maximum power points, but preferred TE design regimes are identified where there is little cost penalty for moving into regions of higher efficiency and slightly lower power outputs. These regimes are closely tied to previously identified low cost design regimes. This work shows that the optimum fill factor F opt minimizing system costs decreases as heat losses increase, and increases as exhaust mass flow rate and heat exchanger effectiveness increase. These findings have profound implications on the design and

  10. An Overview of Opportunities for Waste Heat Recovery and Thermal Integration in the Primary Aluminum Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, Cassandre; Gosselin, Louis

    2012-08-01

    Efficient smelters currently consume roughly 13 MWh of electricity per ton of aluminum, while roughly half of that energy is lost as thermal waste. Although waste heat is abundant, current thermal integration in primary aluminum facilities remains limited. This is due to both the low quality of waste heat available and the shortage of potential uses within reasonable distance of identified waste heat sources. In this article, we present a mapping of both heat dissipation processes and heat demands around a sample facility (Alcoa Deschambault Quebec smelter). Our primary aim is to report opportunities for heat recovery and integration in the primary aluminum industry. We consider potential heat-to-sink pairings individually and assess their thermodynamic potential for producing energy savings.

  11. Pumped Fluid Loop Heat Rejection and Recovery Systems for Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Prina, Mauro; Ramirez, Brenda; Paris, Anthony; Novak, Keith; Pauken, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the heat rejection and heat recovery system for thermal control of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL mission will use mechanically pumped fluid loop based architecture for thermal control of the spacecraft and rover. The architecture is designed to harness waste heat from an Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermo-electric Generator (MMRTG) during Mars surface operations for thermal control during cold conditions and also reject heat during the cruise aspect of the mission. There are several test that are being conducted that will insure the safety of this concept. This architecture can be used during any future interplanetary missions utilizing radioisotope power systems for power generation.

  12. Heat recovery from chillers cuts costs in sunbelt stores. [Rusty Pelican Restaurants, Irvine, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Poplett, J.

    1985-04-22

    Rusty Pelican Restaurants Incorporated, which owns and operates 18 seafood restaurants from its headquarters in Irvine California, will net a payback of three to four years on the installation of heat recovery systems in all nine of its California locations. The systems capture waste heat from the restaurants roof-top air conditioning units to heat domestic hot water, and are therefore being installed in Sunbelt locations where air conditioners are used most. On the average, the systems will cut electricity consumed by the air conditioning units by 15% and cut domestic hot water heating costs by 41 to 63%.

  13. Pumped Fluid Loop Heat Rejection and Recovery Systems for Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Prina, Mauro; Ramirez, Brenda; Paris, Anthony; Novak, Keith; Pauken, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the heat rejection and heat recovery system for thermal control of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL mission will use mechanically pumped fluid loop based architecture for thermal control of the spacecraft and rover. The architecture is designed to harness waste heat from an Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermo-electric Generator (MMRTG) during Mars surface operations for thermal control during cold conditions and also reject heat during the cruise aspect of the mission. There are several test that are being conducted that will insure the safety of this concept. This architecture can be used during any future interplanetary missions utilizing radioisotope power systems for power generation.

  14. Heat treatment of unclarified Escherichia coli homogenate improved the recovery efficiency of recombinant hepatitis B core antigen.

    PubMed

    Ng, Michelle Y T; Tan, Wen Siang; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Ling, Tau Chuan; Tey, Beng Ti

    2006-10-01

    Heat precipitation procedure has been regularly incorporated as a selective purification step in various thermostable proteins expressed in different hosts. This method is efficient in precipitation of most of the host proteins and also deactivates various host proteases that can be harmful to the desired gene products. In this study, introduction of heat treatment procedure in the purification of hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) produced in Escherichia coli has been investigated. Thermal treatment of the cell homogenate at 60 degrees C for 30 min prior to subsequent clarification steps has resulted in 1.4 times and 18% higher in purity and recovery yield, respectively, compared to the non-heat-treated cell homogenate. In direct capture of HBcAg by using anion-exchangers from unclarified feedstock, pre-conditioning the feedstock by heat treatment at 60 degrees C for 45 min has increased the recovery yield of HBcAg by 2.9-fold and 42% in purity compared to that treated for 10 min. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis showed that the antigenicity of the core particles was not affected by the heat treatment process.

  15. Fouling reduction characteristics of a no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger for flue gas heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Y.D.; Lee, K.B.; Islam, S.Z.; Ko, S.B.

    2008-07-01

    In conventional flue gas heat recovery systems, the fouling by fly ashes and the related problems such as corrosion and cleaning are known to be major drawbacks. To overcome these problems, a single-riser no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger is devised and studied. Fouling and cleaning tests are performed for a uniquely designed fluidized bed-type heat exchanger to demonstrate the effect of particles on the fouling reduction and heat transfer enhancement. The tested heat exchanger model (1 m high and 54 mm internal diameter) is a gas-to-water type and composed of a main vertical tube and four auxiliary tubes through which particles circulate and transfer heat. Through the present study, the fouling on the heat transfer surface could successfully be simulated by controlling air-to-fuel ratios rather than introducing particles through an external feeder, which produced soft deposit layers with 1 to 1.5 mm thickness on the inside pipe wall. Flue gas temperature at the inlet of heat exchanger was maintained at 450{sup o}C at the gas volume rate of 0.738 to 0.768 CMM (0.0123 to 0.0128 m{sup 3}/sec). From the analyses of the measured data, heat transfer performances of the heat exchanger before and after fouling and with and without particles were evaluated. Results showed that soft deposits were easily removed by introducing glass bead particles, and also heat transfer performance increased two times by the particle circulation. In addition, it was found that this type of heat exchanger had high potential to recover heat of waste gases from furnaces, boilers, and incinerators effectively and to reduce fouling related problems.

  16. Development of silencers for suppressing noise emitted from heat-recovery boilers taking into account the attenuation of sound energy in their heating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semin, S. A.; Tupov, V. B.

    2011-08-01

    A formula is proposed using which attenuation of the level of acoustic power in a heat-recovery boiler can be calculated as a function of the area of its heat-transfer heating surfaces. The silencers developed by specialists of the Moscow Power Engineering Institute for additional suppression of noise emitted from combined-cycle and gas turbine units equipped with heat-recovery boilers are considered.

  17. Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Jovovic, Vladimir

    2015-12-31

    Gentherm began work in October 2011 to develop a Thermoelectric Waste Energy Recovery System for passenger vehicle applications. Partners in this program were BMW and Tenneco. Tenneco, in the role of TIER 1 supplier, developed the system-level packaging of the thermoelectric power generator. As the OEM, BMW Group demonstrated the TEG system in their vehicle in the final program phase. Gentherm demonstrated the performance of the TEG in medium duty and heavy duty vehicles. Technology developed and demonstrated in this program showed potential to reduce fuel consumption in medium and heavy duty vehicles. In light duty vehicles it showed more modest potential.

  18. Cold water immersion recovery following intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Pointon, Monique; Duffield, Rob; Cannon, Jack; Marino, Frank E

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) on recovery of neuromuscular function following simulated team-sport exercise in the heat. Ten male team-sport athletes performed two sessions of a 2 × 30-min intermittent-sprint exercise (ISE) in 32°C and 52% humidity, followed by a 20-min CWI intervention or passive recovery (CONT) in a randomized, crossover design. The ISE involved a 15-m sprint every minute separated by bouts of hard running, jogging and walking. Voluntary and evoked neuromuscular function, ratings of perceived muscle soreness (MS) and blood markers for muscle damage were measured pre- and post-exercise, immediately post-recovery, 2-h and 24-h post-recovery. Measures of core temperature (Tcore), heart rate (HR), capillary blood and perceptions of exertion, thermal strain and thirst were also recorded at the aforementioned time points. Post-exercise maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and activation (VA) were reduced in both conditions and remained below pre-exercise values for the 24-h recovery (P < 0.05). Increased blood markers of muscle damage were observed post-exercise in both conditions and remained elevated for the 24-h recovery period (P < 0.05). Comparative to CONT, the post-recovery rate of reduction in Tcore, HR and MS was enhanced with CWI whilst increasing MVC and VA (P < 0.05). In contrast, 24-h post-recovery MVC and activation were significantly higher in CONT compared to CWI (P = 0.05). Following exercise in the heat, CWI accelerated the reduction in thermal and cardiovascular load, and improved MVC alongside increased central activation immediately and 2-h post-recovery. However, despite improved acute recovery CWI resulted in an attenuated MVC 24-h post-recovery.

  19. Heat recovery and melting system for scrap metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jenson, R.E.; Pryor, J.C.

    1982-03-16

    Metallic scrap contaminated with combustibles is melted in a reverberatory melting furnace having two communicating wells; one being an enclosed sidewell, which is the receiving well for scrap material during melting, and the other being an enclosed main holding well for molten metal. The main well has burner means to provide heat for melting the metal and treating the scrap material. Heat from molten metal flowing between the main well and the sidewell produces exhaust gases by vaporizing the combustibles of the scrap material. An external passage circulates the exhaust gases from the sidewell to the main well for incineration by the main well's burner means. The external passage has an eductor means which draws the exhaust gases from the sidewell and propels them towards the main well.

  20. Destabilization and recovery of a yeast prion after mild heat shock.

    PubMed

    Newnam, Gary P; Birchmore, Jennifer L; Chernoff, Yury O

    2011-05-06

    Yeast prion [PSI(+)] is a self-perpetuating amyloid of the translational termination factor Sup35. Although [PSI(+)] propagation is modulated by heat shock proteins (Hsps), high temperature was previously reported to have little or no effect on [PSI(+)]. Our results show that short-term exposure of exponentially growing yeast culture to mild heat shock, followed by immediate resumption of growth, leads to [PSI(+)] destabilization, sometimes persisting for several cell divisions after heat shock. Prion loss occurring in the first division after heat shock is preferentially detected in a daughter cell, indicating the impairment of prion segregation that results in asymmetric prion distribution between a mother cell and a bud. Longer heat shock or prolonged incubation in the absence of nutrients after heat shock led to [PSI(+)] recovery. Both prion destabilization and recovery during heat shock depend on protein synthesis. Maximal prion destabilization coincides with maximal imbalance between Hsp104 and other Hsps such as Hsp70-Ssa. Deletions of individual SSA genes increase prion destabilization and/or counteract recovery. The dynamics of prion aggregation during destabilization and recovery are consistent with the notion that efficient prion fragmentation and segregation require a proper balance between Hsp104 and other (e.g., Hsp70-Ssa) chaperones. In contrast to heat shock, [PSI(+)] destabilization by osmotic stressors does not always depend on cell proliferation and/or protein synthesis, indicating that different stresses may impact the prion via different mechanisms. Our data demonstrate that heat stress causes asymmetric prion distribution in a cell division and confirm that the effects of Hsps on prions are physiologically relevant.

  1. Destabilization and recovery of a yeast prion after mild heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Newnam, Gary P.; Birchmore, Jennifer L.; Chernoff, Yury O.

    2011-01-01

    Yeast prion [PSI+] is a self-perpetuating amyloid of the translational termination factor Sup35. Although [PSI+] propagation is modulated by heat shock proteins (Hsps), high temperature was previously reported to have little or no effect on [PSI+]. Our results show that short-term exposure of exponentially growing yeast culture to mild heat shock, followed by immediate resumption of growth, leads to [PSI+] destabilization, sometimes persisting for several cell divisions after heat shock. Prion loss occurring in the first division after heat shock is preferentially detected in a daughter cell, indicating the impairment of prion segregation that results in asymmetric prion distribution between a mother cell and a bud. Longer heat shock or prolonged incubation in the absence of nutrients after heat shock lead to [PSI+] recovery. Both prion destabilization and recovery during heat shock depend on protein synthesis. Maximal prion destabilization coincides with maximal imbalance between Hsp104 and other Hsps such as Hsp70-Ssa. Deletions of individual SSA genes increase prion destabilization and/or counteract recovery. Dynamics of prion aggregation during destabilization and recovery is consistent with the notion that efficient prion fragmentation and segregation require a proper balance between Hsp104 and other (e. g. Hsp70-Ssa) chaperones. In contrast to heat shock, [PSI+] destabilization by osmotic stressors does not always depend on cell proliferation and/or protein synthesis, indicating that different stresses may impact the prion via different mechanisms. Our data demonstrate that heat stress causes asymmetric prion distribution in a cell division, and confirm that effects of Hsps on prions are physiologically relevant. PMID:21392508

  2. Salicylic acid alleviates decreases in photosynthesis under heat stress and accelerates recovery in grapevine leaves

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the effect of salicylic acid (SA) on photosynthesis of plants including grapevines has been investigated, very little is yet known about the effects of SA on carbon assimilation and several components of PSII electron transport (donor side, reaction center and acceptor side). In this study, the impact of SA pretreatment on photosynthesis was evaluated in the leaves of young grapevines before heat stress (25°C), during heat stress (43°C for 5 h), and through the following recovery period (25°C). Photosynthetic measures included gas exchange parameters, PSII electron transport, energy dissipation, and Rubisco activation state. The levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the chloroplast were also investigated. Results SA did not significantly (P < 0.05) influence the net photosynthesis rate (Pn) of leaves before heat stress. But, SA did alleviate declines in Pn and Rubisco activition state, and did not alter negative changes in PSII parameters (donor side, acceptor side and reaction center QA) under heat stress. Following heat treatment, the recovery of Pn in SA-treated leaves was accelerated compared with the control (H2O-treated) leaves, and, donor and acceptor parameters of PSII in SA-treated leaves recovered to normal levels more rapidly than in the controls. Rubisco, however, was not significantly (P < 0.05) influenced by SA. Before heat stress, SA did not affect level of HSP 21, but the HSP21 immune signal increased in both SA-treated and control leaves during heat stress. During the recovery period, HSP21 levels remained high through the end of the experiment in the SA-treated leaves, but decreased in controls. Conclusion SA pretreatment alleviated the heat stress induced decrease in Pn mainly through maintaining higher Rubisco activition state, and it accelerated the recovery of Pn mainly through effects on PSII function. These effects of SA may be related in part to enhanced levels of HSP21. PMID:20178597

  3. Counter flow cooling drier with integrated heat recovery

    DOEpatents

    Shivvers, Steve D.

    2009-08-18

    A drier apparatus for removing water or other liquids from various materials includes a mixer, drying chamber, separator and regenerator and a method for use of the apparatus. The material to be dried is mixed with a heated media to form a mixture which then passes through the chamber. While passing through the chamber, a comparatively cool fluid is passed counter current through the mixture so that the mixture becomes cooler and drier and the fluid becomes hotter and more saturated with moisture. The mixture is then separated into drier material and media. The media is transferred to the regenerator and heated therein by the hot fluid from the chamber and supplemental heat is supplied to bring the media to a preselected temperature for mixing with the incoming material to be dried. In a closed loop embodiment of the apparatus, the fluid is also recycled from the regenerator to the chamber and a chiller is utilized to reduce the temperature of the fluid to a preselected temperature and dew point temperature.

  4. Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

    2008-06-20

    An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

  5. Recovery Act: Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems Research

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, Scott Paul; Pertzborn, Amanda

    2011-06-30

    One innovation to ground-source heat pump (GSHP, or geothermal systems is the hybrid GSHP (HyGSHP) system. A HyGSHP system can dramatically decrease the first cost of GSHP systems by using conventional technology (such as a cooling tower or a boiler) to meet a portion of the peak heating or cooling load. We monitored and analyzed three buildings employing HyGSHP systems (two cooling-dominated, one heating-dominated) to demonstrate the performance of the hybrid approach. The buildings were monitored for a year and the measured data was used to validate models of each system. Additionally, we used the models to analyze further improvements to the hybrid approach and established that it has positive impacts, both economically and environmentally. We also documented the lessons learned by those who design and operate the three systems, including discussions of equipment sizing, pump operation, and cooling tower control. Finally, we described the measured data sets and models from this work and have made them freely available for further study of hybrid systems.

  6. Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Abe

    1939-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel to investigate the partial recovery of the heat energy which is apparently wasted in the cooling of aircraft engines. The results indicate that if the radiator is located in an expanded duct, a part of the energy lost in cooling is recovered; however, the energy recovery is not of practical importance up to airplane speeds of 400 miles per hour. Throttling of the duct flow occurs with heated radiators and must be considered in designing the duct outlets from data obtained with cold radiators in the ducts.

  7. Georgia Pacific: Crossett Mill Identifies Heat Recovery Projects and Operational Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    2003-10-01

    An assessment team conducted a mill-wide energy survey at Georgia-Pacific's Crossett, Arkansas mill to update a previous pinch analysis. Three heat recovery projects were identified that could reduce annual costs by $4.8 million and reduce natural gas use by 1,845,000 x 106 Btu. The overall payback period for the heat recovery projects would be less than 1 year. Furthermore, by implementing operational improvements, the mill could save $4.8 million more annually and 1,500,000 x 106 Btu in natural gas.

  8. The production, recovery, properties, and applications of americium and curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, James D.; Schulz, Wallace W.

    1993-02-01

    Nuclear reactors produce mixtures of Am-241 and Am-242, and beta decay of plutonium produces radioactively pure Am-241. Curium is a product of intense neutron exposure of Pu-239. Separation and purification processes for americium and curium include ion exchange, precipitation, and both liquid-liquid and molten-salt extraction. This article reviews the principal production, recovery, and waste treatment processes and briefly discusses the chemical properties and uses of americium and curium.

  9. Assessment of the potential for heat recovery and load leveling on refrigeration systems, volume 1, summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merriam, R. L.; Lee, W. D.; Carr, J. E.; Boyce, S. E.; Bierenbaum, H. S.

    1980-03-01

    The potential energy savings from refrigerant heat recovery in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors and its impact on electric utilities were assessed. It was concluded that the technology for heat recovery is well established in all sectors and in comparison with solar water heating equivalent energy savings can be achieved at a fraction of the cost. In the absence of barriers, the potential market for heat recovery could be substantial, with an annual energy savings of 0.25 x 10 to the 15th power Btu in 1990. The economic impacts on summer peaking electric utilities were found to be favorable in all regions in central air conditioner applications. Annual net cost savings to the utility were estimated to be $10 to $50 per residential application. In the commercial sector and food processing segment of the industry sector, refrigerant heat recovery could reduce total energy consumption by about 0.28 x 10 to the 15th power Btu, with the major savings from applications in existing buildings.

  10. Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields can impair spermatogenesis recovery after reversible testicular damage induced by heat.

    PubMed

    Tenorio, Bruno Mendes; Ferreira Filho, Moisés Bonifacio Alves; Jimenez, George Chaves; de Morais, Rosana Nogueira; Peixoto, Christina Alves; Nogueira, Romildo de Albuquerque; da Silva Junior, Valdemiro Amaro

    2014-06-01

    Male infertility is often related to reproductive age couples experiencing fertility-related issues. Men may have fertility problems associated with reversible testicular damage. Considering that men have been increasingly exposed to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields generated by the production, distribution and use of electricity, this study analyzed whether 60 Hz and 1 mT magnetic field exposure may impair spermatogenesis recovery after reversible testicular damage induced by heat shock using rats as an experimental model. Adult male rats were subjected to a single testicular heat shock (HS, 43 °C for 12 min) and then exposed to the magnetic field for 15, 30 and 60 d after HS. Magnetic field exposure during the spermatogenesis recovery induced changes in testis components volume, cell ultrastructure and histomorphometrical parameters. Control animals had a reestablished and active spermatogenesis at 60 d after heat shock, while animals exposed to magnetic field still showed extensive testicular degeneration. Magnetic field exposure did not change the plasma testosterone. In conclusion, extremely low-frequency magnetic field may be harmful to fertility recovery in males affected by reversible testicular damage.

  11. Heat Recovery Ventilation for Housing: Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Robert J.; Miller, Barbara

    The air-to-air heat exchanger (a fan powered ventilation device that recovers heat from stale outgoing air) is explained in this six-part publication. Topic areas addressed are: (1) the nature of air-to-air heat exchangers and how they work; (2) choosing and sizing the system; (3) installation, control, and maintenance of the system; (4) heat…

  12. Analysis of economic and environmental benefits of a new heat pump air conditioning system with a heat recovery device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, lingxue

    2017-08-01

    The paper designs a new wind-water cooling and heating water conditioner system, connects cooling tower with heat recovery device, which uses cooling water to completely remove the heat that does not need heat recollection, in order to ensure that the system can work efficiently with higher performance coefficient. After the test actual engineering operation, the system’s maximum cooling coefficient of performance can reach 3.5. Its maximum comprehensive coefficient of performance can reach 6.5. After the analysis of its economic and environmental, we conclude that the new system can save 89822 kw per year. It reflects energy-saving and environmental benefits of the cold and hot water air conditioning system.

  13. Application of matrix heat exchangers to thermomechanical exergy recovery from liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Vikas; Green, Roger

    This paper reports the outcome of a project aimed at exploring thermomechanical exergy recovery from liquid hydrogen. The basis of this project was the conceptual design, development and testing of a new process for CO 2 removal from air for use in alkaline fuel cells operating with hydrogen stored as a liquid, addressing simultaneously: thermomechanical exergy recovery from liquid hydrogen, and its application to CO 2 removal from atmospheric air. This project was an attempt to address these issues by using the cooling available from the vaporisation of liquid hydrogen and/or boil-off vapour, to remove CO 2 from the alkaline fuel cell feed air by refrigeration purification, ie. by freezing the CO 2 out of the air. A schematic description of the process and an energy balance for refrigeration purification for the CO 2 removal are presented, showing that the process relies on high effectiveness heat exchangers and water re-vaporisation. The high effectiveness heat transfer is achieved using perforated plate matrix heat exchangers. Implicit in this work were: The development of a new sizing procedure for matrix heat exchangers based on an approximate analytical solution for their performance, published recently in this journal. The development of a new method for construction of perforated plate matrix heat exchangers. Experimental testing of matrix heat exchanger performance. The application of matrix heat exchangers to mass transfer, and their use as reversing heat exchangers. Certain questions relating to the recent analysis published in this journal are raised and modifications suggested. Experimental results of heat exchanger effectiveness tests and CO 2 removal tests showed that heat exchangers of the requisite effectiveness were designed and manufactured, and that the proposed process was successful in exergy recovery and CO 2 removal

  14. Optimal Placement of Non-Intrusive Waste Heat Recovery Devices in Exhaust Ducts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    cases, these recirculation zones create “ dead zones ” where heat transfer through the duct walls is severely restricted. In this case, these dead zones ...of recirculation thinking that they would all act as “ dead zones ” like the primary recirculation zone . Knowing that the impinging flow and local...counterintuitive because of unexpected recirculation zone effects. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Waste heat recovery, thermoelectric generator, optimization

  15. Technology profile: Vacuum-mediated LNAPL free product recovery/bioremediation (bioslurper), issue 1. Technology profile

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, P.E.

    1994-03-01

    Vacuum-mediated Free Product Recovery/Bioremediation (Bioslurping) is applicable to sites where light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) (e.g.. petroleum hydrocarbons: gasoline, jet fuels, diesel, heating oils, etc.) form a measurable layer of LNAPL on the water table. All parameters that affect the recoverability of the LNAPLs should be considered in site selection. Major factors include the mass of LNAPL (Is there enough to recover.) and the relative permeability of the subsurface matrix to air, water, and LNAPL. This technology can simultaneously remove LNAPL free product and treat the unsaturated (vadose) zone (via bioventing).

  16. Optimization of Thermoelectric Components for Automobile Waste Heat Recovery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.

    2015-10-01

    For a typical spark ignition engine approximately 40% of available thermal energy is lost as hot exhaust gas. To improve fuel economy, researchers are currently evaluating technology which exploits exhaust stream thermal power by use of thermoelectric generators (TEGs) that operate on the basis of the Seebeck effect. A 5% improvement in fuel economy, achieved by use of TEG output power, is a stated objective for light-duty trucks and personal automobiles. System modeling of thermoelectric (TE) components requires solution of coupled thermal and electric fluxes through the n and p-type semiconductor legs, given appropriate thermal boundary conditions at the junctions. Such applications have large thermal gradients along the semiconductor legs, and material properties are highly dependent on spatially varying temperature profiles. In this work, one-dimensional heat flux and temperature variations across thermoelectric legs were solved by using an iterative numerical approach to optimize both TE module and TEG designs. Design traits were investigated by assuming use of skutterudite as a thermoelectric material with potential for automotive applications in which exhaust gas and heat exchanger temperatures typically vary from 100°C to over 600°C. Dependence of leg efficiency, thermal fluxes and electric power generation on leg geometry, fill fractions, electric current, thermal boundary conditions, etc., were studied in detail. Optimum leg geometries were computed for a variety of automotive exhaust conditions.

  17. Waste heat recovery system for recapturing energy after engine aftertreatment systems

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-06-17

    The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery (WHR) system including a Rankine cycle (RC) subsystem for converting heat of exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine, and an internal combustion engine including the same. The WHR system includes an exhaust gas heat exchanger that is fluidly coupled downstream of an exhaust aftertreatment system and is adapted to transfer heat from the exhaust gas to a working fluid of the RC subsystem. An energy conversion device is fluidly coupled to the exhaust gas heat exchanger and is adapted to receive the vaporized working fluid and convert the energy of the transferred heat. The WHR system includes a control module adapted to control at least one parameter of the RC subsystem based on a detected aftertreatment event of a predetermined thermal management strategy of the aftertreatment system.

  18. Non-Heat Treatable Alloy Sheet Products

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, H.W.; Barthold, G.W.; Das, S.K.

    1999-08-01

    ALCAR is an innovative approach for conducting multi-company, pre-competitive research and development programs. ALCAR has been formed to crate a partnership of aluminum producers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Center for Research and Technology Development (ASME/CRTD), the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), three USDOE National Laboratories, and a Technical Advisory Committee for conducting cooperative, pre-competitive research on the development of flower-cost, non-heat treated (NHT) aluminum alloys for automotive sheet applications with strength, formability and surface appearance similar to current heat treated (HT) aluminum alloys under consideration. The effort has been supported by the USDOE, Office of Transportation Technology (OTT) through a three-year program with 50/50 cost share at a total program cost of $3 million. The program has led to the development of new and modified 5000 series aluminum ally compositions. Pilot production-size ingots have bee n melted, cast, hot rolled and cold rolled. Stamping trials on samples of rolled product for demonstrating production of typical automotive components have been successful.

  19. A mathematical model to predict the effect of heat recovery on the wastewater temperature in sewers.

    PubMed

    Dürrenmatt, David J; Wanner, Oskar

    2014-01-01

    Raw wastewater contains considerable amounts of energy that can be recovered by means of a heat pump and a heat exchanger installed in the sewer. The technique is well established, and there are approximately 50 facilities in Switzerland, many of which have been successfully using this technique for years. The planning of new facilities requires predictions of the effect of heat recovery on the wastewater temperature in the sewer because altered wastewater temperatures may cause problems for the biological processes used in wastewater treatment plants and receiving waters. A mathematical model is presented that calculates the discharge in a sewer conduit and the spatial profiles and dynamics of the temperature in the wastewater, sewer headspace, pipe, and surrounding soil. The model was implemented in the simulation program TEMPEST and was used to evaluate measured time series of discharge and temperatures. It was found that the model adequately reproduces the measured data and that the temperature and thermal conductivity of the soil and the distance between the sewer pipe and undisturbed soil are the most sensitive model parameters. The temporary storage of heat in the pipe wall and the exchange of heat between wastewater and the pipe wall are the most important processes for heat transfer. The model can be used as a tool to determine the optimal site for heat recovery and the maximal amount of extractable heat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental investigation of a reticulated porous alumina heat exchanger for high temperature gas heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A; Chandran, RB; Davidson, JH

    2015-01-22

    The present study presents an experimental study of a prototype counter-flow heat exchanger designed to recover sensible heat from inert and reactive gases flowing through a high temperature solar reactor for splitting CO2. The tube-in-tube heat exchanger is comprised of two concentric alumina tubes, each filled with reticulated porous alumina with a nominal porosity of 80% and pore density of 5 pores per inch (ppi). The RPC provides high heat transfer surface area per unit volume (917 m(-1)) with low pressure drop. Measurements include the permeability, inertial coefficient, overall heat transfer coefficient, effectiveness and pressure drop. For laminar flow and an inlet gas temperature of 1240 K, the overall heat transfer coefficients are 36-41 W m(-2) K-1. The measured performance is in good agreement with a prior CFD model of the heat exchanger. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantifying the effects of heating temperature, and combined effects of heating medium pH and recovery medium pH on the heat resistance of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Leguérinel, I; Spegagne, I; Couvert, O; Coroller, L; Mafart, P

    2007-05-01

    The influence of heating treatment temperature, pH of heating and recovery medium on the survival kinetics of Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 13311 is studied and quantified. From each non-log linear survival curve, Weibull model parameters were estimated. An average shape parameter value of 1.67 was found, which is characteristic of downward concavity curves and is in agreement with values estimated from other S. typhimurium strains. Bigelow type models quantifying the heating temperature, heating and recovery medium pH influences are fitted on scale parameter delta data (time of first decimal reduction), which reflects the bacterial heat resistance. The estimate of z(T) (4.64 degrees C) is in the range of values given in the literature for this species. The influence of pH of the heating medium on the scale parameter (z(pH): 8.25) is lower than that of the recovery pH medium influence (z(')(pH): 3.65).

  2. Heat Pipe-Assisted Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ju-Chan; Chi, Ri-Guang; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Lee, Wook-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Currently, large amounts of thermal energy dissipated from automobiles are emitted through hot exhaust pipes. This has resulted in the need for a new efficient recycling method to recover energy from waste hot exhaust gas. The present experimental study investigated how to improve the power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system assisted by a wickless loop heat pipe (loop thermosyphon) under the limited space of the exhaust gas pipeline. The present study shows a novel loop-type heat pipe-assisted TEG concept to be applied to hybrid vehicles. The operating temperature of a TEG's hot side surface should be as high as possible to maximize the Seebeck effect. The present study shows a novel TEG concept of transferring heat from the source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any local place with a loop-type heat pipe. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate an electromotive force power of around 1.3 V in the case of 170°C hot exhaust gas. Two thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for a conductive block model and four Bi2Te3 TEMs with a heat pipe-assisted model were installed in the condenser section. Heat flows to the condenser section from the evaporator section connected to the exhaust pipe. This novel TEG system with a heat pipe can be placed in any location on an automobile.

  3. Aluminium recovery vs. hydrogen production as resource recovery options for fine MSWI bottom ash fraction.

    PubMed

    Biganzoli, Laura; Ilyas, Aamir; Praagh, Martijn van; Persson, Kenneth M; Grosso, Mario

    2013-05-01

    Waste incineration bottom ash fine fraction contains a significant amount of aluminium, but previous works have shown that current recovery options based on standard on-step Eddy Current Separation (ECS) have limited efficiency. In this paper, we evaluated the improvement in the efficiency of ECS by using an additional step of crushing and sieving. The efficiency of metallic Al recovery was quantified by measuring hydrogen gas production. The ash samples were also tested for total aluminium content with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). As an alternative to material recovery, we also investigated the possibility to convert residual metallic Al into useful energy, promoting H2 gas production by reacting metallic Al with water at high pH. The results show that the total aluminium concentration in the <4 mm bottom ash fraction is on average 8% of the weight of the dry ash, with less than 15% of it being present in the metallic form. Of this latter, only 21% can be potentially recovered with ECS combined with crushing and sieving stages and subsequently recycled. For hydrogen production, using 10MNaOH at 1L/S ratio results in the release of 6-11l of H2 gas for each kilogram of fine dry ash, equivalent to an energy potential of 118 kJ.

  4. Evaluation of TA10 Broth for Recovery of Heat- and Freeze-Injured Salmonella from Beef

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) Salmonella pre-enrichment broth (lactose [LAC] broth), buffered peptone water (BPW), and universal preenrichment (UP) broth were compared with TA10 broth, developed in our laboratory, for recovery of heat- and freeze-injured Salmonella (55ºC for 2-20 min a...

  5. Comparison of working fluids used in ORC waste heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Krazinski, J.L.; Buyco, E.H.; Bushby, H.M.

    1981-01-01

    The performance and cost of Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) heat recovery systems are examined. The properties of seven working fluids are compared and their impact on system design investigated. A computer code was developed for conducting the necessary analysis. 12 refs.

  6. Air-pollution aspects of modular heat-recovery incinerators. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Savoie, M.J.; Schanche, G.W.; Mikucki, W.J.

    1986-02-01

    This report provides technical information on modular solid-waste heat-recovery incinerators (HRIs), air-pollution regulations that apply to HRIs, air-pollutant emissions from currently marketed HRIs, and air-polution-control techniques for HRIs. The information will be useful to Army installations, Major Commands, and Corps of Engineers Districts that must plan and design HRI facilities.

  7. Residential ventilation with heat recovery: Improving indoor air quality and saving energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseme, G. D.; Berk, J. V.; Boegel, M. L.; Halsey, H. I.; Hollowell, C. D.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Turiel, I.

    1980-05-01

    Residential air quality measurements were made and the use of mechanical ventilation systems with air-to-air heat exchangers is discussed as a promising means of pollutant control. A particular advantage of this control strategy is that the heat exchanger permits recovery of a large portion of the heat that would normally be lost in a simple exhaust ventilation system, and therefore maintains the energy efficiency of the house. An economic analysis is presented showing that installation of these systems in newly constructed homes is cost effective in most regions of the country.

  8. Water Recovery with the Heat Melt Compactor in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Goo, Jonathan; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    The Heat Melt Compactor is a proposed utility that will compact astronaut trash, extract the water for eventual re-use, and form dry square tiles that can be used as additional ionizing radiation shields for future human deep space missions. The Heat Melt Compactor has been under development by a consortium of NASA centers. The downstream portion of the device is planned to recover a small amount of water while in a microgravity environment. Drop tower low gravity testing was performed to assess the effect of small particles on a capillary-based water/air separation device proposed for the water recovery portion of the Heat Melt Compactor.

  9. Survey of literature on convective heat transfer coefficients and recovery factors for high atmosphere thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, S.

    1973-01-01

    Heat transfer phenomena of rarefied gas flows is discussed based on a literature survey of analytical and experimental rarefied gas dynamics. Subsonic flows are emphasized for the purposes of meteorological thermometry in the high atmosphere. The heat transfer coefficients for three basic geometries are given in the regimes of free molecular flow, transition flow, slip flow, and continuum flow. Different types of heat phenomena, and the analysis of theoretical and experimental data are presented. The uncertainties calculated from the interpolation rule compared with the available experimental data are discussed. The recovery factor for each geometry in subsonic rarefied flows is also given.

  10. Waste heat recovery options in a large gas-turbine combined power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upathumchard, Ularee

    This study focuses on power plant heat loss and how to utilize the waste heat in energy recovery systems in order to increase the overall power plant efficiency. The case study of this research is a 700-MW natural gas combined cycle power plant, located in a suburban area of Thailand. An analysis of the heat loss of the combustion process, power generation process, lubrication system, and cooling system has been conducted to evaluate waste heat recovery options. The design of the waste heat recovery options depends to the amount of heat loss from each system and its temperature. Feasible waste heat sources are combustion turbine (CT) room ventilation air and lubrication oil return from the power plant. The following options are being considered in this research: absorption chillers for cooling with working fluids Ammonia-Water and Water-Lithium Bromide (in comparison) and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) with working fluids R134a and R245fa. The absorption cycles are modeled in three different stages; single-effect, double-effect and half-effect. ORC models used are simple ORC as a baseline, ORC with internal regenerator, ORC two-phase flash expansion ORC and ORC with multiple heat sources. Thermodynamic models are generated and each system is simulated using Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to define the most suitable waste heat recovery options for the power plant. The result will be synthesized and evaluated with respect to exergy utilization efficiency referred as the Second Law effectiveness and net output capacity. Results of the models give recommendation to install a baseline ORC of R134a and a double-effect water-lithium bromide absorption chiller, driven by ventilation air from combustion turbine compartment. The two technologies yield reasonable economic payback periods of 4.6 years and 0.7 years, respectively. The fact that this selected power plant is in its early stage of operation allows both models to economically and effectively perform waste heat

  11. Single-cell analysis of S. cerevisiae growth recovery after a sublethal heat-stress applied during an alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, Pierre; Preziosi-Belloy, Laurence; Ghommidh, Charles

    2011-06-01

    Interest in bioethanol production has experienced a resurgence in the last few years. Poor temperature control in industrial fermentation tanks exposes the yeast cells used for this production to intermittent heat stress which impairs fermentation efficiency. Therefore, there is a need for yeast strains with improved tolerance, able to recover from such temperature variations. Accordingly, this paper reports the development of methods for the characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth recovery after a sublethal heat stress. Single-cell measurements were carried out in order to detect cell-to-cell variability. Alcoholic batch fermentations were performed on a defined medium in a 2 l instrumented bioreactor. A rapid temperature shift from 33 to 43 °C was applied when ethanol concentration reached 50 g l⁻¹. Samples were collected at different times after the temperature shift. Single cell growth capability, lag-time and initial growth rate were determined by monitoring the growth of a statistically significant number of cells after agar medium plating. The rapid temperature shift resulted in an immediate arrest of growth and triggered a progressive loss of cultivability from 100 to 0.0001% within 8 h. Heat-injured cells were able to recover their growth capability on agar medium after a lag phase. Lag-time was longer and more widely distributed as the time of heat exposure increased. Thus, lag-time distribution gives an insight into strain sensitivity to heat-stress, and could be helpful for the selection of yeast strains of technological interest.

  12. The Role of Capital Productivity in British Airways' Financial Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, Peter

    1999-01-01

    British Airways (BA) was privatised in 1987, but its financial recovery occurred a number of years earlier. This recovery was sustained throughout the early 1990s economic recession, a period when few major airlines were operating profitably. This paper examines the role of productivity developments at British Airways from the early 1980s through 1996. The emphasis is on capital productivity and investment, but changes in capital intensity and labour productivity are also evaluated. Various measures are considered for both capital and labour productivity: outputs are measured in available tonne-kms (ATKS) and revenue tonne-kms (RTKs), with the former preferred over the latter two measures, after adjustment for work performed by BA for others. Capital inputs are measured in equivalent lease costs adjusted to constant prices with a different treatment of flight and ground equipment or assets. Labour inputs are derived from total payroll costs deflated by a UK wage price index. The airline made considerable capital investments over the period and at the same time went through two major processes of labour restructuring. This resulted in a gradual increase in capital intensity, relative high labour productivity growth, but poor capital productivity performance. However, capital investment played an important role in the airline's sustained labour and total factor productivity over the whole period.

  13. Recovery of salt wastes in the production of propylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zyablitseva, M.P.; Tyurin, B.K.; Kudinov, V.I.; Bukbulatov, I.K.; Mazanko, A.F.

    1983-02-01

    In the production of propylene oxide as much as 40 t dilute calcium chloride solution forms per ton of product in the step of saponification of propylene chlorhydrine with milk of lime. To create a zero-waste technology for production of propylene oxide, there is practical interest in saponification of propylene chlorhydrine with electrolysis brines with recovery of the resultant solution of sodium chloride after purification to remove organic impurities. The possibility of using an electrochemical method to purify wastewater from production of propylene oxide in using the purified solution as starting material for production of electrolysis brines was investigated. Experimental testing of processes of purification and recovery of wastewaters in a regime of industrial electrolysis confirmed the possibility of using purified wastewater from production of propylene oxide as brine for electrolysis. Incorporation of the developed method into industry will permit zero-waste production of propylene oxide with a closed salt cycle. The cost of purification of 1 m/sup 3/ wastewater is 1-1.5 rubles.

  14. Recent advances for the production and recovery methods of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Duygu; Demirci, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Lysozyme is an antimicrobial peptide with a high enzymatic activity and positive charges. Therefore, it has applications in food and pharmaceutical industries as an antimicrobial agent. Lysozyme is ubiquitous in both animal and plant kingdoms. Currently, egg-white lysozyme is the most commercially available form of lysozyme. The main concerns of egg-white lysozyme are high recovery cost, low activity and most importantly the immunological problems to some people. Therefore, human lysozyme production has gained importance in recent years. Scientists have developed transgenic plants, animals and microorganisms that can produce human lysozyme. Out of these, microbial production has advantages for commercial productions, because high production levels are achievable in a relatively short time. It has been reported that fermentation parameters, such as pH, temperature, aeration, are key factors to increase the effectiveness of the human lysozyme production. Moreover, purification of the lysozyme from the fermentation broth needs to be optimized for the economical production. In conclusion, this review paper covers the mechanism of lysozyme, its sources, production methods and recovery of lysozyme.

  15. The Role of Capital Productivity in British Airways' Financial Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, Peter

    1999-01-01

    British Airways (BA) was privatized in 1987, but its financial recovery occurred a number of years earlier, This recovery was sustained throughout the early 1990s economic recession, a period when few major airlines were operating profitably. This paper examines the role of productivity developments at British Airways from the early 1980s through 1996. The emphasis is on capital productivity and investment, but changes in capital intensity and labour productivity are also evaluated. Various measures are considered for both capital and labour productivity: outputs are measured in available tonne-kms (ATKs) and revenue tonne-kms (RTKs), with the former preferred over the latter two measures, after adjustment for work performed by BA for others. Capital inputs are measured in equivalent lease costs adjusted to constant prices with a different treatment of flight and ground equipment or assets. Labour inputs are derived from total payroll costs deflated by a UK wage price index. The airline made considerable capital investments over the period and at the same time went through two major processes of labour restructuring. This resulted in a gradual increase in capital intensity, relative high labour productivity growth, but poor capital productivity performance, However, capital investment played an important role in the airline's sustained labour and total factor productivity over the whole period.

  16. The Role of Capital Productivity in British Airways' Financial Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, Peter

    1999-01-01

    British Airways (BA) was privatized in 1987, but its financial recovery occurred a number of years earlier, This recovery was sustained throughout the early 1990s economic recession, a period when few major airlines were operating profitably. This paper examines the role of productivity developments at British Airways from the early 1980s through 1996. The emphasis is on capital productivity and investment, but changes in capital intensity and labour productivity are also evaluated. Various measures are considered for both capital and labour productivity: outputs are measured in available tonne-kms (ATKs) and revenue tonne-kms (RTKs), with the former preferred over the latter two measures, after adjustment for work performed by BA for others. Capital inputs are measured in equivalent lease costs adjusted to constant prices with a different treatment of flight and ground equipment or assets. Labour inputs are derived from total payroll costs deflated by a UK wage price index. The airline made considerable capital investments over the period and at the same time went through two major processes of labour restructuring. This resulted in a gradual increase in capital intensity, relative high labour productivity growth, but poor capital productivity performance, However, capital investment played an important role in the airline's sustained labour and total factor productivity over the whole period.

  17. Spray method for recovery of heat-injured Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Back, Kyeong-Hwan; Kim, Sang-Oh; Park, Ki-Hwan; Chung, Myung-Sub; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    Selective agar is inadequate for supporting recovery of injured cells. During risk assessment of certain foods, both injured and noninjured cells must be enumerated. In this study, a new method (agar spray method) for recovering sublethally heat-injured microorganisms was developed and used for recovery of heat-injured Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes. Molten selective agar was applied as an overlay to presolidified nonselective tryptic soy agar (TSA) by spray application. Heat-injured cells (55°C for 10 min in 0.1% peptone water or 55°C for 15 min in sterilized skim milk) were inoculated directly onto solidified TSA. After a 2-h incubation period for cell repair, selective agar was applied to the TSA surface with a sprayer, and the plates were incubated. The recovery rate for heat-injured Salmonella Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes with the spray method was compared with the corresponding rates associated with TSA alone, selective media alone, and the conventional overlay method (selective agar poured on top of resuscitated cells grown on TSA and incubated for 2 h). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in pathogen recovery obtained with TSA, the overlay method, and the spray method. However, a lower recovery rate (P < 0.05) was obtained for isolation of injured cells on selective media. Overall, these results indicate that the agar spray method is an acceptable alternative to the conventional overlay method and is a simpler and more convenient approach to recovery and detection of injured cells.

  18. Proposed Performance Evaluation Acceptance Test for Heat Recovery Incinerators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    1985). D 3176, Method for Ultimate Analysis of Coal and Coke (1984). D 3180, Method for Calculating Coal and Coke Analyses from As-Determined to Differ...or approval of the use of such commercial products . The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position...such as coal or oil fired boilers, no standard performance test is available to assess field performance or to use as an acceptance test for the HRI

  19. Combined effect of ohmic heating and enzyme assisted aqueous extraction process on soy oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Pare, Akash; Nema, Anurag; Singh, V K; Mandhyan, B L

    2014-08-01

    This research describes a new technological process for soybean oil extraction. The process deals with the combined effect of ohmic heating and enzyme assisted aqueous oil extraction process (EAEP) on enhancement of oil recovery from soybean seed. The experimental process consisted of following basic steps, namely, dehulling, wet grinding, enzymatic treatment, ohmic heating, aqueous extraction and centrifugation. The effect of ohmic heating parameters namely electric field strength (EFS), end point temperature (EPT) and holding time (HT) on aqueous oil extraction process were investigated. Three levels of electric field strength (i.e. OH600V, OH750V and OH900V), 3 levels of end point temperature (i.e. 70, 80 and 90 °C) and 3 levels of holding time (i.e. 0, 5 and 10 min.) were taken as independent variables using full factorial design. Percentage oil recovery from soybean by EAEP alone and EAEP coupled with ohmic heating were 53.12 % and 56.86 % to 73 % respectively. The maximum oil recovery (73 %) was obtained when the sample was heated and maintained at 90 °C using electric field strength of OH600V for a holding time of 10 min. The free fatty acid (FFA) of the extracted oil (i.e. in range of 0.97 to 1.29 %) was within the acceptable limit of 3 % (oleic acid) and 0.5-3 % prescribed respectively by PFA and BIS.

  20. Agar Underlay Method for Recovery of Sublethally Heat-Injured Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kang, D. H.; Siragusa, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A method of recovering sublethally heat-injured bacteria was developed. The procedure (termed the agar underlay method) uses a nonselective agar underlaid with a selective medium. In a two-chambered petri dish, the Lutri plate (LP), a nonselective agar is inoculated with a population of sublethally heat-injured bacteria. After a 2-h repair incubation period, selective agar is added to the bottom chamber of the LP and incubated. By diffusing through the nonselective top agar, selective agents from the underlay medium impart selectivity to the system. By the agar underlay method, recovery rates of the heat-injured food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium were not different (P > 0.05) from recovery rates determined with nonselective media. Sublethally heat-injured cells (60°C for 1.5 min in buffer or 80°C for 30 s on meat surfaces) grew and produced a typical colony morphology and color reaction when the agar underlay procedure was used with the appropriate respective selective agars. Unlike agar overlay methods for injury repair, the agar underlay procedure allows the typical selective-medium colony morphology to develop and allows colonies to be more easily picked for further characterization. Higher recovery rates of heat-injured fecal enterococci from bovine fecal samples and total coliforms from animal waste lagoons were obtained by the agar underlay method with selective agars than by direct plating on the respective selective media. PMID:10583985

  1. Test and evaluation of the heat recovery incinerator system at Naval Station, Mayport, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-05-01

    This report describes test and evaluation of the two-ton/hr heat recovery incinerator (HRI) facility located at Mayport Naval Station, Fla., carried out during November and December 1980. The tests included: (1) Solid Waste: characterization, heating value, and ultimate analysis, (2) Ash: moisture, combustibles, and heating values of both bottom and cyclone ashes; Extraction Procedure toxicity tests on leachates from both bottom and cyclone ashes; trace metals in cyclone particulates, (3) Stack Emissions: particulates (quantity and size distribution), chlorides, oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and trace elements, and (4) Heat and Mass Balance: all measurements required to carry out complete heat and mass balance calculations over the test period. The overall thermal efficiency of the HRI facility while operating at approximately 1.0 ton/hr was found to be 49% when the primary Btu equivalent of the electrical energy consumed during the test program was included.

  2. Pretreatment with indomethacin results in increased heat stroke severity during recovery in a rodent model of heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Audet, Gerald N; Dineen, Shauna M; Stewart, Delisha A; Plamper, Mark L; Pathmasiri, Wimal W; McRitchie, Susan L; Sumner, Susan J; Leon, Lisa R

    2017-09-01

    It has been suggested that medications can increase heat stroke (HS) susceptibility/severity. We investigated whether the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin (INDO) increases HS severity in a rodent model. Core temperature (Tc) of male, C57BL/6J mice (n = 45) was monitored continuously, and mice were given a dose of INDO [low dose (LO) 1 mg/kg or high dose (HI) 5 mg/kg in flavored treat] or vehicle (flavored treat) before heating. HS animals were heated to 42.4°C and euthanized at three time points for histological, molecular, and metabolic analysis: onset of HS [maximal core temperature (Tc,Max)], 3 h of recovery [minimal core temperature or hypothermia depth (HYPO)], and 24 h of recovery (24 h). Nonheated (control) animals underwent identical treatment in the absence of heat. INDO (LO or HI) had no effect on physiological indicators of performance (e.g., time to Tc,Max, thermal area, or cooling time) during heating or recovery. HI INDO resulted in 45% mortality rate by 24 h (HI INDO + HS group). The gut showed dramatic increases in gross morphological hemorrhage in HI INDO + HS in both survivors and nonsurvivors. HI INDO + HS survivors had significantly lower red blood cell counts and hematocrit suggesting significant hemorrhage. In the liver, HS induced cell death at HYPO and increased inflammation at Tc,Max, HYPO, and 24 h; however, there was additional effect with INDO + HS group. Furthermore, the metabolic profile of the liver was disturbed by heat, but there was no additive effect of INDO + HS. This suggests that there is an increase in morbidity risk with INDO + HS, likely resulting from significant gut injury.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This paper suggests that in a translational mouse model, NSAIDs may be counterindicated in situations that put an individual at risk of heat injury. We show here that a small, single dose of the NSAID indomethacin before heat stroke has a dramatic and highly damaging effect on the gut, which ultimately leads to

  3. A high performance cocurrent-flow heat pipe for heat recovery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Hartl, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    By the introduction of a plate-and-tube separator assembly into a heat pipe vapor core, it has been demonstrated that axial transport capacity in reflux mode can be improved by up to a factor of 10. This improvement is largely the result of eliminating the countercurrent shear that commonly limits reflux heat pipe axial capacity. With benzene, axial heat fluxes up to 1800 W/sq cm were obtained in the temperature range 40 to 80 C, while heat flux densities up to 3000 W/sq cm were obtained with R-11 over the temperature range 40 to 80 C. These very high axial capacities compare favorably with liquid metal limits; the sonic limit for liquid sodium, for example, is 3000 W/sq cm at 657 C. Computational models developed for these cocurrent flow heat pipes agreed with experimental data within + or - 25%.

  4. Simulation of a waste incineration process with flue-gas cleaning and heat recovery sections using Aspen Plus.

    PubMed

    Cimini, Silvano; Prisciandaro, Marina; Barba, Diego

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, the modeling of a dual-purpose plant for the production of electrical and thermal energy from the heat treatment of solid wastes is presented. Particularly, the process has been modeled by using the Aspen Plus Shell, with the aim of performing a study about the applicability of this software in the simulation of a solid waste incineration process, which involves complex gas-solid reactions where the solids are referred to as "non-conventional". The model is developed to analyze and quantify the expected benefits associated with refuse derived fuel (RDF) thermal utilization; thus attention is focused on the performance of the energy recovery section.

  5. Production and Recovery of Pyruvic Acid: Recent Advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Dharm; Keshav, Amit; Mazumdar, Bidyut; Kumar, Awanish; Uslu, Hasan

    2017-07-01

    Pyruvic acid is an important keto-carboxylic acid and can be manufactured by both chemical synthesis and biotechnological routes. In the present paper an overview of recent developments and challenges in various existing technique for the production and recovery of pyruvic acid from fermentation broth or from waste streams has been presented. The main obstacle in biotechnological production of pyruvic acid is development of suitable microorganism which can provide high yield and selectivity. On the other hand, technical limitation in recovery of pyruvic acid from fermentation broth is that, it could not be separated as other carboxylic acid in the form of salts by addition of alkali. Besides, pyruvic acid cannot be crystallized. Commercial separation by distillation is very expensive because pyruvic acid decomposes at higher temperature. It is also chemically reactive due to its peculiar molecular structure and has tendency to polymerize. Thus, at high concentration the various type of reaction leads to lower yield of the product, and hence, conventional methods are not favorable. Alternate separation technologies viable to both synthetic and biological routes are the current research areas. Latest techniques such as reactive extraction is new to the field of recovery of pyruvic acid. Recent development and future prospects in downstream processing of biochemically produced pyruvic acids has been discussed in this review article.

  6. Characterization of Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) Product Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Linden; Wignarajah, Kanapathipi; Alba, Richard Gilbert; Pace, Gregory S.; Fisher, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) is designed to sterilize and process wastes produced during space missions. Benefits of the HMC include reduction of biohazards to the crew, reduction in volume of wastes that would otherwise require storage, production of radiation shielding tiles, and recovery of water and other resources. Water reuse is critical onboard spacecrafts; it reduces the need for resupply missions and saves valuable storage space. The main sources of water in HMC batches are food, beverages, shampoo, disinfecting wipes, toothpaste, and diapers. Water reclaimed by the HMC was analyzed for concentrations of Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-­-, NO2-­-, Br-­-, NO3-­-, PO43-­-, SO42-­-, total organic carbon (TOC), total inorganic carbon (TIC), % total solids, and pH. The data are discussed in relation to the current water input characteristics established for the International Space Station Water Processor Assembly system. Batches with higher than average amounts of food produced HMC product water with higher sulfate content, and batches with higher proportions of disinfectant wipes and food yielded HMC product water with higher ammonium concentration. We also compared theoretical chemical composition of HMC product water based on food labels and literature values to experimental results.

  7. Intraventricular administration of isoproterenol inhibits both heat production and heat loss mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, M T; Chandra, A; Fan, Y C; Sun, R

    1980-07-15

    At an ambient temperature (Ta) of 8 degrees C, intraventricular administration of isoproterenol inhibited metabolic heat production and led to hypothermia in rats. In contrast, at a Ta of 22 degrees C and of 30 degrees C, isoproterenol decreased cutaneous circulation and led to hyperthermia. The data indicate that isoproterenol inhibits both heat production and heat loss mechanisms in rats.

  8. Economical Recovery of By-products in the Mining Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, J.B.

    2001-12-05

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies, Mining Industry of the Future Program, works with the mining industry to further the industry's advances toward environmental and economic goals. Two of these goals are (1) responsible emission and by-product management and (2) low-cost and efficient production (DOE 1998). DOE formed an alliance with the National Mining Association (NMA) to strengthen the basis for research projects conducted to benefit the mining industry. NMA and industry representatives actively participate in this alliance by evaluating project proposals and by recommending research project selection to DOE. Similarly, the National Research Council (NRC) has recently and independently recommended research and technology development opportunities in the mining industry (NRC 2001). The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Colorado School of Mines engineers conducted one such project for DOE regarding by -product recovery from mining process residue. The results of this project include this report on mining industry process residue and waste with opportunity for by-product recovery. The U.S. mineral processing industry produces over 30,000,000 metric tons per year of process residue and waste that may contain hazardous species as well as valuable by-products. This study evaluates the copper, lead, and zinc commodity sectors which generate between 23,300,000 and 24,000,000 metric tons per year. The distribution of residual elements in process residues and wastes varies over wide ranges* because of variations in the original ore content as it is extracted from the earth's crust. In the earth's crust, the elements of interest to mining fall into two general geochemical classifications, lithophiles and chalcophiles** (Cox 1997). Groups of elements are almost always present together in a given geochemical classification, but the relative amounts of each element are unique to a particular ore body. This paper generally describes

  9. Joule heating a palladium nanowire sensor for accelerated response and recovery to hydrogen gas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Taggart, David K; Penner, Reginald M

    2010-07-05

    The properties of a single heated palladium (Pd) nanowire for the detection of hydrogen gas (H(2)) are explored. In these experiments, a Pd nanowire, 48-98 microm in length, performs three functions in parallel: 1) Joule self-heating is used to elevate the nanowire temperature by up to 128 K, 2) the 4-contact wire resistance in the absence of H(2) is used to measure its temperature, and 3) the nanowire resistance in the presence of H(2) is correlated with its concentration, allowing it to function as a H(2) sensor. Compared with the room-temperature response of a Pd nanowire, the response of the heated nanowire to hydrogen is altered in two ways: First, the resistance change (DeltaR/R(0)) induced by H(2) exposure at any concentration is reduced by a factor of up to 30 and second, the rate of the resistance change - observed at the beginning ("response") and at the end ("recovery") of a pulse of H(2) - is increased by more than a factor of 50 at some H(2) concentrations. Heating nearly eliminates the retardation of response and recovery seen from 1-2% H(2), caused by the alpha --> beta phase transition of PdH(x), a pronounced effect for nanowires at room temperature. The activation energies associated with sensor response and recovery are measured and interpreted.

  10. Performance investigation of a cogeneration plant with the efficient and compact heat recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myat, Aung; Thu, Kyaw; Kim, Young-Deuk; Choon, Ng Kim

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the performance investigation of a cogeneration plant equipped with an efficient waste heat recovery system. The proposed cogeneration system produces four types of useful energy namely: (i) electricity, (ii) steam, (iii) cooling and (iv) dehumidification. The proposed plant comprises a Capstone C30 micro-turbine which generates 24 kW of electricity, a compact and efficient waste heat recovery system and a host of waste heat activated devices namely (i) a steam generator, (ii) an absorption chiller, (iii) an adsorption chiller and (iv) a multi-bed desiccant dehumidifier. The numerical analysis for the host of waste heat recovery system and thermally activated devices using FORTRAN power station linked to powerful IMSL library is performed to investigate the performance of the overall system. A set of experiments, both part load and full load, of micro-turbine is conducted to examine the electricity generation and the exhaust gas temperature. It is observed that energy utilization factor (EUF) could achieve as high as 70% while Fuel Energy Saving Ratio (FESR) is found to be 28%.

  11. Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery and Utilization from Residential Appliances and Fixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, John J; Christian, Jeff; Gehl, Anthony C

    2012-09-01

    Executive Summary In every home irrespective of its size, location, age, or efficiency, heat in the form of drainwater or dryer exhaust is wasted. Although from a waste stream, this energy has the potential for being captured, possibly stored, and then reused for preheating hot water or air thereby saving operating costs to the homeowner. In applications such as a shower and possibly a dryer, waste heat is produced at the same time as energy is used, so that a heat exchanger to capture the waste energy and return it to the supply is all that is needed. In other applications such as capturing the energy in drainwater from a tub, dishwasher, or washing machine, the availability of waste heat might not coincide with an immediate use for energy, and consequently a heat exchanger system with heat storage capacity (i.e. a regenerator) would be necessary. This study describes a two-house experimental evaluation of a system designed to capture waste heat from the shower, dishwasher clothes washer and dryer, and to use this waste heat to offset some of the hot water energy needs of the house. Although each house was unoccupied, they were fitted with equipment that would completely simulate the heat loads and behavior of human occupants including operating the appliances and fixtures on a demand schedule identical to Building American protocol (Hendron, 2009). The heat recovery system combined (1) a gravity-film heat exchanger (GFX) installed in a vertical section of drainline, (2) a heat exchanger for capturing dryer exhaust heat, (3) a preheat tank for storing the captured heat, and (4) a small recirculation pump and controls, so that the system could be operated anytime that waste heat from the shower, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, and in any combination was produced. The study found capturing energy from the dishwasher and clothes washer to be a challenge since those two appliances dump waste water over a short time interval. Controls based on the status of the

  12. Optimal recovery of the solution of the heat equation from inaccurate data

    SciTech Connect

    Magaril-Il'yaev, G G; Osipenko, Konstantin Yu

    2009-06-30

    The problem of optimal recovery of the solution of the heat equation in the entire space at a fixed instant of time from inaccurate observations of this solution at some other instants of time is investigated. Explicit expressions for an optimal recovery method and its error are given. The solution of a similar problem with a priori information about the temperature distribution at some instants of time is also given. In all cases the optimal method uses information about at most two observations. Bibliography: 22 titles.

  13. The recovery of heat-stressed Escherichia coli in lake water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Lim, C H; Flint, K P

    1995-12-01

    Escherichia coli was heat stressed at 55 degrees, 60 degrees or 65 degrees C in sterile flasks of lake water. After 6 h at these temperatures the viable count on nutrient agar had dropped below the limits of detection (1 colony in 100 ml). The flasks were transferred to a 15 degrees C incubator and left for 7 d. Recovery of the stressed E. coli was shown to occur within 48 h at this temperature. Recovery also occurred in microcosms amended with 5% (v/v) synthetic sewage. The stressed E. coli multiplied in the amended but not in the unamended microcosms.

  14. The study of the mobile compressor unit heat losses recovery system waste heat exchanger thermal insulation types influence on the operational efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusha, V. L.; Chernov, G. I.; Kalashnikov, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    The paper examines the mobile compressor unit (MCU) heat losses recovery system waste heat exchanger prototype external thermal insulation types influence on the operational efficiency. The study is conducted by means of the numerical method through the modellingof the heat exchange processes carried out in the waste heat exchanger in ANSUS. Thermaflex, mineral wool, penofol, water and air were applied as the heat exchanger external insulation. The study results showed the waste heat exchanger external thermal insulationexistence or absence to have a significant impact on the heat exchanger operational efficiency.

  15. Heat production in an Archean crustal profile and implications for heat flow and mobilization of heat-producing elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Morgan, P.; Kelley, S. A.; Percival, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Concentrations of heat producing elements (Th, U, and K) in 58 samples representative of the main lithologies in a 100-km transect of the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield have been obtained. The relatively large variation in heat production found among the silicic plutonic rocks is shown to correlate with modal abundances of accessory minerals, and these variations are interpreted as premetamorphic. The present data suggest fundamental differences in crustal radioactivity distributions between granitic and more mafic terrains, and indicate that a previously determined apparently linear heat flow-heat production relationship for the Kapuskasing area does not relate to the distribution of heat production with depth.

  16. Heat production in an Archean crustal profile and implications for heat flow and mobilization of heat-producing elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Morgan, P.; Kelley, S. A.; Percival, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Concentrations of heat producing elements (Th, U, and K) in 58 samples representative of the main lithologies in a 100-km transect of the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield have been obtained. The relatively large variation in heat production found among the silicic plutonic rocks is shown to correlate with modal abundances of accessory minerals, and these variations are interpreted as premetamorphic. The present data suggest fundamental differences in crustal radioactivity distributions between granitic and more mafic terrains, and indicate that a previously determined apparently linear heat flow-heat production relationship for the Kapuskasing area does not relate to the distribution of heat production with depth.

  17. Effects of solutes on damage production and recovery in zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Zee, R.H.; Birtcher, R.C.; MacEwen, S.R.; Abromeit, C.

    1986-04-01

    Dilute zirconium-based alloys and pure zirconium were irradiated at 10 K with spallation neutrons at IPNS. Four types of alloys - Zr-Ti, Zr-Sn, Zr-Dy and Zr-Au - each with three concentration levels, were used. Low-temperature resistivity damage rates are enhanced by the presence of any of the four solutes. The greatest enhancement was produced by Au while the least by Dy. Within each alloy group, damage production also increased but at a decreasing rate, with increasing concentration. Post-irradiation annealing experiments, up to 400 K, showed that all four solutes suppress recovery due to interstitial migration, indicative of interstitial trapping by the solutes. Vacancy recovery is also suppressed by the presence of Sn, Dy or Au. The effect of Ti is to shift this stage to lower temperature. No clear correlation between the results with solute size was detected.

  18. Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

  19. Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

    2012-12-03

    Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2

  20. Recovery of exhaust waste heat for a hybrid car using steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababatin, Yasser

    A number of car engines operate with an efficiency rate of approximately 22% to 25% [1]. The remainder of the energy these engines generate is wasted through heat escape out of the exhaust pipe. There is now an increasing desire to reuse this heat energy, which would improve the overall efficiency of car engines by reducing their consumption of fuel. Another benefit is that such reuse would minimize harmful greenhouse gases that are emitted into the environment. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to examine how the wasted heat energy can be reused and/or recovered by use of a heat recovery system that would store this energy in a hybrid car battery. Green turbines will be analyzed as a possible solution to recycle the lost energy in a way that will also improve the overall automotive energy efficiency.

  1. Optimization of automotive Rankine cycle waste heat recovery under various engine operating condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punov, Plamen; Milkov, Nikolay; Danel, Quentin; Perilhon, Christelle; Podevin, Pierre; Evtimov, Teodossi

    2017-02-01

    An optimization study of the Rankine cycle as a function of diesel engine operating mode is presented. The Rankine cycle here, is studied as a waste heat recovery system which uses the engine exhaust gases as heat source. The engine exhaust gases parameters (temperature, mass flow and composition) were defined by means of numerical simulation in advanced simulation software AVL Boost. Previously, the engine simulation model was validated and the Vibe function parameters were defined as a function of engine load. The Rankine cycle output power and efficiency was numerically estimated by means of a simulation code in Python(x,y). This code includes discretized heat exchanger model and simplified model of the pump and the expander based on their isentropic efficiency. The Rankine cycle simulation revealed the optimum value of working fluid mass flow and evaporation pressure according to the heat source. Thus, the optimal Rankine cycle performance was obtained over the engine operating map.

  2. Analysis of a membrane-based condesate recovery heat exchanger (CRX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbold, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a temperature and humidity control system that can remove heat and recover water vapor is key to the development of an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). Large quantities of water vapor must be removed from air, and this operation has proven difficult in the absense of gravity. This paper presents the modeling results from a program to develop a novel membrane-based heat exchanger known as the condensate recovery heat exchanger (CRX). This device cools and dehumidifies humid air and simultaneously recovers water-vapor condensate. In this paper, the CRX is described and the results of an analysis of the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of the device are given.

  3. Preliminary market assessment of fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery technology

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F.T.; Fey, C.L.; Grogan, P.J.; Klein, N.P.

    1980-06-01

    A preliminary assessment of fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery (FBWHR) system market potential is presented with emphasis on the factors influencing industrial acceptability. Preliminary market potential areas are identified based on the availability of waste heat. Trends in energy use are examined to see the effect they might have on these market potential areas in the future. Focus groups interviews are used to explore important factors in the industrial decision-making process. These important factors are explored quantitatively in a survey of industrial plant engineers. The survey deals with the waste-heat boiler configuration of the FBWHR system. Results indicate market acceptance of the fluidized-bed waste-heat boiler could be quite low.

  4. Analysis of a membrane-based condesate recovery heat exchanger (CRX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbold, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a temperature and humidity control system that can remove heat and recover water vapor is key to the development of an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). Large quantities of water vapor must be removed from air, and this operation has proven difficult in the absense of gravity. This paper presents the modeling results from a program to develop a novel membrane-based heat exchanger known as the condensate recovery heat exchanger (CRX). This device cools and dehumidifies humid air and simultaneously recovers water-vapor condensate. In this paper, the CRX is described and the results of an analysis of the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of the device are given.

  5. Energy recovery from solid waste. [production engineering model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, C.; Huang, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    A recent group study on the problem of solid waste disposal provided a decision making model for a community to use in determining the future for its solid waste. The model is a combination of the following factors: technology, legal, social, political, economic and environmental. An assessment of local or community needs determines what form of energy recovery is desirable. A market for low pressure steam or hot water would direct a community to recover energy from solid waste by incineration to generate steam. A fuel gas could be produced by a process known as pyrolysis if there is a local market for a low heating value gaseous fuel. Solid waste can also be used directly as a fuel supplemental to coal in a steam generator. An evaluation of these various processes is made.

  6. Energy recovery from solid waste. [production engineering model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, C.; Huang, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    A recent group study on the problem of solid waste disposal provided a decision making model for a community to use in determining the future for its solid waste. The model is a combination of the following factors: technology, legal, social, political, economic and environmental. An assessment of local or community needs determines what form of energy recovery is desirable. A market for low pressure steam or hot water would direct a community to recover energy from solid waste by incineration to generate steam. A fuel gas could be produced by a process known as pyrolysis if there is a local market for a low heating value gaseous fuel. Solid waste can also be used directly as a fuel supplemental to coal in a steam generator. An evaluation of these various processes is made.

  7. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation and Topological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-06-01

    A comprehensive numerical model has been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details of the model and results from the analysis of General Motors' prototype TEG were described in part I of the study. In part II of this study, parametric evaluations are considered to assess the influence of heat exchanger, geometry, and thermoelectric module configurations to achieve optimization of the baseline model. The computational tool is also adapted to model other topologies such as transverse and circular configurations (hexagonal and cylindrical) maintaining the same volume as the baseline TEG. Performance analysis of these different topologies and parameters is presented and compared with the baseline design.

  8. Engineering Scoping Study of Thermoelectric Generator Systems for Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, Terry; Choate, William T.

    2006-11-01

    This report evaluates thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems with the intent to: 1) examine industrial processes in order to identify and quantify industrial waste heat sources that could potentially use TEGs; 2) describe the operating environment that a TEG would encounter in selected industrial processes and quantify the anticipated TEG system performance; 3) identify cost, design and/or engineering performance requirements that will be needed for TEGs to operate in the selected industrial processes; and 4) identify the research, development and deployment needed to overcome the limitations that discourage the development and use of TEGs for recovery of industrial waste heat.

  9. Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) improves long term recovery after focal cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Ouyang, Yibing; Barreto, George; Giffard, Rona

    2011-01-25

    Many brain protective strategies have been tested over short survival intervals, but few have been examined for long term benefit. The inducible member of the Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family, Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72), has been widely found to reduce ischemic injury. Here we assessed outcome in Hsp72 transgenic overexpressing mice and wild type littermates for one month following transient focal ischemia. Hsp72 reduced infarct area lost and improved behavioral outcome on rotarod and foot fault at one month. Thus protection by Hsp72 overexpression is long lasting, and includes improved recovery of motor function over one month.

  10. Comparison of working fluids used in ORC waste-heat-recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Krazinski, J.L.; Buyco, E.H.; Bushby, H.M.

    1981-01-01

    The performance and cost of Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) heat-recovery systems are examined in the present paper. The properties of seven working fluids are compared and their impact on system design investigated. A computer code was developed for conducting the necessary analysis. Modeling of the major hardware components and the approach taken in calculating their costs are discussed. The paper describes the methodology used in the thermodynamic and economic analysis. Predicted system costs are given for several heat-source temperatures. Trade-offs which must be considered when evaluating the working fluids are also discussed.

  11. Application of fuel cells with heat recovery for integrated utility systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, V.; King, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of fuel cell powerplants with heat recovery for use in an integrated utility system. Such a design provides for a low pollution, noise-free, highly efficient integrated utility. Use of the waste heat from the fuel cell powerplant in an integrated utility system for the village center complex of a new community results in a reduction in resource consumption of 42 percent compared to conventional methods. In addition, the system has the potential of operating on fuels produced from waste materials (pyrolysis and digester gases); this would provide further reduction in energy consumption.

  12. Development of rapid gas heating process for semifinished steel products

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, L.K. ); Chan, I.S. ); Nelson, J.G. )

    1994-09-01

    The metal heating industry associates quality and high efficiency with electrical induction heating. The ability of induction to rapidly heat product has been a key difference between electrical and combustion heating methods. Conventional gas-fired furnaces rely on radiation from refractory structures to transfer heat to the product. As the metal approaches its target temperature, the rate of heat transfer flows significantly because the temperature difference between the metal and refractory is small. The heating rates of conventional furnaces are typically below those achieved with induction. Despite this, conventional gas-fired furnaces remain the mainstay of the metals industry because of lower capital and operating costs, and greater operating flexibility and reliability than induction systems. Today, there exists a gas-based rapid heating process, Rapidfire, that is capable of achieving considerably higher heating rates than conventional furnaces. Oxygen natural gas fired rapid heating has been developed by Air Products and Chemicals with funding from the Gas Research Institute. This technology is able to provide the end user with heating capabilities similar to induction, but with the flexibility and operating costs typically associated with gas-fired systems. A novel oxygen-natural gas based, rapid heating technology, Rapidfire, has been developed capable of achieving five to six times higher heating rates (200 to 400 F/min for 3 to 4-in. diameter bars) than conventional combustion processes. Anticipated applications include forging, transfer bar edge heating, bar/slab preheating and direct rolling (eg, 2-in. thin cast slabs).

  13. The global joule heat production rate and the AE index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, S.; Ahn, B.-H.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1985-01-01

    The degree of accuracy with which the AE index may be used as a measure of the joule heat production rate is evaluated for a typical substorm event on March 18, 1978, by estimating the global joule heat production rate as a function of time on the basis of data obtained from the IMS's six meridian chains. It is found that, although the AE index is statistically linearly related to the global joule heat production rate, caution is required when one assumes that details of AE index time variations during individual events are representative of those of the joule heat production rate.

  14. Evaluation of TA10 broth for recovery of heat- and freeze-injured Salmonella from beef.

    PubMed

    Kamisaki-Horikoshi, Naoko; Okada, Yukio; Takeshita, Kazuko; Sameshima, Takashi; Kawasaki, Susumu; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Fratamico, Pina M

    2011-01-01

    The Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) Salmonella pre-enrichment broth [lactose (LAC) broth], buffered peptone water, and universal pre-enrichment (UP) broth were compared with TA10 broth, developed in our laboratory, for recovery of heat- and freeze-injured Salmonella (55 degrees C for 2-20 min and -20 degrees C for 2 months, respectively) from beef. Beef samples were contaminated with single Salmonella serovars, and contamination levels of 0.44 to <0.001 most probable number (MPN)/g and 0.74 to 0.14 MPN/g were used for heat- and freezing-induced injury studies, respectively. Twenty test portions (25 g) of the contaminated beef were pre-enriched in each broth, and the BAM Salmonella culture method was used thereafter. There was a significant difference (chi2 = 7.73) in recovery of heat-injured Salmonella between TA10 broth and LAC broth, 189 (67.5%) versus 156 (55.7%) positive samples, respectively, determined by plating onto selective agars and identification by biochemical tests. For the recovery of freeze-injured Salmonella, there was a significant difference (chi2 = 24.7) between TA10 and LAC broth, 189 (72.7%) versus 133 (51.2%) positive samples, respectively. TA10 broth was more effective than LAC broth and UP broth for recovery of freeze-injured Salmonella. The results indicate that TA10 broth should be used instead of LAC broth for testing of beef that may be contaminated with heat- and freeze-injured Salmonella spp.

  15. Reliability Engineering Analysis - Small-Scale Heat Recovery Incinerator Installations (NS Mayport and NAS, Jacksonville).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    NOTES 19 KEY WORDS (ContIinueR on reverse* side it necessary And identify by block. ruoober) Reliability prediction ; Heat recovery; Incineration...Testing requirements 20 ASTRAn (Cn l.... ,.. . old. It n ... nd id.n-fy by b1..4 -.. 1) ThsrPort addresses the reliability prediction conducted on hetwo...23 7.0 RELIABILITY PREDICTION ........................................... 29 7.1 NS Mayport

  16. Model of Heat Exchangers for Waste Heat Recovery from Diesel Engine Exhaust for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Chad; Vuppuluri, Prem; Shi, Li; Hall, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    The performance and operating characteristics of a hypothetical thermoelectric generator system designed to extract waste heat from the exhaust of a medium-duty turbocharged diesel engine were modeled. The finite-difference model consisted of two integrated submodels: a heat exchanger model and a thermoelectric device model. The heat exchanger model specified a rectangular cross-sectional geometry with liquid coolant on the cold side, and accounted for the difference between the heat transfer rate from the exhaust and that to the coolant. With the spatial variation of the thermoelectric properties accounted for, the thermoelectric device model calculated the hot-side and cold-side heat flux for the temperature boundary conditions given for the thermoelectric elements, iterating until temperature and heat flux boundary conditions satisfied the convection conditions for both exhaust and coolant, and heat transfer in the thermoelectric device. A downhill simplex method was used to optimize the parameters that affected the electrical power output, including the thermoelectric leg height, thermoelectric n-type to p-type leg area ratio, thermoelectric leg area to void area ratio, load electrical resistance, exhaust duct height, coolant duct height, fin spacing in the exhaust duct, location in the engine exhaust system, and number of flow paths within the constrained package volume. The calculation results showed that the configuration with 32 straight fins was optimal across the 30-cm-wide duct for the case of a single duct with total height of 5.5 cm. In addition, three counterflow parallel ducts or flow paths were found to be an optimum number for the given size constraint of 5.5 cm total height, and parallel ducts with counterflow were a better configuration than serpentine flow. Based on the reported thermoelectric properties of MnSi1.75 and Mg2Si0.5Sn0.5, the maximum net electrical power achieved for the three parallel flow paths in a counterflow arrangement was 1

  17. Ex situ product recovery for enhanced butanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Eom, Moon-Ho; Choi, Jin-Dal-Rae; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-05-01

    In situ butanol recovery fermentation has been intensively studied as an effective alternative to conventional butanol production, which is limited due to the cellular toxicity of butanol. However, the low biocompatibility of adsorbents often leads to failure of in situ recovery fermentations. In this study, Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 was cultured in flasks without shaking and in situ recovery fermentation was performed by using an adsorbent L493. The amounts of acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) increased by 34.4 % in the presence of the adsorbent. In contrast, cell growth and production of organic acids and ABE were retarded in the 7-L batch fermentations with in situ butanol recovery. Cell damage occurred in the fermentor upon agitation in the presence of the adsorbent, unlike in static flask cultures with in situ recovery. Ex situ recovery fermentation using circulation of fermentation broth after mid-exponential phase of cell growth was developed to avoid adsorbent-cell incompatibility. No apparent cell damage was observed and 25.7 g/L of ABE was produced from 86.2 g/L glucose in the fed-batch mode using 7 L fermentors. Thus, ex situ recovery fermentation with C. beijerinckii is effective for enhancing butanol fermentation.

  18. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling and Baseline Model Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-04-01

    A numerical model has been developed to simulate coupled thermal and electrical energy transfer processes in a thermoelectric generator (TEG) designed for automotive waste heat recovery systems. This model is capable of computing the overall heat transferred, the electrical power output, and the associated pressure drop for given inlet conditions of the exhaust gas and the available TEG volume. Multiple-filled skutterudites and conventional bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from exhaust into usable electrical power. Heat transfer between the hot exhaust gas and the hot side of the TEMs is enhanced with the use of a plate-fin heat exchanger integrated within the TEG and using liquid coolant on the cold side. The TEG is discretized along the exhaust flow direction using a finite-volume method. Each control volume is modeled as a thermal resistance network which consists of integrated submodels including a heat exchanger and a thermoelectric device. The pressure drop along the TEG is calculated using standard pressure loss correlations and viscous drag models. The model is validated to preserve global energy balances and is applied to analyze a prototype TEG with data provided by General Motors. Detailed results are provided for local and global heat transfer and electric power generation. In the companion paper, the model is then applied to consider various TEG topologies using skutterudite and bismuth telluride TEMs.

  19. Thermodynamic Analysis of Blast Furnace Slag Waste Heat-Recovery System Integrated with Coal Gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, W. J.; Li, P.; Lei, W.; Chen, W.; Yu, Q. B.; Wang, K.; Qin, Q.

    2015-05-01

    The blast furnace (BF) slag waste heat was recovered by an integrated system stage by stage, which combined a physical and chemical method. The water and coal gasification reactions were used to recover the heat in the system. Based on the first and second law of thermodynamics, the thermodynamic analysis of the system was carried out by the enthalpy-exergy diagram. The results showed that the concept of the "recovery-temperature countercurrent, energy cascade utilization" was realized by this system to recover and use the high-quality BF slag waste heat. In this system, the high-temperature waste heat was recovered by coal gasification and the relatively low-temperature waste heat was used to produce steam. The system's exergy and thermal recycling efficiency were 52.6% and 75.4%, respectively. The exergy loss of the integrated system was only 620.0 MJ/tslag. Compared with the traditional physical recycling method producing steam, the exergy and thermal efficiencies of the integrated system were improved significantly. Meanwhile, approximately 182.0 m3/tslag syngas was produced by coal gasification. The BF slag waste heat will be used integrally and efficiently by the integrated system. The results provide the theoretical reference for recycling and using the BF slag waste heat.

  20. MHD heat and seed recovery technology project. Eighth quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Petrick, M.; Johnson, T. R.

    1980-08-01

    The MHD Heat and Seed Recovery Technology Project at Argonne National Laboratory is obtaining information for the design and operation of the steam plant downstream of the MHD channel-diffuser, and of the seed regeneration process. The project goal is to supply the engineering data required in the design of components for prototype and demonstration MHD facilities. The work is being done in close cooperation with the Heat Recovery-Seed Recovery facilities, which will be 20-MW prototypes of the MHD steam bottoming system. The primary effort of the HSR Technology Project is directed toward experimental investigations of critical issues, such as (1) NO/sub x/ behavior in the radiant boiler and secondary combustor; (2) radiant boiler design to meet the multiple requirements of steam generation, NO/sub x/ decomposition, and seed-slag separation; (3) effects of solid or liquid seed deposits on heat transfer and gas flow in the steam and air heaters; (4) formation, growth, and deposition of the seed-slag particles; (5) character of the combustion gas effluents; and (6) the corrosion and erosion of ceramic and metallic materials of construction. These investigations are performed primarily in a 2-MW test facility, Argonne MHD Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL). Other project activities are related to studies of the thermochemistry of the seed-slag combustion gas system. Activities are reported.

  1. Kinetics of recovery and recystallization of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbi, A N; Rowcliffe, A F; Eatherly, W S; Gibson, L T

    1996-04-01

    A series of slow cycle and rapid cycle anneals was carried out in the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy (heat 832665). Also, a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study was initiated on the samples of the same alloy. The recovery and recrystallization phenomena of V-4Cr-4Ti in slow cycle annealing were quite different from that observed in rapid cycle annealing. The large driving force for recrystallization due to rapid heating resulted in the first nuclei appearing after only 1 minute of 1000{degrees}C. There was a two-stage hardness reduction; the first stage involved recovery due to cell formation and annihilation of dislocation, and second stage was associated with the growth of recrystallization nuclei. This is consistent with results obtained from the DSC in which there was a broad exothermic peak from {approx}200 to 800{degrees}C due to recovery followed by a sharp exotherm associated with recrystallization. The activation energy for recrystallization for V-4Cr-4Ti, which was determined at 576 {+-} 75, kJ/mole is significantly higher than that for pure V, and is thought to be related to Ti and Cr in solid solution.

  2. New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Ming; Abdelaziz, Omar; Yin, Hongxi

    2014-11-01

    Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150 200 C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50 60 C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural gas boilers for applications with process fluid return temperatures higher than or close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas.

  3. Technologies for Production of Heat and Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Kara G. Cafferty

    2014-04-01

    Biomass is a desirable source of energy because it is renewable, sustainable, widely available throughout the world, and amenable to conversion. Biomass is composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin components. Cellulose is generally the dominant fraction, representing about 40 to 50% of the material by weight, with hemicellulose representing 20 to 50% of the material, and lignin making up the remaining portion [4,5,6]. Although the outward appearance of the various forms of cellulosic biomass, such as wood, grass, municipal solid waste (MSW), or agricultural residues, is different, all of these materials have a similar cellulosic composition. Elementally, however, biomass varies considerably, thereby presenting technical challenges at virtually every phase of its conversion to useful energy forms and products. Despite the variances among cellulosic sources, there are a variety of technologies for converting biomass into energy. These technologies are generally divided into two groups: biochemical (biological-based) and thermochemical (heat-based) conversion processes. This chapter reviews the specific technologies that can be used to convert biomass to energy. Each technology review includes the description of the process, and the positive and negative aspects.

  4. Use of a turboexpander in steam power units for heat energy recovery in heat supply systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, R. A.; Daminov, A. Z.; Solomin, I. N.; Futin, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    A method for raising the efficiency of a boiler plant by installing a unit operating by the organic Rankine cycle is presented. Such units allow one to generate electricity to cover the auxiliaries of a heat source at a heat-transfer fluid temperature of no more than 130°C. The results of commissioning tests of boilers revealed that their efficiency is maximized under a load that is close or corresponds to the nominal one. If this load is maintained constantly, excess heat energy is produced. This excess may be used to generate electric energy in a steam power unit with a turboexpander. A way to insert this unit into the flow diagram of a boiler plant is proposed. The results of analysis of turbine types (turboexpanders included) with various capacities are presented, and the optimum type for the proposed flow diagram is chosen. The methodology for the design of turboexpanders and compressors used in the oil and gas industry and their operational data were applied in the analysis of a turboexpander. The results of the thermogasdynamic analysis of a turboexpander and the engineered shape of an axial-radial impeller are presented. Halocarbon R245fa is chosen as the working medium based on its calorimetric properties.

  5. Future crop production threatened by extreme heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, Stefan; Ewert, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Heat is considered to be a major stress limiting crop growth and yields. While important findings on the impact of heat on crop yield have been made based on experiments in controlled environments, little is known about the effects under field conditions at larger scales. The study of Deryng et al (2014 Global crop yield response to extreme heat stress under multiple climate change futures Environ. Res. Lett. 9 034011), analysing the impact of heat stress on maize, spring wheat and soya bean under climate change, represents an important contribution to this emerging research field. Uncertainties in the occurrence of heat stress under field conditions, plant responses to heat and appropriate adaptation measures still need further investigation.

  6. Turbulent boundary layer heat transfer experiments: Convex curvature effects including introduction and recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the heat transfer rate through turbulent and transitional boundary layers on an isothermal, convexly curved wall and downstream flat plate. The effect of convex curvature on the fully turbulent boundary layer was a reduction of the local Stanton numbers 20% to 50% below those predicted for a flat wall under the same circumstances. The recovery of the heat transfer rates on the downstream flat wall was extremely slow. After 60 cm of recovery length, the Stanton number was still typically 15% to 20% below the flat wall predicted value. Various effects important in the modeling of curved flows were studied separately. These are: the effect of initial boundary layer thickness, the effect of freestream velocity, the effect of freestream acceleration, the effect of unheated starting length, and the effect of the maturity of the boundary layer. An existing curvature prediction model was tested against this broad heat transfer data base to determine where it could appropriately be used for heat transfer predictions.

  7. Characteristics of MSW and heat energy recovery between residential and commercial areas in Seoul.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sora; Yoo, Kee-Young; Hanaki, Keisuke

    2011-03-01

    This paper analyzes the amount and characteristics of municipal solid waste (MSW) according to the inhabitant density of population and the business concentration in 25 districts in Seoul. Further, the heat energy recovery and avoided CO(2) emissions of four incineration plants located in residential and commercial areas in Seoul are examined. The amount of residential waste per capita tended to increase as the density of inhabitants decreased. The amount of commercial waste per capita tended to increase as the business concentration increased. The examination of the heat energy recovery characteristics indicated that the four incineration plants produced heat energy that depended on residential or commercial areas based on population and business. The most important result regarding avoided CO(2) emissions was that commercial areas with many office-type businesses had the most effective CO(2) emission savings by combusting 1 kg of waste. Assuming the full-scale operation of the four incineration plants, the amount of saved CO(2) emissions per year was 444 Gg CO(2) and 57,006 households in Seoul can be provided with heat energy equivalent to 542,711 Nm(3) of LNG.

  8. Electrocaloric cooling: The importance of electric-energy recovery and heat regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaznik, U.; Vrabelj, M.; Kutnjak, Z.; Malič, B.; Poredoš, A.; Kitanovski, A.

    2015-09-01

    Here we explore the effect of electric-energy recovery and heat regeneration on the energy efficiency of an electrocaloric-cooling system. Furthermore, the influence of the polarization-electric field hysteresis on the energy efficiency of the system is analysed. For the purposes of the analysis, the properties of (1 - x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-x PbTiO3 (PMN-100xPT) with x = 0, x=0.1 , and x=0.35 are characterized. We show that if no heat is regenerated, even small irreversibilities in the electric circuit used to recover the electric energy can cause a significant drop in the achievable energy efficiency. On the other hand, when a heat regeneration process is considered and a realistic value for the degree of electric-energy recovery equal to 80% is assumed, the limit for the energy efficiency of a system employing PMN ceramics is estimated to be equal to 81% of the efficiency of a Carnot heat pump.

  9. Gas-engine Heat-Recovery Unit. Final report, September 1983-July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kubasco, A.J.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of Gas Engine Heat Recovery Unit was to design, fabricate and test an efficient, compact, and corrosion resistant heat recovery unit (HRU) for use on exhaust of natural gas-fired reciprocating engine-generator sets in the 50-500 kW range. The HRU would be a core component of a factory pre-packaged cogeneration system designed around component optimization, reliability and efficiency. The HRU uses finned high alloy, stainless steel tubing wound into a compact helical coil heat exchanger. The corrosion resistance of the tubing allows more heat to be taken from the exhaust gas without fear of the effects of acid condensation. One HRU is currently installed in a cogeneration system at the Henry Ford Hospital Complex in Dearborn, Michigan. A second unit underwent successful endurance testing for 850 hours. The plan was to commercialize the HRU through its incorporation into a Caterpillar pre-packaged cogeneration system. Caterpillar is not proceeding with the concept at this time because of a downturn in the small size cogeneration market.

  10. Analysis of heat recovery of diesel engine using intermediate working fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lei; Zhang, Jiang; Tan, Gangfeng; Liu, Huaming

    2017-02-01

    The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is an effective way to recovery the engine exhaust heat. The thermal stability of the evaporation system is significant for the stable operation of the ORC system. In this paper, the performance of the designed evaporation system which combines with the intermediate fluid for recovering the exhaust waste heat from a diesel engine is evaluated. The thermal characteristics of the target diesel engine exhaust gas are evaluated based on the experimental data firstly. Then, the mathematical model of the evaporation system is built based on the geometrical parameters and the specific working conditions of ORC. Finally, the heat transfer characteristics of the evaporation system are estimated corresponding to three typical operating conditions of the diesel engine. The result shows that the exhaust temperature at the evaporator outlet increases slightly with the engine speed and load. In the evaporator, the heat transfer coefficient of the Rankine working fluid is slightly larger than the intermediate fluid. However, the heat transfer coefficient of the intermediate fluid in the heat exchanger is larger than the exhaust side. The heat transfer areas of the evaporator in both the two-phase zone and the preheated zone change slightly along with the engine working condition while the heat transfer areas of the overheated zone has changed obviously. The maximum heat transfer rate occurs in the preheating zone while the minimum value occurs in the overheating zone. In addition, the Rankine working fluid temperature at the evaporator outlet is not sensitively affected by the torque and speed of the engine and the organic fluid flow is relatively stable. It is concluded that the intermediate fluid could effectively reduce the physical changes of Rankine working fluid in the evaporator outlet due to changes in engine operating conditions.

  11. Analysis of heat recovery of diesel engine using intermediate working fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lei; Zhang, Jiang; Tan, Gangfeng; Liu, Huaming

    2017-07-01

    The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is an effective way to recovery the engine exhaust heat. The thermal stability of the evaporation system is significant for the stable operation of the ORC system. In this paper, the performance of the designed evaporation system which combines with the intermediate fluid for recovering the exhaust waste heat from a diesel engine is evaluated. The thermal characteristics of the target diesel engine exhaust gas are evaluated based on the experimental data firstly. Then, the mathematical model of the evaporation system is built based on the geometrical parameters and the specific working conditions of ORC. Finally, the heat transfer characteristics of the evaporation system are estimated corresponding to three typical operating conditions of the diesel engine. The result shows that the exhaust temperature at the evaporator outlet increases slightly with the engine speed and load. In the evaporator, the heat transfer coefficient of the Rankine working fluid is slightly larger than the intermediate fluid. However, the heat transfer coefficient of the intermediate fluid in the heat exchanger is larger than the exhaust side. The heat transfer areas of the evaporator in both the two-phase zone and the preheated zone change slightly along with the engine working condition while the heat transfer areas of the overheated zone has changed obviously. The maximum heat transfer rate occurs in the preheating zone while the minimum value occurs in the overheating zone. In addition, the Rankine working fluid temperature at the evaporator outlet is not sensitively affected by the torque and speed of the engine and the organic fluid flow is relatively stable. It is concluded that the intermediate fluid could effectively reduce the physical changes of Rankine working fluid in the evaporator outlet due to changes in engine operating conditions.

  12. Prior Heat Stress Effects Fatigue Recovery of the Elbow Flexor Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Masaki; Shields, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Long-lasting alterations in hormones, neurotransmitters and stress proteins after hyperthermia may be responsible for the impairment in motor performance during muscle fatigue. Methods Subjects (n = 25) performed a maximal intermittent fatigue task of elbow flexion after sitting in either 73 or 26 deg C to examine the effects of prior heat stress on fatigue mechanisms. Results The heat stress increased the tympanic and rectal temperatures by 2.3 and 0.82 deg C, respectively, but there was full recovery prior to the fatigue task. While prior heat stress had no effects on fatigue-related changes in volitional torque, EMG activity, torque relaxation rate, MEP size and SP duration, prior heat stress acutely increased the pre-fatigue relaxation rate and chronically prevented long-duration fatigue (p < 0.05). Discussion These findings indicate that prior passive heat stress alone does not alter voluntary activation during fatigue, but prior heat stress and exercise produce longer-term protection against long-duration fatigue. PMID:21674526

  13. Exergy analysis of the Szewalski cycle with a waste heat recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Ziółkowski, Paweł; Badur, Janusz

    2015-09-01

    The conversion of a waste heat energy to electricity is now becoming one of the key points to improve the energy efficiency in a process engineering. However, large losses of a low-temperature thermal energy are also present in power engineering. One of such sources of waste heat in power plants are exhaust gases at the outlet of boilers. Through usage of a waste heat regeneration system it is possible to attain a heat rate of approximately 200 MWth, under about 90 °C, for a supercritical power block of 900 MWel fuelled by a lignite. In the article, we propose to use the waste heat to improve thermal efficiency of the Szewalski binary vapour cycle. The Szewalski binary vapour cycle provides steam as the working fluid in a high temperature part of the cycle, while another fluid - organic working fluid - as the working substance substituting conventional steam over the temperature range represented by the low pressure steam expansion. In order to define in detail the efficiency of energy conversion at various stages of the proposed cycle the exergy analysis was performed. The steam cycle for reference conditions, the Szewalski binary vapour cycle as well as the Szewalski hierarchic vapour cycle cooperating with a system of waste heat recovery have been comprised.

  14. Prior heat stress effects fatigue recovery of the elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Masaki; Shields, Richard K

    2011-07-01

    Long-lasting alterations in hormones, neurotransmitters, and stress proteins after hyperthermia may be responsible for the impairment in motor performance during muscle fatigue. Subjects (n = 25) performed a maximal intermittent fatigue task of elbow flexion after sitting in either 73° or 26°C to examine the effects of prior heat stress on fatigue mechanisms. The heat stress increased the tympanic and rectal temperatures by 2.3° and 0.82°C, respectively, but there was full recovery prior to the fatigue task. Although prior heat stress had no effects on fatigue-related changes in volitional torque, electromyographic (EMG) activity, torque relaxation rate, motor evoked potential (MEP) size, and silent period (SP) duration, prior heat stress acutely increased the pre-fatigue relaxation rate and chronically prevented long-duration fatigue (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that prior passive heat stress alone does not alter voluntary activation during fatigue, but prior heat stress and exercise produce longer-term protection against long-duration fatigue. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Youth sports in the heat: recovery and scheduling considerations for tournament play.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Michael F

    2009-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges facing numerous young athletes is attempting to perform safely and effectively in the heat. An even greater performance challenge and risk for incurring exertional heat injury is encountered when a young athlete has to compete multiple times on the same day, with only a short rest period between rounds of play, during a hot-weather tournament. Within the scope of the rules, tournament directors frequently provide athletes with only the minimum allowable time between same-day matches or games. Notably, prior same-day exercise has been shown to increase cardiovascular and thermal strain and perception of effort in subsequent activity bouts, and the extent of earlier exercise-heat exposure can affect performance and competition outcome. Incurred water and other nutrient deficits are often too great to offset during short recovery periods between competition bouts, and the athletes are sometimes 'forced' to compete again not sufficiently replenished. Providing longer rest periods between matches and games can significantly improve athlete safety and performance, by enhancing recovery and minimizing the 'carryover' effects from previous competition-related physical activity and heat exposure that can negatively affect performance and safety. Governing bodies of youth sports need to address this issue and provide more specific, appropriate and evidence-based guidelines for minimum rest periods between same-day contests for all levels of tournament play in the heat. Youth athletes are capable of tolerating the heat and performing reasonably well and safely in a range of hot environments if they prepare well, manage hydration sufficiently, and are provided the opportunity to recover adequately between contests.

  16. 75 FR 33379 - Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures-Productivity Adjustment; Quarterly Rail Cost Adjustment Factor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Surface Transportation Board Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures--Productivity Adjustment; Quarterly Rail... Railroads that the Board restate the previously published productivity adjustment for the 2003-2007 averaging period (2007 productivity adjustment) so that it tracks the 2007 productivity adjustment...

  17. New industrial heat pump applications to fructose production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    An energy cost reduction study of the American Fructose Decatur,Inc. High Fructose Corn Syrup process has been completed. The objective was to find cost effective energy cost reduction projects and to develop a coherent strategy for realizing the savings. There are many possible options for reducing energy cost. To facilitate a fair comparison of the options, Pinch Technology was used to identify appropriate heat recovery, heat pumping and cogeneration options. Of particular interest were the opportunities for utilizing heat pumps, for energy cost reduction or other profit increasing uses. Therefore, where a heat pumping scheme was identified, its merits relative to other potential projects was carefully evaluated to ensure that the heat pump was technically and economically sound. It is felt that the results obtained in this study are applicable to other wet corn milling sites which include a refinery section, due to the similarity of processes throughout the industry. This study and others indicate that reductions in thermal energy consumption of 15--25% can be expected through increased heat recovery. Also, the use of MVR and thermocompression evaporators is appropriate and additional economically viable opportunities exist for using industrial heat pumps to increase even further the level of energy cost reduction achievable. 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Considerations concerning the physical heat-recovery of raw coke-oven gas in an industrial pilot-station

    SciTech Connect

    Paunescu, L.; Gaba, A.

    1998-12-31

    The paper presents the conception and realization obtained by the research team at the Metallurgical Researches Institute in an industrial pilot-station on the field of the physical heat-recovery of raw coke-oven gas.

  19. Brain mapping after prolonged cycling and during recovery in the heat.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Kevin; Roelands, Bart; Marusic, Uros; Tellez, Helio Fernandez; Knaepen, Kristel; Meeusen, Romain

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of prolonged intensive cycling and postexercise recovery in the heat on brain sources of altered brain oscillations. After a max test and familiarization trial, nine trained male subjects (23 ± 3 yr; maximal oxygen uptake = 62.1 ± 5.3 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1)) performed three experimental trials in the heat (30°C; relative humidity 43.7 ± 5.6%). Each trial consisted of two exercise tasks separated by 1 h. The first was a 60-min constant-load trial, followed by a 30-min simulated time trial (TT1). The second comprised a 12-min simulated time trial (TT2). After TT1, active recovery (AR), passive rest (PR), or cold water immersion (CWI) was applied for 15 min. Electroencephalography was measured at baseline and during postexercise recovery. Standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography was applied to accurately pinpoint and localize altered electrical neuronal activity. After CWI, PR and AR subjects completed TT2 in 761 ± 42, 791 ± 76, and 794 ± 62 s, respectively. A prolonged intensive cycling performance in the heat decreased β activity across the whole brain. Postexercise AR and PR elicited no significant electrocortical differences, whereas CWI induced significantly increased β3 activity in Brodmann areas (BA) 13 (posterior margin of insular cortex) and BA 40 (supramarginal gyrus). Self-paced prolonged exercise in the heat seems to decrease β activity, hence representing decreased arousal. Postexercise CWI increased β3 activity at BA 13 and 40, brain areas involved in somatosensory information processing.

  20. Brain mapping after prolonged cycling and during recovery in the heat

    PubMed Central

    De Pauw, Kevin; Roelands, Bart; Marušič, Uroš; Tellez, Helio Fernandez; Knaepen, Kristel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of prolonged intensive cycling and postexercise recovery in the heat on brain sources of altered brain oscillations. After a max test and familiarization trial, nine trained male subjects (23 ± 3 yr; maximal oxygen uptake = 62.1 ± 5.3 ml·min−1·kg−1) performed three experimental trials in the heat (30°C; relative humidity 43.7 ± 5.6%). Each trial consisted of two exercise tasks separated by 1 h. The first was a 60-min constant-load trial, followed by a 30-min simulated time trial (TT1). The second comprised a 12-min simulated time trial (TT2). After TT1, active recovery (AR), passive rest (PR), or cold water immersion (CWI) was applied for 15 min. Electroencephalography was measured at baseline and during postexercise recovery. Standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography was applied to accurately pinpoint and localize altered electrical neuronal activity. After CWI, PR and AR subjects completed TT2 in 761 ± 42, 791 ± 76, and 794 ± 62 s, respectively. A prolonged intensive cycling performance in the heat decreased β activity across the whole brain. Postexercise AR and PR elicited no significant electrocortical differences, whereas CWI induced significantly increased β3 activity in Brodmann areas (BA) 13 (posterior margin of insular cortex) and BA 40 (supramarginal gyrus). Self-paced prolonged exercise in the heat seems to decrease β activity, hence representing decreased arousal. Postexercise CWI increased β3 activity at BA 13 and 40, brain areas involved in somatosensory information processing. PMID:23990240

  1. Studies on the effect of ohmic heating on oil recovery and quality of sesame seeds.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Kirti; Mudgal, V D; Viswasrao, Gajanan; Srivastava, Himani

    2016-04-01

    This research describes a new technological process for sesame oil extraction. The process deals with the effect of ohmic heating on enhancement of oil recovery and quality of cleaned and graded sesame seed. The effect of ohmic heating parameters namely electric field strength (EFS), end point temperature (EPT) and holding time (HT) on oil extraction process were investigated. Three levels of electric field strength (600, 750 and 900 V/m), end point temperature (65, 75 and 85 °C) and holding time (5, 10 and 15 min.) were taken as independent variables using full factorial design. Percentage oil recovered from sesame seed through mechanical extracted oil by application of ohmic heating varies from 39.98 to 43.15 %. The maximum oil recovery 43.15 % was obtained when the sample was heated and maintained at 85 °C using EFS of 900 V/m for a holding time of 10 min as against 34.14 % in control sample. The free fatty acid (FFA) of the extracted oil was within the acceptable limit (1.52 to 2.26 % oleic acid) of 0.5 to 3 % as prescribed respectively by Prevention of Food Adulteration (PFA) and Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS). The peroxide value of extracted oil was also found within the acceptable limit (0.78 to 1.01 meq/kg). The optimum value for maximum oil recovery, minimum residual oil content, free fatty acid (FFA) and peroxide value were 41.24 %, 8.61 %, 1.74 % oleic acid and 0.86 meq/kg, respectively at 722.52 V/m EFS at EPT 65 °C for 5 min. holding time which was obtained by response surface methodology.

  2. Martian surface heat production and crustal heat flow from Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, B. C.; McLennan, S. M.; Klein, E. C.

    2011-07-01

    Martian thermal state and evolution depend principally on the radiogenic heat-producing element (HPE) distributions in the planet's crust and mantle. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft has mapped the surface abundances of HPEs across Mars. From these data, we produce the first models of global and regional surface heat production and crustal heat flow. As previous studies have suggested that the crust is a repository for approximately 50% of the radiogenic elements on Mars, these models provide important, directly measurable constraints on Martian heat generation. Our calculations show considerable geographic and temporal variations in crustal heat flow, and demonstrate the existence of anomalous heat flow provinces. We calculate a present day average surface heat production of 4.9 ± 0.3 × 10-11 W · kg-1. We also calculate the average crustal component of heat flow of 6.4 ± 0.4 mW · m-2. The crustal component of radiogenically produced heat flow ranges from <1 mW · m-2 in the Hellas Basin and Utopia Planitia regions to ˜13 mW · m-2 in the Sirenum Fossae region. These heat production and crustal heat flow values from geochemical measurements support previous heat flow estimates produced by different methodologies.

  3. Recovery of Heat Treated Bacillus cereus Spores Is Affected by Matrix Composition and Factors with Putative Functions in Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Warda, Alicja K.; Tempelaars, Marcel H.; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of spores to recover and grow out after food processing is affected by cellular factors and by the outgrowth conditions. In the current communication we studied the recovery and outgrowth of individually sorted spores in BHI and rice broth media and on agar plates using flow cytometry. We show that recovery of wet heat treated Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores is affected by matrix composition with highest recovery in BHI broth or on rice agar plates, compared to BHI agar plates and rice broth. Data show that not only media composition but also its liquid or solid state affect the recovery of heat treated spores. To determine the impact of factors with putative roles in recovery of heat treated spores, specific genes previously shown to be highly expressed in outgrowing heat-treated spores were selected for mutant construction. Spores of nine B. cereus ATCC 14579 deletion mutants were obtained and their recovery from wet heat treatment was evaluated using BHI and rice broth and agar plates. Deletion mutant spores showed different capacity to recover from heat treatment compared to wild type with the most pronounced effect for a mutant lacking BC5242, a gene encoding a membrane protein with C2C2 zinc finger which resulted in over 95% reduction in recovery compared to the wild type in BHI broth. Notably, similar relative performance of wild type and mutants was observed using the other recovery conditions. We obtained insights on the impact of matrix composition and state on recovery of individually sorted heat treated spores and identified cellular factors with putative roles in this process. These results may provide leads for future developments in design of more efficient combined preservation treatments. PMID:27486443

  4. Recovery of Heat Treated Bacillus cereus Spores Is Affected by Matrix Composition and Factors with Putative Functions in Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Warda, Alicja K; Tempelaars, Marcel H; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N

    2016-01-01

    The ability of spores to recover and grow out after food processing is affected by cellular factors and by the outgrowth conditions. In the current communication we studied the recovery and outgrowth of individually sorted spores in BHI and rice broth media and on agar plates using flow cytometry. We show that recovery of wet heat treated Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores is affected by matrix composition with highest recovery in BHI broth or on rice agar plates, compared to BHI agar plates and rice broth. Data show that not only media composition but also its liquid or solid state affect the recovery of heat treated spores. To determine the impact of factors with putative roles in recovery of heat treated spores, specific genes previously shown to be highly expressed in outgrowing heat-treated spores were selected for mutant construction. Spores of nine B. cereus ATCC 14579 deletion mutants were obtained and their recovery from wet heat treatment was evaluated using BHI and rice broth and agar plates. Deletion mutant spores showed different capacity to recover from heat treatment compared to wild type with the most pronounced effect for a mutant lacking BC5242, a gene encoding a membrane protein with C2C2 zinc finger which resulted in over 95% reduction in recovery compared to the wild type in BHI broth. Notably, similar relative performance of wild type and mutants was observed using the other recovery conditions. We obtained insights on the impact of matrix composition and state on recovery of individually sorted heat treated spores and identified cellular factors with putative roles in this process. These results may provide leads for future developments in design of more efficient combined preservation treatments.

  5. Temperature and energy deficit in the ground during operation and recovery phases of closed-loop ground source heat pump system: Effect of the groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erol, Selcuk; Francois, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The advection/dispersion mechanism of the groundwater flow in the ground has a significant effect on a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) to enhance its thermal performance. However, the amount of energy extracted from the ground never disappears and only shifts with the magnitude of the effective thermal velocity in the infinite domain. In this work, we focus on the temperature and the energy balance of the ground in an advection/dispersion dominated heat transfer system during the operation period of a BHE and the subsequent recovery phase when the system is idle. The problem is treated with single BHE and multi-BHEs systems, for different representative geology and different groundwater flow velocity. In order to assess the thermal energy deficit due to heat extraction from the ground, we used the finite line source analytical model, developed recently (Erol et al., 2015) that provides the temperature distributions around the boreholes for discontinuous heat extraction. The model is developed based on the Green's function, which is the solution of heat conduction/advection/dispersion equation in porous media, for discontinuous heat extraction by analytically convoluting rectangular function or pulses in time domain. The results demonstrate the significant positive impact of the groundwater flow for the recovery in terms of temperature deficit at the location of the borehole. However, the total thermal energy deficit is not affected by the groundwater movement. The energy balance of the ground is the same no matter the prevailing heat transfer system, which can be only conduction or advection/dispersion. In addition, the energy balance of the ground is not based on either the duration of the production period operation or of the recovery phase, but depends on the total amount of heat that is extracted and on the bulk volumetric heat capacity of the ground.

  6. Recovery heat exchange to conserve energy in wood drying. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, H.N.

    1985-06-01

    The North Central Forest Experiment Station of the Forest Service has had an ongoing program since 1974 to conserve energy in wood drying without reducing wood quality. We have suggested ways to conserve energy, developed new drying techniques which were less energy intensive than conventional methods, and investigated recovery of vent stream energy with bench-scale heat exchangers. This study is a culmination of our efforts to conserve energy in lumber drying by vent stream recovery in a conventional dry kiln. An experimental 600 bf kiln was fitted with a recovery heat exchanger to utilize the vent stream from a 100 bf prototype pressure steam dryer. Four runs were conducted, two with green yellow-poplar in both the kiln and pressure steam dryer, and two with air-dried red oak in the kiln and green silver maple in the pressure steam dryer. The dryers were instrumented so that air and steam temperatures, pressures, steam rates, electrical consumption, and humidity could be monitored on a periodic basis. Determinations of lumber physical characteristics before and after drying were made so that changes in quality of the lumber as a result of drying could be determined.

  7. Development of a System for Thermoelectric Heat Recovery from Stationary Industrial Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebling, D. G.; Krumm, A.; Pfeiffelmann, B.; Gottschald, J.; Bruchmann, J.; Benim, A. C.; Adam, M.; Labs, R.; Herbertz, R. R.; Stunz, A.

    2016-07-01

    The hot forming process of steel requires temperatures of up to 1300°C. Usually, the invested energy is lost to the environment by the subsequent cooling of the forged parts to room temperature. Thermoelectric systems are able to recover this wasted heat by converting the heat into electrical energy and feeding it into the power grid. The proposed thermoelectric system covers an absorption surface of half a square meter, and it is equipped with 50 Bismuth-Telluride based thermoelectric generators, five cold plates, and five inverters. Measurements were performed under production conditions of the industrial environment of the forging process. The heat distribution and temperature profiles are measured and modeled based on the prevailing production conditions and geometric boundary conditions. Under quasi-stationary conditions, the thermoelectric system absorbs a heat radiation of 14.8 kW and feeds electrical power of 388 W into the power grid. The discussed model predicts the measured values with slight deviations.

  8. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the research is to provide databases and design criteria to assist in the selection of optimum alloys for construction of components needed to contain process streams in advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems. Typical components include: steam line piping and superheater tubing for low emission boilers (600 to 700{degrees}C), heat exchanger tubing for advanced steam cycles and topping cycle systems (650 to 800{degrees}C), foil materials for recuperators, on advanced turbine systems (700 to 750{degrees}C), and tubesheets for barrier filters, liners for piping, cyclones, and blowback system tubing for hot-gas cleanup systems (850 to 1000{degrees}C). The materials being examined fall into several classes, depending on which of the advanced heat recovery concepts is of concern. These classes include martensitic steels for service to 650{degrees}C, lean stainless steels and modified 25Cr-30Ni steels for service to 700{degrees}C, modified 25Cr-20Ni steels for service to 900{degrees}C, and high Ni-Cr-Fe or Ni-Cr-Co-Fe alloys for service to 1000{degrees}C.

  9. Disposal of High-Temperature Slags: A Review of Integration of Heat Recovery and Material Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongqi; Zhang, Zuotai

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays with the continuous urbanization in China, the carbon emission and resource shortage have been serious issues, for which the disposal of blast furnace slags (BFS) and steel slags (SS) discharged from the metallurgical industry make up a significant strategy. The output of crude steel reached 823 Mt in China in 2014 and the thermal heat in these slags was equivalent to ~18 Mt of standard coal. Herein, the recent advances were systemically reviewed and analyzed, mainly from two respects, i.e., integration of heat recovery and material recycling and crystallization control of the slags. It was first found that for the heat recovery from BFS, the most intensively investigated physical method and chemical method were centrifugal granulation and gasification reaction, respectively. Furthermore, a two-step approach could contribute to a promising strategy for the treatment of slags, i.e., the liquid slags were first granulated into small particles, and then other further treatment was performed such as gasification reaction. With regard to SS, the effective disposal could be achieved using a selective crystallization and phase separation (SCPS) method, and moreover, the solid solution of 2CaO·SiO2 and the target phases could act as a promising enriched phase to extract the valuable elements.

  10. Waste burning and heat recovery characteristics of a mass burn incineration system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsin

    2003-02-01

    An experimental investigation on waste combustion characteristics of a mass burn incinerator is conducted in this study. Three different charging modes, including operator manipulation, periodic feeding, and temperature control, are taken into consideration. The results indicate that the burning characteristics in the combustion chambers are closely related to the operating modes. For the operator manipulation where the wastes are sent into the incinerator in two short periods, the entire temperature distribution of the primary combustion chamber can be partitioned into two parts, thereby yielding waste group combustion. Temperature oscillations in both the primary and secondary combustion chambers are characterized for the periodic feeding. However, because of the shorter charging period and smaller amount of waste, the burning interaction between the two chambers is initially weak and becomes notable in the final stage. When temperature control is performed, the burning oscillation of the primary combustion chamber is further amplified so the combustion interaction is drastic. These exhibitions are mainly caused by the competition between endothermic and exothermic reactions. The instantaneous heat exchange efficiency of the cyclone heat recovery system (CHRS) installed in the incineration system is also evaluated to obtain details of energy recovery behaviors. As a result, the efficiency tends to decrease linearly with increasing temperature of hot flue gas. This arises from the fact that heat loss from the gas to the environment is increased when the temperature of the former is higher, even though the temperature gradient across the cyclone is enlarged.

  11. Program Final Report - Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Meisner

    2011-08-31

    We conducted a vehicle analysis to assess the feasibility of thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery and conversion to useful electrical power and found that eliminating the 500 W of electrical power generated by the alternator corresponded to about a 7% increase in fuel economy (FE) for a small car and about 6% for a full size truck. Electric power targets of 300 W were established for city and highway driving cycles for this project. We obtained critical vehicle level information for these driving cycles that enabled a high-level design and performance analysis of radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems for several potential vehicle platforms, and we identified the location and geometric envelopes of the radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems. Based on this analysis, we selected the Chevrolet Suburban as the most suitable demonstration vehicle for this project. Our modeling and thermal analysis assessment of a radiator-based thermoelectric generator (TEG), however, revealed severe practical limitations. Specifically the small temperature difference of 100°C or less between the engine coolant and ambient air results in a low Carnot conversion efficiency, and thermal resistance associated with air convection would reduce this conversion efficiency even further. We therefore decided not to pursue a radiator-based waste heat recovery system and focused only on the exhaust gas. Our overall approach was to combine science and engineering: (1) existing and newly developed TE materials were carefully selected and characterized by the material researcher members of our team, and most of the material property results were validated by our research partners, and (2) system engineers worked closely with vehicle engineers to ensure that accurate vehicle-level information was used for developing subsystem models and designs, and the subsystem output was analyzed for potential fuel economy gains. We incorporated material, module, subsystem

  12. Fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system development: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Patch, K.D.; Cole, W.E.

    1988-06-01

    A major energy loss in industry is the heat content of the flue gases from industrial process heaters. One effective way to utilize the energy, which is applicable to all processes, is to preheat the combustion air for the process heater. Although recuperators are available to preheat this air when the flue gases are clean, recuperators to recover the heat from dirty and corrosive flue gases do not exist. The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) system is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, recirculating alumina particles are heated by the flue gas in a raining bed. The hot particles are then removed from the bed and placed in a fluidized bed where they are fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is preheated. The cooled particles are then returned to the raining bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry. In this final report, the design, development, fabrication, and installation of a full-scale FBWHR system is detailed.

  13. A Simulation Study on a Thermoelectric Generator for Waste Heat Recovery from a Marine Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Dongxu; Tseng, King Jet; Wei, Zhongbao; Zheng, Yun; Romagnoli, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a marine engine has been evaluated for waste heat recovery (WHR) using thermoelectric generators (TEG). The feasibility of Mg2Sn0.75Ge0.25, Cu2Se, and Cu1.98Se as potential thermoelectric (TE) material were investigated. A straight fin heat exchanger is used to enhance the heat transfer between the hot exhaust gas and TE modules. To facility the analysis, a system level thermal resistance model is built and validated with experiments. After the model is validated, a small marine engine with rated power of 1.7-3 MW is taken as baseline model and it is found that around 2-4 KW electrical power can be extracted from exhaust gas by the TEG at varying design and operating parameters. The back pressure effect induced by the heat exchanger is also considered in this study. Finally, a parameter study is conducted regarding the impact of the TE module height on the output power. It is shown that the height of the TE leg could play a significant role in the module geometry design, and that the optimal height varies between 1 mm and 2 mm under different heat exchangers and exhaust gas flow rates.

  14. A Simulation Study on a Thermoelectric Generator for Waste Heat Recovery from a Marine Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Dongxu; Tseng, King Jet; Wei, Zhongbao; Zheng, Yun; Romagnoli, Alessandro

    2017-05-01

    In this study, a marine engine has been evaluated for waste heat recovery (WHR) using thermoelectric generators (TEG). The feasibility of Mg2Sn0.75Ge0.25, Cu2Se, and Cu1.98Se as potential thermoelectric (TE) material were investigated. A straight fin heat exchanger is used to enhance the heat transfer between the hot exhaust gas and TE modules. To facility the analysis, a system level thermal resistance model is built and validated with experiments. After the model is validated, a small marine engine with rated power of 1.7-3 MW is taken as baseline model and it is found that around 2-4 KW electrical power can be extracted from exhaust gas by the TEG at varying design and operating parameters. The back pressure effect induced by the heat exchanger is also considered in this study. Finally, a parameter study is conducted regarding the impact of the TE module height on the output power. It is shown that the height of the TE leg could play a significant role in the module geometry design, and that the optimal height varies between 1 mm and 2 mm under different heat exchangers and exhaust gas flow rates.

  15. Heat transfer during heat sterilization and cooling processes of canned products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dincer, I.

    In this paper, an analysis of transient heat transfer during heat sterilization and cooling processes of a cylindrical canned product is presented. In the analysis, most practical case including the boundary condition of third kind (i.e., convection boundary condition, leading to 0.1 <= Bi <= 100) was employed. A simple analytical model for determining effective heat transfer coefficients for such products is developed. For the heat sterilization process, heating coefficient is incorporated into heat transfer coefficient model. An experimental study was performed to measure the thermal center temperatures of the short-cylindrical canned products (i.e., Tuna fish) during heat sterilization at the retort medium temperatures of 115∘C and 121∘C, and during cooling process at 16∘C. The effective heat transfer coefficient model used the experimental temperature data. Using these effective heat transfer coefficients the center temperature distributions were calculated and compared with the experimental temperature distributions. Agreement was found considerably high. The results of the present study indicate that the heat-transfer analysis technique and heat-transfer coefficient model are reliable, and can provide accurate results for such problems.

  16. Heat production as a quantitative parameter of phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Miyamae, T; Yamamura, M

    1988-05-09

    Microcalorimetry was applied to measure phagocytosis by human peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. Heat production was 9.1 +/- 2.6 microW by 1 X 10(6) unstimulated neutrophils and increased to 28.4 +/- 3.2 microW in association with phagocytosis. The increase in heat production was directly proportional to the number of Saccharomyces cerevisiae particles phagocytosed as well as to the concentration of opsonizing serum. No heat increase was observed in the absence of phagocytosis. An increase in heat production by monocytes was also observed in association with phagocytosis, but it was much less obvious than that by neutrophils. Heat production can thus be used as a quantitative measure of phagocytosis.

  17. Energy recovery by production of fuel from citrus wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wesley Clark, C.

    1982-05-01

    A study to determine how much energy can be recovered from a Florida citrus processing plant was conducted. The production of ethyl alcohol in particular was examined as it is thought to represent the greatest potential for immediate energy recovery. Three-fourths of the energy expended to produce, harvest, process and market a box of fruit was recoverable using existing technology, i.e. 78,500 Btu/ box of fruit recoverable from a total energy expenditure of 107,800 Btu/ box of fruit. Aside from the actual cost benefits of recovering energy in the form of ethanol, the food processor is also helping to reduce the foreign-oil imports by the blending of ethyl alcohol with unleaded gasoline to form gasohol.

  18. Development of portable measuring system for testing of electrical vehicle's heat energy recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvajcz, K.; Váradiné Szarka, A.

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays the consumer society applies a huge amount of energy in many fields including transportation sector. Internal combustion vehicles contribute substantially to the air pollution. An alternative solution for reducing energy consumption is replacing the internal combustion vehicles by electrical or hybrid vehicles. Today one of the biggest disadvantages of the electrical vehicles is the finite capacity of batteries. The research topic presented in this paper is the „Energy Harvesting”, and development of energy recovery system for electrical vehicles which largely contributes in increasing the driving range. At the current phase of the research efficiency analysis of the heat energy recovery devices are investigated in real driving circumstances. Computer based mobile and wireless measurement system for the analysis was developed, tested and installed in a real vehicle. Driving tests were performed and analysed in different circumstances.

  19. Improving photosynthesis and crop productivity by accelerating recovery from photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Kromdijk, Johannes; Głowacka, Katarzyna; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; Gabilly, Stéphane T; Iwai, Masakazu; Niyogi, Krishna K; Long, Stephen P

    2016-11-18

    Crop leaves in full sunlight dissipate damaging excess absorbed light energy as heat. When sunlit leaves are shaded by clouds or other leaves, this protective dissipation continues for many minutes and reduces photosynthesis. Calculations have shown that this could cost field crops up to 20% of their potential yield. Here, we describe the bioengineering of an accelerated response to natural shading events in Nicotiana (tobacco), resulting in increased leaf carbon dioxide uptake and plant dry matter productivity by about 15% in fluctuating light. Because the photoprotective mechanism that has been altered is common to all flowering plants and crops, the findings provide proof of concept for a route to obtaining a sustainable increase in productivity for food crops and a much-needed yield jump. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  1. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  2. Energy-Recovery Linacs for Commercial Radioisotope Production

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland Paul

    2016-11-19

    Most radioisotopes are produced by nuclear reactors or positive ion accelerators, which are expensive to construct and to operate. Photonuclear reactions using bremsstrahlung photon beams from less-expensive electron linacs can generate isotopes of critical interest, but much of the beam energy in a conventional electron linac is dumped at high energy, making unwanted radioactivation. The largest part of this radioactivation may be completely eliminated by applying energy recovery linac technology to the problem with an additional benefit that the energy cost to produce a given amount of isotope is reduced. Consequently, a Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is a path to a more diverse and reliable domestic supply of short-lived, high-value, high-demand isotopes at a cost lower than that of isotopes produced by reactors or positive-ion accelerators. A Jefferson Lab approach to this problem involves a thin photon production radiator, which allows the electron beam to recirculate through rf cavities so the beam energy can be recovered while the spent electrons are extracted and absorbed at a low enough energy to minimize unwanted radioactivation. The thicker isotope photoproduction target is not in the beam. MuPlus, with Jefferson Lab and Niowave, proposed to extend this ERL technology to the commercial world of radioisotope production. In Phase I we demonstrated that 1) the ERL advantage for producing radioisotopes is at high energies (~100 MeV), 2) the range of acceptable radiator thickness is narrow (too thin and there is no advantage relative to other methods and too thick means energy recovery is too difficult), 3) using optics techniques developed under an earlier STTR for collider low beta designs greatly improves the fraction of beam energy that can be recovered (patent pending), 4) many potentially useful radioisotopes can be made with this ERL technique that have never before been available in significant commercial quantities

  3. Heat waves imposed during early pod development in soybean (Glycine max) cause significant yield loss despite a rapid recovery from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Matthew H; Yendrek, Craig R; Drag, David; Locke, Anna M; Rios Acosta, Lorena; Leakey, Andrew D B; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2015-08-01

    Heat waves already have a large impact on crops and are predicted to become more intense and more frequent in the future. In this study, heat waves were imposed on soybean using infrared heating technology in a fully open-air field experiment. Five separate heat waves were applied to field-grown soybean (Glycine max) in central Illinois, three in 2010 and two in 2011. Thirty years of historical weather data from Illinois were analyzed to determine the length and intensity of a regionally realistic heat wave resulting in experimental heat wave treatments during which day and night canopy temperatures were elevated 6 °C above ambient for 3 days. Heat waves were applied during early or late reproductive stages to determine whether and when heat waves had an impact on carbon metabolism and seed yield. By the third day of each heat wave, net photosynthesis (A), specific leaf weight (SLW), and leaf total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration (TNC) were decreased, while leaf oxidative stress was increased. However, A, SLW, TNC, and measures of oxidative stress were no different than the control ca. 12 h after the heat waves ended, indicating rapid physiological recovery from the high-temperature stress. That end of season seed yield was reduced (~10%) only when heat waves were applied during early pod developmental stages indicates the yield loss had more to do with direct impacts of the heat waves on reproductive process than on photosynthesis. Soybean was unable to mitigate yield loss after heat waves given during late reproductive stages. This study shows that short high-temperature stress events that reduce photosynthesis and increase oxidative stress resulted in significant losses to soybean production in the Midwest, U.S. The study also suggests that to mitigate heat wave-induced yield loss, soybean needs improved reproductive and photosynthetic tolerance to high but increasingly common temperatures.

  4. Technology for industrial waste heat recovery by organic Rankine cycle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, W. G.; Drake, R. L.; Prisco, C. J.

    1984-10-01

    The recovery of industrial waste heat and the conversion thereof to useful electric power by use of Rankine cycle systems is studied. Four different aspects of ORC technology were studied: possible destructive chemical reaction between an aluminum turbine wheel and R-113 working fluid under wheel-to-rotor rub conditions; possible chemical reaction between stainless steel or carbon steel and any of five different ORC working fluids under rotor-stator rub conditions; effects on electric generator properties of extended exposure to an environment of saturated R-113 vapor/fluid; and operational proof tests under laboratory conditions of two 1070 kW, ORC, R-113 hermetic turbogenerator power module systems.

  5. Metabolic heat production, heat loss and the circadian rhythm of body temperature in the rat.

    PubMed

    Refinetti, Roberto

    2003-05-01

    Metabolic heat production (calculated from oxygen consumption), dry heat loss (measured in a calorimeter) and body temperature (measured by telemetry) were recorded simultaneously at 6 min intervals over five consecutive days in rats maintained in constant darkness. Robust circadian rhythmicity (confirmed by chi square periodogram analysis) was observed in all three variables. The rhythm of heat production was phase-advanced by about half an hour in relation to the body temperature rhythm, whereas the rhythm of heat loss was phase-delayed by about half an hour. The balance of heat production and heat loss exhibited a daily oscillation 180 deg out of phase with the oscillation in body temperature. Computations indicated that the amount of heat associated with the generation of the body temperature rhythm (1.6 kJ) corresponds to less than 1 % of the total daily energy budget (172 kJ) in this species. Because of the small magnitude of the fraction of heat balance associated with the body temperature rhythm, it is likely that the daily oscillation in heat balance has a very slow effect on body temperature, thus accounting for the 180 deg phase difference between the rhythms of heat balance and body temperature.

  6. Simultaneous Waste Heat and Water Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gases for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dexin

    2016-12-31

    This final report presents the results of a two-year technology development project carried out by a team of participants sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project is to develop a membrane-based technology to recover both water and low grade heat from power plant flue gases. Part of the recovered high-purity water and energy can be used directly to replace plant boiler makeup water as well as improving its efficiency, and the remaining part of the recovered water can be used for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), cooling tower water makeup or other plant uses. This advanced version Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) with lower capital and operating costs can be applied to existing plants economically and can maximize waste heat and water recovery from future Advanced Energy System flue gases with CO2 capture in consideration, which will have higher moisture content that favors the TMC to achieve higher efficiency.

  7. High temperature fluid-bed heat recovery for aluminum melting furnace

    SciTech Connect

    1982-12-01

    The objective of the study was to establish whether technical problems would be encountered in increasing the inlet temperature of the fluid bed heat exchanger unit at Alcoa above the 1100/sup 0/F target of the current contract. Specifically, the temperature range of up to, and potentially above, 1600/sup 0/F were investigated to establish the benefits of higher temperature, trade offs required, and plans to achieve that technology goal. The benefits are tabulated and are very significant, particularly at the temperature range of 1600 to 1800/sup 0/F. Relative to 1100/sup 0/F the heat recovery is increased by 24 to 29% at 1600 and 1800/sup 0/F respectively.

  8. Comparison of Waste Heat Recovery from the Exhaust of a Spark Ignition and a Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, K. T.; Schmidt, M.; Zybala, R.; Merkisz, J.; Fuć, P.; Lijewski, P.

    2010-09-01

    We present herein a design for and performance measurements of a prototype thermoelectric generator (TEG) mounted on both a spark ignition engine (0.9 dm3) and a self-ignition engine (1.3 dm3). Using the prototype TEG as a tool, benchmark studies were performed in order to compare its parameters in terms of heat recovery from exhaust gases of both engine types. The test bed study was performed with an Automex AMX-210/100 eddy-current brake dynamometer. To provide a comprehensive overview of the TEG operating conditions, characterization of its parameters such as temperature distribution, heat flux density, and efficiency was done at engine speeds and loads similar to those within the range of operation of real road conditions.

  9. A Global compilation of Heat Production in Granitic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Kiki; Sørensen, Nanna K.; Nielsen, Louise S. K.; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina M.

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of the heat production in the crust is important for understanding the energy balance in Earth. It is assumed that the crust produces a substantial part of the heat in Earth, but its proportion in comparison to the mantle and the contribution from core solidification is not well known. Knowledge of the crustal heat production is required for assessing the mantle heat flow at the crust-mantle interface. Granites probably are the main heat producing rock types in the crust, and therefore their heat production is of crucial importance for understanding Earth heat balance. As part of a B.Sc. thesis study we have compiled a new database based on published values of heat production in various types of granites. The database has about 500 entries for concentrations of U, Th, and K and the total heat generation in different continental regions. The database also includes information on crustal age and the emplacement age of granites, where available. Some of the main conclusions that may be drawn from analyses of this new database are: • Distribution of heat production values is narrow in Archean-early Proterozoic granites but very broad in middle-late Proterozoic granites. • We observe no correlation between granite type and heat production. • Some correlation may be inferred between age and heat production - heat production is relatively low in Archaean-early Proterozoic granites. • Proterozoic granites are dominated by A-type which have high heat production; the I-type Archean granitic rocks seem to have the highest Th/U ratio. • The Th/U ratio is supposed to be 3.7-4.0 based on relative time constants. This is in general correct with a global average value of 3.7. However, it is ca. 3.8 for Phanerozoic and Archaean-early Proterozoic granites and 3.3 for middle-late Proterozoic granites. We speculate if this variation may be caused by major plate reorganization or perhaps by change in global plate tectonic style?

  10. Hypertension is associated with greater heat exchange during exercise recovery in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, S F; Teles, M C; Ribeiro, V G C; Magalhães, F C; Mendonça, V A; Peixoto, M F D; Leite, L H R; Coimbra, C C; Lacerda, A C R

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with systemic arterial hypertension have a higher risk of heat-related complications. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the thermoregulatory responses of hypertensive subjects during recovery from moderate-intensity exercise performed in the heat. A total of eight essential hypertensive (H) and eight normotensive (N) male subjects (age=46.5±1.3 and 45.6±1.4 years, body mass index=25.8±0.8 and 25.6±0.6 kg/m2, mean arterial pressure=98.0±2.8 and 86.0±2.3 mmHg, respectively) rested for 30 min, performed 1 h of treadmill exercise at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption, and rested for 1 h after exercise in an environmental chamber at 38°C and 60% relative humidity. Skin and core temperatures were measured to calculate heat exchange parameters. Mean arterial pressure was higher in the hypertensive than in the normotensive subjects throughout the experiment (P<0.05, unpaired t-test). The hypertensive subjects stored less heat (H=-24.23±3.99 W·m-2vs N=-13.63±2.24 W·m-2, P=0.03, unpaired t-test), experienced greater variations in body temperature (H=-0.62±0.05°C vsN=-0.35±0.12°C, P=0.03, unpaired t-test), and had more evaporated sweat (H=-106.1±4.59 W·m-2vs N=-91.15±3.24 W·m-2, P=0.01, unpaired t-test) than the normotensive subjects during the period of recovery from exercise. In conclusion, essential hypertensive subjects showed greater sweat evaporation and increased heat dissipation and body cooling relative to normotensive subjects during recovery from moderate-intensity exercise performed in hot conditions.

  11. Hypertension is associated with greater heat exchange during exercise recovery in a hot environment

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, S. F.; Teles, M. C.; Ribeiro, V. G. C.; Magalhães, F. C.; Mendonça, V. A.; Peixoto, M. F. D.; Leite, L. H. R.; Coimbra, C. C.; Lacerda, A. C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with systemic arterial hypertension have a higher risk of heat-related complications. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the thermoregulatory responses of hypertensive subjects during recovery from moderate-intensity exercise performed in the heat. A total of eight essential hypertensive (H) and eight normotensive (N) male subjects (age=46.5±1.3 and 45.6±1.4 years, body mass index=25.8±0.8 and 25.6±0.6 kg/m2, mean arterial pressure=98.0±2.8 and 86.0±2.3 mmHg, respectively) rested for 30 min, performed 1 h of treadmill exercise at 50% of maximal oxygen consumption, and rested for 1 h after exercise in an environmental chamber at 38°C and 60% relative humidity. Skin and core temperatures were measured to calculate heat exchange parameters. Mean arterial pressure was higher in the hypertensive than in the normotensive subjects throughout the experiment (P<0.05, unpaired t-test). The hypertensive subjects stored less heat (H=-24.23±3.99 W·m−2 vs N=-13.63±2.24 W·m−2, P=0.03, unpaired t-test), experienced greater variations in body temperature (H=-0.62±0.05°C vsN=-0.35±0.12°C, P=0.03, unpaired t-test), and had more evaporated sweat (H=-106.1±4.59 W·m−2 vs N=-91.15±3.24 W·m−2, P=0.01, unpaired t-test) than the normotensive subjects during the period of recovery from exercise. In conclusion, essential hypertensive subjects showed greater sweat evaporation and increased heat dissipation and body cooling relative to normotensive subjects during recovery from moderate-intensity exercise performed in hot conditions. PMID:26517335

  12. Metabolic heat production by human and animal populations in cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Iain D.; Kennedy, Chris A.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic heating from building energy use, vehicle fuel consumption, and human metabolism is a key term in the urban energy budget equation. Heating from human metabolism, however, is often excluded from urban energy budgets because it is widely observed to be negligible. Few reports for low-latitude cities are available to support this observation, and no reports exist on the contribution of domestic animals to urban heat budgets. To provide a more comprehensive view of metabolic heating in cities, we quantified all terms of the anthropogenic heat budget at metropolitan scale for the world's 26 largest cities, using a top-down statistical approach. Results show that metabolic heat release from human populations in mid-latitude cities (e.g. London, Tokyo, New York) accounts for 4-8% of annual anthropogenic heating, compared to 10-45% in high-density tropical cities (e.g. Cairo, Dhaka, Kolkata). Heat release from animal populations amounts to <1% of anthropogenic heating in all cities. Heat flux density from human and animal metabolism combined is highest in Mumbai—the world's most densely populated megacity—at 6.5 W m-2, surpassing heat production by electricity use in buildings (5.8 W m-2) and fuel combustion in vehicles (3.9 W m-2). These findings, along with recent output from global climate models, suggest that in the world's largest and most crowded cities, heat emissions from human metabolism alone can force measurable change in mean annual temperature at regional scale.

  13. Metabolic heat production by human and animal populations in cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Iain D.; Kennedy, Chris A.

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic heating from building energy use, vehicle fuel consumption, and human metabolism is a key term in the urban energy budget equation. Heating from human metabolism, however, is often excluded from urban energy budgets because it is widely observed to be negligible. Few reports for low-latitude cities are available to support this observation, and no reports exist on the contribution of domestic animals to urban heat budgets. To provide a more comprehensive view of metabolic heating in cities, we quantified all terms of the anthropogenic heat budget at metropolitan scale for the world's 26 largest cities, using a top-down statistical approach. Results show that metabolic heat release from human populations in mid-latitude cities (e.g. London, Tokyo, New York) accounts for 4-8% of annual anthropogenic heating, compared to 10-45% in high-density tropical cities (e.g. Cairo, Dhaka, Kolkata). Heat release from animal populations amounts to <1% of anthropogenic heating in all cities. Heat flux density from human and animal metabolism combined is highest in Mumbai—the world's most densely populated megacity—at 6.5 W m-2, surpassing heat production by electricity use in buildings (5.8 W m-2) and fuel combustion in vehicles (3.9 W m-2). These findings, along with recent output from global climate models, suggest that in the world's largest and most crowded cities, heat emissions from human metabolism alone can force measurable change in mean annual temperature at regional scale.

  14. Geothermal waste heat utilization from in situ thermal bitumen recovery operations.

    PubMed

    Nakevska, Nevenka; Schincariol, Robert A; Dehkordi, S Emad; Cheadle, Burns A

    2015-01-01

    In situ thermal methods for bitumen extraction introduce a tremendous amount of energy into the reservoirs raising ambient temperatures of 13 °C to as high as 200 °C at the steam chamber edge and 50 °C along the reservoir edge. In essence these operations have unintentionally acted as underground thermal energy storage systems which can be recovered after completion of bitumen extraction activities. Groundwater flow and heat transport models of the Cold Lake, Alberta, reservoir, coupled with a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) model, allowed for investigating the use of closed-loop geothermal systems for energy recovery. Three types of BHEs (single U-tube, double U-tube, coaxial) were tested and analyzed by comparing outlet temperatures and corresponding heat extraction rates. Initial one year continuous operation simulations show that the double U-tube configuration had the best performance producing an average temperature difference of 5.7 °C, and an average heat extraction of 41 W/m. Given the top of the reservoir is at a depth of 400 m, polyethylene piping provided for larger extraction gains over more thermally conductive steel piping. Thirty year operation simulations illustrate that allowing 6 month cyclic recovery periods only increases the loop temperature gain by a factor of 1.2 over continuous operation. Due to the wide spacing of existing boreholes and reservoir depth, only a small fraction of the energy is efficiently recovered. Drilling additional boreholes between existing wells would increase energy extraction. In areas with shallower bitumen deposits such as the Athabasca region, i.e. 65 to 115 m deep, BHE efficiencies should be larger. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  15. Application guide for waste heat recovery with organic Rankine cycle equipment. Final report May-Dec 82

    SciTech Connect

    Moynihan, P.I.

    1983-01-15

    This report assesses the state-of-the-art of commercially available organic Rankine cycle (ORC) hardware from a literature search and industry survey. Engineering criteria for applying ORC technology are established, and a set of nomograms to enable the rapid sizing of the equipment is presented. A comparison of an ORC system with conventional heat recovery techniques can be made with a nomogram developed for a recuperative heat exchanger. A graphical technique for evaluating the economic aspects of an ORC system and conventional heat recovery method is discussed; also included is a description of anticipated future trends in organic Rankine cycle RandD.

  16. Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat and waste heat recovery in the iron and steel industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katter, L. B.; Peterson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The system identified operates from the primary arc furnace evacuation system as a heat source. Energy from the fume stream is stored as sensible energy in a solid medium (packed bed). A steam-driven turbine is arranged to generate power for peak shaving. A parametric design approach is presented since the overall system design, at optimum payback is strongly dependent upon the nature of the electric pricing structure. The scope of the project was limited to consideration of available technology so that industry-wide application could be achieved by 1985. A search of the literature, coupled with interviews with representatives of major steel producers, served as the means whereby the techniques and technologies indicated for the specific site are extrapolated to the industry as a whole and to the 1985 time frame. The conclusion of the study is that by 1985, a national yearly savings of 1.9 million barrels of oil could be realized through recovery of waste heat from primary arc furnace fume gases on an industry-wide basis. Economic studies indicate that the proposed system has a plant payback time of approximately 5 years.

  17. Transgenic mice expressing the human heat shock protein 70 have improved post-ischemic myocardial recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Plumier, J C; Ross, B M; Currie, R W; Angelidis, C E; Kazlaris, H; Kollias, G; Pagoulatos, G N

    1995-01-01

    Heat shock treatment induces expression of several heat shock proteins and subsequent post-ischemic myocardial protection. Correlations exist between the degree of stress used to induce the heat shock proteins, the amount of the inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the level of myocardial protection. The inducible HSP70 has also been shown to be protective in transfected myogenic cells. Here we examined the role of human inducible HSP70 in transgenic mouse hearts. Overexpression of the human HSP70 does not appear to affect normal protein synthesis or the stress response in transgenic mice compared with nontransgenic mice. After 30 min of ischemia, upon reperfusion, transgenic hearts versus nontransgenic hearts showed significantly improved recovery of contractile force (0.35 +/- 0.08 versus 0.16 +/- 0.05 g, respectively, P < 0.05), rate of contraction, and rate of relaxation. Creatine kinase, an indicator of cellular injury, was released at a high level (67.7 +/- 23.0 U/ml) upon reperfusion from nontransgenic hearts, but not transgenic hearts (1.6 +/- 0.8 U/ml). We conclude that high level constitutive expression of the human inducible HSP70 plays a direct role in the protection of the myocardium from ischemia and reperfusion injury. Images PMID:7706492

  18. RF heating for fusion product studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, T. Johnson, T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Kiptily, V.; Rimini, F.; Eriksson, J.; Mantsinen, M.; Schneider, M.; Tsalas, M.

    2015-12-10

    Third harmonic cyclotron heating is an effective tool for accelerating deuterium (D) beams to the MeV energy range, suitable for studying ITER relevant fast particle physics in plasmas without significant tritium content. Such experiments were recently conducted in JET with an ITER like wall in D plasmas with {sup 3}He concentrations up to 30% in order to boost the fusion reactivity by D-{sup 3}He reactions. The harmonic cyclotron heating produces high-energy tails in the MeV range of D ions by on-axis heating and of {sup 3}He ions by tangential off-axis heating. The discharges are characterized by long sawtooth free periods and a rich spectrum of MHD modes excited by the fast D and {sup 3}He ions. The partitions of the power, which depend on the distribution function of D, vary strongly over several slowing down times. Self-consistent modelling of the distribution function with the SELFO-light code are presented and compared with experimental data from fast particle diagnostics.

  19. RF heating for fusion product studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Kiptily, V.; Eriksson, J.; Mantsinen, M.; Schneider, M.; Rimini, F.; Tsalas, M.

    2015-12-01

    Third harmonic cyclotron heating is an effective tool for accelerating deuterium (D) beams to the MeV energy range, suitable for studying ITER relevant fast particle physics in plasmas without significant tritium content. Such experiments were recently conducted in JET with an ITER like wall in D plasmas with 3He concentrations up to 30% in order to boost the fusion reactivity by D-3He reactions. The harmonic cyclotron heating produces high-energy tails in the MeV range of D ions by on-axis heating and of 3He ions by tangential off-axis heating. The discharges are characterized by long sawtooth free periods and a rich spectrum of MHD modes excited by the fast D and 3He ions. The partitions of the power, which depend on the distribution function of D, vary strongly over several slowing down times. Self-consistent modelling of the distribution function with the SELFO-light code are presented and compared with experimental data from fast particle diagnostics.

  20. Radiogenic heat production, thermal regime and evolution of continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschal, Jean-Claude; Jaupart, Claude

    2013-12-01

    Heat flow and heat production data complement seismic information and provide strong constraints on crustal composition, thickness and evolution. They have helped understand the nature of the Mohorovicic discontinuity and the variations in seismic velocities below the Moho. Notably, heat flow studies have delineated the vertical distribution of heat producing elements throughout the crust and in the upper most mantle lithosphere. Analysis of global data sets on heat flow and crustal thickness demonstrate that there is no correlation between these two variables. This is due to the large spatial variations in crustal composition and heat production that exist within a single geological province. For a given crustal thickness, the Moho temperature varies within a wide range (≈ 300 K) depending on surface heat flux and crustal heat production. Thus one cannot use generic models based on a “type” crustal column to calculate crustal geotherms. In stable regions, lower crustal temperatures depend on the amount and vertical distribution of heat producing elements in the crust. These temperatures determine the conditions of crustal stability and impose a limit on the maximum thickness of a stabilized crust.

  1. Wood processing wastes recovery and composted product field test

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.T.; Lin, K.L.

    1997-12-31

    Lumber mill waste, more than 3,000 tons per month, is one of the main waste sources in I-Lan area. Most of the lumber mill waste is sawdust which takes a large parts of organic-containing wastes in I-Lan county. Wastes from seafood plants around the Sueou Harbor causes a treatment problem because of their high nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations. Furthermore, the distiller-by products in I-Lan Winery are easy to become spoiled and result in odor. In this study, the compost method is suggested to deal with these waste problems and make energy recovery. Microorganisms incubating in the laboratory provide the stable seed needed for composting. Flowers and vegetable raising are scheduled to be used in field to verify the efficiency of the products. The optimal combination ration of wastes and operation criteria then will be concluded in this study after economic analyzing. The results show that the Zinnia elegans leaves growth is relative with organic fertilizer. It can also be illustrated from the statistical value that the F value is 19.4 and above the critical value 9.4.

  2. Experimental and numerical analyses on a plate heat exchanger with phase change for waste heat recovery at off-design conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollone, Roberto; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Di Battista, Davide; Fatigati, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    This paper analyzes the performances of an evaporator for small scale waste heat recovery applications based on bottoming Organic Rankine Cycles with net output power in the range 2-5 kW. The heat recovery steam generator is a plate heat exchanger with oil as hot stream and an organic fluid on the cold side. An experimental characterization of the heat exchanger was carried out at different operating points measuring temperatures, pressures and flow rates on both sides. The measurement data further allowed to validate a numerical model of the evaporator whereas heat transfer coefficients were evaluated comparing several literature correlations, especially for the phase-change of the organic fluid. With reference to a waste heat recovery application in industrial compressed air systems, multiple off-design conditions were simulated considering the effects of oil mass flow rate and temperature on the superheating of the organic fluid, a key parameter to ensure a proper operation of the expansion machine, thus of the energy recovery process.

  3. Rubisco activase and wheat productivity under heat stress conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rubisco activase (RCA) constrains the photosynthetic potential of plants at high temperature (heat stress). We hypothesized that endogenous levels of RCA could serve as an important determinant of plant productivity under heat stress conditions. In this study, we investigated the possible relation...

  4. Improved heat recovery and high-temperature clean-up for coal-gas fired combustion turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Barthelemy, N.M.; Lynn, S.

    1991-07-01

    This study investigates the performance of an Improved Heat Recovery Method (IHRM) applied to a coal-gas fired power-generating system using a high-temperature clean-up. This heat recovery process has been described by Higdon and Lynn (1990). The IHRM is an integrated heat-recovery network that significantly increases the thermal efficiency of a gas turbine in the generation of electric power. Its main feature is to recover both low- and high-temperature heat reclaimed from various gas streams by means of evaporating heated water into combustion air in an air saturation unit. This unit is a packed column where compressed air flows countercurrently to the heated water prior to being sent to the combustor, where it is mixed with coal-gas and burned. The high water content of the air stream thus obtained reduces the amount of excess air required to control the firing temperature of the combustor, which in turn lowers the total work of compression and results in a high thermal efficiency. Three designs of the IHRM were developed to accommodate three different gasifying process. The performances of those designs were evaluated and compared using computer simulations. The efficiencies obtained with the IHRM are substantially higher those yielded by other heat-recovery technologies using the same gasifying processes. The study also revealed that the IHRM compares advantageously to most advanced power-generation technologies currently available or tested commercially. 13 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Waste heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engines by exhaust-driven Brayton cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalifa, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation of Bryton Bottoming Systems (BBS) as waste heat recovery devices for future adiabatic diesel engines in heavy duty trucks is presented. Parametric studies were performed to evaluate the influence of external and internal design parameters on BBS performance. Conceptual design and trade-off studies were undertaken to estimate the optimum configuration, size, and cost of major hardware components. The potential annual fuel savings of long-haul trucks equipped with BBS were estimated. The addition of a BBS to a turbocharged, nonaftercooled adiabatic engine would improve fuel economy by as much as 12%. In comparison with an aftercooled, turbocompound engine, the BBS-equipped turbocharged engine would offer a 4.4% fuel economy advantage. If installed in tandem with an aftercooled turbocompound engine, the BBS could effect a 7.2% fuel economy improvement. The cost of a mass-produced 38 Bhp BBS is estimated at about $6460 or 170/Bhp. Technical and economic barriers that hinder the commercial introduction of bottoming systems were identified. Related studies in the area of waste heat recovery from adiabatic diesel engines and NASA-CR-168255 (Steam Rankine) and CR-168256 (Organic Rankine).

  6. Radiation intensification of the reactor pressure vessels recovery by low temperature heat treatment (wet annealing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasikov, E.

    2015-04-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of NPP safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. There are two approaches to annealing. The first one is so-called «dry» high temperature (∼475°C) annealing. It allows obtaining practically complete recovery, but requires the removal of the reactor core and internals. External heat source (furnace) is required to carry out RPV heat treatment. The alternative approach is to anneal RPV at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps while operating within the RPV design limits. This low temperature «wet» annealing, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible.

  7. Finite element analysis on the thermoelectric generator for the waste heat recovery of solar application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, Muhammad Nubli; Ilias, Izzudin; Abas, Amir; Muhamad, Wan Mansor Wan

    2017-09-01

    Thermoelectric generator (TEG) is the solid state device that converts the thermal gradient into electrical energy. TEG is widely used as the renewable energy source especially for the electronic equipment that operates with the small amount of electrical power. In the present analysis, the finite element analysis (FEA) using ANSYS is conducted on a model of the TEG attached with the aluminium, Al plate on the hot side of the TEG. This simple construction of TEG model was built in order to be used in the waste heat recovery of solar application. It was shown that the changes of the area and thickness of the Al plate increased the temperature gradient between hot and cold sides of TEG. This directly increase the voltage produced by the TEG based on the Seeback effect. The increase of the thermal gradient due to the increment of thickness and width of Al plate might be because of the increase of thermal resistance of Al plate. This finding provides a valuable data in design process to build a good TEG attached with Al plate for the waste heat recovery of solar application.

  8. Turbulent boundary layer heat transfer experiments: Convex curvature effects, including introduction and recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Heat transfer rates were measured through turbulent and transitional boundary layers on an isothermal, convexly curved wall and downstream flat plate. The effect of convex curvature on the fully turbulent boundary layer was a reduction of the local Stanton numbers 20-50% below those predicted for a flat wall under the same circumstances. The recovery of the heat transfer rates on the downstream flat wall was extremely slow. After 60 cm of recovery length, the Stanton number was still typically 15-20% below the flat wall predicted value. Various effects important in the modeling of curved flows were studied separately. These are: (1) the effect of initial boundary layer thickness; (2) the effect of freestream velocity; (3) the effect of freestream acceleration; (4) the effect of unheated starting length; and (5) the effect of the maturity of the boundary layer. Regardless of the initial state, curvature eventually forced the boundary layer into an asymptotic curved condition. The slope, minus one, is believed to be significant.

  9. Solid fossil-fuel recovery by electrical induction heating in situ - A proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, S.

    1980-04-01

    A technique, termed electrical induction heating, is proposed for in situ processes of energy production from solid fossil fuels, such as bitumen production from underground distillation of oil sand; oil by underground distillation of oil shale; petroleum from heavy oil by underground mobilization of heavy oil, from either residues of conventional liquid petroleum deposits or new deposits of viscous oil; methane and coal tar from lignite and coal deposits by underground distillation of coal; and generation of electricity by surface combustion of low calorific-value gas from underground coke gasification by combustion of the organic residue left from the underground distillation of coal by induction heating. A method of surface distillation of mined coking coal by induction heating to produce coke, methane, and coal tar is also proposed.

  10. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  11. Recovery

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video discusses the recovery events that occur in high-power rocketry and the various devices used in safely recovering the rocket. The video includes a discussion of black powder and ejection...

  12. Heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin production in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Whipp, S C; Moon, H W; Lyon, N C

    1975-01-01

    Hysterectomy-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets were infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli on day 4 of life. Samples of feces and intestinal contents were collected and tested in infant mice for enterotoxic activity. Positive enterotoxic responses were observed in mice given filtrates of feces and intestinal contents from piglets infected withe enterotoxigenic E. coli known to produce heat-stable enterotoxin but not heat-liabile enterotoxin in vitro. It is concluded that heat-stable enterotoxigenic E. coli induce diarrhea by production of heat-stable enterotoxin in vivo. PMID:1097335

  13. Biobutanol production in a Clostridium acetobutylicum biofilm reactor integrated with simultaneous product recovery by adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium acetobutylicum can propagate on fibrous matrices and form biofilms that have improved butanol tolerance and a high fermentation rate and can be repeatedly used. Previously, a novel macroporous resin, KA-I, was synthesized in our laboratory and was demonstrated to be a good adsorbent with high selectivity and capacity for butanol recovery from a model solution. Based on these results, we aimed to develop a process integrating a biofilm reactor with simultaneous product recovery using the KA-I resin to maximize the production efficiency of biobutanol. Results KA-I showed great affinity for butanol and butyrate and could selectively enhance acetoin production at the expense of acetone during the fermentation. The biofilm reactor exhibited high productivity with considerably low broth turbidity during repeated batch fermentations. By maintaining the butanol level above 6.5 g/L in the biofilm reactor, butyrate adsorption by the KA-I resin was effectively reduced. Co-adsorption of acetone by the resin improved the fermentation performance. By redox modulation with methyl viologen (MV), the butanol-acetone ratio and the total product yield increased. An equivalent solvent titer of 96.5 to 130.7 g/L was achieved with a productivity of 1.0 to 1.5 g · L-1 · h-1. The solvent concentration and productivity increased by 4 to 6-fold and 3 to 5-fold, respectively, compared to traditional batch fermentation using planktonic culture. Conclusions Compared to the conventional process, the integrated process dramatically improved the productivity and reduced the energy consumption as well as water usage in biobutanol production. While genetic engineering focuses on strain improvement to enhance butanol production, process development can fully exploit the productivity of a strain and maximize the production efficiency. PMID:24401161

  14. Recovery of viability and radiation resistance by heat-injured conidia of Penicillium expansum Lk. ex Thom.

    PubMed

    Baldy, R W; Sommer, N F; Buckley, P M

    1970-05-01

    Spores heated in water at 54 C for up to 1 hr were plated on nutrient agar immediately or held for 3 days in aerated water at 23 C and then plated. Under these conditions, holding was optimal for recovery, increasing survival percentage up to 20-fold over values for immediate plating. Recovery was prevented partially or completely, however, when spores were held in any of the following solutions: glucose, potassium phosphate, ammonium or sodium acetate, sodium azide, or 2,4-dinitrophenol, or in the sodium or potassium salts of pyruvate, and tricarboxylic acid cycle acids. Both anaerobiosis and incubation at 0 C prevented recovery. Survivors of a heat treatment were more sensitive to gamma radiation than were unheated spores. Conditions which affected the recovery of viability had the same effect on restoration of radiation resistance. Thus, many of the processes for restoration of radiation resistance seem involved also in recovery of viability after heating. After a 99% inactivating treatment (about 30 min at 54 C), heated spores respired as fast as unheated spores, or faster. Malate, citrate, succinate, and acetate stimulated respiration in unheated spores and inhibited it in heated spores.

  15. Differential proteomic analysis of grapevine leaves by iTRAQ reveals responses to heat stress and subsequent recovery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High temperature is a major environmental factor limiting grape yield and affecting berry quality. Thermotolerance includes the direct response to heat stress and the ability to recover from heat stress. To better understand the mechanism of the thermotolerance of Vitis, we combined a physiological analysis with iTRAQ-based proteomics of Vitis vinifera cv Cabernet Sauvignon, subjected to 43°C for 6 h, and then followed by recovery at 25/18°C. Results High temperature increased the concentrations of TBARS and inhibited electronic transport in photosynthesis apparatus, indicating that grape leaves were damaged by heat stress. However, these physiological changes rapidly returned to control levels during the subsequent recovery phase from heat stress. One hundred and seventy-four proteins were differentially expressed under heat stress and/or during the recovery phase, in comparison to unstressed controls, respectively. Stress and recovery conditions shared 42 proteins, while 113 and 103 proteins were respectively identified under heat stress and recovery conditions alone. Based on MapMan ontology, functional categories for these dysregulated proteins included mainly photosynthesis (about 20%), proteins (13%), and stress (8%). The subcellular localization using TargetP showed most proteins were located in the chloroplasts (34%), secretory pathways (8%) and mitochondrion (3%). Conclusion On the basis of these findings, we proposed that some proteins related to electron transport chain of photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes, HSPs and other stress response proteins, and glycolysis may play key roles in enhancing grapevine adaptation to and recovery capacity from heat stress. These results provide a better understanding of the proteins involved in, and mechanisms of thermotolerance in grapevines. PMID:24774513

  16. Methane production and recovery using potato waste solubles and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    The production and recovery of methane gas utilizing various potato conversion wastes in either soluble or solid form is discussed in this chapter. Such wastes may occur at temperatures ranging from 25 C to as high as 55 C. The form and concentration of the waste and the temperature may dictate the choice of one of several possible treatment processes which are variously designated as conventional (holding tanks), contact (recycle of cell solids), and filter (packed bed) reactors. To this may be added a recent concept of an expanded bed reactor. A first design approach was employed to approximate capital and operating costs with an evaluation of the internal rates of return on investment and payout times. The fraction of the energy required by a processing plant which could be provided by the gas produced was of interest as a potential supplemental source of energy in the event that natural gas supplies are reduced or that prices of this fuel continue to escalate rapidly.

  17. Enthalphyand Heat Capacity of Several Candy Products,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    They are three types of chocolate : ’Extra with Milk,’ ’Sport,’ and ’Soy Bean’ without ground nuts and sugar. For a caloric investigation of the candy products an adiabatic calorimeter was used.

  18. Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1982-31 January 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, W.E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

    1983-02-01

    The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

  19. Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1981-31 January 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, W. E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

    1982-02-01

    The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

  20. Electricity and heat production by biomass cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčič, Simon; Marčič, Milan

    2017-07-01

    In Slovenia, approximately 2 % of electricity is generated using cogeneration systems. Industrial and district heating networks ensure the growth of such technology. Today, many existing systems are outdated, providing myriad opportunities for reconstruction. One concept for the development of households and industry envisages the construction of several small biomass units and the application of natural gas as a fuel with a relatively extensive distribution network. This concept has good development potential in Slovenia. Forests cover 56 % of the surface area in Slovenia, which has, as a result, a lot of waste wood to be turned into biomass. Biomass is an important fuel in Slovenia. Biomass is gasified in a gasifier, and the wood gas obtained is used to power the gas engine. This paper describes a biomass cogeneration system as the first of this type in Slovenia, located in Ruše.

  1. Heat stress causes substantial labour productivity loss in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, Kerstin K.; Botzen, Wouter J. W.; Oppermann, Elspeth; Kjellstrom, Tord; Garnett, Stephen T.

    2015-07-01

    Heat stress at the workplace is an occupational health hazard that reduces labour productivity. Assessment of productivity loss resulting from climate change has so far been based on physiological models of heat exposure. These models suggest productivity may decrease by 11-27% by 2080 in hot regions such as Asia and the Caribbean, and globally by up to 20% in hot months by 2050. Using an approach derived from health economics, we describe self-reported estimates of work absenteeism and reductions in work performance caused by heat in Australia during 2013/2014. We found that the annual costs were US$655 per person across a representative sample of 1,726 employed Australians. This represents an annual economic burden of around US$6.2 billion (95% CI: 5.2-7.3 billion) for the Australian workforce. This amounts to 0.33 to 0.47% of Australia’s GDP. Although this was a period when many Australians experienced what is at present considered exceptional heat, our results suggest that adaptation measures to reduce heat effects should be adopted widely if severe economic impacts from labour productivity loss are to be avoided if heat waves become as frequent as predicted.

  2. Recovery from heat, salt and osmotic stress in Physcomitrella patens requires a functional small heat shock protein PpHsp16.4

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant small heat shock proteins (sHsps) accumulate in response to various environmental stresses, including heat, drought, salt and oxidative stress. Numerous studies suggest a role for these proteins in stress tolerance by preventing stress-induced protein aggregation as well as by facilitating protein refolding by other chaperones. However, in vivo evidence for the involvement of sHsps in tolerance to different stress factors is still missing, mainly due to the lack of appropriate mutants in specific sHsp genes. Results In this study we characterized the function of a sHsp in abiotic stress tolerance in the moss Physcomitrella patens, a model for primitive land plants. Using suppression subtractive hybridization, we isolated an abscisic acid-upregulated gene from P. patens encoding a 16.4 kDa cytosolic class II sHsp. PpHsp16.4 was also induced by salicylic acid, dithiothreitol (DTT) and by exposure to various stimuli, including osmotic and salt stress, but not by oxidative stress-inducing compounds. Expression of the gene was maintained upon stress relief, suggesting a role for this protein in the recovery stage. PpHsp16.4 is encoded by two identical genes arranged in tandem in the genome. Targeted disruption of both genes resulted in the inability of plants to recover from heat, salt and osmotic stress. In vivo localization studies revealed that PpHsp16.4 localized in cytosolic granules in the vicinity of chloroplasts under non stress conditions, suggesting possible distinct roles for this protein under stress and optimal growth. Conclusions We identified a member of the class II sHsp family that showed hormonal and abiotic stress gene regulation. Induction of the gene by DTT treatment suggests that damaged proteins may act as signals for the stress-induction of PpHsp16.4. The product of this gene was shown to localize in cytosolic granules near the chloroplasts, suggesting a role for the protein in association with these organelles. Our study

  3. Modeling of reciprocating internal combustion engines for power generation and heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Kyung Tae; Cho, Heejin; Luck, Rogelio; Mago, Pedro J.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a power generation and heat recovery model for reciprocating internal combustion engines (ICEs). The purpose of the proposed model is to provide realistic estimates of performance/efficiency maps for both electrical power output and useful thermal output for various capacities of engines for use in a preliminary CHP design/simulation process. The proposed model will serve as an alternative to constant engine efficiencies or empirical efficiency curves commonly used in the current literature for simulations of CHP systems. The engine performance/efficiency calculation algorithm has been coded to a publicly distributed FORTRAN Dynamic Link Library (DLL), and a user friendly tool has been developed using Visual Basic programming. Simulation results using the proposed model are validated against manufacturer’s technical data.

  4. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1997-12-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, and modified alloy 800. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700 C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925 C with good weldability and ductility.

  5. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1995-08-01

    Alloys for design and construction of structural components needed to contain process streams and provide internal structures in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems were examined. Emphasis was placed on high-strength, corrosion-resistant alloys for service at temperatures above 1000 {degrees}F (540{degrees}C). Data were collected that related to fabrication, joining, corrosion protection, and failure criteria. Alloys systems include modified type 310 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb steels and sulfidation-resistance alloys HR120 and HR160. Types of testing include creep, stress-rupture, creep crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for high temperature service, a modified type 310 stainless steel was developed with a target strength of twice that for standard type 310 stainless steel.

  6. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-08-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, modified alloy 800, and two sulfidation resistant alloys: HR160 and HR120. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700{degrees}C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925{degrees}C with good weldability and ductility.

  7. Organic-Rankine-cycle systems for waste-heat recovery in refineries and chemical process plants

    SciTech Connect

    Meacher, J.S.

    1981-09-01

    The use of organic Rankine cycles (ORC) for the recovery and conversion of low-temperature waste heat has received considerable attention during recent years. The number of demonstration systems developed and put into service is small, and only a fraction of the possible energy-conserving benefits of the concept have been realized to date. This situation is due partly to the fact that energy costs have only recently risen to the point where such units provide acceptable return on investment. A second contributing factor may be that the design of ORC equipment has not yet responded to the special needs of the dominant market for ORC systems. 2 references, 12 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Metabolic heat production by human and animal populations in cities.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Iain D; Kennedy, Chris A

    2016-12-26

    Anthropogenic heating from building energy use, vehicle fuel consumption, and human metabolism is a key term in the urban energy budget equation. Heating from human metabolism, however, is often excluded from urban energy budgets because it is widely observed to be negligible. Few reports for low-latitude cities are available to support this observation, and no reports exist on the contribution of domestic animals to urban heat budgets. To provide a more comprehensive view of metabolic heating in cities, we quantified all terms of the anthropogenic heat budget at metropolitan scale for the world's 26 largest cities, using a top-down statistical approach. Results show that metabolic heat release from human populations in mid-latitude cities (e.g. London, Tokyo, New York) accounts for 4-8% of annual anthropogenic heating, compared to 10-45% in high-density tropical cities (e.g. Cairo, Dhaka, Kolkata). Heat release from animal populations amounts to <1% of anthropogenic heating in all cities. Heat flux density from human and animal metabolism combined is highest in Mumbai-the world's most densely populated megacity-at 6.5 W m(-2), surpassing heat production by electricity use in buildings (5.8 W m(-2)) and fuel combustion in vehicles (3.9 W m(-2)). These findings, along with recent output from global climate models, suggest that in the world's largest and most crowded cities, heat emissions from human metabolism alone can force measurable change in mean annual temperature at regional scale.

  9. Effect of iron saturation on the recovery of lactoferrin in rennet whey coming from heat-treated skim milk.

    PubMed

    Brisson, G; Britten, M; Pouliot, Y

    2007-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of thermal treatments on the recovery of lactoferrin in whey coming from rennet-coagulated skim milk. The impact of lactoferrin iron saturation was also assessed using skim milk spiked with different lactoferrin iron forms. The recovery of lactoferrin in the rennet whey fraction was determined by reverse-phase HPLC. One- and 2-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE analyses were performed on rennet curds to characterize the protein interactions involving lactoferrin in heated milk. The extent of lactoferrin recovered in the whey fraction was found to reduce as the heating temperature increased. The binding of iron by lactoferrin improved its thermal stability and its recovery in the whey fraction. Poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis results showed that the association of lactoferrin in the unheated milk rennet curd involved noncovalent interactions, whereas upon heating, lactoferrin also interacted via an intermolecular disulfide link. Depending on the severity of the heat treatment, lactoferrin aggregates with Cys-containing proteins (beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, alpha(s2)-casein, and kappa-casein) occurred by intermolecular thiol/disulfide exchange reactions. These noncovalent and covalent interactions explained the lower recovery of lactoferrin in heated milk.

  10. Rubisco activase and wheat productivity under heat-stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Ristic, Zoran; Momcilovic, Ivana; Bukovnik, Urska; Prasad, P V Vara; Fu, Jianming; Deridder, Benjamin P; Elthon, Thomas E; Mladenov, Novica

    2009-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA) constrains the photosynthetic potential of plants at high temperatures (heat stress). Endogenous levels of RCA could serve as an important determinant of plant productivity under heat-stress conditions. Thus, in this study, the possible relationship between expression levels of RCA and plant yield in 11 European cultivars of winter wheat following prolonged exposure to heat stress was investigated. In addition, the effect of a short-term heat stress on RCA expression in four genotypes of wheat, five genotypes of maize, and one genotype of Arabidopsis thaliana was examined. Immunoblots prepared from leaf protein extracts from control plants showed three RCA cross-reacting bands in wheat and two RCA cross-reacting bands in maize and Arabidopsis. The molecular mass of the observed bands was in the range between 40 kDa and 46 kDa. Heat stress affected RCA expression in a few genotypes of wheat and maize but not in Arabidopsis. In wheat, heat stress slightly modulated the relative amounts of RCA in some cultivars. In maize, heat stress did not seem to affect the existing RCA isoforms (40 kDa and 43 kDa) but induced the accumulation of a new putative RCA of 45-46 kDa. The new putative 45-46 kDa RCA was not seen in a genotype of maize (ZPL 389) that has been shown to display an exceptional sensitivity to heat stress. A significant, positive, linear correlation was found between the expression of wheat 45-46 kDa RCA and plant productivity under heat-stress conditions. Results support the hypothesis that endogenous levels of RCA could play an important role in plant productivity under supraoptimal temperature conditions.

  11. Low Cost Advanced Thermoelectric (TE) Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, G. P.

    2014-03-01

    Low cost, fully integrated TE generators (TEGs) to recover waste heat from vehicle exhaust will reduce transportation sector energy consumption and emissions. TEGs will be the first application of high-temperature TE materials for high-volume use and establish new industrial sectors with scaled up production capability of TEG materials and components. We will create a potential supply chain for practical automotive TEGs and identify manufacturing and assembly processes for large scale production of TEG materials and components. Our work focusses on several innovative R&D paths: (1) enhanced TE material performance by doping and compositional tuning, (2) optimized TE material fabrication and processing to reduce thermal conductivity and improve fracture strength, (3) high volume production for successful skutterudite commercialization, (4) new material, nanostructure, and nanoscale approaches to reduce thermal interface and electrical contact resistances, (5) innovative heat exchangers for high efficiency heat flows and optimum temperature profiles despite highly variable exhaust gas operating conditions, (6) new modeling and simulation tools, and (7) inexpensive materials for thermal insulation and coatings for TE encapsulation. Recent results will be presented. Supported by the U.S. DOE Vehicle Technology Program.

  12. Heat production during contraction in skeletal muscle of hypothyroid mice

    SciTech Connect

    Leijendekker, W.J.; van Hardeveld, C.; Elzinga, G. )

    1987-08-01

    The effect of hypothyroidism on tension-independent and -dependent heat produced during a twitch and a tetanic contraction of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscle of mice was examined. The amount of heat produced during a twitch and the rate of heat development during a tetanus of EDL and soleus were measured at and above optimal length. The effect of hypothyroidism on force production was <30%. Straight lines were used to fit the relation between heat production and force. Hypothyroidism significantly decreases tension-independent heat during contraction of EDL and soleus muscle. Because the tension-independent heat is considered to be related to the Ca{sup 2+} cycling, these findings suggest that ATP splitting due to the Ca{sup 2+} cycling is reduced in hypothyroid mice. This conclusion was strengthened by the observation that the oxalate-supported {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}-uptake activity and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}-loading capacity of muscle homogenates from hypothyroid mice were reduced, respectively, to 51 and to 65% in soleus and to 63 and 73% in EDL muscle as compared with euthyroid mice. The tension-dependent rate of heat development during a tetanus was also decreased in soleus muscle of hypothyroid mice. This suggests a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis related to cross-bridge cycling in this muscle due to the hypothyroid state.

  13. A Quantitative Study of the Viability of Greywater Heat Recovery (GWHR): GWHR Implemented in Barracks and Dining Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    30 B4 Greywater heat recovery cooling modes (reference 2) ........................................................... 32 ERDC...Cubic meter pints (US liquid) 0.473176 Liters cubic feet 0.02831685 cubic meters ERDC/CERL TR-11-20 x ERDC/CERL TR-11-20 1 1 Introduction...energy to preheat domestic hot water, it is also possible to use the recovered energy (or alternatively, the tech- nology) for space heating or cooling

  14. The effects of cranial cooling during recovery on subsequent uncompensable heat stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Phillip J; Masbou, Anaïs T; Petersen, Stewart R; Cheung, Stephen S

    2015-08-01

    This study compared cranial (CC) with passive (CON) cooling during recovery on tolerance to subsequent exercise while wearing firefighting protective ensemble and self-contained breathing apparatus in a hot-humid environment. Eleven males (mean ± SD; age, 30.9 ± 9.2 years; peak oxygen consumption, 49.5 ± 5.1 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) performed 2 × 20 min treadmill walks (5.6 km · h(-1), 4% incline) in 35 °C and 60% relative humidity. During a 20-min recovery (rest), participants sat and removed gloves, helmets, and flash hoods but otherwise remained encapsulated. A close-fitting liquid-perfused hood pumped 13 °C water at ∼ 500 mL · min(-1) through the head and neck (CC) or no cooling hood was worn (CON). During rest, neck temperature was lower in CC compared with CON from 4 min (CC: 35.73 ± 3.28 °C, CON: 37.66 ± 1.35 °C, p = 0.025) until the end (CC: 33.06 ± 4.70 °C, CON: 36.85 ± 1.63 °C, p = 0.014). Rectal temperature rose in both CC (0.11 ± 0.19 °C) and CON (0.26 ± 0.15 °C) during rest, with nonsignificant interaction between conditions (p = 0.076). Perceived thermal stress was lower (p = 0.006) from 5 min of CC (median: 3 (quartile 1: 3, quartile 3: 4)) until the end of rest compared with CON (median: 4 (quartile 1: 4, quartile 3: 4)). However, there were no significant differences (p = 0.906) in tolerance times during the second exercise between CC (16.55 ± 1.14 min) and CON (16.60 ± 1.31 min), nor were there any difference in rectal temperature at the start (CC: 38.30 ± 0.40 °C, CON: 38.40 ± 0.16 °C, p = 0.496) or at the end (CC: 38.82 ± 0.23 °C, CON: 39.07 ± 0.22 °C, p = 0.173). With high ambient heat and encapsulation, cranial and neck cooling during recovery decreases physiological strain and perceived thermal stress, but is ineffective in improving subsequent uncompensable heat stress tolerance.

  15. MHD heat and seed recovery technology project. Ninth quarterly report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Petrick, Michael; Johnson, Terry R.

    1980-05-01

    The MHD Heat and Seed Recovery Technology Project at Argonne National Laboratory is obtaining information for the design and operation of the steam plant downstream of the MHD channel-diffuser, and of the seed regeneration process. The project goal is to supply the engineering data required in the design of components for prototype and demonstration MHD facilities. The primary effort of the HSR Technology Project at Argonne is directed toward experimental investigations of critical problem areas, such as (1) NO/sub x/ behavior in the radiant boiler and secondary combustor; (2) radiant boiler design to meet the multiple requirements of steam generation, NO/sub x/ decomposition, and seed-slag separation; (3) effects of solid or liquid seed deposits on heat transfer and gas flow in the steam and air heaters; (4) formation, growth, and deposition of seed-slag particles; and (5) character of the combustion gas effluents. These investigations are performed primarily in a 2-MW test facility, Argonne MHD Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL). Other project activities are related to studies of the thermochemistry of the seed-slag combustion gas system, identification of ceramic and metallic materials for service in the MHD-steam plant, and evaluation of seed regeneration processes. Progress is described.

  16. MHD heat and seed recovery technology project. Tenth quarterly report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Petrick, M.; Johnson, T. R.

    1980-12-01

    The MHD Heat and Seed Recovery Technology Project at Argonne National Laboratory is obtaining information for the design and operation of the steam plant downstream of the MHD channel-diffuser, and of the seed regeneration process. The project goal is to supply the engineering data required in the design of components for prototype and demonstration MHD facilities. The primary effort of the HSR Technology Project at Argonne is directed toward experimental investigations of critical problem areas, such as (1) corrosion and erosion of refractories and metal alloys; (2) NO/sub x/ behavior in the radiant boiler and secondary combustor; (3) radiant boiler design to meet the multiple requirements of steam generation, NO/sub x/ decomposition, and seed-slag separation; (4) effects of solid or liquid seed deposits on heat transfer and gas flow in the steam and air heaters; (5) formation, growth, and deposition of seed-slag particles; and (6) character of the combustion gas effluents. These investigations are performed primarily in a 2-MW test facility, the Argonne MHD Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL). Other project activities are related to studies of the thermochemistry of the seed-slag combustion gas system, and evaluation of seed regeneration processes. Progress is reported.

  17. Process for the recovery of heat and chemicals from spent liquor

    SciTech Connect

    Petaenen, P.

    1993-07-27

    A process is described for the recovery of heat and chemicals from spent liquors consisting essentially of the steps of: (a) evaporating water from the liquor in a concentrator vessel to increase the solids concentration by heating under pressure greater than atmospheric to a temperature above the atmospheric boiling point of the liquor; (b) feeding the liquor from the concentrator vessel to an expansion vessel where the pressure and temperature are lowered but still maintained above the atmospheric pressure and above the atmospheric boiling point of the liquor to further increase the solids concentration of the liquor; (c) feeding the liquor from the expansion vessel to a second expansion vessel and mixing the liquor therein with ashes fed into said second expansion vessel under pressure and further expansion evaporating the mixture while still maintaining the mixture above atmospheric pressure and above the atmospheric boiling point of the liquor; and (d) feeding the mixture into a soda-ash furnace while maintaining the raised pressure and temperature in the second expansion vessel.

  18. The use of mechanical ventilation with heat recovery for controlling radon and radondaughter concentrations in houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaroff, W. W.; Boegel, M. L.; Hollowell, C. D.; Roseme, G. D.

    An energy research house in Maryland was found to have radon concentrations far in excess of recommended guidelines. A mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery was installed in this house to test its effectiveness as an energy-efficient control technique for indoor radon. Radon concentration was monitored continuously for 2 weeks under varying ventilation conditions [0.07-0.8 air changes per hour (ach)] and radondaughter concentrations were measured by grab-sample techniques about nine times daily during this period. At ventilation rates of 0.6 ach and higher, radon-daughter levels dropped below guidelines for indoor concentrations. Comparison with other studies indicates that indoor radon buildup may be a problem in a considerable portion of houses characterized by their low infiltration rates. The use of mechanical ventilation systems with air-to-air heat exchangers may offer a practical, cost-effective and energy-efficient means of alleviating not only the radon problem specifically but also the general deterioration of indoor air quality in many houses designed or retrofitted to achieve low infiltration.

  19. Effect of media, additives, and incubation conditions on the recovery of high pressure and heat-injured Clostridium botulinum spores.

    PubMed

    Reddy, N R; Tetzloff, R C; Skinner, G E

    2010-08-01

    The effect of additives and post-treatment incubation conditions on the recovery of high pressure and heat-injured (i.e., processed at 620 MPa and 95 and 100 degrees C for 5 min) spores of Clostridium botulinum strains, 62-A (proteolytic type A) and 17-B (nonproteolytic type B) was studied. High pressure and heat-injured spores were inoculated into TPGY (Trypticase-Peptone-Glucose-Yeast extract) anaerobic broth media containing additives (lysozyme, L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, dipicolonic acid, sodium bicarbonate, and sodium lactate) at various concentrations (0-10 microg/ml) individually or in combination. The spore counts of high pressure and heat-injured 62-A and 17-B recovered from TPGY broth containing lysozyme (10 microg/ml) incubated for 4 months versus that recovered from peptone-yeast extract-glucose-starch (PYGS) plating agar containing lysozyme (10 microg/ml) incubated under anaerobic conditions for 5 days were also compared. None of the additives either individually or in combination in TPGY broth improved recovery of injured spore enumeration compared to processed controls without additives. Addition of lysozyme at concentrations of 5 and 10 microg/ml in TPGY broth improved initial recovery of injured spores of 17-B during the first 4 days of incubation but did not result in additional recovery at the end of the 4 month incubation compared to the processed control without lysozyme. Adding lysozyme at a concentration of 10 microg/ml to PYGS plating agar resulted in no effect on the recovery of high pressure and heat-injured 62-A and 17-B spores. The recovery counts of high pressure and heat-injured spores of 62-A and 17-B were lower (i.e., <1.0 log units) with PYGS plating agar compared to the MPN method using TPGY broth as the growth medium.

  20. Intensified recovery of valuable products from whey by use of ultrasound in processing steps - A review.

    PubMed

    Gajendragadkar, Chinmay N; Gogate, Parag R

    2016-09-01

    The current review focuses on the analysis of different aspects related to intensified recovery of possible valuable products from cheese whey using ultrasound. Ultrasound can be used for process intensification in processing steps such as pre-treatment, ultrafiltration, spray drying and crystallization. The combination of low-frequency, high intensity ultrasound with the pre-heat treatment minimizes the thickening or gelling of protein containing whey solutions. These characteristics of whey after the ultrasound assisted pretreatment helps in improving the efficacy of ultrafiltration used for separation and also helps in preventing the blockage of orifice of spray dryer atomizing device. Further, the heat stability of whey proteins is increased. In the subsequent processing step, use of ultrasound assisted atomization helps to reduce the treatment times as well as yield better quality whey protein concentrate (WPC) powder. After the removal of proteins from the whey, lactose is a major constituent remaining in the solution which can be efficiently recovered by sonocrystallization based on the use of anti-solvent as ethanol. The scale-up parameters to be considered during designing the process for large scale applications are also discussed along with analysis of various reactor designs. Overall, it appears that use of ultrasound can give significant process intensification benefits that can be harnessed even at commercial scale applications.

  1. Aural Canal, Esophageal, and Rectal Temperatures During Exertional Heat Stress and the Subsequent Recovery Period

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Daniel; Lemire, Bruno B.; Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: The measurement of body temperature is crucial for the initial diagnosis of exertional heat injury and for monitoring purposes during a subsequent treatment strategy. However, little information is available about how different measurements of body temperature respond during and after exertional heat stress. Objective: To present the temporal responses of aural canal (Tac), esophageal (Tes), and rectal (Tre) temperatures during 2 different scenarios (S1, S2) involving exertional heat stress and a subsequent recovery period. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-four healthy volunteers, with 12 (5 men, 7 women) participating in S1 and 12 (7 men, 5 women) participating in S2. Intervention(s): The participants exercised in the heat (42°C, 30% relative humidity) until they reached a 39.5°C cut-off criterion, which was determined by Tre in S1 and by Tes in S2. As such, participants attained different levels of hyperthermia (as determined by Tre) at the end of exercise. Participants in S1 were subsequently immersed in cold water (2°C) until Tre reached 37.5°C, and participants in S2 recovered in a temperate environment (30°C, 30% relative humidity) for 60 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured Tac, Tes, and Tre throughout both scenarios. Results: The Tes (S1  =  40.19 ± 0.41°C, S2  =  39.50 ± 0.02°C) was higher at the end of exercise compared with both Tac (S1  =  39.74 ± 0.42°C, S2  =  38.89 ± 0.32°C) and Tre (S1  =  39.41 ± 0.04°C, S2  =  38.74 ± 0.28°C) (for both comparisons in each scenario, P < .001). Conversely, Tes (S1  =  36.26 ± 0.74°C, S2  =  37.36 ± 0.34°C) and Tac (S1  =  36.48 ± 1.07°C, S2  =  36.97 ± 0.38°C) were lower compared with Tre (S1  =  37.54 ± 0.04°C, S2  =  37.78 ± 0.31°C) at the end of both scenarios (for both comparisons in each scenario, P < .001). Conclusions: We

  2. Ohmic heated sheet for the Ca ion beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A.; Bogomolov, S.; Kazarinov, N.; Kochagov, O.; Loginov, V.

    2008-02-15

    The production of intense accelerated {sup 48}Ca ion beams is the key problem in the experiments on the synthesis of new superheavy nuclei. For this purpose in the FLNR (JINR), an electron cyclotron resonance ion source is used at the U-400 cyclotron. The combination of a micro oven with a hot tantalum sheet inside the discharge chamber allowed the production of the intense {sup 48}Ca{sup 5+} ion beam at the {sup 48}Ca consumption of about 0.5 mg/h. In this case, the tantalum sheet is heated by microwaves and plasma electrons. The microwave power of up to 500 W is required to heat the sheet to the temperature of about 500 deg. C. To decrease the required microwave power, a new sheet with a direct Ohmic heating was designed. The present paper describes the method, technique, and preliminary experimental results on the production of the Ca ion beam.

  3. Final Scientific/Technical Report [Recovery Act: Districtwide Geothermal Heating Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterton, Mike

    2014-02-12

    The Recovery Act: Districtwide Geothermal Heating Conversion project performed by the Blaine County School District was part of a larger effort by the District to reduce operating costs, address deferred maintenance items, and to improve the learning environment of the students. This project evaluated three options for the ground source which were Open-Loop Extraction/Re-injection wells, Closed-Loop Vertical Boreholes, and Closed-Loop Horizontal Slinky approaches. In the end the Closed-Loop Horizontal Slinky approach had the lowest total cost of ownership but the majority of the sites associated with this project did not have enough available ground area to install the system so the second lowest option was used (Open-Loop). In addition to the ground source, this project looked at ways to retrofit existing HVAC systems with new high efficiency systems. The end result was the installation of distributed waterto- air heat pumps with water-to-water heat pumps installed to act as boilers/chillers for areas with a high ventilation demand such as they gymnasiums. A number of options were evaluated and the lowest total cost of ownership approach was implemented in the majority of the facilities. The facilities where the lowest total cost of ownership approaches was not selected were done to maintain consistency of the systems from facility to facility. This project had a number of other benefits to the Blaine County public. The project utilizes guaranteed energy savings to justify the levy funds expended. The project also developed an educational dashboard that can be used in the classrooms and to educate the community on the project and its performance. In addition, the majority of the installation work was performed by contractors local to Blaine County which acted as an economic stimulus to the area during a period of recession.

  4. Cold-water immersion decreases cerebral oxygenation but improves recovery after intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Minett, G M; Duffield, R; Billaut, F; Cannon, J; Portus, M R; Marino, F E

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effects of post-exercise cooling on recovery of neuromuscular, physiological, and cerebral hemodynamic responses after intermittent-sprint exercise in the heat. Nine participants underwent three post-exercise recovery trials, including a control (CONT), mixed-method cooling (MIX), and cold-water immersion (10 °C; CWI). Voluntary force and activation were assessed simultaneously with cerebral oxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy) pre- and post-exercise, post-intervention, and 1-h and 24-h post-exercise. Measures of heart rate, core temperature, skin temperature, muscle damage, and inflammation were also collected. Both cooling interventions reduced heart rate, core, and skin temperature post-intervention (P < 0.05). CWI hastened the recovery of voluntary force by 12.7 ± 11.7% (mean ± SD) and 16.3 ± 10.5% 1-h post-exercise compared to MIX and CONT, respectively (P < 0.01). Voluntary force remained elevated by 16.1 ± 20.5% 24-h post-exercise after CWI compared to CONT (P < 0.05). Central activation was increased post-intervention and 1-h post-exercise with CWI compared to CONT (P < 0.05), without differences between conditions 24-h post-exercise (P > 0.05). CWI reduced cerebral oxygenation compared to MIX and CONT post-intervention (P < 0.01). Furthermore, cooling interventions reduced cortisol 1-h post-exercise (P < 0.01), although only CWI blunted creatine kinase 24-h post-exercise compared to CONT (P < 0.05). Accordingly, improvements in neuromuscular recovery after post-exercise cooling appear to be disassociated with cerebral oxygenation, rather reflecting reductions in thermoregulatory demands to sustain force production. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Dual-well recovery system design for enhanced DNAPL production

    SciTech Connect

    Nazar, A.; Gray, D.; Oolman, T.

    1997-12-31

    An innovative recovery well system was designed and installed for the enhanced recovery of dense non-aqueous phase liquid, DNAPL (creosote) at an active wood treating facility which had historic releases of wood treating chemicals to soils and groundwater. The regulatory objective of the work, which is being conducted pursuant to a State RCRA Post-Closure Permit, is to implement interim measures for enhanced DNAPL recovery in the vicinity of the downgradient point of compliance (POC) of a 2-acre RCRA Regulated Unit. The RCRA-Regulated Unit consists of two closed former surface impoundments formerly used for wastewater treatment. The facility is underlain by coarsening downward sand and gravel deposits ranging in thickness from about 75 to 90 feet below ground surface (ft-bgs). DNAPL is present in both residual and mobile phases throughout the saturated zone from a depth of approximately 25 to 90 ft-bgs. The DNAPL has also accumulated on the top of a confining clay layer which underlies the alluvial sand and gravel deposits. Due to the physical nature of the subsurface materials and the presence of DNAPL, innovative recovery well installation and design practices were required to provide for the ability to enhance DNAPL recovery. The technology consists of a dual-well recirculating design contained within a singular, large diameter borehole. The design incorporated innovative practices in drilling and installation, screen slot sizing, and well construction, featuring a dual-well design. Conventional mud rotary drilling techniques were utilized with innovative equipment modifications and the use of a natural organic polymer drilling fluid additive to enhance overall recovery well efficiency and performance.

  6. Physiological and production responses to feeding schedule in lactating dairy cows exposed to short-term, moderate heat stress.

    PubMed

    Ominski, K H; Kennedy, A D; Wittenberg, K M; Moshtaghi Nia, S A

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this research was to characterize the production responses of lactating dairy cows during and after short-term, moderate heat exposure, and to determine whether evening (p.m.) feeding would alleviate the associated production losses. In a two-period, cross-over design, eight mature lactating cows were fed a total mixed ration at either 0830 or 2030 h. Each 15-d period consisted of a 5-d thermoneutral phase, a 5-d heat stress phase and a 5-d thermoneutral recovery phase. Mean daily vaginal temperature and respiration rate increased by 0.6 +/- 0.04 degrees C and 27 +/- 1.3 breaths/min, respectively, during short-term heat exposure. Daily dry matter intake, milk yield and solids-not-fat were depressed by 1.4 +/- 0.13 kg, 1.7 +/- 0.32 kg and 0.07 +/- 0.023%, respectively, during heat exposure. During the recovery phase, dry matter intake remained depressed, milk protein declined by 0.05 +/- 0.020%, and daily milk yield exhibited a further decline of 1.2 +/- 0.32 kg. Time of feeding had no effect on vaginal temperature, respiration rate, dry matter intake, water intake, milk yield, fat-corrected milk, protein percent, solids-non-fat percent or somatic cell count during heat exposure or during the recovery period that followed. Fat percent was, however, significantly lower in p.m.-fed animals. These data indicate that short-term, moderate heat stress, which occurs during the spring and summer months in Canada and the Northern United States, will significantly decrease production in the lactating cow. Shifting from morning to evening feeding did not alleviate production losses associated with this type of heat stress.

  7. Decomposition products of glycidyl esters of fatty acids by heating.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Wataru; Endo, Yasushi

    2017-03-01

    In this study, decomposition products of glycidyl palmitate (GP) of fatty acids heated at high temperature such as deep frying were investigated. When GP and tripalmitin (TP) were heated at 180 and 200 °C, they were decreased with heating time. The weight of GP was less than that of TP, although both GP and TP were converted to polar compounds after heating. The decomposition rate of GP was higher than TP. Both GP and TP produced considerable amounts of hydrocarbons and aldehydes during heating. Aldehydes produced from GP and TP included saturated aldehydes with carbon chain length of 3-10, while hydrocarbons consisted of carbon chain length of 8-15. It was observed that major hydrocarbons produced from GP during heating were pentadecane. Moreover, the level of carbon dioxide (CO2) released from GP was higher than that of TP. It was suggested that fatty acids in GE might be susceptible to decarboxylation. From these results, GP might be quickly decomposed to hydrocarbons, aldehydes and CO2 besides polar compounds by heating, in comparison with TP.

  8. Antioxidants in heat-processed koji and the production mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Okutsu, Kayu; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Ikeda, Natsumi; Kusano, Tatsuro; Hashimoto, Fumio; Takamine, Kazunori

    2015-11-15

    We previously developed antioxidative heat-processed (HP)-koji via two-step heating (55 °C/2days → 75 °C/3 days) of white-koji. In this study, we isolated antioxidants in HP-koji and investigated their formation mechanisms. The antioxidants were identified to be 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) and 5-(α-D-glucopyranosyloxymethyl)-2-furfural (GMF) based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis. HMF and GMF were not present in intact koji, but were formed by heating at 75 °C. As production of these antioxidants was more effective by two-step heating than by constant heating at 55 °C or 75 °C, we presumed that the antioxidant precursors are derived enzymatically at 55°C and that the antioxidants are formed subsequently by thermal reaction at 75 °C. The heating assay of saccharide solutions revealed glucose and isomaltose as HMF and GMF precursors, respectively, and thus the novel finding of GMF formation from isomaltose. Finally, HMF and GMF were effectively formed by two-step heating from glucose and isomaltose present in koji. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnonics: Selective heat production in nanocomposites with different magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Yu; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2016-03-07

    We theoretically study Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) in nanocomposites focusing on the analysis of heat production. It is demonstrated that at the FMR frequency, the temperature of nanoparticles can be raised at the rate of a few degrees per second at the electromagnetic (EM) irradiation power equivalent to the sunlight power. Thus, using FMR, one can initiate either surface or bulk reaction in the vicinity of a particular magnetic inclusion by purposely delivering heat to the nanoscale at a sufficiently fast rate. We examined the FMR features in (a) the film with a mixture of nanoparticles made of different materials; (b) the laminated films where each layer is filled with a particular type of magnetic nanoparticles. It is shown that different nanoparticles can be selectively heated at the different bands of EM spectrum. This effect opens up new exciting opportunities to control the microwave assisted chemical reactions depending on the heating rate.

  10. The effect of catalase on recovery of heat-injured DNA-repair mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mackey, B M; Seymour, D A

    1987-06-01

    The apparent sensitivity of Escherichia coli K12 to mild heat was increased by recA (def), recB and polA, but not by uvrA, uvrB or recF mutations. However, addition of catalase to the rich plating medium used to assess viability restored counts of heat-injured recA, recB and polA strains to wild-type levels. E. coli p3478 polA was sensitized by heat to a concentration of hydrogen peroxide similar to that measured in autoclaved recovery medium. The apparent heat sensitivity of DNA-repair mutants is thus due to heat-induced sensitivity to the low levels of peroxide present in rich recovery media. It is proposed that DNA damage in heated cells could occur indirectly by an oxidative mechanism. The increased peroxide sensitivity of heat-injured cells was not due to a decrease in total catalase activity but may be related specifically to inactivation of the inducible catalase/peroxidase (HPI).

  11. Product recovery of ponderosa pine in Arizona and New Mexico.

    Treesearch

    Thomas D. Fahey; Janet K. Ayer. Sachet

    1993-01-01

    A mill recovery study of ponderosa pine in Arizona and New Mexico showed wide variation in quality within the resource. Lumber grade ranged widely by log grade and diameter, with a major difference within grade 5 logs between old growth and young growth. Old growth produced mostly Shop and Selects grades of lumber while young growth produced mostly Dimension grades of...

  12. Effects of gas bubble production on heat transfer from a volumetrically heated liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Geoffrey R.

    Aqueous solutions of uranium salts may provide a new supply chain to fill potential shortfalls in the availability of the most common radiopharmaceuticals currently in use worldwide, including Tc99m which is a decay product of Mo99. The fissioning of the uranium in these solutions creates Mo99 but also generates large amounts of hydrogen and oxygen from the radiolysis of the water. When the dissolved gases reach a critical concentration, bubbles will form in the solution. Bubbles in the solution affect both the fission power and the heat transfer out of the solution. As a result, for safety and production calculations, the effects of the bubbles on heat transfer must be understood. A high aspect ratio tank was constructed to simulate a section of an annulus with heat exchangers on the inner and outer steel walls to provide cooling. Temperature measurements via thermocouples inside the tank and along the outside of the steel walls allowed the calculation of overall and local heat transfer coefficients. Different air injection manifolds allowed the exploration of various bubble characteristics and patterns on heat transfer from the pool. The manifold type did not appear to have significant impact on the bubble size distributions in water. However, air injected into solutions of magnesium sulfate resulted in smaller bubble sizes and larger void fractions than those in water at the same injection rates. One dimensional calculations provide heat transfer coefficient values as functions of the superficial gas velocity in the pool.

  13. Mixed policies for recovery and disposal of multiple-type consumer products

    SciTech Connect

    Krikke, H.R.; Harten, A. van; Schuur, P.C.

    1998-04-01

    New European government policies aim at the closure of material flows as part of integrated chain management (ICM). One of the main implementation instruments is extended producer responsibility, which makes original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) formally responsible for take-back, recovery, and reuse of discarded products. One of the key problems for OEMs is to determine a recovery strategy, i.e., determine to what extent return products must be disassembled and which recovery and disposal (RD) options should be applied. On a tactical management level, this involves anticipation of problems such as meeting legislation, limited volumes of secondary end markets, bad quality of return products, and facility investments in recycling infrastructure. In this paper, a model is presented that can be used to determine a recovery strategy for multiple-type consumer products. The objective function incorporates technical, ecological, and commercial decision criteria and optimization occurs using a two-level optimization procedure. First, a set of potential product recovery and disposal (PRD) strategies is generated for each separate product type. Secondly, optimal PRD strategies are assigned to the products within a coherent multiproduct or product group policy. The aim is to find an optimal balance between maximizing net profit and meeting constraints like recovery targets, limited market volumes, and processing capacities. A TV case is worked out to illustrate the working of the model. Also, the managerial use of the model is discussed in view of establishing an economically and ecologically sound base for achieving ICM.

  14. Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

  15. PERVAPORATION MEMBRANE SYSTEMS FOR VOLATILE FERMENTATION PRODUCT RECOVERY AND DEHYDRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The economics of fermentative production of fuels and commodity chemicals can be a strong function of the efficiency with which the fermentation products are removed from the biological media. Due to growth inhibition by some fermentation products, including ethanol, concentrati...

  16. PERVAPORATION MEMBRANE SYSTEMS FOR VOLATILE FERMENTATION PRODUCT RECOVERY AND DEHYDRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The economics of fermentative production of fuels and commodity chemicals can be a strong function of the efficiency with which the fermentation products are removed from the biological media. Due to growth inhibition by some fermentation products, including ethanol, concentrati...

  17. 75 FR 16575 - Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures-Productivity Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... productivity adjustment, as measured by the average change in railroad productivity for the years 2004 through... a result, the corrected 5-year geometric mean of the annual change in productivity for the...

  18. An analytical study on the performance of the organic Rankine cycle for turbofan engine exhaust heat recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadon, S.; Abu Talib, A. R.

    2016-10-01

    Due to energy shortage and global warming, issues of energy saving have become more important. To increase the energy efficiency and reduce the fuel consumption, waste heat recovery is a significant method for energy saving. The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) has great potential to recover the waste heat from the core jet exhaust of a turbofan engine and use it to produce power. Preliminary study of the design concept and thermodynamic performance of this ORC system would assist researchers to predict the benefits of using the ORC system to extract the exhaust heat engine. In addition, a mathematical model of the heat transfer of this ORC system is studied and developed. The results show that with the increment of exhaust heat temperature, the mass flow rate of the working fluid, net power output and the system thermal efficiency will also increase. Consequently, total consumption of jet fuel could be significantly saved as well.

  19. Assessment of Meat and Poultry Product Recalls Due to Salmonella Contamination: Product Recovery and Illness Prevention.

    PubMed

    Seys, Scott A; Sampedro, Fernando; Hedberg, Craig W

    2017-08-01

    Data from the recalls of meat and poultry products from 2000 through 2012 due to Salmonella contamination were used to assess the factors associated with the recovery of the recalled product and to develop quantitative models to estimate the number of illnesses prevented by recalls. The percentage of product recovered following a recall action was not dependent on establishment size, recall expansions, complexity of the distribution chain, type of distribution, amount of time between the production and recall dates, or number of pounds of product recalled. However, illness-related recalls were associated with larger amounts of recalled product, smaller percentages of recalled product recovered, a greater number of days between the production date and recall date, and nationwide distribution than were recalls that were not illness related. In addition, the detection of recall-associated illnesses appeared to be enhanced in states with strong foodborne illness investigation systems. The number of Salmonella illnesses prevented by recalls was based on the number of illnesses occurring relative to the number of pounds consumed, which was then extrapolated to the number of pounds of recalled product recovered. A simulation using a program evaluation and review technique probability distribution with illness-related recalls from 2003 through 2012 estimated that there were 19,000 prevented Salmonella illnesses, after adjusting for underdiagnosis. Recalls not associated with illnesses from 2000 through 2012 prevented an estimated additional 8,300 Salmonella illnesses, after adjusting for underdiagnosis. Although further improvements to ensure accurate and complete reporting should be undertaken, our study demonstrates that recalls are an important tool for preventing additional Salmonella illnesses. Moreover, additional training resources dedicated to public health agencies for enhancing foodborne illness detection, investigations, and rapid response and reporting would

  20. Cost Estimates Of Concentrated Photovoltaic Heat Sink Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    generation. As the CPV market has matured, production costs have come down to near flat-panel photovoltaic (PV) production costs. CPV units...sink designs to increase efficiency. Modern heat sink design can achieve greater overall efficiencies of electricity generation. As the CPV market ...capital costs and intermittency (DASN, 2012). While the price per kWh of solar is falling as the solar market continues to mature, solar installation

  1. ON-SITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and low-emission vapor degreasing. The atmospheric and vacuum ...

  2. ON-SITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and low-emission vapor degreasing. The atmospheric and vacuum ...

  3. Recovery Act: Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, Mark

    2013-09-30

    Cedarville School District retrofitted the heating and cooling systems in three campus areas (High School, Middle School, and Upper Elementary School) with geothermal heat pumps and ground source water loops, as a demonstration project for the effective implementation of geothermal heat pump systems and other energy efficiency and air quality improvements.

  4. Gas turbine waste heat recovery propulsion for U. S. Navy surface combatants

    SciTech Connect

    Marron, H.D.

    1981-10-01

    Discussed is the current NAVSEA Program to design, develop, test, and evaluate a Waste Heat Recovered marine gas turbine cruise propulsion plant for non-nuclear surface combatants. Included are: alternative systems considered for cruise propulsion development, the combined cycle design objectives of simplicity, low maintenance, high reliability, a 20 percent overall performance goal and minimal ship impact on weight and volume. The need to involve industry support in all phases of system development and into production will be discussed relative to the overall need to reduce initial capital and logistic support costs. 3 refs.

  5. Effects of resource addition on recovery of production and plant functional composition in degraded semiarid grasslands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Hooper, David U; Li, Hui; Gong, Xiao Ying; Peng, Fei; Wang, Hong; Dittert, Klaus; Lin, Shan

    2017-02-28

    Degradation of semiarid ecosystems from overgrazing threatens a variety of ecosystem services. Rainfall and nitrogen commonly co-limit production in semiarid grassland ecosystems; however, few studies have reported how interactive effects of precipitation and nitrogen addition influence the recovery of grasslands degraded by overgrazing. We conducted a 6-year experiment manipulating precipitation (natural precipitation and simulated wet year precipitation) and nitrogen (0, 25 and 50 kg N ha(-1)) addition at two sites with different histories of livestock grazing (moderately and heavily grazed) in Inner Mongolian steppe. Our results suggest that recovery of plant community composition and recovery of production can be decoupled. Perennial grasses provide long-term stability of high-quality forage production in this system. Supplemental water combined with exclosures led, in the heavily grazed site, to the strongest recovery of perennial grasses, although widespread irrigation of rangeland is not a feasible management strategy in many semiarid and arid regions. N fertilization combined with exclosures, but without water addition, increased dominance of unpalatable annual species, which in turn retarded growth of perennial species and increased inter-annual variation in primary production at both sites. Alleviation of grazing pressure alone allowed recovery of desired perennial species via successional processes in the heavily grazed site. Our experiments suggest that recovery of primary production and desirable community composition are not necessarily correlated. The use of N fertilization for the management of overgrazed grassland needs careful and systematic evaluation, as it has potential to impede, rather than aid, recovery.

  6. A REVIEW OF PERVAPORATION FOR PRODUCT RECOVERY FROM BIOMASS FERMENTATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although several separation technologies are technically capable of removing volatile products from fermentation broths, distillation remains the dominant technology. This is especially true for the recovery of biofuels such as ethanol. In this paper, the status of an emerging m...

  7. A REVIEW OF PERVAPORATION FOR PRODUCT RECOVERY FROM BIOMASS FERMENTATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although several separation technologies are technically capable of removing volatile products from fermentation broths, distillation remains the dominant technology. This is especially true for the recovery of biofuels such as ethanol. In this paper, the status of an emerging m...

  8. Heat Pre-Treatment of Beverages Wastewater on Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyub, S. Z.; Mohd, N. S.; Ibrahim, S.

    2017-06-01

    At present, a large variety of alternative fuels have been investigated and hydrogen gas is considered as the possible solution for the future due to its unique characteristics. Through dark fermentation process, several factors were found to have significant impact on the hydrogen production either through process enhancement or inhibition and degradation rates or influencing parameters. This work was initiated to investigate the optimum conditions for heat pre-treatment and initial pH for the dark fermentative process under mesophilic condition using a central composite design and response surface methodology (RSM). Different heat treatment conditions and pH were performed on the seed sludge collected from the anaerobic digester of beverage wastewater treatment plant. Heat treatment of inoculum was optimized at different exposure times (30, 90, 120 min), temperatures (80, 90 and 100°C) and pH (4.5, 5.5, 6.5) in order to maximize the biohydrogen production and methanogens activity inhibition. It was found that the optimum heat pre-treatment condition and pH occurred at 100°C for 50 min and the pH of 6.00. At this optimum condition the hydrogen yield was 63.0476 ml H2/mol glucose (H2 Yield) and the COD removal efficiency was 90.87%. In conclusion, it can be hypothesized that different heat treatment conditions led to differences in the initial microbial communities (hydrogen producing bacteria) which resulted in the different hydrogen yields.

  9. QTL for the thermotolerance effect of heat hardening, knockdown resistance to heat and chill-coma recovery in an intercontinental set of recombinant inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Norry, Fabian M; Scannapieco, Alejandra C; Sambucetti, Pablo; Bertoli, Carlos I; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-10-01

    The thermotolerance effect of heat hardening (also called short-term acclimation), knockdown resistance to high temperature (KRHT) with and without heat hardening and chill-coma recovery (CCR) are important phenotypes of thermal adaptation in insects and other organisms. Drosophila melanogaster from Denmark and Australia were previously selected for low and high KRHT, respectively. These flies were crossed to construct recombinant inbred lines (RIL). KRHT was higher in heat-hardened than in nonhardened RIL. We quantify the heat-hardening effect (HHE) as the ratio in KRHT between heat-hardened and nonhardened RIL. Composite interval mapping revealed a more complex genetic architecture for KRHT without heat-hardening than for KRHT in heat-hardened insects. Five quantitative trait loci (QTL) were found for KRHT, but only two of them were significant after heat hardening. KRHT and CCR showed trade-off associations for QTL both in the middle of chromosome 2 and the right arm of chromosome 3, which should be the result of either pleiotropy or linkage. The major QTL on chromosome 2 explained 18% and 27-33% of the phenotypic variance in CCR and KRHT in nonhardened flies, respectively, but its KRHT effects decreased by heat hardening. We discuss candidate loci for each QTL. One HHE-QTL was found in the region of small heat-shock protein genes. However, HHE-QTL explained only a small fraction of the phenotypic variance. Most heat-resistance QTL did not colocalize with CCR-QTL. Large-effect QTL for CCR and KRHT without hardening (basal thermotolerance) were consistent across continents, with apparent transgressive segregation for CCR. HHE (inducible thermotolerance) was not regulated by large-effect QTL.

  10. Supercritical water gasification of sewage sludge: gas production and phosphorus recovery.

    PubMed

    Acelas, Nancy Y; López, Diana P; Brilman, D W F Wim; Kersten, Sascha R A; Kootstra, A Maarten J

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the feasibility of the gasification of dewatered sewage sludge in supercritical water (SCW) for energy recovery combined with P-recovery from the solid residue generated in this process was investigated. SCWG temperature (400°C, 500°C, 600°C) and residence time (15min, 30min, 60min) were varied to investigate their effects on gas production and the P recovery by acid leaching. The results show that the dry gas composition for this uncatalyzed gasification of sewage sludge in SCW mainly comprised of CO2, CO, CH4, H2, and some C2-C3 compounds. Higher temperatures and longer residence times favored the production of H2 and CH4. After SCWG, more than 95% of the P could be recovered from the solid residue by leaching with acids. SCWG combined with acid leaching seems an effective method for both energy recovery and high P recovery from sewage sludge.

  11. Analytical expressions to estimate the free product recovery in oil-contaminated aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz; Tuncay, Kagan; Lingarn, Rajasekhar; Kambham, Kiran K. R.

    1994-12-01

    Petroleum products, such as gasoline, leaked from an underground storage tank can be recovered successfully by two-pump operations. The success of the recovery effort depends on the accurate placement of the recovery well at the spill site. An effective recovery operation can minimize the remaining contamination mass in the subsurface. Therefore, a careful evaluation and determination has to be made as to where to locate the recovery well. The location of the well can be decided based on an estimation of the extent and thickness of free product on the water table. Such an estimation should be based on analysis of governing mechanisms. In this study we present analytical solutions to estimate the recovery of oil from an established oil lens. These solutions are obtained by applying the Laplace transformation to averaged linear partial differential equations governing the phenomenon. The governing equation for the free product thickness is derived by averaging the oil phase mass balance equation along the free product thickness and substituting the boundary conditions at the oil/water interface and oil surface. The analytical solutions estimate the temporal and spatial distribution of free product thickness on the water table for a number of recovery scenarios. Results are presented for the temporal and spatial variation of the free product thickness, temporal variation of the free product volume recovered, and recovery efficiency based on the readings at the monitoring wells. Since they can be utilized without a great deal of data, analytical solutions are quite attractive as screening tools in two-pump free product recovery operations.

  12. Furnace and Heat Recovery Area Design and Analysis for Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Seltzer

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the furnace and heat recovery area design and analysis task of the Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler study is to optimize the location and design of the furnace, burners, over-fire gas ports, and internal radiant surfaces. The furnace and heat recovery area were designed and analyzed using the FW-FIRE and HEATEX computer programs. The furnace is designed with opposed wall-firing burners and over-fire air ports. Water is circulated in the furnace by natural circulation to the waterwalls and divisional wall panels. Compared to the air-fired furnace, the oxygen-fired furnace requires only 65% of the surface area and 45% of the volume. Two oxygen-fired designs were simulated: (1) without over-fire air and (2) with 20% over-fire air. The maximum wall heat flux in the oxygen-fired furnace is more than double that of the air-fired furnace due to the higher flame temperature and higher H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations. The coal burnout for the oxygen-fired case is 100% due to a 500 F higher furnace temperature and higher concentration of O{sub 2}. Because of the higher furnace wall temperature of the oxygen-fired case compared to the air-fired case, furnace water wall material was upgraded from carbon steel to T91. The total heat transfer surface required in the oxygen-fired heat recovery area (HRA) is 25% less than the air-fired HRA due to more heat being absorbed in the oxygen-fired furnace and the greater molecular weight of the oxygen-fired flue gas. The HRA tube materials and wall thickness are practically the same for the air-fired and oxygen-fired design since the flue gas and water/steam temperature profiles encountered by the heat transfer banks are very similar.

  13. Combined heating and chemical treatment for oil recovery from aging crude oil.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chunjuan; Jiang, Qingzhe; Song, Zhaozheng; Tan, Guorong; Shi, Zhan

    2016-07-01

    With increasing use of chemical oil displacement agents in tertiary recovery and the application of various demulsifiers for crude oil dehydration, a large amount of aging crude oil containing a high ratio of water is produced, and it is very difficult for processing and utilisation. In this article, we chose aging crude oil samples from a union station in an oilfield in China. Sample composition was analysed to demonstrate that the key of aging crude oil dehydration is the removal of solid impurities. Thus, an efficient method of combining heating and chemical treatments was developed to treat aging crude oil. It includes two steps: The first step is washing of aging crude oil with hot water with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate; the second step is chemical demulsification of the above mixture with hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride solution. The result showed that 2.9% of solid impurities and 29.2% of water were removed in the first step; 27.2% of oil, 24.3% of water, and 3.47% of solid impurities in the aging crude oil were recycled in the second step. A total 87.07% of aging crude oil could be solved with this method. The present two-step treatment method can ensure that the dehydration process runs normally and efficiently in the union station, making it a promising method in the recycling of aging crude oil.

  14. Risk analysis of heat recovery steam generator with semi quantitative risk based inspection API 581

    SciTech Connect

    Prayogo, Galang Sandy Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Ismail, Rifky; Kim, Seon Jin

    2016-04-19

    Corrosion is a major problem that most often occurs in the power plant. Heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is an equipment that has a high risk to the power plant. The impact of corrosion damage causing HRSG power plant stops operating. Furthermore, it could be threaten the safety of employees. The Risk Based Inspection (RBI) guidelines by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 58 has been used to risk analysis in the HRSG 1. By using this methodology, the risk that caused by unexpected failure as a function of the probability and consequence of failure can be estimated. This paper presented a case study relating to the risk analysis in the HRSG, starting with a summary of the basic principles and procedures of risk assessment and applying corrosion RBI for process industries. The risk level of each HRSG equipment were analyzed: HP superheater has a medium high risk (4C), HP evaporator has a medium-high risk (4C), and the HP economizer has a medium risk (3C). The results of the risk assessment using semi-quantitative method of standard API 581 based on the existing equipment at medium risk. In the fact, there is no critical problem in the equipment components. Damage mechanisms were prominent throughout the equipment is thinning mechanism. The evaluation of the risk approach was done with the aim of reducing risk by optimizing the risk assessment activities.

  15. Risk analysis of heat recovery steam generator with semi quantitative risk based inspection API 581

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayogo, Galang Sandy; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Ismail, Rifky; Kim, Seon Jin

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is a major problem that most often occurs in the power plant. Heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is an equipment that has a high risk to the power plant. The impact of corrosion damage causing HRSG power plant stops operating. Furthermore, it could be threaten the safety of employees. The Risk Based Inspection (RBI) guidelines by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 58 has been used to risk analysis in the HRSG 1. By using this methodology, the risk that caused by unexpected failure as a function of the probability and consequence of failure can be estimated. This paper presented a case study relating to the risk analysis in the HRSG, starting with a summary of the basic principles and procedures of risk assessment and applying corrosion RBI for process industries. The risk level of each HRSG equipment were analyzed: HP superheater has a medium high risk (4C), HP evaporator has a medium-high risk (4C), and the HP economizer has a medium risk (3C). The results of the risk assessment using semi-quantitative method of standard API 581 based on the existing equipment at medium risk. In the fact, there is no critical problem in the equipment components. Damage mechanisms were prominent throughout the equipment is thinning mechanism. The evaluation of the risk approach was done with the aim of reducing risk by optimizing the risk assessment activities.

  16. Heat production and heat loss responses to cold water immersion after 35 days horizontal bed rest.

    PubMed

    Mekjavic, Igor B; Kounalakis, Stylianos N; Keramidas, Michail E; Biolo, Gianni; Narici, Marco; Eiken, Ola

    2012-05-01

    Bed rest is a terrestrial experimental analogue of unloading experienced during exposure to microgravity. Such unloading causes atrophy predominantly of the postural muscles, especially those of the lower limbs. We tested the hypothesis that 35 d horizontal bed rest alters thermoregulatory responses of subjects (N = 10) immersed in 15 degrees C water, particularly the heat produced by the shivering tremor of the skeletal muscles. Before and after bed rest we measured the thickness of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), tibialis anterior (TA), and biceps brachii (BB) muscles by ultrasonography. During the immersions, we monitored rectal and skin temperatures, heat flux, heart rate, and oxygen uptake. After bed rest, muscle thickness decreased significantly by 12.2 +/- 8.8% and 8.0 +/- 9.1% in the GM and VL, respectively. No changes were observed in the TA and BB muscles. The 35-d bed rest caused a significant reduction in aerobic power, as reflected in maximal oxygen uptake. There were no significant differences in any of the observed thermoregulatory responses between the pre- and post-bed rest immersions. Cardiovascular and muscular deconditioning had no effect on the heat production and heat loss responses. Due to the significant reduction in the mass of the muscles in the lower limbs, concomitant with no change in heat production, we conclude that leg muscles do not play a significant role in shivering thermogenesis.

  17. Production data reporting and how it aids surveillance in thermal recovery fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dever, R.E.; Womack, F.A.

    1983-03-01

    Modern surveillance requirements in large thermal recovery oil fields overwhelm manual efforts at collection, retrieval, and reporting of operations and production data. The introduction of a customized data base management and reporting system for this purpose can benefit Operations and Engineering through increased production from timelier awareness of field operating conditions, reduced operating expenses, better steam utilization, and significant manpower productivity increases.

  18. [Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria sp in heat-processed products].

    PubMed

    Tobía, M B; Mengoni, G B; Pellón, H S

    1997-01-01

    Presence of Listeria monocytogenes in thermoprocessed food which is vacuum packaged, refrigerated stored and eaten uncooked or minimally heated was investigated. Thirty samples including sausage, large sausage with ham, spring large sausage, liverwurst and bologna were examined. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated and identified according to USDA-FSIS method for meat products, simultaneously with McBride agar. Seven out of 30 samples were found to contain listeriae. Five isolates were identified as Listeria monocytogenes through Gram coloration, culture appearance, biochemical test and serotyping. This product results potentially risky for the susceptible population. The presence of this microorganism in this kind of product suggests environmental post-process contamination or insufficient thermal process.

  19. Butanol production in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation with in situ product recovery by adsorption.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chuang; Liu, Fangfang; Xu, Mengmeng; Tang, I-Ching; Zhao, Jingbo; Bai, Fengwu; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2016-11-01

    Activated carbon Norit ROW 0.8, zeolite CBV901, and polymeric resins Dowex Optipore L-493 and SD-2 with high specific loadings and partition coefficients were studied for n-butanol adsorption. Adsorption isotherms were found to follow Langmuir model, which can be used to estimate the amount of butanol adsorbed in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. In serum-bottle fermentation with in situ adsorption, activated carbon showed the best performance with 21.9g/L of butanol production. When operated in a fermentor, free- and immobilized-cell fermentations with adsorption produced 31.6g/L and 54.6g/L butanol with productivities of 0.30g/L·h and 0.45g/L·h, respectively. Thermal desorption produced a condensate containing ∼167g/L butanol, which resulted in a highly concentrated butanol solution of ∼640g/L after spontaneous phase separation. This in situ product recovery process with activated carbon is energy efficient and can be easily integrated with ABE fermentation for n-butanol production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Debottlenecking product inhibition in 1,3-propanediol fermentation by In-Situ Product Recovery.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Guneet; Srivastava, A K; Chand, Subhash

    2015-12-01

    The present work describes the application of liquid-liquid extraction as an In-Situ product recovery (ISPR) technique to overcome the problem of product inhibition in 1,3-PD fermentation. As a part of initial screening experiments, six solvents were subjected to phase separation and biocompatibility tests to find the best extractant for in-situ removal of 1,3-PD from the bioreactor. These included tributylphosphate, ethyl acetate, butyl acetate, oleyl alcohol, oleic acid and hexanol. Of these, ethyl acetate was found to be the most suitable solvent for 1,3-PD extraction. Use of the selected extractant in continuous integrated fermentation-extraction was established by batch and fed-batch extractive fermentations which demonstrated a significantly improved 1,3-PD production of 35g/L and 74.5g/L, respectively. A steady state 1,3-PD concentration of 58g/L was obtained in continuous extractive system. Continuous cultivation with in-situ cell retention and in-situ 1,3-PD removal demonstrated a 5-fold enhancement in 1,3-PD productivity over non-extractive batch.

  1. Effect of heat shock and recovery temperature on variability of single cell lag time of Cronobacter turicensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y Zh; Métris, A; Stasinopoulos, D M; Forsythe, S J; Sutherland, J P

    2015-02-01

    The effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery temperature on the individual cellular lag of Cronobacter turicensis was analysed using optical density measurements. Low numbers of cells were obtained through serial dilution and the time to reach an optical density of 0.035 was determined. Assuming the lag of a single cell follows a shifted Gamma distribution with a fixed shape parameter, the effect of recovery temperature on the individual lag of untreated and sublethally heat treated cells of Cr. turicensis were modelled. It was found that the shift parameter (Tshift) increased asymptotically as the temperature decreased while the logarithm of the scale parameter (θ) decreased linearly with recovery temperature. To test the validity of the model in food, growth of low numbers of untreated and heat treated Cr. turicensis in artificially contaminated infant first milk was measured experimentally and compared with predictions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. Although the model for untreated cells slightly underestimated the actual growth in first milk at low temperatures, the model for heat treated cells was in agreement with the data derived from the challenge tests and provides a basis for reliable quantitative microbiological risk assessments for Cronobacter spp. in infant milk.

  2. Effect of incubation media on the recovery of Escherichia coli K12 heated at 52 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M; Srivastava, B S; Agarwala, S C

    1978-07-01

    The exposure of exponentially grown Escherichia coli K12 to 52 degrees C for 30 min in Tris/Mg2+ buffer resulted in a considerable loss of viability when plated on tryptone agar. When such heated bacteria were held at 37 degrees C for 2 h in tryptone broth before plating on tryptone agar, there was a significant increase in viability. Thus, heat damage was repaired in tryptone broth but not on tryptone agar. Recovery was greater in tryptone broth than in synthetic medium. In tryptone broth, recA or polA mutants also recovered but a lex mutant did not. As a result of heating, the sensitivity of bacteria to ultraviolet radiation (u.v.), to mitomycin C and to plating on high salt medium was enhanced. After incubation for 2 h in tryptone broth at 37 degrees C, the bacteria regained their resistance to u.v. and mitomycin C and tolerance to high salt medium. Recovery of viability required RNA and protein synthesis, whereas recovery of u.v. resistance did not require protein synthesis. Heating for 30 min inhibited the release of acid-soluble material from DNA in all strains of E. coli used.

  3. Influence of different heating regimes on the shape-recovery behavior of poly(L-lactide) in simulated thermomechanical tests.

    PubMed

    Ghobadi, Ehsan; Heuchel, Matthias; Kratz, Karl; Lendlein, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Multifunctional polymer-based biomaterials, which combine degradability with a shape-memory capability and in this way enable the design of actively moving implants such as self-anchoring implants or controlled release systems, have been recently introduced. Of particular interest are approved degradable polymers such as poly(L-lactide) (PLLA), which can be easily functionalized with a shape-memory effect. In the case of semicrystalline PLLA, the glass transition can be utilized as shape-memory switching domain. In this work we applied a fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation to study the shape-memory behavior of PLLA. A heating-deformation-cooling programming procedure was applied to atomistic PLLA packing models followed by a recovery module under stress-free conditions allowing the shape recovery. The recovery was simulated by heating the samples from Tlow = 250 K to Thigh = 500 K with different heating rates β of 125, 40 and 4 K·ns(-1). We could demonstrate that the obtained strain recovery rate (Rr) was strongly influenced by the applied simulation time and heating rate, whereby Rr values in the range from 46% to 63% were achieved. On its own the application of a heating rate of 4 K·ns(-1) enabled us to determine a characteristic switching temperature of Tsw = 473 K for the modeled samples. We anticipate that the atomistic modeling approach presented should be capable of enabling further study of Tsw with respect to the molecular structure of the investigated SMP and therefore could be applied in the context of design and development of new shape-memory (bio)materials.

  4. Recovery and purification process development for monoclonal antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junfen; Winter, Charles; Bayer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Hundreds of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently in development, and many companies have multiple antibodies in their pipelines. Current methodology used in recovery processes for these molecules are reviewed here. Basic unit operations such as harvest, Protein A affinity chromatography and additional polishing steps are surveyed. Alternative processes such as flocculation, precipitation and membrane chromatography are discussed. We also cover platform approaches to purification methods development, use of high throughput screening methods, and offer a view on future developments in purification methodology as applied to mAbs. PMID:20647768

  5. Influence of heat shock on glycerol production in alcohol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Berovic, Marin; Pivec, Aleksandra; Kosmerl, Tatjana; Wondra, Mojmir; Celan, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    The influence of single and double heat shocks induced during the exponential growth phase of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation of cultivar Sauvignon Blanc grape must was examined. Rapid temperature changes from 18 degrees C to 34 degrees C have been applied. The effect of the duration of exposure to a high temperature has been analyzed. By the applications of a single heat shock and a double heat shock, up to 8.2 g l(-1) and 11.0 g l(-1) glycerol have been produced, respectively. To prevent the evaporation of fine wine bouquet compounds during the temperature changes, reflux coolers on the top of bioreactors have been employed. By using this method, glycerol production was increased by up to 65%.

  6. Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Spycher, N.

    2009-05-01

    It has been suggested that enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) may be operated with supercritical CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid (D.W. Brown, 2000). Such a scheme could combine recovery of geothermal energy with simultaneous geologic storage of CO{sub 2}, a greenhouse gas. At geothermal temperature and pressure conditions of interest, the flow and heat transfer behavior of CO{sub 2} would be considerably different from water, and chemical interactions between CO{sub 2} and reservoir rocks would also be quite different from aqueous fluids. This paper summarizes our research to date into fluid flow and heat transfer aspects of operating EGS with CO{sub 2}. (Chemical aspects of EGS with CO{sub 2} are discussed in a companion paper; Xu and Pruess, 2010.) Our modeling studies indicate that CO{sub 2} would achieve heat extraction at larger rates than aqueous fluids. The development of an EGS-CO{sub 2} reservoir would require replacement of the pore water by CO{sub 2} through persistent injection. We find that in a fractured reservoir, CO{sub 2} breakthrough at production wells would occur rapidly, within a few weeks of starting CO{sub 2} injection. Subsequently a two-phase water-CO{sub 2} mixture would be produced for a few years,followed by production of a single phase of supercritical CO{sub 2}. Even after single-phase production conditions are reached,significant dissolved water concentrations will persist in the CO{sub 2} stream for many years. The presence of dissolved water in the production stream has negligible impact on mass flow and heat transfer rates.

  7. Quality assessment of palm products upon prolonged heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Tarmizi, Azmil Haizam Ahmad; Lin, Siew Wai

    2008-01-01

    Extending the frying-life of oils is of commercial and economic importance. Due to this fact, assessment on the thermal stability of frying oils could provide considerable savings to the food processors. In this study, the physico-chemical properties of five palm products mainly palm oil, single-fractionated palm olein, double-fractionated palm olein, red palm olein and palm-based shortening during 80 hours of heating at 180 degrees C were investigated. Heating properties of these products were then compared with that of high oleic sunflower oil, which was used as reference oil. The indices applied in evaluating the quality changes of oils were free fatty acid, smoke point, p-anisidine value, tocols, polar and polymer compounds. Three palm products i.e. palm oil, single-fractionated palm olein and double-fractionated palm olein were identified to be the most stable in terms of lower formation of free fatty acid, polar and polymer compounds as well as preserving higher smoke point and tocols content compared to the other three oils. The low intensity of hydrolytic and oxidative changes due to prolonged heating, suggests that these palm products are inherently suitable for frying purposes.

  8. [Effect of aggregate state, tonicity, and level of nutrients in media on recovery of Escherichia coli bacteria from heat damage].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I I

    1996-01-01

    The influence of aggregate condition, nutrient composition and tonicity of incubation medium on recovery from damages induced by heat at 52 degrees C Escherichia coli B/r and Escherichia coli BS-1 cells was studied. The cells were shown to be recovered from heat damages only in liquid and isotonic medium. The observed increase in a number of viable organisms was not greatly depended on source of energy, plastic material and macroelements of incubation medium. The recovered cells showed increase of osmotic tolerance to hyper- and hypotonic shock similar to intact cells. No increase in survivors was observed when heated cells were incubated on solid and/or anisotonic medium. The additional cell killing and high osmosensitivity may be seen in this case. The role of the system of osmotic homeostasis, including membrane state, in the modification of cell viability and osmoresistance of heated bacterial cells was discussed on the base of the data obtained.

  9. Effect of heat recovery water heater system on the performance of residential split air conditioner using hydrocarbon refrigerant (HCR22)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, A.; Thalal; Amri, I.; Herisiswanto; Mainil, A. K.

    2017-09-01

    This This paper presents the performance of residential split air conditioner (RSAC) using hydrocarbon refrigerant (HCR22) as the effect on the use of heat recovery water heater system (HRWHS). In this study, RSAC was modified with addition of dummy condenser (trombone coil type) as heat recovery water heater system (HRWHS). This HRWHS is installed between a compressor and a condenser by absorbing a part of condenser waste heat. The results show that RSAC with HRWHS is adequate to generate hot water with the temperature range about 46.58˚C - 48.81˚C when compared to without HRWHS and the use of dummy condenser does not give significant effect to the split air conditioner performance. When the use of HRWHS, the refrigerant charge has increase about 19.05%, the compressor power consumption has slightly increase about 1.42% where cooling capacity almost the same with slightly different about 0.39%. The condenser heat rejection is lower about 2.68% and the COP has slightly increased about 1.05% when compared to without HRWHS. The use of HRWHS provide free hot water, it means there is energy saving for heating water without negative impact to the system performance of RSAC.

  10. Recovery of elemental sulphur from products containing contaminated elemental sulphur by froth flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Adamache, I.I.

    1989-10-03

    This patent describes a process for the recovery by froth flotation of elemental sulphur from contaminated products resulting from exploitation processes using wells for the application of heat to reservoirs in order to recover elemental sulphur. It comprises: coarse screening the contaminated elemental sulphur; treating the coarse screening undersize to wet scrubbing to produce a coarse fraction slurry and a fine fraction slurry, attrition scrubbing the coarse fraction slurry; size classifying at least one of the attrition scrubbed coarse fraction slurry or the fine fraction slurry to produce an undersize slurry of minus 10 mesh and adjusting the undersize slurry to ast least 25% solids, returning the oversized fraction from the size classifying to the hydraulic sizing; conditioning the minus 10 mesh undersize slurry with two classes of reagents using a frother reagent and a promoter/collector reagent; subjecting the slurry-reagent composition to at least one stage of froth flotation to produce an elemental sulphur concentrate; and filtering and dewatering the resultant elemental sulphur concentrate.

  11. Effect of heat stress and recovery on viability, oxidative damage, and heat shock protein expression in hepatic cells of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanting; Liu, Bo; Xie, Jun; Xu, Pao; Habte-Tsion, H-Michael; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of hyperthermia and recovery on cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and heat shock protein (HSP60, 70, and 90) mRNA expression in the hepatic cells of the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idellus. Triplicate groups of cultured cells were exposed to 30, 32, or 34 °C for 0.5 h and then immediately incubated at 27 °C in 5 % CO2 for 6, 12, 24, or 48 h. Hyperthermia stress greatly reduced cell viability and increased LDH release. Cell damage declined after recovery. Hyperthermia stress increased the lipid peroxide levels and reduced the antioxidant capacity (e.g., reduced SOD and T-AOC) of the cells. However, oxidative damage declined as the recovery period increased, and the levels of MDA, SOD, and T-AOC were restored. After cells were exposed to 32 °C, the expression of HSP60 after recovery for 1, 2, and 4 h (P < 0.05), the expression of HSP70 after recovery for 0.5 and 1 h (P < 0.01), and the expression of HSP90 throughout recovery were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than the prestress levels. During the recovery period, the variations in HSP gene expression reflected the transition period from a state of cellular growth to one of the cellular repairs. In conclusion, hyperthermia depresses cell viability, induces oxidative damage, and increases HSP expression, which plays an important role during hyperthermic stress in grass carp hepatic cells.

  12. Birch's Crustal Heat Production-Heat Flow Law: Key to Quantifying Mantle Heat Flow as a function of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, D. D.; Thakur, M.

    2007-12-01

    Birch (1968) first showed the linear correlation of surface heat flow and radioactive heat production (Qs = Qo + bAs ) in granites in New England, USA and discussed implications to the vertical scale of radioactive heat generation in the crust. Subsequently similar relationships have been found worldwide and numerous papers written describing more details and expanding the implications of Birch's Law. The results are a powerful contribution from heat flow research to the understanding of the lithosphere and its evolution. Models are both well constrained experimentally and simple in implications. However, there still exist thermal models of the crust and lithosphere that do not have the same firm foundation and involve unnecessary ad hoc assumptions. A main point of confusion has been that the several of the original relationships were so low in error as to be considered by some to be "fortuitous". Interestingly a "similar" relationship has been proposed based on regional scale averaging of Qs -As data. A second point of confusion is that one admissible crustal radioactivity distribution model (the constant heat generation to depth b) has been criticized as unrealistic for a number of reasons, including the effect of erosion. However, it is appropriate to refer to the Qs -As relationship as a law because in fact the relationship holds as long as the vertical distribution is "geologically realistic." as will be demonstrated in this paper. All geologic and geophysical models of the continental crust imply decreasing heat production as a function of depth (i.e. the seismic layering for example) except in very special cases. This general decrease with depth is the only condition required for the existence of a "linear" Qs -As relationship. A comparison of all the Qs -As relationships proposed for terrains not affected by thermal events over the last 150 to 200 Ma shows a remarkably uniformity in slope (10 ± 3 km) and intercept value (30 ± 5 mWm-2 ). Therefore these

  13. Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Rosenberry, Harris Companies

    2012-05-04

    A large centralized geothermal heat pump system was installed to provide ice making, space cooling, space heating, process water heating, and domestic hot water heating for an ice arena in Eagan Minnesota. This paper provides information related to the design and construction of the project. Additionally, operating conditions for 12 months after start-up are provided.

  14. Method of preparing a high heating value fuel product

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, R.; Fan, L.T.

    1989-10-24

    This patent describes a method of preparing a high heating value fuel product. The method comprising the steps of: blending a high heating value waste material with a cellulosic material; mixing an organic reagent to the blended mixture of the waste material and the cellulosic material, the organic reagent being a mixture having a 4-15 weight percent of a chemical selected from the group consisting of: triethylene, glycol, diethylene glycol, and glycerin propylene glycol; introducing a pozzolanic agent to the blended mixture for controlling the rate of solidification; and forming the blended mixture into a form suitable for handling. Also described is the same method with the mixture of the organic reagent further comprising: a 20-32 weight percent calcium chloride solution. Another method of preparing a fuel product is also described.

  15. A New Model for Heat Flow in Extensional Basins: Estimating Radiogenic Heat Production

    SciTech Connect

    Waples, Douglas W.

    2002-06-15

    Radiogenic heat production (RHP) represents a significant fraction of surface heat flow, both on cratons and in sedimentary basins. RHP within continental crust-especially the upper crust-is high. RHP at any depth within the crust can be estimated as a function of crustal age. Mantle RHP, in contrast, is always low, contributing at most 1 to 2 mW/m{sup 2} to total heat flow. Radiogenic heat from any noncrystalline basement that may be present also contributes to total heat flow. RHP from metamorphic rocks is similar to or slightly lower than that from their precursor sedimentary rocks. When extension of the lithosphere occurs-as for example during rifting-the radiogenic contribution of each layer of the lithosphere and noncrystalline basement diminishes in direct proportion to the degree of extension of that layer. Lithospheric RHP today is somewhat less than in the distant past, as a result of radioactive decay. In modeling, RHP can be varied through time by considering the half lives of uranium, thorium, and potassium, and the proportional contribution of each of those elements to total RHP from basement. RHP from sedimentary rocks ranges from low for most evaporites to high for some shales, especially those rich in organic matter. The contribution to total heat flow of radiogenic heat from sediments depends strongly on total sediment thickness, and thus differs through time as subsidence and basin filling occur. RHP can be high for thick clastic sections. RHP in sediments can be calculated using ordinary or spectral gamma-ray logs, or it can be estimated from the lithology.

  16. Pressure intelligent control strategy of Waste heat recovery system of converter vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xugang; Wu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Jiayan; Qian, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The converter gas evaporative cooling system is mainly used for absorbing heat in the high temperature exhaust gas which produced by the oxygen blowing reaction. Vaporization cooling steam pressure control system of converter is a nonlinear, time-varying, lagging behind, close coupling of multivariable control object. This article based on the analysis of converter operation characteristics of evaporation cooling system, of vaporization in a production run of pipe pressure variation and disturbance factors.For the dynamic characteristics of the controlled objects,we have improved the conventional PID control scheme.In Oxygen blowing process, we make intelligent control by using fuzzy-PID cascade control method and adjusting the Lance,that it can realize the optimization of the boiler steam pressure control.By design simulation, results show that the design has a good control not only ensures drum steam pressure in the context of security, enabling efficient conversion of waste heat.And the converter of 1800 flue gas through pipes and cool and dust removal also can be cooled to about 800. Therefore the converter haze evaporative cooling system has achieved to the converter haze temperature decrease effect and enhanced to the coal gas returns-ratio.

  17. A thermodynamic study of waste heat recovery from GT-MHR using organic Rankine cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yari, Mortaza; Mahmoudi, S. M. S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the utilization of waste heat from a gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) using different arrangements of organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) for power production. The considered organic Rankine cycles were: simple organic Rankine cycle (SORC), ORC with internal heat exchanger (HORC) and regenerative organic Rankine cycle (RORC). The performances of the combined cycles were studied from the point of view of first and second-laws of thermodynamics. Individual models were developed for each component and the effects of some important parameters such as compressor pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature, and evaporator and environment temperatures on the efficiencies and on the exergy destruction rate were studied. Finally the combined cycles were optimized thermodynamically using the EES (Engineering Equation Solver) software. Based on the identical operating conditions for the GT-MHR cycle, a comparison between the three combined cycles and a simple GT-MHR cycle is also were made. This comparison was also carried out from the point of view of economics. The GT-MHR/SORC combined cycle proved to be the best among all the cycles from the point of view of both thermodynamics and economics. The efficiency of this cycle was about 10% higher than that of GT-MHR alone.

  18. Energy and economic analysis of total energy systems for residential and commercial buildings. [utilizing waste heat recovery techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, W. L.; Bollenbacher, G.

    1974-01-01

    Energy and economic analyses were performed for an on-site power-plant with waste heat recovery. The results show that for any specific application there is a characteristic power conversion efficiency that minimizes fuel consumption, and that efficiencies greater than this do not significantly improve fuel consumption. This type of powerplant appears to be a reasonably attractive investment if higher fuel costs continue.

  19. Combined heat recovery and dry scrubbing for MWCs to meet the new EPA guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Finnis, P.J.; Heap, B.M.

    1997-12-01

    Both the UK and US Municipal Waste Combuster (MWC) markets have undergone upgraded regulatory control. In the UK, the government`s Integrated Pollution Control (IPC) regime, enforced by the 1990 Environmental Protection Act (EPA) Standard IPR5/3 moved control of emissions of MWCs from local councils to the government Environmental Authority (EA). Existing MWCs had until December 1, 1996 to complete environmental upgrades. Simultaneously, the European Community (EC) was finalizing more stringent legislation to take place in the year 2001. In the US, the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to issue emission guidelines for new and existing facilities. Existing facilities are likely to have only until the end of 1999 to complete upgrades. In North America, Procedair Industries Corp had received contracts from Kvaerner EnviroPower AB, for APC systems of four new Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) fluid bed boilers that incorporated low outlet temperature economizers as part of the original boiler equipment. The Fayetteville, North Carolina facility was designed for 200,000 tpy. What all these facilities have in common is low economizer outlet temperatures of 285{degrees}F coupled with a Total Dry Scrubbing System. MWC or RDF facilities using conventional spray dryer/fabric filter combinations have to have economizer gas outlet temperatures about 430{degrees}F to allow for evaporation of the lime slurry in the spray dryer without the likelihood of wall build up or moisture carry over. Since the Totally Dry Scrubbing System can operate with economizer gas outlet temperatures about 285{degrees}F, the added energy available for sale from adding low outlet temperature economizer heat recovery can be considerable. This paper focuses on Procedair`s new plant and retrofit experience using `Dry Venturi Reactor/Fabric Filter` combinations with the lower inlet temperature operating conditions.

  20. Effect of recovery intensity on peak power output and the development of heat strain during intermittent sprint exercise while under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Neil S; Castle, Paul C; Spencer, Matt

    2008-09-01

    This study compared two intensities of active recovery on intermittent sprint exercise performance and the development of heat strain in hot, humid conditions. Eight male game players completed four Cycling Intermittent Sprint Protocols (CISP) consisting of twenty 2-min periods, each including 10-s passive rest, 5-s maximal sprint against a resistance of 7.5% body mass and 105-s active recovery. The CISP was performed in mean (S.D.) temperate conditions with active recovery intensities of 50% V(O)(2peak) (TEMP50) and 35% V(O)(2peak)(TEMP35) and in hot, humid [35.2 (0.4) degrees C, 80.4 (2.1)% RH] conditions with the same intensities (HOT50 and HOT35, respectively) in a randomised, counterbalanced order. Heat strain (physiological strain index (PSI)) was calculated from rectal temperature and heart rate. All subjects completed the CISP (20 sprints) in TEMP50 and TEMP35. The mean number of sprints completed for HOT50 and HOT35 was 13 (3) and 17 (2), respectively; both of which were lower than TEMP50 and TEMP35 (P<0.01) and different between hot conditions. Reductions in peak power output (PPO) occurred in the TEMP50 and HOT50 by sprint 8 (P<0.05), but in HOT35 a reduction was delayed until sprint 13 (P<0.05). The rate of PSI increase was faster in HOT50 than TEMP50 and HOT35, but peak PSI was not different. By lowering the recovery intensity, one component of the PSI (heart rate) was reduced and intermittent sprint exercise performance was maintained for longer in the heat.

  1. Hanford production reactor heat releases 1951--1971

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to document and detail the thermal releases from the Hanford nuclear production reactors during the period 1951 through 1971, and to put these releases in historical perspective with respect to changing Columbia River flows and temperatures. This information can also be used as a foundation for further ecological evaluations. When examining Hanford production reactor thermal releases to the Columbia River all related factors affecting the releases and the characteristics of the river should be considered. The major considerations in the present study were the characteristics of the releases themselves (primarily coolant flow rate, temperatures, discharge facilities, period of operation, and level of operation) and the characteristics of the river in that reach (primarily flow rate, temperature and mixing characteristics; the effects of dam construction were also taken into account). In addition, this study addressed ecological effects of thermal releases on aquatic species. Accordingly, this report includes discussion of the reactor cooling system, historical heat releases, thermal mixing and transport studies, hydroelectric power development, and ecologic effects of Hanford production reactor heat releases on salmon and trout. Appendix A contains reactor operating statistics, and Appendix B provide computations of heat added to the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and Richland, Washington.

  2. Loss of Hsp70 in Drosophila Is Pleiotropic, With Effects on Thermotolerance, Recovery From Heat Shock and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wei J.; Golic, Kent G.

    2006-01-01

    The heat-shock response is a programmed change in gene expression carried out by cells in response to environmental stress, such as heat. This response is universal and is characterized by the synthesis of a small group of conserved protein chaperones. In Drosophila melanogaster the Hsp70 chaperone dominates the profile of protein synthesis during the heat-shock response. We recently generated precise deletion alleles of the Hsp70 genes of D. melanogaster and have used those alleles to characterize the phenotypes of Hsp70-deficient flies. Flies with Hsp70 deletions have reduced thermotolerance. We find that Hsp70 is essential to survive a severe heat shock, but is not required to survive a milder heat shock, indicating that a significant degree of thermotolerance remains in the absence of Hsp70. However, flies without Hsp70 have a lengthened heat-shock response and an extended developmental delay after a non-lethal heat shock, indicating Hsp70 has an important role in recovery from stress, even at lower temperatures. Lack of Hsp70 also confers enhanced sensitivity to a temperature-sensitive lethal mutation and to the neurodegenerative effects produced by expression of a human polyglutamine disease protein. PMID:16204210

  3. Comparative evaluation of three alternative power cycles for waste heat recovery from the exhaust of adiabatic diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    Three alternative power cycles were compared in application as an exhaust-gas heat-recovery system for use with advanced adiabatic diesel engines. The power cycle alternatives considered were steam Rankine, organic Rankine with RC-1 as the working fluid, and variations of an air Brayton cycle. The comparison was made in terms of fuel economy and economic payback potential for heavy-duty trucks operating in line-haul service. The results indicate that, in terms of engine rated specific fuel consumption, a diesel/alternative-power-cycle engine offers a significant improvement over the turbocompound diesel used as the baseline for comparison. The maximum imporvement resulted from the use of a Rankine cycle heat-recovery system in series with turbocompounding. The air Brayton cycle alternatives studied, which included both simple-cycle and compression-intercooled configurations, were less effective and provided about half the fuel consumption improvement of the Rankine cycle alternatives under the same conditions. Capital and maintenance cost estimates were also developed for each of the heat-recovery power cycle systems. These costs were integrated with the fuel savings to identify the time required for net annual savings to pay back the initial capital investment. The sensitivity of capital payback time to arbitrary increases in fuel price, not accompanied by corresponding hardware cost inflation, was also examined. The results indicate that a fuel price increase is required for the alternative power cycles to pay back capital within an acceptable time period.

  4. A study of natural circulation in the evaporator of a horizontal-tube heat recovery steam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Pleshanov, K. A.; Sterkhov, K. V.

    2014-07-01

    Results obtained from investigations of stable natural circulation in an intricate circulation circuit with a horizontal layout of the tubes of evaporating surface having a negative useful head are presented. The possibility of making a shift from using multiple forced circulation organized by means of a circulation pump to natural circulation in vertical heat recovery steam generator is estimated. Criteria for characterizing the performance reliability and efficiency of a horizontal evaporator with negative useful head are proposed. The influence of various design solutions on circulation robustness is considered. With due regard of the optimal parameters, the most efficient and least costly methods are proposed for achieving more stable circulation in a vertical heat recovery steam generator when a shift is made from multiple forced to natural circulation. A procedure for calculating the circulation parameters and an algorithm for checking evaporator performance reliability are developed, and recommendations for the design of heat recovery steam generator, nonheated parts of natural circulation circuit, and evaporating surface are suggested.

  5. Product recovery method and system for hydrocarbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, L.

    1983-08-09

    A process and system are disclosed for producing and utilizing to advantage vapors and gases from hydrocarbon feedstock such as crushed oil shale, a coal and shale mixture, or straight coal. A prime mover driven by steam generated in the system produces electrical energy for supplying electrical power to the microwave oven employed. The prime mover is steam driven, such steam being supplied by a boiler. The boiler is, in turn, provided with a series of heat sources taking the form of the hot, spent shale, and/or coke from the coal, passing through such oven as well as perhaps portions of condensate or residue and portions or all of the gases generated in the system. The system thus reduces and in some cases may even eliminate power requirements otherwise imposed on an external electrical power source. Principally, however, the system generates sufficient energy as to be a m supplement to the energy requirement of an external power source. While magnetron tubes may preferably be employed in connection with the microwave oven used, other types of tubes or other electro-magnetic microwave generating means can be employed, this of a power requirement and wave length sufficient to heat the incoming feedstock. The feedstock itself is preheated by solids' hea exchangers, themselves raised in temperature by steam produced as well as the vapors and gases generated.

  6. Heat exposure and productivity in orchards: Implications for climate change research.

    PubMed

    Quiller, Grant; Krenz, Jennifer; Ebi, Kristie; Hess, Jeremy J; Fenske, Richard A; Sampson, Paul D; Pan, Mengjie; Spector, June T

    2017-01-31

    Recent studies suggest that heat exposure degrades work productivity, but such studies have not considered individual- and workplace-level factors. Forty-six tree fruit harvesters (98% Latino/a) from six orchards participated in a cross-sectional study in Central/Eastern Washington in 2015. The association between maximum measured work-shift Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGTmax) and productivity (total weight of fruit bins collected per time worked) was estimated using linear mixed effects models, adjusting for relevant confounders. The mean (standard deviation) WBGTmax was 27.9 (3.6)°C in August and 21.2 (2.0)°C in September. There was a trend of decreasing productivity with increasing WBGTmax, but this association was not statistically significant. When individual- and workplace-level factors were included in the model, the association approached the null. Not considering individual, work, and economic factors that affect rest and recovery in projections of the impacts of climate change could result in overestimates of reductions in future productivity and underestimate risk of heat illness.

  7. Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms, SUPRI TR-127

    SciTech Connect

    Kovscek, Anthony R.; Brigham, William E.; Castanier, Louis M.

    2001-09-07

    The program spans a spectrum of topics and is divided into five categories: (i) multiphase flow and rock properties, (ii) hot fluid injection, (iii) primary heavy-oil production, (iv) reservoir definition, and (v) in-situ combustion.

  8. Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Kevin Dean; Wagner, Robert M; Briggs, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery

  9. Heat production in Littorina saxatilis Olivi and Littorina neritoides L. (gastropoda: Prosobranchia) during an experimental exposure to air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Inge

    1990-06-01

    The adaptation of littorinid molluscs to prolonged aerial exposure was investigated by the determination of heat production. Littorina saxatilis, inhabiting the upper eulittoral, reached a maximum metabolic activity during submersion (heat production: 3.26×10-3J s-1 (gadw)-1. On the first three days of desiccation, the heat production was continuously reduced to 40% of the submersed value. A prolonged aerial exposure was lethal for this species. In the supralittoral L. neritoides, three stages of energy metabolism could be observed: An intermediate heat production during submersion (1.97×10-3Js-1 (gadw)-1), an increased metabolism during the first hour of aerial exposure (heat production 204% of submersed value), and a minimal metabolism (39% of the submersed value and 19% of maximum value) during the following days and weeks of desiccation. Recovery depended on water salinity; L. saxatilis proved to be less euryhaline than L. neritoides. Thus, the metabolic adaptations correlate with the level of littoral habitat; inactivity combined with a drastically reduced energy consumption is a metabolically economic way to survive in periodically dry environments.

  10. A novel pyroelectric generator utilising naturally driven temperature fluctuations from oscillating heat pipes for waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabek, D.; Taylor, J.; Ayel, V.; Bertin, Y.; Romestant, C.; Bowen, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature thermal to electrical energy converters have the potential to provide a route for recovering waste energy. In this paper, we propose a new configuration of a thermal harvester that uses a naturally driven thermal oscillator free of mechanical motion and operates between a hot heat source and a cold heat sink. The system exploits a heat induced liquid-vapour transition of a working fluid as a primary driver for a pyroelectric generator. The two-phase instability of a fluid in a closed looped capillary channel of an oscillating heat pipe (OHP) creates pressure differences which lead to local high frequency temperature oscillations in the range of 0.1-5 K. Such temperature changes are suitable for pyroelectric thermal to electrical energy conversion, where the pyroelectric generator is attached to the adiabatic wall of the OHP, thereby absorbing thermal energy from the passing fluid. This new pyroelectric-oscillating heat pipe (POHP) assembly of a low temperature generator continuously operates across a spatial heat source temperature of 55 °C and a heat sink temperature of 25 °C, and enables waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting from small temperature gradients at low temperatures. Our electrical measurements with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) show an open circuit voltage of 0.4 V (AC) and with lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) an open circuit voltage of 0.8 V (AC) at a frequency of 0.45 Hz, with an energy density of 95 pJ cm-3 for PMN-PT. Our novel POHP device therefore has the capability to convert small quantities of thermal energy into more desirable electricity in the nW to mW range and provides an alternative to currently used batteries or centralised energy generation.

  11. Analysis of the heavy oil production technology effectiveness using natural thermal convection with heat agent recirculation method in reservoirs with varying initial water saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osnos, V. B.; Kuneevsky, V. V.; Larionov, V. M.; Saifullin, E. R.; Gainetdinov, A. V.; Vankov, Yu V.; Larionova, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    The method of natural thermal convection with heat agent recirculation (NTC HAR) in oil reservoirs is described. The analysis of the effectiveness of this method for oil reservoir heating with the values of water saturation from 0 to 0.5 units is conducted. As the test element Ashalchinskoye oil field is taken. CMG STARS software was used for calculations. Dynamics of cumulative production, recovery factor and specific energy consumption per 1 m3 of crude oil produced in the application of the heat exchanger with heat agent in cases of different initial water saturation are defined and presented as graphs.

  12. Relationship of thermal status to productivity in heat-stressed dairy cows given recombinant bovine somatotropin.

    PubMed

    Settivari, R S; Spain, J N; Ellersieck, M R; Byatt, J C; Collier, R J; Spiers, D E

    2007-03-01

    The responses of lactating Holstein cows to daily administration of bovine somatotropin (bST) were measured at thermoneutrality (Tn) and under both constant and cycled heat-stress conditions to determine the relationship between thermal status and bST-induced shifts in milk production. All tests included a 5-d acclimation period at Tn (18 degrees C), followed by a 2-d increase in ambient temperature to 28.5 degrees C. After d 3, ambient temperature was cycled between 28.5 (day) and 25.5 degrees C (night) for 4 d. Daily injections with either 31 mg of bST or saline began on d 1 of the experiment. Milk production, feed intake, and respiratory rate (RR) were measured daily. Intraperitoneal, telemetric temperature transmitters were used for a continuous measure of core body temperature (T(core)). Blood samples were collected during each phase to evaluate the changes in serum chemistry in response to bST and heat stress. Following a 15-d recovery, cows were switched across injection treatments and the study was repeated. Milk production decreased by approximately 18.4% below the initial yield at Tn by the end of 7 d of heat challenge. Although a reduction in milk production occurred during heat stress in both groups, milk production was higher in bST-treated cows compared with control cows during periods of constant and cyclic heat. Likewise, bST treatment during the entire period increased the milk-to-feed ratio over the control level by approximately 11.3%. Plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 and serum nonesterified fatty acids accompanied the increased growth hormone level with bST treatment (approximately 122.0 and 88.8%, respectively), whereas plasma urea nitrogen was reduced by approximately 13.3% to reflect the shift to lipid metabolism. There was no difference in T(core) of the treatment and control groups at Tn. Both bST and control cows increased RR and T(core) above the Tn level by approximately 94.8 and 2.9%, respectively, during constant heat, with a

  13. 77 FR 74027 - Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided with Multiple Heat-Conducting Paths and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Integrated Circuit Packages Provided with Multiple Heat- Conducting Paths and Products... integrated circuit packages provided with multiple heat-conducting paths and products containing same...

  14. Recovery of phenolic compounds from biomass during ethanol production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biomass to ethanol conversion represents an alternative liquid fuel technology that does not need to compete with food crops. Maintaining agricultural production of commodity crops such as corn and soybeans for the food supply and using agricultural waste or low input energy crops grown on marginal ...

  15. Comparison of supplements to enhance recovery of heat-injured Salmonella from egg albumen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The recovery of Salmonella from liquid egg white (LEW) is complicated by thermal and innate LEW antimicrobial-induced injury. Numerous supplements have been reported to promote the recovery of injured bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of twelve media supplements to af...

  16. Effects of heat on workers' health and productivity in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ro-Ting; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2009-11-11

    The impact of global warming on population health is a growing concern and has been widely discussed. The issue of heat stress disorders and consequent productivity reduction among workers has not yet been widely addressed. Taiwan is an island straddling the Tropic of Cancer in the West Pacific and has both subtropical and tropical climates. As of 2008, the economy of Taiwan accounts for 1.1% of the world gross domestic product at purchasing power parity and is listed as 19th in the world and eighth in Asia, according to International Monetary Fund data. The aim of this paper is to identify occupations at risk and the potential health impacts of heat on workers in Taiwan. Historical data relating to meteorology, population, the labour force and economy were obtained from publicly available databases from the Taiwanese government. Hot seasons with an average maximum temperature above 30 degrees C and relative humidity above 74%, lasting for four to six months from May to October, pose health threats to construction, farming and fishery workers. In particular, populations of ageing farmers and physically overloaded construction workers are the two most vulnerable worker categories in which high temperature impacts on health and productivity. Currently, regulations and preventive actions for heat relief are difficult to enforce for several reasons, including lack of equipment for measuring environmental conditions, lack of awareness of potential hazards and strict time constraints imposed on workers. There is an urgent need to systematically and comprehensively assess the impact of a warming climate on workers' health and productivity to provide effective prevention strategies for a better working and living environment in Taiwan.

  17. Influence of lactic acid and post-treatment recovery time on the heat resistance of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yasuo; Miake, Kiyotaka; Nakamura, Hiromi; Kage-Nakadai, Eriko; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2017-09-18

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lactic acid (LA) with and without organic material at various post-treatment recovery times on the heat resistance of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). LA decreased Lm numbers; however, the effect was remarkably attenuated by the presence of organic matter. Five strains of Lm were treated with LA and the listericidal effects were compared. The effect of LA varied depending on the strain, with ≥3.0% (w/w) LA required to kill the Lm strains in a short time. The heat resistance of Lm treated with LA was examined with respect to the time interval between the acid treatment and the subsequent manufacturing step. The heat resistance of Lm was shown to significantly increase during the post-treatment period. Heat tolerance (D value) increased up to 3.4-fold compared with the non-treated control bacteria. RNA sequencing and RT-PCR analyses suggested that several stress chaperones, proteins controlled by RecA and associated with high-temperature survival, were involved in the mechanism of enhanced heat resistance. These results are applicable to manufacturers when LA and heat treatment methods are utilized for the effective control of Lm in foods. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A COMBINED REACTION/PRODUCT RECOVERY PROCESS FOR THE CONTINUOUS PRODUCTION OF BIODIESEL

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, J.F., Jr.; McFarlane, J.; Schuh, D.L.; Tsouris, C; Day, J.N.; Hullette, J.N.

    2009-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Nu-Energie, LLC entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for the purpose of demonstrating and deploying a novel technology for the continuous synthesis and recovery of biodiesel from the transesterification of triglycerides. The focus of the work was the demonstration of a combination Couette reactor and centrifugal separator - an invention of ORNL researchers - that facilitates both product synthesis and recovery from reaction byproducts in the same apparatus. At present, transesterification of triglycerides to produce biodiesel is performed in batch-type reactors with an excess of a chemical catalyst, which is required to achieve high reactant conversions in reasonable reaction times (e.g., 1 hour). The need for long reactor residence times requires use of large reactors and ancillary equipment (e.g., feed and product tankage), and correspondingly large facilities, in order to obtain the economy of scale required to make the process economically viable. Hence, the goal of this CRADA was to demonstrate successful, extended operation of a laboratory-scale reactor/separator prototype to process typical industrial reactant materials, and to design, fabricate, and test a production-scale unit for deployment at the biodiesel production site. Because of its ease of operation, rapid attainment of steady state, high mass transfer and phase separation efficiencies, and compact size, a centrifugal contactor was chosen for intensification of the biodiesel production process. The unit was modified to increase the residence time from a few seconds to minutes*. For this application, liquid phases were introduced into the reactor as separate streams. One was composed of the methanol and base catalyst and the other was the soy oil used in the experiments. Following reaction in the mixing zone, the immiscible glycerine and methyl ester products were separated in the high speed rotor and collected from separate

  19. Solar production of intermediate temperature process heat, phase 1 design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-08-01

    The system consists of 42,420 sq ft of parabolic trough, single axis tracking, concentrating solar collectors. The collectors are oriented in a North-South configuration and track East-West. A heat transfer fluid (Gulf Synfluid 4cs) is circulated in a closed loop fashion through the solar collectors and a series of heat exchangers. The inlet and outlet fluid temperatures for the collectors are 370 F and 450 F respectively. These temperatures are constantly maintained via a variable flow rate through the collectors (the flow rate varies in direct proportion to the level of insolation). Superheated steam is the final product of the solar energy system. Final steam quality at the steam generator is 420 F and 165 Psia.

  20. Hydrogen production from coal using a nuclear heat source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quade, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    A strong candidate for hydrogen production in the intermediate time frame of 1985 to 1995 is a coal-based process using a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as a heat source. Expected process efficiencies in the range of 60 to 70% are considerably higher than all other hydrogen production processes except steam reforming of a natural gas. The process involves the preparation of a coal liquid, hydrogasification of that liquid, and steam reforming of the resulting gaseous or light liquid product. A study showing process efficiency and cost of hydrogen vs nuclear reactor core outlet temperature has been completed, and shows diminishing returns at process temperatures above about 1500 F. A possible scenario combining the relatively abundant and low-cost Western coal deposits with the Gulf Coast hydrogen users is presented which provides high-energy density transportation utilizing coal liquids and uranium.

  1. Verification of relationship model between Korean new elderly class’s recovery resilience and productive aging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Gun-Sang; Kim, Dae-Sung; Yi, Eun-Surk

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to verification of relationship model between Korean new elderly class’s recovery resilience and productive aging. As of 2013, this study sampled preliminary elderly people in Gyeonggi-do and other provinces nationwide. Data from a total of effective 484 subjects was analyzed. The collected data was processed using the IBM SPSS 20.0 and AMOS 20.0, and underwent descriptive statistical analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and structure model verification. The path coefficient associated with model fitness was examined. The standardization path coefficient between recovery resilience and productive aging is β=0.975 (t=14.790), revealing a statistically significant positive effect. Thus, it was found that the proposed basic model on the direct path of recovery resilience and productive aging was fit for the model. PMID:26730383

  2. Verification of relationship model between Korean new elderly class's recovery resilience and productive aging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Gun-Sang; Kim, Dae-Sung; Yi, Eun-Surk

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to verification of relationship model between Korean new elderly class's recovery resilience and productive aging. As of 2013, this study sampled preliminary elderly people in Gyeonggi-do and other provinces nationwide. Data from a total of effective 484 subjects was analyzed. The collected data was processed using the IBM SPSS 20.0 and AMOS 20.0, and underwent descriptive statistical analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and structure model verification. The path coefficient associated with model fitness was examined. The standardization path coefficient between recovery resilience and productive aging is β=0.975 (t=14.790), revealing a statistically significant positive effect. Thus, it was found that the proposed basic model on the direct path of recovery resilience and productive aging was fit for the model.

  3. Bioelectrochemical recovery of waste-derived volatile fatty acids and production of hydrogen and alkali.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-09-15

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA) are organic compounds of great importance for various industries and environmental processes. Fermentation and anaerobic digestion of organic wastes are promising alternative technologies for VFA production. However, one of the major challenges is development of sustainable downstream technologies for VFA recovery. In this study, an innovative microbial bipolar electrodialysis cell (MBEDC) was developed to meet the challenge of waste-derived VFA recovery, produce hydrogen and alkali, and potentially treat wastewater. The MBEDC was operated in fed-batch mode. At an applied voltage of 1.2 V, a VFA recovery efficiency of 98.3%, H2 of 18.4 mL and alkali production presented as pH of 12.64 were obtained using synthetic fermentation broth. The applied voltage, initial VFA concentrations and composition were affecting the VFA recovery. The energy balance revealed that net energy (5.20-6.86 kWh/kg-VFA recovered) was produced at all the applied voltages (0.8-1.4 V). The coexistence of other anionic species had no negative effect on VFA transportation. The VFA concentration was increased 2.96 times after three consecutive batches. Furthermore, the applicability of MBEDC was successfully verified with digestate. These results demonstrate for the first time the possibility of a new method for waste-derived VFA recovery and valuable products production that uses wastewater as fuel and bacteria as catalyst. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Model wall and recovery temperature effects on experimental heat transfer data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.; Stone, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    Basic analytical procedures are used to illustrate, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the relative impact upon heat transfer data analysis of certain factors which may affect the accuracy of experimental heat transfer data. Inaccurate knowledge of adiabatic wall conditions results in a corresponding inaccuracy in the measured heat transfer coefficient. The magnitude of the resulting error is extreme for data obtained at wall temperatures approaching the adiabatic condition. High model wall temperatures and wall temperature gradients affect the level and distribution of heat transfer to an experimental model. The significance of each of these factors is examined and its impact upon heat transfer data analysis is assessed.

  5. Furnace and Heat Recovery Area Design and Analysis for Conceptual Design of Supercritical O2-Based PC Boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Seltzer

    2006-05-01

    The objective of the furnace and heat recovery area design and analysis task of the Conceptual Design of Supercritical Oxygen-Based PC Boiler study is to optimize the location and design of the furnace, burners, over-fire gas ports, and internal radiant surfaces. The furnace and heat recovery area were designed and analyzed using the FW-FIRE, Siemens, and HEATEX computer programs. The furnace is designed with opposed wall-firing burners and over-fire air ports. Water is circulated in the furnace by forced circulation to the waterwalls at the periphery and divisional wall panels within the furnace. Compared to the air-fired furnace, the oxygen-fired furnace requires only 65% of the surface area and 45% of the volume. Two oxygen-fired designs were simulated: (1) with cryogenic air separation unit (ASU) and (2) with oxygen ion transport membrane (OITM). The maximum wall heat flux in the oxygen-fired furnace is more than double that of the air-fired furnace due to the higher flame temperature and higher H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations. The coal burnout for the oxygen-fired case is 100% due to a 500 F higher furnace temperature and higher concentration of O{sub 2}. Because of the higher furnace wall temperature of the oxygen-fired case compared to the air-fired case, furnace water wall material was upgraded from T2 to T92. Compared to the air-fired heat recovery area (HRA), the oxygen-fired HRA total heat transfer surface is 35% less for the cryogenic design and 13% less for the OITM design due to more heat being absorbed in the oxygen-fired furnace and the greater molecular weight of the oxygen-fired flue gas. The HRA tube materials and wall thickness are nearly the same for the air-fired and oxygen-fired design since the flue gas and water/steam temperature profiles encountered by the heat transfer banks are similar.

  6. Lipopeptide surfactants: Production, recovery and pore forming capacity.

    PubMed

    Inès, Mnif; Dhouha, Ghribi

    2015-09-01

    Lipopeptides are microbial surface active compounds produced by a wide variety of bacteria, fungi and yeast. They are characterized by highly structural diversity and have the ability to decrease the surface and interfacial tension at the surface and interface, respectively. Surfactin, iturin and fengycin of Bacillus subtilis are among the most studied lipopeptides. This review will present the main factors encountering lipopeptides production along with the techniques developed for their extraction and purification. Moreover, we will discuss their ability to form pores and destabilize biological membrane permitting their use as antimicrobial, hemolytic and antitumor agents. These open great potential applications in biomediacal, pharmaceutic and agriculture fields.

  7. Heat Resistance of Salmonella in Various Egg Products

    PubMed Central

    Garibaldi, J. A.; Straka, R. P.; Ijichi, K.

    1969-01-01

    The heat-resistance characteristics of Salmonella typhimurium Tm-1, a reference strain in the stationary phase of growth, were determined at several temperatures in the major types of products produced by the egg industry. The time required to kill 90% of the population (D value) at a given temperature in specific egg products was as follows: at 60 C (140 F), D = 0.27 min for whole egg; D = 0.60 min for whole egg plus 10% sucrose; D = 1.0 min for fortified whole egg; D = 0.20 min for egg white (pH 7.3), stabilized with aluminum; D = 0.40 min for egg yolk; D = 4.0 min for egg yolk plus 10% sucrose; D = 5.1 min for egg yolk plus 10% NaCl; D = 1.0 min for scrambled egg mix; at 55 C (131 F), D = 0.55 min for egg white (pH 9.2); D = 1.2 min for egg white (pH 9.2) plus 10% sucrose. The average Z value (number of degrees, either centigrade or fahrenheit, for a thermal destruction time curve to traverse one logarithmic cycle) was 4.6 C (8.3 F) with a range from 4.2 to 5.3 C. Supplementation with 10% sucrose appeared to have a severalfold greater effect on the heat stabilization of egg white proteins than on S. typhimurium Tm-1. This information should be of value in the formulation of heat treatments to insure that all egg products be free of viable salmonellae. Images PMID:4890741

  8. Modelling, sizing and testing a scroll expander for a waste heat recovery application on a gasoline engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legros, Arnaud; Guillaume, Ludovic; Diny, Mouad; Lemort, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Waste heat recovery technologies in a mobile application emerge every time energy becomes a valuable resource. It has been the case in the 70s with oil crisis and it is starting to regain some interests now due to the continuously rising price of oil and due to the restrictive standards imposed by the different governments. This paper deals with the recovery on the exhaust gases of an internal combustion engine by using a Rankine system. The study focuses on the expander, which is one of the most important components of the system. The use of a scroll expander operating with steam is currently investigated through simulation and experimentation. This paper presents the modelling of a scroll expander. The model is a detailed model including various losses such as leakage, friction or under or over expansion. This model has been used to design and size a tailor-made scroll expander. This was necessary due to the small amount of expanders on the market and also to have a machine that fits our application. After designing the machine, a prototype has been built. It has also been tested on our prototype bench of waste heat recovery on a gasoline engine, by means of a Rankine cycle. Measured performance will be presented, analysed and compared to predictions by the model. The first results will be presented here and discussed in order to give recommendations for the design of next prototypes.

  9. Microbial production of 2-chloro-alpha-methylbenzyl alcohol and its adsorptive recovery.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa; Adachi; Matsuno

    2000-08-01

    An adsorptive process was combined with yeast-mediated production of chiral 2-chloro-alpha-methylbenzyl alcohol (o-Cl-1-PA) for effective product recovery and reuse of the reaction medium. Low temperature was suitable for long-term reactor operation, and continuous production using a shallow-bed reactor was achieved for at least 22 days while maintaining a high conversion. The appropriate size of the adsorption column for product recovery from the reactor effluent was estimated through measurement of breakthrough curves of o-Cl-1-PA in a packed bed of the resin at various adsorbate concentrations and feed flow rates. Using the adsorption column, 98% of the product and the residual substrate were recovered from the reactor effluent, and the effluent from the adsorption column was successfully reused as the reaction medium after microfiltration to save the medium consumption.

  10. Factors associated with marketable milk production recovery after treatment of naturally occurring acute coliform mastitis.

    PubMed

    Shinozuka, Yasunori; Kaneko, Sohei; Kurose, Tomoyasu; Watanabe, Aiko; Kuruhara, Kana; Kawai, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Milk production loss after recovery from acute coliform mastitis causes major economic losses for dairy industries. Declines in milk production and composition are caused by multiple factors, including cow factors, microorganisms and treatments, but the influence of each factor has not been determined. To investigate risk factors for milk loss after treatment for acute coliform mastitis, multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted in 53 clinical cases. Systemic administration of fluoroquinolone was significantly associated with recovery of marketable milk production. The time to slaughter was significantly shorter in cows with complete loss of quarter milk production than in cows that produced marketable milk. In this study, we identified factors associated with increased risk of milk production loss.

  11. [Recovery of Staphylococcus aureus after acid injury in milk products].

    PubMed

    Assis, E M; De Carvalho, E P; Asquieri, E R; Robbs, P G

    1994-01-01

    The growth behavior of Staphylococcus aureus in fresh Cheese (Minas and Muzzarella) during their shelf-life was studied. The possible injury of this microorganism caused by the increasing acidity was also investigated. Raw milk was inoculated with 10(6) cells/ml (S. aureus FRIA-100) and the cheese production was performed according to normal procedures. Minas and muzzarella cheese were stored at 7 degrees C for 40 and 60 days, respectively. At 2-3 days intervals, the following analysis were performed: acidity, pH, S. aureus counting using agar Baird Parker by the traditional methods and by the method recommended by the American Public Health Association to evaluate the reparation of injured cells. We had a secure indication of the presence of injured S. aureus when acidity was in the range of 0.7 to 0.8% expressed in lactic acid and when the cycle was 1.3 log higher than the traditional one.

  12. Flat plate heat exchangers for the new production reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1988-12-07

    The New Production Reactor (NPR) will require heat exchangers (HX) as part of the ancillary equipment. The most common type of heat exchanger in the US is the shell and tube, the type presently in SRP reactor service. This type of design is the one that is normally described in detail in heat transfer texts. Other designs are more efficient, and there was a period when these designs were actively modified. The largest driving force for higher efficiency HX was the OPEC produced energy shortage of the early 1970's. Several comments were made by B.S. Spangler about flat plate HX for the NPR after my initial comparison between shell and tube and flat plate HX (DPST-88-729). Since answers were not readily available, Philippe Marchal of Packinox (Louveciennes, France) agreed to visit SRL. This report contains a series of answers to all comments raised in DPST-88-743 and some general statements comparing flat plate HX to shell and tube HX. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Laser production and heating of plasma for MHD application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments have been made on the production and heating of plasmas by the absorption of laser radiation. These experiments were performed to ascertain the feasibility of using laser-produced or laser-heated plasmas as the input for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. Such a system would have a broad application as a laser-to-electricity energy converter for space power transmission. Experiments with a 100-J-pulsed CO2 laser were conducted to investigate the breakdown of argon gas by a high-intensity laser beam, the parameters (electron density and temperature) of the plasma produced, and the formation and propagation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. Experiments were also carried out using a 1-J-pulsed CO2 laser to heat the plasma produced in a shock tube. The shock-tube hydrogen plasma reached electron densities of approximately 10 to the 17th/cu cm and electron temperatures of approximately 1 eV. Absorption of the CO2 laser beam by the plasma was measured, and up to approximately 100 percent absorption was observed. Measurements with a small MHD generator showed that the energy extraction efficiency could be very large with values up to 56 percent being measured.

  14. One-, two-, and three-phase flow during free-product recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    An increasing variety of options is becoming available for recovering organic liquids from the subsurface following releases from leaking underground storage tanks, buried pipelines, and surface spills. Multiphase fluid flow in porous media during product recovery must be considered to optimize desired effects and minimize unintended consequences. Free-product recovery commonly focuses first on soils that are saturated with respect to nonaqueous-phase liquid (NAPL), especially when a substantial thickness of floating product is apparent in monitoring wells. This paper also addresses product recovery from soils that are unsaturated with respect to NAPL, such as in the transition zone between the water table and the capillary fringe. Considering both saturated and unsaturated soils, the available product recovery methods can generally be classified as those that aim to recover NAPL only; NAPL and water; and NAPL, water, and vapor. The corresponding flow processes, respectively, involve one, two, and three phases. Examples of these distinctly different approaches are presented, along with their applicability, advantages, and disadvantages.

  15. Advances in in-situ product recovery (ISPR) in whole cell biotechnology during the last decade.

    PubMed

    Van Hecke, Wouter; Kaur, Guneet; De Wever, Heleen

    2014-11-15

    The review presents the state-of-the-art in the applications of in-situ product recovery (ISPR) in whole-cell biotechnology over the last 10years. It summarizes various ISPR-integrated fermentation processes for the production of a wide spectrum of bio-based products. A critical assessment of the performance of various ISPR concepts with respect to the degree of product enrichment, improved productivity, reduced process flows and increased yields is provided. Requirements to allow a successful industrial implementation of ISPR are also discussed. Finally, supporting technologies such as online monitoring, mathematical modeling and use of recombinant microorganisms with ISPR are presented.

  16. Influence of Thermal Boundary Effects on the Process of Creating Recovery Stresses in a SMA Wire Activated by Joule Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debska, Aleksandra; Balandraud, Xavier; Destrebecq, Jean-François; Gwozdziewicz, Piotr; Seruga, Andrzej

    2017-07-01

    The study deals with the influence of thermal boundary effects on the process of creating recovery stresses in a SMA wire activated by Joule heating, during a thermal cycle (up to the return to ambient temperature). First, a thermal characterization is performed using infrared thermography for temperature profile measurements along the wire in a steady-state regime. Second, recovery stress tests are performed using a uniaxial testing machine. Finally, tests are analyzed using a thermomechanical model, taking the inhomogeneous temperature distribution along the wire into account. The influence of the initial distribution of martensite (before thermal activation of the memory effect) is discussed, as well as the influence of the wire length. It is shown that the thermal boundary effects at the contact with the grips of the testing machine significantly influence the response of the wire. For instance, during the heating of the wire, an austenite-to-martensite transformation may occur in the zones near the wire ends (where the temperature remains close to ambient) due to the increased stress. A length of influence of the thermal boundary effects on the overall wire response is defined, and a condition to neglect this influence is proposed. The study highlights the importance of taking thermal boundary effects into account for practical applications of SMAs based on Joule heating.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Exhaust Gas Cooling in Channels with Periodic Elbows for Application in Compact Heat Recovery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bari, Sergio; Cotton, James S.; Robinson, Anthony J.

    2012-11-01

    Miniature and Micro devices represent the new frontier for advanced heat and mass transfer technology. Due to the small length scales, the use of CFD is very useful for designing and optimizing microfluidic devices since experimentation and visualization at these scales can be difficult. In this work a high temperature air microfluidic cooling strategy for applications such as compact waste heat recovery, exhaust gas recirculation and fuel cell thermal management is proposed. Initially, the application of a simple straight microchannel is considered. In an effort to partially compensate for the poor thermal properties of air, right-angle bends are introduced in order to induce Dean vortices which periodically restart the thermal boundary layer development, thus improving the heat transfer and fluid mixing. Numerical simulations in the range of 100 <= ReDh <= 1000 have been carried out for channels of square cross-section. Channel wall lengths of 1.0 mm are investigated for elbow spacings of 5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm. High temperature air (300°C) at atmospheric inlet pressure is the working fluid. The results indicate that the elbows substantially improve the local and average heat transfer in the channels while increasing the pressure drop. Design considerations are discussed which take into account the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the channels.

  18. Energy recovery during expansion of compressed gas using power plant low-quality heat sources

    DOEpatents

    Ochs, Thomas L.; O'Connor, William K.

    2006-03-07

    A method of recovering energy from a cool compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid is disclosed which includes incrementally expanding the compressed gas, compressed liquid, vapor, or supercritical fluid through a plurality of expansion engines and heating the gas, vapor, compressed liquid, or supercritical fluid entering at least one of the expansion engines with a low quality heat source. Expansion engines such as turbines and multiple expansions with heating are disclosed.

  19. Optical investigation of heat release and NOx production in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, B. H.; Patel, S.; Dunkley, P.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Two passive optical techniques are described to investigate combustion. Optical Emission Tomography (OET) is used for non-intrusive study of heat release through the detection of chemiluminescence by the hydroxyl radical that is generated in the burning process. The OET technique described here is based on a passive fibre-optic detection system, which allows spatially resolved high-frequency detection of the flame front in a combustion flame, where all fibres detect the emission signals simultaneously. The system withstands the high pressures and temperatures typically encountered in the harsh environments of gas turbine combustors and IC engines. The sensor-array is non-intrusive, low-cost, compact, simple to configure and can be quickly set up around a combustion field. The maximum acquisition rate is 2 kHz. This allows spatially resolved study of the fast phenomena in combustion. Furthermore, the production of NOx is investigated through the emission of green light as a result of adding tri-methyl-borate to a flame. In combustion, the tri-methyl-borate produces green luminescence in locations where NOx would be produced. Combining the green luminescence visualisation with OET detection of the hydroxyl radical allows monitoring of heat release and of NOx production areas, thus giving a means of studying both the burning process and the resulting NOx pollution.

  20. An environmental friendly animal waste disposal process with ammonia recovery and energy production: Experimental study and economic analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ye; Tan, Michelle Ting Ting; Chong, Clive; Xiao, Wende; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2017-10-01

    Animal manure waste is considered as an environmental challenge especially in farming areas mainly because of gaseous emission and water pollution. Among all the pollutants emitted from manure waste, ammonia is of greatest concern as it could contribute to formation of aerosols in the air and could hardly be controlled by traditional disposal methods like landfill or composting. On the other hand, manure waste is also a renewable source for energy production. In this work, an environmental friendly animal waste disposal process with combined ammonia recovery and energy production was proposed and investigated both experimentally and economically. Lab-scale feasibility study results showed that 70% of ammonia in the manure waste could be converted to struvite as fertilizer, while solid manure waste was successfully gasified in a 10kW downdraft fixed-bed gasifier producing syngas with the higher heating value of 4.9MJ/(Nm(3)). Based on experimental results, economic study for the system was carried out using a cost-benefit analysis to investigate the financial feasibility based on a Singapore case study. In addition, for comparison, schemes of gasification without ammonia removal and incineration were also studied for manure waste disposal. The results showed that the proposed gasification-based manure waste treatment process integrated with ammonia recovery was most financially viable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.