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Sample records for rectal carcinoid tumors

  1. [Ultrasonographic study of rectal carcinoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Nomura, M; Fujita, N; Matsunaga, A; Ando, M; Tominaga, G; Noda, Y; Kobayashi, G; Kimura, K; Yuki, T; Ishida, K; Yago, A; Mochizuki, F; Chonan, A

    1996-11-01

    To compare intraluminal ultrasonographic (ILUS) findings with histological findings of rectal carcinoid tumors, 35 patients with rectal carcinoid tumors were reviewed. The results were as follows: 1) The rectal wall was visualized as a seven- or nine-layer structure by means of ILUS in 81% of the patients. 2) The possibility that the thin hyperechoic third layer above the tumor on ILUS corresponds to the muscularis mucosae and fibrointerstitium above the tumor histologically. 3) In cases with relatively high internal echoes, the amount of fibrointerstitium exceeded that of tumor cells histologically. 4) In cases with nonuniform internal echo patterns, tumor cells were separated by thick fibrointerstitium forming nodular nests.

  2. Acromegaly due to a Macroinvasive Plurihormonal Pituitary Adenoma and a Rectal Carcinoid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Sang Ouk; Hwang, Jin-Kyung; Rhee, Sang Youl; Chon, Suk; Oh, Seungjoon; Lee, Misu; Pellegata, Natalia S.

    2015-01-01

    A macroinvasive pituitary adenoma with plurihormonality usually causes acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia, and also accompanies with neurologic symptoms such as visual disturbances. However, its concurrent presentation with a rectal carcinoid tumor is rarely observed. This study reports the history, biochemical, colonoscopic and immunohistochemical results of a 48-year-old female with acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia. Despite the large size and invasive nature of the pituitary adenoma to adjacent anatomical structures, she did not complain of any neurologic symptoms such as visual disturbance or headache. Immunohistochemical staining of the surgical specimen from the pituitary adenoma revealed that the tumor cells were positive for growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Staining for pituitary-specific transcription factor-1 (Pit-1) was shown to be strongly positive, which could have been possibly contributing to the plurihormonality of this adenoma. Colonoscopy found a rectal polyp that was identified to be a carcinoid tumor using immunohistochemical staining. A macroinvasive pituitary adenoma with concomitant rectal carcinoid tumor was secreting GH, PRL, and TSH, which were believed to be in association with over-expression of Pit-1. This is the first case report of double primary tumors comprising a plurihormonal pituitary macroadenoma and rectal carcinoid tumor. PMID:25559714

  3. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for lung carcinoid tumor symptoms Surgery to treat lung carcinoid tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  4. Rectal Mechano-sensory Function in Patients with Carcinoid Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Tine; Brock, Christina; Haase, Anne-Mette; Laurberg, Søren; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Grønbæk, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In patients with neuroendocrine tumors, excessive production of serotonin and other amines may cause the carcinoid syndrome, which is mainly characterized by diarrhea and flushing. Little is known about the pathophysiology of carcinoid diarrhea. In several other groups of patients, diarrhea may be associated with rectal hypersensitivity and increased rectal tone. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare rectal sensitivity and compliance in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and in healthy subjects. Methods Twelve patients (6 males, aged 54–78 years, median 65 years), with carcinoid diarrhea and 19 healthy subjects (7 males, aged 50–78 years, median 61 years) were included. Rectal mechanical and heat stimulation was used for assessment of rectal mechano-sensory properties. Results Overall, 5.3% higher temperatures were needed to elicit sensory responses in patients with carcinoid diarrhea than in healthy subjects (P = 0.015). Posthoc analyses revealed that the sensory threshold to heat was 48.1 ± 3.1°C in patients vs 44.7 ± 4.7°C in healthy subjects (P = 0.041). In contrast, patients and healthy subjects showed no overall differences in rectal sensory response to mechanical distension (P = 0.731) or rectal compliance (P = 0.990). Conclusions Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have higher sensory thresholds to heat stimulation in comparison to healthy subjects, but normal rectal sensation to mechanical distension and normal compliance. Therefore, treatment of carcinoid diarrhea should aim at prolonging gastrointestinal transit and decreasing secretion, rather than modifying rectal mechano-sensory function. PMID:26690884

  5. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Progressive Carcinoid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-04

    Atypical Carcinoid Tumor; Foregut Carcinoid Tumor; Hindgut Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Midgut Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1

  6. Stages of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  7. Can Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems. Carcinoid tumors often are found incidentally (by accident). These tumors aren’t causing any symptoms but ... Carcinoid Tumors? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Talking ...

  8. Minute liver metastases from a rectal carcinoid: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Hemmi, Hideyuki; Gu, Jin-Yu; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    We here report a 43-year-old male patient with minute liver metastases from a rectal carcinoid. Hepatic nodules were diagnosed during surgery, although they were not diagnosed by preoperative computed tomography or ultrasound examination. The rectal carcinoid was resected together with liver metastases and the patient has had no disease recurrence for 5 years following postoperative treatment of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oral administration of 1-hexylcarbamoyl-5-fluorouracil (HCFU). In 2003, a health check examination indicated presence of occult blood in his stool. Barium enema study revealed a rectal tumor in the lower rectum and colonoscopy showed a yellowish lesion with a size of 30 mm in diameter. Pathological examination of the biopsy specimen indicated that the rectal tumor was carcinoid. Although preoperative imaging examinations failed to detect liver metastases, 2 min nodules were found on the surface of liver during surgery. A rapid pathological examination revealed that they were metastatic tumors from the rectal carcinoid. Low anterior resection was performed for the rectal tumor and the pathological report indicated that there were 4 metastatic lymph nodes in the rectal mesentery. The patient received treatment by HAIC using 5-FU plus oral administration of HCFU and survived for 5 years. We also review world-wide current treatments and their efficacy for hepatic metastases of carcinoid tumors. PMID:21160856

  9. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » How are lung carcinoid tumors diagnosed? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  10. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  11. General Information about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  13. [A case of laparoscopic surgery for a rectal carcinoid after ALTA therapy for an internal hemorrhoid].

    PubMed

    Aomatsu, Naoki; Nakamura, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakao, Shigetomi; Uchima, Yasutake; Aomatsu, Keiho

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of laparoscopic surgery for a rectal carcinoid after aluminum potassium and tannic acid (ALTA) therapy for an internal hemorrhoid. A 66-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of bleeding during defecation. He was diagnosed via anoscopy with Goligher grade II internal hemorrhoids. Examination via colonoscopy revealed 2 yellowish submucosal tumors in the lower rectum that were 5mm and 10mm in diameter. A rectal carcinoid tumor was diagnosed based on histopathology. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated no metastases to the liver or lymph nodes. First, we performed ALTA therapy for the internal hemorrhoids. Two weeks later, we performed laparoscopic-assisted low anterior resection (D2) for the rectal carcinoid. The patient was discharged without complications and has not experienced recurrence during the 2 years of follow-up care.

  14. [A case of laparoscopic surgery for a rectal carcinoid after ALTA therapy for an internal hemorrhoid].

    PubMed

    Aomatsu, Naoki; Nakamura, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakao, Shigetomi; Uchima, Yasutake; Aomatsu, Keiho

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of laparoscopic surgery for a rectal carcinoid after aluminum potassium and tannic acid (ALTA) therapy for an internal hemorrhoid. A 66-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of bleeding during defecation. He was diagnosed via anoscopy with Goligher grade II internal hemorrhoids. Examination via colonoscopy revealed 2 yellowish submucosal tumors in the lower rectum that were 5mm and 10mm in diameter. A rectal carcinoid tumor was diagnosed based on histopathology. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated no metastases to the liver or lymph nodes. First, we performed ALTA therapy for the internal hemorrhoids. Two weeks later, we performed laparoscopic-assisted low anterior resection (D2) for the rectal carcinoid. The patient was discharged without complications and has not experienced recurrence during the 2 years of follow-up care. PMID:25731340

  15. What's New in Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors What’s new in gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor research and treatment? There ... for the causes of , ways to prevent , and new approaches to diagnose and treat GI carcinoid tumors. ...

  16. Carcinoid tumor of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Nikanne, Elina; Kantola, Olli; Parviainen, Tapani

    2004-08-01

    Although carcinoid tumors are labeled as neuroendocrine tumors they can also originate in tissue lacking neuroendocrine cells, such as that in the middle ear. Symptoms of a carcinoid tumor in the middle ear are common ear symptoms such as fullness, pain and hearing loss. Carcinoid tumors have also been considered to be slow-growing. Both these aspects can easily lead to a relatively late diagnosis of carcinoid tumor of the middle ear. The diagnosis is made histologically, and the tumor is primarily treated surgically. In the follow-up of patients, octreotide scanning has proved to be a sensitive method in cases of both recurrence and metastasis. Our patient was a 34-year-old, otherwise healthy female with left-sided acute otitis media and facial palsy in her left ear. She had also suffered from the same symptoms 4 years earlier. She was treated with an operation, and the histologic diagnosis was a carcinoid tumor. In the follow-up of the patient we used octreotide scanning.

  17. What Are the Key Statistics for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What are the key statistics about lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  18. What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What are the risk factors for lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  19. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What should you ask your doctor about lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  20. What Happens after Treatment for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » What happens after treatment for lung carcinoid tumors? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  1. What's New in Lung Carcinoid Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for lung carcinoid tumors What’s new in lung carcinoid tumor research and treatment? Many ... controlling when our cells grow and divide into new cells. Certain genes that cause cells to grow, ...

  2. [Ileal carcinoid tumors. Value of small intestine transit].

    PubMed

    Mugel-Riwer, B; Bersani, D; Mugel, J L

    1983-05-01

    The authors describe two personnel observations of ileal carcinoid tumors, demonstrated by double contrast small bowel examination. Confirmation came from operation and histology. Small bowel examination can demonstrate limited carcinoid tumors giving no angiographic traduction.

  3. PHACES syndrome associated with carcinoid endobronchial tumor.

    PubMed

    Mama, Nadia; H'mida, Dorra; Lahmar, Imen; Yacoubi, Mohamed Tahar; Tlili-Graiess, Kalthoum

    2014-05-01

    PHACES syndrome consists of the constellation of manifestations including posterior fossa anomalies of the brain (most commonly Dandy-Walker malformations), hemangiomas of the face and scalp, arterial abnormalities, cardiac defects, eye anomalies and sternal defects. We present a case with a possible PHACES syndrome including sternal cleft and supraumbilical raphé, precordial skin tag, persistent left superior vena cava and subtle narrowing of the aorta with an endobronchial carcinoid tumor. All these anomalies were discovered on chest multi-detector CT. This is a unique case of PHACES syndrome associated with carcinoid tumor. Review of the literature revealed 3 cases of PHACES syndrome with glial tumor. The authors tried to find the relationship between PHACES syndrome and carcinoid tumors or gliomas, which all derive from the neural crest cells.

  4. Primary renal carcinoid tumor: A radiologic review

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Leslie; Shaban, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is the classic famous anonym of neuroendocrine neoplasms. Primary renal carcinoid tumors are extremely rare, first described by Resnick and colleagues in 1966, with fewer than a total of 100 cases reported in the literature. Thus, given the paucity of cases, the clinical and histological behavior is not well understood, impairing the ability to predict prognosis. Computed tomography and (occasionally) octreotide studies are used in the diagnosis and followup of these rare entites. A review of 85 cases in the literature shows that no distinctive imaging features differentiate them from other primary renal masses. The lesions tend to demonstrate a hypodense appearance and do not usually enhance in the arterial phases, but can occasionally calcify. Octreotide scans do not seem to help in the diagnosis; however, they are more commonly used in the postoperative followup. In addition, we report a new case of primary renal carcinoid in a horseshoe kidney. PMID:27186242

  5. [Renal neuroendocrine tumor (carcinoid) : a case report].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Yusuke; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Nakai, Yasutomo; Takayama, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Akira; Nonomura, Norio

    2013-11-01

    A 32-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment of left renal cystic tumor, which was detected by computed tomographic (CT) scan 3 years ago. CT scan showed a multilocular cyst (5 cm in diameter) with a solid tumor in the left kidney which was enhanced with contrast. There was no evidence of extrarenal invasion or distant metastasis. We performed retroperitoneal laparoscopic radical nephrectomy. Pathological examinations revealed a cellular arrangement specific to carcinoid tumor and positive for CD56 (NCAM) and neuron-specific enolase. The cell proliferation rate was estimated to be under 2% with Ki67 staining. The pathological diagnosis was renal neuroendocrine tumor (carcinoid). At the 9-month follow up, he had no evidence of local recurrence or metastasis.

  6. Carcinoid Tumor in Accidental, Asymptomatic Meckel's Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valeria; Merkel, Keresztely; Zolnai, Zsofia

    2013-01-01

    Although Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital gastrointestinal disorder, it is controversial whether asymptomatic diverticula in adults should be respected. The authors report the case of a patient who was operated due to ileus caused by adhesions and a Meckel's diverticulum without any sign of inflammation was accidentally noted and removed. As a surprise, the pathological examination of the diverticulum proved carcinoid tumor, a neuroendocrine malignant tumor. The case raises the importance of the removal of asymptomatic Meckel's diverticulum.

  7. Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Ayub, Adil; Naeem, Buria; Najam, Sehrish; Ahmed, Zubair; Jafri, Wasim; Hamid, Saeed

    2016-03-01

    Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor (PHCT) represents an extremely rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported to date. These tumors are rarely associated with metastasis and surgical resection is usually curative. Herein, we report two cases of PHCT associated with poor outcomes due to late diagnosis. Both cases presented late with non-specific symptoms. One patient presented after a 2-week history of symptoms and the second case had a longstanding two years symptomatic interval during which he remained undiagnosed and not properly worked up. Both these cases were diagnosed with hepatic carcinoid tumor, which originates from neuroendocrine cells. Case 1 opted for palliative care and expired in one month’s time. Surgical resection was advised to the second case, but he left against medical advice. PMID:26975959

  8. Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Ayub, Adil; Naeem, Buria; Najam, Sehrish; Ahmed, Zubair; Jafri, Wasim; Hamid, Saeed

    2016-03-01

    Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor (PHCT) represents an extremely rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported to date. These tumors are rarely associated with metastasis and surgical resection is usually curative. Herein, we report two cases of PHCT associated with poor outcomes due to late diagnosis. Both cases presented late with non-specific symptoms. One patient presented after a 2-week history of symptoms and the second case had a longstanding two years symptomatic interval during which he remained undiagnosed and not properly worked up. Both these cases were diagnosed with hepatic carcinoid tumor, which originates from neuroendocrine cells. Case 1 opted for palliative care and expired in one month’s time. Surgical resection was advised to the second case, but he left against medical advice.

  9. Malignant metastatic carcinoid presenting as brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, I. Vijay; Jain, S. K.; Kurmi, Dhrubajyoti; Sharma, Rakesh; Chopra, Sanjeev; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rarely known to metastasise to the brain. It is even more rare for such patients to present with symptoms related to metastases as the initial and only symptom. We present a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with hemiparesis and imaging features suggestive of brain tumor. He underwent surgery and the histopathology revealed metastatic malignant lesion of neuroendocrine origin. A subsequent work up for the primary was negative. Patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the pathophysiological features, workup and treatment options of this rare disease and discuss the methods of differentiating it from more common brain tumors. PMID:27366273

  10. In vitro chemoresistance testing in well differentiated carcinoid tumors.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Well-differentiated, “typical” carcinoid tumors traditionally have a very poor response to chemotherapy. We hypothesized that tumor specimens from well differentiated carcinoid tumors would be highly resistant to the effects of chemotherapy when tested against a variety of antineoplastic agents in v...

  11. Primary pulmonary carcinoid tumor with metastasis to endometrial polyp

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Mazdak; Kolev, Valentin; Costin, Dan; Mizrachi, Howard H.; Chuang, Linus; Warner, Richard R.P.; Gretz, Herbert F.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A carcinoid tumor occurring in the endometrium has been documented in the literature, but there is no report in regard to carcinoid tumor metastasis to endometrium. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of a malignant carcinoid metastasis to an endometrial polyp. Patient underwent hysteroscopy, and polypectomy. The pathology demonstrated an endometrial polyp containing a 4 mm x 5 mm nodule of metastatic carcinoid tumor, consistent with metastasis from patient's known pulmonary carcinoid. The tumor was morphologically similar to the tumors of the right lung, with similar immune-profile. DISCUSSION This patient presented with a suspicious pelvic ultrasound. Due to her age, the first priority was to exclude uterine cancer. The endometrial polyp, which was found, had a small focus of metastatic carcinoid tumor. To the best of our knowledge, this finding has not been previously recorded in the literature. Our patient also had a history of metastatic carcinoid tumor to breast. This finding is also very uncommon. CONCLUSION This is the first case in the literature described a malignant carcinoid metastasis to an endometrial polyp. PMID:23127865

  12. [Retrospective evaluation of carcinoid tumors of the appendix in children].

    PubMed

    San Vicente, B; Bardají, C; Rigol, S; Obiols, P; Melo, M; Bella, R

    2009-04-01

    Carcinoids of the appendix are rare in children. Usually diagnosed incidentally on histologic investigation following appendectomy for acute apendicitis. To investigate the significance of the diagnosis of appendiceal carcinoid tumors in children, we conducted a retrospective study in our institution. Between 1990 and 2007 a total of 1158 appendectomy were done. In four patients the diagnosis was appendiceal carcinoid. We studied treatment, follow-up and prognosis of this patients. Indicacion for appendectomy was acute pain in lower right quadrant. The median tumor diameter was lower than 1 cm and the appropriate treatment was appendectomy. The prognosis was excellent in all the patients.

  13. A rare case of carcinoid tumor in a tailgut cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jehangir, Asad; Le, Brian H.; Carter, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    Tailgut cysts are rare congenital lesions that arise from the failure of regression of the embryological tailgut. We report a case of neoplastic transformation of tailgut cyst to carcinoid tumor which is exceedingly uncommon. PMID:27406449

  14. Unusual presentation of carcinoid tumor as acute cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Saxton, C.R.

    1983-07-01

    The patient described had signs, symptoms, and laboratory data consistent with acute cholecystitis. A sonogram also suggested cholecystitis, and the gallbladder was not displayed by nuclear imaging. Cholecystectomy revealed the absence of stones but showed carcinoid tumor metastatic to the gallbladder.

  15. Endoscopic mucosal resection with circumferential incision for treatment of rectal carcinoid tumours

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is simple and quick and has low complication rates. However, the disadvantage of local recurrence or remnant rate limits the use of this technique. We aimed to analyse the outcomes of conventional EMR and EMR with circumferential incision (CIEMR), a simplified modification of EMR, in the endoscopic treatment of rectal carcinoid tumours. Methods A total of 59 consecutive patients with rectal carcinoid tumours without regional lymph node enlargement confirmed by endoscopic ultrasonography were included in the study. These patients underwent endoscopic treatment from January 2009 to September 2011 and were randomly designated into CIEMR (n = 31) or EMR group (n = 28). En bloc resection rate, pathological complete resection rate, procedure time, complications and follow-up outcomes were analysed. Results The en bloc resection rate was not significantly different between the CIEMR and EMR groups (100% versus 96.55%, P > 0.05). The pathological complete resection rate was higher in the CIEMR group than in the EMR group (96.7% versus 82.14%, P < 0.05). The overall complication rate, delayed bleeding and procedure time were not significantly different between the two groups. No recurrence was observed in either the EMR or CIEMR group. Conclusions CIEMR optimises the procedure of EMR and simplifies the technique of endoscopic submucosal dissection; thus, it has a better histologically complete resection rate and more acceptable complication rate than EMR. Thus, CIEMR may be preferable to conventional EMR for resection of rectal carcinoid tumours less than 15 mm. PMID:24472342

  16. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Éden Sartor; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; Corrêa, Isaac José Felippe; Robles, Laercio; Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumors are extremely rare neoplasms derived from hormone-producing neuroendocrine cells. It is difficult to make their diagnosis before biopsy, surgical resection or necropsy. A recent publication described only 94 cases of these tumors. There is no sex predilection and apparently it has no association with cirrhosis or preexisting hepatic disease. The most effective treatment is hepatectomy, and resection is determined by size and location of the lesions. PMID:25628206

  17. Paraneoplastic neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder associated with stomach carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Talal; Al-Sarawi, Adnan; Binfalah, Mohamed; Dermime, Said

    2014-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO), or Devic's syndrome, is an autoimmune central nervous system demyelinating disorder primarily affecting the spinal cord and the optic nerves. It is characterized by the presence of NMO antibodies, alongside clinical and radiological findings. NMO and NMO-spectrum disorders (NMO-SD) have been reported in autoimmune disorders, and are infrequently described as a paraneoplastic syndrome with cancers of lung, breast, and carcinoid tumors of the thyroid. We report a patient who presented with severe vomiting, blurring of vision, vertigo, diplopia, left hemiparesis and hemisensory loss and ataxia. She was found to have a longitudinally-extensive demyelinating lesion extending from the medulla to the upper cervical spinal cord on MRI. Her gastric endoscopy revealed carcinoid tumor of the stomach, and classic paraneoplastic antibodies in the serum were negative. She had extremely high serum gastrin level and high titer of NMO IgG autoantibody. The patient made an excellent recovery with tumor resection and immunotherapy, with both clinical and radiological improvement. On rare instances, NMO or NMO-SD may present as a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome associated with carcinoid tumor of the stomach.

  18. Marital Status and Survival in Patients with Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Greenleaf, Erin K.; Cooper, Amanda B.; Hollenbeak, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Marital status is a known prognostic factor in overall and disease-specific survival in several types of cancer. The impact of marital status on survival in patients with carcinoid tumors remains unknown. We hypothesized that married patients have higher rates of survival than similar unmarried patients with carcinoid tumors. METHODS Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, we identified 23,126 people diagnosed with a carcinoid tumor between 2000 and 2011 and stratified them according to marital status. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to compare the characteristics and outcomes between patient cohorts. Overall and cancer-related survival were analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Multivariable survival analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards models (hazards ratio [HR]), controlling for demographics and tumor-related and treatment-related variables. Propensity score analysis was performed to determine surgical intervention distributions among married and unmarried (ie, single, separated, divorced, widowed) patients. RESULTS Marital status was significantly related to both overall and cancer-related survival in patients with carcinoid tumors. Divorced and widowed patients had worse overall survival (HR, 1.33 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.08–1.33] and 1.34 [95% CI, 1.22–1.46], respectively) and cancer-related survival (HR, 1.15 [95% CI, 1.00–1.31] and 1.15 [95% CI, 1.03–1.29], respectively) than married patients over five years. Single and separated patients had worse overall survival (HR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.08–1.33] and 1.62 [95% CI, 1.25–2.11], respectively) than married patients over five years, but not worse cancer-related survival. Unmarried patients were more likely than matched married patients to undergo definitive surgical intervention (62.67% vs 53.11%, respectively, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Even after controlling for other prognostic factors, married patients have a

  19. Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor and chylous ascites, a rare association with a poor prognosis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Portale, Teresa Rosanna; Mosca, Francesco; Minona, Elisa; Trovato, Maria Antonietta; Gangemi, Pietro; Bordonaro, Roberto; Puleo, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal carcinoid is a rare tumor. The association of this tumor with chylous ascites is uncommon. A review of the English-language literature carried out in 2002 identified only 15 cases. We report a case of chylous ascites, gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor and elevated blood levels of CA-125 in a patient who did not respond to chemotherapy.

  20. How Are Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... as symptoms that might be caused by a mass (tumor) in the stomach, intestines, or rectum. Some ... attention to the abdomen, looking for a tumor mass or enlarged liver. If your medical history and ...

  1. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the abdomen (diaphragm), the membranes surrounding the space between the lungs (mediastinal pleura), or membranes of ... tumor of any size has grown into the space between the lungs (mediastinum), the heart, the large ...

  2. Tumores carcinoides gastrointestinales—Versión para profesionales de salud

    Cancer.gov

    Información del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer para profesionales de salud sobre el tratamiento del tumor carcinoide gastrointestinal, así como referencias a estudios clínicos y otros temas relacionados.

  3. Transoral robotic surgery for atypical carcinoid tumor of the larynx.

    PubMed

    Muderris, Togay; Bercin, Sami; Sevil, Ergun; Acar, Baran; Kiris, Muzaffer

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, transoral robotic surgery has been introduced as an efficient and a reliable method for excision of selected oral cavity, tongue base, and supraglottic tumors in otolaryngology. In this case report, a 39-year-old woman with a history of hoarseness and dysphagia for approximately 6 months is presented. The patient was diagnosed with atypical carcinoid tumor on the laryngeal aspect of the epiglottis, and excision of the tumor was performed through transoral robotic surgery using the robotic da Vinci surgical system, a 0-degree three-dimensional endoscope, 5-mm microinstruments compatible with the da Vinci robot, and a Feyh-Kastenbauer/Weinstein-O'Malley retractor. The mass was removed completely, and no complications occurred. The patient recovered without a need for tracheotomy. Findings of the 1-year clinical follow-up revealed no locoregional recurrence or distant metastasis. This case shows, once again, that transoral robotic surgery could be used safely and effectively regardless of pathologic diagnosis in the supraglottic region tumors. PMID:24220389

  4. Primary carcinoid tumors of the testis: a clinicopathologic study of 29 cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenle P; Guo, Charles; Berney, Daniel M; Ulbright, Thomas M; Ubright, Thomas M; Hansel, Donna E; Shen, Rulong; Ali, Tehmina; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2010-04-01

    Testicular carcinoid tumors are rare with only limited studies. We identified 29 primary testicular carcinoid cases from 7 academic institutions. Patients ranged in age from 12 to 65 years old (mean 36). The most common presenting symptom was the sole finding of either a testicular mass or swelling seen in 15/24 cases with available information. The next most common mode of presentation was as an incidental finding seen in 6 cases. Two patients had carcinoid syndrome including diarrhea, hot flashes, and palpitations. Nineteen were pure carcinoid tumors, 3 were associated with cystic teratoma, 2 with cysts lacking epithelial lining, 4 with epidermoid cyst, and 1 with dermoid cyst. The mean size was 2.5 cm. All 29 primary carcinoids lacked associated intratubular germ cell neoplasia, unclassified type. Mitotic figures were rare in primary carcinoid tumors with only 3 cases showing more than 2 per 10 HPF; necrosis was found in only 1 case. Random scattered mild to moderate nuclear atypia was seen in 12/29 cases. Of the 28 cases found premortem, treatment included focal excision in 3 patients and radical orchiectomy in 25 patients. Follow-up, available in 24 cases, ranged from 1 to 228 months (mean 52.7 mo); of the 20 patients with testicular typical carcinoid tumors found premortem, all were alive at last follow-up without recurrences or metastases. Of the 4 patients with a primary atypical carcinoid tumor, 1 at the time of diagnosis had retroperitoneal and lung metastases who after chemotherapy underwent resection of the retroperitoneal tumor showing metastatic yolk sac tumor and embryonal carcinoma. After resection, serum AFP levels remained elevated and the patient is scheduled for salvage chemotherapy and bone marrow transplant. The other 2 patients with atypical carcinoid and follow-up had no evidence of disease at 68 and 114 months. Most primary carcinoid tumors of the testis have a benign clinical course even if associated with epidermoid/dermoid cysts, or

  5. Thiocoraline activates the Notch pathway in carcinoids and reduces tumor progression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wyche, Thomas P.; Dammalapati, Ajitha; Cho, Hyunah; Harrison, April D.; Kwon, Glen S.; Chen, Herbert; Bugni, Tim S.; Jaskula-Sztul, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoids are slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) that are characterized by hormone overproduction; surgery is currently the only option for treatment. Activation of the Notch pathway has previously been shown to have a role in tumor suppression in NETs. The marine-derived thiodepsipeptide thiocoraline was investigated in vitro in two carcinoid cell lines (BON and H727). Carcinoid cells treated with nanomolar concentrations of thiocoraline resulted in a decrease in cell proliferation and an alteration of malignant phenotype evidenced by decrease of NET markers, ASCL-1, CgA, and NSE. Western blot analysis demonstrated the activation of Notch1 on the protein level in BON cells. Additionally, thiocoraline activated downstream Notch targets HES1, HES5, and HEY2. Thiocoraline effectively suppressed carcinoid cell growth by promoting cell cycle arrest in BON and H727 cells. An in vivo study demonstrated that thiocoraline, formulated with polymeric micelles, slowed carcinoid tumor progression. Thus, the therapeutic potential of thiocoraline, which induced activation of the Notch pathway, in carcinoid tumors was demonstrated. PMID:25412645

  6. Cryo-recanalization in a case of carcinoid tumor - An interesting case report

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Rakesh K; Madan, Arun; Chawla, Aditya; Arora, Harsh Nandini

    2015-01-01

    The term “cryotherapy” comes from the Greek cryo (κρύο) meaning cold, and therapy (θεραπεία) meaning cure. Cryosurgery is the application of extreme cold to destroy abnormal or diseased tissue. Carcinoid tumors of the lung are a fascinating but uncommon group of pulmonary neoplasms. In the past, these tumors were grouped with benign or less aggressive malignant pulmonary tumors, namely bronchial adenomas. Recent studies have revealed that carcinoid lung tumors are the most indolent form of a spectrum of bronchopulmonary neuroendocrine tumors that, at its extreme, include small cell carcinoma of the lung as its most malignant member. They commonly present as endobronchial obstructions, and if complete, can be life-threatening and require immediate intervention.[1] Recently, we have treated a patient of carcinoid tumor of lung who was managed with cryo-recanalization with excellent response. PMID:26628773

  7. Primary renal carcinoid tumor: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Cui, Tongyue; Ban, Ziqin; Luo, Lei; Sun, Lijiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this case report is to discuss the clinicopathological features of a patient with a primary renal carcinoid tumor. Methods We report on the clinical and pathological information of one case of a patient with a primary renal carcinoid tumor as well as review relative literature. Results The patient was diagnosed with a renal tumor when she received physical examination, and exhibited no positive symptoms. The diameter of tumor was 5 cm, the cross surface of the tumor was light yellow and firm, and the central part was soft with hemorrhage and necrosis. Immunohistochemical staining revealed strong and diffuse staining with synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and neuron-specific enolase. Conclusion A primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare. Surgical resection is a preferred therapeutic method. PMID:26966374

  8. Bronchial carcinoid tumors metastatic to the sella turcica and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Moshkin, Olga; Rotondo, Fabio; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Soares, Mark; Coire, Claire; Smyth, Harley S; Goth, Miklos; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman

    2012-06-01

    We review here the literature on neuroendocrine neoplasms metastatic to the pituitary and present an example of the disease. Metastasis of bronchial carcinoid tumors to the sellar region are rare. Herein, we describe the case of a 63-year-old woman who presented with constant cough and headaches. She had previously been operated for carcinoid tumor of the lung. During the preoperative investigation, a CT scan of the head revealed a sellar mass. Six months after a left lower lobectomy, the sellar lesion was removed by transsphenoidal surgery. The two tumors were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Both showed identical morphologic features, those of carcinoid tumor. Immunohistochemistry revealed immunoreactivity for the endocrine markers, synaptophysin and chromogranin, as well as CD-56, serotonin, bombesin and vascular endothelial growth factor. The sellar neoplasm showed nuclear immunopositivity for thyroid transcription factor-1, supporting the diagnosis of a metastatic bronchial carcinoid tumor. In conclusion, this is the first report of a serotonin- and bombesin-immunopositive atypical bronchial carcinoid tumor metastatic to the sella. PMID:22485018

  9. A case of diffused malignant pleural mesothelioma forming small multiple disseminations with intraoperatively suspicious carcinoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Suemitsu, Ryuichi; Takeo, Sadanori; Hamatake, Motoharu; Furuya, Kiyomi; Uesugi, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    A 65-year-old male, having symptoms suggestive of pulmonary malignant tumor, underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Surgery revealed a solid tumor originating from the thoracic wall, with many small solid tumors in the thoracic wall and diaphragm near the tumor. The intraoperative observation of a frozen section typed the tumor as carcinoid; however, hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistological findings provided the definitive diagnosis of diffused, malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM).

  10. Treatment of Lung Carcinoid by Type and Extent of Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor about lung carcinoid tumors? Treatment of lung carcinoid, by type and extent of disease The ... those that can’t be removed completely Resectable lung carcinoid tumors Resectable carcinoid tumors haven’t spread ...

  11. Carcinoid tumor arising in a mature cystic teratoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    TOSUNER, ZEYNEP; SÖNMEZ, FATMA CAVİDE; ARICI, DİLEK SEMA; DANSUK, RAMAZAN

    2015-01-01

    Mature cystic teratomas are common benign tumors of the ovary. The most common form of malignant transformation is squamous cell carcinoma, however, malignant transformation is rarely observed and cases are usually asymptomatic. Carcinoid tumors are rare tumors of the neuroendocrine system. A number of the carcinoids result in clinical syndromes due to the secretion of vasoactive substances produced by the tumor. A 75-year-old woman suffering from groin pain was admitted to the Faculty of Medicine at Bezmialem Vakıf University (Istanbul, Turkey). An adnexal mass was detected during the physical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging scans exhibited an 8×7-cm mass in the right ovary. Surgical excision of the mass was performed and histopathological examination revealed a mature cystic teratoma with three germ layers. An area consisting of nests and trabeculae was evident in the cyst wall. The pathological diagnosis was of an insular and trabecular variant of carcinoid tumor arising in a mature cystic teratoma. The patient did not present with carcinoid syndrome, and no recurrence was observed after 11 months of follow-up examinations. PMID:26137048

  12. Sporadic gastric carcinoid tumor successfully treated by two-stage laparoscopic surgery: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Takahiro; Oshiro, Takashi; Urita, Tasuku; Yoshida, Yutaka; Ooshiro, Mitsuru; Okazumi, Shinichi; Katoh, Ryoji; Sasai, Daisuke; Hiruta, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of sporadic gastric carcinoid tumor successfully treated by two-stage laparoscopic surgery. A 38-year old asymptomatic woman was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a submucosal tumor of the stomach. Endoscopic examination showed a solitary submucosal tumor without ulceration or central depression on the posterior wall of the antrum and biopsy specimens were not sufficient to determine the diagnosis. Endoscopic ultrasound revealed a tumor nearly 2 cm in diameter arising from the muscle layer and a computed tomography scan showed the tumor enhanced in the arterial phase. Laparoscopic wedge resection was performed for definitive diagnosis. Pathologically, the tumor was shown to be gastric carcinoid infiltrating the muscle layer which indicated the probability of lymph node metastasis. Serum gastrin levels were normal. As a radical treatment, laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy with regional lymphadenectomy was performed 3 wk after the initial surgery. Finally, pathological examination revealed no lymph node metastasis. PMID:21160902

  13. Rectal Ischemia Mimicked Tumor Mass

    PubMed Central

    Zikos, Nicolaos; Aggeli, Panagiota; Louka, Evangelia; Pappas-Gogos, George

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic proctitis is a rare disease which is usually encountered in elderly with comorbidities. We present a case of an 80-year old man with severe coronary disease who presented with severe hematochezia and hypotension. Endoscopy revealed a rectal mass 3-4 cm above the dental line and rectosigmoid mucosal inflammation compatible with ischemic colitis. The rectal insult was so intense that it resembled a neoplasmatic lesion. We discuss the causes, the prognostic factors, and the clinical and therapeutic challenges of this rare, albeit life-threatening entity, and we review the relative literature. A percentage of 10%–20% of patients with ischemic colitis usually have a distal potentially obstructing lesion or disorder such as cancer, diverticulitis or fecal impaction. Ischemic colitis, when mucosal and submucosal edema is severe and hemorrhagic nodules are large enough, can mimic a neoplasmatic lesion. The best treatment approach is a conservative management initially with a close clinical followup and after stabilization a repetition of rectal endoscopy with new biopsies. Early recognition of this clinical entity is of paramount importance to implement appropriate therapy (conservative or surgical) and avoid potentially fatal treatment of presumed inflammatory or infectious bowel diseases. PMID:24109523

  14. Clinicopathologic and DNA cytometric analysis of carcinoid tumors of the thymus.

    PubMed

    Goto, K; Kodama, T; Matsuno, Y; Yokose, T; Asamura, H; Kamiya, N; Shimosato, Y

    2001-10-01

    Twelve cases of carcinoid tumors of the thymus were reviewed in terms of clinicopathologic, histochemical, and immunohistochemical features and DNA ploidy patterns. The collective consisted of nine male and three female patients, aged 34 to 74 years, of whom five (42%) had symptoms. Eleven patients underwent surgical resection, and one with systemic metastases was autopsied. In the 11 resected patients, tumors had invaded surrounding structures in four cases, and mediastinal lymph node metastases were detected in six. Recurrence occurred in two of the resected patients (18%), and the 5-year survival rate was 82%. Histologically, all tumors showed an organoid growth pattern with delicate fibrovascular stroma. In addition, three tumors had unusual morphologic features such as combined features of carcinoid tumor and thymoma and solid growth pattern with occasional large tumor cells. Mitotic counts ranged from 1 to 14 per 10 high-power fields with a mean count of 4.9. Central necrosis within solid nests was observed in nine tumors. Classification of this series using the WHO histologic classification system resulted in categorization of all 12 tumors as atypical carcinoids. All tumors were positive for Grimelius staining and for cytokeratin. Immunohistochemical staining documented the presence of moderately to strongly positive neuroendocrine markers such as neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and neural cell adhesion molecule. No correlation between proliferative activity based on the Ki67 labeling index and prognosis or lymph node metastasis was found. Concerning DNA ploidy patterns, only one tumor with multiple lymph node metastases was considered to be aneuploid. In conclusion, although all of our cases were histologically classified as atypical carcinoid tumors of the thymus, most were diploid, and the patients enjoyed a relatively good prognosis.

  15. Carcinoid tumor of the middle ear: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo; Chen, Fei; Li, Jin-Nan; Liu, Shi-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors of the middle ear are very rare. Here we describe a 37-year-old man with multiple recurrent carcinoid tumor of the right middle ear. The CT demonstrated the recurrent mass that filled the tympanum and mastoid with osteolytic invasion, and the tumor was removed by surgery. The pathological findings showed the tumor cells, without necrosis and mitotic activity, had round, oval, or slightly irregular nuclei and finely-dispersed chromatin, arranged in cords, nests, and glandular structures. They were strongly positive for synaptophysin and CD56, but were negative for S-100 and chromogranin A. Ki-67 proliferation activity was low (<2%). With a review of the literature, the clinical, pathological characteristics and treatment modalities of this rare tumor are discussed. PMID:25400805

  16. Acute appendicitis with a neuroendocrine tumor G1 (carcinoid): pitfalls of conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki A; Fujimoto, Taketoshi; Kato, Yo; Sasaki, Mayumi; Ikusue, Toshikazu

    2016-08-01

    A man in his early thirties presented to our clinic with right lower abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) revealed a swollen appendix and an appendicolith. Abscess formation was not observed but ongoing appendiceal rupture was not ruled out. Three months after successful conservative therapy, the lumen of the apical portion was kept dilated and laparoscopic interval appendectomy was performed. No tumorous findings were observed macroscopically. However, histology revealed many tiny nests infiltrating the submucosa, muscular layer, and subserosa at the root of the appendix. An appendiceal neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1; carcinoid) was diagnosed immunohistologically. Neither CT nor US visualized the tumor because of its non-tumor-forming but infiltrative growth. In conclusion, after successful conservative treatment, interval appendectomy should be considered to uncover a possible appendiceal NET G1 (carcinoid), particularly when dilatation of the distal lumen is kept under observation. PMID:27311320

  17. Roentgenologic diagnosis of primary corticotropin-producing carcinoid tumors of the mediastinum

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.R.; Aughenbaugh, G.L.; Wick, M.R.; Baker, B.A.; Salassa, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    A study was undertaken of five patients with Cushing syndrome due to adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) production by thymic carcinoid tumor (primary mediastinal Apudomas), including two recent patients examined by computed tomography (CT) of the chest. Plain roentgenography of the chest initially failed to detect tumor in four of the five patients, while CT of the chest yielded definitive diagnostic information in both patients in whom it was employed. For one of these patients, a mediastinal tumor could be seen retrospectively on plain roentgenograms of the chest, although it had been missed on the first examination. One of the tumors appeared to be partially calcified on CT scan, a finding not previously reported. Blastic osseous metastasis, which is common when malignant carcinoid tumors spread to bone, was seen in one patient. Our data suggest that in patients with suspected ectopic ACTH production, CT scanning of the mediastinum should be performed early in order to avoid delay in diagnosis of an ACTH-secreting carcinoid tumor of the mediastinum.

  18. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwangzoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Results Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Conclusion Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary. PMID:27592514

  19. Expression of neurotensin messenger RNA in a human carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Ishizuka, J; Townsend, C M; Rajaraman, S; Thompson, J C

    1991-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT), a distal gut peptide, has important regulatory and trophic effects throughout the gut; however the intracellular mechanisms that regulate the gene expression and release of human NT are not known. The purpose of this endeavor was to study a functioning human pancreatic carcinoid cell line (called BON) in vitro that expresses the NT gene, and to study the effect of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signal-transduction pathway on the expression and release of human NT. RNA was prepared from BON cell line (which has been established in this laboratory); the RNA was analyzed for NT mRNA expression by Northern hybridization with a complementary DNA probe. RNA blot analysis demonstrated that the NT gene is expressed in BON and is transcribed to two mRNAs of 1.0- and 1.5-kb sizes. In the second part of this study, BON cells were treated with either forskolin (FSK), which increases intracellular levels of cAMP, or with serotonin (5-HT), which reduces cAMP in BON cells. Forskolin produced a dose-dependent increase in NT peptide release and, furthermore, FSK (10(-6) mol/L) rapidly increased NT mRNA abundance 1 hour after addition; conversely, 5-HT (10(-5) mol/L) decreased NT mRNA at 1 hour. Neurotensin mRNA levels returned to control values by 3 hours after either FSK or 5-HT, which suggests that the transcript half-life for NT is relatively short. These findings show that the expression and peptide release of human NT is mediated, in part, by the cAMP signal-transduction pathway. Our human carcinoid cell line will provide a useful model to study the in vitro regulation of NT gene expression and peptide release. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1659338

  20. [Appendiceal carcinoid tumors. Evaluation of long-term outcomes in a tertiary level].

    PubMed

    Suárez-Grau, Juan Manuel; García-Ruiz, Salud; Rubio-Chaves, Carolina; Bustos-Jiménez, Manuel; Docobo-Durantez, Fernando; Padillo-Ruiz, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: los tumores apendiculares se encuentran en cerca de 1% de las apendicectomías y representan 0.5% de las neoplasias intestinales. El tipo de tumor más frecuente es el carcinoide apendicular, que casi siempre es un hallazgo durante la apendicectomía por otro motivo. Su pronóstico es excelente y la supervivencia es mayor de 95% a cinco años de la intervención. Objetivo: reportar una serie de casos y analizar la supervivencia media a cinco años posteriores a la identificación el tumor. Material y métodos: análisis retrospectivo (1990-2010) de pacientes con tumor carcinoide apendicular intervenidos en el servicio de Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo del Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, España. Se analizaron: la supervivencia a cinco años, la necesidad de tratamiento complementario y las pruebas para seguimiento en la consulta. Resultados: se encontraron 42 pacientes intervenidos por tener un tumor carcinoide apendicular. En 38 pacientes la operación fue de urgencia, la mayoría por sospecha de apendicitis aguda, sin que en ninguno se hubiera establecido el diagnóstico de tumor carcinoide antes de la operación. El síntoma predominante al ingreso fue el dolor abdominal. El tratamiento quirúrgico fue: apendicectomía en 34 pacientes (12 por laparoscopia), en el intraoperatorio siete pacientes requirieron resecciones colónicas mayores debido a la afectación del colon; sólo uno requirió la reintervención para completar la hemicolectomía derecha. Al momento del diagnóstico dos pacientes tenían enfermedad diseminada (metástasis hepáticas). La supervivencia a cinco años fue superior a 95%, sin recidivas o tratamiento posterior de la enfermedad. Conclusiones: el tumor carcinoide apendicular difícilmente se diagnostica antes del procedimiento quirúrgico. La apendicectomía suele ser suficiente aunque en algunos pacientes las resecciones colónicas son necesarias por diseminación. La supervivencia a 5 años es

  1. Carcinoid syndrome, acromegaly, and hypoglycemia due to an insulin-secreting neuroendocrine tumor of the liver.

    PubMed

    Furrer, J; Hättenschwiler, A; Komminoth, P; Pfammatter, T; Wiesli, P

    2001-05-01

    We report a patient with a hepatic neuroendocrine tumor showing an extraordinary change of the tumor's humoral manifestations from a clinically documented extrapituitary acromegaly and a typical carcinoid syndrome toward a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome. At the primary manifestation of the tumor, an increased serum level of insulin-like growth factor I due to overproduction of GHRH and an increased urinary excretion of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were found. The clinical manifestation of the GHRH excess was an arthralgia, which resolved completely after operative tumor debulking and normalization of insulin-like growth factor I and GHRH serum levels. The secretion of serotonin from the tumor resulted in a typical carcinoid syndrome including right-sided valvular heart disease. On the later course of the disease, the humoral manifestations of the tumor were supplemented by the secretion of insulin, leading to recurrent severe hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. The hepatic origin of hyperinsulinism was demonstrated by selective arterial calcium stimulation. Moreover, tumor cells revealed insulin and C-peptide immunoreactivity in the immunohistochemical analysis. The patient died 8 yr after the initial diagnosis of the tumor, and a carefully performed autopsy procedure confirmed the absence of any extrahepatic tumor manifestation. PMID:11344231

  2. Carcinoid syndrome, acromegaly, and hypoglycemia due to an insulin-secreting neuroendocrine tumor of the liver.

    PubMed

    Furrer, J; Hättenschwiler, A; Komminoth, P; Pfammatter, T; Wiesli, P

    2001-05-01

    We report a patient with a hepatic neuroendocrine tumor showing an extraordinary change of the tumor's humoral manifestations from a clinically documented extrapituitary acromegaly and a typical carcinoid syndrome toward a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia syndrome. At the primary manifestation of the tumor, an increased serum level of insulin-like growth factor I due to overproduction of GHRH and an increased urinary excretion of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were found. The clinical manifestation of the GHRH excess was an arthralgia, which resolved completely after operative tumor debulking and normalization of insulin-like growth factor I and GHRH serum levels. The secretion of serotonin from the tumor resulted in a typical carcinoid syndrome including right-sided valvular heart disease. On the later course of the disease, the humoral manifestations of the tumor were supplemented by the secretion of insulin, leading to recurrent severe hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. The hepatic origin of hyperinsulinism was demonstrated by selective arterial calcium stimulation. Moreover, tumor cells revealed insulin and C-peptide immunoreactivity in the immunohistochemical analysis. The patient died 8 yr after the initial diagnosis of the tumor, and a carefully performed autopsy procedure confirmed the absence of any extrahepatic tumor manifestation.

  3. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Somatostatinoma

  4. Mature Ovarian Teratoma with Carcinoid Tumor in a 28-Year-Old Patient

    PubMed Central

    Petousis, Stamatios; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Traianos, Alexandros; Miliaras, Dimosthenis; Kamparoudis, Apostolos; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Rousso, David

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Coexistence of carcinoid tumor inside a mature cystic teratoma is an extremely rare phenomenon, especially in young women. We present the case of a 28-year-old woman diagnosed with a right ovarian carcinoid and treated uneventfully with conservative surgical approach. Case Report. A 28-year-old woman, gravid 0, parity 0, presented to our department for her annual gynecological examination and Pap smear test. During her examination, a mobile cystic mass was detected in the right lower abdomen. Ultrasound indicated a right ovarian mass 10.5 × 6.3 cm, confirmed by CT scan. Further investigation revealed AFP levels (1539 ng/mL). The ovarian mass was excised by laparoscopy, leaving intact the remaining right ovary. Frozen sections showed a mature cystic teratoma. However, paraffin sections revealed the presence of a small carcinoid within the teratoma's gastric-type mucosa. The patient was set to a close followup. Nine months postoperatively, ultrasound pelvis imaging and CT scan of the abdomen as well as serum tumor markers have shown no evidence of recurrence disease. Conclusion. Despite the weak evidence, fertility spare surgical approach for women wanting to preserve their genital tract might be a reasonable option. PMID:23984130

  5. Effective palliative treatment of metastatic carcinoid tumors with intra-arterial chemotherapy/chemoembolization combined with octreotide acetate.

    PubMed

    Hajarizadeh, H; Ivancev, K; Mueller, C R; Fletcher, W S; Woltering, E A

    1992-05-01

    Survival in patients with metastatic carcinoid tumors is dependent on control of tumor growth and adequate palliation of vasoactive amine-induced symptoms of flushing, diarrhea, wheezing, and valvular heart disease. Eight patients with carcinoid tumors metastatic to the liver were treated with long-term octreotide acetate therapy (100 to 500 micrograms three times a day), intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil infusion (2 g/day x 5 days), and hepatic tumor chemoembolization. All eight patients became asymptomatic and have remained so with a mean follow-up duration of 22 months from the time of first infusion. Following institution of subcutaneous octreotide acetate, intra-arterial infusion, and tumor chemoembolization, all patients are alive with a mean survival of 40 months from the time of diagnosis of carcinoid syndrome (range: 2 to 108 months). Four patients had greater than a 50% decrease in tumor size after therapy (mean follow-up duration: 10.6 months), and the other four patients have had stable disease after institution of therapy. It appears that combinations of long-term subcutaneous administration of octreotide acetate, intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil, and tumor chemoembolization effectively control progressive liver metastasis and provide excellent symptomatic palliation in patients with hepatic metastasis from functional carcinoid tumors.

  6. Carcinoid crisis induced by receptor radionuclide therapy with 90Y-DOTATOC in a case of liver metastases from bronchial neuroendocrine tumor (atypical carcinoid).

    PubMed

    Davì, M V; Bodei, L; Francia, G; Bartolomei, M; Oliani, C; Scilanga, L; Reghellin, D; Falconi, M; Paganelli, G; Lo Cascio, V; Ferdeghini, M

    2006-06-01

    SS receptors are overexpressed in many tumors, mainly of neuroendocrine origin, thus enabling the treatment with SS analogs. The clinical experience of receptor radionuclide therapy with the new analog [90Y-DOTA0-Tyr3 ]-octreotide [90Y-DOTATOC] has been developed over the last decade and is gaining a pivotal role in the therapeutic workout of these tumors. It is well known that some procedures performed in diagnostic and therapeutic management of endocrine tumors, such as agobiopsy and hepatic chemoembolization, can be associated with the occurrence of symptoms related to the release of vasoactive amines and/or hormonal peptides from tumor cell lysis. This is the first report of a severe carcinoid crisis developed after receptor radionuclide therapy with 90Y-DOTATOC administered in a patient affected by liver metastases from bronchial neuroendocrine tumor (atypical carcinoid). Despite protection with H1 receptor antagonists, octreotide and corticosteroids, few days after the therapy the patient complained of persistent flushing of the face and upper trunk, severe labial and periocular oedema, diarrhoea and loss of appetite. These symptoms increased and required new hospitalisation. The patient received iv infusion of octreotide associated with H1 and H2 receptor antagonists and corticosteroid therapy, which induced symptom remission within few days. The case here reported confirms that radionuclide therapy is highly effective in determining early rupture of metastatic tissue and also suggests that pre-medication should be implemented before the radiopeptide administration associated with a close monitoring of the patient in the following days.

  7. Surgical approaches for liver metastases in carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Ahmad; Buell, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Liver is the commonest site for metastasis in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs); it occurs in 45-95% of patients. Available treatment options include surgical resection, liver transplantation, chemotherapy and biotherapy. Surgery is the gold standard for curative therapy. Typically, a multidisciplinary approach is a cornerstone for decision making while dealing with this aggressive disease. This review will focus on the performance and safety of open, laparoscopic, and liver transplant surgical approaches in NETs patients with liver metastases. PMID:26425458

  8. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery for Rectal Tumors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kunitake, Hiroko; Abbas, Maher A

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1983, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) has emerged as a safe and effective method to treat rectal lesions including benign tumors, early rectal cancer, and rectal fistulas and strictures. This minimally invasive technique offers the advantages of superior visualization of the lesion and greater access to proximal lesions with lower margin positivity and specimen fragmentation and lower long-term recurrence rates over traditional transanal excision. In addition, over two decades of scientific data support the use of TEM as a viable alternative to radical excision of the rectum with less morbidity, faster recovery, and greater potential cost savings when performed at specialized centers. PMID:22745615

  9. [Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor with Cushing's Syndrome in a Patient who Underwent Pulmonary Resection by Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Mishina, Taijiro; Miyajima, Masahiro; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary carcinoid tumor with Cushing's syndrome is comparatively rare disease. It is difficult to make an early diagnosis due to small size lesion in its early stage. We report a case of pulmonary carcinoid tumor with Cushing's syndrome successfully localised by positron emission tomography/computed tomography and was resected in the early stage. The levels of serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone( ACTH) decreased immediately after surgery, and the symptoms of Cushing's syndrome were relieved.

  10. Carcinoid syndrome from gastrointestinal carcinoids without liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Feldman, J M; Jones, R S

    1982-07-01

    Although patients with bronchial and ovarian carcinoid tumors can develop the carcinoid syndrome (diarrhea and/or flushing) in the absence of hepatic metastasis, it is believed that development of the carcinoid syndrome in patients with carcinoid tumors of gastrointestinal origin occurs only after the patient has hepatic metastasis. This is explained by hepatic inactivation of most of the serotonin in the portal circulation or by the fact that hepatic metastases are larger than the primary tumor in the gastrointestinal tract. Three patients with ileal and jejunal carcinoid tumors who developed the carcinoid syndrome without obvious hepatic metastasis are described. Two of the patients had intra-abdominal, but extrahepatic, metastasis that probably drained directly into the systemic circulation. The third patient had an ileal carcinoid with clinical involvement limited to adjacent mesenteric lymph nodes. Following resection of her tumor, her urinary 5-HIAA excretion and platelet serotonin level returned to normal, and her attacks of carcinoid flushing virtually ceased. She has occasional spells of "blushing" that are thought to be benign; however, further close follow-up study will be needed to be certain that she is free of disease. It is suggested that each patient with the carcinoid syndrome be evaluated with CT and technetium-99 pertechnetate liver scans. If there is no liver involvement detected with these studies, one should consider hepatic arteriogram or laparotomy to determine if the patient's tumor might be totally resectable. PMID:7092350

  11. Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome associated with bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumor in youth: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    LI, WEN-YA; LIU, XU-DONG; LI, WEI-NAN; DONG, SI-YUAN; QU, XIAO-HAN; GONG, SHU-LEI; SHAO, MING-RUI; ZHANG, LIN

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome (CushingPS) caused by bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumors presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The present study reports the case of an 18-year-old male patient presenting with rapid weight gain, polyuria, polydipsia and progressive muscle weakness. Chemical and imaging findings suggested ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropin. Whole-body 18fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG-PET/CT) positron-emission tomography revealed an increased uptake of 18FDG-PET/CT in the right middle lung mass and lobar lymph node. Postoperative pathology confirmed the presence of a typical carcinoid, as well as a lobar lymph node metastasis. The patient underwent a right middle lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node resection, which resulted in symptom clearance, followed by rapid weight loss. No CushingPS or tumor recurrence was observed at the 3-month postoperative follow-up. PMID:27347101

  12. [Rectal prolapse revealing a tumor: The role of abdominal ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Bequet, E; Stiennon, L; Lhomme, A; Piette, C; Hoyoux, C; Rausin, L; Guidi, O

    2016-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is rare in children and usually benign. However, there are various diseases that can be associated with it, such as cystic fibrosis or other causes of increased abdominal pressure. Here, we review the various underlying conditions that pediatricians or pediatric gastroenterologists should consider in the case of rectal prolapse. We report on three cases of children with a rectal prolapse and intra-abdominal tumors. Current recommendations and practice do not include a systematic check via abdominal imaging in cases of rectal prolapse. However, in some situations, imaging is indicated to detect a possible expansive process. Thus, in the presence of recurrent prolapse or of associated urinary or neurological signs, imaging is justified so as to allow for an early diagnosis and treatment of these neoplasms. Given its lack of radiation exposure and good sensitivity in children, ultrasound imaging is the first choice. PMID:27265581

  13. Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma

  14. [Unilateral hyperlucent lung induced by a carcinoid tumor: comments on the differential diagnosis and mechanisms of hypoperfusion].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, N; Bugnet, A-S; Demian, M; Massard, G; De Blay, F; Pauli, G

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old woman in whom a systematic thoracic x-ray led to the diagnosis of unilateral hyperlucent lung due to a carcinoid tumor obstructing the main left bronchus almost completely. Injected computed tomography permitted diagnosis of left lung hypoperfusion and visualization of the tumor. After enlarged inferior left lobar resection, normal perfusion was observed six months later on the isotopic lung perfusion scan. Other reported causes of unilateral hyperlucent lung are discussed as well as pathophysiological mechanisms of lung hypoperfusion and hypoxic vasoconstriction.

  15. [Unilateral hyperlucent lung induced by a carcinoid tumor: comments on the differential diagnosis and mechanisms of hypoperfusion].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, N; Bugnet, A-S; Demian, M; Massard, G; De Blay, F; Pauli, G

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old woman in whom a systematic thoracic x-ray led to the diagnosis of unilateral hyperlucent lung due to a carcinoid tumor obstructing the main left bronchus almost completely. Injected computed tomography permitted diagnosis of left lung hypoperfusion and visualization of the tumor. After enlarged inferior left lobar resection, normal perfusion was observed six months later on the isotopic lung perfusion scan. Other reported causes of unilateral hyperlucent lung are discussed as well as pathophysiological mechanisms of lung hypoperfusion and hypoxic vasoconstriction. PMID:16012363

  16. Carcinoid tumor associated with adjacent dysplastic columnar epithelium in the renal pelvis: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Sun; Choi, Chan; Kang, Taek Won; Choi, Yoo Duk

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are well documented in the pulmonary and gastrointestinal systems, but very rare in the urinary tract, especially in the renal pelvis. We report on a 60-year-old female patient who presented with left flank pain and fever. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a heterogeneously enhancing mass in the left renal pelvis and a stone at the left proximal ureter. Multiple parenchymal lesions were also observed, which were identified as uneven caliectasis displaying air-fluid levels and renal parenchymal atrophy. The patient underwent simple nephro-ureterectomy. Macroscopically, a polypoid mass was observed in the renal pelvis. Microscopically, the tumor revealed acinar, tubular, and solid pattern and was composed of small, monotonous and hyperchromatic cells. Lining epithelia in renal pelvis and ureter revealed columnar epithelia with dysplastic change. The tumor cells were positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, CD56, and focally positive for cytokeratin. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin and chromogranin A highlighted the neuroendocrine cells in the columnar epithelium. Ki-67 (1:50; MIB-1) labeling index was less than 1% in the area with highest uptake. We report here a case of carcinoid tumor of the renal pelvis that was associated with adjacent dysplastic columnar epithelium. PMID:26644387

  17. Intra-tumor Genetic Heterogeneity in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hardiman, Karin M.; Ulintz, Peter J.; Kuick, Rork; Hovelson, Daniel H.; Gates, Christopher M.; Bhasi, Ashwini; Grant, Ana Rodrigues; Liu, Jianhua; Cani, Andi K.; Greenson, Joel; Tomlins, Scott; Fearon, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer arises in part from the cumulative effects of multiple gene lesions. Recent studies in selected cancer types have revealed significant intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity and highlighted its potential role in disease progression and resistance to therapy. We hypothesized the existence of significant intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in rectal cancers involving variations in localized somatic mutations and copy number abnormalities. Two or three spatially disparate regions from each of six rectal tumors were dissected and subjected to next-generation whole exome DNA sequencing, Oncoscan SNP arrays, and targeted confirmatory sequencing and analysis. The resulting data were integrated to define subclones using SciClone. Mutant-allele tumor heterogeneity (MATH) scores, mutant allele frequency correlation, and mutation percent concordance were calculated, and copy number analysis including measurement of correlation between samples was performed. Somatic mutations profiles in individual cancers were similar to prior studies, with some variants found in previously reported significantly mutated genes and many patient-specific mutations in each tumor. Significant intra-tumor heterogeneity was identified in the spatially disparate regions of individual cancers. All tumors had some heterogeneity but the degree of heterogeneity was quite variable in the samples studied. We found that 67–97% of exonic somatic mutations were shared among all regions of an individual’s tumor. The SciClone computational method identified 2 to 8 shared and unshared subclones in the spatially disparate areas in each tumor. MATH scores ranged from 7 to 41. Allele frequency correlation scores ranged from R2 = 0.69 to 0.96. Measurements of correlation between samples for copy number changes varied from R2 = 0.74 to 0.93. All tumors had some heterogeneity, but the degree was highly variable in the samples studied. The occurrence of significant intra-tumor heterogeneity may allow

  18. Challenges in the Diagnosis and Management of Well-Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Lung (Typical and Atypical Carcinoid): Current Status and Future Considerations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the lung represent approximately 25% of all primary lung tumors and can be classified as low grade (typical carcinoids), intermediate grade (atypical carcinoids), or high grade (large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma or small cell lung carcinoma). Low- and intermediate-grade lung NET are increasingly recognized as biologically distinct from high-grade lung NET based on clinical behavior and underlying molecular abnormalities. This review summarizes current knowledge and challenges in the diagnosis and management of low- and intermediate-grade lung NET. Accurate histopathologic classification of lung NET is critical to determining appropriate treatment options but can be challenging even for experts. For low- and intermediate-grade lung NET, surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for localized disease. Although no standard systemic therapy has been established for the treatment of advanced, unresectable disease, a number of promising treatment options are emerging, including somatostatin analogs, temozolomide-based chemotherapy, targeted therapy with mammalian target of rapamycin or vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Given the difficulty in accurately diagnosing these tumors, and the paucity of data supporting establishment of standard systemic therapy options, management of patients within the setting of a multidisciplinary team, including specialists with expertise in NET, is recommended. Ongoing and future clinical trials hopefully will provide stronger evidence to support treatment recommendations for low- and intermediate-grade lung NET. Implications for Practice: Treatment of neuroendocrine tumors (NET), particularly those of lung origin, continues to evolve. This review seeks to educate oncologists on the most up-to-date options and supporting data regarding management of two rare lung neoplasms, typical and atypical carcinoid tumors. Although surgical resection has been the

  19. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Rectal Cancer - Biobanking of Preoperative Tumor Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Peter; Nietert, Manuel; Gusky, Linda; Kitz, Julia; Conradi, Lena C.; Müller-Dornieden, Annegret; Schüler, Philipp; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Rüschoff, Josef; Ströbel, Philipp; Grade, Marian; Liersch, Torsten; Beißbarth, Tim; Ghadimi, Michael B.; Sax, Ulrich; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Translational research relies on high-quality biospecimens. In patients with rectal cancer treated preoperatively with radiochemotherapy tissue based analyses are challenging. To assess quality challenges we analyzed tissue samples taken over the last years in a multicenter setting. We retrospectively evaluated overall 197 patients of the CAO/ARO/AIO-94- and 04-trial with locally advanced rectal cancer that were biopsied preoperatively at the University Medical Center Goettingen as well as in 10 cooperating hospitals in Germany. The cellular content of tumor, mucosa, stroma, necrosis and the amount of isolated DNA and RNA as well as the RNA integrity number (RIN) as quality parameters were evaluated. A high RNA yield (p = 2.75e–07) and the content of tumor (p = 0.004) is significantly associated to high RIN-values, whereas a high content of mucosa (p = 0.07) shows a trend and a high amount of necrosis (p = 0.01) is significantly associated with RNA of poor quality. Correlating biopsies from Goettingen and the cooperating centers showed comparable tumor content results. By taking small sized biopsies we could assess a clear correlation between a good RNA quality and a high amount of RNA and tumor cells. These results also indicate that specimens collected at different centers are of comparable quality. PMID:27752113

  20. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the lung in pregnancy mimicking carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Maturu, Venkata Nagarjuna; Bal, Amanjit; Singh, Navneet

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMT) are uncommon neoplasms of the lung in adults. They constitute less than 1% of all lung neoplasms and usually present as parenchymal masses. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. They are characterized by spindle-shaped tumor cells (fibroblasts/myofibroblasts) in a background of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. About 50% of the tumors harbor an ALK gene rearrangement. They have to be differentiated from inflammatory pseudotumors (IPT), which show increased number of IgG4 plasma cells on immunostaining and are negative for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) protein. Herein, we present a case of a 28-year old female who presented with hemoptysis and was diagnosed with an IMT of lung in the first trimester of pregnancy. We have not only reviewed the occurrence of IMT during pregnancy but also discuss the management options for IMT during pregnancy. PMID:26933315

  1. Carcinoid Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pay? Resources for Carcinoid and NET Cancer Insurance Appeals Mobile App A Review of Carcinoid Cancer UN ... Pay? Resources for Carcinoid and NET Cancer Insurance Appeals Mobile App A Review of Carcinoid Cancer UN ...

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of a large metastatic carcinoid tumor: success with a note of caution.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Bradley W; Harvey, Harold A; Dye, Charles E; Dougherty-Hamod, Brandy; Moyer, Matthew T

    2014-12-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle infusion (EUS-FNI) of alcohol is the most reported method for EUS-guided tumor ablation. Several studies have reported successful EUS-guided ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, these tumors have been relatively small (< 3 cm). In this report, a 50-year-old man with a metastatic carcinoid tumor with a large porta hepatis mass was referred to our clinic for EUS-guided ethanol ablation. After two separate EUS-FNI ablations, there was a 36 % reduction in tumor size (9.0 × 11.4 cm to 6.7 × 9.8 cm) with associated tumor lysis syndrome. Chromogranin A levels decreased from 460 to 132 ng/mL. The patient reported complete resolution of abdominal pain within 2 weeks, but only mild improvement in flushing and diarrhea. In conclusion, large metastatic neuroendocrine tumors can be successfully treated with EUS-guided ethanol ablation. Evidence-based guidelines are needed with regard to the appropriate volume of ethanol injected in EUS-guided ablation to promote the efficacy and safety of this emerging procedure. PMID:26135103

  3. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Gastrointestinal Cancer, Cancer of the Stomach and Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1986-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer provides only palliation with perhaps increased survival time in some patients. The primary treatment of gastric carcinomas is surgical, as this is the only hope for cure. It is estimated that 80 to 85 percent of patients with newly diagnosed cases of stomach cancer will be dead of their disease within five years. Radiation therapy alone is seldom employed, except as a palliative measure to control hemorrhage or pain. There are no data to suggest that postoperative radiation increases survival rates. Single-agent chemotherapy is of temporary palliative value in 20 to 30 percent of cases with a duration of response from three to five months. Combination chemotherapy has shown a somewhat higher response rate than single-agent therapy. In advanced gastric cancer, there is no evidence of improved long-term disease-free survival rates with any combination yet reported. The treatment of carcinoid cancer of the intestinal tract is surgical removal, as this offers the only hope of cure. Radiation therapy is of little benefit, except for moderate palliation in cases of extensive liver metasasis. Carcinoid cancers are moderately sensitive to chemotherapy. While some adjuvant chemotherapy trials suggest improvement, major survival gains remain to be demonstrated. Uncertainty as to the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers is probably due to lack of data. PMID:3528508

  4. Endobronchial Hamartoma Subtotally Occluding the Right Main Bronchus and Mimicking Bronchial Carcinoid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Lococo, Filippo; Galeone, Carla; Lasagni, Luciano; Carbonelli, Cristiano; Tagliavini, Elena; Piro, Roberto; Zucchi, Luigi; Sgarbi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hamartomas are very rarely identified as an endobronchial lesion. Herein, we describe a peculiar case of a 55-year-old woman with persistent cough and increasing dyspnea and radiological detection of a solid lesion subtotally occluding the main right bronchus. Despite the radiological and radiometabolic (18-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan) features were highly suspected for bronchial carcinoid, the definitive diagnosis after endoscopic removal was indicative of an endobronchial hamartoma. When considering differential diagnosis of an endobronchial lesion, the physicians should take firmly in mind such rare entity and, accordingly, bronchoscopy and bronchoscopic biopsy should be done as first step in management of all cases presenting with endobronchial lesions. PMID:27082600

  5. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  6. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  7. In vivo trans-rectal ultrasound coupled trans-rectal near-infrared optical tomography of canine prostate bearing transmissible venereal tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhen; Holyoak, G. Reed; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Xu, Guan; Bunting, Charles F.; Slobodov, Gennady; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Piao, Daqing

    2009-02-01

    In vivo trans-rectal near-infrared (NIR) optical tomography is conducted on a tumor-bearing canine prostate with the assistance of trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS). The canine prostate tumor model is made possible by a unique round cell neoplasm of dogs, transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) that can be transferred from dog to dog regardless of histocompatibility. A characterized TVT cell line was homogenized and passed twice in subcutaneous tissue of NOD/SCID mice. Following the second passage, the tumor was recovered, homogenized and then inoculated by ultrasound guidance into the prostate gland of a healthy dog. The dog was then imaged with a combined trans-rectal NIR and TRUS imager using an integrated trans-rectal NIR/US applicator. The image was taken by NIR and US modalities concurrently, both in sagittal view. The trans-rectal NIR imager is a continuous-wave system that illuminates 7 source channels sequentially by a fiber switch to deliver sufficient light power to the relatively more absorbing prostate tissue and samples 7 detection channels simultaneously by a gated intensified high-resolution CCD camera. This work tests the feasibility of detecting prostate tumor by trans-rectal NIR optical tomography and the benefit of augmenting TRUS with trans-rectal NIR imaging.

  8. Ovarian strumal carcinoid producing peptide YY associated with severe constipation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Muller, Kristen E; Tafe, Laura J; Gonzalez, Jorge L; West, Loyd A; Schned, Alan R

    2015-01-01

    Primary carcinoid tumors are rare neoplasms of the ovary. Of the 4 histologic subtypes, ovarian carcinoid tumors with insular patterns produce carcinoid syndrome in approximately one third of cases, versus strumal and trabecular carcinoids which very rarely cause typical carcinoid syndrome. A unique presentation of ovarian carcinoid tumors with concurrent severe constipation has been reported, which is thought to represent a new carcinoid syndrome. The proposed mechanism is the production of peptide YY by the tumor, a gastrointestinal hormone responsible for decreasing gut motility. We report a case of a 34-yr-old white woman who presented with constipation and weight loss for 1 yr, and was found to have a unilateral ovarian strumal carcinoid, which produced peptide YY as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. The 13 previous case reports of ovarian carcinoids with constipation are reviewed and the clinicopathologic features are discussed. This report and literature review further solidifies this entity as a new type of carcinoid syndrome.

  9. Occupational risk factors for small bowel carcinoid tumor: a European population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kaerlev, Linda; Teglbjaerg, Peter Stubbe; Sabroe, Svend; Kolstad, Henrik A; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Eriksson, Mikael; Guénel, Pascal; Hardell, Lennart; Cyr, Diane; Ballard, Terri; Zambon, Paola; Morales Suárez-Varela, María M; Stang, Andreas; Olsen, Jorn

    2002-06-01

    Small bowel carcinoid tumor (SBC) is a rare disease of unknown etiology but with an age-, sex-, and place-specific occurrence that may indicate an occupational origin. A European multicenter population-based case-control study was conducted from 1995 through 1997. Incident SBC cases between 35 and 69 years of age (n = 101) were identified, together with 3335 controls sampled from the catchment area of the cases. Histological review performed by a reference pathologist left 99 cases for study; 84 cases and 2070 population controls were interviewed. The industries most closely associated (a twofold or more odds ratio [OR]) with SBC, taking into account a 10-year time lag after exposure were, among women, employment in wholesale industry of food and beverages (OR, 8.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9 to 34.9]) and among men, manufacture of motor vehicle bodies (OR, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.2 to 22.4), footwear (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 0.9 to 16.1), and metal structures (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.0 to 10.4). The identified high-risk occupations with an OR above 2 were shoemakers, structural metal preparers, construction painters and other construction workers, bookkeepers, machine fitters, and welders (men). The OR for regular occupational use of organic solvents for at least half a year was 2.0 (95% CI, 1.0 to 4.2). Exposure to rust-preventive paint containing lead was suggested as another potential occupational exposure (OR, 9.1; 95% CI, 0.8 to 107). This explorative study suggests an association between certain occupational exposures and SBC, but some of these associations could be attributable to chance. All findings should be regarded as tentative.

  10. Anorectal function and outcomes after transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Karakayali, Feza Y.; Tezcaner, Tugan; Moray, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that allows full-thickness resection and suture closure of the defect for large rectal adenomas, selected low-risk rectal cancers, or small cancers in patients who have a high risk for major surgery. Our aim, in the given prospective study was to report our initial clinical experience with TAMIS, and to evaluate its effects on postoperative anorectal functions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 10 patients treated with TAMIS for benign and malignant rectal tumors, preoperative and postoperative anorectal function was evaluated with anorectal manometry and Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. RESULTS: The mean distance of the tumors from the anal verge was 5.6 cm, and mean tumor diameter was 2.6 cm. All resection margins were tumor free. There was no difference in preoperative and 3-week postoperative anorectalmanometry findings; only mean minimum rectal sensory volume was lower at 3 weeks after surgery. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all patients except one which resolved by 6 weeks after surgery.The mean postoperative follow-up was 28 weeks without any recurrences. CONCLUSION: Transanal minimally invasive surgery is a safe and effective procedure for treatment of rectal tumors and can be performed without impairing anorectal functions. PMID:26622116

  11. A case of multicentric carcinoid in a patient with psoriatic spondyloarthropathy.

    PubMed

    George, Nabil; Depala, Archana; Al Sweedan, Laith; Chakravarty, Kuntal

    2015-01-01

    We describe the first case of a patient presenting with multicentric carcinoid occurring in the lung and subsequently in the rectum, with chronic psoriatic arthritis. Although reports have been published regarding carcinoid syndrome occurring alongside rheumatoid arthritis, no reports have been made on such a case. Initial presentation of carcinoid syndrome in this patient was insidious and atypical with few symptoms, including shortness of breath and long standing abdominal bloating. Several years later a sudden change in bowel habit prompted a colonoscopy with biopsy that revealed a carcinoid rectal polyp. The case we report describes a rare presentation of carcinoid syndrome in chronic psoriatic arthropathy.

  12. A Case of Multicentric Carcinoid in a Patient with Psoriatic Spondyloarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    George, Nabil; Depala, Archana; Al Sweedan, Laith; Chakravarty, Kuntal

    2015-01-01

    We describe the first case of a patient presenting with multicentric carcinoid occurring in the lung and subsequently in the rectum, with chronic psoriatic arthritis. Although reports have been published regarding carcinoid syndrome occurring alongside rheumatoid arthritis, no reports have been made on such a case. Initial presentation of carcinoid syndrome in this patient was insidious and atypical with few symptoms, including shortness of breath and long standing abdominal bloating. Several years later a sudden change in bowel habit prompted a colonoscopy with biopsy that revealed a carcinoid rectal polyp. The case we report describes a rare presentation of carcinoid syndrome in chronic psoriatic arthropathy. PMID:25802789

  13. Validation of serum versus plasma measurements of chromogranin A levels in patients with carcinoid tumors.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromogranin A (CGA) levels are used to confirm the diagnosis, and monitor the course of patients with neuroendocrine tumors. Chromogranin A levels are significantly reduced when patients are acutely treated with octreotide; however, limited data is available that correlates octreotide long-acting ...

  14. Perforated Meckel's diverticulum containing a carcinoid tumor successfully treated by the laparoscopic approach: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Curbelo-Peña, Yuhamy; Dardano-Berriel, Juan; Guedes-De la Puente, Xavier; Saladich-Cubero, Maria; Stickar, Tomas; De Caralt-Mestres, Enric

    2016-01-01

    Mekel's diverticulum is a gastrointestinal malformation. Occurs in one of every 40 patients. It is usually asymptomatic whereas complications can be developed in 2% to 4%. The report is based on a 41-year old male, who attended to emergency, complaining of right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Blood tests showed high level of inflammatory markers. With acute appendicitis as presumptive diagnosis, laparoscopy was performed. The intraoperative findings were: a perforated Mekel's diverticulum with normal cecal appendix. Mechanical diverticular resection was made. The patient was successfully recovered from surgery. Histopathology examination showed: Meckel's diverticulum perforated with acute inflammation and neuroendocrine tumor (G1) pT1. Mekel's diverticulum is rarely affected by inflammatory complications and just few cases are associated with tumors. However, has ever been described before, coexisting both situations, being our patient the first reported with this exceptional clinical presentation, and treated successfully by laparoscopic approach. PMID:27251847

  15. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  16. [A case of recurrent cough in bronchial carcinoid].

    PubMed

    Strano, M; Funis, M; Frediani, S; Duvina, P L

    1999-01-01

    The carcinoid tumors of the bronchial are extremely uncommon, with an incidence of 5% of all pulmonary neoplasms. The carcinoid is the more frequent tumor of the lung in paediatric age. The symptoms most often reported were cough, recurring infection, chest pain, hemoptysis, fever, dyspnea, mild dyspnea attacks after physical effort or nervousness. The carcinoid syndrome is uncommon. Neuroendocrine tumors of the lung embrace a spectrum from low-grade typical carcinoid, intermediate-grade atypical carcinoid, and high-grade categories of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. Low grade neoplasms may metastasize to adjacent nodes. Atypical carcinoids are considered low grade malignancies. Most malignant end of neuroendocrine neoplasm group is small cell carcinoma. Typical carcinoids carry an excellent prognosis and should be offered conservative lung resection, whilst atypical carcinoids which behave aggressively should be treated by radical lung resection. The authors report a case of the young patients with bronchial typical carcinoid tumor who had suffered from cough and mild dyspnea attacks after physical effort or nervousness in the last year. PMID:10570790

  17. Low thrombospondin 2 expression is predictive of low tumor regression after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yih; Chang, I-Wei; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Li, Chien-Feng; Lee, Sung-Wei; Lin, Li-Ching; Lee, Ying-En; He, Hong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay of treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Several heparin-binding associated proteins have been reported to play a critical role in cancer progression. However, the clinical relevancies of such proteins and their associations with CCRT response in rectal cancer have not yet to be fully elucidated. Methods: The analysis of a public transcriptome of rectal cancer indicated that thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) is a predictive factor for CCRT response. Immunohistochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate the expression of THBS2 in pretreatment biopsy specimens from rectal cancer patients without distant metastasis. Furthermore, the relationships between THBS2 expression and various clinicopathological factors or survival were analyzed. Results: Low expression of THBS2 was significantly associated with advanced pretreatment tumor (P<0.001) and nodal status (P=0.004), post-treatment tumor (P<0.001) and nodal status (P<0.001), increased vascular invasion (P=0.003), increased perineural invasion (P=0.023) and inferior tumor regression grade (P=0.015). In univariate analysis, low THBS2 expression predicted worse outcomes for disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival and metastasis-free survival (all P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, low expression of THBS2 still served as a negative prognostic factor for disease-free survival (Hazard ratio=3.057, P=0.002) and metastasis-free survival (Hazard ratio=3.362, P=0.012). Conclusion: Low THBS2 expression was correlated with advanced disease status and low tumor regression after preoperative CCRT and that it acted as an independent negative prognostic factor in rectal cancer. THBS2 may represent a predictive biomarker for CCRT response in rectal cancer. PMID:26807188

  18. Usefulness of endoscopic resection using the band ligation method for rectal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Seung; Kim, Yoon Jae; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Kyoung Oh; Kwon, Kwang An; Park, Dong Kyun; An, Jung Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are among the most common of gastrointestinal NETs. Due to recent advances in endoscopy, various methods of complete endoscopic resection have been introduced for small (≤10 mm) rectal NETs. However, there is a debate about the optimal treatment for rectal NETs. In our study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of endoscopic resection using pneumoband and elastic band (ER-BL) for rectal NETs smaller than 10 mm in diameter. Methods A total of 55 patients who were diagnosed with rectal NET from January 2004 to December 2011 at Gil Medical Center were analyzed retrospectively. Sixteen patients underwent ER-BL. For comparison, 39 patients underwent conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Results There was a markedly lower deep margin positive rate for ER-BL than for conventional EMR (6% [1/16] vs. 46% [18/39], P=0.029). Four patients who underwent conventional EMR experienced perforation or bleeding. However, they recovered within a few days. On the other hand, patients whounderwent endoscopic resection using a pneumoband did not experience any complications. In multivariate analysis, ER-BL (P=0.021) was independently associated with complete resection. Conclusions ER-BL is an effective endoscopic treatment with regards to deep margin resection for rectal NET smaller than 10 mm. PMID:27175117

  19. [Rectal tenesmus due to tumor invasion into the pelvic cavity responding favorably to antiarrhythmic drug therapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kazuho; Koizumi, Takahisa; Nakazato, Kenei; Nakagawa, Tomoki; Masuda, Ryota; Mikami, Mikio; Tokuda, Yutaka; Iwasaki, Masayuki

    2012-12-01

    We experienced 3 patients(Cases 1, 3, and 4)with pelvic tumor-related rectal tenesmus showing favorable responses to antiarrhythmic drugs. Based on this experience, we administered antiarrhythmic drugs preferentially to 2 others with tumor derived rectal tenesmus(Cases 2 and 5), and again obtained favorable responses. These 5 patients(1 man, 4 women)were 28-89(mean 58)years of age. The primary lesion was cervical cancer in 3 patients, ovarian cancer in 1, and bladder cancer in 1. In the 3 with cervical cancer, the tumor had directly infiltrated the rectum and vulva. The patient with ovarian cancer had a residual tumor in the Douglas pouch postoperatively. The patient with bladder cancer had undergone total cystectomy and urinary diversion using an ileal conduit at another institution. All 5 patients complained of a frequent desire to defecate without feces(rectal tenesmus). Their rectal tenesmus was attributed to pelvic neurological dysfunction around the rectum. Drug therapy was initiated with oral mexiletine hydrochloride(Mexitil)150 mg in 3 divided doses in 4 patients and with continuous infusion of intravenous lidocaine 2%(Xylocaine)500mg/day in the other(Case 2). None had adverse reactions; all 5 experienced palliation of symptoms and improved quality of life. PMID:23235181

  20. Significance of defect closure following transanal local full-thickness excision of rectal malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Noura, Shingo; Ohue, Masayuki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Yasui, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Transanal excision (TAE) for rectal tumors is increasingly applied and it is generally recommended that the defect following full-thickness excision should be closed. The aim of this study was to compare the complications and anal function following TAE between cases where the defect was closed and those where it was not. A total of 43 consecutive rectal malignant tumor patients eligible for TAE were investigated. Regarding anorectal function, incontinence was assessed using the Wexner score. The defect of the rectum was closed in 21 of the 43 patients. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding gender, distance from the anal verge, tumor size, diagnosis and tumor site. There was a significantly higher number of postoperative complications of all grades and ≥Clavien-Dindo grade IIIa in the closure group (P=0.02 and 0.04, respectively). Regarding the Wexner score, there was no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.24). Compared with the closure group, the non-closure group had significantly fewer postoperative complications of all grades and ≥Clavien-Dindo grade IIIa. Moreover, there was no significant difference regarding the anorectal function between the two groups. Thus, suturing the rectal defect is not necessarily recommended following TAE.

  1. Intraoperative fluorescence imaging to localize tumors and sentinel lymph nodes in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Handgraaf, Henricus J M; Boogerd, Leonora S F; Verbeek, Floris P R; Tummers, Quirijn R J G; Hardwick, James C H; Baeten, Coen I M; Frangioni, John V; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L

    2016-01-01

    Tumor involvement at the resection margin remains the most important predictor for local recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. A careful description of tumor localization is therefore essential. Currently, endoscopic tattooing with ink is customary, but visibility during laparoscopic resections is limited. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging using indocyanine green (ICG) could be an improvement. In addition to localize tumors, ICG can also be used to identify sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). The feasibility of this new technique was explored in five patients undergoing laparoscopic low anterior resection for rectal cancer. Intraoperative tumor visualization was possible in four out of five patients. Fluorescence signal could be detected 32 ± 18 minutes after incision, while ink could be detected 42 ± 21 minutes after incision (p = 0.53). No recurrence was diagnosed within three months after surgery. Ex vivo imaging identified a mean of 4.2 ± 2.7 fluorescent lymph nodes, which were appointed SLNs. One out of a total of 83 resected lymph nodes contained a micrometastasis. This node was not fluorescent. This technical note describes the feasibility of endoscopic tattooing of rectal cancer using ICG:nanocolloid and NIR fluorescence imaging during laparoscopic resection. Simultaneous SLN mapping was also feasible, but may be less reliable due to neoadjuvant therapy.

  2. Significance of defect closure following transanal local full-thickness excision of rectal malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Noura, Shingo; Ohue, Masayuki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Yasui, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Transanal excision (TAE) for rectal tumors is increasingly applied and it is generally recommended that the defect following full-thickness excision should be closed. The aim of this study was to compare the complications and anal function following TAE between cases where the defect was closed and those where it was not. A total of 43 consecutive rectal malignant tumor patients eligible for TAE were investigated. Regarding anorectal function, incontinence was assessed using the Wexner score. The defect of the rectum was closed in 21 of the 43 patients. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding gender, distance from the anal verge, tumor size, diagnosis and tumor site. There was a significantly higher number of postoperative complications of all grades and ≥Clavien-Dindo grade IIIa in the closure group (P=0.02 and 0.04, respectively). Regarding the Wexner score, there was no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.24). Compared with the closure group, the non-closure group had significantly fewer postoperative complications of all grades and ≥Clavien-Dindo grade IIIa. Moreover, there was no significant difference regarding the anorectal function between the two groups. Thus, suturing the rectal defect is not necessarily recommended following TAE. PMID:27699041

  3. Carcinoid of the Appendix During Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: Unexpected Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Haluck, Randy; Cooney, Robert N.; Minnick, Kathleen E.; Ruggiero, Francesco; Smith, J. Stanley

    1999-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors of the midgut arise from the distal duodenum, jejunum, ileum, appendix, ascending and right transverse colon. The appendix and terminal ileum are the most common location. The majority of carcinoid tumors originate from neuroendocrine cells along the gastrointestinal tract, but they are also found in the lung, ovary, and biliary tracts. We report the first case of elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy in which we found a suspicious lesion at the tip of the appendix and proceeded to perform a laparoscopic appendectomy. The lesion revealed a carcinoid tumor of the appendix. PMID:10323177

  4. [A Case of Rectal Villous Tumor Detected with Heart Failure and Electrolyte Imbalance].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Junya; Maeda, Yoshinari; Nagashima, Yukiko; Nishimura, Taku; Morita, Katsuhiko; Setoguchi, Mihoko; Sakata, Kouichiro

    2015-11-01

    A 74-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with a chief complaint of appetite loss, and already diagnosed dehydration and heart failure. After hospitalization, the signs of heart failure were improved with liquid supplementation and electrolyte revision. At admission, computed tomography incidentally detected a rectal tumor. She underwent colonography, which revealed a huge villous tumor in the rectum. Based on the result of the initial biopsy, it was classified as a group 4 tumor, but additional biopsy of specimens obtained from 6 places led to a diagnosis of group 5 tumor. Then, we performed laparoscopic super-low anterior resection and made an ileal stoma. The electrolyte imbalance was improved and did not recur after the operation. In this case, the electrolyte imbalance caused by the huge villous tumor was electrolyte depletion syndrome (EDS). PMID:26805333

  5. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate Measured by Magnetic Resonance Volumetry Correlated With Pathologic Tumor Response of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlates with the pathologic tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 405 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-T4) who had undergone preoperative CRT and radical proctectomy. The tumor volume was measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry before and after CRT but before surgery. We analyzed the correlation between the TVRR and the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and tumor regression grade (TRG). Downstaging was defined as ypStage 0-I (ypT0-T2N0M0), and the TRG proposed by Dworak et al. was used. Results: The mean TVRR was 65.0% {+-} 22.3%. Downstaging and complete regression occurred in 167 (41.2%) and 58 (14.3%) patients, respectively. The TVRRs according to ypT classification (ypT0-T2 vs. ypT3-T4), ypN classification (ypN0 vs. ypN1-N2), downstaging (ypStage 0-I vs. ypStage II-III), good regression (TRG 3-4 vs. TRG 1-2), and complete regression (TRG 4 vs. TRG 1-3) were all significantly different (p <.05). When the TVRR was categorized into three groups (<60%, 60-80%, and >80%), the rates of ypT0-T2, ypN0, downstaging, and good regression were all significantly greater for patients with a TVRR of {>=}60%, as was the complete regression rate for patients with a TVRR >80% (p <.05). Conclusion: The TVRR measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlated significantly with the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and TRG after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  6. [Atypical case of bronchial carcinoid].

    PubMed

    Andrzejak, R; Mydłowski, R; Krajewski, E; Orłowski, T; Bochnia, M

    1997-01-01

    This article illustrates problems in diagnosis and treatment of an atypical form of bronchial carcinoid. We described the case of a 49-year old man, exposed to granite dust and noise for 25 years who had suffered from frequent bronchitis inflammations and pneumonias for 5 years prior to the diagnosis. He was admitted to our clinic because of supposed occupational nature of hearing deficiency. Although a pneumoconiosis was excluded before the admission, we found clinical and X-ray features of the right lung emphysema with medium restrictive ventilation disturbances. Bronchoscopy was performed because of "bright" right lung and ventilation disturbances and it showed presence of the carcinoid. Unusual in this case were tiny anamnestical findings (mild dyspnea attacks after physical effort or nervousness) plus increasing frequency of reported from the childhood bronchitis and pneumonias and uncharacteristic "bright" right lung in X-ray. Therapeutical difficulties resulted from atypical histological form of the tumor, its diameter, polypous-infiltrative character, and inconvenient localization. In spite of late diagnosis of carcinoid and significant acceleration of respiratory decompensation symptoms after the diagnosis the attempt of surgical therapy was appropriate but unsuccessful. After the operation the patient was suffering long lasting lowering of arterial pressure (what was corrected with catecholamine infusions) probably as a result of serotonin secretion. However it was not established because of technical reasons.

  7. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  8. Clinical Parameters Predicting Pathologic Tumor Response After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Dae Yong Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin; Koom, Woong Sub; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To identify pretreatment clinical parameters that could predict pathologic tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study involved 351 patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery between October 2001 and July 2006. Tumor responses to preoperative CRT were assessed in terms of tumor downstaging and tumor regression. Statistical analyses were performed to identify clinical factors associated with pathologic tumor response. Results: Tumor downstaging (defined as ypT2 or less) was observed in 167 patients (47.6%), whereas tumor regression (defined as Dworak's Regression Grades 3 or 4) was observed in 103 patients (29.3%) and complete regression in 51 patients (14.5%). Multivariate analysis found that predictors of downstaging were pretreatment hemoglobin level (p = 0.045), cN0 classification (p < 0.001), and serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (p < 0.001), that predictors of tumor regression were cN0 classification (p = 0.044) and CEA level (p < 0.001), and that the predictor of complete regression was CEA level (p = 0.004). Conclusions: The data suggest that pretreatment CEA level is the most important clinical predictor of pathologic tumor response. It may be of benefit in the selection of treatment options as well as the assessment of individual prognosis.

  9. Frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes in pulmonary carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Sun, Ruping; Ozretić, Luka; Seidal, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Leenders, Frauke; George, Julie; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Pinther, Berit; Bosco, Graziella; Konrad, Kathryn; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Schneider, Peter M; Bogus, Magdalena; Soltermann, Alex; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Ansén, Sascha; Stoelben, Erich; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Solomon, Benjamin; Field, John K; Hyde, Russell; Davies, Michael PA.; Heukamp, Lukas C; Petersen, Iver; Perner, Sven; Lovly, Christine; Cappuzzo, Federico; Travis, William D; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Haas, Stefan A.; Buettner, Reinhard; Thomas, Roman K

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoids are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the lung. The molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of these tumors have not been systematically studied so far. Here we perform gene copy number analysis (n=54), genome/exome (n=44) and transcriptome (n=69) sequencing of pulmonary carcinoids and observe frequent mutations in chromatin-remodeling genes. Covalent histone modifiers and subunits of the SWI/SNF complex are mutated in 40% and 22.2% of the cases respectively, with MEN1, PSIP1 and ARID1A being recurrently affected. In contrast to small-cell lung cancer and large-cell neuroendocrine tumors, TP53 and RB1 mutations are rare events, suggesting that pulmonary carcinoids are not early progenitor lesions of the highly aggressive lung neuroendocrine tumors but arise through independent cellular mechanisms. These data also suggest that inactivation of chromatin remodeling genes is sufficient to drive transformation in pulmonary carcinoids. PMID:24670920

  10. [Atypical carcinoid of larynx: a case report].

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenjing; Wang, Xin; Shi, Jinfeng

    2015-09-01

    An 70-year-old male come for swallowing pain 5 years, turning worse 10 months. Laryngoscopy showed a tumor with rough surface at the laryngeal surface of epiglottic. Outpatient pathology: poorly differentiated carcinoma of the larynx. CT: the root of epiglottic is slightly thickened. He accepted the partial laryngectomy, tracheotomy, bilateral functional neck dissection. Pathology: atypical carcinoid of larynx.

  11. Pneumothorax as atypical presentation of bronchial carcinoid.

    PubMed

    Madrid-Carbajal, Claudia J; García-Clemente, Marta M; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Margarita; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; Alvarez-Santín, Laura; Casan-Clarà, Pere

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of pneumothorax associated with an endobronchial carcinoid tumor in a 18-year-old man with dyspnea and chest pain. Additional tests were done, identifying in the chest roentgenogram a complete left pneumothorax with persistent leak, which was confirmed by computed tomography of the chest, and also finding an endobronchial lesion that limited the complete reexpansion of the left lung. Surgical excision was performed, and the lesion was identified as a typical bronchial carcinoid, with satisfactory outcome after the intervention. PMID:24296189

  12. Pneumothorax as atypical presentation of bronchial carcinoid.

    PubMed

    Madrid-Carbajal, Claudia J; García-Clemente, Marta M; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Margarita; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; Alvarez-Santín, Laura; Casan-Clarà, Pere

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of pneumothorax associated with an endobronchial carcinoid tumor in a 18-year-old man with dyspnea and chest pain. Additional tests were done, identifying in the chest roentgenogram a complete left pneumothorax with persistent leak, which was confirmed by computed tomography of the chest, and also finding an endobronchial lesion that limited the complete reexpansion of the left lung. Surgical excision was performed, and the lesion was identified as a typical bronchial carcinoid, with satisfactory outcome after the intervention.

  13. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) before and after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and its clinical utility for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Feifei; Mu, Dianbin; Meng, Xiangjiao; Kong, Li; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Sujing; Zhang, Jianbo; Yu, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds: Radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) can potentiate systemic antitumor immune effect. However, immunomodulation during RT or CT and their clinical implications in rectal cancer have not been thoroughly investigated. Methods: We investigated alterations in the densities of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) during chemoradiation and their clinical utilities in patients with rectal cancer. We analyzed 136 rectal cancer patients who underwent neoadjuvant RT, CT or chemoradiotherapy (CRT), followed by radical resection retrospectively. Pretreatment biopsy specimens and posttreatment resected specimens of all patients were immunostained for CD3 and CD8. The predictive value of TILs to neoadjuvant treatment and prognosis were examined. Results: Densities of CD3+ and CD8+TILs in posttreatment specimens after RT, CT or CRT were all significantly higher than those in pretreatment specimens. There were no significant differences between each two of these three groups. High pretreatment CD3+ and CD8+TILs were associated with good response (TRG ≥ 3) after neoadjuvant treatments (P = 0.033 and 0.021). High CD3+TILs and CD8+TILs in pretreatment biopsy specimens were significantly associated with favorable disease free survival (DFS) (P = 0.010 and P = 0.022) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.019 and P = 0.003). Conclusions: We may, thus, conclude that chemoradiation can enhance local immune response by increased TILs. High TILs densities before treatment are associated with good response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and a favorable prognosis. PMID:26269765

  14. Giant thymic carcinoid.

    PubMed

    John, L C; Hornick, P; Lang, S; Wallis, J; Edmondson, S J

    1991-05-01

    Thymic carcinoid is a rare tumour. It may present with ectopic endocrine secretion or with symptoms of compression as a result of its size. A case is reported which presented with symptoms of compression where the size of the tumour was uniquely large such as to warrant the term giant thymic carcinoid. The typical histological features are described, together with its possible origin and its likely prognosis.

  15. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, < 5 cm from anal verge; and patients facing tumors with enlarged nodes and/or CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  16. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  17. Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma in a patient with rectal laterally spreading tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, MIN; YIN, LINGDI; YAO, YULING; WANG, LEI; XU, GUIFANG; ZHANG, XIAOQI; LV, YING; SUN, QI; FAN, XIANGSHAN; ZOU, XIAOPING

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma (LELGC) is a rare neoplasm of the stomach that accounts for 1–4% of all gastric cancer cases. It is characterized by the presence of a lymphoid stroma with cells arranged primarily in micro alveolar, thin trabecular and primitive tubular patterns or isolated cells. In the present study, the case of a 50-year-old male patient with LELGC and rectal laterally spreading tumor is presented. Following endoscopic submucosal dissection, a diagnosis of carcinoma was reached and the patient underwent total radical gastrectomy. The postoperative pathological stage was IA T1bN0cM0 according to the Tumor-Node-Metastasis classification of gastric carcinoma, and the patient recovered well. The present case is reported to summarize the endoscopic and pathological characteristics of LELGC. PMID:27073504

  18. Invasive atypical thymic carcinoid: three case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shan; Wang, Zhong-Tang; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zong, Shi-Xiang; Li, Bao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Atypical thymic carcinoid is an extremely rare thymic neuroendocrine tumor derived from the neuroendocrine system. The aims of this paper were to investigate the clinical features of atypical thymic carcinoid and collate information and experience to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. We describe three cases of atypical carcinoid of the thymus; clinical features, pathological data, treatment modalities, and short-term patient outcomes were summarized and analyzed. The initial clinical symptoms and signs of all three patients were nonspecific and an anterior mediastinal mass was found in each patient on chest computed tomography scan. All three patients underwent surgical resection (total thymectomy and complete excision of the tumor), followed by postoperative radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. The diagnoses of three patients were confirmed by pathological and immunohistochemical evaluation. We also present a review of the literature to collate as much information as possible and provide a reference for proper diagnosis and treatment of atypical thyroid carcinoid. PMID:27785065

  19. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  20. Association Between the Cytogenetic Profile of Tumor Cells and Response to Preoperative Radiochemotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    González-González, María; Garcia, Jacinto; Alcazar, José A.; Gutiérrez, María L.; Gónzalez, Luis M.; Bengoechea, Oscar; Abad, María M.; Santos-Briz, Angel; Blanco, Oscar; Martín, Manuela; Rodríguez, Ana; Fuentes, Manuel; Muñoz-Bellvis, Luis; Orfao, Alberto; Sayagues, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy to locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients has proven efficient in a high percentage of cases. Despite this, some patients show nonresponse or even disease progression. Recent studies suggest that different genetic alterations may be associated with sensitivity versus resistance of rectal cancer tumor cells to neoadjuvant therapy. We investigated the relationship between intratumoral pathways of clonal evolution as assessed by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (51 different probes) and response to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy, evaluated by Dworak criteria in 45 rectal cancer tumors before (n = 45) and after (n = 31) treatment. Losses of chromosomes 1p (44%), 8p (53%), 17p (47%), and 18q (38%) and gains of 1q (49%) and 13q (75%) as well as amplification of 8q (38%) and 20q (47%) chromosomal regions were those specific alterations found at higher frequencies. Significant association (P < 0.05) was found between alteration of 1p, 1q, 11p, 12p, and 17p chromosomal regions and degree of response to neoadjuvant therapy. A clear association was observed between cytogenetic profile of the ancestral tumor cell clone and response to radiochemotherapy; cases presenting with del(17p) showed a poor response to neoadjuvant treatment (P = 0.03), whereas presence of del(1p) was more frequently observed in responder patients (P = 0.0002). Moreover, a significantly higher number of copies of chromosomes 8q (P = 0.004), 13q (P = 0.003), and 20q (P = 0.002) were found after therapy versus paired pretreatment rectal cancer samples. Our results point out the existence of an association between tumor cytogenetics and response to neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. Further studies in larger series of patients are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:25474426

  1. Case of peptide-YY-producing strumal carcinoid of the ovary: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Eriko; Shoji, Tadahiro; Miura, Jiyu; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Yoshizaki, Akira; Sugiyama, Toru

    2012-10-01

    Ovarian carcinoid is a rare tumor accounting for approximately 0.1% of all ovarian malignancies. We describe a case of peptide-YY-producing strumal carcinoid of the ovary associated with severe constipation. A 48-year-old woman was found to have a pelvic mass on ultrasonography when she visited her primary doctor for a health check-up. She was thus referred to our department. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solid right ovarian tumor 60 × 50 mm in size. The patient underwent a right adnexectomy and was histopathologically diagnosed as having strumal carcinoid of the ovary. On immunohistochemical examination, the tumor cells were positive for peptide YY. The patient's constipation resolved rapidly after surgery. Based on her clinical course, her constipation was considered to have been caused by the strumal carcinoid of the ovary. The clinical course of this case supports the previously recognized correlation between peptide-YY-producing ovarian carcinoid and constipation.

  2. Primary lung carcinoid, a rare cause of paraparesis: report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Visouli, Aikaterini N.; Darwiche, Kaid; Kourtoglou, Georgios I.; Mpakas, Andreas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Stylianaki, Aikaterini; Christofis, Chistos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Courcoutsakis, Nicolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Carcinoids are neuroendocrine tumors mainly involving the gastrointestinal tract, lungs and bronchi. They were considered benign with slow growth, but they can be malignant in a substantial percentage of patients (metastasizing to liver, bones, skin, etc). Endocrine activity results in carcinoid syndrome. Proximal myopathy has been reported in 7% of patients with carcinoid syndrome. Bronchopulmonary and thymic carcinoids producing adrenocorticotropic hormone can cause Cushing’s syndrome, a main feature of which is myopathy. There are a few reports of carcinoids associated with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, including neuropathy. We hereby present an extremely rare case of a primary lung carcinoid presented with paraparesis due to polyneuropathy, and review the relevant literature. To the best of our knowledge there is no similar previous report. Complete resolution of paraparesis after excision of the lung carcinoid suggests paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. PMID:23304441

  3. The cost-effectiveness of octreotide acetate in the treatment of carcinoid syndrome and VIPoma.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, W H; Eikin, E P; Woltering, E A; Modlin, I M; Anthony, L; Villa, K F; Zagari, M

    1998-01-01

    Markov modeling was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of octreotide in treating carcinoid syndrome and VIPoma. For each condition, using octreotide was associated with doubled survival time. Octreotide was cost-effective for treating carcinoid tumor ($752 per additional year of life, two additional years on average), and cost saving for VIPoma.

  4. New Perspectives on Predictive Biomarkers of Tumor Response and Their Clinical Application in Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and can improve local control and survival outcomes. However, the responses of individual tumors to CRT are not uniform and vary widely, from complete response to disease progression. Patients with resistant tumors can be exposed to irradiation and chemotherapy that are both expensive and at times toxic without benefit. In contrast, about 60% of tumors show tumor regression and T and N down-staging. Furthermore, a pathologic complete response (pCR), which is characterized by sterilization of all tumor cells, leads to an excellent prognosis and is observed in approximately 10-30% of cases. This variety in tumor response has lead to an increased need to develop a model predictive of responses to CRT in order to identify patients who will benefit from this multimodal treatment. Endoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, serum carcinoembryonic antigen, and molecular biomarkers analyzed using immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling are the most commonly used predictive models in preoperative CRT. Such modalities guide clinicians in choosing the best possible treatment options and the extent of surgery for each individual patient. However, there are still controversies regarding study outcomes, and a nomogram of combined models of future trends is needed to better predict patient response. The aim of this article was to review currently available tools for predicting tumor response after preoperative CRT in rectal cancer and to explore their applicability in clinical practice for tailored treatment. PMID:26446626

  5. Tumor microcirculation during a course of combined chemoradiation in patients with primary rectal carcinoma measured with dynamic T1 mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner; De Vries, Alexander

    2003-05-01

    A recently introduced dynamic T1 mapping technique was used to investigate changes of tumor microcirculatory parameters in 16 patients with clinically staged T3) primary rectal carcinoma during a course of preoperative combined chemoradiation. For dynamic T1 mapping an ultra-fast snapshot FLASH T1 mapping sequence was implemented on a 1.5T whole body MR scanner. Acquiring a series of T1 maps contrast media (CM) uptake and washout over an examination time of 40 min was monitored. From the obtained series of T1-maps perfusion-indices (PI) were calculated as the ratio of maximum slope of the tumor CM curve and the maximum of the arterial CM curve. Using pathologic classification of the resected tumors after therapy the patient group could be divided into patients with and without response to therapy. It was found that mean pre-therapy PI values of tumors showing therapy-response were significantly lower than for tumors without no therapy-response. In addition a different behavior of PI distributions within tumors for both groups was observed. The presented study indicates that PI values and their distributions within a tumor seem to be of predictive value for therapy outcome of preoperative therapy in patients with primary rectal carcinoma.

  6. MRI Risk Stratification for Tumor Relapse in Rectal Cancer Achieving Pathological Complete Remission after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Honsoul; Myoung, Sungmin; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Ahn, Joong Bae; Hur, Hyuk; Lim, Joon Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Rectal cancer patients achieving pCR are known to have an excellent prognosis, yet no widely accepted consensus on risk stratification and post-operative management (e.g., adjuvant therapy) has been established. This study aimed to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) high-risk factors for tumor relapse in pathological complete remission (pCR) achieved by rectal cancer patients who have undergone neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and curative resection. Materials and Methods We analyzed 88 (male/female = 55/33, median age, 59.5 years [range 34–78]) pCR-proven rectal cancer patients who had undergone pre-CRT MRI, CRT, post-CRT MRI and curative surgery between July 2005 and December 2012. Patients were observed for post-operative tumor relapse. We analyzed the pre/post-CRT MRIs for parameters including mrT stage, mesorectal fascia (mrMRF) status, tumor volume, tumor regression grade (mrTRG), nodal status (mrN), and extramural vessel invasion (mrEMVI). We performed univariate analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results Post-operative tumor relapse occurred in seven patients (8.0%, n = 7/88) between 5.7 and 50.7 (median 16.8) months. No significant relevance was observed between tumor volume, volume reduction rate, mrTRG, mrT, or mrN status. Meanwhile, positive mrMRF (Ppre-CRT = 0.018, Ppre/post-CRT = 0.006) and mrEMVI (Ppre-CRT = 0.026, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.008) were associated with higher incidence of post-operative tumor relapse. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a higher risk of tumor relapse in patients with positive mrMRF (Ppre-CRT = 0.029, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.009) or mrEMVI (Ppre-CRT = 0.024, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.003). Conclusion Positive mrMRF and mrEMVI status was associated with a higher risk of post-operative tumor relapse of pCR achieved by rectal cancer patients, and therefore, can be applied for risk stratification and to individualize treatment plans. PMID:26730717

  7. Carcinoid Tumor: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Similarly, periodic audiograms and checks of the patients vestibular function will prevent irreversible 8th nerve damage. Monitoring ... Similarly, periodic audiograms and checks of the patients vestibular function will prevent irreversible 8th nerve damage. Monitoring ...

  8. What Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the inhaled air into your bloodstream and pass carbon dioxide (a waste product from the body) into the ... exhale. Taking in oxygen and getting rid of carbon dioxide are your lungs’ main functions. A thin lining ...

  9. Natural Course of an Untreated Metastatic Perirectal Lymph Node After the Endoscopic Resection of a Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hyung; Lee, Jung Su; Park, Soyoung; Lee, Ho-Su; Lee, Hyojeong; Park, Sang Hyoung; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Myung, Seung-Jae; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jihun

    2015-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis is rare in small (i.e., <10 mm) rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). In addition to tumor size, pathological features such as the mitotic or Ki-67 proliferation index are associated with lymph node metastasis in rectal NETs. We recently treated a patient who underwent endoscopic treatment of a small, grade 1 rectal NET that recurred in the form of perirectal lymph node metastasis 7 years later. A 7-mm-sized perirectal lymph node was noted at the time of the initial endoscopic treatment. The same lymph node was found to be slightly enlarged on follow-up and finally confirmed as a metastatic NET. Therefore, the perirectal lymph node metastasis might have been present at the time of the initial diagnosis. However, the growth rate of the lymph node was extremely low, and it took 7 years to increase in size from 7 to 10 mm. NETs with low Ki-67 proliferation index and without mitotic activity may grow extremely slowly even if they are metastatic. PMID:25932004

  10. Extended Intervals after Neoadjuvant Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: The Key to Improved Tumor Response and Potential Organ Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Christian P; Becerra, Adan Z; Aquina, Christopher T; Tejani, Mohamedtaki A; Wexner, Steven D; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Remzi, Feza H; Dietz, David W; Monson, John RT; Fleming, Fergal J

    2016-01-01

    Background Many rectal cancer patients experience tumor downstaging and some are found to achieve a pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT). Previous data suggest that there is an association between the time interval from nCRT completion to surgery and tumor response rates, including pCR. However, these studies have been primarily from single institutions with small sample sizes. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between a longer interval after nCRT and pCR in a nationally representative cohort of rectal cancer patients. Study Design Clinical stage II–III rectal cancer patients undergoing nCRT with a documented surgical resection were selected from the 2006 – 2011 National Cancer Data Base. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between nCRT-surgery interval time (<6 weeks, 6–8 weeks, >8 weeks) and the odds of pCR. The relationship between nCRT-surgery interval, surgical morbidity, and tumor downstaging was also examined. Results Overall, 17,255 patients met the inclusion criteria. A nCRT-surgery interval time >8 weeks was associated with higher odds of pCR (OR=1.12, 95%CI=1.01–1.25) and tumor downstaging (OR=1.11, 95%CI =1.02–1.25). The longer time delay was also associated with lower odds of 30-day readmission (OR=0.82, 95%CI: 0.70–0.92). Conclusions A nCRT-surgery interval time >8 weeks results in increased odds of pCR with no evidence of associated increased surgical complications compared to 6–8 weeks. This data supports the implementation of a lengthened interval after nCRT to optimize the chances of pCR and perhaps add to the possibility of ultimate organ preservation (non-operative management). PMID:26206642

  11. In vivo trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled optical tomography of a transmissible venereal tumor model in the canine pelvic canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhen; Holyoak, G. Reed; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Xu, Guan; Bunting, Charles F.; Slobodov, Gennady; Piao, Daqing

    2009-05-01

    In vivo trans-rectal near-infrared (NIR) optical tomography was performed concurrently with, albeit reconstructed without spatial a prior of, trans-rectal ultrasound (US) on transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) developed as a model in the canine pelvic canal. Studies were taken longitudinally at prior to, 14 days after, and 35 days after the TVT injection. As the tumor grew, the nodules became increasingly hyperabsorptive and moderately hyperscattering on NIR. The regions of strong NIR contrast, especially on absorption images, correlated well with those of US hypoechoic masses indicative of tumors. Combining the information of trans-rectal NIR and US detected the tumor more accurately than did the US alone at 14 days postinjection.

  12. Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Replacement in a Carcinoid Heart

    PubMed Central

    Loyalka, Pranav; Schechter, Michael; Nascimbene, Angelo; Raman, Ajay Sundara; Ilieascu, Cezar A.; Gregoric, Igor D.

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid heart disease presents as right-sided heart failure attributable to the dysfunction of the tricuspid and pulmonary valves. Although surgical valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment when patients become symptomatic, it is associated with substantial perioperative mortality rates. We present a case of severe pulmonary valve stenosis secondary to carcinoid heart disease, treated successfully with percutaneous valve replacement. A 67-year-old man with severe pulmonary valve stenosis was referred to our center for pulmonary valve replacement. The patient had a history of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor of the small bowel with carcinoid syndrome, carcinoid heart disease, and tricuspid valve regurgitation previously treated with surgical valve replacement. Because of the patient's severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hostile chest anatomy seen on a computed tomographic scan dating from previous cardiothoracic surgery, we considered off-label percutaneous valve replacement a viable alternative to open-heart surgery. A 29-mm Edwards Sapien XT valve was successfully deployed over the native pulmonary valve. There were no adverse sequelae after the procedure, and the patient was discharged from the hospital the next day. This case report shows that percutaneous valve replacement can be a valid option in carcinoid heart disease patients who are not amenable to surgical valve replacement. PMID:27547148

  13. Endoscopic Resection for Small Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumors: Comparison of Endoscopic Submucosal Resection with Band Ligation and Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection.

    PubMed

    Bang, Byoung Wook; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Hyung Kil; Shin, Yong Woon; Kwon, Kye Sook; Kim, Joon Mee

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. There is no consensus so far regarding the optimal endoscopic method for treatment of small rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET). The aim of this study was to compare treatment efficacy, safety, and procedure time between endoscopic submucosal resection with band ligation (ESMR-L) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Methods. We conducted a prospective study of patients who visited Inha University Hospital for endoscopic resection of rectal NET (≦10 mm). Pathological complete resection rate, procedure time, and complications were evaluated. Results. A total of 77 patients were treated by ESMR-L (n = 53) or ESD (n = 24). En bloc resection was achieved in all patients. A significantly higher pathological complete resection rate was observed in the ESMR-L group (53/53, 100%) than in the ESD group (13/24, 54.2%) (P = 0.000). The procedure time of ESD (17.9 ± 9.1 min) was significantly longer compared to that of ESMR-L (5.3 ± 2.8 min) (P = 0.000). Conclusions. Considering the clinical efficacy, technical difficulty, and procedure time, the ESMR-L method should be considered as the first-line therapy for the small rectal NET (≤10 mm). ESD should be left as a second-line treatment for the fibrotic lesion which could not be removed using the ESMR-L method. PMID:27525004

  14. Endoscopic Resection for Small Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumors: Comparison of Endoscopic Submucosal Resection with Band Ligation and Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Seok; Shin, Yong Woon; Kwon, Kye Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. There is no consensus so far regarding the optimal endoscopic method for treatment of small rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET). The aim of this study was to compare treatment efficacy, safety, and procedure time between endoscopic submucosal resection with band ligation (ESMR-L) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Methods. We conducted a prospective study of patients who visited Inha University Hospital for endoscopic resection of rectal NET (≦10 mm). Pathological complete resection rate, procedure time, and complications were evaluated. Results. A total of 77 patients were treated by ESMR-L (n = 53) or ESD (n = 24). En bloc resection was achieved in all patients. A significantly higher pathological complete resection rate was observed in the ESMR-L group (53/53, 100%) than in the ESD group (13/24, 54.2%) (P = 0.000). The procedure time of ESD (17.9 ± 9.1 min) was significantly longer compared to that of ESMR-L (5.3 ± 2.8 min) (P = 0.000). Conclusions. Considering the clinical efficacy, technical difficulty, and procedure time, the ESMR-L method should be considered as the first-line therapy for the small rectal NET (≤10 mm). ESD should be left as a second-line treatment for the fibrotic lesion which could not be removed using the ESMR-L method. PMID:27525004

  15. Thymic carcinoids in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Teh, B T; Zedenius, J; Kytölä, S; Skogseid, B; Trotter, J; Choplin, H; Twigg, S; Farnebo, F; Giraud, S; Cameron, D; Robinson, B; Calender, A; Larsson, C; Salmela, P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical, pathologic, and genetic features of thymic carcinoids in the setting of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and to study means for detection and prevention of this tumor in patients with MEN1. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Thymic carcinoid is a rare malignancy, with approximately 150 cases reported to date. It may be associated with MEN1 and carries a poor prognosis, with no effective treatment. Its underlying etiology is unknown. METHODS: Ten patients with MEN1 from eight families with anterior mediastinal tumors were included in a case series study at tertiary referring hospitals. Clinicopathologic studies were done on these patients, with a review of the literature. Mutation analysis was performed on the MEN1 gene in families with clusterings of the tumor to look for genotype-phenotype correlation. Loss of heterozygosity was studied in seven cases to look for genetic abnormalities. RESULTS: Histologic studies of all tumors were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid. Clustering of this tumor was found in some of the families-three pairs of brothers and three families with first- or second-degree relatives who had thymic carcinoid. All patients described here were men, with a mean age at detection of 44 years (range 31 to 66). Most of the patients had chest pain or were asymptomatic; none had Cushing's or carcinoid syndrome. All tumors were detected by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest. The results of octreoscans performed in three patients were all positive. Histopathologic studies were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid and did not stain for ACTH. Mutation analysis of the families with clustering revealed mutations in different exons/introns of the MEN1 gene. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies of seven tumors did not show LOH in the MEN1 region, but two tumors showed LOH in the 1p region. CONCLUSIONS: MEN1-related thymic carcinoids constitute approximately 25

  16. Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer

  17. FAIM2, as a novel diagnostic maker and a potential therapeutic target for small-cell lung cancer and atypical carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hio Chung; Kim, Jong In; Chang, Hee Kyung; Woodard, Gavitt; Choi, Young Sik; Ku, Ja-Lok; Jablons, David M.; Kim, Il-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Lung neuroendocrine (NE) tumors are a heterogeneous group of tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells that includes typical carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and large cell NE cancer. The subtyping of NE tumors is based on the number of mitoses per high powered field and the presences of necrosis. However, the best diagnostic criteria to differentiate various subtypes of lung NE tumors remains controversial and few diagnostic markers distinguish typical and atypical carcinoid. In this study, we show that FAIM2, an inhibitory molecule in the Fas-apoptosis pathway, is significantly overexpressed in SCLC compared to non-small cell lung cancer. In addition, FAIM2 expression is significantly higher in atypical carcinoid than typical carcinoid. As atypical carcinoid has been shown to have worse clinical outcomes than typical carcinoid, our data suggests that FAIM2 may be a useful diagnostic marker for atypical carcinoid. Knockdown of FAIM2 expression increases Fas-induced apoptotic cell death in SCLC cells. Etoposide treatment combined with FAIM2 inhibition also shows modest but significant reduction of viable SCLC cells. Taken together, our results suggest that FAIM2 is a potential NE tumor marker with higher expression in atypical carcinoid and SCLC, and could be a new therapeutic target for SCLC. PMID:27677402

  18. Composite Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated B-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder and Tubular Adenoma in a Rectal Polyp.

    PubMed

    Lo, Amy A; Gao, Juehua; Rao, M Sambasivia; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-01

    Composite tumors are formed when there is intermingling between two components of separate tumors seen histologically. Cases demonstrating composite tubular adenoma with other types of tumors in the colon are rare. Composite tubular adenomas with nonlymphoid tumors including carcinoids, microcarcinoids, and small cell undifferentiated carcinoma have been reported in the literature. The occurrence of composite lymphoma and tubular adenoma within the colorectal tract is extremely rare. Only three cases have been reported and include one case of mantle cell lymphoma and two cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arising in composite tubular adenomas. We present the first case of composite Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and tubular adenoma in a rectal polyp with a benign endoscopic appearance.

  19. Genotypic characteristics of resistant tumors to pre-operative ionizing radiation in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramzan, Zeeshan; Nassri, Ammar B; Huerta, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Due to a wide range of clinical response in patients undergoing neo-adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer it is essential to understand molecular factors that lead to the broad response observed in patients receiving the same form of treatment. Despite extensive research in this field, the exact mechanisms still remain elusive. Data raging from DNA-repair to specific molecules leading to cell survival as well as resistance to apoptosis have been investigated. Individually, or in combination, there is no single pathway that has become clinically applicable to date. In the following review, we describe the current status of various pathways that might lead to resistance to the therapeutic applications of ionizing radiation in rectal cancer. PMID:25024812

  20. Feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for lower rectal tumors with hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shinwa; Toyonaga, Takashi; Morita, Yoshinori; Hoshi, Namiko; Ishida, Tsukasa; Ohara, Yoshiko; Yoshizaki, Tetsuya; Kawara, Fumiaki; Umegaki, Eiji; Azuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids. METHODS: The outcome of ESD for 23 lesions with hemorrhoids (hemorrhoid group) was compared with that of 48 lesions without hemorrhoids extending to the dentate line (non-hemorrhoid group) during the same study period. RESULTS: Median operation times (ranges) in the hemorrhoid and non-hemorrhoid groups were 121 (51-390) and 130 (28-540) min. The en bloc resection rate and the curative resection rate in the hemorrhoid group were 96% and 83%, and they were 100% and 90% in the non-hemorrhoid group, respectively. In terms of adverse events, perforation and postoperative bleeding did not occur in both groups. In terms of the clinical course of hemorrhoids after ESD, the rate of complete recovery of hemorrhoids after ESD in lesions with resection of more than 90% was significantly higher than that in lesions with resection of less than 90%. CONCLUSION: ESD on lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids could be performed safely, similarly to that on rectal lesions extending to the dentate line without hemorrhoids. In addition, all hemorrhoids after ESD improved to various degrees, depending on the resection range. PMID:27468216

  1. Gastric carcinoids and therapeutic options. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dobru, Daniela; Boeriu, Alina; Mocan, Simona; Pascarenco, Ofelia; Boeriu, Cristian; Molnar, Calin

    2013-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids) are tumors originating from neuroendocrine cells. The distinction between different types of gastric carcinoids is important for their management. We present the case of a 38-year old woman with type 1 gastric neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) associated with autoimmune atrophic gastritis. The management of these tumors has not been yet codified and different therapeutic strategies have been suggested. A proper evaluation before therapy is indicated in order to rule out both the malignant transformation as well as the presence of synchronous lesions, such as dysplasia or gastric adenocarcinoma. We describe our diagnostic and therapeutic strategies with references to previously published reports. PMID:23539397

  2. MRI Predictive Factors for Tumor Response in Rectal Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy - Implications for Induction Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Stanley K.T.; Tait, Diana

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics at baseline and following chemoradiation therapy (CRT) most strongly associated with histopathologic response were investigated and survival outcomes evaluated in accordance with imaging and pathological response. Methods and Materials: Responders were defined as mrT3c/d-4 downstaged to ypT0-2 on pathology or low at risk mrT2 downstaged to ypT1 or T0. Multivariate logistic regression of baseline and posttreatment MRI: T, N, extramural venous invasion (EMVI), circumferential resection margin, craniocaudal length <5 cm, and MRI tumor height ≤5 cm were used to identify independent predictor(s) for response. An association between induction chemotherapy and EMVI status was analyzed. Survival outcomes for pathologic and MRI responders and nonresponders were analyzed. Results: Two hundred eighty-one patients were eligible; 114 (41%) patients were pathology responders. Baseline MRI negative EMVI (odds ratio 2.94, P=.007), tumor height ≤5 cm (OR 1.96, P=.02), and mrEMVI status change (positive to negative) following CRT (OR 3.09, P<.001) were the only predictors for response. There was a strong association detected between induction chemotherapy and ymrEMVI status change after CRT (OR 9.0, P<.003). ymrT0-2 gave a positive predictive value of 80% and OR of 9.1 for ypT0-2. ymrN stage accuracy of ypN stage was 75%. Three-year disease-free survival for pathology and MRI responders were similar at 80% and 79% and significantly better than poor responders. Conclusions: Tumor height and mrEMVI status are more important than baseline size and stage of the tumor as predictors of response to CRT. Both MRI- and pathologic-defined responders have significantly improved survival. “Good response” to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer with ypT0-2 carries significantly better 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival. Use of induction chemotherapy for improving mrEMVI status and knowledge of MRI

  3. Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Metastases From Atypical Laryngeal Carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kui-Rong; Jia, Yuan-Jing; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Wang, Qin-Ying; Bao, Yang-Yang; Feng, Zhi-Ying; Yao, Hong-Tian; Fan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoids is approximately 20%. However, the pathogenesis and natural history of, and prognostic factors for, the condition remain poorly understood. We reported a 54-year-old female presented with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Laryngoscopy revealed a 0.5 × 1.5-cm reddish mass on the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis. Under general anesthesia, a biopsy sample was obtained via suspension laryngoscopy. Routine pathology revealed atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Immunohistochemical staining of the sections of primary tumor was positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, P53, and CD56. GLUT-1, p-Akt, and PI3K were negative. The Ki-67 index was 15%. Supraglottic laryngectomy and selective right-neck dissection were performed. After 6 months, the patient complained of pain in the right wall of the chest; multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules were evident at that site and in the abdomen. An abdominal nodule was biopsied and pathology revealed that the atypical metastatic carcinoid had metastasized to both cutaneous and subcutaneous areas of the abdomen. Chemotherapy was then prescribed. Currently, the intrathecal drug delivery system remains in place. No local recurrence has been detected. Furthermore, we systematically reviewed clinical manifestations of the disease, pathogenesis, prognostic factors, and treatment. The metastasis rate (cutaneous and subcutaneous) was approximately 12.2%. Thirty patients (62.5%) with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases exhibited contemporaneous lymph node invasion. The 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 44.0%, 22.0%, and 13.0%, respectively. The prognosis of patients with atypical laryngeal carcinoids was poor. Relevant prognostic factors included the level of p53, human papilloma virus status, certain hypoxic markers, and distant metastasis. No

  4. Expression Profiling of Rectal Tumors Defines Response to Neoadjuvant Treatment Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muiño, Raquel; Comino, Ana; Bueno, Pablo; Ferrón, J. Antonio; Cuadros, Marta

    2014-01-01

    To date, no effective method exists that predicts the response to preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Nevertheless, identification of patients who have a higher likelihood of responding to preoperative CRT could be crucial in decreasing treatment morbidity and avoiding expensive and time-consuming treatments. The aim of this study was to identify signatures or molecular markers related to response to pre-operative CRT in LARC. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of 26 pre-treatment biopsies of LARC (10 responders and 16 non-responders) without metastasis using Human WG CodeLink microarray platform. Two hundred and fifty seven genes were differentially over-expressed in the responder patient subgroup. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed a significant ratio of differentially expressed genes related to cancer, cellular growth and proliferation pathways, and c-Myc network. We demonstrated that high Gng4, c-Myc, Pola1, and Rrm1 mRNA expression levels was a significant prognostic factor for response to treatment in LARC patients (p<0.05). Using this gene set, we were able to establish a new model for predicting the response to CRT in rectal cancer with a sensitivity of 60% and 100% specificity. Our results reflect the value of gene expression profiling to gain insight about the molecular pathways involved in the response to treatment of LARC patients. These findings could be clinically relevant and support the use of mRNA levels when aiming to identify patients who respond to CRT therapy. PMID:25380052

  5. Two cases of endobronchial carcinoid masked by superimposed aspergillosis: a review of the literature of primary lung cancers associated with Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, John Robert; Restrepo, Carlos S; Jagirdar, Jaishree

    2013-02-01

    We describe 2 cases of endobronchial pulmonary carcinoid tumor with superimposed Aspergillus colonization. The Aspergillus hyphae were associated with fibrin, ulcer debris, and granulomatous inflammation in part masking the carcinoid tumor. Presence of necrotic debris made diagnosis on biopsy difficult, and atypical carcinoid could not be ruled out. The association of carcinoid tumor with aspergillosis is rare and has been reported in 4 other cases thus far. A review of the literature reveals at least 35 cases of lung carcinoma with coexisting Aspergillus upon presentation. Most of these carcinomas are either cavitary squamous cell or adenocarcinomas harboring an aspergilloma. The other carcinomas are associated with bronchial obstruction as in carcinoids or are a minor component of a preexisting cavity raising the possibility of "scar carcinoma." As in aspergillomas not associated with carcinoma, upper lobe involvement predominates. Diagnosis can be challenging with delayed discovery of underlying neoplasm leading to suboptimal treatment. PMID:22079170

  6. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  7. Different optical spectral characteristics in a necrotic transmissible venereal tumor and a cystic lesion in the same canine prostate observed by triple-band trans-rectal optical tomography under trans-rectal ultrasound guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhen; Holyoak, G. Reed; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Rock, Kendra; Ownby, Charlotte L.; Slobodov, Gennady; Bunting, Charles F.; Piao, Daqing

    2011-03-01

    Different optical spectral characteristics were observed in a necrotic transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) and a cystic lesion in the same canine prostate by triple-wavelength trans-rectal optical tomography under trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance. The NIR imager acquiring at 705nm, 785nm and 808nm was used to quantify both the total hemoglobin concentration (HbT) and oxygen saturation (StO2) in the prostate. The TVT tumor in the canine prostate as a model of prostate cancer was induced in a 7-year old, 27 kg dog. A 2 mL suspension of 2.5x106 cells/mL of homogenized TVT cells recovered from an in vivo subcutaneously propagated TVT tumor in an NOD/SCID mouse were injected in the cranial aspect of the right lobe of the canine prostate. The left lobe of the prostate had a cystic lesion present before TVT inoculation. After the TVT homogenate injection, the prostate was monitored weekly over a 9-week period, using trans-rectal NIR and TRUS in grey-scale and Doppler. A TVT mass within the right lobe developed a necrotic center during the later stages of this study, as the mass presented with substantially increased [HbT] in the periphery, with an area of reduced StO2 less than the area of the mass itself shown on ultrasonography. Conversely, the cystic lesion presented with slightly increased [HbT] in the periphery of the lesion shown on ultrasound with oxygen-reduction inside and in the periphery of the lesion. There was no detectable change of blood flow on Doppler US in the periphery of the cystic lesion. The slightly increased [HbT] in the periphery of the cystic lesion was correlated with intra-lesional hemorrhage upon histopathologic examination.

  8. Current concepts in diagnosis and perioperative management of carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Javier G; Silvay, George; Solís, Jorge

    2013-09-01

    Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine tumors with a very unpredictable clinical behavior. In the setting of hepatic metastases, the tumor's release of bioactive substances into the systemic circulation results in carcinoid syndrome: a constellation of symptoms among which cutaneous flushing, gastrointestinal hypermotility, and cardiac involvement are the most prominent. Cardiac manifestations, also known as carcinoid heart disease, are secondary to a severe fibrotic reaction which frequently involves the right-sided valves and may extend towards the subvalvular apparatus leading to valve thickening and retraction. Left-sided involvement is rare and mostly observed in the presence of an interatrial shunt, endobronchial tumor localization, and high tumor activity. Echocardiographic techniques often reveal noncoaptation of the valves, which are fixed in a semiopen position. In patients with advanced lesions and severe valvular dysfunction, surgery is currently the only definitive treatment to potentially improve quality of life and provide survival benefit. Although cardiac surgery has been traditionally reserved for those patients with symptomatic right ventricular failure, a significant trend towards improved surgical outcomes has triggered a more liberal referral for valve replacement. Carcinoid heart disease poses two distinct challenges for the anesthesiologist: carcinoid crisis and low cardiac output syndrome secondary to right ventricular failure. Carcinoid crisis, characterized by flushing, hypotension, and bronchospasm, may be precipitated by catecholamines and histamine releasing drugs used routinely in patients undergoing valve surgery. Although a broader utilization of octreotide have significantly simplified the anesthetic and perioperative management of these patients, a very balanced anesthetic technique is required to identify and manage low cardiac output syndrome.

  9. Goblet cells carcinoid with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the vermiform appendix: a step towards the unitary intestinal stem cell theory?

    PubMed

    Gravante, G; Yahia, S; Gopalakrishnan, K; Mathew, G

    2014-06-01

    Associations of various histotypes in appendiceal neoplasms may help elucidate the histogenesis of such uncommon tumors. We present the fourth published case of Goblet Cell Carcinoid (GCC) associated with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the appendix. This association has been described only for GCC and not for classic appendix carcinoids which are thought to originate from neuroendocrine-committed cells. The GCC-mucinous association adds more towards the theory of a pluripotent intestinal stem cell with amphicrine possibilities of differentiation.

  10. Morphine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  11. Radiation-Induced Thymidine Phosphorylase Upregulation in Rectal Cancer Is Mediated by Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 From Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Li Ge; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jong-Seok; Yun, Eun-Jin; Park, Jong-Il; Park, Hae-Duck; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Lim, Kyu Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The mechanisms of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) regulation induced by radiation therapy (XRT) in various tumors are poorly understood. We investigated the effect and mechanisms of preoperative XRT on TP expression in rectal cancer tissues. Methods and Materials: TP expression and CD68 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels in rectal cancer tissues and cancer cell lines were evaluated before and after XRT in Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunoassay, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction studies. Isolated peripheral blood monocytes were used in the study of chemotaxis under the influence of MCP-1 released by irradiated colon cancer cells. Results: Expression of TP was significantly elevated by 9 Gy of XRT in most rectal cancer tissues but not by higher doses of XRT. In keeping with the close correlation of the increase in both TP expression and the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), anti-TP immunoreactivity was found in the CD68-positive TAMs and not the neoplastic cells. Expression of MCP-1 was increased in most cases after XRT, and this increase was strongly correlated with TP expression. However, this increase in MCP-1 expression occurred in tumor cells and not stromal cells. The XRT upregulated MCP-1 mRNA and also triggered the release of MCP-1 protein from cultured colon cancer cells. The supernatant of irradiated colon cancer cells showed strong chemotactic activity for monocyte migration, but this activity was completely abolished by neutralizing antibody. Conclusions: Use of XRT induces MCP-1 expression in cancer cells, which causes circulating monocytes to be recruited into TAMs, which then upregulate TP expression in rectal cancer tissues.

  12. A region growing method for tumor volume segmentation on PET images for rectal and anal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Day, Ellen; Betler, James; Parda, David; Reitz, Bodo; Kirichenko, Alexander; Mohammadi, Seyed; Miften, Moyed

    2009-10-01

    The application of automated segmentation methods for tumor delineation on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) images presents an opportunity to reduce the interobserver variability in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. In this work, three segmentation methods were evaluated and compared for rectal and anal cancer patients: (i) Percentage of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV% max), (ii) fixed SUV cutoff of 2.5 (SUV2.5), and (iii) mathematical technique based on a confidence connected region growing (CCRG) method. A phantom study was performed to determine the SUV% max threshold value and found to be 43%, SUV43% max. The CCRG method is an iterative scheme that relies on the use of statistics from a specified region in the tumor. The scheme is initialized by a subregion of pixels surrounding the maximum intensity pixel. The mean and standard deviation of this region are measured and the pixels connected to the region are included or not based on the criterion that they are greater than a value derived from the mean and standard deviation. The mean and standard deviation of this new region are then measured and the process repeats. FDG-PET-CT imaging studies for 18 patients who received RT were used to evaluate the segmentation methods. A PET avid (PETavid) region was manually segmented for each patient and the volume was then used to compare the calculated volumes along with the absolute mean difference and range for all methods. For the SUV43% max method, the volumes were always smaller than the PETavid volume by a mean of 56% and a range of 21%-79%. The volumes from the SUV2.5 method were either smaller or larger than the PETavid volume by a mean of 37% and a range of 2%-130%. The CCRG approach provided the best results with a mean difference of 9% and a range of 1%-27%. Results show that the CCRG technique can be used in the segmentation of tumor volumes on FDG-PET images, thus providing treatment planners with a clinically

  13. Incidentally discovered goblet cell carcinoid clinically presenting as acute intestinal obstruction: a case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Nishat; Shamim, Nida; Sofi, Lateef Ahmed; Rizvi, Syed Amjad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) is a rare variant of carcinoid tumor that exclusively involves the appendix. It usually occurs in 5th-6th decade with the most common clinical presentation being acute appendicitis. The natural history of this tumor is intermediate between carcinoids and adenocarcinomas. We here report a case of GCC diagnosed incidentally in a patient presenting with acute intestinal obstruction. Ultrasonographic examination supported the clinical diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction, following which the patient underwent laparotomy and resection of ileum along with appendix was done. On gross pathological examination, a nodular growth was present on the tip and body of appendix that was yellow in color with a semi-solid to mucoid consistency on cut section. On microscopy, lakes of mucin with few acinar structures floating in them were seen. The submucosa as well as serosa were infiltrated by clusters of goblet cells and well-formed acini, with little atypia. Glands and nests were positive for periodic acid Schiff and immunohistochemistry showed focal chromogranin positivity in glandular structures, thereby confirming the diagnosis of GCC. Although the prognosis of GCC is better than adenocarcinomas, it is one of the carcinoids having a poorer outcome when compared with other variants of carcinoid tumor. Therefore, it is important to rule out other differential diagnoses of goblet cell carcinoid, the most important being mucinous adenocarcinomas. PMID:24739849

  14. Toward automatic segmentation and quantification of tumor and stroma in whole-slide images of H and E stained rectal carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geessink, Oscar G. F.; Baidoshvili, Alexi; Freling, Gerard; Klaase, Joost M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2015-03-01

    Visual estimation of tumor and stroma proportions in microscopy images yields a strong, Tumor-(lymph)Node- Metastasis (TNM) classification-independent predictor for patient survival in colorectal cancer. Therefore, it is also a potent (contra)indicator for adjuvant chemotherapy. However, quantification of tumor and stroma through visual estimation is highly subject to intra- and inter-observer variability. The aim of this study is to develop and clinically validate a method for objective quantification of tumor and stroma in standard hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained microscopy slides of rectal carcinomas. A tissue segmentation algorithm, based on supervised machine learning and pixel classification, was developed, trained and validated using histological slides that were prepared from surgically excised rectal carcinomas in patients who had not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Whole-slide scanning was performed at 20× magnification. A total of 40 images (4 million pixels each) were extracted from 20 whole-slide images at sites showing various relative proportions of tumor and stroma. Experienced pathologists provided detailed annotations for every extracted image. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated using cross-validation by testing on 1 image at a time while using the other 39 images for training. The total classification error of the algorithm was 9.4% (SD = 3.2%). Compared to visual estimation by pathologists, the algorithm was 7.3 times (P = 0.033) more accurate in quantifying tissues, also showing 60% less variability. Automatic tissue quantification was shown to be both reliable and practicable. We ultimately intend to facilitate refined prognostic stratification of (colo)rectal cancer patients and enable better personalized treatment.

  15. Tumor vascularity evaluated by transrectal color Doppler US in predicting therapy outcome for low-lying rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, Brunella . E-mail: a.leonemd@tiscalinet.it; Valentini, Vincenzo; Coco, Claudio; Mancini, Anna Paola; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Vecchio, Fabio Maria; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact on T downstaging of the vasculature supplying blood flow to rectal cancer evaluated by color Doppler ultrasound. Methods and Materials: Color Doppler images were graded in 29 T3-staged rectal carcinoma patients sonographically just before chemoradiation. Any arterial vessels detected in rectal masses were assigned one of two grades: vascularity was considered as grade 1 for vessels feeding the periphery and as grade 2 for vessels coursing in all rectal masses within its peripheral and central portions. The pulsatility indices (PI = peak systolic velocity - end-diastolic velocity/time-averaged maximum velocity) were calculated in the central and peripheral portions. Results: The pathologic observations showed a change in stage in 15 of the 23 patients graded 2, positive predictive value 65.2% (p = 0.047), and in one of the six rectal cancers graded 1 (negative predictive value, 83.3%). The minimal peripheral PI values in rectal cancer graded 2 were higher in nonresponding (2.2 {+-} 1.3) than in responding lesions (1.6 {+-} 0.7) p = 0.01. Conclusion: Vascularity graded 2 associated with low peripheral PI values are indicators of therapy outcome. Vascularity graded 1 and high peripheral PI values in graded 2 have negative predictive value.

  16. Cushing's like syndrome in typical bronchial carcinoid a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pedicelli, Ilaria; Patriciello, Giuseppina; Scala, Giovanni; Sorrentino, Antonietta; Gravino, Gennaro; Patriciello, Pasquale; Zeppa, Pio; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo; Vatrella, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome occurred in 1-5% of cases of bronchial carcinoids. In this paper we describe a case of typical bronchial carcinoid in a nonsmoker young male with clinical manifestations mimicking a Cushing's syndrome. The patient performed chest radiograph and computed tomography. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed the presence of an endobronchial mass occluding the bronchus intermedius. A rigid bronchoscopy was necessary for the conclusive diagnosis and for partial resection of the intraluminal tumor. Despite of the presence of Cushingoid features, the normal blood levels of ACTH and cortisol excluded the coexistence of a Cushing's syndrome. PMID:26923475

  17. Cushing's like syndrome in typical bronchial carcinoid a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pedicelli, Ilaria; Patriciello, Giuseppina; Scala, Giovanni; Sorrentino, Antonietta; Gravino, Gennaro; Patriciello, Pasquale; Zeppa, Pio; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo; Vatrella, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome occurred in 1-5% of cases of bronchial carcinoids. In this paper we describe a case of typical bronchial carcinoid in a nonsmoker young male with clinical manifestations mimicking a Cushing's syndrome. The patient performed chest radiograph and computed tomography. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed the presence of an endobronchial mass occluding the bronchus intermedius. A rigid bronchoscopy was necessary for the conclusive diagnosis and for partial resection of the intraluminal tumor. Despite of the presence of Cushingoid features, the normal blood levels of ACTH and cortisol excluded the coexistence of a Cushing's syndrome.

  18. Detection of somatostatin receptors in surgical and percutaneous needle biopsy samples of carcinoids and islet cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Reubi, J C; Kvols, L K; Waser, B; Nagorney, D M; Heitz, P U; Charboneau, J W; Reading, C C; Moertel, C

    1990-09-15

    Somatostatin (SS) receptor status was investigated in the tumor tissues from 62 patients with carcinoid tumors and 15 patients with islet cell carcinomas using receptor autoradiography techniques with two different iodinated somatostatin analogues as radioligands, a [Leu8, DTrp22, Tyr25]somatostatin-28 and a somatostatin octapeptide, Tyr3-octreotide. The carcinoid tumors were either primaries (n = 32) or metastases (n = 43), sampled as surgical specimens or as small needle liver biopsies. Fifty-four of 62 carcinoid patients had SS receptor-positive tumors (87%). All 15 islet cell carcinoma patients had positive tumors (4 primaries, 11 metastases), i.e., 3 vipomas, 3 insulinomas, 2 glucagonomas, 1 gastrinoma, 2 polyfunctional tumors, and 4 nonfunctioning tumors. Saturation and competition experiments on tissue sections revealed saturable, high affinity binding sites pharmacologically specific for bioactive SS analogues. In a majority of the tumors, the receptors were densely distributed and were always homogeneously found in the whole tumor. All except two tumors were labeled with both radioligands. Multiple liver metastases (n = 16) from three different patients were all shown to contain a comparable amount of receptors. SS receptors could be demonstrated even in very small tissue samples of liver metastases obtained by percutaneous liver biopsies (mean weight, 6.8 mg). The majority of the eight SS receptor-negative carcinoids were mainly bronchial carcinoids (n = 5), usually poorly differentiated. On the contrary, SS receptor-positive cases were never found to be anaplastic. All tumors except one from patients pretreated with octreotide (3 days to 3.8 years) were SS receptor positive. In the majority of carcinoids or islet cell carcinomas, the SS receptor status correlated with the in vivo biochemical response (hormone inhibition) to octreotide. These data demonstrate (a) the high prevalence of SS receptors in the primary tumors of both carcinoids and islet cell

  19. Repeated Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography and Perfusion-Computed Tomography Imaging in Rectal Cancer: Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake Corresponds With Tumor Perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Marco H.M.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze both the intratumoral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and perfusion within rectal tumors before and after hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Rectal cancer patients, referred for preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT), underwent FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) and perfusion-CT (pCT) imaging before the start of hypofractionated RT and at the day of the last RT fraction. The pCT-images were analyzed using the extended Kety model, quantifying tumor perfusion with the pharmacokinetic parameters K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, and v{sub p}. The mean and maximum FDG uptake based on the standardized uptake value (SUV) and transfer constant (K{sup trans}) within the tumor were correlated. Also, the tumor was subdivided into eight subregions and for each subregion the mean and maximum SUVs and K{sup trans} values were assessed and correlated. Furthermore, the mean FDG uptake in voxels presenting with the lowest 25% of perfusion was compared with the FDG uptake in the voxels with the 25% highest perfusion. Results: The mean and maximum K{sup trans} values were positively correlated with the corresponding SUVs ({rho} = 0.596, p = 0.001 and {rho} = 0.779, p < 0.001). Also, positive correlations were found for K{sup trans} values and SUVs within the subregions (mean, {rho} = 0.413, p < 0.001; and max, {rho} = 0.540, p < 0.001). The mean FDG uptake in the 25% highest-perfused tumor regions was significantly higher compared with the 25% lowest-perfused regions (10.6% {+-} 5.1%, p = 0.017). During hypofractionated radiotherapy, stable mean (p = 0.379) and maximum (p = 0.280) FDG uptake levels were found, whereas the mean (p = 0.040) and maximum (p = 0.003) K{sup trans} values were found to significantly increase. Conclusion: Highly perfused rectal tumors presented with higher FDG-uptake levels compared with relatively low perfused tumors. Also, intratumor regions with a high FDG

  20. [Perioperative Management of Emergency Operation for a Patient with Carcinoid Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yuri; Kawanoue, Naoya; Minami, Eriko; Ishikawa, Tomoki; Shin, Yoshiaki; Mieda, Hideyuki; Ishii, Mizue; Iwasaki, Etsu; Fukushima, Tomihiro; Tokioka, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    We report a case of carcinoid syndrome requiring an emergency operation for an upper gastrointestinal perforation. A 46-year-old man had undergone left lower lobectomy for a lung carcinoid tumor seven years previously, and liver metastasis was found five years previously. He developed cutaneous flushing and watery diarrhea, and was diagnosed with carcinoid syndrome one year previously. Although he was treated with octreotid, his symptoms became worse and he was admitted to our hospital. During the hospital stay, he underwent an emergency operation for an upper gastrointestinal perforation. Before the operation, hemodynamics were unstable. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane and propofol, and maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. Only vasopressin was used for the treatment of hypotension. Landiolol was used for perioperative tachyarrythmia. During anesthesia, there was no severe hypotension or hypertension. After the operation, he was managed with intubation in the ICU. Octreotid was administered again for the carcinoid syndrome. Vasopressin was necessary for the treatment of hypotension in the ICU. After improvement of hemodynamics, extubation was performed on the 3rd ICU day and he was discharged from the ICU on the 4th ICU day. In conclusion, we were able to perform good perioperative management of carcinoid syndrome accompanied by hemodynamic instability. PMID:26790329

  1. Carcinoid heart disease: Diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Luis, Sushil A; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Hedinger syndrome refers to carcinoid valvular heart disease. The disease is believed to be triggered by vasoactive substances that result in valvular fibrosis. It classically occurs in patients with metastatic carcinoid and preferentially involves the right sided cardiac valves. Affected valves become thickened and retracted, exhibiting regurgitation and sometimes, stenosis. Echocardiography is recommended in patients with carcinoid syndrome and a follow up study is advisable in those who develop a murmur or other symptoms or signs of valvular heart disease. For appropriately selected patients, valve replacement surgery appears to improve outcomes.

  2. Gastric carcinoids: Between underestimation and overtreatment

    PubMed Central

    Massironi, Sara; Sciola, Valentina; Spampatti, Matilde Pia; Peracchi, Maddalena; Conte, Dario

    2009-01-01

    Gastric carcinoids (GCs), which originate from gastric enterochromaffin-like (ECL) mucosal cells and account for 2.4% of all carcinoids, are found increasingly in the course of upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy. Current nosography includes those occurring in chronic conditions with hypergastrinemia, as the type 1 associated with chronic atrophic gastritis, and the type 2 associated with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, and type 3, which is unrelated to hypergastrinemia and is frequently malignant, with distant metastases. The optimal clinical approach to GCs remains to be elucidated, depending upon type, size and number of carcinoids. While there is agreement concerning the treatment of type 3 carcinoids, for types 1 and 2, current possibilities include simple surveillance, endoscopic polypectomy, surgical excision, associated or not with surgical antrectomy, or total gastrectomy. Moreover, the recent introduction of somatostatin analogues represents a therapeutic option of possibly outstanding relevance. PMID:19437556

  3. Delineation of Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) for Radiation Treatment Planning of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using Information From MRI or FDG-PET/CT: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Braendengen, Morten; Hansson, Karl; Radu, Calin; Siegbahn, Albert; Jacobsson, Hans; Glimelius, Bengt

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of target volumes is important to maximize radiation dose to the tumor and minimize it to nontumor tissue. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are standard imaging modalities in rectal cancer. The aim was to explore whether functional imaging with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), combined with CT (FDG-PET/CT) gives additional information to standard pretreatment evaluation and changes the shape and size of the gross tumor volume (GTV). Methods and Materials: From 2007 to 2009, 77 consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively screened for inclusion in the study at two university hospitals in Sweden, and 68 patients were eligible. Standard GTV was delineated using information from clinical examination, CT, and MRI (GTV-MRI). Thereafter, a GTV-PET was defined in the fused PET-CT, and the target volume delineations were compared for total volume, overlap, and mismatch. Pathologic uptake suspect of metastases was also registered. Results: The median volume of GTV-MRI was larger than that of GTV-PET: 111 cm{sup 3} vs. 87 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.001). In many cases, the GTV-MRI contained the GTV defined on the PET/CT images as subvolumes, but when a GTV total was calculated after the addition of GTV-PET to GTV-MRI, the volume increased, with median 11% (range, 0.5-72%). New lesions were seen in 15% of the patients for whom PET/CT was used. Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT facilitates and adds important information to the standard delineation procedure of locally advanced rectal cancer, mostly resulting in a smaller GTV, but a larger total GTV using the union of GTV-MRI and GTV-PET. New lesions were sometimes seen, potentially changing the treatment strategy.

  4. What Is a Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for energy and rids the body of solid waste. After food is chewed and swallowed, it enters the esophagus. ... The colon absorbs water and mineral nutrients from food and serves as a storage place for waste. The waste left after this process goes into ...

  5. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified. PMID:24403010

  6. Management of occult adrenocorticotropin-secreting bronchial carcinoids: limits of endocrine testing and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Loli, P; Vignati, F; Grossrubatscher, E; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Zurleni, F; Lomuscio, G; Rossetti, O; Ravini, M; Vanzulli, A; Bacchetta, C; Galli, C; Valente, D

    2003-03-01

    The differential diagnosis and the identification of the source of ACTH in occult ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to a bronchial carcinoid still represents a challenge for the endocrinologist. We report our experience in six patients with occult bronchial carcinoid in whom extensive hormonal, imaging, and scintigraphic evaluation was performed. All patients presented with hypercortisolism associated with high plasma ACTH values. The CRH test and high dose dexamethasone suppression test suggested an ectopic source of ACTH in three of six patients. During bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling, none of the patients showed a central to peripheral ACTH gradient. At the time of diagnosis, none of the patients had radiological evidence of the ectopic source of ACTH, whereas pentetreotide scintigraphy identified the lesion in two of four patients. Finally, a chest computed tomography scan revealed the presence of a bronchial lesion in all patients, and pentetreotide scintigraphy identified four of six lesions. In all patients a bronchial carcinoid was found and removed. In one patient with scintigraphic evidence of residual disease after two operations, radioguided surgery, using a hand-held gamma probe after iv administration of radiolabeled pentetreotide, was performed; this allowed detection and removal of residual multiple mediastinal lymph node metastases. In conclusion, our data show that there is not a single endocrine test or imaging procedure accurate enough to diagnose and localize occult ectopic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids. Radioguided surgery appears to be promising in the presence of multiple tumor foci and previous incomplete removal of the tumor. PMID:12629081

  7. Management of occult adrenocorticotropin-secreting bronchial carcinoids: limits of endocrine testing and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Loli, P; Vignati, F; Grossrubatscher, E; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Zurleni, F; Lomuscio, G; Rossetti, O; Ravini, M; Vanzulli, A; Bacchetta, C; Galli, C; Valente, D

    2003-03-01

    The differential diagnosis and the identification of the source of ACTH in occult ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to a bronchial carcinoid still represents a challenge for the endocrinologist. We report our experience in six patients with occult bronchial carcinoid in whom extensive hormonal, imaging, and scintigraphic evaluation was performed. All patients presented with hypercortisolism associated with high plasma ACTH values. The CRH test and high dose dexamethasone suppression test suggested an ectopic source of ACTH in three of six patients. During bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling, none of the patients showed a central to peripheral ACTH gradient. At the time of diagnosis, none of the patients had radiological evidence of the ectopic source of ACTH, whereas pentetreotide scintigraphy identified the lesion in two of four patients. Finally, a chest computed tomography scan revealed the presence of a bronchial lesion in all patients, and pentetreotide scintigraphy identified four of six lesions. In all patients a bronchial carcinoid was found and removed. In one patient with scintigraphic evidence of residual disease after two operations, radioguided surgery, using a hand-held gamma probe after iv administration of radiolabeled pentetreotide, was performed; this allowed detection and removal of residual multiple mediastinal lymph node metastases. In conclusion, our data show that there is not a single endocrine test or imaging procedure accurate enough to diagnose and localize occult ectopic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids. Radioguided surgery appears to be promising in the presence of multiple tumor foci and previous incomplete removal of the tumor.

  8. Rectal Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    The rectum is the lower part of your large intestine where your body stores stool. Problems with rectum are common. They include hemorrhoids, abscesses, incontinence and cancer. Many people are embarrassed to talk about rectal ...

  9. Mesalamine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal mesalamine is used to treat ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in the lining of the colon [large intestine] and rectum), proctitis (swelling in the rectum), and ...

  10. Atypical Bronchial Carcinoid Masquerading as Bronchial Asthma.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, V; Iqbal; Kumar, Vinod

    2015-11-01

    A case study of 35-year-old woman with persistent breathlessness and wheezing that had been unsuccessfully treated with inhaled beta 2-agonists and steroids for about two years. Patient developed dry cough and haemoptysis, so investigated further. Spirometry demonstrated a restrictive pattern. Chest CT demonstrated well defined hyperdense lesion in right middle lobe. Biopsy taken from the mass during bronchoscopy demonstrated the picture of atypical bronchial carcinoid. In this case, due to the lack of awareness, diagnosis of carcinoid was delayed by two years. PMID:27608788

  11. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) Followed by Laparoscopic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: Predictors of the Tumor Response and the Long-Term Oncologic Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jun-Gi; Cho, Hyun Min; Shim, Byoung Yong

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the predictors of a tumor response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and the long-term oncologic outcomes of preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery for patients who suffer from rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study involved 274 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and who had been treated with preoperative CRT and curative laparoscopic total mesorectal excision between January 2003 and January 2009. We assessed the long-term oncologic outcomes, in terms of recurrence and survival, of the treated patients. Results: Forty-two (15.3%) of the 274 patients had complete pathologic responses (pCR). The pre-CRT carcinoembryonic antigen level was the only significant predictor of a pCR on the multivariate analysis (p = 0.01). The overall survival at 5 years was 73.1%, with a mean survival period of 59.7 months (95% CI, 57.1-62.3). The disease-free survival at 5 years was 67.3% with a mean survival period of 54.7 months (95% CI, 51.7-57.8). The pCR group had a higher rate of overall survival at 5 years than did the non-pCR group, and the difference was significant (86.0% vs. 71.2%; hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.96; p = 0.03). The cumulative incidences of local and distant recurrences at 5 years were 5.8% and 28.3%, respectively. A total of 84.5% (234 of 274) of the patients had their anal sphincters preserved. Grade 3 or 4 acute and long-term toxic effects occurred in 22.2% and 8.4% of the patients, respectively. Conclusion: Preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery seems safe and feasible with favorable long-term outcomes and a high rate of sphincter preservation for the patients with low-lying tumors of the rectum.

  12. Usefulness of two independent histopathological classifications of tumor regression in patients with rectal cancer submitted to hyperfractionated pre-operative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liszka, Łukasz; Zielińska-Pająk, Ewa; Pająk, Jacek; Gołka, Dariusz; Starzewski, Jacek; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the usefulness of two independent histopathological classifications of rectal cancer regression following neo-adjuvant therapy. METHODS: Forty patients at the initial stage cT3NxM0 submitted to preoperative radiotherapy (42 Gy during 18 d) and then to radical surgical treatment. The relationship between “T-downstaging” versus regressive changes expressed by tumor regression grade (TRG 1-5) and Nasierowska-Guttmejer classification (NG 1-3) was studied as well as the relationship between TRG and NG versus local tumor stage ypT and lymph nodes status, ypN. RESULTS: Complete regression (ypT0, TRG 1) was found in one patient. “T-downstaging” was observed in 11 (27.5%) patients. There was a weak statistical significance of the relationship between “T-downstaging” and TRG staging and NG stage. Patients with ypT1 were diagnosed as TRG 2-3 while those with ypT3 as TRG5. No lymph node metastases were found in patients with TRG 1-2. None of the patients without lymph node metastases were diagnosed as TRG 5. Patients in the ypT1 stage were NG 1-2. No lymph node metastases were found in NG 1. There was a significant correlation between TRG and NG. CONCLUSION: Histopathological classifications may be useful in the monitoring of the effects of hyperfractionated preoperative radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer at the stage of cT3NxM0. There is no unequivocal relationship between “T-downstaging” and TRG and NG. There is some concordance in the assessment of lymph node status with ypT, TRG and NG. TRG and NG are of limited value for the risk assessment of the lymph node involvement. PMID:17278216

  13. Combination of carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide, and sulforaphane, reduces the viability and growth of bronchial carcinoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bronchial carcinoids are pulmonary neuroendocrine cell-derived tumors comprising typical (TC) and atypical (AC) malignant phenotypes. The 5-year survival rate in metastatic carcinoid, despite multiple current therapies, is 14-25%. Hence, we are testing novel therapies that can affect the proliferation and survival of bronchial carcinoids. Methods In vitro studies were used for the dose–response (AlamarBlue) effects of acetazolamide (AZ) and sulforaphane (SFN) on clonogenicity, serotonin-induced growth effect and serotonin content (LC-MS) on H-727 (TC) and H-720 (AC) bronchial carcinoid cell lines and their derived NOD/SCID mice subcutaneous xenografts. Tumor ultra structure was studied by electron microscopy. Invasive fraction of the tumors was determined by matrigel invasion assay. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to study the effect of treatment(s) on proliferation (Ki67, phospho histone-H3) and neuroendocrine phenotype (chromogranin-A, tryptophan hydroxylase). Results Both compounds significantly reduced cell viability and colony formation in a dose-dependent manner (0–80 μM, 48 hours and 7 days) in H-727 and H-720 cell lines. Treatment of H-727 and H-720 subcutaneous xenografts in NOD/SCID mice with the combination of AZ + SFN for two weeks demonstrated highly significant growth inhibition and reduction of 5-HT content and reduced the invasive capacity of H-727 tumor cells. In terms of the tumor ultra structure, a marked reduction in secretory vesicles correlated with the decrease in 5-HT content. Conclusions The combination of AZ and SFN was more effective than either single agent. Since the effective doses are well within clinical range and bioavailability, our results suggest a potential new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of bronchial carcinoids. PMID:23927827

  14. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy using irinotecan plus S-1 for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    DOI, HIROSHI; BEPPU, NAOHITO; KATO, TAKASHI; NODA, MASASHI; YANAGI, HIDENORI; TOMITA, NAOHIRO; KAMIKONYA, NORIHIKO; HIROTA, SHOZO

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical value of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a predictor of tumor response in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NA-CRT) for rectal cancer (RC) through measurement of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in each tumor. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy with a total dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions was performed in all 16 patients with RC, combined with irinotecan and S-1. MRI was performed before and after NA-CRT. Multiple factors were assessed to predict the pathological response to NA-CRT. The pathological response rate was determined in 9 patients (56.3%). Statistical analyses indicated that the ADC value prior to NA-CRT was significantly lower in patients with a better response to NA-CRT (P=0.023). A cut-off value of 0.750×10−3 mm2/sec obtained by a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated a sensitivity of 77.8% and specificity of 85.7% for pathological responders to NA-CRT. In addition, the patients with lower ADC values exhibited a greater pathological response to NA-CRT (P=0.041). In conclusion, the ADC value of MRI of RC patients treated with NA-CRT followed by surgery may provide valuable information to predict the response to NA-CRT. PMID:26623064

  15. A Rare Combination of Ovarian and Uterine Leiomyomas with Goblet Cell Carcinoid of the Appendix

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaikh, Abdulrahman F.; Darwish, Abdulla; Nagaraj, Veena; Alsada, Abeer

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of the rare combination of unilateral ovarian leiomyoma, uterine leiomyoma, and goblet cell carcinoid tumor of the appendix in a premenopausal woman who presented with right iliac pain. Immunohistochemistry study for desmin (muscle marker) and chromogranin and synaptophysin (neuroendocrine markers) confirmed immunophenotyping origin. Interestingly, both tumors showed positive reaction for estrogen receptor. To our knowledge, such a combination has not been reported previously in the literature. In this paper, the pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of both types of tumors are discussed. PMID:25685587

  16. Feasibility of an Adaptive Strategy in Preoperative Radiochemotherapy for Rectal Cancer With Image-Guided Tomotherapy: Boosting the Dose to the Shrinking Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Passoni, Paolo; Fiorino, Claudio; Slim, Najla; Ronzoni, Monica; Ricci, Vincenzo; Di Palo, Saverio; De Nardi, Paola; Orsenigo, Elena; Tamburini, Andrea; De Cobelli, Francesco; Losio, Claudio; Iacovelli, Nicola A.; Broggi, Sara; Staudacher, Carlo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of preoperative adaptive radiochemotherapy by delivering a concomitant boost to the residual tumor during the last 6 fractions of treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with T3/T4N0 or N+ rectal cancer were enrolled. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of oxaliplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} on days −14, 0, and +14, and 5-fluorouracil 200 mg/m{sup 2}/d from day −14 to the end of radiation therapy (day 0 is the start of radiation therapy). Radiation therapy consisted of 41.4 Gy in 18 fractions (2.3 Gy per fraction) with Tomotherapy to the tumor and regional lymph nodes (planning target volume, PTV) defined on simulation CT and MRI. After 9 fractions simulation CT and MRI were repeated for the planning of the adaptive phase: PTV{sub adapt} was generated by adding a 5-mm margin to the residual tumor. In the last 6 fractions a boost of 3.0 Gy per fraction (in total 45.6 Gy in 18 fractions) was delivered to PTV{sub adapt} while concomitantly delivering 2.3 Gy per fraction to PTV outside PTV{sub adapt}. Results: Three patients experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity; 2 of 3 showed toxicity before the adaptive phase. Full dose of radiation therapy, oxaliplatin, and 5-fluorouracil was delivered in 96%, 96%, and 88% of patients, respectively. Two patients with clinical complete response (cCR) refused surgery and were still cCR at 17 and 29 months. For the remaining 23 resected patients, 15 of 23 (65%) showed tumor regression grade 3 response, and 7 of 23 (30%) had pathologic complete response; 8 (35%) and 12 (52%) tumor regression grade 3 patients had ≤5% and 10% residual viable cells, respectively. Conclusions: An adaptive boost strategy is feasible, with an acceptable grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity rate and a very encouraging tumor response rate. The results suggest that there should still be room for further dose escalation of the residual tumor with the aim of increasing pathologic complete response and/or c

  17. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    PubMed

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  18. Everolimus and Vatalanib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. A case of bronchial carcinoid: diagnosis and follow-up with 111In-DTPA-octreotide.

    PubMed

    Orsolon, P; Bagni, B; Basadonna, P; Geatti, O; Talmassons, G; Guerra, U P

    1995-12-01

    Scintigraphy with radiolabelled analogue of somatostatin is highly sensitive in detecting carcinoid tumors especially if performed with Single Photon Computed Tomography (SPECT). In this report we describe our experience with 111In-DTPA-Octreotide in a female patient affected by a small asymptomatic intrabronchial carcinoid demonstrated by CT scan and bronchial endoscopy performed after recurrent left pneumonias. Planar views and SPECT images, using 111In-DTPA-Octreotide, were collected before and four hours after the first endoscopic laser resection. All groups of SPECT images were positive in the left parahilar region but at a different degree. Scans performed after resection showed a low degree of uptake which was considered to be probably secondary to local swelling; CT scan was negative. Follow up endoscopic biopsy repeated at six months, showed a relapse always in the same site; CT scan of the thorax was again negative. 111In-DTPA-Octreotide images obtained at twelve months were positive always in the left parahilar region, CT scan was negative but another biopsy was not possible. Therefore it was suspected a relapse of the carcinoid which was probably growing only through the bronchial wall without spreading towards the bronchial lumen and/or the lung parenchima. In this occasion, it was also thought that images collected four hours after resection could be positive not only for swelling but for a relapse as well. In every scintigraphic session, SPECT images presented higher quality than planar. This case suggests that 111In-DTPA-Octreotide SPECT is a non-invasive diagnostic technique which could be applied as a follow-up tool especially to patients with no-secreting carcinoid neoplasm and/or with negative or doubtful endoscopic and radiological investigations.

  20. Rectal cancer: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rödel, Claus; Hofheinz, Ralf; Fokas, Emmanouil

    2016-08-01

    The monolithic approach to apply the same schedule of preoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)- or capecitabine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) to all patients with clinically staged TNM stage II/III rectal cancer need to be questioned. Five randomized trials have been completed to determine if the addition of oxaliplatin to preoperative 5-FU/capecitabine-based CRT offers an advantage compared with single-agent CRT. In contrast to the German CAO/ARO/AIO-04 trial, results from the ACCORD 12, STAR-01, PETACC-6 and NSAPB R-04 trials failed to demonstrate a significant improvement of early or late efficacy endpoints with the addition of oxaliplatin. Most of the phase II trials incorporating cetuximab into CRT reported disappointingly low rates of pCR; the combination of CRT with VEGF inhibition showed encouraging pCR rates but at the cost of increased surgical complications. Novel clinical trials currently address (1) the role of induction and consolidation chemotherapy before or after CRT, (2) minimal or omitted surgery following complete response to CRT, or (3) the omission of radiotherapy for selected patients with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The notion of different multimodal treatment concepts according to tumor stage, location, mesorectal fascia margin status, molecular profiles, tumor response, and patients' preferences becomes increasingly popular and will render the multimodal treatment approach of rectal cancer more risk-adapted. PMID:27644910

  1. Pancreatic endocrine tumors: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R T

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET's) can be divided on a clinical and pathologic basis into ten classes [insulinomas, gastrinomas (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome), VIPomas (Verner-Morrison syndrome, WDHA, pancreatic cholera), glucagonomas, somatostatinomas, ACTH-releasing tumors (ACTHomas), growth hormone-releasing factor secreting tumors (GRFomas), nonfunctioning or pancreatic polypeptide secreting tumors (non-functioning PET), PET's causing carcinoid syndrome and PET's causing hypercalcemia)]. Recent reports suggest calcitonin-secreting PET's also rarely occur but whether they cause a distinct clinical syndrome is unclear. PET's resemble carcinoid tumors histologically; in their ability to synthesize and frequently secrete multiple peptides such as neuroendocrine cell markers (chromogranins); their biologic behavior and their tumor growth patterns. Both groups of tumors are highly vascular, have high densities of somatostatin receptors and similar tumor localization studies including somatostatin receptor scintigraphy are used for both. PET's, similar to carcinoids causing the carcinoid syndrome, require two separate treatment options be considered: treatment directed against the hormone-excess state and treatment directed against the tumor per se because of their malignant nature. In the last few years there have been advances in tumor diagnosis, localization methods, treatment approaches particularly related to the use of synthetic somatostatin analogues, and the definition of the role of surgical procedures in these diseases. Important other advances include insights into the long-term natural history of PET's particularly from studies of gastrinomas, which allow prognostic factors to be identified and the timing of treatment options to better planned, as well as insights into the molecular basis of these disorders. The latter includes both a description of the molecular basis of the genetic inherited syndromes associated with PET's or carcinoid tumors, as well as

  2. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  3. Tumor Volume Changes Assessed by Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Volumetry in Rectal Cancer Patients After Preoperative Chemoradiation: The Impact of the Volume Reduction Ratio on the Prediction of Pathologic Complete Response

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Young Wan; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Jin Soo; Min, Byung Soh; Kim, Hogeun; Lim, Joon Seok; Seong, Jinsil; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between tumor volume changes assessed by three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry and the histopathologic tumor response in rectal cancer patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 84 patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by radical surgery were prospectively enrolled in the study. The post-treatment tumor volume and tumor volume reduction ratio (% decrease ratio), as shown by 3D MR volumetry, were compared with the histopathologic response, as shown by T and N downstaging and the tumor regression grade (TRG). Results: There were no significant differences in the post-treatment tumor volume and the volume reduction ratio shown by 3D MR volumetry with respect to T and N downstaging and the tumor regression grade. In a multivariate analysis, the tumor volume reduction ratio was not significantly associated with T and N downstaging. The volume reduction ratio (>75%, p = 0.01) and the pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level (<=3 ng/ml, p = 0.01), but not the post-treatment volume shown by 3D MR (<= 5ml), were, however, significantly associated with an increased pathologic complete response rate. Conclusion: More than 75% of the tumor volume reduction ratios were significantly associated with a high pathologic complete response rate. Therefore, limited treatment options such as local excision or simple observation might be considered after preoperative CRT in this patient population.

  4. Massive hepatic resection for the carcinoid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zeegen, R.; Rothwell-Jackson, R.; Sandler, M.

    1969-01-01

    Removal of the right lobe of the liver which was occupied largely by metastases, together with resection of ileal primary tumours, brought about complete remission of symptoms and signs in a 43-year-old man with a six-year history of the carcinoid syndrome. Investigations should be orientated toward surgery. When practicable, radical surgery of the type described here appears to offer the best hope of alleviating the distressing clinical features of the condition. ImagesFIG. 1aFIG. 1bFIG. 2aFIG. 2bFIG. 3 PMID:5810970

  5. GTI-2040, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-26

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Single-incision laparoscopic rectopexy (Wells) with simultaneous sigmoidectomy in a case of complete rectal prolapse and a sigmoid tumor: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Miyo, Masaaki; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mokutani, Yukako; Uemura, Mamoru; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the technique of single-incision laparoscopic surgery for colorectal disease has rapidly disseminated in association with improvements in instrumentation and procedures, offering a less invasive procedure and excellent cosmetic results. We herein present the case of a 74-year-old female who suffered complete rectal prolapse with a pedunculated polyp (20 mm) in the sigmoid colon; the stalk of the polyp was too thick to perform endoscopic mucosal resection, which is associated with a high risk of bleeding. The patient was successfully managed using single-incision laparoscopic rectopexy (Wells) with simultaneous sigmoidectomy, a procedure that has not been reported in the literature to date. There were no perioperative complications. The patient's constipation caused by the rectal prolapse improved, and no recurrence was observed for 2 months after the operation. This case emphasizes that complete rectal prolapse is a benign disease occurring in elderly patients that is well suited to treatment with minimally invasive single-incision laparoscopic surgery.

  7. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Osmond, Allison; Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:27610135

  8. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended.

  9. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:27610135

  10. AACE/ACE DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF MIDGUT CARCINOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Katznelson, Laurence; Vinik, Aaron I.; Wong, Richard; Randolph, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a collection of complex tumors that arise from the diffuse endocrine system, primarily from the digestive tract. Carcinoid tumors most commonly originate from the small intestine. These tumors are either referred to as small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors or midgut carcinoids (MGCs). The purpose of this review article is to survey the diagnostic and therapeutic pathways for patients with MGC and provide an overview of the complex multidisciplinary care involved in improving their quality of life, treatment outcomes, and survival. Methods The current literature regarding the diagnosis and management of MGCs was reviewed. Results Dry flushing and secretory diarrhea are the hallmarks of the clinical syndrome of MGC. Managing MGC requires attention to the overall symptom complex, including the physical effects of the tumor and biomarker levels. The somatostatin analogs (SAs) octreotide and lanreotide are highly efficacious for symptomatic improvement. MGCs require resection to encompass the primary tumor and mesenteric lymph node metastases and should include cholecystectomy if the patient is likely to receive SA therapy. Debulking of liver metastasis by resection in combination with ablative therapies and other liver-directed modalities may help palliate symptoms and hormonal overproduction in carefully selected patients. Quality of life is an important measure of patients’ perception of the burden of their disease and impact of treatment modalities and may be a useful guide in deciding changes in therapy to alter apparent health status. Conclusion MGC is a challenging malignancy that requires the input of a multidisciplinary team to develop the best treatment plan. Consultation with expert centers that specialize in NETs may also be indicated for complex cases. With expert care, patients can be cured or live with the disease and enjoy good quality of life. PMID:25962092

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Benafif, Sarah; Eeles, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours arise in cells of the diffuse neuroendocrine system and can develop in a number of anatomical sites including the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. There has been a move away from the use of the term carcinoid tumour to the more appropriate use of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) to highlight the potential for invasion and metastasis associated with some NETs. Although most cases are sporadic, 15-20% of cases are related to a hereditary syndrome, the most common of these being multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1). Other hereditary syndromes include the following: von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), neurofibromatosis 1 and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), which are all associated with a germline mutation of the associated tumour suppressor gene and an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Familial small intestinal NET (SI NET) is a recently described condition which is also inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. There appears to be more than one causative gene; thus far, only the IPMK gene has been identified as a causative germline mutation. This was identified by carrying out whole-exome sequencing of germline and tumour DNA in a family with multiple members diagnosed with SI NET. Identification of NET predisposition genes in other families via these methods will allow the development of dedicated NET gene panels which can be used to screen NET patients and at-risk relatives for hereditary mutations. Close surveillance of at-risk individuals is important to detect NETs early when curative surgery can be offered and the morbidity and mortality of metastatic NETs can be avoided. PMID:27075353

  12. Tumors and Tumorlike Conditions of the Anal Canal and Perianal Region: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Surabhi, Venkateswar R; Menias, Christine O; Amer, Ahmed M; Elshikh, Mohamed; Katabathina, Venkata S; Hara, Amy K; Baughman, William C; Kielar, Ania; Elsayes, Khaled M; Siegel, Cary L

    2016-01-01

    Tumors and tumorlike conditions of the anus and perianal region originate from the anal canal and anal margin or result from direct extension of tumors from adjacent organs. The anatomy of the anal canal is complex, and its different histologic characteristics can lead to diverse pathologic conditions. The anal canal extends from the anorectal junction to the anal verge. The World Health Organization classification of anal canal tumors includes (a) anal intraepithelial neoplasia, the precursor of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and (b) invasive tumors. Invasive tumors are further classified on the basis of cell type as epithelial tumors (SCC, adenocarcinoma, mucinous adenocarcinoma, small cell carcinoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma), nonepithelial tumors, carcinoid tumors, melanoma, and secondary tumors (direct spread from rectal, cervical, or prostate carcinoma). The anal margin, or perianal skin, lies outside the anal verge and encompasses a radius of 5 cm from the anal verge. Tumors in the anal margin are classified according to the World Health Organization classification of skin tumors. Anal margin tumors include SCC, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, also known as Bowen disease, adenocarcinoma and its precursor Paget disease, basal cell carcinoma, and verrucous carcinoma (Buschke-Löwenstein tumor), which is a rare variant of SCC. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation, staging, and follow-up of patients with anal and perianal tumors. However, because of the overlap in imaging features among these diverse entities, a definitive diagnosis is best established at histopathologic examination. Nevertheless, familiarity with the pathogenesis, imaging features, and treatment of these tumors can aid radiologic diagnosis and guide appropriate patient treatment. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618320

  13. [Incidence of colonic and rectal tumors as a function of the urban and rural characteristics of the residential area in the Isère district (1979-1985), France].

    PubMed

    Exbrayat, C; Menegoz, F; Colonna, M; Lutz, J M

    1991-01-01

    From 1979 to 1985, 1443 new malignant tumors of the colon and 1017 of the rectum appear in the departement of Isère (France). Using the urban category of "Zone de Peuplement Industriel et Urbain" (Z.P.I.U), we were able to classify place of residence within 3 strata, according to the proportion of inhabitants of the rural (or urban) type. For both sexes, incidence of colon carcinomas is higher in urban categories than in rural ones. For males, incidence of rectal carcinomas is higher within areas of the rural type. Going from the urban category of the rural one, "urban" being the level of reference. Relative Risks for men are 1,0.9 and 0.6 for the colon, and 1, 1.3 and 1.2 for the rectum. For women, RR's are 1,0.8, and 0.7 for colon, and 1,1.0, and 0.8 for the rectum. Same results are described in the literature, with higher risks for colon cancers in urban areas. Our results reporting lower incidence for rectal carcinomas in Isère among men, are in contradiction with other results in the literature. This work supports the idea that epidemiology of large bowel carcinomas should focus onto segments. Second, when categories of residence allow it, it is worthwhile looking at gradients that bring more information on the relation, than the simple dichotomy: urban versus rural.

  14. Carcinoid Tumour of Caecum: an Unusual Palpable Mass in the Right Iliac Fossa.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Mohit M; Sude, Nandkishor S

    2016-04-01

    Carcinoid tumour represents 0.8-1.5 % of malignant digestive tumours. Gastrointestinal (GI) carcinoids account for 95 % of all the carcinoids, and caecal carcinoids account for 5 % of all the carcinoids. These tumours are frequent in women (2-4:1) as reported by Spallitta and Termine (Minerva Chir 55:77-87, 2002). In order of frequency, they may occur in the appendix (35 %), ileum (28 %), rectum (13 %) and bronchi. Incidence is less than 1 % in the pancreas, gall bladder, liver, larynx, testes and ovaries. The colon and ileocaecal region are rare sites of origin for gastrointestinal carcinoids as reported by Soga (J Exp Clin Cancer Res 17:139-48, 1998). They remain asymptomatic for years and many a times are diagnosed endoscopically, intraoperatively or during autopsy, based on their histopathological findings. We present a rare case of caecal carcinoid. PMID:27303130

  15. ACTH producing pulmonary carcinoid and pituitary macroadenoma: a fortuitous association?

    PubMed

    Wong, M; Isa, S H Md; Kamaruddin, N A; Khalid, B A K

    2007-06-01

    We report a case of a 45 year-old man who presented initially with a non-functioning pituitary macroadenoma. A routine chest radiography done preoperatively revealed a right lung nodule which was confirmed by computed tomography (CT) of the thorax. Transfrontal hypophysectomy was performed while a conservative approach was taken for the lung nodule. Four years later, he presented acutely with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) dependent Cushing's syndrome which resolved following a right lobectomy. Histological examination revealed an atypical carcinoid. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an ectopic ACTH secreting pulmonary carcinoid found in association with a non-functioning pituitary macroadenoma.

  16. Importance of surgical margins in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mukkai Krishnamurty, Devi; Wise, Paul E

    2016-03-01

    Distal resection margin (DRM) and circumferential resection margin (CRM) are two important considerations in rectal cancer management. Although guidelines recommend a 2 cm DRM, studies have shown that a shorter DRM is adequate, especially in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Standardization of total mesorectal excision has greatly improved quality of CRM. Although more patients are undergoing sphincter-saving procedures, abdominoperineal resection is indicated for very distal tumors, and pelvic exenteration is often necessary for tumors involving pelvic organs. PMID:27094456

  17. Genetics of neuroendocrine and carcinoid tumours.

    PubMed

    Leotlela, P D; Jauch, A; Holtgreve-Grez, H; Thakker, R V

    2003-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) originate in tissues that contain cells derived from the embryonic neural crest, neuroectoderm and endoderm. Thus, NETs occur at many sites in the body, although the majority occur within the gastro-entero-pancreatic axis and can be subdivided into those of foregut, midgut and hindgut origin. Amongst these, only those of midgut origin are generally argentaffin positive and secrete serotonin, and hence only these should be referred to as carcinoid tumours. NETs may occur as part of complex familial endocrine cancer syndromes, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), although the majority occur as non-familial (i.e. sporadic) isolated tumours. Molecular genetic studies have revealed that the development of NETs may involve different genes, each of which may be associated with several different abnormalities that include point mutations, gene deletions, DNA methylation, chromosomal losses and chromosomal gains. Indeed, the foregut, midgut and hindgut NETs develop via different molecular pathways. For example, foregut NETs have frequent deletions and mutations of the MEN1 gene, whereas midgut NETs have losses of chromosome 18, 11q and 16q and hindgut NETs express transforming growth factor-alpha and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, in lung NETs, a loss of chromosome 3p is the most frequent change and p53 mutations and chromosomal loss of 5q21 are associated with more aggressive tumours and poor survival. In addition, methylation frequencies of retinoic acid receptor-beta, E-cadherin and RAS-associated domain family genes increase with the severity of lung NETs. Thus the development and progression of NETs is associated with specific genetic abnormalities that indicate the likely involvement of different molecular pathways.

  18. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  19. A thymic carcinoid in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris).

    PubMed

    Powe, Joshua; Castleman, William; Fiorello, Christine

    2005-09-01

    An 18-yr-old Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) presented with acute onset hind limb paresis. Radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging revealed a caudal abdominal aortic thrombus and a cranial mediastinal mass. Necropsy confirmed aortic thrombosis. Necrotizing enteritis and multifocal renal thrombosis were also noted. The cranial mediastinum contained a bilobed mass that histologically and ultrastructurally was consistent with a carcinoid.

  20. A thymic carcinoid in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris).

    PubMed

    Powe, Joshua; Castleman, William; Fiorello, Christine

    2005-09-01

    An 18-yr-old Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) presented with acute onset hind limb paresis. Radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging revealed a caudal abdominal aortic thrombus and a cranial mediastinal mass. Necropsy confirmed aortic thrombosis. Necrotizing enteritis and multifocal renal thrombosis were also noted. The cranial mediastinum contained a bilobed mass that histologically and ultrastructurally was consistent with a carcinoid. PMID:17312779

  1. Tumor Delineation Based on Time-Activity Curve Differences Assessed With Dynamic Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Marco Aerts, Hugo; Ollers, Michel C.; Bosmans, Geert; Lee, John A.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Ruysscher, Dirk de; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Dekker, Andre L.A.J.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To develop an unsupervised tumor delineation method based on time-activity curve (TAC) shape differences between tumor tissue and healthy tissue and to compare the resulting contour with the two tumor contouring methods mostly used nowadays. Methods and Materials: Dynamic positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) acquisition was performed for 60 min starting directly after fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) injection. After acquisition and reconstruction, the data were filtered to attenuate noise. Correction for tissue motion during acquisition was applied. For tumor delineation, the TAC slope values were k-means clustered into two clusters. The resulting tumor contour (Contour I) was compared with a contour manually drawn by the radiation oncologist (Contour II) and a contour generated using a threshold of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV; Contour III). Results: The tumor volumes of Contours II and III were significantly larger than the tumor volumes of Contour I, with both Contours II and III containing many voxels showing flat TACs at low activities. However, in some cases, Contour II did not cover all voxels showing upward TACs. Conclusion: Both automated SUV contouring and manual tumor delineation possibly incorrectly assign healthy tissue, showing flat TACs, as being malignant. On the other hand, in some cases the manually drawn tumor contours do not cover all voxels showing steep upward TACs, suspected to be malignant. Further research should be conducted to validate the possible superiority of tumor delineation based on dynamic PET analysis.

  2. Atypical carcinoid and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung: a proteomic dataset from formalin-fixed archival samples.

    PubMed

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Abbondio, Marcello; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Eccher, Albino; Rindi, Guido; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Uzzau, Sergio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Here we present a dataset generated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples from two rare lung neuroendocrine tumor subtypes (namely, two atypical carcinoids, ACs, and two large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, LCNECs). Samples were subjected to a shotgun proteomics pipeline, comprising full-length protein extraction, SDS removal through spin columns, in solution trypsin digestion, long gradient liquid chromatography peptide separation and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1260 and 2436 proteins were identified in the AC and LCNEC samples, respectively, with FDR <1%. MS data are available in the PeptideAtlas repository at http://www.peptideatlas.org/PASS/PASS00375.

  3. Atypical carcinoid and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung: a proteomic dataset from formalin-fixed archival samples

    PubMed Central

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Abbondio, Marcello; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Eccher, Albino; Rindi, Guido; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Uzzau, Sergio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a dataset generated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples from two rare lung neuroendocrine tumor subtypes (namely, two atypical carcinoids, ACs, and two large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, LCNECs). Samples were subjected to a shotgun proteomics pipeline, comprising full-length protein extraction, SDS removal through spin columns, in solution trypsin digestion, long gradient liquid chromatography peptide separation and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1260 and 2436 proteins were identified in the AC and LCNEC samples, respectively, with FDR <1%. MS data are available in the PeptideAtlas repository at http://www.peptideatlas.org/PASS/PASS00375. PMID:27054153

  4. Atypical carcinoid and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung: a proteomic dataset from formalin-fixed archival samples.

    PubMed

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Abbondio, Marcello; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Eccher, Albino; Rindi, Guido; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Uzzau, Sergio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Here we present a dataset generated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples from two rare lung neuroendocrine tumor subtypes (namely, two atypical carcinoids, ACs, and two large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, LCNECs). Samples were subjected to a shotgun proteomics pipeline, comprising full-length protein extraction, SDS removal through spin columns, in solution trypsin digestion, long gradient liquid chromatography peptide separation and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1260 and 2436 proteins were identified in the AC and LCNEC samples, respectively, with FDR <1%. MS data are available in the PeptideAtlas repository at http://www.peptideatlas.org/PASS/PASS00375. PMID:27054153

  5. Prognosis of patients with carcinoid heart disease after valvular surgery.

    PubMed

    Manoly, Imthiaz; McAnelly, Sarah-Louise; Sriskandarajah, Sanjeevan; McLaughlin, Kenneth Edward

    2014-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. We addressed the following question: in patients who are diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease (CHD), do valvular surgeries improve their prognosis? Fifty percent of the patients with clinically diagnosed carcinoid syndrome had cardiac involvement which was present either as valvular dysfunction or as cardiac metastases. These patients often require surgery due to their heightened risk of cardiac disease. Altogether 217 relevant papers were identified as a result of the below-mentioned search, of which 10 papers represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Of the patients who were identified to have carcinoid heart disease in different studies, 193 patients had valve procedure, mainly replacements at tricuspid, mitral and aortic valve positions and either valvuloplasty or replacement at pulmonary valve. Tricuspid and pulmonary valves represented the majority of the excised valves among patients undergoing valvular surgery for CHD. The pathology of carcinoid valve was attributed to the presence of plaque, causing thickening and retraction. Pure regurgitation was the most common finding in all the valves except pulmonary valve which had both stenosis and insufficiency. Thirty-day mortality was 17% (range 1-63%) and long-term survivors were reported to be alive at an average of 58 months (28-80 months) after the valve surgery. The evidence demonstrates that surgical intervention can lead to improved prognosis and reduce the symptoms of heart failure. Postoperative mortality was mainly due to the carcinoid disease itself and not as a complication of the surgery. Therefore, surgery could be considered for symptomatic palliation in carefully selected individuals.

  6. Correlation in Rectal Cancer Between Clinical Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy and Sphincter or Organ Preservation: 10-Year Results of the Lyon R 96-02 Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ortholan, Cecile; Romestaing, Pascale; Chapet, Olivier; Gerard, Jean Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in rectal cancer, the benefit of a neoadjuvant radiation dose escalation with endocavitary contact radiotherapy (CXRT) in addition to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This article provides an update of the Lyon R96-02 Phase III trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with T2 to T3 carcinoma of the lower rectum were randomly assigned to neoadjuvant EBRT 39 Gy in 13 fractions (43 patients) vs. the same EBRT with CXRT boost, 85 Gy in three fractions (45 patients). Median follow-up was 132 months. Results: The 10-year cumulated rate of permanent colostomy (CRPC) was 63% in the EBRT group vs. 29% in the EBRT+CXRT group (p < 0.001). The 10-year rate of local recurrence was 15% vs. 10% (p = 0.69); 10-year disease-free survival was 54% vs. 53% (p = 0.99); and 10-year overall survival was 56% vs. 55% (p = 0.85). Data of clinical response (CR) were available for 78 patients (36 in the EBRT group and 42 in the EBRT+CXRT group): 12 patients were in complete CR (1 patient vs. 11 patients), 53 patients had a CR {>=}50% (24 patients vs. 29 patients), and 13 patients had a CR <50% (11 patients vs. 2 patients) (p < 0.001). Of the 65 patients with CR {>=}50%, 9 had an organ preservation procedure (meaning no rectal resection) taking advantage of major CR. The 10-year CRPC was 17% for patients with complete CR, 42% for patients with CR {>=}50%, and 77% for patients with CR <50% (p = 0.014). Conclusion: In cancer of the lower rectum, CXRT increases the complete CR, turning in a significantly higher rate of long-term permanent sphincter and organ preservation.

  7. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  8. Overexpression of PY1289-HER3 in sporadic pulmonary carcinoid from patients bearing MEN1 gene variants

    PubMed Central

    LATTANZIO, ROSSANO; VESCHI, SERENA; ACETO, GITANA MARIA; CURIA, MARIA CRISTINA; CAMA, ALESSANDRO; DE LELLIS, LAURA; FANTINI, FABIANA; ANGELUCCI, DOMENICO; IACOBELLI, STEFANO; PIANTELLI, MAURO; BATTISTA, PASQUALE

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptors (HERs) (HER1/HER2/HER3/HER4) and their phosphorylated forms (p-HER1/p-HER2/p-HER3/p-HER4) in pulmonary carcinoids (PCs). HER and p-HER protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays in 37 specimens of sporadic PCs, 29 typical carcinoids (TCs) and 8 atypical carcinoids (ACs). When compared with the ACs, the TCs did not exhibit any differences in terms of HER/p-HER expression. The tumors of this study have previously been characterized for the expression of menin and the mutational status of menin 1 (MEN1), a gene strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of PCs. In the present study, it was found that the cytoplasmic (‘disarrayed’), but not nuclear (‘arrayed’) expression of menin was positively correlated with HER3 (P=0.004), HER4 (P=0.015), p-HER1 (P=0.005), p-HER3 (P<0.001), and p-HER4 (P=0.001) expression. Moreover, HER3 and p-HER3 were found to be significantly more expressed in PCs with MEN1 variants, than in tumors with MEN1 wild-type (P=0.000 and P=0.025, respectively). These findings suggest the potential clinical use of HER inhibitors in the treatment of patients with PCs, particularly for individuals with p-HER3-positive PCs harboring MEN1 gene variants. PMID:27347164

  9. Rectal culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  10. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever or significant rectal bleeding. Laser or infrared coagulation and sclerotherapy (injection of medicine directly into the ... or if symptoms persist despite rubber band ligation, coagulation or sclerotherapy. What are anal fissures? Tears that ...

  11. Carcinoid heart disease from ovarian primary presenting with acute pericarditis and biventricular failure

    PubMed Central

    Vergani, D; Massironi, L; Lombardi, F; Fiorentini, C

    1998-01-01

    A case is described of a 54 year old woman who had acute pericarditis with large exudative effusion accompanied by severe right and left ventricular failure. The patient was finally diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian carcinoid teratoma. She was treated with octreotide—a somatostatin analogue—followed by radical surgical resection of the neoplasm. At one year follow up only mild carcinoid tricuspid regurgitation remained. Only 16 cases of carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian primary have been described in literature. Moreover clinically manifest acute, non-metastatic pericarditis and left heart failure are not considered as possible presentations of carcinoid heart disease, whatever the origin. In a recent series a small pericardial effusion was considered an infrequent and unexpected echocardiographic finding in carcinoid heart patients. One case of "carcinoid pericarditis" has previously been described as a consequence of pericardial metastasis. Left sided heart involvement is usually caused by bronchial carcinoids or patency of foramen ovale; both were excluded in the case presented.

 Keywords: carcinoid heart disease;  ovarian tumour;  acute pericarditis;  heart failure PMID:10065036

  12. Rectal Microbicide Development

    PubMed Central

    Dezzutti, Charlene

    2014-01-01

    The last few years have seen important progress in demonstrating the efficacy of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis, vaginal microbicides, and treatment as prevention as effective strategies for reducing the risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV infection. There has also been significant progress in the development of rectal microbicides. Preclinical non-human primate studies have demonstrated that antiretroviral microbicides can provide significant protection from rectal challenge with SIV or SHIV. Recent Phase 1 rectal microbicide studies have characterized the safety, acceptability, compartmental pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmaco-dynamics (PD) of both UC781 and tenofovir gels. The tenofovir gel formulation used in vaginal studies was not well tolerated in the rectum and newer rectal-specific formulations have been developed and evaluated in Phase 1 studies. The PK/PD data generated in these Phase 1 studies may reduce the risk of advancing ineffective candidate rectal microbicides into late stage development. Tenofovir gel is currently poised to move into Phase 2 evaluation and it is possible that a Phase 2B/3 effectiveness study with this product could be initiated in the next 2–3 years. PMID:23612991

  13. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Rectal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. Carcinoid tumour of appendix in a child: a rare case at an uncommon site.

    PubMed

    Vani, B R; Thejaswini, M U; Kumar, B Deepak; Murthy, V Srinivasa; Geethamala, K

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours of the appendix are uncommon incidentally detected tumours during histopathological examination following appendicectomy for acute appendicitis. Even though considered rare in children, they are the most frequently encountered tumours of the gastrointestinal tract. To our knowledge, carcinoid tumour of appendix in childhood has not yet been reported from Indian Subcontinent. The clinical presentation is similar to acute appendicitis and the signs and symptoms of carcinoid syndrome have not been reported in children. The prognosis of carcinoid tumour of appendix is excellent in children as the tumour is generally small in size and less aggressive with no metastasis. Simple appendicectomy is curative in most of the patients and long term follow up is debatable. We present here a case of carcinoid tumour of the body of appendix, which is an uncommon location in a 6-year-old child.

  15. High-dose-rate pre-operative endorectal brachytherapy for patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Devic, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    High-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (HDREBT) is an image guided brachytherapy treatment for patients with rectal cancer. It is based on tumor imaging with magnetic resonance in particular, which is used to choose eligible patients and improve tumor visualization. Treatment planning is performed using 3D CT simulation and treatment planning. The treatment is given on an outpatient basis and requires minimal local anesthesia. The validation of the technique was carried out through a preoperative study and is now explored as part of a radical treatment for early rectal cancer or as a boost modality. We describe technical aspects of the HDREBT and we discuss the ongoing institutional review board approved studies exploring the clinical applications of this treatment modality for patients with rectal cancer: 1) as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with operable rectal tumor; 2) as a option to improve local control in patients with newly diagnosed rectal cancer but with previous pelvic radiation. PMID:26034500

  16. Use of radioguided surgery with [111In]-pentetreotide in the management of an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grossrubatscher, E; Vignati, F; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Belloni, P A; Vanzulli, A; Bramerio, M; Marocchi, A; Rossetti, O; Zurleni, F; Loli, P

    2005-01-01

    Intraoperative [111In]-pentetreotide scintigraphy with a hand-held gamma detector probe has recently been proposed to increase the intraoperative detection rate of small neuroendocrine tumors and their metastases. We report a case of a 28-yr-old woman with ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid, in whom the use of radioguided surgery improved disease management. At presentation, radiolabeled pentetreotide scintigraphy was the only procedure able to detect the ectopic source of ACTH. After radiologic confirmation, the patient underwent removal of a bronchial carcinoid, with disease persistence. After surgery, pentetreotide scintigraphy showed pathologic uptake in the mediastinum not previously detected at surgery and only subsequently confirmed by radiologic studies. Despite a second thoracic exploration, hormonal, scintigraphic, and radiological evidence of residual disease persisted. Radioguided surgery was then performed using a hand-held gamma probe 48 h after iv administration of a tracer dose of radiolabeled [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]-pentetreotide, which permitted detection and removal of multiple residual mediastinal lymph node metastases. Clinical and radiologic cure, with no evidence of tracer uptake at pentetreotide scintigraphy, was subsequently observed. The use of an intraoperative gamma counter appears a promising procedure in the management of metastatic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids. PMID:15816375

  17. Use of radioguided surgery with [111In]-pentetreotide in the management of an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grossrubatscher, E; Vignati, F; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Belloni, P A; Vanzulli, A; Bramerio, M; Marocchi, A; Rossetti, O; Zurleni, F; Loli, P

    2005-01-01

    Intraoperative [111In]-pentetreotide scintigraphy with a hand-held gamma detector probe has recently been proposed to increase the intraoperative detection rate of small neuroendocrine tumors and their metastases. We report a case of a 28-yr-old woman with ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid, in whom the use of radioguided surgery improved disease management. At presentation, radiolabeled pentetreotide scintigraphy was the only procedure able to detect the ectopic source of ACTH. After radiologic confirmation, the patient underwent removal of a bronchial carcinoid, with disease persistence. After surgery, pentetreotide scintigraphy showed pathologic uptake in the mediastinum not previously detected at surgery and only subsequently confirmed by radiologic studies. Despite a second thoracic exploration, hormonal, scintigraphic, and radiological evidence of residual disease persisted. Radioguided surgery was then performed using a hand-held gamma probe 48 h after iv administration of a tracer dose of radiolabeled [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]-pentetreotide, which permitted detection and removal of multiple residual mediastinal lymph node metastases. Clinical and radiologic cure, with no evidence of tracer uptake at pentetreotide scintigraphy, was subsequently observed. The use of an intraoperative gamma counter appears a promising procedure in the management of metastatic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids.

  18. Metastatic Midgut Carcinoid in the Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Lois, Konstantinos B; Skinner, Jane; Petrides, George; James, Robert Andrew; Perros, Petros

    2015-09-01

    Metastasis of neuroendocrine tumor to the myocardium is rare. We present a case of 64-year-old woman, who presented initially with abdominal pain and large adnexal mass. The image-guided biopsy showed low-grade neuroendocrine tumor with Ki67 less than 2% within the ovarian tissue. CT staging revealed bilateral adnexal masses, liver metastases, and primary lesion in the terminal ileum. Octreoscan showed marked tracer uptake within the lower esophagus not related to obvious mass on CT scan; the echocardiography confirmed the presence of a 2.7 cm LV/LA mass. In this case, close correlation between ECHO and the octreoscan obviated need for myocardial biopsy. PMID:26164175

  19. Adenomatous tumors of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Stanley; Koss, Shira

    2015-04-01

    Adenomatous tumors are an uncommon cause of a middle ear mass. Clinical findings may be nonspecific, leading to difficulties in differentiation from other middle ear tumors. Controversy also exists whether to classify middle ear adenoma and carcinoid as separate neoplasms, or alternatively within a spectrum of the same pathologic entity. Most adenomatous middle ear tumors are indolent in behavior, with a benign histologic appearance and slowly progressive growth. The mainstay of treatment is complete surgical resection, which affords the greatest likelihood of cure.

  20. The Prognostic Value of Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement in Patients with Extraperitoneal Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Woo; Shin, Jin Yong; Oh, Sung Jin; Park, Jong Kwon; Yu, Hyeon; Ahn, Min Sung; Bae, Ki Beom; Hong, Kwan Hee; Ji, Yong Il

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic influence of circumferential resection margin (CRM) status in extraperitoneal rectal cancer probably differs from that of intraperitoneal rectal cancer because of its different anatomical and biological behaviors. However, previous reports have not provided the data focused on extraperitoneal rectal cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prognostic significance of the CRM status in patients with extraperitoneal rectal cancer. From January 2005 to December 2008, 248 patients were treated for extraperitoneal rectal cancer and enrolled in a prospectively collected database. Extraperitoneal rectal cancer was defined based on tumors located below the anterior peritoneal reflection, as determined intraoperatively by a surgeon. Cox model was used for multivariate analysis to examine risk factors of recurrence and mortality in the 248 patients, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of recurrence and mortality in 135 patients with T3 rectal cancer. CRM involvement for extraperitoneal rectal cancer was present in 29 (11.7%) of the 248 patients, and was the identified predictor of local recurrence, overall recurrence, and death by multivariate Cox analysis. In the 135 patients with T3 cancer, CRM involvement was found to be associated with higher probability of local recurrence and mortality. In extraperitoneal rectal cancer, CRM involvement is an independent risk factor of recurrence and survival. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that CRM involvement in extraperitoneal rectal cancer is considered an indicator for (neo)adjuvant therapy rather than conventional TN status.

  1. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  2. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances—serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications. PMID:27594907

  3. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances—serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications.

  4. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances-serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications. PMID:27594907

  5. Human biodistribution of [111In]diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-(DTPA)-D-[Phe1]-octreotide and peroperative detection of endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Ohrvall, U; Westlin, J E; Nilsson, S; Wilander, E; Juhlin, C; Rastad, J; Akerström, G

    1995-12-01

    Requisites for preoperative and intraoperative tumor localization with [111In]diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-D-[Phe1]-octreotide scanning were explored in 23 patients with endocrine tumors (15 carcinoids, 4 insulinomas, and single cases of gastrinoma, medullary thyroid carcinoma, aldosteronoma, and paraganglioma). The patients were subjected to Octreoscan single photon emission computed tomographic examination prior to surgery and well counter investigation of nuclide uptake in tumors and normal tissues sampled at surgery. Somatostatin receptor-positive tumors demonstrated efficient nuclide accumulation with mean tumor:blood radioactivity ratios of 180-370 (for carcinoids and insulinoma), compared with tissue:blood ratios of 302 for spleen, 42 for liver, and < 10-15 in other normal tissues (pancreas, small intestine, and mesenteric fat). Inefficient preoperative visualization of lesions was related to inconspicuous size, as for primary intestinal carcinoids, tiny liver metastases, and a single small insulinoma. High background activity, pronounced tumor fibrosis, and meager accumulation of tracer also interfered with visualization. Tumor deposits in organs with low background activity (such as carcinoid mesenteric metastases and endocrine pancreatic tumors) were generally most readily detected. Intraoperative investigations with hand-held gamma detector probes were disturbed by obvious high background activity. These investigations revealed two preoperatively unrecognized primary intestinal carcinoids, which, however, were both palpable during surgery. These studies, therefore, had little impact on the surgical strategy. PMID:7493348

  6. Microsatellite alteration at chromosome 3p loci in neuroendocrine and non-neuroendocrine lung tumors. Histogenetic and clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Hurr, K.; Kemp, B.; Silver, S. A.; el-Naggar, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    Although chromosome 3p regions are the most frequent site for genetic alterations in small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), the extent of such abnormality in carcinoid tumors remained to be investigated. Moreover, the histogenetic and biological implications of these findings in non-carcinoid lung tumors remain unclear. We studied eight microsatellite loci on chromosome 3p regions by multiplex polymerase chain reaction in paired normal and tumor DNA from 17 carcinoid tumors, 5 SCLCs, and 38 NSCLCs to determine the histogenetic and the clinical significance of their alterations in these neoplasms. Our results revealed a lack of microsatellite abnormalities at all loci tested in both typical and atypical carcinoid tumors. SCLCs and NSCLCs showed loss of heterozygosity in 100% (5/5) and 58.0% (22/38), respectively. Loss of heterozygosity at more than two loci correlated significantly with poor histological differentiation and were preponderantly found in high proliferative index and DNA aneuploid NSCLCs. Microsatellite instability was noted in only one (1.7%) of the lesions. Our study suggests that 1) the difference in chromosome 3p alterations between carcinoid tumors and SCLCs favors a stochastic rather than linear evolution of these tumors, 2) 3p alterations may constitute an initial event in the development of small cell carcinomas, and 3) loss of heterozygosity at 3p loci is associated with aggressive tumor characteristics in non-small-cell carcinomas. Images Figure 2 PMID:8701999

  7. Adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid (appendiceal-type crypt cell adenocarcinoma) is a morphologically distinct entity with highly aggressive behavior and frequent association with peritoneal/intra-abdominal dissemination: an analysis of 77 cases.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michelle D; Basturk, Olca; Shaib, Walid L; Xue, Yue; Balci, Serdar; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Akkas, Gizem; Memis, Bahar; Robinson, Brian S; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Staley, Charles A; Staley, Christopher A; Winer, Joshua H; Russell, Maria C; Knight, Jessica H; Goodman, Michael; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-10-01

    High-grade versions of appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids ('adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoids') are poorly characterized. We herein document 77 examples. Tumors occurred predominantly in females (74%), mean age 55 years (29-84), most with disseminated abdominal (77% peritoneal, 58% gynecologic tract involvement) and stage IV (65%) disease. Many presented to gynecologic oncologists, and nine had a working diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. Metastases to liver (n=3) and lung (n=1) were uncommon and none arose in adenomatous lesions. Tumors had various histologic patterns, in variable combinations, most of which were fairly specific, making them recognizable as appendiceal in origin, even at metastatic sites: I: Ordinary goblet cell carcinoid/crypt pattern (rounded, non-luminal acini with well-oriented goblet cells), in variable amounts in all cases. II: Poorly cohesive goblet cell pattern (diffusely infiltrative cords/single files of signet ring-like/goblet cells). III: Poorly cohesive non-mucinous cell (diffuse-infiltrative growth of non-mucinous cells). IV: Microglandular (rosette-like glandular) pattern without goblet cells. V: Mixed 'other' carcinoma foci (including ordinary intestinal/mucinous). VI: goblet cell carcinoid pattern with high-grade morphology (marked nuclear atypia). VII: Solid sheet-like pattern punctuated by goblet cells/microglandular units. Ordinary nested/trabecular ('carcinoid pattern') was very uncommon. In total, 33(52%) died of disease, with median overall survival 38 months and 5-year survival 32%. On multivariate analysis perineural invasion and younger age (<55) were independently associated with worse outcome while lymph-vascular invasion, stage, and nodal status trended toward, but failed to reach, statistical significance. Worse behavior in younger patients combined with female predilection and ovarian-affinity raise the possibility of hormone-assisted tumor progression. In conclusion, 'adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid' is

  8. The flexible implant in treatment of rectal carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Vider, M.; Lim, N.; Ditlow, R. Jr.; Au, F.; Gennaro, A.R.

    1982-07-01

    A modified technique for removable afterloading Iridium-192 implantation is described. Under local or general anesthesia, a series of flexible tygone tubes are introduced into all the tumor area in the rectum. This technique is especially suitable for palliation in high-risk, elderly patients. No rectal tube is necessary in this technique.

  9. Rectal angiolipoma: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kacar, Sabite; Kuran, Sedef; Temucin, Tulay; Odemis, Bulent; Karadeniz, Nilufer; Sasmaz, Nurgul

    2007-03-01

    Angiolipoma is a rare vascular variant of the benign lipomatous tumors and is generally seen in subcutaneous tissues. We report a 70-year-old female with abdominal distension not related to rectal small polypoid mass with peduncule described as angiolipoma by histologically, and review the literature.

  10. [Grading of neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W; Schnabel, P A; Komminoth, P

    2016-07-01

    The current WHO classification of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) differentiates between typical carcinoids (low grade NET), atypical carcinoids (intermediate grade NET) and small cell and large cell carcinomas (high grade NET) according to the prognosis. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas are graded in an identical way. Together with the TNM system this enables a preoperative estimation of the prognosis in biopsies and fine needle aspirates. Well-differentiated tumors are graded into G1 tumors by the number of mitoses, <2 per 10 high-power fields (HPF) and the Ki-67 (index <3 %) and G2 tumors (2-20 mitoses/10 HPF, Ki-67 3-20 %). Discrepancies between the number of mitoses and the Ki-67 index are not uncommon and in these cases the higher value of the two should be applied. The more differentiated tumors of the G3 type have to be differentiated from undifferentiated carcinomas of the small cell type and large cell type with a much poorer prognosis. Prognosis relevant grading of thyroid cancers is achieved by special subtyping so that the G1-G3 system is not applicable. The rare cancers of the parathyroid gland and of the pituitary gland are not graded. Adrenal tumors also have no grading system. The prognosis is dependent on the Ki-67 index and with some reservations on the established scoring systems. PMID:27379621

  11. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent; Gronbaek, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea restricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has not yet been evaluated in any group of patients. We aimed to test the performance of 3D-Transit in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and to compare the patients’ regional gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) and colonic motility patterns with those of healthy subjects. Methods Fifteen healthy volunteers and seven patients with neuroendocrine tumor and at least 3 bowel movements per day were investigated with 3D-Transit and standard radiopaque markers. Results Total GITT assessed with 3D-Transit and radiopaque markers were well correlated (Spearman’s rho = 0.64, P = 0.002). Median total GITT was 12.5 (range: 8.5–47.2) hours in patients versus 25.1 (range: 13.1–142.3) hours in healthy (P = 0.007). There was no difference in gastric emptying (P = 0.778). Median small intestinal transit time was 3.8 (range: 1.4–5.5) hours in patients versus 4.4 (range: 1.8–7.2) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.044). Median colorectal transit time was 5.2 (range: 2.9–40.1) hours in patients versus 18.1 (range: 5.0–134.0) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.012). Median frequency of pansegmental colonic movements was 0.45 (range: 0.03–1.02) per hour in patients and 0.07 (range: 0–0.61) per hour in healthy subjects (P = 0.045). Conclusions Three-dimensional Transit allows assessment of regional GITT in patients with diarrhea. Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have faster than normal gastrointestinal transit due to faster small intestinal and colorectal transit times. The latter is caused by an increased frequency of pansegmental colonic movements. PMID:26130638

  12. MicroRNA in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Azadeh; Gruber, Jens; Ghadimi, B Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer, one of the most common cancers worldwide, the proper staging of the disease determines the subsequent therapy. For those with locally advanced rectal cancer, a neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is recommended before any surgery. However, response to CRT ranges from complete response (responders) to complete resistance (non-responders). To date we are not able to separate in advance the first group from the second, due to the absence of a valid biomarker. Therefore all patients receive the same therapy regardless of whether they reap benefits. On the other hand almost all patients receive a surgical resection after the CRT, although a watch-and-wait procedure or an endoscopic resection might be sufficient for those who responded well to the CRT. Being highly conserved regulators of gene expression, microRNAs (miRNAs) seem to be promising candidates for biomarkers. Many studies have been analyzing the miRNAs expressed in rectal cancer tissue to determine a specific miRNA profile for the ailment. Unfortunately, there is only a small overlap of identified miRNAs between different studies, posing the question as to whether different methods or differences in tissue storage may contribute to that fact or if the results simply are not reproducible, due to unknown factors with undetected influences on miRNA expression. Other studies sought to find miRNAs which correlate to clinical parameters (tumor grade, nodal stage, metastasis, survival) and therapy response. Although several miRNAs seem to have an impact on the response to CRT or might predict nodal stage, there is still only little overlap between different studies. We here aimed to summarize the current literature on rectal cancer and miRNA expression with respect to the different relevant clinical parameters. PMID:27190581

  13. Octreotide and Lanreotide in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Pokuri, Venkata K; Fong, Mei Ka; Iyer, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are heterogeneous, rare malignancies that arise most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. They often secrete vasoactive substances resulting in carcinoid syndrome and the tumor cells exclusively express somatostatin receptors. Octreotide and lanreotide are the two synthetic somatostatin analogs used for the control of carcinoid symptoms and tumor progression in advanced inoperable disease. Recent pivotal trials (PROMID and CLARINET studies) established their antitumor activity. We discuss the available data to support their use as symptom controlling and antiproliferative agents. This article also reviews the guidelines (National Comprehensive Cancer Network and North American Neuro Endocrine Tumor Society), cost-analysis (suggesting the cost-effectiveness of lanreotide autogel compared to higher doses of octreotide long acting release formulation in refractory patients), and future directions of somatostatin analogs in the management of patients refractory to conventional doses of octreotide and lanreotide. PMID:26743514

  14. Primary bronchial tumors in childhood. A clinicopathologic study of six cases.

    PubMed

    Lack, E E; Harris, G B; Eraklis, A J; Vawter, G F

    1983-02-01

    A primary bronchial tumor was diagnosed in six children younger than age 12 years. These cases include four bronchial carcinoids, a low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and a granular cell tumor ("myoblastoma"). Lobar or segmental resection was performed in each case and remains the treatment of choice. The most common bronchial tumors in childhood are carcinoids with 17 other evaluable cases in the English Literature. This series includes the youngest child to be reported with bilateral choroidal metastases leading to blindness; in addition, there were clinical manifestations of gigantism and acromegaly possibly related to ectopic hormone production. Low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas rank second in frequency to carcinoids and have an excellent prognosis. Judging from the childhood bronchial tumors reported to date, proved examples of bronchogenic carcinoma are vanishingly rare. PMID:6295603

  15. Rectal bleeding induced by Dipyridamole.

    PubMed

    Bayer, I; Kyzer, S; Creter, D; Lewinski, U H

    1986-02-01

    Nineteen patients treated continuously with Dipyridamole were evaluated for rectal bleeding. Thirteen suffered from overt rectal bleeding and six served as controls. Hemorrhoids were found in all patients. Contact bleeding was found in 16. The bleeding continued despite rubber band ligation, and stopped only on withdrawal of the drug. PMID:3484697

  16. A New Laparoscopic Surgical Procedure to Achieve Sufficient Mesorectal Excision in Upper Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohigashi, Seiji; Taketa, Takashi; Sudo, Kazuki; Shiozaki, Hironori; Onodera, Hisashi

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Mesorectal excision corresponding to the location of a tumor, termed tumor-specific mesorectal excision (TSME), is commonly performed for resection of upper rectal cancer. We devised a new laparoscopic procedure for sufficient TSME with rectal transection followed by mesorectal excision. Operative Technique. After mobilization of the sigmoid colon and ligation of inferior mesenteric vessels, we dissected the mesorectum along the layer of the planned total mesorectal excision. The rectal wall was carefully separated from the mesorectum at the appropriate anal side from the tumor. After the rectum was isolated and transected using an endoscopic linear stapler, the rectal stump drew immediately toward the anal side, enabling the mesorectum to be identified clearly. In this way, sufficient TSME can be performed easily and accurately. This technique has been successfully conducted on 19 patients. Conclusion. This laparoscopic technique is a feasible and reliable procedure for achieving sufficient TSME. PMID:22312519

  17. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  18. Rectal cancer and Fournier’s gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects. PMID:26290629

  19. Expect the unexpected: Endometriosis mimicking a rectal carcinoma in a post-menopausal lady

    PubMed Central

    Jakhmola, C. K.; Kumar, Ameet; Sunita, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Altered bowels habits along with rectal mass in an elderly would point toward a rectal cancer. We report an unusual case of a post-menopausal lady who presented with these complaints. We had difficulties in establishing a pre-operative diagnosis. With a tentative diagnosis of a rectal cancer/gastrointestinal stromal tumor, she underwent a laparoscopic anterior resection. On histopathology, this turned out to be endometriosis. Bowel endometriosis is an uncommon occurrence. That it occurred in a post-menopausal lady was a very unusual finding. We discuss the case, its management, and the relevant literature. PMID:27073315

  20. Growth-hormone-releasing factor immunoreactivity in human endocrine tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, D. G.; Quan, R.; Hoffman, A. R.; Webber, R. J.; Chang, J. K.; Bensch, K. G.

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-three human tumors and adjacent nonneoplastic tissues were analyzed immunohistochemically for the presence of growth-hormone-releasing factor (GRF). Four of 9 pancreatic endocrine tumors, 2 of 3 appendiceal carcinoids, and 1 of 5 cecal carcinoids were immunoreactive for GRF. One of the GRF-containing pancreatic tumors was associated with acromegaly. Histologically, the growth patterns of these tumors were variable, and the distribution of immunoreactive cells was patchy and irregular. There were no normal cells that contained GRF. These results indicate that GRF production by human tumors is more common than previously thought, although clinical acromegaly may not be apparent in patients who harbor such neoplasms. Images Figure 1 PMID:6093542

  1. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental.

  2. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental. PMID:23584263

  3. Photodynamic therapy for bronchial carcinoid tumours: complete response over a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, Keyvan; Dixon, Kate; Gibbins, Sally

    2013-06-01

    A 63-year old woman diagnosed in September 2001 with a typical bronchial carcinoid of the left upper lobe bronchus extending into the left main stem bronchus is presented. The patient was unsuitable for standard surgical treatment, and the topography was not amenable for a parenchyma-saving bronchoplastic procedure. Two cycles of bronchoscopic photodynamic therapy (PDT) were undertaken at 6 monthly intervals. The patient has now been followed up regularly for over 10 years without signs of recurrence bronchoscopically or radiologically. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a carcinoid tumour treated solely by PDT. PMID:23284100

  4. [Anaplastic tumor of the bladder with neurosecretory granules and benign courses].

    PubMed

    Vera-Román, J M; Arrufat Boix, J M

    1989-06-01

    We report on a 59-year-old female patient with a bladder tumor that was initially classified as anaplastic (undifferentiated) tumor. Posteriorly, electron microscopic and immunohistochemical analyses of the specimen revealed a neuroendocrine tumor distinct from a paraganglioma. The origin and prognosis of bladder carcinoids and small cell undifferentiated carcinomas are discussed. The authors indicate that the level of bladder wall infiltration is the most important prognostic parameter in these type of tumors.

  5. Local staging of rectal cancer: the current role of MRI

    PubMed Central

    Rogalla, Patrik; Taupitz, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of powerful gradient coil systems and high-resolution surface coils, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently extended its role in the staging of rectal cancer. MRI is superior to endorectal ultrasound, the most widely used staging modality in patients with rectal tumors, in that it visualizes not only the intestinal wall but also the surrounding pelvic anatomy. The crucial advantage of MRI is not that it enables exact T-staging but precise evaluation of the topographic relationship of a tumor to the mesorectal fascia. This fascia is the most important anatomic landmark for the feasibility of total mesorectal excision, which has evolved into the standard operative procedure for the resection of cancer located in the middle or lower third of the rectum. MRI is currently the only imaging modality that is highly accurate in predicting whether or not it is likely that a tumor-free margin can be achieved and thus provides important information for planning of an effective therapeutic strategy, especially in patients with advanced rectal cancer. PMID:17008990

  6. Biochemical diagnosis of neuroendocrine GEP tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, K.

    1997-01-01

    Neuroendocrine gut and pancreatic tumors are known to contain and secret different peptide hormones and amines. During the last two decades, many radioimmunoassays and Elizas have been developed to analyze these substances in blood and urine, which has enabled clinicians to improve the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with various neuroendocrine tumors. Due to cost constraints in medical care, it is important to try to define the most useful biochemical markers from the clinical point of view. The glycoprotein chromogranin A has been shown to be a useful marker for diagnosing various neuroendocrine tumors, both by histopathology and circulating tumor markers. In patients with demonstrable endocrine tumors, about 90 percent of the patients present high circulating levels of chromogranin A. A hundred-fold increase of plasma chromogranin is seen in patients with midgut carcinoid tumors and liver metastases. The plasma levels of chromogranin A reflect the tumor mass and can be used for monitoring the patient during treatment and follow-up, although the day-to-day variation might be 30-40 percent. High circulating levels of the chromogranin A might be an indicator of bad prognosis in patients with malignant carcinoid tumors. Besides analyzing plasma chromogranin A, specific analyses such as urinary 5-HIAA in midgut carcinoid patients, serum gastrin in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and insulin/proinsulin in patients with hypoglycemia should be performed. In patients with small tumor masses or intermittent symptoms, provocative tests such as a meal stimulation test, secretin test or pentagastrin stimulation of tachykinin release can supplement the basal measurements of peptides and amines. To fully evaluate the growth potential in neuroendocrine tumors, traditional biochemical markers should be supplemented with indicators of growth proliferation (Ki-67, PCNA) and immunohistochemical staining for the adhesion molecule CD44 and the PDGF-alpha receptor

  7. Trebananib And Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-05

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVB Uterine Sarcoma

  8. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer This page ... and rectal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Colon Cancer Avastin (Bevacizumab) Bevacizumab Camptosar ( ...

  9. Evaluation of a rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xin-Mei; Tang, Guang-Yu; Cheng, Ying-Sheng; Zhou, Bi

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To establish a rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model for the study of rectal carcinoma. METHODS: A suspension of VX2 cells was injected into the rectum wall under the guidance of X-ray fluoroscopy. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to observe tumor growth and metastasis at different phases. Pathological changes and spontaneous survival time of the rabbits were recorded. RESULTS: Two weeks after VX2 cell implantation, the tumor diameter ranged 4.1-5.8 mm and the success implantation rate was 81.8%. CT scanning showed low-density foci of the tumor in the rectum wall, while enhanced CT scanning demonstrated asymmetrical intensification in tumor foci. MRI scanning showed a low signal of the tumor on T1-weighted imaging and a high signal of the tumor on T2-weighted imaging. Both types of signals were intensified with enhanced MRI. Metastases to the liver and lung could be observed 6 wk after VX2 cell implantation, and a large area of necrosis appeared in the primary tumor. The spontaneous survival time of rabbits with cachexia and multiple organ failure was about 7 wk after VX2 cell implantation. CONCLUSION: The rabbit rectal VX2 carcinoma model we established has a high stability, and can be used in the study of rectal carcinoma. PMID:19418587

  10. Possible photoactivated dermatitis with features of post-inflammatory pigmentary alteration (PIPA) and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Orme, Charisse M; Shvartsbeyn, Marianna; Meehan, Shane A; Kornreich, Craig; Ramachandran, Sarika; Soter, Nicholas A

    2015-12-16

    Cutaneous flushing and facial erythema are common dermatologic conditions that elicit a wide differential diagnosis that includes rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, photodermatitis, connective-tissue diseases, carcinoid syndrome, and mastocytosis. Herein we present an usual case of a mask-like rosacea-PIPA overlap that occurred in a patient with prior history of rectal carcinoid tumor and a negative systemic evaluation.

  11. Management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries.

    PubMed

    Bostick, P J; Johnson, D A; Heard, J F; Islas, J T; Sims, E H; Fleming, A W; Sterling-Scott, R P

    1993-06-01

    Twenty-eight consecutive extraperitoneal rectal injuries for a period of 34 months ending in May 1990 were reviewed retrospectively. All injuries were due to penetrating gunshot wounds. The rectal exam was positive in 75% of patients versus 80.8% with proctosigmoidoscopy. All 28 patients had diversion of the fecal stream. Diverting colostomies were performed in 17 patients, Hartmann's colostomies in 7 patients, and proximal loop colostomies in 4 patients. Presacral drainage was used in 25 patients (89.3%). Distal irrigation was performed in 13 patients (46.4%) and primary repair in 9 patients (32.1%). There was one infectious complication (3.6%) and no deaths (0%). Fecal diversion and presacral drainage are the mainstay of therapy for civilian rectal injuries. The importance of distal irrigation of the rectum has not been established. Primary repair of the rectum has no effect on morbidity and mortality.

  12. A rare cause of severe rectal bleeding: solitary rectal ulcer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urganc, Nafiye; Kalyoncu, Derya; Usta, Merve; Eken, Kamile Gulcin

    2014-10-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare benign disorder in children which often goes unrecognized or easily misdiagnosed with other common diseases. It usually presents with rectal bleeding, constipation, mucous discharge, prolonged straining, tenesmus, and lower abdominal pain. The rectal bleeding varies from a little fresh blood to severe hemorrhage that requires blood transfusion. We report herein a pediatric case of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome who admitted to pediatric emergency department with severe rectal bleeding for reminding this rare syndrome.

  13. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery as optimal option in treatment of rare rectal lesions: A single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Ortenzi, Monica; Ghiselli, Roberto; Cappelletti Trombettoni, Maria Michela; Cardinali, Luca; Guerrieri, Mario

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the outcomes of transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) in the treatment of rare rectal condition like mesenchymal tumors, condylomas, endometriosis and melanoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed a twenty-three years database. Fifty-two patients were enrolled in this study. The lesions were considered suitable for TEM if they were within 20 cm from the anus. All of them underwent an accurate preoperative workup consisting in clinical examination, total colonoscopy with biopsies, endoscopic ultrasonography, and pelvic computerized tomography or pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. Operative time, intraoperative complications, rate of conversion, tumor size, postoperative morbidity, mortality, the length of hospital stay, local and distant recurrence were analyzed. RESULTS Among the 1328 patients treated by TEM in our department, the 52 patients with rectal abnormalities other than adenoma or adenocarcinoma represented 4.4%. There were 30 males (57.7%) and 22 females (42.3%). Mean age was 55 years (median = 60, range = 24-78). This series included 14 (26.9%) gastrointestinal stromal tumors, 21 neuroendocrine tumors (40.4%), 1 ganglioneuroma (1.9%), 2 solitary ulcers in the rectum (3.8%), 6 cases of rectal endometriosis (11.5%), 6 cases of rectal condylomatosis (11.5%) and 2 rectal melanomas (3.8%). Mean lesion diameter was 2.7 cm (median: 4, range: 0.4-8). Mean distance from the anal verge was 9.5 cm (median: 10, range: 4-15). One patient operated for rectal melanoma developed distant metastases and died two years after the operation. We experienced 2 local recurrences (3.8%) with an overall survival equal to 97.6% (95%CI: 95%-99%) at the end of follow-up and a disease free survival of 98% (95%CI: 96%-99%). CONCLUSION We could conclude that TEM is an important therapeutical option for rectal rare conditions. PMID:27668073

  14. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery as optimal option in treatment of rare rectal lesions: A single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Ortenzi, Monica; Ghiselli, Roberto; Cappelletti Trombettoni, Maria Michela; Cardinali, Luca; Guerrieri, Mario

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the outcomes of transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) in the treatment of rare rectal condition like mesenchymal tumors, condylomas, endometriosis and melanoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed a twenty-three years database. Fifty-two patients were enrolled in this study. The lesions were considered suitable for TEM if they were within 20 cm from the anus. All of them underwent an accurate preoperative workup consisting in clinical examination, total colonoscopy with biopsies, endoscopic ultrasonography, and pelvic computerized tomography or pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. Operative time, intraoperative complications, rate of conversion, tumor size, postoperative morbidity, mortality, the length of hospital stay, local and distant recurrence were analyzed. RESULTS Among the 1328 patients treated by TEM in our department, the 52 patients with rectal abnormalities other than adenoma or adenocarcinoma represented 4.4%. There were 30 males (57.7%) and 22 females (42.3%). Mean age was 55 years (median = 60, range = 24-78). This series included 14 (26.9%) gastrointestinal stromal tumors, 21 neuroendocrine tumors (40.4%), 1 ganglioneuroma (1.9%), 2 solitary ulcers in the rectum (3.8%), 6 cases of rectal endometriosis (11.5%), 6 cases of rectal condylomatosis (11.5%) and 2 rectal melanomas (3.8%). Mean lesion diameter was 2.7 cm (median: 4, range: 0.4-8). Mean distance from the anal verge was 9.5 cm (median: 10, range: 4-15). One patient operated for rectal melanoma developed distant metastases and died two years after the operation. We experienced 2 local recurrences (3.8%) with an overall survival equal to 97.6% (95%CI: 95%-99%) at the end of follow-up and a disease free survival of 98% (95%CI: 96%-99%). CONCLUSION We could conclude that TEM is an important therapeutical option for rectal rare conditions.

  15. Pure bronchoplastic resections of the bronchus without pulmonary resection for endobronchial carcinoid tumours†

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Kai; Karenovics, Wolfram; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Jordan, Simon; Dusmet, Michael

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumours are relatively uncommon primary lung neoplasms. A small proportion of these lesions are predominantly endobronchial and do not extend beyond the bronchial wall. Endoscopic resection can be performed, but carries around a one in three risk of local recurrence and, therefore, mandates long-term surveillance. An alternative is complete surgical resection via bronchoplastic resection. We present our experience of surgical resection in patients with endobronchial carcinoids. METHODS From 2000 to 2010, 13 patients (age 45 ± 16 years, 10 males) underwent pure bronchoplastic resection, including systematic nodal dissection, for endobronchial carcinoid tumours, without the resection of lung parenchyma. RESULTS There was no significant operative morbidity or mortality. This is a retrospective review of a consecutive case series. The last follow-up for all patients was obtained in 2011. The mean maximum tumour size was 18 ± 8 mm. No lymph node invasion was observed. The median follow-up was 6.3 ± 3.3 years, with no regional recurrence. In 1 case, a tumourlet was identified at 5 years in the contralateral airway and viewed as a metachronous new lesion. CONCLUSIONS Bronchial sleeve resection is a safe procedure for suitably located endobronchial carcinoid tumours. Endoscopic resection should be reserved for patients who decline, or are unfit, for surgery. PMID:23628650

  16. Corticotropin-releasing hormone, proopiomelanocortin, and glucocorticoid receptor gene expression in adrenocorticotropin-producing tumors in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Suda, T; Tozawa, F; Dobashi, I; Horiba, N; Ohmori, N; Yamakado, M; Yamada, M; Demura, H

    1993-01-01

    To differentiate between ectopic ACTH syndrome and Cushing's disease, gene expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), and glucocorticoid receptor was examined in 10 pituitary adenomas (Cushing's disease) and in 10 ectopic ACTH-producing tumors. CRH increased plasma ACTH levels in all patients with Cushing's disease and in five patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome whose tumors contained CRH and CRH mRNA. In five CRH nonresponders, CRH was not detected in tumors that contained no CRH mRNA or that contained only long-size CRH mRNA. Dexamethasone (Dex) decreased plasma ACTH levels in all patients with Cushing's disease and in three patients with ectopic ACTH-producing bronchial carcinoid. These tumors contained glucocorticoid receptor mRNA. CRH increased and Dex decreased ACTH release and POMC mRNA levels in pituitary adenoma and bronchial carcinoid cells. PMA increased POMC mRNA levels only in carcinoid cells. These results reveal characteristics of ectopic ACTH-producing tumors: long-size CRH mRNA and PMA-induced POMC gene expression. In addition, there are two ectopic ACTH syndrome subtypes: tumors containing ACTH with CRH (CRH responder) and tumors without CRH. Dex decreases ACTH release and POMC mRNA levels in some bronchial carcinoids. Therefore, CRH and Dex tests have limited usefulness in differentiating between Cushing's disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome. Images PMID:8254033

  17. [Indications for radiotherapy of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Winkler, R; Franke, H D; Dörner, A

    1990-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy complete each other in local control of suffering from rectal carcinoma. A radiotherapeutic effect on tumor is secured often. The adjuvant radiotherapy is the most interesting indication, though the most controversial as present too. Analysing all data and with experiences of an own irradiation study we have not any doubt that the indication is qualified for a combined therapy, if the therapeutic aim with priority is to prevent a local relapse as the most frequent and complained of form of therapeutic failure. In this problem, radical irradiation forms, as pre- and accumulating irradiation (sandwich-technique) and after-irradiation, render superior to an exclusive pre irradiation. In result of this study we practise a preirradiation of 25 Gy with immediately following operation and an accumulating irradiation to 50 Gy in proved high-risk-stage (T greater than or equal to 3 NoMo,Tx N1-3 Mo). If there is a primary local incurability by tumor invasion into the neighbourhood a pre-irradiation is done with 50 Gy and following explorative laparatomy within 4-6 weeks. Nearly 60% of these tumors become operable after that. Likewise we practise in unirradiated patients with locoregional tumor recurrence. Also here the extirpation quota of patients with general or systemic incurability, that a stoma construction is required in, we carry out a transanal tumor reduction and irradiate with 50 Gy after that. Especially this therapeutic principle has proved its worth in patients that are past eighty. Here with acceptable living quality and avoiding a stoma construction a survival can be reached that corresponds to the statistical survival of this stage of life. PMID:2101452

  18. Sleeping position and rectal temperature.

    PubMed

    Petersen, S A; Anderson, E S; Lodemore, M; Rawson, D; Wailoo, M P

    1991-08-01

    The effects of sleeping position upon body temperature were assessed by continuous monitoring of rectal temperature in 137 babies sleeping at home under conditions chosen by their parents. There were three groups of subjects: (1) normal babies aged 12-22 weeks whose temperature rhythms were developed, (2) normal babies aged 6-12 weeks who were developing their night time temperature rhythms, and (3) babies the night after diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus immunisation, whose temperature rhythms were disturbed. Sleeping in the prone position was not associated with higher rectal temperatures at any time of night in young babies, nor did it exaggerate the disturbance of rectal temperature rhythm after immunisation. In older normal babies the prone position did not disturb rectal temperature in the first part of the night, though prone sleepers warmed a little faster prior to walking, especially in warm conditions. Prone sleepers were, however, born earlier in gestation and tended to be of lower birth weight. Normal babies can therefore thermoregulate effectively whatever their sleeping posture, even in warm conditions, though the prone position may make it slightly more difficult to lose heat. It is difficult to see how the prone position, even interacting with warm conditions, could induce lethal hyperthermia in otherwise normal babies. Perhaps the prone position is associated with other risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome.

  19. Predominance of CIN versus MSI in the development of rectal cancer at young age

    PubMed Central

    Fernebro, Eva; Halvarsson, Britta; Baldetorp, Bo; Nilbert, Mef

    2002-01-01

    Background Development of proximal and distal colorectal cancers involve partly different mechanisms associated with the microsatellite instability (MSI) and the chromosomal instability (CIN) pathways. Colorectal cancers in patients under 50 years of age represent about 5% of the total number of tumors and have been associated with an increased frequency of MSI tumors. However, MSI and CIN may play different roles in the development of colon cancer and rectal cancer, and we have specifically investigated their contribution to the development of rectal cancer at young age. Methods Thirty rectal cancers diagnosed before the age of 50 were characterized for DNA-ploidy, MSI, mutations of KRAS and CTNNB1 and immunohistochemical expression of p53, β-catenin and of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins MLH1 and MSH2. Results DNA aneuploidy was detected in 21/30 tumors, KRAS mutations in 6 tumors, no mutations of CTNNB1 were detected but immunohistochemical staining for β-catenin showed nuclear staining in 6 tumors, and immunohistochemical expression of p53 was detected in 18 tumors. MSI was detected in 3/30 tumors, all of which showed and immunohistochemical loss of staining for the MMR protein MSH2, which strongly indicates a phenotype associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Conclusions MSI occurs only in a small fraction of the tumors from young patients with rectal cancer, but when present it strongly indicates an underlying HNPCC-causing mutation, and other mechanisms than HNPCC thus cause rectal cancer in the majority of young patients. PMID:12379157

  20. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN SPHINCTER PRESERVATION FOR ELDERLY RECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of rectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods Using SEER-Medicare linked data, we identified 4,959 stage I–III rectal cancer patients over age 65 diagnosed from 2000–2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. Results The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly rectal cancer patients. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which, combined, explained 31% of procedure variation. Conclusions Receipt of local excision is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. PMID:24750983

  1. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  2. Expression of the p73 protein in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Daniella; Gao Jingfang; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate p73 expression in normal mucosa, primary tumor, and metastasis in relation to radiotherapy (RT) response and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: p73 was immunohistochemically examined on biopsies (unirradiated, n = 102), distant (from the large bowel, n = 82), and adjacent (adjacent to primary tumor, n = 89) normal mucosa samples, primary tumors (n = 131), and lymph node metastasis (n = 32) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Seventy-four patients received surgery alone and 57 received additional RT. Results: Cytoplasmic p73 was increased in the primary tumor compared with the distant or adjacent mucosa (p {<=} 0.0001). Nuclear (p = 0.02) and cytoplasmic (p = 0.003) p73 was higher in irradiated distant mucosa samples than in unirradiated ones, and nuclear p73 tended to be increased in irradiated primary tumors compared with unirradiated ones (p = 0.06). p73 was positively related to cyclooxygenase-2 expression in irradiated tumors (p = 0.03). p73-negative tumors tended to have a lower local recurrence after RT compared with unirradiated cases (p 0.06). Conclusions: Normal epithelial cells seem more sensitive to RT than tumor cells regarding p73 expression. Patients with p73-negative rectal tumors may have a lower risk of local recurrence after RT.

  3. [Novel techniques in the treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Rautio, Tero; Kairaluoma, Matti; Sand, Juhani

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the eighth and tenth most common kind of cancer in men and women, respectively, with an increasing frequency of occurrence. Together with cancer of the large intestine it forms the third most common cancer entity. Surgical therapy is the most important form of treatment of rectal cancer; in combination with adjuvant therapy it will cure a significant proportion of the patients and provide relief for tumor-induced hemorrhagic and obstructive symptoms. The operation has usually been conducted as an open surgery with the use of simple instruments. In recent times, the operative techniques have become more versatile, and mini-invasive techniques have resulted in quicker recovery of the patients from the operation. PMID:27483632

  4. [A case of multiple tumors].

    PubMed

    Chikazawa, H; Shibata, J; Murata, H; Yoshida, K; Fujiyama, S; Satoh, T; Kako, H; Takano, S; Misumi, A; Akagi, M

    1990-05-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to our clinic for a further examination of rectal and liver tumors, after which a rectal cancer, a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a hemangioma of the liver a retroperitoneal cyst, and a submucosal tumor of the stomach (SMT) were diagnosed by means of a colonoscopy, a gastroscopy, and US, CT, and angiography, these tests also revealing elevated CEA and AFP levels. A hepatic subsegmentectomy and a Miles's operation, as well as an enucleation of other liver tumors and an SMT, were performed and a retroperitoneal cyst was removed. The histopathological finding of the rectal cancer was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, while the liver tumors were determined as being an HCC of the trabecular type, adenomatas revealing hyperplasia, a hemangioma, and the SMT showing a benign leiomyoblastoma.

  5. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, T.A.; Skibber, J.M.; Ajani, J.A.

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3, N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further. 22 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Triple Negative Breast Cancer (Currently Accruing Only Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients Since 6/8/2007)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  7. [The acute bleeding rectal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hansen, H

    1985-06-14

    An acute bleeding rectal ulcer was the solitary condition in four patients. The cause of such an ulcer, which always results in heavy arterial bleeding, remains unknown. The source of bleeding is demonstrated by rectoscopy which may at times be difficult because of the large amount of blood in the rectum and the hidden position of the small ulcer. Sclerosing or circumferential suturing of the ulcer provides immediate cessation of bleeding and cure.

  8. Optimizing Treatment for Rectal Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Hrabe, Jennifer; Gurland, Brooke

    2016-09-01

    Rectal prolapse is associated with debilitating symptoms and leads to both functional impairment and anatomic distortion. Symptoms include rectal bulge, mucous drainage, bleeding, incontinence, constipation, tenesmus, as well as discomfort, pressure, and pain. The only cure is surgical. The optimal surgical repair is not yet defined though laparoscopic rectopexy with mesh is emerging as a more durable approach. The chosen approach should be individually tailored, taking into account factors such as presence of pelvic floor defects and coexistence of vaginal prolapse, severe constipation, surgical fitness, and whether the patient has had a previous prolapse procedure. Consideration of a multidisciplinary approach is critical in patients with concomitant vaginal prolapse. Surgeons must weigh their familiarity with each approach and should have in their armamentarium both perineal and abdominal approaches. Previous barriers to abdominal procedures, such as age and comorbidities, are waning as minimally invasive approaches have gained acceptance. Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is one such approach offering relatively low morbidity, low recurrence rates, and good functional improvement. However, proficiency with this procedure may require advanced training. Robotic rectopexy is another burgeoning approach which facilitates suturing in the pelvis. Successful rectal prolapse surgeries improve function and have low recurrence rates, though it is important to note that correcting the prolapse does not assure functional improvement. PMID:27582654

  9. An Unusual Cause of Rectal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Maja; Füglistaler, Ida; Zettel, Andreas; Fox, Mark; Manz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a benign disease that is often misdiagnosed. It is characterized by a combination of symptoms, endoscopic findings and histology. Patients present with constipation, rectal bleeding, mucous discharge, pain and a sensation of incomplete defecation. There are many different manifestations of this disease, with or without rectal prolapse. We report an unusual presentation of SRUS as a circular stenosis in a middle-aged male.

  10. The outcomes of therapeutic decision in lower 3rd rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hsin; Wei, Po-Li; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Lin, En-Kwang; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Lu, Yen-Jung; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the outcomes of the selective neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in lower 3rd rectal cancer patients in different groups (with or without neoadjuvant CCRT), especially in survival rate, local recurrence rate, and sphincter preservation rate.From January 1999 to December 2012, 69 consecutive patients who had histologically proven adenocarcinoma of lower 3rd rectum, defined preoperatively as lower tumor margin within 7 cm from the anal verge as measured by rigid sigmoidoscopy, received total mesorectum excision (TME). Our inclusion criteria of neoadjuvant CCRT are lower 3rd rectal cancer, stage II/III, and large (diameter >5 cm or >1/2 of circumference). Neoadjuvant concurrent CCRT had begun to apply lower 3rd rectal cancer patients or not. The radiation techniques of neoadjuvant CCRT for lower 3rd rectal cancer patients were all conventional fraction intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy.Five-year overall survival rate, disease-free survival rate, and local recurrence rate for lower 3rd rectal cancer patients in group I were 51%, 45%, and 25%, respectively. On the contrary, 5-year overall survival rate, disease-free survival rate, and local recurrence rate for lower rectal cancer patients in group II were 70%, 70%, and 3%, respectively. The 5-year sphincter sparing rate was increased from 38.2% to 100% after the beginning of neoadjuvant CCRT. Analyzing local recurrence, overall survival rate, disease-specific survival rate, and sphincter sparing rate in group II were statistically significant superior to group I.Five-year overall survival rate, disease-free survival rate, and sphincter sparing rate for lower 3rd rectal cancer patients were improved after the addition of neoadjuvant CCRT. No unacceptable toxicity was noted after conventional fraction IMRT and concurrent fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy. Our study showed neoadjuvant CCRT could be valuable for lower 3rd rectal cancer patients

  11. Carcinoid Heart Disease: From Pathophysiology to Treatment--'Something in the Way It Moves'.

    PubMed

    Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona; Grossman, Ashley B; Gross, David J

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid heart disease (CHD) is a rare cardiac manifestation occurring in patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumours and the carcinoid syndrome, usually involving the right-sided heart valves and eventually leading to right heart failure. The pathophysiology of CHD is still obscure and believed to be multifactorial, as a variety of vasoactive substances secreted by the tumour appear to be involved. The management of patients with CHD is complex, as both the systemic malignant disease and the heart involvement have to be addressed. Timely diagnosis and early surgical treatment in appropriately selected patients are of outmost importance, as CHD is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Valve replacement surgery alleviates right heart failure and may also contribute to improved survival. In the present study we have comprehensively reviewed the existing literature to date, mainly focusing on the pathophysiology of CHD. Other aspects of CHD (such as the clinical presentation, diagnostic tools and therapeutic approach) are addressed in brief.

  12. Significance of Cox-2 expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachkoria, Ketevan; Zhang Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiao-feng.sun@ibk.liu.se

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has reduced local recurrence of rectal cancers, but the result is not satisfactory. Further biologic factors are needed to identify patients for more effective radiotherapy. Our aims were to investigate the relationship of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression to radiotherapy, and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers with or without radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cox-2 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distal normal mucosa (n = 28), in adjacent normal mucosa (n = 107), in primary cancer (n = 138), lymph node metastasis (n = 30), and biopsy (n = 85). The patients participated in a rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Results: Cox-2 expression was increased in primary tumor compared with normal mucosa (p < 0.0001), but there was no significant change between primary tumor and metastasis. Cox-2 positivity was or tended to be related to more p53 and Ki-67 expression, and less apoptosis (p {<=} 0.05). In Cox-2-negative cases of either biopsy (p = 0.01) or surgical samples (p = 0.02), radiotherapy was related to less frequency of local recurrence, but this was not the case in Cox-2-positive cases. Conclusion: Cox-2 expression seemed to be an early event involved in rectal cancer development. Radiotherapy might reduce a rate of local recurrence in the patients with Cox-2 weakly stained tumors, but not in those with Cox-2 strongly stained tumors.

  13. Variation in the CYP19A1 gene and risk of colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Kadlubar, Susan; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    CYP19A1, or aromatase, influences estrogen-metabolizing enzymes and may influence cancer risk. We examine variation in the CYP19A1 gene and risk of colorectal cancer using data from population-based case–control studies (colon n = 1,574 cases, 1,970 controls; rectal n = 791 cases, 999 controls). Four SNPs were statistically significantly associated with colon cancer and four were associated with rectal cancer. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, the AA genotype of rs12591359 was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer (OR 1.44 95% CI 1.16–1.80) and the AA genotype of rs2470144 was associated with a reduced risk of rectal cancer (OR 0.65 95% CI 0.50–0.84). Variants of CYP19A1 were associated with CIMP+ and CIMP+/KRAS2-mutated tumors. CT/TT genotypes of rs1961177 were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of a MSI+ colon tumor (OR 1.77 95% CI 1.26–2.37). We observed statistically significant interactions between genetic variation in NFκB1 and CYP19A1 for both colon and rectal cancer. Our data suggest the importance of CYP19A1 in the development of colon and rectal cancer and that estrogen may influence risk through an inflammation-related mechanism. PMID:21479914

  14. Rare tumors of the rectum. Narrative review.

    PubMed

    Errasti Alustiza, José; Espín Basany, Eloy; Reina Duarte, Angel

    2014-11-01

    Most rectal neoplasms are adenocarcinomas, but there is a small percentage of tumors which are of other histological cell lines such as neuroendocrine tumors, sarcomas, lymphomas and squamous cell carcinomas, which have special characteristics and different treatments. We have reviewed these rare tumors of the rectum from a clinical and surgical point of view.

  15. Critical appraisal of laparoscopic vs open rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Winson Jianhong; Chew, Min Hoe; Dharmawan, Angela Renayanti; Singh, Manraj; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Loi, Carol Tien Tau; Tang, Choong Leong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term clinical and oncological outcomes of laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR) and the impact of conversion in patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: An analysis was performed on a prospective database of 633 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection. Patients were compared in three groups: Open surgery (OP), laparoscopic surgery, and converted laparoscopic surgery. Short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and survival analysis were compared. RESULTS: Among 633 patients studied, 200 patients had successful laparoscopic resections with a conversion rate of 11.1% (25 out of 225). Factors predictive of survival on univariate analysis include the laparoscopic approach (P = 0.016), together with factors such as age, ASA status, stage of disease, tumor grade, presence of perineural invasion and vascular emboli, circumferential resection margin < 2 mm, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. The survival benefit of laparoscopic surgery was no longer significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.148). Neither 5-year overall survival (70.5% vs 61.8%, P = 0.217) nor 5-year cancer free survival (64.3% vs 66.6%, P = 0.854) were significantly different between the laparoscopic group and the converted group. CONCLUSION: LRR has equivalent long-term oncologic outcomes when compared to OP. Laparoscopic conversion does not confer a worse prognosis. PMID:27358678

  16. Unraveling tumor grading and genomic landscape in lung neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Papotti, Mauro; Rindi, Guido; Scarpa, Aldo

    2014-06-01

    Currently, grading in lung neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is inherently defined by the histological classification based on cell features, mitosis count, and necrosis, for which typical carcinoids (TC) are low-grade malignant tumors with long life expectation, atypical carcinoids (AC) intermediate-grade malignant tumors with more aggressive clinical behavior, and large cell NE carcinomas (LCNEC) and small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC) high-grade malignant tumors with dismal prognosis. While Ki-67 antigen labeling index, highlighting the proportion of proliferating tumor cells, has largely been used in digestive NETs for assessing prognosis and assisting therapy decisions, the same marker does not play an established role in the diagnosis, grading, and prognosis of lung NETs. Next generation sequencing techniques (NGS), thanks to their astonishing ability to process in a shorter timeframe up to billions of DNA strands, are radically revolutionizing our approach to diagnosis and therapy of tumors, including lung cancer. When applied to single genes, panels of genes, exome, or the whole genome by using either frozen or paraffin tissues, NGS techniques increase our understanding of cancer, thus realizing the bases of precision medicine. Data are emerging that TC and AC are mainly altered in chromatin remodeling genes, whereas LCNEC and SCLC are also mutated in cell cycle checkpoint and cell differentiation regulators. A common denominator to all lung NETs is a deregulation of cell proliferation, which represents a biological rationale for morphologic (mitoses and necrosis) and molecular (Ki-67 antigen) parameters to successfully serve as predictors of tumor behavior (i.e., identification of pathological entities with clinical correlation). It is envisaged that a novel grading system in lung NETs based on the combined assessment of mitoses, necrosis, and Ki-67 LI may offer a better stratification of prognostic classes, realizing a bridge between molecular alterations

  17. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  18. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and pathological complete response in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Linda; Fichera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer has evolved significantly in the last few decades. Significant improvements in local disease control were achieved in the 1990s, with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Level 1 evidence has shown that, with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) the rates of local recurrence can be lower than 6% and, as a result, neoadjuvant CRT currently represents the accepted standard of care. This approach has led to reliable tumor down-staging, with 15–27% patients with a pathological complete response (pCR)—defined as no residual cancer found on histological examination of the specimen. Patients who achieve pCR after CRT have better long-term outcomes, less risk of developing local or distal recurrence and improved survival. For all these reasons, sphincter-preserving procedures or organ-preserving options have been suggested, such as local excision of residual tumor or the omission of surgery altogether. Although local recurrence rate has been stable at 5–6% with this multidisciplinary management method, distal recurrence rates for locally-advanced rectal cancers remain in excess of 25% and represent the main cause of death in these patients. For this reason, more recent trials have been looking at the administration of full-dose systemic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting (in order to offer early treatment of disseminated micrometastases, thus improving control of systemic disease) and selective use of radiotherapy only in non-responders or for low rectal tumors smaller than 5 cm. PMID:26290512

  19. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  20. [Multifocal gastric carcinoid associated with chronic type A atrophic gastritis. Analysis of 2 clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Moneghini, D; Fontana, M G; Villanacci, V; Salerni, B

    2001-01-01

    Gastric carcinoid is a rare disease, representing less than 1% of gastric tumours and 11-41% of all gastrointestinal carcinoids. The recent Solcia's classification distinguishes three subtypes of these neoplasms, which show specific clinical and pathological features. Type one arises in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis (CGA), achlorhydria, hypergastrinemia and consequent enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia and dysplasia. Type two is related to Zollinger Ellison syndrome and type three represents the sporadic kind. We report two cases of multifocal gastric carcinoid associated to CGA, one of them with pernicious anemia. Both patients had aspecific abdominal symptoms; the diagnosis was suspected by upper endoscopy and confirmed by histological examination. Patients were submitted to total gastrectomy. They are still alive six years after surgery, without signs or symptoms of recurrences. Treatment of these tumours is controversial, because of their uncertain biological and clinical behaviour. Some Authors propose a conservative strategy (only endoscopic surveillance or removal); others stress importance of surgery (antrectomy or gastric resection). We discuss and underline the role of surgical therapy and the relevance of radical approach.

  1. Heterogeneity of KRAS Mutation Status in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Peter; König, Alexander; Schirmer, Markus; Kitz, Julia; Conradi, Lena-Christin; Azizian, Azadeh; Bernhardt, Markus; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Grade, Marian; Ghadimi, Michael; Ströbel, Philipp; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anti-EGFR targeted therapy is of increasing importance in advanced colorectal cancer and prior KRAS mutation testing is mandatory for therapy. However, at which occasions this should be performed is still under debate. We aimed to assess in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer whether there is intra-specimen KRAS heterogeneity prior to and upon preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and if there are any changes in KRAS mutation status due to this intervention. Materials and Methods KRAS mutation status analyses were performed in 199 tumor samples from 47 patients with rectal cancer. To evaluate the heterogeneity between different tumor areas within the same tumor prior to preoperative CRT, 114 biopsies from 34 patients (mean 3 biopsies per patient) were analyzed (pre-therapeutic intratumoral heterogeneity). For the assessment of heterogeneity after CRT residual tumor tissue (85 samples) from 12 patients (mean 4.2 tissue samples per patient) were analyzed (post-therapeutic intratumoral heterogeneity) and assessment of heterogeneity before and after CRT was evaluated in corresponding patient samples (interventional heterogeneity). Primer extension method (SNaPshot™) was used for initial KRAS mutation status testing for Codon 12, 13, 61, and 146. Discordant results by this method were reevaluated by using the FDA-approved KRAS Pyro Kit 24, V1 and the RAS Extension Pyro Kit 24, V1 Kit (therascreen® KRAS test). Results For 20 (43%) out of the 47 patients, a KRAS mutation was detected. With 12 out of 20, the majority of these mutations affected codon 35. We did not obtained evidence that CRT results in changes of the KRAS mutation pattern. In addition, no intratumoral heterogeneity in the KRAS mutational status could be proven. This was true for both the biopsies prior to CRT and the resection specimens thereafter. The discrepancy observed in some samples when using the SNaPshot™ assay was due to insufficient sensitivity of this technique upon

  2. Transsphincteric tumor resection in case of a pararectal solitary fibrous tumor

    PubMed Central

    Troja, Achim; El-Sourani, Nader; Antolovic, Dalibor; Raab, Hans Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Transsphincteric resection of rectal tumors was first described about 120 years ago. Nowadays, this approach faded into obscurity due to standardized guidelines and practice in surgical oncology including lymphadenectomy, mesorectal excision and radical dissection of veins. However, transsphincteric resection seems reasonable in some cases, especially if an abdominal approach can be avoided. In the following, we will present and describe the technique of the transsphincteric approach with its variations in rectal surgery in the case of a rare pararectal tumor. PMID:26773876

  3. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  4. Notch Signaling in Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Judy S.; Singleton, Ciera S.; Miele, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoids and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from the neuroendocrine cells of the GI tract, endocrine pancreas, and the respiratory system. NETs remain significantly understudied with respect to molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, particularly the role of cell fate signaling systems such as Notch. The abundance of literature on the Notch pathway is a testament to its complexity in different cellular environments. Notch receptors can function as oncogenes in some contexts and tumor suppressors in others. The genetic heterogeneity of NETs suggests that to fully understand the roles and the potential therapeutic implications of Notch signaling in NETs, a comprehensive analysis of Notch expression patterns and potential roles across all NET subtypes is required. PMID:27148486

  5. Magnetic Resonance (MR) rectography in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usova, AV; Frolova, IG; Trukhacheva, NG; Cheremisina, OV; Afanas'ev, SG

    2016-02-01

    Purpose was the assessment of diagnostic efficiency of MR-rectography in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms. 12 patients with polyps and small tumors of a rectum are examined, the size of detected neoplasms varied in the range 3-18 mm. Native MRI and MRI with retrograde contrasting by ultrasonic gel was carried out. Results of MRI are compared with results of videocolonoscopy. Sensitivity of native MRT was 24%, MR- rectography was 88%. MR-rectography can be used in diagnostics of small-size rectal neoplasms.

  6. Rectal mucocoele following subtotal colectomy for colitis.

    PubMed

    Appleton, N; Day, N; Walsh, C

    2014-09-01

    We present a unique case of a rectal mucocoele affecting a patient several years after his subtotal colectomy for ulcerative colitis. This was secondary to both a benign anorectal stenosis and a benign mucus secreting rectal adenoma. This case highlights the importance of surveillance in such patients.

  7. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  11. Temsirolimus and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Paraganglioma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Regional Pheochromocytoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  12. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Cos Escuín, Julio

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (PNT) encompass a broad spectrum of tumors including typical carcinoid (TC) and atypical (AC) tumors, large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Although no variety can be considered benign, AC and TC have a much lower metastatic potential, are usually diagnosed in early stages, and most are candidates for surgical treatment. Several chemotherapy (CT) regimens are available in the case of recurrence or in advanced stages, although scientific evidence is insufficient. LCNEC, which is currently classified alongside large-cell carcinomas, have molecular features, biological behavior and CT sensitivity profile closely resembling SCLC. Pathological diagnosis is often difficult, despite the availability of immunohistochemical techniques, and surgical specimens may be necessary. The diagnostic tests used are similar to those used in other lung tumors, with some differences in the optimal tracer in positron emission tomography. The new TNM classification is useful for staging these tumors. Carcinoid syndrome, very rare in PNT, may cause symptoms that are difficult to control and requires special therapy with somatostatin analogs and other drugs. Overall, with the exception of SCLC, new trials are needed to provide a response to the many questions arising with regard to the best treatment in each lineage and each stage.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Cos Escuín, Julio

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (PNT) encompass a broad spectrum of tumors including typical carcinoid (TC) and atypical (AC) tumors, large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Although no variety can be considered benign, AC and TC have a much lower metastatic potential, are usually diagnosed in early stages, and most are candidates for surgical treatment. Several chemotherapy (CT) regimens are available in the case of recurrence or in advanced stages, although scientific evidence is insufficient. LCNEC, which is currently classified alongside large-cell carcinomas, have molecular features, biological behavior and CT sensitivity profile closely resembling SCLC. Pathological diagnosis is often difficult, despite the availability of immunohistochemical techniques, and surgical specimens may be necessary. The diagnostic tests used are similar to those used in other lung tumors, with some differences in the optimal tracer in positron emission tomography. The new TNM classification is useful for staging these tumors. Carcinoid syndrome, very rare in PNT, may cause symptoms that are difficult to control and requires special therapy with somatostatin analogs and other drugs. Overall, with the exception of SCLC, new trials are needed to provide a response to the many questions arising with regard to the best treatment in each lineage and each stage. PMID:24685201

  15. Nonoperative management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Torok, Jordan A; Palta, Manisha; Willett, Christopher G; Czito, Brian G

    2016-01-01

    Surgery has long been the primary curative modality for localized rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation has significantly improved local control rates and, in a significant minority, eradicated all disease. Patients who achieve a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant therapy have an excellent prognosis, although the combination treatment is associated with long-term morbidity. Because of this, a nonoperative management (NOM) strategy has been pursued to preserve sphincter function in select patients. Clinical and radiographic findings are used to identify patients achieving a clinical complete response to chemoradiation, and they are then followed with intensive surveillance. Incomplete, nonresponding and those demonstrating local progression are referred for salvage with standard surgery. Habr-Gama and colleagues have published extensively on this treatment strategy and have laid the groundwork for this approach. This watch-and-wait strategy has evolved over time, and several groups have now reported their results, including recent prospective experiences. Although initial results appear promising, several significant challenges remain for NOM of rectal cancer. Further study is warranted before routine implementation in the clinic.

  16. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in the preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guinet, C; Buy, J N; Ghossain, M A; Sézeur, A; Mallet, A; Bigot, J M; Vadrot, D; Ecoiffier, J

    1990-03-01

    Nineteen patients with middle and lower rectal carcinomas were operated on, with abdominoperineal resection in 10 patients, lower anterior resection with coloanal anastomosis in 6 patients, and colorectal anastomosis in 3 patients. The distance of the lower margin of the tumor to insertion of the levator ani on the rectal wall was correctly evaluated by computed tomography in 12 (63%) of 19 patients and by magnetic resonance imaging in 13 (68%) of 19 patients, while digital examination correctly assessed the distance in 15 (79%) of 19 patients. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were unable to assess extension through the rectal wall. No significant difference was observed between computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in assessing extension to the perivesical fat, adjacent organs, pelvic side wall, or lymph nodes. According to the TNM classification, magnetic resonance imaging correctly staged 74% (14/19) of carcinomas, while computed tomography correctly staged 68% (13/19).

  17. Multidisciplinary management of nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Folkert, Ian W; Hernandez, Paul; Roses, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are a rare and diverse group of tumors; nonfunctional (NF) PNETs account for the majority of cases. Most patients with NF-PNETs have metastatic disease at the time of presentation. A variety of treatment modalities exist, including medical, liver directed, and surgical treatments. Aggressive surgical management is associated with prolonged survival, however available data are limited by selection bias and the frequent combination of PNETs with carcinoid tumors. Although few patients with metastatic disease will be cured, application of currently available therapies in a multidisciplinary setting can lead to excellent outcomes with prolonged patient survival. PMID:27003988

  18. Design of a rectal probe for diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging for chemotherapy and radiotherapy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giessen, Martijn; Santoro, Ylenia; Mirzaei Zarandi, Soroush; Pigazzi, Alessio; Cerussi, Albert E.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2014-03-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) has shown great potential for the early detection of non-responding tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer, already one day after therapy starts. Patients with rectal cancer receive similar chemotherapy treatment. The rectum geometry and tissue properties of healthy and tumor tissue in the rectum and the requirement of surface contact impose constraints on the probe design. In this work we present the design of a DOSI probe with the aim of early chemotherapy/radiotherapy effectiveness detection in rectal tumors. We show using Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements that the colon tissue can be characterized reliably using a source-detector separation in the order of 10 mm. We present a design and rapid prototype of a probe for DOSI measurements that can be mounted on a standard laparoscope and that fits through a standard rectoscope. Using predominantly clinically approved components we aim at fast clinical translation.

  19. Tissue effects of glutamine in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Hernando-Martín, Mercedes; Calleja-Fernández, Alicia; Cano-Rodríguez, Isidoro; Cordido, Fernando; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D

    2015-04-01

    Introducción: El objetivo fue evaluar los efectos de la administración de glutamina sobre la regresión tumoral y sobre el tejido sano en pacientes con cáncer rectal que recibieron quimiorradioterapia. Material y métodos: Se incluyó 10 pacientes con cáncer rectal operado después de quimiorradioterapia, un subgrupo de un ensayo clínico que comparó glutamina con placebo en la prevención de enteritis aguda. Un patólogo experto analizó las muestras de tumor y tejido sano, buscando datos de regresión tumoral, mucífagos y daño por radiación. Resultados: No hubo diferencias entre placebo y glutamina en el grado de regresión tumoral. Todos los pacientes con glutamina presentaron mucífagos, frente al 28,6% con placebo (p = 0,038). El daño sobre tejido sano fue similar en los pacientes con glutamina y placebo, y entre aquellos con y sin enteritis. Conclusión: La glutamina no ejerce un efecto protector frente a la quimiorradioterapia sobre el tumor o el tejido rectal sano.

  20. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  1. Central bronchial carcinoid: Management of a case and anesthetic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Goswami, D; Kashyap, L; Batra, R K; Bhagat, C

    2016-01-01

    Obstructing lesions of the central airways present with a variety of symptoms and are often associated with pneumonia or asthma-like states. Anesthesia to these patients often presents challenges right from the preoperative stabilization of underlying lung condition, mask ventilation in the supine position to maintaining oxygenation and ventilation in the intraoperative and postoperative period. We present here a case of a young woman with a central bronchial tumor with significant airway obstruction with potential for major bleeding and subsequent anesthetic management without lung sacrificing measures and cardiopulmonary bypass assistance. PMID:26955320

  2. Rectal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Rectal Prolapse in a Toddler.

    PubMed

    Khushbakht, Samreen; ul Haq, Anwar

    2015-12-01

    Rectal duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies. They constitute only 4% of the total gastrointestinal anomalies. They usually present in childhood. The common presenting symptoms are mass or pressure effects like constipation, tenesmus, urinary retention, local infection or bleeding due to presence of ectopic gastric mucosa. We are reporting a rare presenting symptom of rectal duplication cyst in a 4-year-old boy/toddler who presented with rectal prolapse. He also had bleeding per rectum. Rectal examination revealed a soft mass palpable in the posterior rectal wall. CT scan showed a cystic mass in the posterior wall of the rectum. It was excised trans-anally and the postoperative recovery was uneventful. Biopsy report showed rectal duplication cyst. PMID:26691370

  3. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  4. MRI staging of low rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shihab, Oliver C; Moran, Brendan J; Heald, Richard J; Quirke, Philip; Brown, Gina

    2009-03-01

    Low rectal tumours, especially those treated by abdominoperineal excision (APE), have a high rate of margin involvement when compared with tumours elsewhere in the rectum. Correct surgical management to minimise this rate of margin involvement is reliant on highly accurate imaging, which can be used to plan the planes of excision. In this article we describe the techniques for accurate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment and a novel staging system for low rectal tumours. Using this staging system it is possible for the radiologist to demonstrate accurately tumour-free planes for surgical excision of low rectal tumours. PMID:18810451

  5. [Perianal and rectal impalement injuries].

    PubMed

    Joos, A K; Herold, A; Palma, P; Post, S

    2006-09-01

    Perianal impalement injuries with or without involvement of the anorectum are rare. Apart from a high variety of injury patterns, there is a multiplicity of diagnostic and therapeutic options. Causes of perianal impalement injury are gunshot, accidents, and medical treatment. The diagnostic work-up includes digital rectal examination followed by rectoscopy and flexible endoscopy under anaesthesia. We propose a new classification for primary extraperitoneal perianal impalement injuries in four stages in which the extension of sphincter and/or rectum injury is of crucial importance. Therapeutic aspects such as wound treatment, enterostomy, drains, and antibiotic treatment are discussed. The proposed classification encompasses recommendations for stage-adapted management and prognosis of these rare injuries. PMID:16896899

  6. Rectal temperature after marathon running.

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, R J; Leiper, J B; Thompson, J

    1985-01-01

    Rectal temperature was measured in 62 male runners who competed in the 1983 Dundee marathon race: all measurements were made immediately after the race. Competitors' times were noted at 5, 10, 15 and 20 miles (8.0, 16.1, 24.1, 32.2 km) and at the finish (26.2 miles, 42.2 km). Mean finishing time of the group was 3 hr 33 min +/- 48 min (mean +/- S.D.; range = 2 hr 17 min-5 hr 11 min). Mean running speed of the group decreased progressively as the distance covered increased. Mean post-race rectal temperature was 38.7 +/- 0.9 degrees C (range 35.6-40.3 degrees C). The post-race temperature was correlated (p less than 0.01) with the time taken to cover the last 6.2 miles (10 km) of the race, but not with the overall finishing time (p greater than 0.05). Only the fastest runners were able to maintain an approximately constant pace throughout the race, whereas the slower runners slowed down progressively. The runners with the highest post-race temperature, although not necessarily the fastest runners, also tended to maintain a steady pace throughout. The runners with the lowest post-race temperature slowed down markedly only over the last 6.2 mile section of the race. The results clearly indicate that runners forced by fatigue or injury to slow down in the latter stages of races held at low ambient temperatures may already be hypothermic or at serious risk of hypothermia. Images p192-a p192-b p192-c PMID:4092138

  7. [A Case of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with a Pathological Complete Response to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Shin-ichi; Iizaka, Masayoshi; Murakami, Seiichi; Nimura, Satoshi; Takeguchi, Touichirou

    2015-11-01

    A 61-year-old woman presented with the chief complaint of melena. She was diagnosed with rectal cancer via colonoscopy. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a rectal cancer with wall thickening, accompanied by several regional lymph node metastases with no distant metastasis. The tumor stage was cT3, cN2a, cM0 according to the TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors (7th Edition, UICC). Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (UFT 400 mg/day tegafur-uracil and 75 mg/day Leucovorin; 1.8 Gy in 25 fractions, total 45 Gy) was administered. Eight weeks after CRT, laparoscopy-assisted low anterior resection was performed. A pathological examination revealed that both the primary site and regional lymph nodes had no residual cancer cells, and a diagnosis of pathological complete response was made. The patient has been disease-free for 4 years since the operation. We report a case of rectal cancer that was successfully treated via preoperative CRT. This case may aid the development of a standard therapy for advanced rectal cancer.

  8. Role of Peroxiredoxin I in Rectal Cancer and Related to p53 Status

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Lee, Kuan-Der; Yeh, Chung-Hung; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Shih; Chin, Chih-Chien; Lin, Paul- Yang; Wang, Jeng-Yi

    2010-11-01

    Background: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is widely accepted for the treatment of localized rectal cancer. Although peroxiredoxin I (PrxI) and p53 have been implicated in carcinogenesis and cancer treatment, the role of PrxI and its interaction with p53 in the prognosis and treatment response of rectal cancer remain relatively unstudied. Methods and Materials: In the present study, we examined the levels of PrxI and p53 in rectal cancer patients using membrane arrays and compared them with normal population samples. To demonstrate the biologic changes after manipulation of PrxI expression, we established stable transfectants of HCT-116 (wild-type p53) and HT-29 (mutant p53) cells with a PrxI silencing vector. The predictive capacities of PrxI and p53 were also assessed by relating the immunohistochemical staining of a retrospective series of rectal cancer cases to the clinical outcome. Results: The membrane array and immunochemical staining data showed that PrxI, but not p53, was significantly associated with the tumor burden. Our immunochemistry findings further indicated that PrxI positivity was linked to a poor response to neoadjuvant therapy and worse survival. In cellular and animal experiments, the inhibition of PrxI significantly decreased tumor growth and sensitized the tumor to irradiation, as indicated by a lower capacity to scavenge reactive oxygen species and more extensive DNA damage. The p53 status might have contributed to the difference between HCT-116 and HT-29 after knockdown of PrxI. Conclusion: According to our data, the level of PrxI combined with the p53 status is relevant to the prognosis and the treatment response. We suggested that PrxI might be a new biomarker for rectal cancer.

  9. Predictors of Rectal Tolerance Observed in a Dose-Escalated Phase 1-2 Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.W. Nathan; Cho, L. Chinsoo; Straka, Christopher; Christie, Alana; Lotan, Yair; Pistenmaa, David; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Nanda, Akash; Kueplian, Patrick; Brindle, Jeffrey; Cooley, Susan; Perkins, Alida; Raben, David; Xie, Xian-Jin; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To convey the occurrence of isolated cases of severe rectal toxicity at the highest dose level tested in 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer; and to rationally test potential causal mechanisms to guide future studies and experiments to aid in mitigating or altogether avoiding such severe bowel injury. Methods and Materials: Clinical and treatment planning data were analyzed from 91 patients enrolled from 2006 to 2011 on a dose-escalation (45, 47.5, and 50 Gy in 5 fractions) phase 1/2 clinical study of SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Results: At the highest dose level, 6.6% of patients treated (6 of 91) developed high-grade rectal toxicity, 5 of whom required colostomy. Grade 3+ delayed rectal toxicity was strongly correlated with volume of rectal wall receiving 50 Gy >3 cm{sup 3} (P<.0001), and treatment of >35% circumference of rectal wall to 39 Gy (P=.003). Grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was significantly correlated with treatment of >50% circumference of rectal wall to 24 Gy (P=.010). Conclusion: Caution is advised when considering high-dose SBRT for treatment of tumors near bowel structures, including prostate cancer. Threshold dose constraints developed from physiologic principles are defined, and if respected can minimize risk of severe rectal toxicity.

  10. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  11. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  12. Scrotal cooling increases rectal temperature in man.

    PubMed

    Vash, Peter D; Engels, Thomas M; Kandeel, Fouad R; Greenway, Frank

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of scrotal cooling on rectal temperature in man. Pilot studies suggested that immersing the scrotum in a 30 degrees C water bath increased rectal temperature, but immersing the scrotum in a 0 degree C water bath did not. Six healthy young men immersed their scrotums in a 35 degrees C water bath for 11 min followed by 21 min at 30 degrees C. Rectal temperature rose by 0.38 +/- 0.04 degrees C (P < 0.01) in response to the 30 degrees C water bath. Repetition of the study by immersing the hands instead of the scrotum in the water bath had no effect on rectal temperature. The scrotum appears to play a role in human temperature regulation.

  13. Problems in family practice. Rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Graham, J

    1978-07-01

    The diagnosis and management of rectal bleeding problems varies with the urgency of the situation, the age of the patient, and the applicability of available diagnostic methods. Every instance of rectal bleeding is a problem that demands investigation by endoscopic, radiographic, and laboratory means. A physician can be misled by the patient's understatement or underobservance of bleeding. A good history obtained as quickly as possible in urgent circumstances and in great detail under more relaxed circumstances is of immeasurable diagnostic value.

  14. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  15. Mixed Adenocarcinoid Tumor Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Regeti, Kalyani; Jehangir, Waqas; Zafar, Shoaib; Sen, Shuvendu; Sidhom, Ibrahim; Yousif, Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Mixed adenocarcinoid tumors are not uncommon neoplasms of appendix. The clinical presentation of these tumors is often similar to that of acute appendicitis or may present as asymptomatic. These tumors are found incidentally during histopathological examination of the resected appendix following appendectomy or other abdominal procedures. Mixed adenocarcinoids usually behave as adenocarcinomas with rapid metastasis, so prognosis depends upon how aggressive the tumor behaves. The present study reports a case of a 53-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain and fever for 1 day and underwent successful appendectomy and recovered later. Subsequently, a mixed adenocarcinoma with carcinoid features of the appendix was diagnosed by histopathological examination. Follow-up examination of the patient in 3 months revealed metastasis of carcinoma to the peritoneum with adenocarcinoma features.

  16. Effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Baeten, Coen . E-mail: C.Baeten@surgery.azm.nl; Castermans, Karolien; Lammering, Guido; Hillen, Femke; Wouters, Bradly G.; Hillen, Harry; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Baeten, Cornelius G.M.I.

    2006-11-15

    Background: We and others have shown that angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration are important prognostic factors in rectal cancer. However, little is known about its possible changes in response to radiotherapy (RTX), which is frequently given to rectal tumors as a neoadjuvant treatment to improve the prognosis. We therefore investigated the biologic effects of RTX on these parameters using fresh-frozen biopsy samples of tumor and normal mucosa tissue before and after RTX. Methods: Biopsy samples were taken from a total of 34 patients before and after either a short course or long course of RTX combined with chemotherapy. The following parameters were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction: Microvessel density, leukocyte infiltration, proliferating epithelial and tumor cells, proliferating endothelial cells, adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells, and the angiogenic mRNA profile. Results: The tumor biopsy samples taken after RTX treatment demonstrated a significant decrease in microvessel density and the number of proliferating tumor cells and proliferating endothelial cells (p < 0.001). In contrast, the leukocyte infiltration, the levels of basic fibroblast growth factor in carcinoma tissue, and the adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells in normal as well as carcinoma tissue increased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data show that together with an overall decrease in tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation, RTX results in an increase in the expression of adhesion molecules that stimulate leukocyte infiltration. This suggests the possibility that, in addition to its direct cytotoxic effect, radiation may also stimulate an immunologic tumor response that could contribute to the documented improvement in local tumor control and distal failure rate of rectal cancers.

  17. Primary renal carcinoid tumour with lung metastasis misdiagnosed as renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Daboul, Nour; Monga, Dulabh; Bunker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old man with a history of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosed 10 years prior, status post right nephrectomy, presented for evaluation of pulmonary nodules. A year after the nephrectomy, he had undergone cutaneous metastasectomy in the right flank area, and a further 2 years later he had had his second cutaneous metastasectomy in the right chest wall. Both cutaneous pathologies had, at the time, shown metastatic neoplasm with histological features compatible with those of the previous renal tumour. He was treated with sorafenib. 3 years later he developed asymptomatic pulmonary nodules, which gradually doubled in size over the next 2.5 years. He underwent bronchoscopy and left lower lobe biopsy. Pathology revealed a metastatic renal carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumour. Second review of the previous renal neoplasm and the cutaneous metastatic pathology showed trabecular architecture, consistent with carcinoid, but mimicking the long parallel arrays that have been described in some cases of papillary RCC. PMID:26951438

  18. Identification of capsaicin-sensitive rectal mechanoreceptors activated by rectal distension in mice.

    PubMed

    Spencer, N J; Kerrin, A; Singer, C A; Hennig, G W; Gerthoffer, W T; McDonnell, O

    2008-05-01

    Rodents detect visceral pain in response to noxious levels of rectal distension. However, the mechanoreceptors that innervate the rectum and respond to noxious levels of rectal distension have not been identified. Here, we have identified the mechanoreceptors of capsaicin-sensitive rectal afferents and characterized their properties in response to circumferential stretch of the rectal wall. We have also used the lethal spotted (ls/ls) mouse to determine whether rectal mechanoreceptors that respond to capsaicin and stretch may also develop in an aganglionic rectum that is congenitally devoid of enteric ganglia. In wild type (C57BL/6) mice, graded increases in circumferential stretch applied to isolated rectal segments activated a graded increase in firing of slowly-adapting rectal mechanoreceptors. Identical stimuli applied to the aganglionic rectum of ls/ls mice also activated similar graded increases in firing of stretch-sensitive rectal afferents. In both wild type and aganglionic rectal preparations, focal compression of the serosal surface using von Frey hairs identified mechanosensitive "hot spots," that were associated with brief bursts of action potentials. Spritzing capsaicin (10 microM) selectively onto each identified mechanosensitive hot spot activated an all or none discharge of action potentials in 32 of 56 identified hot spots in wild type mice and 24 of 62 mechanosensitive hot spots in the aganglionic rectum of ls/ls mice. Each single unit activated by both capsaicin and circumferential stretch responded to low mechanical thresholds (1-2 g stretch). No high threshold rectal afferents were ever recorded in response to circumferential stretch. Anterograde labeling from recorded rectal afferents revealed two populations of capsaicin-sensitive mechanoreceptor that responded to stretch: one population terminated within myenteric ganglia, the other within the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers. In the aganglionic rectum of ls/ls mice, only the

  19. [Adjuvant chemotherapy of the colonic and rectal carcinoma: concepts and uptodate results].

    PubMed

    Weber, W; Nagel, G A

    1977-06-18

    The aim of adjuvant chemotherapy is the destruction of micrometastases after surgical removal of a malignant tumor. This treatment modality is gaining in importance in the light of experimental data and lcinical success in pediatric tumors. Results of ongoing studies in colo-rectal cancer show a marginal effect of prophylactic treatment with 5-fluorouracil. The treatment benefits in trials with historical controls are much greater than in studies with simultaneous controls. Use of historical controls is therefore of doubtful value. Ongoing trials use the combination of 5-fluorouracil and methyl-CCNU, which has been shown to double the remission rate in advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy of colo-rectal cancer is still experimental and justified only in the framework of clinical trials.

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound for the characterization and staging of rectal cancer. Current state of the method. Technological advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gersak, Mariana M; Badea, Radu; Graur, Florin; Hajja, Nadim Al; Furcea, Luminita; Dudea, Sorin M

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate type of examination for the assessment of rectal tumors. Over the years, the method has advanced from gray-scale examination to intravenous contrast media administration and to different types of elastography. The multimodal approach of tumors (transrectal, transvaginal) is adapted to each case. 3D ultrasound is useful for spatial representation and precise measurement of tumor formations, using CT/MR image reconstruction; color elastography is useful for tumor characterization and staging; endoscopic ultrasound using intravenous contrast agents can help study the amount of contrast agent targeted at the level of the tumor formations and contrast wash-in/wash-out time, based on the curves displayed on the device. The transvaginal approach often allows better visualization of the tumor than the transrectal approach. Performing the procedure with the rectal ampulla distended with contrast agent may be seen as an optimization of the examination methodology. All these aspects are additional methods for gray-scale endoscopic ultrasound, capable of increasing diagnostic accuracy. This paper aims at reviewing the progress of transrectal and transvaginal ultrasound, generically called endoscopic ultrasound, for rectal tumor diagnosis and staging, with emphasis on the current state of the method and its development trends.

  1. Rectal Motion in Patients Receiving Preoperative Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, James D.; Dawson, Laura A.; Sampson, Elliott; Bayley, Andrew; Scott, Sandra; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Timothy; Cummings, Bernard; Dinniwell, Robert; Kim, John J.; Ringash, Jolie; Wong, Rebecca; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the movement of rectum, mesorectum, and rectal primary during a course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer had a planning CT scan with rectal contrast before commencement of preoperative chemoradiation. The scan was repeated during Weeks 1, 3, and 5 of chemoradiation. The rectal primary (gross tumor volume), rectum, mesorectum, and bladder were contoured on all four scans. An in-house biomechanical model-based deformable image registration technique, Morfeus, was used to measure the three-dimensional spatial change in these structures after bony alignment. The required planning target volume margin for this spatial change, after bone alignment, was also calculated. Results: Rectal contrast was found to introduce a systematic error in the position of all organs compared with the noncontrast state. The largest change in structures during radiotherapy was in the anterior and posterior directions for the mesorectum and rectum and in the superior and inferior directions for the gross tumor volume. The planning target volume margins required for internal movement for the mesorectum based on the three scans acquired during treatment are 4 mm right, 5 mm left, 7 mm anterior, and 6 mm posterior. For the rectum, values were 8 mm right, 8 mm left, 8 mm anterior, and 9 mm posterior. The greatest movement of the rectum occurred in the upper third. Conclusions: Contrast is no longer used in CT simulation. Assuming bony alignment, a nonuniform margin of 8 mm anteriorly, 9 mm posteriorly, and 8 mm left and right is recommended.

  2. Endoscopic resection of sparganosis presenting as colon submucosal tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong Keun; Baek, Dong Hoon; Lee, Bong Eun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Song, Geun Am; Park, Do Youn

    2016-01-01

    Human sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by infection with the tapeworm Sparganum, the migrating plerocercoid (second stage) larva of Spirometra species. Sparganosis usually involves subcutaneous tissues and/or muscles of various parts of the body, but involvement of other sites such as the brain, eye, peritoneopleural cavity, urinary track, scrotum, and abdominal viscera has also been documented. Infections caused by sparganum have a worldwide distribution but are most common in Southeast Asia such as China, Japan, and South Korea. Rectal sparganosis is an uncommon disease but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unusual and suspicious rectal submucosal tumors. We report a case of rectal sparganosis presenting as rectal submucosal tumor. We performed endoscopic submucosal dissection of the rectal submucosal tumor. The sparganosis was confirmed based on the presence of calcospherules in the submucosal layer on histological examination. Moreover, the result of the immunoglobulin G antibody test for sparganosis was positive but became negative after endoscopic submucosal dissection. Though rare, rectal sparganosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of rectal submucosal tumor-like lesions. This case suggests that physicians should make effort to exclude sparganosis through careful diagnostic approaches, including detailed history taking and serological tests for parasites. In this report, we aimed to highlight the clinical presentation of Sparganum infection as a rectal submucosal tumor. PMID:27217709

  3. Endoscopic resection of sparganosis presenting as colon submucosal tumor: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Keun; Baek, Dong Hoon; Lee, Bong Eun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Song, Geun Am; Park, Do Youn

    2016-05-21

    Human sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by infection with the tapeworm Sparganum, the migrating plerocercoid (second stage) larva of Spirometra species. Sparganosis usually involves subcutaneous tissues and/or muscles of various parts of the body, but involvement of other sites such as the brain, eye, peritoneopleural cavity, urinary track, scrotum, and abdominal viscera has also been documented. Infections caused by sparganum have a worldwide distribution but are most common in Southeast Asia such as China, Japan, and South Korea. Rectal sparganosis is an uncommon disease but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unusual and suspicious rectal submucosal tumors. We report a case of rectal sparganosis presenting as rectal submucosal tumor. We performed endoscopic submucosal dissection of the rectal submucosal tumor. The sparganosis was confirmed based on the presence of calcospherules in the submucosal layer on histological examination. Moreover, the result of the immunoglobulin G antibody test for sparganosis was positive but became negative after endoscopic submucosal dissection. Though rare, rectal sparganosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of rectal submucosal tumor-like lesions. This case suggests that physicians should make effort to exclude sparganosis through careful diagnostic approaches, including detailed history taking and serological tests for parasites. In this report, we aimed to highlight the clinical presentation of Sparganum infection as a rectal submucosal tumor. PMID:27217709

  4. Long-Term Survival and Local Relapse Following Surgery Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Upper Rectal Cancer: An International Multi-Institutional Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Seok; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Simon, Ng Siu Man; Law, Wai Lun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shan, Hester Cheung Yui; Kwak, Sang Gyu; Choi, Gyu-Seog

    2016-05-01

    Controversy remains regarding whether preoperative chemoradiation protocol should be applied uniformly to all rectal cancer patients regardless of tumor height. This pooled analysis was designed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiation can be safely omitted in higher rectal cancer.An international consortium of 7 institutions was established. A review of the database that was collected from January 2004 to May 2008 identified a series of 2102 patients with stage II/III rectal or sigmoid cancer (control arm) without concurrent chemoradiation. Data regarding patient demographics, recurrence pattern, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. The primary end point was the 5-year local recurrence rate.The local relapse rate of the sigmoid colon cancer (SC) and upper rectal cancer (UR) cohorts was significantly lower than that of the mid/low rectal cancer group (M-LR), with 5-year estimates of 2.5% for the SC group, 3.5% for the UR group, and 11.1% for the M-LR group, respectively. A multivariate analysis showed that tumor depth, nodal metastasis, venous invasion, and lower tumor level were strongly associated with local recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate of local failure was 90.6%, 92.5%, and 94.4% for tumors located within 5, 7, and 9 cm from the anal verge, respectively.Routine use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II/III rectal tumors located more than 8 to 9 cm above the anal verge would be excessive. The integration of a more individualized approach focused on systemic control is warranted to improve survival in patients with upper rectal cancer.

  5. Long-Term Survival and Local Relapse Following Surgery Without Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Upper Rectal Cancer: An International Multi-Institutional Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Seok; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Simon, Ng Siu Man; Law, Wai Lun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shan, Hester Cheung Yui; Kwak, Sang Gyu; Choi, Gyu-Seog

    2016-05-01

    Controversy remains regarding whether preoperative chemoradiation protocol should be applied uniformly to all rectal cancer patients regardless of tumor height. This pooled analysis was designed to evaluate whether preoperative chemoradiation can be safely omitted in higher rectal cancer.An international consortium of 7 institutions was established. A review of the database that was collected from January 2004 to May 2008 identified a series of 2102 patients with stage II/III rectal or sigmoid cancer (control arm) without concurrent chemoradiation. Data regarding patient demographics, recurrence pattern, and oncological outcomes were analyzed. The primary end point was the 5-year local recurrence rate.The local relapse rate of the sigmoid colon cancer (SC) and upper rectal cancer (UR) cohorts was significantly lower than that of the mid/low rectal cancer group (M-LR), with 5-year estimates of 2.5% for the SC group, 3.5% for the UR group, and 11.1% for the M-LR group, respectively. A multivariate analysis showed that tumor depth, nodal metastasis, venous invasion, and lower tumor level were strongly associated with local recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate of local failure was 90.6%, 92.5%, and 94.4% for tumors located within 5, 7, and 9 cm from the anal verge, respectively.Routine use of preoperative chemoradiation for stage II/III rectal tumors located more than 8 to 9 cm above the anal verge would be excessive. The integration of a more individualized approach focused on systemic control is warranted to improve survival in patients with upper rectal cancer. PMID:27258487

  6. Expression of PRL proteins at invasive margin of rectal cancers in relation to preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, Asa R.; Svanvik, Joar; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: PRL-3 (phosphatase of regenerating liver) is involved in metastasis of colorectal cancer; however, its therapeutic implication in cancer patients has not been studied. We investigated the relationships of PRL expression to radiotherapy (RT) in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 36) and adjacent (n = 82) normal mucosa, primary tumor (n = 125), biopsy specimens (n = 96), and lymph node metastasis (n = 30) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Results: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was increased from the distant to adjacent mucosa and to the primary tumor (p < 0.05). PRL was highly expressed at the invasive margin in 28% of the primary tumors and 26% of the metastases. In the RT group, strong PRL expression at the invasive margin was related to distant recurrence (p 0.006) and poor survival (p = 0.01), but not in the non-RT group. The survival significance remained even after adjusting for Dukes' stage and differentiation (p = 0.02). Additional multivariate analyses showed that the correlation with prognostic significance of PRL differed between the RT and non-RT groups (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression (rather than PRL-3 alone) at the invasive margin predicted resistance to RT and unfavorable survival in rectal cancer patients with preoperative RT.

  7. Rare Presentation of Gastroesophageal Carcinoma with Rectal Metastasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Karki, Niraj; Sapkota, Binita; Niazi, Masooma; Remy, Prospere

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Gastroesophageal carcinoma with rectal metastasis Symptoms: Bloating • constipation • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy • flexible sigmoidoscopy • lower endoscopic ultrasound Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Gastroesophageal cancers, previously considered rare, are rapidly increasing worldwide. We present here a unique case of gastroesophageal carcinoma with metastasis to the rectum. Case Report: A 60-year-old female patient presented with constipation, bloating, and weight loss of 4-month duration. She had undergone sleeve gastrectomy 6 years before. Endoscopies performed revealed a friable-looking mucosa in the lower esophagus and a polypoid rectal mass. Histopathological examination from both the esophageal and rectal lesions revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. Immunohistochemistry stain from both specimens was positive for CK7 supporting the gastric site primary with metastasis to the rectum. Further evaluation also revealed metastasis to bone and malignant pleural effusion. Chemotherapy with palliative intent was initiated. Conclusions: Colorectal metastasis is commonly seen from cancers of the breast, stomach, melanoma, kidney, prostate, and ovaries. However, colorectal metastasis from gastroesophageal cancer has never been reported in the medical literature. Diagnosis relies on histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical staining of the tumor. Treatment depends on the tumor stage. Tumors with widespread metastatic disease are candidates for palliative chemotherapy. PMID:27558656

  8. Up front hepatectomy for metastatic rectal carcinoma - reversed, liver first approach. Early experience with 15 patients.

    PubMed

    Straka, M; Skrovina, M; Soumarova, R; Kotasek, R; Burda, L; Vojtek, C

    2014-01-01

    Timing and sequence of therapeutic interventions in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and synchronous liver metastases is a matter of ongoing discussion. The aim of this report is to show the feasibility and safety of a reversed strategy in patients with up front resectable synchronous liver metastases. Consecutive series of 15 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma and liver synchronous metastases where up front liver resection was carried out as an initial intervention is presented. Local treatment of both, metastatic disease and primary tumor, was preferred. Liver resection was followed by neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant radiochemotherapy (RCT) for local pelvic disease control and subsequent resection of rectum. Systemic adjuvant chemotherapy was placed at the end of the entire treatment cycle. All 15 patients after up front hepatectomy were able to proceed with their treatment plan. 14 patients completed their RCT for primary tumor and subsequent rectal resection was successfully carried out. In 12 of them. 3 patients showed complete clinical response on cross sectional imaging and a careful "wait-and-see" policy was adopted for them. In two patients metastatic disease progression was noticed during the treatment cycle.Liver first approach in patients with up front resectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) is safe and feasible. Local neoadjuvant treatment after CRLM resection may result in preoperative downsizing or even complete clinical response of the primary tumor. Reversed strategy may to a degree eliminate negative oncologic impact of surgical complications after rectal surgery as CRLM has been already addressed.

  9. In rectal cancer, the type of desmoplastic response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy is associated with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hideki; Shinto, Eiji; Hashiguchi, Yojiro; Shimazaki, Hideyuki; Kajiwara, Yoshiki; Sueyama, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Junji; Hase, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    Although the essential contribution of the desmoplastic reaction (DR) to aggressive tumor behavior is increasingly recognized, its prognostic value has not been investigated in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed 101 consecutive patients with rectal cancer treated with short-course chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery (2001-2007). The DR in the resected primary tumor was pathologically classified into three patterns on the basis of products of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs): mature (multilayered fibrotic), intermediate (keloid-like hyalinized), and immature (mostly myxoid). We classified 46 tumors as mature, 30 as intermediate, and 25 as immature DR. In addition, immunostaining of CD8(+) and FoxP3(+) cells was performed to characterize the immune response accompanying DR. Mature DR correlated with higher density of CD8(+) and FoxP3(+) cells in both resected surgical and pretreatment biopsy specimens. A significant association with DR category was observed for T stage, lymphatic invasion, and venous invasion (P ≤ 0.0001-0.0006). Mature DR was significantly associated with higher grade of pathological response (P = 0.0350). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 82, 72, and 47 % for mature, intermediate, and immature DR, respectively (P = 0.0055). On multivariate analysis, DR category and ypN were independently predictive of DFS. The pattern of the DR in rectal cancers after chemoradiotherapy treatment might have a prognostic value, as it likely reflects pretreatment desmoplastic environment.

  10. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-01-01

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery. PMID:26191350

  11. Combined modality preoperative therapy for unresectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Percarpio, B; Bitterman, J; Sabbath, K; Alfano, F; Ruszkowski, R; Bowen, J

    1992-01-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer has been a surgical challenge because of fixation of the primary tumor to the boney pelvis or to other pelvic soft tissues. During a 12-month period seven patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum were treated preoperatively with simultaneous pelvic irradiation (4500-5040 cGy) and infusion chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil 1000 mg per m2 per day over 96 hours and mitomycin 10 mg per m2. Tolerance was reasonable and all patients underwent successful resection of the primary lesion. Two patients had a complete response to preoperative combined modality therapy with no cancer found in the surgical specimen. With a short follow-up period, all patients have experienced satisfactory healing and none have suffered local or distant recurrence. The results of this limited series are encouraging for future clinical trials.

  12. [Endorectal echotomography in assessing the spread of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bilenko, A A; Didarchuk, S P

    1998-01-01

    Endorectal echotomography is one of modern methods to diagnose rectal carcinoma spreading. On the basis of examination of 56 patients with the above pathology the authors have studied the ultrasonic semiotics of tumourous lesion of rectum and its regional lymphatic apparatus during different stages of the illness. The article contains an outline of the methods of investigation. The findings from ultrasonic diagnosis were compared with the results of clinical, endoscopic investigations and histological analysis of the operative material. A high diagnostic value was shown of the method in the assessment of local spread of the tumor: sensitivity--94.6%, specificity--83.3%, general precision--91.8%. Endorectal ultrasonic tomography permits the enlarged pararectal lymphatic nodes to be visualized but the method's demerit is lack of ultrasonic criteria in the differential diagnosis between the metastatic lesion of the lymphatic node and inflammatory type changes.

  13. Restaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancers: is histology the key in patient selection?

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Nitin; Vallam, Karthik; Engineer, Reena; Ostwal, Vikas; Arya, Supreeta

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemoradiation is the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, there is no clarity regarding the necessity for restaging scans to rule out systemic progression of disease post chemoradiation with existing literature being divided on the need for the same. Methods Data from a prospectively maintained database was retrospectively analysed. All locally advanced rectal cancers (node positive/T4/T3 with threatened or involved CRM) were included. Biopsy proof of adenocarcinoma and CT scan of abdomen and chest were mandatory. Grade of tumor and response to CTRT on restaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were documented. Results Out of 119 patients subjected to CTRT, 72 underwent definitive total mesorectal excision while 13 patients progressed locoregionally on restaging MR pelvis and 15 other patients progressed systemically while the rest defaulted. Patients with poorly differentiated (PD) cancers were compared to those with well/moderately differentiated (WMD) tumors. PD tumors had a significantly higher rate of local progression (32.1% vs. 5.6% %, P=0.0011) and systemic progression (35.7% vs. 6.9%, P=0.0008) as compared to WMD tumors. Only one-third (9/28) of PD patients underwent TME while the rest progressed. Conclusions Selecting poorly differentiated tumors alone for restaging CECT abdomen and thorax will be a cost effective strategy as the rate of progression is very high. Also patients with PD tumors need to be consulted about the high probability of progression of disease. PMID:27284467

  14. Expression of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 in Resected Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangjiao; Huang, Zhaoqin; Di, Jian; Mu, Dianbin; Wang, Yawei; Zhao, Xianguang; Zhao, Hanxi; Zhu, Wanqi; Li, Xiaolin; Kong, Lingling; Xing, Ligang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The addition of trastuzumab to chemotherapy was demonstrated to be beneficial for advanced human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) positive gastric cancer. However, the HER-2 status of rectal cancer remains uncertain. This study aimed to determine the HER-2 expression in a large multicenter cohort of rectal cancer patients. The clinical and pathological features of 717 patients were retrospectively reviewed. All the patients were diagnosed with primary rectal adenocarcinoma without distant metastasis and took surgery directly without any preoperative anticancer treatment. HER-2 status was assessed on resected samples. A total of 99 cases with IHC3+ and 16 cases with IHC 2+ plus gene amplification were determined as HER-2 positive. 22.6% of HER-2 positive patients had local recurrence, whereas 16.9% of HER-2 negative patients did (P = 0.146). HER-2 positive tumors were more likely to have distant metastasis (P = 0.007). Univariate analysis revealed that pathological tumor stage, pathological node stage, positive margin, and lymphovascular invasion were significantly correlated with 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS). The patients with >10 dissected lymph nodes showed significantly longer OS (P = 0.045) but not DFS (P = 0.054). HER-2 negative patients had significantly better 5-year DFS (P < 0.001) and 5-year OS (P = 0.013) than those of the HER-2 positive patients. In the subgroup analysis for the early rectal cancer and locally advanced rectal cancer, HER-2 was also a poor predictor for survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that HER-2 was an independent prognostic factor for 5-year DFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.919, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.415–2.605, P < 0.001) and for 5-year OS (HR = 1.549, 95% CI 1.097–2.186, P = 0.013). When the treatment was included in the analysis for locally advanced patients, HER-2 was a prognostic factor for 5-year DFS (P = 0.001) but not for

  15. Review of systemic therapies for locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Arsen; Tan, Carlyn; Tuli, Richard; Hendifar, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer, along with colon cancer, is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. Up to a quarter of patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis and 40% will develop metastatic disease. The past 10 years have been extremely exciting in the treatment of both locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer (mRC). With the advent of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, increased numbers of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are surviving longer and some are seeing their tumors shrink to sizes that allow for resection. The advent of biologics and monoclonal antibodies has propelled the treatment of mRC further than many could have hoped. Combined with regimens such as FOLFOX or FOLFIRI, median survival rates have been increased to an average of 23 months. However, the combinations of chemotherapy regimens seem endless for rectal cancer. We will review the major chemotherapies available for locally advanced and mRC as well as regimens currently under investigation such as FOLFOXIRI. We will also review vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors as single agents and in combination with traditional chemotherapy regimens. PMID:25830038

  16. [Current situation and outlook of transanal total mesorectum excision in rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kang, Liang; Wang, Jianping

    2016-08-25

    Since the characteristics of metastasis and invasion of rectal cancer are confirmed gradually, the aim of surgical treatment in rectal cancer is to protect anal and reproductive function, and to minimize the damage of patients. With prominent advantages of identified lower tumor resection margin, enough circumference resection margin, more minimally invasive procedure and faster recovery, transanal total mesorectal excision(taTME) integrated with natural canal theory, transanal minimally invasive technique and TME can effectively solve the difficulties of transabdominal procedure and becomes the research hotspot in rectal cancer surgery worldwide. Though taTME is still at the initial stage and has certain problems, such as the definition of operational procedure, careful performance of standard operation, further summary of operational detail and skill, observation of long-term efficacy and optimization design of operational instruments, it will be supported by high-level evidence based on increasing cases, maturation of procedure, and clinical multicenter cohort researches. TaTME has a good application prospect and may become one of the main procedures of colorectal surgery to treat the middle or low rectal cancer.

  17. [Current situation and outlook of transanal total mesorectum excision in rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kang, Liang; Wang, Jianping

    2016-08-25

    Since the characteristics of metastasis and invasion of rectal cancer are confirmed gradually, the aim of surgical treatment in rectal cancer is to protect anal and reproductive function, and to minimize the damage of patients. With prominent advantages of identified lower tumor resection margin, enough circumference resection margin, more minimally invasive procedure and faster recovery, transanal total mesorectal excision(taTME) integrated with natural canal theory, transanal minimally invasive technique and TME can effectively solve the difficulties of transabdominal procedure and becomes the research hotspot in rectal cancer surgery worldwide. Though taTME is still at the initial stage and has certain problems, such as the definition of operational procedure, careful performance of standard operation, further summary of operational detail and skill, observation of long-term efficacy and optimization design of operational instruments, it will be supported by high-level evidence based on increasing cases, maturation of procedure, and clinical multicenter cohort researches. TaTME has a good application prospect and may become one of the main procedures of colorectal surgery to treat the middle or low rectal cancer. PMID:27545460

  18. Californium-252 brachytherapy for anal and ano-rectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, B.; Maruyama, Y.; Proudfoot, W.; Malcolm, A.

    1986-01-01

    Surgery has historically been the standard treatment for anal, ano-rectal and rectal carcinoma but is prone to local or regional failure. Over the past 15 years there has been increasing interest in and success with radiation therapy and combined chemoradiotherapy for treatment of anal and ano-rectal cancers. Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with external beam teletherapy has been investigated for anal and ano-rectal lesions at the Univ. of Kentucky with encouraging results.

  19. Stapled transanal rectal mucosectomy ten years after.

    PubMed

    Pescatori, M; Aigner, F

    2007-03-01

    Stapled mucosectomy (SM) was first proposed for the management of patients with rectal internal mucosal prolapse and obstructed defecation, but gained popularity worldwide for the treatment of hemorrhoids. The present review highlights the advantages and disadvantages of the operation. SM tends to decrease postoperative pain and shortens convalescence after hemorrhoid surgery, but may be followed by severe complications, e.g. rectal obliteration and pelvic sepsis requiring a diverting stoma, more frequently than after standard hemorrhoidectomy. Moreover it carries a higher recurrence rate in the treatment of fourth-degree piles. A recent Cochrane metaanalysis demonstrated that SM is less effective than standard hemorrhoidectomy since it carries a higher recurrence rate (OR=3.6) and reintervention rate (OR=2.3). When used for rectal mucosal prolapse and obstructed defecation, SM is reported to have variable results. A better outcome is likely to be achieved in patients without anismus and psychoneurosis operated on by specialists trained with this technique.

  20. Management and imaging of low rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Gisella; Daniels, Ian; Heald, R J; Brown, Gina; Moran, B J

    2004-01-01

    Large variations in recurrence rates have been reported with the best results following total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery for low and middle rectal cancers. However, the low rectal cancers still have higher rates of local recurrence (up to 30%) whether operated by low anterior resection or abdominoperineal excision (APE) due to high rates of circumferential margin involvement. The treatment of choice for low rectal cancers that encroach upon the potential circumferential resection margin is surgery combined with preoperative neoadjuvant treatment. Preoperative chemotherapy combined with long-term radiotherapy reduces recurrence rates and preoperative loco-regional staging can help to select the patients more likely to benefit from neo-adjuvant therapy. Surface coil MRI is the most promising modality for patient selection, which can provide good views of the circumferential resection margin especially the presence or absence of tumour encroaching the intersphincteric plane. PMID:15572087

  1. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  2. [A case of huge advanced rectal cancer invaded into the surrounding organs resected successfully after preoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6].

    PubMed

    Sakakura, Chouhei; Nishio, Minoru; Miyashita, Atsushi; Nagata, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Takuo; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ikoma, Hisashi; Kubota, Ken; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kikuchi, Syoujirou; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Ochiai, Toshiya; Kokuba, Yukihito; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Sonoyama, Teruhisa; Otsuji, Eigo

    2008-11-01

    In the recent improvement in chemotherapy for advanced rectal cancer, a treatment for rectal cancer involving the surrounding organs has been well thought out. In this report, we described a case of advanced rectal cancer invaded into the surrounding organs was resected successfully after preoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6. The case was a 74-year-old man with advanced rectal cancer (type 3). A close examination of the patient revealed a bowel movement disturbance. Bowel obstruction was treated with transverse colostomy. Then chemotherapy (mFOLFOX6) was performed six times. It was judged at first to be a huge tumor of 15 cm in diameter, which was unresectable due to invasion into the urinary bladder and sacrum. However, after mFOLFOX6 was enforced, the tumor was shrunk to about 5 cm in diameter (effect judgment PR). Then the tumor was successfully resected. A pathologic histology inspection of the tumor, judged to be Grade 2 prior to resection, revealed a differentiation type glandular carcinoma and a highly lymphocytic infiltration. These results suggested that an appropriate preoperative chemotherapy was useful for huge rectal cancers involving the surrounding organs such as urinary bladder and sacrum.

  3. Silicone elastomer sling for rectal prolapse in cats

    PubMed Central

    Corgozinho, Katia Barão; Belchior, Cristiane; de Souza, Heloisa Justen Moreira; Ferreira, Ana Maria; Resende, Carolina; Damico, Brandão; Cunha, Simone

    2010-01-01

    This study reports 2 cases of recurrent rectal prolapse secondary to anal abnormality in cats. In both cases the anus was wide, leading to a rectal mucosal prolapse during defecation. A silicone elastomer sling was introduced around the anus, and the rectal prolapse was definitively resolved. PMID:20676293

  4. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben Youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route.

  5. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route. PMID:27123404

  6. GASTRIC CARCINOID TYPE 1 IN A PATIENT WITH AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME: ADDITIONAL ENDOCRINOLOGICAL EVALUATION REQUIRED.

    PubMed

    Vrkljan, Ana Marija; Grasić, David; Kruljac, Ivan; Nikolić, Marko; Filipović-Cugura, Jaksa; Ulamec, Monika; Kovacić, Ksenija; Babić, Nenad; Ljubicić, Neven

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome by definition consists of two or more endocrinological insufficiencies or two organ specific autoimmune diseases. There are no stringent criteria for endocrinological evaluation of patients with one endocrine insufficiency. However, detailed endocrinological evaluation should be undertaken in patients with two autoimmune diseases. Additionally, follow up thereafter should be a must in these patients in order to avoid the possibility of not diagnosing subsequent autoimmune diseases that can occur. The aim of this case report is to point to the necessity of endocrinological screening to be made in patients presenting with gastric carcinoid type 1. We report on a 62-year-old woman who was diagnosed with primary hypothyroidism in 1993. In 2011, she was re-admitted to the hospital due to increasing fatigue. Macrocytic anemia, low vitamin B12 levels and positive parietal antibodies confirmed pernicious anemia. Furthermore, she underwent gastroscopy, which revealed two polyps in the corpus of the stomach and one in the fornix. Endoscopic mucosal resection was performed and histopathologic analysis confirmed three G1 gastric carcinoids (Ki67 2%). Additional endocrinological evaluation disclosed positive glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies, but normal fasting and postprandial glucose and HbA1c. In 2013, she was diagnosed with glucose intolerance and subsequently with latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood. Plasma glucose and HbA1c normalized after dietary intervention. Due to the increase of serum chromogranin A, prophylactic antrectomy was performed in 2014. The patient is still followed-up and has normal chromogranin A, gastrin and HbA1c levels. PMID:27017730

  7. Recent advances in diagnosis and therapy of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Pelley, R J; Bukowski, R M

    1997-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare tumors that can be classified as APU-Domas (amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation). They can be subdivided into the carcinoid tumors of the gastrointestinal submucosa and the islet cell endocrine tumors of the pancreas. Although the majority of tumors that become clinically apparent are malignant, they are frequently slow growing. Despite this, neuroendocrine tumors may generate disabling hormonal syndromes requiring aggressive treatment to achieve palliation. Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of these tumors has led to better radiographic imaging and more accurate localization techniques. Medical therapies with somatostatin analogues, omeprazole, and locoregional tumor ablation have made a positive impact on curative and palliative therapy. This review updates the recent efforts made in the radiographic imaging and therapeutics of the gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

  8. [Nuclear morphology in false negative and negative rectal biopsies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rilke, F; Clemente, C; Pilotti, S

    1975-01-01

    An typical nuclear structure consisting of a cribriform and condensed chromatin pattern with hyperchromasia, a small nucleolus and a moderately increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio was observed in the epithelial cells of the crypts and in the stromal and muscular cells of 51 out of 70 oncologically negative biopsies of the rectal mucosa. The subsequent retrieval of all clinical and histologia data revealed that the 51 cases included 39 of adenocarcinoma of the large intestine either present (15 cases) at a variable distance from the false negative biopsy or removed previously (24 cases), 7 of extra-intestinal malignant tumor (parotid gland, urinary bladder, endometrium, breast, stomach, metastatic, anus) and 5 with benign conditions of the large intestine. Of the remaining 19 cases whose biopsies did not reveal the atypical nuclear structure 16 had benign lesions of the large intestine and nowhere evidence of malignancy, two had an adenocarcinoma of the large bowel (one present and one removed previously) and one a carcinoma of the anus. In the rectal biopsies examined the atypical nuclear structure was detected in 93.9% of the cases with a malignant tumor either present or removed previously and in 19% of the cases with benign conditions. The morphologic evidence indicated that the atypical nuclear structure was compatible with a possible distrubance of the mitotic cycle since the findings were restricted to the generative compartment of rectal epithelium. The results are discussed in connection with their possible practical use as a diagnostic aid in the evaluation and interpretation of false negative and negative rectal biopsies as well as with their possible significance in the biology of tumor-bearing hosts.

  9. Assessment of colloid response by nonlinear optical microscopy after preoperative radiochemotherapy for rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Lianhuang; Chen, Zhifen; Wang, Xingfu; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Li, Hongsheng; Jiang, Weizhong; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-05-01

    Colloid response is a type of tumor response that occurs after preoperative radiochemotherapy for rectal carcinoma. Given its important influence on survival, the colloid response should be considered when estimating histopathological reactions. Here, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was applied to evaluate the colloid response ex vivo. This study demonstrated that MPM has the capability to visualize the colloid response in the absence of labels and can, in particular, identify rare residual carcinomatous cells in mucin pools. These results highlight the potential of this nonlinear optical technique as a diagnostic tool for tumor response after neoadjuvant treatment.

  10. Association of statin use with a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Matthew S.; Minsky, Bruce D. . E-mail: minskyb@mskcc.org; Saltz, Leonard B.; Riedel, Elyn; Chessin, David B.; Guillem, Jose G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To assess whether 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, or statins, might enhance the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2001, 358 patients with clinically resectable, nonmetastatic rectal cancer underwent surgery at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for either locally advanced tumors or low-lying tumors that would require abdominoperineal resection. We excluded 9 patients for radiation therapy dose <45 Gy or if statin use was unknown, leaving 349 evaluable patients. Median radiation therapy dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45-55.8 Gy), and 308 patients (88%) received 5-flurouracil-based chemotherapy. Medication use, comorbid illnesses, clinical stage as assessed by digital rectal examination and ultrasound, and type of chemotherapy were analyzed for associations with pathologic complete response (pCR), defined as no microscopic evidence of tumor. Fisher's exact test was used for categoric variables, Mantel-Haenszel test for ordered categoric variables, and logistic regression for multivariate analysis. Results: Thirty-three patients (9%) used a statin, with no differences in clinical stage according to digital rectal examination or ultrasound compared with the other 324 patients. At the time of surgery, 23 nonstatin patients (7%) were found to have metastatic disease, compared with 0% for statin patients. The unadjusted pCR rates with and without statin use were 30% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.10). Variables significant univariately at the p = 0.15 level were entered into a multivariate model, as were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which were strongly associated with statin use. The odds ratio for statin use on pCR was 4.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.7-12.1; p = 0.003) after adjusting for NSAID use, clinical stage, and type of chemotherapy. Conclusion: In multivariate analysis, statin use is associated with an improved p

  11. [Comparative study of MRI and x-ray computed tomography in the preoperative evaluation of rectal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Guinet, C; Ghossain, M; Buy, J N; Sézeur, A; Mallet, A; Bigot, J M; Malbec, L; Vadrot, D; Ecoiffier, J

    1990-05-01

    Twenty-one patients with middle and low rectal carcinomas have been operated by abdominoperineal resection (APR) in 11 patients, and low anterior resection (LAR) with coloanal anastomosis in 7 and colorectal anastomosis in 3. The distance of the lower margin of the tumor to insertion of the levator ani on the rectal wall was correctly evaluated by CT in 15 of 21 cases (71%) and by MR in 14 of 21 (67%) while digital examination correctly assessed the distance in 17 of 21 (81%). CT and MR were unable to assess extension through the rectal wall. No significant discordance was observed between CT and MR in assessing extension to the perivesical fat, adjacent organs, pelvic side wall or lymphnodes. According to the TNM classification, MR correctly staged 76% (16 of 21) of patients while CT correctly staged 71% (15 of 21).

  12. Identification of deregulation of apoptosis and cell cycle in neuroendocrine tumors of the lung via NanoString nCounter expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Robert Fred Henry; Werner, Robert; Ting, Saskia; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Theegarten, Dirk; Christoph, Daniel Christian; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Mairinger, Fabian Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumors of the lung comprise typical (TC) and atypical carcinoids (AC), large-cell neuroendocrine cancer (LCNEC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Cell cycle and apoptosis are key pathways of multicellular homeostasis and deregulation of these pathways is associated with cancerogenesis. Materials and Methods Sixty representative FFPE-specimens (16 TC, 13 AC, 16 LCNEC and 15 SCLC) were used for mRNA expression analysis using the NanoString technique. Eight genes related to apoptosis and ten genes regulating key points of cell cycle were investigated. Results ASCL1, BCL2, CASP8, CCNE1, CDK1, CDK2, CDKN1A and CDKN2A showed lower expression in carcinoids compared to carcinomas. In contrast, CCNE1 and CDK6 showed elevated expression in carcinoids compared to carcinomas. The calculated BCL2/BAX ratio showed increasing values from TC to SCLC. Between SCLC and LCNEC CDK2, CDKN1B, CDKN2A and PNN expression was significantly different with higher expression in SCLC. Conclusion Carcinoids have increased CDK4/6 and CCND1 expression controlling RB1 phosphorylation via this signaling cascade. CDK2 and CCNE1 were increased in carcinomas showing that these use the opposite way to control RB1. BAX and BCL2 are antagonists in regulating apoptosis. BCL2 expression increased over BAX expression with increasing malignancy of the tumor from TC to SCLC. PMID:26008974

  13. Carcinoid syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck, or upper chest Diarrhea Heart palpitations Low blood pressure Skin lesions on the face called telangiectasias Wheezing Sometimes symptoms are brought on by physical exertion, or eating or drinking things such as blue cheeses, chocolate, or red wine.

  14. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... dilator is a device designed to dilate the anal sphincter and canal when the size of the anal opening...

  15. [A new WHO classification of prostate tumors].

    PubMed

    Frank, G A; Andreeva, Yu Yu; Moskvina, L V; Efremov, G D; Samoilova, S I

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews the 2016 WHO classification of prostate tumors, notes the alterations made, and describes approaches to the diagnosis of cancer types and grades. It also gives original photomicrographs from the authors' collection. The main alterations were as follows: - The types of prostate adenocarcinoma were added by pleomorphic giant-cell carcinoma; oncocytic (8290/3) and lymphoepithelial (8082/3) carcinomas were excluded. - Grade III prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) was substituted for high grade PIN (8148/2). - Intraductal carcinoma (8500/2) was added. - Basal cell adenoma (8147/0) was excluded. - Carcinoids were referred to as low-grade neuroendocrine tumors according to the current terminology; large cell neuroendocrine cancer (8013/3) was added. - Paraganglioma (8613/3) and neuroblastoma (9500/3) were excluded. Stromal tumors were grouped with mesenchymal neoplasms. -Malignant fibrous histiocytoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, chondroma, and hemangiopericytoma were excluded. - Synovial sarcoma (9040/3), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (8825/1), osteosarcoma (9180/3), undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (8802/3), solitary fibrous tumor (8815/1), and malignant solitary fibrous tumor (8815/3) were added. The section of lymphoproliferative diseases was extended. The tumors of unknown origin included paraganglioma and neuroblastoma from a group of neuroendocrine tumors. The TNM staging was completely consistent with the 2010 AJCC version. PMID:27600780

  16. [A new WHO classification of prostate tumors].

    PubMed

    Frank, G A; Andreeva, Yu Yu; Moskvina, L V; Efremov, G D; Samoilova, S I

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews the 2016 WHO classification of prostate tumors, notes the alterations made, and describes approaches to the diagnosis of cancer types and grades. It also gives original photomicrographs from the authors' collection. The main alterations were as follows: - The types of prostate adenocarcinoma were added by pleomorphic giant-cell carcinoma; oncocytic (8290/3) and lymphoepithelial (8082/3) carcinomas were excluded. - Grade III prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) was substituted for high grade PIN (8148/2). - Intraductal carcinoma (8500/2) was added. - Basal cell adenoma (8147/0) was excluded. - Carcinoids were referred to as low-grade neuroendocrine tumors according to the current terminology; large cell neuroendocrine cancer (8013/3) was added. - Paraganglioma (8613/3) and neuroblastoma (9500/3) were excluded. Stromal tumors were grouped with mesenchymal neoplasms. -Malignant fibrous histiocytoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, chondroma, and hemangiopericytoma were excluded. - Synovial sarcoma (9040/3), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (8825/1), osteosarcoma (9180/3), undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (8802/3), solitary fibrous tumor (8815/1), and malignant solitary fibrous tumor (8815/3) were added. The section of lymphoproliferative diseases was extended. The tumors of unknown origin included paraganglioma and neuroblastoma from a group of neuroendocrine tumors. The TNM staging was completely consistent with the 2010 AJCC version.

  17. 10 rare tumors that warrant a genetics referral.

    PubMed

    Banks, Kimberly C; Moline, Jessica J; Marvin, Monica L; Newlin, Anna C; Vogel, Kristen J

    2013-03-01

    The number of described cancer susceptibility syndromes continues to grow, as does our knowledge on how to manage these syndromes with the aim of early detection and cancer prevention. Oncologists now have greater responsibility to recognize patterns of cancer that warrant referral for a genetics consultation. While some patterns of common cancers are easy to recognize as related to hereditary cancer syndromes, there are a number of rare tumors that are highly associated with cancer syndromes yet are often overlooked given their infrequency. We present a review of ten rare tumors that are strongly associated with hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes: adrenocortical carcinoma, carcinoid tumors, diffuse gastric cancer, fallopian tube/primary peritoneal cancer, leiomyosarcoma, medullary thyroid cancer, paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma, renal cell carcinoma of chromophobe, hybrid oncocytoic, or oncocytoma histology, sebaceous carcinoma, and sex cord tumors with annular tubules. This review will serve as a guide for oncologists to assist in the recognition of rare tumors that warrant referral for a genetic consultation.

  18. Prediction of Response to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer by Multiplex Kinase Activity Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Folkvord, Sigurd; Flatmark, Kjersti; Dueland, Svein

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Tumor response of rectal cancer to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) varies considerably. In experimental tumor models and clinical radiotherapy, activity of particular subsets of kinase signaling pathways seems to predict radiation response. This study aimed to determine whether tumor kinase activity profiles might predict tumor response to preoperative CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Sixty-seven LARC patients were treated with a CRT regimen consisting of radiotherapy, fluorouracil, and, where possible, oxaliplatin. Pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens were analyzed using microarrays with kinase substrates, and the resulting substrate phosphorylation patterns were correlated with tumor response to preoperative treatment as assessed by histomorphologic tumor regression grade (TRG). A predictive model for TRG scores from phosphosubstrate signatures was obtained by partial-least-squares discriminant analysis. Prediction performance was evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation and use of an independent test set. Results: In the patient population, 73% and 15% were scored as good responders (TRG 1-2) or intermediate responders (TRG 3), whereas 12% were assessed as poor responders (TRG 4-5). In a subset of 7 poor responders and 12 good responders, treatment outcome was correctly predicted for 95%. Application of the prediction model on the remaining patient samples resulted in correct prediction for 85%. Phosphosubstrate signatures generated by poor-responding tumors indicated high kinase activity, which was inhibited by the kinase inhibitor sunitinib, and several discriminating phosphosubstrates represented proteins derived from signaling pathways implicated in radioresistance. Conclusions: Multiplex kinase activity profiling may identify functional biomarkers predictive of tumor response to preoperative CRT in LARC.

  19. Efficacy of Immunohistochemical Staining in Differentiating a Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Poorly Differentiated Rectal Cancer: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Sairafi; Han, Yoon Dae; Jang, Mi; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    A rectal carcinoma, including primary an adenosquamous and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is a very rare disease, accounting for 0.025% to 0.20% of all large-bowel malignant tumors. Because SCCs have a higher mortality than adenosquamous carcinomas, determining whether the primary rectal cancer exhibits an adenomatous component or a squamous component is important. While differentiating between these 2 components, especially in poorly differentiated rectal cancer, is difficult, specific immunohistochemical stains enable accurate diagnoses. Here, we report the use of immunohistochemical stains to distinguish between the adenomatous and the squamous components in 2 patients with low rectal cancer, a 58-year-old man and a 73-year-old woman, who were initially diagnosed using the histopathologic results for a poorly differentiated carcinoma. These data suggest that using these immunohistochemical stains will help to accurately diagnose the type of rectal cancer, especially for poorly differentiated carcinomas, and will provide important information to determine the proper treatment for the patient. PMID:27626026

  20. Efficacy of Immunohistochemical Staining in Differentiating a Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Poorly Differentiated Rectal Cancer: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Sairafi; Han, Yoon Dae; Jang, Mi; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    A rectal carcinoma, including primary an adenosquamous and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is a very rare disease, accounting for 0.025% to 0.20% of all large-bowel malignant tumors. Because SCCs have a higher mortality than adenosquamous carcinomas, determining whether the primary rectal cancer exhibits an adenomatous component or a squamous component is important. While differentiating between these 2 components, especially in poorly differentiated rectal cancer, is difficult, specific immunohistochemical stains enable accurate diagnoses. Here, we report the use of immunohistochemical stains to distinguish between the adenomatous and the squamous components in 2 patients with low rectal cancer, a 58-year-old man and a 73-year-old woman, who were initially diagnosed using the histopathologic results for a poorly differentiated carcinoma. These data suggest that using these immunohistochemical stains will help to accurately diagnose the type of rectal cancer, especially for poorly differentiated carcinomas, and will provide important information to determine the proper treatment for the patient.

  1. Efficacy of Immunohistochemical Staining in Differentiating a Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Poorly Differentiated Rectal Cancer: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Rami, Sairafi; Han, Yoon Dae; Jang, Mi; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2016-08-01

    A rectal carcinoma, including primary an adenosquamous and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is a very rare disease, accounting for 0.025% to 0.20% of all large-bowel malignant tumors. Because SCCs have a higher mortality than adenosquamous carcinomas, determining whether the primary rectal cancer exhibits an adenomatous component or a squamous component is important. While differentiating between these 2 components, especially in poorly differentiated rectal cancer, is difficult, specific immunohistochemical stains enable accurate diagnoses. Here, we report the use of immunohistochemical stains to distinguish between the adenomatous and the squamous components in 2 patients with low rectal cancer, a 58-year-old man and a 73-year-old woman, who were initially diagnosed using the histopathologic results for a poorly differentiated carcinoma. These data suggest that using these immunohistochemical stains will help to accurately diagnose the type of rectal cancer, especially for poorly differentiated carcinomas, and will provide important information to determine the proper treatment for the patient. PMID:27626026

  2. The effect of preoperative chemoradiotherapy on lymph nodes harvested in TME for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adequate lymph nodes resection in rectal cancer is important for staging and local control. This retrospective analysis single center study evaluated the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation on the number of lymph nodes in rectal carcinoma, considering some clinicopathological parameters. Methods A total of 111 patients undergone total mesorectal excision for rectal adenocarcinoma from July 2005 to May 2012 in our center were included. No patient underwent any prior pelvic surgery or radiotherapy. Chemoradiotherapy was indicated in patients with rectal cancer stage II or III before chemoradiation. Results One-hundred and eleven patients were considered. The mean age was 67.6 yrs (range 36 – 84, SD 10.8). Fifty (45.0%) received neoadjuvant therapy before resection. The mean number of removed lymph nodes was 13.6 (range 0–39, SD 7.3). In the patients who received neoadjuvant therapy the number of nodes detected was lower (11.5, SD 6.5 vs. 15.3, SD 7.5, p = 0.006). 37.4% of patients with preoperative chemoradiotherapy had 12 or more lymph nodes in the specimen compared to the 63.6% of those who had surgery at the first step (p: 0.006). Other factors associated in univariate analysis with lower lymph nodes yield included stage (p 0.005) and grade (p 0.0003) of the tumour. Age, sex, tumor site, type of operation, surgeons and pathologists did not weight upon the number of the removed lymph nodes. Conclusion In TME surgery for rectal cancer, preoperative CRT results into a reduction of lymph nodes yield in univariate analisys and linear regression. PMID:24246069

  3. Dose mapping of the rectal wall during brachytherapy with an array of scintillation dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, L. E.; Suchowerska, N.; Yin, Y.; Lambert, J.; Haque, M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: In pelvic brachytherapy treatments, the rectum is an organ at risk. The authors have developed an array of scintillation dosimeters suitable for in vivo use that enables quality assurance of the treatment delivery and provides an alert to potential radiation accidents. Ultimately, this will provide evidence to direct treatment planning and dose escalation and correlate dose with the rectal response. Methods: An array of 16 scintillation dosimeters in an insertable applicator has been developed. The dosimeters were calibrated simultaneously in a custom designed circular jig before use. Each dosimeter is optically interfaced to a set of pixels on a CCD camera located outside the treatment bunker. A customized software converts pixel values into dose rate and accumulates dose for presentation during treatment delivery. The performance of the array is tested by simulating brachytherapy treatments in a water phantom. The treatment plans were designed to deliver a known dose distribution on the surface of the rectal applicator, assumed to represent the dose to the rectal wall. Results: The measured doses were compared to those predicted by the treatment plan and found to be in agreement to within the uncertainty in measurement, usually within 3%. The array was also used to track the progression of the source as it moved along the catheter. The measured position was found to agree with the position reported by the afterloader to within the measurement uncertainty, usually within 2 mm. Conclusions: This array is capable of measuring the actual dose received by each region of the rectal wall during brachytherapy treatments. It will provide real time monitoring of treatment delivery and raise an alert to a potential radiation accident. Real time dose mapping in the clinical environment will give the clinician additional confidence to carry out dose escalation to the tumor volume while avoiding rectal side effects.

  4. [Two cases of advanced rectal cancer resected successfully after neoadjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX regimen].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroki; Taniguchi, Fumihiro; Sonoda, Hiromichi; Itokawa, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Jun; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Koide, Kazuma; Ueshima, Yasuo; Takashina, Kenichiro; Lee, Chol-Jou; Shioaki, Yasuhiro

    2009-11-01

    We describe here two cases of locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to surgery. The first patient was a 54-year-old man whose chief complaint was bloody stool. A detailed examination revealed a rectal cancer with direct invasion of the primary rectal carcinoma into the prostate. Four courses of FOLFOX4 were administered as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Because the invasion to the prostate was difficult to determine by subsequent CT evaluation, we performed a radical resection. The pathological examination revealed that all surgical margins were negative for malignancy and no metastasis to lymph nodes was found, therefore a surgical evaluation of curability was classified as A. The second patient was a 49-year-old woman whose chief complaint was irregular menstruation. A detailed examination revealed a rectal cancer with metastasis to an ovary and paraaortic lymph node. One course of FOLFOX4 and six courses of mFOLFOX6 (combined with bevacizumab in the first five courses) were administered as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Subsequent examinations revealed significantly reduced primary tumor and the size of metastatic lesion. Given that metastasis to the paraaortic lymph node was difficult to determine, we performed a radical resection. The pathological examination revealed that all surgical margins were negative for malignancy, and the postoperative FDG-PET evaluation did not find FDG accumulation to paraaortic lymph node. We determined that there was no residual cancer and evaluated the surgery as curability B. We conclude that neoadjuvant chemotherapy against locally advanced rectal cancer may improve the curability of the surgery and save the surrounding organs.

  5. [A Case of Rectal Carcinoma with Recurrence around the Drainage Site Complicated by Fournier's Gangrene].

    PubMed

    Abe, Kaoru; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Yamada, Saki; Soma, Daiki; Yagi, Ryoma; Miura, Kohei; Tatsuda, Kumiko; Tajima, Yosuke; Okamura, Takuma; Nakano, Mae; Nakano, Masato; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2015-11-01

    A 71-year-old woman diagnosed with Fournier's gangrene caused by penetration of a rectal carcinoma was referred to our hospital. Emergency drainage and sigmoid colostomy were performed. Pathological examination of a biopsy sample showed moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma. Abdominoperineal resection with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and hysterectomy was performed with curative intent after 4 courses of chemotherapy with S-1 and oxaliplatin. The postoperative pathological diagnosis was StageⅡ (pT4bN0M0). The patient received tegafur/uracil and Leucovorin as adjuvant chemotherapy. Seven months after the curative operation, partial pneumonectomy was performed for the recurrence of the rectal carcinoma in the right lung. Eight months after pneumonectomy, recurrent tumors were observed in the right lung and subcutaneous fat layer of the right buttock along the drainage site. The tumor in the right buttock was excised along with part of the gluteus maximus, and partial pneumonectomy was then performed. Three years and 6 months after the emergency drainage, the patient is alive with no evidence of recurrence. After drainage for rectal carcinoma complicated by Fournier's gangrene, the possibility of recurrence around the drainage site should be considered. PMID:26805341

  6. The Value of Somatostatin Receptor Imaging with In-111 Octreotide and/or Ga-68 DOTATATE in Localizing Ectopic ACTH Producing Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gözde Özkan, Zeynep; Kuyumcu, Serkan; Balköse, Deniz; Özkan, Berker; Aksakal, Nihat; Yılmaz, Ebru; Şanlı, Yasemin; Türkmen, Cüneyt; Aral, Ferihan; Adalet, Işık

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to evaluate the value of somatostatin receptor imaging (SRI) with In-111 octreotide and Ga-68 DOTATATE in localizing ectopic ACTH producing tumors. Methods: Nineteen patients who had In-111 octreotide somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) and/or Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT to localize ectopic ACTH producing tumors between the years 2000 and 2012 were included retrospectively in our study. The results of SRI were compared with clinical onset, radiological findings and surgical data of the patients. Results: Sixteen In-111 octreotide SRS and five Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT were performed in 19 patients. In eight out of 19 patients, ectopic ACTH secretion site could be detected. In five patients, SRS showed pathologic uptake. In four of these patients, surgery revealed pulmonary carcinoid tumors and in one patient pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. In one patient, Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT revealed pathologic uptake in lung nodule which came out to be pulmonary carcinoid tumor. In another patient who had resection of metastases of atypical carcinoid tumor prior to scans, new metastatic foci were detected both with SRS and Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT imaging. In one patient, although SRS was negative, CT which was performed three years later showed a lung nodule diagnosed as pulmonary carcinoid tumor. In 11 patients, ectopic ACTH secretion site could not be detected. In 10 of those patients, scintigraphic and radiological imaging did not show any lesions and in one patient, Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT was false positive. Conclusion: SRI has a complementary role with radiological imaging in localizing ectopic ACTH secretion sites. PET-CT imaging with Ga-68 peptide conjugates is a promising new modality for this indication. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24003397

  7. Underlying anatomy for CTV contouring and lymphatic drainage in rectal cancer radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Stefano; Valentini, Vincenzo; Nori, Stefania L; Fares, Claudia; Dinapoli, Nicola; Gambacorta, Maria Antonierrta

    2003-01-01

    Despite the low local recurrence rate that can be achieved by adequate surgery (total mesorectal excision--TME), radiation therapy was shown to play a significant role in reducing this risk. The widespread use of TME in many European Centers has introduced a new terminology and the need to identify the area at major risk for local failure using this surgical procedure. In the surgical series where extended extra-mesorectal surgery was performed, the role of lymphatic spread was evidenced, especially for low rectal cancer, through the pelvic parietal fascia and lateral pelvic spaces. The aim of this study was to better define some anatomic concepts and the main risk factors which impact on CTV contouring and field conformation in rectal cancer treatment. This information helps formulating guidelines for CTV contouring in daily radiotherapy practice, in order to define the best therapy, according to the tumor stage and location. PMID:15018321

  8. Long-Term Results of Local Excision for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paty, Philip B.; Nash, Garrett M.; Baron, Paul; Zakowski, Maureen; Minsky, Bruce D.; Blumberg, David; Nathanson, Daniel R.; Guillem, Jose G.; Enker, Warren E.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Wong, W. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Objective To review the authors’ experience with local excision of early rectal cancers to assess the effectiveness of initial treatment and of salvage surgery. Summary Background Data Local excision for rectal cancer is appealing for its low morbidity and excellent functional results. However, its use is limited by inability to assess regional lymph nodes and uncertainty of oncologic outcome. Methods Patients with T1 and T2 adenocarcinomas of the rectum treated by local excision as definitive surgery between 1969 to 1996 at the authors’ institution were reviewed. Pathology slides were reviewed. Among 125 assessable patients, 74 were T1 and 51 were T2. Thirty-one patients (25%) were selected to receive adjuvant radiation therapy. Fifteen of these 31 patients received adjuvant radiation in combination with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 6.7 years. One hundred fifteen patients (92%) were followed until death or for greater than 5 years, and 69 patients (55%) were followed until death or for greater than 10 years. Recurrence was recorded as local, distant, and overall. Survival was disease-specific. Results Ten-year local recurrence and survival rates were 17% and 74% for T1 rectal cancers and 26% and 72% for T2 cancers. Median time to relapse was 1.4 years (range 0.4–7.0) for local recurrence and 2.5 years (0.8–7.5) for distant recurrence. In patients receiving radiotherapy, local recurrence was delayed (median 2.1 years vs. 1.1 years), but overall rates of local and overall recurrence and survival rates were similar to patients not receiving radiotherapy. Among 26 cancer deaths, 8 (28%) occurred more than 5 years after local excision. On multivariate analysis, no clinical or pathologic features were predictive of local recurrence. Intratumoral vascular invasion was the only significant predictor of survival. Among 34 patients who developed tumor recurrence, the pattern of first clinical recurrence was predominantly local: 50% local only

  9. Total mesorectal excision for the treatment of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zedan, Ali; Salah, Tareq

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the surgical treatment of rectal cancer, a clear circumferential resection margin and distal resection margin should be obtained. The aim of this study was to determine the morbidity, mortality, survival outcome, and local failure after total mesorectal excision (TME) in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer. Methods This retrospective study was conducted on 101 patients treated for rectal cancer using low anterior resection (LAR), abdominoperinial resection (APR), or Hartmaan’s technique. In all operative procedures, total mesorectal excisions (TMEs) were done. The patients were treated from November 2000 to April 2011 in the South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI) of Assuit University (Egypt). Neo-adjuvant therapy was given to those patients with serosalin filtration, lymph node involvement, and sexual and urinary function impairment. Data were analyzed using IBM-SPSS version 21, and survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results One hundred one patients were evaluable (61 males, 40 females). Regarding the operative procedure used, it was: (APR), LAR, Hartmaan’s technique in 15.8%, 71.3%, and 12.9% of patients, respectively. Operation-related mortality during the 30 days after surgery was 3%. The operations resulted in morbidity in 25% of the patients, anastomotic site leak in 5.9% of the patients, urinary dysfynction in 9.9% of the patients, and erectile dysfunction in 15.8% of the male patients. Regarding safety margin, the median distances were distal/radial margin, 23/12 mm, distal limit 7 cm. Median lymph nodes harvest 19 nodes. Primary tumor locations were anteriorly 23.8%, laterally 13.9%, posteriorly 38.6%, and circumferential 23.8%. Protective stoma 16.8%. Primary Tumor TNM classification (T1, T2, T3, and T4; 3, 28.7, 55.4, and 12.9%, respectively). Nodes Metastases (N0, N1, and N2; 57.4, 31.7, and 10.9%, respectively). TNM staging (I, II, III, and IV; 15.8, 29.7, 46.5, and 7.9%, respectively). Chemotherapy was

  10. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  11. Prognostic Value of MicroRNAs in Preoperative Treated Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Azadeh; Epping, Ingo; Kramer, Frank; Jo, Peter; Bernhardt, Markus; Kitz, Julia; Salinas, Gabriela; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Grade, Marian; Beißbarth, Tim; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer are treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection. Despite similar clinical parameters (uT2-3, uN+) and standard therapy, patients’ prognoses differ widely. A possible prediction of prognosis through microRNAs as biomarkers out of treatment-naïve biopsies would allow individualized therapy options. Methods: Microarray analysis of 45 microdissected preoperative biopsies from patients with rectal cancer was performed to identify potential microRNAs to predict overall survival, disease-free survival, cancer-specific survival, distant-metastasis-free survival, tumor regression grade, or nodal stage. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed on an independent set of 147 rectal cancer patients to validate relevant miRNAs. Results: In the microarray screen, 14 microRNAs were significantly correlated to overall survival. Five microRNAs were included from previous work. Finally, 19 miRNAs were evaluated by qPCR. miR-515-5p, miR-573, miR-579 and miR-802 demonstrated significant correlation with overall survival and cancer-specific survival (p < 0.05). miR-573 was also significantly correlated with the tumor regression grade after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. miR-133b showed a significant correlation with distant-metastasis-free survival. miR-146b expression levels showed a significant correlation with nodal stage. Conclusion: Specific microRNAs can be used as biomarkers to predict prognosis of patients with rectal cancer and possibly stratify patients’ therapy if validated in a prospective study. PMID:27092493

  12. CXCL10 mRNA expression predicts response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wang, Zhimin; Liu, Fangqi; Zhu, Ji; Yang, Li; Cai, Guoxiang; Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Wei; Cai, Sanjun; Xu, Ye

    2014-10-01

    Chemoradiotherapy has been commonly used as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer to allow for less aggressive surgical approaches and to improve quality of life. In cancer, it has been reported that CXCL10 has an anti-tumor function. However, the association between CXCL10 and chemoradiosensitivity has not been fully investigated. We performed this study to investigate the relationship between CXCL10 expression and chemoradiosensitivity in rectal cancer patients. Ninety-five patients with rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) were included. Clinical parameters were compared with the outcome of NCRT and CXCL10 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression between the pathological complete response (pCR) group and non-pathological complete response (npCR) group. CXCL10 mRNA and protein expressions between groups were analyzed using the Student's t test and chi-square test. The mean mRNA level of CXCL10 in the pCR group was significantly higher than that in the npCR group (p = 0.010). In the pCR group, 73.7 % of the patients had high CXCL10 mRNA expression, and 61.4 % of the patients in the npCR group had low CXCL10 mRNA expression. Subjects with high CXCL10 mRNA expression demonstrated a higher sensitivity to NCRT (p = 0.011). The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the diagnostic performance of CXCL10 mRNA expression had an area under the curve of 0.720 (95 % confidence interval, 0.573-0.867). There were no differences between the pCR and npCR groups in CXCL10 protein expression (p > 0.05). High CXCL10 mRNA expression is associated with a better tumor response to NCRT in rectal cancer patients and may predict the outcome of NCRT in this malignancy.

  13. Delaying surgery after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy improves prognosis of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mihmanlı, Mehmet; Kabul Gürbulak, Esin; Akgün, İsmail Ethem; Celayir, Mustafa Fevzi; Yazıcı, Pınar; Tunçel, Deniz; Bek, Tuba Tülin; Öz, Ayhan; Ömeroğlu, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prognostic effect of a delayed interval between neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and surgery in locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS We evaluated 87 patients with locally advanced mid- or distal rectal cancer undergoing total mesorectal excision following an interval period after neoadjuvant CRT at Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul between January 2009 and January 2014. Patients were divided into two groups according to the interval before surgery: < 8 wk (group I) and ≥ 8 wk (group II). Data related to patients, cancer characteristics and pathological examination were collected and analyzed. RESULTS When the distribution of timing between group I (n = 45) and group II (n = 42) was viewed, comparison of interval periods (median ± SD) of groups showed a significant difference of as 5 ± 1.28 wk in group I and 10.1 ± 2.2 wk in group II (P < 0.001). The median follow-up period for all patients was 34.5 (9.9-81) mo. group II had significantly higher rates of pathological complete response (pCR) than group I had (19% vs 8.9%, P = 0.002). Rate of tumor regression grade (TRG) poor response was 44.4% in group I and 9.5% in group II (P < 0.002). A poor pathological response was associated with worse disease-free survival (P = 0.009). The interval time did not show any association with local recurrence (P = 0.79). CONCLUSION Delaying the neoadjuvant CRT-surgery interval may provide nodal down-staging, improve pCR rate, and decrease the rate of TRG poor response. PMID:27672428

  14. Delaying surgery after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy improves prognosis of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mihmanlı, Mehmet; Kabul Gürbulak, Esin; Akgün, İsmail Ethem; Celayir, Mustafa Fevzi; Yazıcı, Pınar; Tunçel, Deniz; Bek, Tuba Tülin; Öz, Ayhan; Ömeroğlu, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prognostic effect of a delayed interval between neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and surgery in locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS We evaluated 87 patients with locally advanced mid- or distal rectal cancer undergoing total mesorectal excision following an interval period after neoadjuvant CRT at Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul between January 2009 and January 2014. Patients were divided into two groups according to the interval before surgery: < 8 wk (group I) and ≥ 8 wk (group II). Data related to patients, cancer characteristics and pathological examination were collected and analyzed. RESULTS When the distribution of timing between group I (n = 45) and group II (n = 42) was viewed, comparison of interval periods (median ± SD) of groups showed a significant difference of as 5 ± 1.28 wk in group I and 10.1 ± 2.2 wk in group II (P < 0.001). The median follow-up period for all patients was 34.5 (9.9-81) mo. group II had significantly higher rates of pathological complete response (pCR) than group I had (19% vs 8.9%, P = 0.002). Rate of tumor regression grade (TRG) poor response was 44.4% in group I and 9.5% in group II (P < 0.002). A poor pathological response was associated with worse disease-free survival (P = 0.009). The interval time did not show any association with local recurrence (P = 0.79). CONCLUSION Delaying the neoadjuvant CRT-surgery interval may provide nodal down-staging, improve pCR rate, and decrease the rate of TRG poor response.

  15. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    SciTech Connect

    Gavioli, Margherita Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible.

  16. Laser application in tracheobronchial tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, B. Krishna; Krishna, Sharon

    2004-09-01

    Ninety three patients with obstructing tracheobronchial tumors were treated with Neodymium: Yttrium - Aluminum - Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser photocoagulation over a period of six years. There were sixty seven Males and 26 Females with a mean age of 44.3 years (range 6- 79 years). 21 benign and 72 malignant lesions were treated with a total 212 sessions of laser photocoagulation (mean 2.4 sessions). The anatomical distribution of lesions were as follows; larynx 9 (three benign and 6 malignant) trachea 39 (27 benign and 12 malignant) left main bronchus 27 (14 malignant) right main bronchus 24 (14 malignant) and vocal cords - 9 (three malignant). There were 21 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, two adenocarcinomas, one adenoid cystic carcinoma, 7 cases of locally infiltrating tumors from thyroid and esophagus, 6 cases of carcinoid tumor and 16 benign lesions. Twenty one patients had a tracheostomy tube in place when treatment was started. Eighteen of the 21 patients with tracheostomy were weaned off the tube in a mean of 5.5 days from the start of treatment. Lumen was restored in 31 (79.4%) patients. In the other eight (20.6%), lumen was achieved, but not sustained. Complications included bleeding in three cases which were managed conservatively, two cases of pneumothorax, and four cases of bronchospasm. There were six deaths during the follow up but none attributable to the procedure. Laser photocoagulation offered effective treatment in the majority of patients with obstructing tracheobronchial tumors, with acceptable morbidity.

  17. Irinotecan and Alisertib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri R.; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Rivers, Robert C.; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, R. Reid; Ellis, Matthew J.C.; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert J.C.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Somatic variants displayed reduced protein abundance compared to germline variants. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein abundance differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five proteomic subtypes in the TCGA cohort, two of which overlapped with the TCGA “MSI/CIMP” transcriptomic subtype, but had distinct mutation, methylation, and protein expression patterns associated with different clinical outcomes. Although copy number alterations showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA abundance, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. The chromosome 20q amplicon was associated with the largest global changes at both mRNA and protein levels; proteomics data highlighted potential 20q candidates including HNF4A, TOMM34 and SRC. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords a new paradigm for understanding cancer biology. PMID:25043054

  19. SPARCL1 Expression Increases With Preoperative Radiation Therapy and Predicts Better Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kotti, Angeliki Holmqvist, Annica; Albertsson, Maria; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is expressed in various normal tissues and many types of cancers. The function of SPARCL1 and its relationship to a patient's prognosis have been studied, whereas its relationship to radiation therapy (RT) is not known. Our aim was to investigate the expression of SPARCL1 in rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: The study included 136 rectal cancer patients who were randomized to undergo preoperative RT and surgery (n=63) or surgery alone (n=73). The expression levels of SPARCL1 in normal mucosa (n=29), primary tumor (n=136), and lymph node metastasis (n=35) were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: Tumors with RT had stronger SPARCL1 expression than tumors without RT (P=.003). In the RT group, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival than weak expression in patients with stage III tumors, independent of sex, age, differentiation, and margin status (P=.022; RR = 18.128; 95% confidence interval, 1.512-217.413). No such relationship was found in the non-RT group (P=.224). Further analysis of interactions among SPARCL1 expression, RT, and survival showed statistical significance (P=.024). In patients with metastases who received RT, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival compared to weak expression (P=.041) but not in the non-RT group (P=.569). Conclusions: SPARCL1 expression increases with RT and is related to better prognosis in rectal cancer patients with RT but not in patients without RT. This result may help us to select the patients best suited for preoperative RT.

  20. Autophagy sensitivity of neuroendocrine lung tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2013-12-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) phenotypes characterize a spectrum of lung tumors, including low-grade typical and intermediate-grade atypical carcinoid, high-grade large-cell NE carcinoma and small cell lung carcinoma. Currently, no effective treatments are available to cure NE lung tumors, demanding identification of biological features specific to these tumors. Here, we report that autophagy has an important role for NE lung tumor cell proliferation and survival. We found that the expression levels of the autophagy marker LC3 are relatively high in a panel of lung tumor cell lines expressing high levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a key NE marker in lung tumors. In response to bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, NE lung tumor cells exhibited cytotoxicity whereas non-NE lung tumor cells exhibited cytostasis, indicating a distinct role of autophagy for NE lung tumor cell survival. Intriguingly, in certain NE lung tumor cell lines, the levels of processed LC3 (LC3-II) were inversely correlated with AKT activity. When AKT activity was inhibited using AKTi or MK2206, the levels of LC3-II and SQSTM1/p62 were increased. In contrast, torin 1, rapamycin or mTOR knockdown increased p62 levels, suggesting that these two pathways have opposing effects on autophagy in certain NE lung tumors. Moreover, inhibition of one pathway resulted in reduced activity of the other, suggesting that these two pathways crosstalk in the tumors. These results suggest that NE lung tumor cells share a common feature of autophagy and are more sensitive to autophagy inhibition than non-NE lung tumor cells. PMID:24126619

  1. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. METHODS: Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. RESULTS: According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images

  2. Predictors of Pathologic Complete Response in Rectal Cancer Patients Undergoing Total Mesorectal Excision After Preoperative Chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Han, Yoon Dae; Kim, Woo Ram; Park, Seung Wan; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-11-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard of care for patients with stage II and III rectal cancer. This strategy leads to pathologic complete response (pCR) in a significant number of patients. Factors predictive of pCR are currently being extensively investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze clinical factors that might be predictive of pCR.This study was a retrospective analysis of rectal cancer patients from January 2004 through December 2012. A total of 332 stage II and III patients with middle and low rectal cancer (≤10 cm) who received CRT and underwent curative total mesorectal excision were eligible. The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy, and 72.6% of patients received infusional 5-fluorouracil with leucovorin, whereas 19.6% of patients received TS-1 with irinotecan, and 7.8% of patients received xeloda only. Pathologic complete response was confirmed by using pathologic specimens and analyzed based on predictive clinical factors.Among the 332 patients, 27.4% (n = 91) achieved pCR. Age, sex, body mass index, clinical T and N stages, tumor differentiation, the chemotherapy agent for CRT, and the time interval between CRT and surgery did not differ between the pCR and non-pCR groups. Carcinoembryogenic antigen (CEA) levels before CRT were 4.61 ± 7.38 ng/mL in the pCR group and 10.49 ± 23.83 ng/mL in the non-pCR group (P = 0.035). Post-CRT CEA levels were 1.4 ± 1.07 ng/mL in the pCR group and 2.16 ± 2.8 ng/mL in the non-pCR group (P = 0.014), and the proportion of middle rectal cancer patients was higher in pCR group (54.9%, P = 0.028). The results from multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that higher tumor location (odds ratio 2.151; P = 0.003) and low post-CRT CEA level (odds ratio 0.789; P = 0.04) were independent predictive factors for pCR.Tumor location and post-CRT CEA level were predictive factors in pCR for rectal cancer patients. Therefore, these factors may

  3. Transanal Evisceration Caused by Rectal Laceration

    PubMed Central

    Torres Sánchez, María Teresa; Richart Aznar, Jose Manuel; Martí Martínez, Eva María; Martínez-Abad, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Transrectal evisceration caused by colorectal injury is an unusual entity. This pathology is more frequent in elderly patients and it is usually produced spontaneously. Rectal prolapse is the principal predisposing factor. An 81-year-old woman was taken to the hospital presenting exit of intestinal loops through the anus. After first reanimation measures, an urgent surgery was indicated. We observed the absence of almost every small intestine loop in the abdominal cavity; these had been moved to the pelvis. After doing the reduction, a 3 to 4 cm linear craniocaudal perforation in upper rectum was objectified, and Hartmann's procedure was performed. We investigated and knew that she frequently manipulate herself to extract her faeces. The fast preoperative management avoided a fatal conclusion or an extensive intestinal resection. Reasons that make us consider rectal self-injury as the etiologic factor are explained. PMID:24639971

  4. Surgical management of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lyen C; Poultsides, George A; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2011-08-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (islet cell tumors) and of the luminal gastrointestinal tract (carcinoids) are a heterogeneous group of epithelial neoplasms that share certain common characteristics. First, they are similar histologically and are difficult to distinguish under light microscopy. Second, they can be associated with hypersecretory syndromes. Third, they are generally slow-growing and have a better prognosis than adenocarcinomas at the same site; however, they do become incurable when they progress to unresectable metastatic disease. Surgery is the only curative treatment and is recommended for most patients for whom cross-sectional imaging suggests that complete resection is possible. This article reviews the surgical management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors, including the preoperative control of hormonal symptoms, extent of resection required, postoperative outcomes, and differing management strategies as determined by whether the tumor has arisen sporadically or as part of a familial disorder, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). PMID:21936439

  5. A Prospective Pathologic Analysis Using Whole-Mount Sections of Rectal Cancer Following Preoperative Combined Modality Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guillem, Jose G.; Chessin, David B.; Shia, Jinru; Suriawinata, Arief; Riedel, Elyn; Moore, Harvey G.; Minsky, Bruce D.; Wong, W Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to use a comprehensive whole-mount pathologic analysis to characterize microscopic patterns of residual disease, as well as circumferential and distal resection margins, in rectal cancer treated with preoperative CMT; and to identify clinicopathologic factors associated with residual disease. Summary Background Data: Recent studies have shown that preoperative combined modality therapy (CMT) for rectal cancer enhances rates of sphincter preservation. However, the efficacy of preoperative CMT in conjunction with a total mesorectal excision (TME)-based resection, in terms of resection margins using whole-mount sections, has not been reported. Furthermore, since patterns of residual disease and extent of distal spread following preoperative CMT are largely unknown, intraoperative determination of distal rectal transection remains a surgical challenge. Methods: We prospectively accrued 109 patients with endorectal ultrasound (ERUS)-staged, locally advanced rectal cancer (T2–T4 and/or N1), located a median distance of 7 cm from the anal verge, requiring preoperative CMT, and undergoing a TME-based resection. Comprehensive whole-mount pathologic analysis was performed, with particular emphasis on extent of residual disease, margin status, and intramural tumor extension. Clinicopathologic factors associated with residual disease were identified. Results: A sphincter-preserving resection was feasible in 87 patients (80%), and in all 109 patients, distal margins were negative (median, 2.1 cm; range, 0.4–10 cm). Intramural extension beyond the gross mucosal edge of residual tumor was observed in only 2 patients (1.8%), both ≤0.95 cm. There were no positive circumferential margins (median, 10 mm; range, 1–28 mm), although 6 were less than or equal to 1 mm. On multivariate analysis, residual disease was observed more frequently in distally located tumors (distance from anal verge <5 cm) (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Our comprehensive

  6. The Evaluation of Rectal Bleeding in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Elizabeth; Nicolaidis, Christina; Helfand, Mark

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Though primary care patients commonly present with rectal bleeding, the optimal evaluation strategy remains unknown. OBJECTIVE To compare the cost-effectiveness of four diagnostic strategies in the evaluation of rectal bleeding. DESIGN Cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov decision model. DATA SOURCES Systematic review of the literature, Medicare reimbursement data, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Cancer Registry. TARGET POPULATION Patients over age 40 with otherwise asymptomatic rectal bleeding. TIME HORIZON The patient's lifetime. PERSPECTIVE Modified societal perspective. INTERVENTIONS Watchful waiting, flexible sigmoidoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy followed by air contrast barium enema (FS+ACBE), and colonoscopy. OUTCOME MEASURES Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. RESULTS OF BASE-CASE ANALYSIS The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for colonoscopy compared with flexible sigmoidoscopy was $5,480 per quality-adjusted year of life saved (QALY). Watchful waiting and FS+ACBE were more expensive and less effective than colonoscopy. RESULTS OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSES The cost of colonoscopy was reduced to $1,686 per QALY when age at entry was changed to 45. Watchful waiting became the least expensive strategy when community procedure charges replaced Medicare costs, when age at entry was maximized to 80, or when the prevalence of polyps was lowered to 7%, but the remaining strategies provided greater life expectancy at relatively low cost. The strategy of FS+ACBE remained more expensive and less effective in all analyses. In the remaining sensitivity analyses, the incremental cost-effectiveness of colonoscopy compared with flexible sigmoidoscopy never rose above $34,000. CONCLUSIONS Colonoscopy is a cost-effective method to evaluate otherwise asymptomatic rectal bleeding, with a low cost per QALY compared to other strategies. PMID:15693933

  7. [Multidisciplinary treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Faes, Seraina; Gié, Olivier; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2016-06-15

    Treatment of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer remains challenging. Preoperative imaging with pelvic MRI allows to identify patients for multimodal treatment including induction chemothe- rapy or neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy and an extended surgical resection. With multidisciplinary approach and an experienced team, excellent oncologic results may be achieved, as well as a good function and quality of life, even with preservation of the anus in the majority of patients. PMID:27487624

  8. Acute rectal obstruction after PPH stapled haemorrhoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, S.; Pescatori, M.

    2002-09-01

    An unusual case of acute intestinal obstruction following a PPH stapled haemorrhoidectomy is reported: the complication was due to an almost complete interruption of the rectal lumen tightened by a purse-string suture anchored by staples. The stricture was dilated and the suture released thus restoring intestinal continuity. Surgeons should be aware that such troublesome complication may occur and can be treated successfully by a transanal approach.

  9. Spiral rectal valves: Anatomy, eponyms, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Ikard, Robert W

    2015-05-01

    Rectal wall valves are obscure anatomic parts that rarely are considered in current medical practice. Yet from the seminal analysis of them in the early nineteenth century by the Irish anatomist and surgeon, John Houston, their structure, purpose, and clinical significance were topics of surprising disagreement. Were they true structures? What function might they have? Did disease originate in rectal valves? Were special operations required for any such diseases? Because Houston's anatomic analyses of rectal valves were substantiated, they came to be known in the English literature as the Spiral Rectal Valves of Houston. In the mid-nineteenth century, a single mid-rectal valve was described by the Hanoverian, Otto Kohlrausch., creating confusion with the established eponym "Houston's Valves." Many hypotheses about rectal valves have been discredited; and their physiologic functions are still unknown.

  10. Epidemiology of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Merav; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Valk, Gerlof D

    2015-01-01

    Formerly named carcinoids, neuroendocrine tumors originate from diffuse endocrine cells, can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, endocrine pancreas and bronchopulmonary (BP) tree, and have a wide range of malignant potential. This chapter summarizes the data available on the epidemiology of neuroendocrine neoplasia (NEN) from around the world, including the relative frequency according to organ of origin, annual incidence rates (IR) and trends in IR at the various anatomic sites, age and stage at presentation, racial and gender differences in IR and 5-year survival rates. Over time, changes have been made in the classification and registration of NEN, both in the same registry and across the globe, thus confounding the possibility to draw conclusions as to the true rise in IR of NEN that is observed all over the world. BP NEN has become the most common site in many western countries, while NEN of the rectum is more common in the Far East. In some countries, appendiceal NEN is the most common site in females. When compared to adenocarcinoma of the same location, the prognosis of NEN patients is better. Five-year survival rates are highest for NEN originating in the rectum and appendix, but lower in small intestinal and pancreatic NEN. Future research is needed to understand the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to NEN epidemiology. PMID:26303701

  11. 5-HTP induced diarrhea as a carcinoid syndrome model in mice?

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Hascoet, M; Deguiral, P

    1996-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is present in the gastrointestinal tract and is probably one of the compounds responsible for diarrhea in patients presenting with carcinoid syndrome. Intraperitoneal administration of L-5-hydroxytryptophan (L-5-HTP) at doses of 25 to 100 mg/kg dramatically increase defecation in mice. In this new paradigm, counting fecal boli deposited is simple and the appraised or inhibition of diarrhea induced by ip 25 mg/kg of L-5-HIP is very clear, with a good reproducibility of scores. L-5-HTP needs to be metabolized into 5-HT to be active; benserazide, an inhibitor of decarboxylase, antagonized the diarrhea induced by 5-HT. Among the 5-HT antagonists used in interaction with 5-HT, only these of the 5-HT3 type (ondansetron, granisetron, tropisetron) and, to a lesser extent 5-HT2 type (ritanserin), decreased the diarrhea induced by 5-HTP. The 5-HT4 receptor agonists from the benzamide family (metoclopramide and zacopride) increased defecation in mice but the effect failed to reach statistical significance.

  12. Rectal hemangiopericytoma in a 37-year-old woman: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon perivascular tumor. Rectal Hemangiopericytomas are extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, only two cases have been reported in the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 37-year-old Asian woman with an Hemangiopericytoma rising from the anterior wall of her rectum. Abdominopelvic computed tomography showed a 7.4 cm solid mass between her uterus and her rectum. Heterogeneous gradual enhancement after intravenous injection of contrast material was noted with several tortuous vessels around her tumor. Intra-operative findings indicated a capsule and well-circumscribed solid tumor connecting with the anterior wall of her rectum by a small pedicle. With immunohistochemical stains, her tumor cells reacted positive for Bcl-2, CD34, and ki67 and negative for CD10, CD117, S100, and Desmin. Follow-up computed tomography scans have shown no tumor recurrence or metastasis signs. Conclusions Rectal Hemangiopericytoma is a rare tumor with non-specific imaging findings. Hemangiopericytomas should be included in the differential list when a massive tumor with heterogeneously gradual enhancement in the regions of the rectum is encountered. PMID:21819590

  13. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  14. Rectal Diclofenac Versus Rectal Paracetamol: Comparison of Antipyretic Effectiveness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Aalinezhad, Marzieh; Sarami, Golbahareh; Rangraz, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is the most common complaint in pediatric medicine and its treatment is recommended in some situations. Paracetamol is the most common antipyretic drug, which has serious side effects such as toxicity along with its positive effects. Diclofenac is one of the strongest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs, which has received little attention as an antipyretic drug. Objectives This study was designed to compare the antipyretic effectiveness of the rectal form of Paracetamol and Diclofenac. Patients and Methods This double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted on 80 children aged six months to six years old. One group was treated with rectal Paracetamol suppositories at 15 mg/kg dose and the other group received Diclofenac at 1 mg/kg by rectal administration (n = 40). Rectal temperature was measured before and one hour after the intervention. Temperature changes in the two groups were compared. Results The average rectal temperature in the Paracetamol group was 39.6 ± 1.13°C, and 39.82 ± 1.07°C in the Diclofenac group (P = 0.37). The average rectal temperature, one hour after the intervention, in the Paracetamol and the Diclofenac group was 38.39 ± 0.89°C and 38.95 ± 1.09°C, respectively (P = 0.02). Average temperature changes were 0.65 ± 0.17°C in the Paracetamol group and 1.73 ± 0.69°C in the Diclofenac group (P < 0.001). Conclusions In the first one hour, Diclofenac suppository is able to control the fever more efficient than Paracetamol suppositories. PMID:26889398

  15. [Rectal cancer in a pregnant woman, a case report].

    PubMed

    Højgaard, Helle Manfeld; Rahr, Hans

    2012-06-25

    A case of disseminated rectal cancer in a 32-year-old pregnant woman is described. Pain was her main complaint, but this had been ascribed to haemorrhoids and treated with topical agents. She was diagnosed with rectal cancer late in the third trimester when her midwife referred her for surgical assessment. Following caesarian section, diagnostic workup showed multiple liver metastases. Rectal cancer in pregnancy is rare, while haemorrhoids are common. We recommend keeping the differential diagnoses in mind and performing a digital rectal examination if pregnant women have anal symptoms.

  16. Case report: Sigmoid strangulation from evisceration through a perforated rectal prolapse ulcer – An unusual complication of rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer Z.; Kittmer, Tiffaney; Forbes, Shawn; Ruo, Leyo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rectal prolapse occurs particularly in elder females and presentation can sometimes lead to complications such as strangulation and evisceration of other organs through the necrotic mucosa. Presentation of case This is a case of a 61 year-old female with rectal prolapse complicated by rectal perforation through which a segment of sigmoid colon eviscerated and became strangulated. This patient initially presented with sepsis requiring ICU admission, but fully recovered following a Hartmann’s procedure with a sacral rectopexy. Discussion Complications of rectal prolapse include incarceration, strangulation, and rarely, perforation with evisceration of other viscera requiring urgent operation. This report provides a brief overview of complications associated with rectal prolapse, reviews similar cases of transrectal evisceration, and discusses the management of chronic rectal prolapse. Conclusion Prompt surgical consult is warranted if any signs or symptoms suggestive of complications from prolapse are present. PMID:25680532

  17. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was

  18. Adoption of Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer From 2000 to 2006: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Patterns-of-Care Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Raymond H.; McCarthy, Ellen P.; Das, Prajnan; Hong, Theodore S.; Mamon, Harvey J.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The German rectal study determined that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) as a component of combined-modality therapy decreased local tumor recurrence, increased sphincter preservation, and decreased treatment toxicity compared with postoperative RT for rectal cancer. We evaluated the use of preoperative RT after the presentation of the landmark German rectal study results and examined the impact of tumor and sociodemographic factors on receiving preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: In total, 20,982 patients who underwent surgical resection for T3-T4 and/or node-positive rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed from 2000 through 2006 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results tumor registries. We analyzed trends in preoperative RT use before and after publication of the findings from the German rectal study. We also performed multivariate logistic regression to identify factors associated with receiving preoperative RT. Results: Among those treated with RT, the proportion of patients treated with preoperative RT increased from 33.3% in 2000 to 63.8% in 2006. After adjustment for age; gender; race/ethnicity; marital status; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry; county-level education; T stage; N stage; tumor size; and tumor grade, there was a significant association between later year of diagnosis and an increase in preoperative RT use (adjusted odds ratio, 1.26/y increase; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.29). When we compared the years before and after publication of the German rectal study (2000-2003 vs. 2004-2006), patients were more likely to receive preoperative RT than postoperative RT in 2004-2006 (adjusted odds ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-2.59). On multivariate analysis, patients who were older, who were female, and who resided in counties with lower educational levels had significantly decreased odds of receiving preoperative RT. Conclusions: After the publication of the landmark German rectal

  19. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Seob; Yoon, Yong sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Chang, Heung Moon; Park, Jin-hong; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-Wook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients’ characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. Results All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. Conclusion PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer. PMID:27730804

  20. [Two Cases of Curative Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer after Preoperative Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Noboru; Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Kuboki, Satoshi; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Kato, Atsushi; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    Reports of conversion in cases of locally advanced colorectal cancer have been increasing. Here, we present 2 cases in which curative resection of locally advanced rectal cancer accompanied by intestinal obstruction was achieved after establishing a stoma and administering chemotherapy. The first case was of a 46-year-old male patient diagnosed with upper rectal cancer and intestinal obstruction. Because of a high level of retroperitoneal invasion, after establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 13 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Around 6 months after the initial surgery, low anterior resection for rectal cancer and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Fourteen days after curative resection, the patient was discharged from the hospital. The second case was of a 66-year-old male patient with a circumferential tumor extending from Rs to R, accompanied by right ureter infiltration and sub-intestinal obstruction. After establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 11 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Five months after the initial surgery, anterior resection of the rectum and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Twenty days after curative resection, the patient was released from the hospital. No recurrences have been detected in either case.

  1. [Two Cases of Curative Resection of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer after Preoperative Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Noboru; Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Kuboki, Satoshi; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Kato, Atsushi; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    Reports of conversion in cases of locally advanced colorectal cancer have been increasing. Here, we present 2 cases in which curative resection of locally advanced rectal cancer accompanied by intestinal obstruction was achieved after establishing a stoma and administering chemotherapy. The first case was of a 46-year-old male patient diagnosed with upper rectal cancer and intestinal obstruction. Because of a high level of retroperitoneal invasion, after establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 13 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Around 6 months after the initial surgery, low anterior resection for rectal cancer and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Fourteen days after curative resection, the patient was discharged from the hospital. The second case was of a 66-year-old male patient with a circumferential tumor extending from Rs to R, accompanied by right ureter infiltration and sub-intestinal obstruction. After establishing a sigmoid colostomy, 11 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus Pmab were administered. Five months after the initial surgery, anterior resection of the rectum and surgery to close the stoma were performed. Twenty days after curative resection, the patient was released from the hospital. No recurrences have been detected in either case. PMID:26805302

  2. Sparing Sphincters and Laparoscopic Resection Improve Survival by Optimizing the Circumferential Resection Margin in Rectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Metin; Bayraktar, Adem; Sivirikoz, Emre; Yegen, Gülcin; Karip, Bora; Saglam, Esra; Bulut, Mehmet Türker; Balik, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of rectal cancer treatment is to minimize the local recurrence rate and extend the disease-free survival period and survival. For this aim, obtainment of negative circumferential radial margin (CRM) plays an important role. This study evaluated predictive factors for positive CRM status and its effect on patient survival in mid- and distal rectal tumors. Patients who underwent curative resection for rectal cancer were included. The main factors were demographic data, tumor location, surgical technique, neoadjuvant therapy, tumor diameter, tumor depth, lymph node metastasis, mesorectal integrity, CRM, the rate of local recurrence, distant metastasis, and overall and disease-free survival. Statistical analyses were performed by using the Chi-squared test, Fisher exact test, Student t test, Mann–Whitney U test and the Mantel–Cox log-rank sum test. A total of 420 patients were included, 232 (55%) of whom were male. We observed no significant differences in patient characteristics or surgical treatment between the patients who had positive CRM and who had negative CRM, but a higher positive CRM rate was observed in patients undergone abdominoperineal resection (APR) (P < 0.001). Advanced T-stage (P < 0.001), lymph node invasion (P = 0.001) and incomplete mesorectum (P = 0.007) were encountered significantly more often in patients with positive CRM status. Logistic regression analysis revealed that APR (P < 0.001) and open resection (P = 0.046) were independent predictors of positive CRM status. Moreover, positive CRM was associated with decreased 5-year overall and disease-free survival (P = 0.002 and P = 0.004, respectively). This large single-institution series demonstrated that APR and open resection were independent predictive factors for positive CRM status in rectal cancer. Positive CRM independently decreased the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates. PMID:26844498

  3. Sparing Sphincters and Laparoscopic Resection Improve Survival by Optimizing the Circumferential Resection Margin in Rectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Metin; Bayraktar, Adem; Sivirikoz, Emre; Yegen, Gülcin; Karip, Bora; Saglam, Esra; Bulut, Mehmet Türker; Balik, Emre

    2016-02-01

    The goal of rectal cancer treatment is to minimize the local recurrence rate and extend the disease-free survival period and survival. For this aim, obtainment of negative circumferential radial margin (CRM) plays an important role. This study evaluated predictive factors for positive CRM status and its effect on patient survival in mid- and distal rectal tumors.Patients who underwent curative resection for rectal cancer were included. The main factors were demographic data, tumor location, surgical technique, neoadjuvant therapy, tumor diameter, tumor depth, lymph node metastasis, mesorectal integrity, CRM, the rate of local recurrence, distant metastasis, and overall and disease-free survival. Statistical analyses were performed by using the Chi-squared test, Fisher exact test, Student t test, Mann-Whitney U test and the Mantel-Cox log-rank sum test.A total of 420 patients were included, 232 (55%) of whom were male. We observed no significant differences in patient characteristics or surgical treatment between the patients who had positive CRM and who had negative CRM, but a higher positive CRM rate was observed in patients undergone abdominoperineal resection (APR) (P < 0.001). Advanced T-stage (P < 0.001), lymph node invasion (P = 0.001) and incomplete mesorectum (P = 0.007) were encountered significantly more often in patients with positive CRM status. Logistic regression analysis revealed that APR (P < 0.001) and open resection (P = 0.046) were independent predictors of positive CRM status. Moreover, positive CRM was associated with decreased 5-year overall and disease-free survival (P = 0.002 and P = 0.004, respectively).This large single-institution series demonstrated that APR and open resection were independent predictive factors for positive CRM status in rectal cancer. Positive CRM independently decreased the 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates.

  4. An unusual hamartomatous malformation of the rectosigmoid presenting as an irreducible rectal prolapse and necessitating rectosigmoid resection in a 14-week-old infant.

    PubMed

    Lamesch, A J

    1983-07-01

    A 14-week-old female infant presented with an irreducible rectal prolapse and a large polypoid tumor at the tip of the prolapsed mucosa. The tumor and prolapsed rectum were resected. Four weeks after the operation, profuse rectal bleeding occurred and a second similar tumor was diagnosed by endoscopy in the sigmoid colon. Laparotomy, rectosigmoid resection, and endorectal pull-through were performed. At operation, the serosal surface showed ragged polypoid lesions and an abnormal angiomatous vascularization. The postoperative course was uneventful. The histology suggested a congenital mucosal malformation. This pathology is unique in our experience and we have been unable to find anything resembling it in the literature. At age two years a Sertoli cell tumor developed in the girl with pubertas precox and a recurrent colonic polyp of the Peutz-Jeghers type. PMID:6861577

  5. Rectal cancer staging: focus on the prognostic significance of the findings described by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution (HR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool for multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) addressing rectal cancer. It provides anatomic information for surgical planning and allows patients to be stratified into different groups according to the risk of local and distant recurrence. One of the objectives of the MDT is the preoperative identification of high-risk patients who will benefit from neoadjuvant treatment. For this reason, the correct evaluation of the circumferential resection margin (CRM), the depth of tumor spread beyond the muscularis propria, extramural vascular invasion and nodal status is of the utmost importance. Low rectal tumors represent a special challenge for the MDT, because decisions seek a balance between oncologic safety, in the pursuit of free resection margins, and the patient's quality of life, in order to preserve sphincter function. At present, the exchange of information between the different specialties involved in dealing with patients with rectal cancer can rank the contribution of colleagues, auditing their work and incorporating knowledge that will lead to a better understanding of the pathology. Thus, beyond the anatomic description of the images, the radiologist's role in the MDT makes it necessary to know the prognostic value of the findings that we describe, in terms of recurrence and survival, because these findings affect decision making and, therefore, the patients' life. In this review, the usefulness of HR MRI in the initial staging of rectal cancer and in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment, with a focus on the prognostic value of the findings, is described as well as the contribution of HR MRI in assessing patients with suspected or confirmed recurrence of rectal cancer. PMID:23876415

  6. Rare Presentation of Gastroesophageal Carcinoma with Rectal Metastasis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Karki, Niraj; Sapkota, Binita; Niazi, Masooma; Remy, Prospere

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal cancers, previously considered rare, are rapidly increasing worldwide. We present here a unique case of gastroesophageal carcinoma with metastasis to the rectum. CASE REPORT A 60-year-old female patient presented with constipation, bloating, and weight loss of 4-month duration. She had undergone sleeve gastrectomy 6 years before. Endoscopies performed revealed a friable-looking mucosa in the lower esophagus and a polypoid rectal mass. Histopathological examination from both the esophageal and rectal lesions revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. Immunohistochemistry stain from both specimens was positive for CK7 supporting the gastric site primary with metastasis to the rectum. Further evaluation also revealed metastasis to bone and malignant pleural effusion. Chemotherapy with palliative intent was initiated. CONCLUSIONS Colorectal metastasis is commonly seen from cancers of the breast, stomach, melanoma, kidney, prostate, and ovaries. However, colorectal metastasis from gastroesophageal cancer has never been reported in the medical literature. Diagnosis relies on histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical staining of the tumor. Treatment depends on the tumor stage. Tumors with widespread metastatic disease are candidates for palliative chemotherapy. PMID:27558656

  7. Definitive high-dose radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Eun Seok; Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Standard management for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) involves preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and radical surgery. However, this level of treatment may be unnecessary for a subgroup of LARC patients. Previous reports have shown that approximately 20% of LARC patients experience a complete tumor response to preoperative CRT. Post-CRT nonoperative management of these patients may prevent morbidities associated with radical surgery. To our knowledge, this case report firstly presents the favorable long-term outcomes of a LARC patient who underwent definitive aim CRT. Methods: The patient was 73 years’ old, and staging workups revealed T3N2bM0 rectal adenocarcinoma. He agreed to receive CRT, but refused surgery. A radiotherapy (RT) dose of 64.8 Gy was prescribed, which was higher than conventional (50.4 Gy) preoperative aim RT. The regimen of concurrent chemotherapy was the same as that used in preoperative aim CRT: 2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. Results: Three months after CRT completion, a complete tumor response was identified clinically. Colonoscopic biopsy after 1 year showed no tumor cells. This patient is alive after 4 years with no evidence of recurrence or severe toxicity. Conclusion: The long-term outcomes of this case indicate the feasibility of definitive high-dose RT with concurrent chemotherapy for LARC. PMID:27749573

  8. Primary ovarian neuroendocrine tumor arising in association with a mature cystic teratoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Nicolas M; Menon, Mini

    2016-08-01

    Primary ovarian carcinoid tumors are exceptionally rare entities accounting for approximately 0.1% of all ovarian neoplasms. This report describes a primary ovarian neuroendocrine tumor arising in association with a mature cystic teratoma in a 65 year-old woman. Macroscopically, the unilateral adnexal tumor was composed of cystic, solid and mucinous elements which resolved into a dual component lesion histologically. The majority of the tumor displayed an organoid architecture with mild to moderate pleomorphism and no discernible mitotic activity, while approximately 10% consisted of sheets and groups of cells with highly pleomorphic nuclei, necrosis and occasional mitoses. Features of a mature cystic teratoma were seen very focally. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong, diffuse positivity for CD56 and synaptophysin. Chromogranin immunonegativity was noted and there was an absence of nuclear β-catenin accumulation. Ki-67 index was 10-12%. Although there is no established diagnostic framework for primary ovarian carcinoid tumors, this case was diagnosed as a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor, Grade 2 (intermediate grade), arising in association with a mature cystic teratoma/dermoid cyst. This case highlights the need to develop ovarian diagnostic criteria in this area. PMID:27508272

  9. The effect of a somatostatin analogue on the release of hormones from human midgut carcinoid tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Wängberg, B; Nilsson, O; Theodorsson, E; Dahlström, A; Ahlman, H

    1991-07-01

    The use of a somatostatin analogue (SMS 201-995) has greatly facilitated the treatment of patients with the midgut carcinoid syndrome. Clinical studies have shown that SMS reduces the peripheral levels of tumour-produced serotonin (5-HT) and tachykinins, e.g. neuropeptide K (NPK), basally and after pentagastrin provocation. Some studies have indicated an inhibitory effect of SMS on tumour cell growth as well. In the present study we have investigated the effects of SMS on four different human midgut carcinoid tumours maintained in long term culture. Media levels of 5-HT and NPK-LI in tumour cell cultures decreased rapidly during incubation with SMS (10(-8)-10(-10) M) in all four tumours studied without evidence for tachyphylaxis (up to 6 weeks observation period). SMS treatment (10(-8) M) during 4 days reduced the media concentrations of 5-HT by 56%, while the intracellular contents of 5-HT were decreased by 27% indicating dual inhibitory effects on synthesis and secretion of 5-HT from tumour cells. The DNA contents of cultures were not affected by SMS (10(-8) M or 10(-10) M) treatment for 4 or 14 days. When tumour cell cultures were challenged with isoprenaline (IP) (10(-6) M) no reduction of the IP induced release of 5-HT could be detected after pretreatment of tumour cell cultures with SMS (10(-8) M) for 1 h, 4 h or 4 days. These studies provide evidence for a direct action of the somatostatin analogue on midgut carcinoid tumour cells, reducing both synthesis and secretion of hormones from tumour cells. This effect appears not to be related to inhibition of tumour cell growth. The inhibition of 5-HT secretion from tumour cells by SMS seems to operate via a second messenger system different from the one mediating the beta-adrenoceptor stimulated release of 5-HT. PMID:1713051

  10. Hypokalaemia: common but not always benign. Severe, persistent hypokalaemia secondary to ectopic ACTH from a carcinoid tumour

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Muhammad Muzaffar; John, Kurien

    2012-01-01

    Hypokalaemia is a common and often benign observation. There is usually an obvious underlying cause for the anomaly. However, hypokalaemia can very rarely be the sole presentation of a more sinister disease. A high index of suspicion and a systematic approach are therefore required to avoid delays in the management, especially in the context of presentation to a medical team. We present a case of a patient with severe and persistent hypokalaemia due to ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion secondary to a carcinoid tumour. The case report is followed by a brief discussion on the approach to the management of hypokalaemia and additional tests to confirm ectopic ACTH. PMID:23152181

  11. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Male Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  12. [Carcinoid tumours of the lung and definition of the medico-legal term "lung cancer" used in the list of occupational disease in Germany--results of the German Mesothelioma Register].

    PubMed

    Neumann, V; Fischer, M; Tannapfel, A

    2008-09-01

    Carcinoid tumours are considered to be malignant epithelial tumours according to the recent WHO classification. This study is based on the examinations of tissue from 108 patients with carcinoid tumours. Our data agree with those of other studies: carcinoid tumours developed mainly in the right lung (40 %) and the lower lobe (30 %), mean age was 56 years, typical carcinoid tumours (74 %) predominated, comparatively high proportion of females (32 %), the mean latency period after asbestos exposure - assuming asbestos as one causal factor - was 35 years. A higher incidence of carcinoid tumours (1.3 %) in the collective of the mesothelioma register compared to the incidence in the collective of all lung carcinomas (1 - 2 %) was not observed. The increased pulmonary asbestos burden analysed in 26 % of patients is explained by the exposure-dependent selection of patients in the register. So far, no association between smoking habits or exposure to other, i. e., occupational pollutions and the development of carcinoid tumours could be established. In the list of occupational diseases (No. 4104) the term "lung cancer" is used without further specification. Thus the following question remains open for discussion: does the term "lung cancer" include carcinoid tumours such as malignant epithelial lung tumours, or is it restricted to the common subtypes such as small cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, large cell carcinoma with regard to occupational disease and compensation?

  13. [A Case of an Unresectable Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer with Surrounding Organ Invasion Successfully Resected after Chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus Cetuximab].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hironori; Ariake, Kyohei; Takemura, Shinichi; Doi, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    A 63-year-old man visited our hospital with pain on micturition and was found to have a large rectal tumor with urinary bladder invasion on enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT). The tumor appeared to be unresectable at presentation; thus, sigmoid colostomy was performed and chemotherapy was initiated. The tumor was found to be EGFR-positive and contained a wild-type KRAS. The mFOLFOX6 plus cetuximab (c-mab) regimen was initiated. The follow-up CT scan showed good tumor shrinkage after 4 courses of chemotherapy; 4 additional courses were administered. The tumor eventually regressed by more than 60% and was judged to be resectable. High anterior resection of the rectum with partial resection of the bladder was performed. Abdominal wall metastasis was detected 8 months after surgery, and additional resection was performed. The patient remained well with no other recurrence 8 months after the high anterior resection. Although chemoradiotherapy is the standard preoperative treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer, systemic therapy is effective in certain cases such as substantial tumor invasion of adjacent organs or metastasis. Here, we present a case of rectal cancer that became curatively resectable after preoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 plus c-mab.

  14. Is rectal MRI beneficial for determining the location of rectal cancer with respect to the peritoneal reflection?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Joo; Ryu, Chun Geun; Kim, Gangmi; Kim, Su Ran; Nam, Sang Eun; Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Young Jun; Hwang, Dae-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Background An objective method for determining the location of the cancer with respect to peritoneal reflection would be helpful to decide the treatment modality for rectal cancer. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of rectal MRI to determine spatial relations between the peritoneal reflection and rectal cancer and to compare these with operative findings. Patients and methods Patients that underwent a rectal cancer operation after a rectal MRI check between November 2008 and June 2010 were considered for the study. The patients that received preoperative concurrent chemoradiation or trans-anal local excision were excluded. Results Fifty-four patients constituted the study cohort. By comparing surgical and radiologic findings, the accuracy for predicting tumour location in relation to the peritoneal reflection by rectal MRI in all patients was 90.7%. In terms of tumour location in relation to peritoneal reflection, the accuracy of rectal MRI was 93.5% in patients with a tumour located above the peritoneal reflection, 90.0% in patients with a tumour located on the peritoneal reflection, and 84.6% in patients with a tumour located below the peritoneal reflection (p=0.061). When the cohort was subdivided by gender, body mass index (BMI), operative findings, or tumour size, no significant difference was observed among subgroups. Conclusions Rectal MRI could be a useful tool for evaluating the relation between rectal cancer and peritoneal reflection especially when tumour size is less than 8cm. Rectal MRI can provide information regarding the location of rectal cancer in relation to the peritoneal reflection for treatment planning purposes. PMID:23411588

  15. "Graciloplasty" in treatment of recurrent complete rectal prolapse: case report.

    PubMed

    Khainga, S O

    2007-08-01

    Gracilis muscle flap was used to treat a seven year old boy with a one year history of recurrent rectal prolapse. Initial perineal surgery in form of Thiersch stitch resulted into failure to control rectal prolapse and damage to anal sphincter. Graciloplasty corrected both problems. PMID:17970009

  16. Why Rectal Douches May Be Acceptable Rectal-Microbicide Delivery Vehicles for MSM

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Bauermeister, José; Ventuneac, Ana; Dolezal, Curtis; Mayer, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Rationale To explore age of onset of rectal douching among men who have sex with men (MSM) and reasons leading to and maintaining douching behavior; and to consider whether rectal douches containing microbicidal agents might be acceptable for men at HIV risk. Methods In Stage 1, we used qualitative methods to explore douching behavior in a sample of 20 MSM. Subsequently, we developed a structured questionnaire that was administered in Stage 2 to 105 MSM. Results More than half of participants who completed Stage 1 douched during the trial despite having been advised not to do so. Of the 105 HIV uninfected participants in Stage 2, 51% reported using rectal douches in the prior six months; 47% douched before and 25% after anal intercourse. Most participants reported douching frequently or always. On average, men reported douching about two hours prior to or one hour following intercourse. Average age of onset was late 20s. Most men who douched wanted to be clean or were encouraged to douche by their partners. Some men thought douching after sex could prevent STIs. Conclusion Rectal douching appears to be a popular behavior among men who have RAI. It is necessary to identify harmless douches. If HIV/STI preventive douches can be developed, rectal douching prior to or following sexual intercourse could become an important additional prevention tool. To reshape an existing behavior to which some men strongly adhere, like douching, by suggesting use of one type of douche over another may be more successful than trying to convince MSM to engage in behaviors they never practiced before or those they resist (e.g., condom use). PMID:19959973

  17. A new 'enterocompressor' to facilitate rectal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Barraza, R P

    1990-02-01

    A newly devised enterocompressor facilitates low rectal anastomosis in children with Hirschsprung's disease. This simple surgical instrument, composed of two semicylindrical valves, a hinge, and a regulating screw, maintains intestinal anastomoses properly placed and produces spur crushing. In addition, it is inexpensive and reusable. The enterocompressor, used in 33 primary and 15 secondary Duhamel operations, and applied to normalize intestinal transit in 10 colectomies, provided adequate anastomosis and prevented leakage of intestinal contents. This enterocompressor can be used safely in children as young as six months of age. PMID:2298104

  18. Prediction of response to chemoradiation in rectal cancer by a gene polymorphism in the epidermal growth factor receptor promoter region

    SciTech Connect

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm . E-mail: kalgsp@vgs.vejleamt.dk; Nielsen, Jens Nederby; Lindebjerg, Jan; Brandslund, Ivan; Jakobsen, Anders

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been associated with radioresistance in solid tumors. Recently a polymorphism in the Sp1 recognition site of the EGFR promoter region was identified. The present study investigated the predictive value of this polymorphism for the outcome of chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 77 patients with locally advanced T3 rectal tumors. Treatment consisted of preoperative radiation therapy at a total tumor dose of 65 Gy and concomitant chemotherapy with Uftoral. Blood samples from 63 patients were evaluated for Sp1 -216 G/T polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction analysis. Forty-eight primary tumor biopsies were available for EGFR immunostaining. Patients underwent surgery 8 weeks after treatment. Pathologic response evaluation was performed according to the tumor regression grade (TRG) system. Results: Forty-nine percent had major response (TRG1-2) and 51% moderate response (TRG 3-4) to chemoradiation. The rates of major response were 34% (10/29) in GG homozygote patients compared with 65% (22/34) in patients with T containing variants (p = 0.023). Fifty-eight percent of biopsies were positive for EGFR expression (28/48). The major response rates with regard to EGFR immunostaining were not significantly different. EGFR-positive tumors were found in 83% of the GG homozygote patients compared with 38% of patients with TT or GT variants (p = 0.008). Conclusions: There was a significant correlation between EGFR Sp1 -216 G/T polymorphism and treatment response to chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Further investigations of a second set of patient and other treatment schedules are warranted.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of radiation therapy-induced microcirculation changes in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lussanet, Quido G. de . E-mail: qdlu@rdia.azm.nl; Backes, Walter H.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Padhani, Anwar R.; Baeten, Coen I.; Baardwijk, Angela van; Lambin, Philippe; Beets, Geerard L.; Engelshoven, Jos van; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) allows noninvasive evaluation of tumor microvasculature characteristics. This study evaluated radiation therapy related microvascular changes in locally advanced rectal cancer by DCE-MRI and histology. Methods and Materials: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI was performed in 17 patients with primary rectal cancer. Seven patients underwent 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy radiation therapy (RT) (long RT) before DCE-MRI and 10 did not. Of these 10, 3 patients underwent five fractions of 5 Gy RT (short RT) in the week before surgery. The RT treated and nontreated groups were compared in terms of endothelial transfer coefficient (K{sup PS}, measured by DCE-MRI), microvessel density (MVD) (scored by immunoreactivity to CD31 and CD34), and tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation (scored by immunoreactivity to Ki67). Results: Tumor K{sup PS} was 77% (p = 0.03) lower in the RT-treated group. Histogram analyses showed that RT reduced both magnitude and intratumor heterogeneity of K{sup PS} (p = 0.01). MVD was significantly lower (37%, p 0.03) in tumors treated with long RT than in nonirradiated tumors, but this was not the case with short RT. Endothelial cell proliferation was reduced with short RT (81%, p = 0.02) just before surgery, but not with long RT (p > 0.8). Tumor cell proliferation was reduced with both long (57%, p < 0.001) and short RT (52%, p = 0.002). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI-derived K{sup PS} values showed significant radiation therapy related reductions in microvessel blood flow in locally advanced rectal cancer. These findings may be useful in evaluating effects of radiation combination therapies (e.g., chemoradiation or RT combined with antiangiogenesis therapy), to account for effects of RT alone.

  20. [Resection of a left obturator lymph node recurrence five years five months after surgery for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Takenoya, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yukari; Suda, Kouichi; Shimizu, Kazuki; Kikuichi, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    A 62-year-old man with lower rectal cancer underwent abdominoperineal resection and dissection of the lateral pelvic lymph nodes. The cancer was staged at pT3pN0cM0, pStage II and did not show recurrence. Two years later, the patient had dysphagia and was diagnosed with esophageal cancer based on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) performed to detect distant metastasis revealed fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the left obturator lymph nodes, indicating rectal cancer recurrence. The patient received radiation therapy (60.4 Gy) for the recurrence. A PET/CT scan obtained 2 years 6 months after the initial rectal cancer resection revealed no FDG uptake. Uraciltegafur plus Leucovorin (UFT+LV) was started and continued for 6 months, but tumor enlargement was noted. Treatment was changed to LV, 5-fluorouracil, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI), but after 4 courses, the patient's carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels rose. The patient then received 4 courses of bevacizumab plus FOLFIRI. A CT scan revealed tumor shrinkage, so the patient received 4 more courses of this regimen. Five years postoperatively, the patient's CEA levels rose again. A PET/CT scan 4 months later revealed FDG uptake in the left obturator lymph nodes, indicative of rectal cancer recurrence. One month later, the lymph nodes were resected. The patient was subsequently recurrence free. Tumor marker measurement and PET/CT helped to assess the patient's condition. When cancer recurs in the lateral pelvic lymph nodes with no involvement of the pelvis and R0 resection is possible, resection should be considered if the patient is capable of undergoing surgery.

  1. Rectal cancer profiling identifies distinct subtypes in India based on age at onset, genetic, epigenetic and clinicopathological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Ruhina Shirin; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Talukdar, Fazlur Rahman

    2015-12-01

    Rectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that develops through multiple pathways characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations. India has a comparatively higher proportion of rectal cancers and early-onset cases. We analyzed genetic (KRAS, TP53 and BRAF mutations, and MSI), epigenetic alterations (CpG island methylation detection of 10 tumor-related genes/loci), the associated clinicopathological features and survival trend in 80 primary rectal cancer patients from India. MSI was detected using BAT 25 and BAT 26 mononucleotide markers and mutation of KRAS, TP53, and BRAF V600E was detected by direct sequencing. Methyl specific polymerase chain reaction was used to determine promoter methylation status of the classic CIMP panel markers (P16, hMLH1, MINT1, MINT2, and MINT31) as well as other tumor specific genes (DAPK, RASSF1, BRCA1, and GSTP1). MSI and BRAF mutations were uncommon but high frequencies of overall KRAS mutations (67.5%); low KRAS codon 12 and a novel KRAS G15S mutation with concomitant RASSF1 methylation in early onset cases were remarkable. Hierarchical clustering as well as principal component analysis identified three distinct subgroups of patients having discrete age at onset, clinicopathological, molecular and survival characteristics: (i) a KRAS associated CIMP-high subgroup; (ii) a significantly younger MSS, CIMP low, TP53 mutant group having differential KRAS mutation patterns, and (iii) a CIMP-negative, TP53 mutated group. The early onset subgroup exhibited the most unfavorable disease characteristics with advanced stage, poorly differentiated tumors and had the poorest survival compared to the other subgroups. Genetic and epigenetic profiling of rectal cancer patients identified distinct subtypes in Indian population.

  2. Comparison of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and capecitabine in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae . E-mail: khjung@ncc.re.kr; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Duck-Woo; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Jun Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Son, Seok-Hyun; Yun, Tak; Hong, Chang Won; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with a bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL) vs. capecitabine in terms of radiologic and pathologic findings in preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: The study enrolled 278 patients scheduled for preoperative CRT using two protocols with different chemotherapeutic regimens. Pelvic radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) was delivered concurrently with FL (n = 145) or capecitabine (n = 133). Surgery was performed 6 weeks after CRT completion. Tumor responses to CRT were measured using both radiologic and pathologic examination. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed at the initial workup and just before surgery after completion of preoperative CRT. Post-CRT pathology tests were used to determine tumor stage and regression. Results: Radiologic examination showed that tumor volume decreased by 68.2% {+-} 20.5% in the FL group and 68.3% {+-} 22.3% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.970). Postoperative pathologic T stage determination showed that downstaging occurred in 44.3% of FL and 49.9% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.571). The tumor regression grades after CRT were Grade 1 (minimal response) in 22.6% and 21.0%, Grade 2 (moderate response) in 53.2% and 50.0%, Grade 3 (near-complete response) in 12.9% and 12.9%, and Grade 4 (complete response) in 11.3% and 16.1% of the FL and capecitabine groups, respectively (p = 0.758). Conclusion: In the present study, the radiologic and pathologic findings did not reveal significant differences in short-term tumor responses between preoperative FL and capecitabine CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Long-term results and a prospective randomized trial are needed.

  3. Comparison Between Perfusion Computed Tomography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kierkels, Roel G.J.; Backes, Walter H.; Janssen, Marco H.M.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare pretreatment scans with perfusion computed tomography (pCT) vs. dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent both pCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a dedicated 40-slice CT-positron emission tomography system and a 3-T MRI system. Dynamic contrast enhancement was measured in tumor tissue and the external iliac artery. Tumor perfusion was quantified in terms of pharmacokinetic parameters: transfer constant K{sup trans}, fractional extravascular-extracellular space v{sub e}, and fractional plasma volume v{sub p}. Pharmacokinetic parameter values and their heterogeneity (by 80% quantile value) were compared between pCT and DCE-MRI. Results: Tumor K{sup trans} values correlated significantly for the voxel-by-voxel-derived median (Kendall's tau correlation, tau = 0.81, p < 0.001) and 80% quantile (tau = 0.54, p = 0.04), as well as for the averaged uptake (tau = 0.58, p = 0.03). However, no significant correlations were found for v{sub e} and v{sub p} derived from the voxel-by-voxel-derived median and 80% quantile and derived from the averaged uptake curves. Conclusions: This study demonstrated for the first time that pCT provides K{sup trans} values comparable to those of DCE-MRI. However, no correlation was found for the v{sub e} and v{sub p} parameters between CT and MRI. Computed tomography can serve as an alternative modality to MRI for the in vivo evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in terms of the transfer constant K{sup trans}.

  4. PET/CT and Bremsstrahlung Imaging After 90Y DOTANOC Therapy for Rectal Net With Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Abdülrezzak, Ümmühan; Kula, Mustafa; Tutuş, Ahmet; Buyukkaya, Fikret; Karaca, Halit

    2015-10-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with Lu or Y is promising with successful results in somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. In all radiation therapies, knowledge of the radiation dose received by the target, and other organs in the body is essential to evaluate the risks and benefits of any procedure. We report a case of liver metastases from a rectal neuroendocrine tumor, which was treated with Y DOTANOC. Posttreatment whole-body planar images were acquired through Bremsstrahlung radiations of Y on a γ-camera, and thoracolumbar PET/CT images were acquired on PET. PMID:26204211

  5. Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer after Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boustani, J; Caubet, M; Bosset, J-F

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this overview was to investigate whether adjuvant chemotherapy has a favourable effect on the outcome of patients with rectal cancer who had preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy. A review of randomised clinical trials that allocated patients between fluorouracil-based and observation or between fluorouracil-based and oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy was carried out, including their corresponding meta-analyses. None of the five randomised trials has shown a significant benefit of fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for overall survival or disease-free survival. Also, the three corresponding meta-analyses failed to show a benefit of adjuvant treatment. Of three randomised trials - two phase III and one phase II with a 3-year disease-free survival end point - two showed a small benefit of adding oxaliplatin to fluorouracil, one failed. The corresponding meta-analyses showed that the pooled difference was not significant. In conclusion, the use of postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy is not scientifically proven.

  6. Transsacral rectopexy for recurrent complete rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Araki, Y; Isomoto, H; Tsuzi, Y; Matsumoto, A; Yasunaga, M; Yamauchi, K; Hayashi, K; Kodama, T

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the functional outcome of transsacral rectopexy performed with Dexon mesh for recurrent complete rectal prolapse. Anorectal function was assessed by anorectal manometry and defecography, before and from 1 year after surgery in five patients who were followed up for 1-3 years. The fecal incontinence score recovered from a preoperative mean score of 3.8 to a postoperative mean score of 1.2, and constipation was improved in four patients (80%). The straining anorectal angle (S-ARA), measured by defecography, improved from a preoperative value of 120.6 degrees +/- 6.9 degrees to a postoperative value of 98.5 degrees +/- 3.5 degrees (P < 0.05), and the perineal descent (PD) improved from a preoperative value of 16.2 +/- 2.5 cm to a postoperative value of 8.1 +/- 1.3 cm (P < 0.05). The maximal resting pressure (MRP) increased from a preoperative value of 20.5 +/- 3.7 cmH2O to a postoperative value of 40.5 +/- 4.8 cmH2O (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that transsacral rectopexy with Dexon mesh can achieve good control of recurrent complete rectal prolapse. PMID:10489150

  7. Rectal examination in paediatric trauma care.

    PubMed

    Winnett, M

    1999-01-01

    When providing trauma care, there is a danger that staff might forget what a frightening and confusing experience it can be for the patient, particularly if that patient is a child. As part of an academic exercise in reflection, I recently examined a critical incident involving the trauma care of a 9-year-old boy. In Accident and Emergency (A&E) the doctor inappropriately performed a rectal examination, which I witnessed in horror. The doctor failed to consider the effect of his actions on the child, the legal necessity for consent and the importance of a full explanation. Deeply disturbed by this incident and determined to avoid any repetition, I set out to find documented evidence to support my assertion that no child should be subjected to such intimate examinations, unless absolutely unavoidable. It is hoped that discussion of this incident will serve to raise the awareness of A&E staff working throughout the country with regard to paediatric rectal examination, as has been the case in my own workplace.

  8. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  9. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  10. Circadian gene expression predicts patient response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haijie; Chu, Qiqi; Xie, Guojiang; Han, Hao; Chen, Zheng; Xu, Benhua; Yue, Zhicao

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy may be useful in patients with operable rectal cancer, but treatment responses are variable. We examined whether expression levels of circadian clock genes could be used as biomarkers to predict treatment response. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 250 patients with rectal cancer, treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy in a single institute between 2011 and 2013. Gene expression analysis (RT-PCR) was performed in tissue samples from 20 patients showing pathological complete regression (pCR) and 20 showing non-pCR. The genes analyzed included six core clock genes (Clock, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2 and Bmal1) and three downstream target genes (Wee1, Chk2 and c-Myc). Patient responses were analyzed through contrast-enhanced pelvic MRI and endorectal ultrasound, and verified by histological assessment. pCR was defined histologically as an absence of tumor cells. Among the 250 included patients, 70.8% showed regression of tumor size, and 18% showed pCR. Clock, Cry2 and Per2 expressions were significantly higher in the pCR group than in the non-pCR group (P<0.05), whereas Per1, Cry1 and Bmal1 expressions did not differ significantly between groups. Among the downstream genes involved in cell cycle regulation, c-Myc showed significantly higher expression in the pCR group (P<0.05), whereas Wee1 and Chk2 expression did not differ significantly between groups. Circadian genes are potential biomarkers for predicting whether a patient with rectal cancer would benefit from neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. PMID:26617816

  11. Optimal time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jong Hoon . E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul.kr; Choi, Won Sik; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chang, Heung Moon; Ryu, Min Hee; Jang, Se Jin; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Capecitabine and its metabolites reach peak plasma concentrations 1 to 2 hours after a single oral administration, and concentrations rapidly decrease thereafter. We performed a retrospective analysis to find the optimal time interval between capecitabine administration and radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy was measured in patients who were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent capecitabine for rectal cancer. Patients were classified into the following groups. Group A1 included patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy, and Group B1 included all other patients. Group B1 was then subdivided into Group A2 (patients who took capecitabine 2 hours before radiotherapy) and Group B2. Group B2 was further divided into Group A3 and Group B3 with the same method. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 weeks after completion of chemoradiation and the pathologic response was evaluated. Results: A total of 200 patients were enrolled in this study. Pathologic examination showed that Group A1 had higher rates of complete regression of primary tumors in the rectum (23.5% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.01), good response (44.7% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.006), and lower T stages (p = 0.021) compared with Group B1; however, Groups A2 and A3 did not show any improvement compared with Groups B2 and B3. Multivariate analysis showed that increases in primary tumors in the rectum and good response were only significant when capecitabine was administered 1 hour before radiotherapy. Conclusion: In preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, the pathologic response could be improved by administering capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy.

  12. Skin manifestations of hormone-secreting tumors.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Serge A

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine and metabolic diseases, besides affecting other organs, can result in changes in cutaneous function and morphology and can lead to a complex symptomatology. Dermatologists may see some of these skin lesions first, either before the endocrinologist, or even after the internist or specialist has missed the right diagnosis. Because some skin lesions might reflect a life-threatening endocrine or metabolic disorder, identifying the underlying disorder is very important, so that patients can receive corrective rather than symptomatic treatment. In this issue, we will review various hormone-secreting tumors, including pituitary disorders (Cushing's syndrome and acromegaly), hyperthyroidism, glucagonoma, carcinoid syndrome, mastocytosis, and hyperandrogenism. We will focus on clinical manifestations, mainly cutaneous, followed by a brief discussion on how to make the diagnosis of each condition in addition to treatment options. PMID:21054708

  13. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Aravantinou, Meropi; Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26886938

  14. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26886938

  15. Local Recurrence in Rectal Cancer: Anatomic Localization and Effect on Radiation Target

    SciTech Connect

    Syk, Erik Torkzad, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nilsson, Per J.; Glimelius, Bengt

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the sites of local recurrence after total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer in an effort to optimize the radiation target. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 patients with recurrence after abdominal resection for rectal cancer were identified from a population-based consecutive cohort of 2,315 patients who had undergone surgery by surgeons trained in the total mesorectal excision procedure. A total of 99 cross-sectional imaging studies were retrieved and re-examined by one radiologist. The clinical records were examined for the remaining patients. Results: Evidence of residual mesorectal fat was identified in 50 of the 99 patients. In 83 patients, local recurrence was identified on the imaging studies. All recurrences were within the irradiated volume if the patients had undergone preoperative radiotherapy or within the same volume if they had not. The site of recurrence was in the lower 75% of the pelvis, anatomically below the S1-S2 interspace for all patients. Only 5 of the 44 recurrences in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge were in the lowest 20% of the pelvis. Six recurrences involved the lateral lymph nodes. Conclusion: These data suggest that a lowering of the upper limit of the clinical target volume could be introduced. The anal sphincter complex with surrounding tissue could also be excluded in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge.

  16. [Role of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer : Is MRI-based selection a future model?].

    PubMed

    Kulu, Y; Hackert, T; Debus, J; Weber, M-A; Büchler, M W; Ulrich, A

    2016-07-01

    Following the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) in the curative treatment of rectal cancer, the role of neoadjuvant therapy has evolved. By improving the surgical technique the local recurrence rate could be reduced by TME surgery alone to below 8 %. Even if local control was further improved by additional preoperative irradiation this did not lead to a general survival benefit. Guidelines advocate that all patients in UICC stage II and III should be pretreated; however, the stage-based indications for neoadjuvant therapy have limitations. This is mainly attributable to the facts that patients with T3 tumors comprise a very heterogeneous prognostic group and preoperative lymph node diagnostics lack accuracy. In contrast, in recent years the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has become an important prognostic parameter. Patients with tumors that are very close to or infiltrate the pelvic fascia (positive CRM) have a higher rate of local recurrence and poorer survival. With high-resolution pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination in patients with rectal cancer, the preoperative CRM can be determined with a high sensitivity and specificity. Improved T staging and better prediction of the resection margins by pelvic MRI potentially facilitate the selection of patients for study-based treatment strategies omitting neoadjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:27339645

  17. [Rectal stenosis due to Schnitzler metastasis following surgery for gastric cancer--a case successfully treated with TS-1 and CDDP combination chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Niinobu, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Sumiko; Itani, Yutaka; Nishikawa, Yasuaki; Amano, Masahiro; Higaki, Naozumi; Hayashida, Hiroto; Sakon, Masato

    2005-10-01

    The patient, a 40-year-old woman, underwent total gastrectomy and excision of the pancreatic tail, spleen and gallbladder for gastric cancer in September 2000. The lesion was judged to be P1, SE, H0, N2 and Stage IV and the patient was managed on a regular schedule as an outpatient. In September 2004, she passed blood-stained feces and rectal palpation detected a hard nodule at the anterior rectal wall. A fiber optic examination of the sigmoid colon detected an ulcerous lesion with a hemorrhage at the anterior rectal wall. A biopsy revealed the lesion to be Group V poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Starting in October 2004, 100 mg/day of TS-1 was administered for 3 weeks; intravenous drip infusion of 100 mg/body of CDDP was conducted in the second week for a period of 24 hours. After 3 courses of this regimen, a fiber optic examination of the colon conducted in February 2005 no longer detected the rectal tumor, leaving only a cicatrix. Upon a CT examination, the para-aortic lymph nodes that had been enlarged were notably reduced in size and an improvement was eminent in the hypertrophic rectal wall. The patient no longer experienced constipation or melena. Her clinical course is being observed while an oral administration of 100 mg/day of TS-1 continues. PMID:16315933

  18. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    PubMed

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs.

  19. Validation of nonrigid registration for multi-tracer PET-CT treatment planning in rectal cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagmolen, Pieter; Roels, Sarah; Loeckx, Dirk; Haustermans, Karin; Maes, Frederik

    2009-02-01

    The goal of radiotherapy is to deliver maximal dose to the tumor and minimal dose to the surrounding tissue. This requires accurate target definition. In sites were the tumor is difficult to see on the CT images, such as for rectal cancer, PET-CT imaging can be used to better define the target. If the information from multiple PETCT images with different tracers needs to be combined, a nonrigid registration is indispensable to compensate for rectal tissue deformations. Such registration is complicated by the presence of different volumes of bowel gas in the images to be registered. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of different nonrigid registration approaches by looking at the overlap of manually delineated rectum contours after registration. Using a B-spline transformation model, the results for two similarity measures, sum of squared differences and mutual information, either calculated over the entire image or on a region of interest are compared. Finally, we also assess the effect of the registration direction. We show that the combination of MI with a region of interest is best able to cope with residual rectal contrast and differences in bowel filling. We also show that for optimal performance the registration direction should be chosen depending on the difference in bowel filling in the images to be registered.

  20. A case report of pathologically complete response of a huge rectal cancer after systemic chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6.

    PubMed

    Okoshi, Kae; Nagayama, Satoshi; Furu, Moritoshi; Mori, Yukiko; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Toguchida, Junya; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2009-08-01

    A 54-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a huge, unresectable rectal cancer occupying his entire pelvic space with a solitary liver metastasis. He had undergone a laparotomy for surgical resection, but ended up with a sigmoid colostomy due to possible invasion into the urinary bladder and pelvic wall. At the completion of seven cycles of FOLFOX regimen, radiographic examination revealed remarkable reduction of the primary rectal tumor and regional lymph nodes, and also a complete response (CR) of the liver metastasis. The tumor was extirpated without any macroscopic residues by a low anterior resection of the rectum, along with a partial resection of the urinary bladder and seminal vesicles. Since pathological and immunohistochemical examinations showed no viable cancer cells in any parts of the resected specimens, the lesion was regarded as a pathologically CR. Analysis for single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes involved in nucleotide excision repair, excision repair cross-complementing group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum group D, showed a genotypic pattern sensitive to oxaliplatin. To our knowledge, this is a rare case of an initially unresectable primary rectal cancer, which was down-staged to a pathologically CR by FOLFOX chemotherapy instead of chemoradiotherapy.

  1. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  2. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  3. Comparison of digital rectal and microchip transponder thermometry in cats.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Jessica M; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Lappin, Michael R

    2009-07-01

    This study compares the use of traditional rectal thermometry with an implantable microchip temperature transponder in cats. The microchip transponder was implanted over the shoulder blades and was programmed with cat identification information. Concurrently, the cats were involved in a study in which they were infected experimentally with feline herpesvirus 1; this situation enabled temperature comparisons in both normal and abnormal ranges. Results from the microchip transponder technique were compared with rectal thermometry by using a concordance test of agreement. These data revealed close agreement between rectal and microchip transponder thermometry in the cat at both normal and abnormal temperature ranges.

  4. Anorectal avulsion: Management of a rare rectal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rispoli, C.; Andreuccetti, J.; Iannone, L.; Armellino, M.; Rispoli, G.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Traumatic injuries of the rectum are unusual even though their treatment is challenging and often lead to high morbidity and mortality rate. PRESENTATION OF CASE This paper reports a rare case of complete rectal avulsion with multiple fracture and hemoperitoneum treated with a multistep approach in our department. DISCUSSION The anorectal avulsion is a rare rectal trauma; only few reports are available. Treatment key points of rectal trauma are: direct repair, diverting stoma and sacral drainage. CONCLUSION We reported a case of anorectal avulsion with complete detachment of external sphincter muscle. A multidisciplinary approach was mandatory in this kind of lesions. PMID:22554940

  5. Disseminated lung cancer presenting as a rectal mass.

    PubMed

    Noergaard, Mia M; Stamp, Inger M H; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, and approximately 50% had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. A rectal mass and unintended weight loss are common manifestations of rectal cancer. Our case presented with a rectal mass, but workup revealed a metastatic lesion from lung cancer. Lung cancer metastases to the lower gastrointestinal tract imply reduced survival compared with the already poor mean survival of stage IV lung cancer. Despite relevant therapy, the patient died 5 months after referral. PMID:27683028

  6. Endorectal sonography in the evaluation of rectal and perirectal disease.

    PubMed

    St Ville, E W; Jafri, S Z; Madrazo, B L; Mezwa, D G; Bree, R L; Rosenberg, B F

    1991-09-01

    Endorectal sonography initially was developed for evaluation of the prostate and now has been adapted for evaluation of rectal and perirectal disease. We used endorectal sonography to evaluate a spectrum of diseases, including primary and recurrent rectal carcinoma, metastases, villous adenoma, leiomyosarcoma, endometriosis, sacrococcygeal teratoma, chordoma, retroperitoneal cystic hamartoma, pelvic lipomatosis, diverticulitis, and perirectal abscess. The technique has been useful in localization of perirectal abscesses and in sonographically guided biopsy of perirectal masses. Knowledge of normal sonographic anatomy of the rectum is essential in the evaluation of rectal and perirectal disease. In this essay, we describe the technique of endorectal sonography and illustrate the sonographic findings in a variety of diseases.

  7. Optical biopsy of the prostate: can we TRUST (trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daqing; Jiang, Zhen; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Holyoak, G. Reed; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Rock, Kendra; Ownby, Charlotte L.; Bunting, Charles F.; Slobodov, Gennady

    2011-03-01

    Needle-based core-biopsy to locate prostate cancer relies heavily upon trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging guidance. Ultrasonographic findings of classic hypoechoic peripheral zone lesions have a low specificity of ~28%, a low positive predictive value of ~29%, and an overall accuracy of ~43%, in prostate cancer diagnosis. The prevalence of isoechoic or nearly invisible prostate cancers on ultrasonography ranges from 25 to 42%. As a result, TRUS is useful and convenient to direct the needle trajectory following a systematic biopsy sampling template rather than to target only the potentially malignant lesion for focal-biopsy. To address this deficiency in the first-line of prostate cancer imaging, a trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled spectral tomography (TRUST) approach is being developed to non-invasively resolve the likely optical signatures of prostate malignancy. The approach has evolved from using one NIR wavelength to two NIR bands, and recently to three bands of NIR spectrum information. The concept has been evaluated on one normal canine prostate and three dogs with implanted prostate tumor developed as a model. The initial results implementing TRUST on the canine prostate tumor model includes: (1) quantifying substantially increased total hemoglobin concentration over the time-course of imaging in a rapidly growing prostate tumor; (2) confirming hypoxia in a prostatic cystic lesion; and (3) imaging hypoxic changes of a necrotic prostate tumor. Despite these interesting results, intensive technologic development is necessary for translating the approach to benefiting clinical practice, wherein the ultimate utility is not possibly to eliminate needle-biopsy but to perform focal-biopsy that is only necessary to confirm the cancer, as well as to monitor and predict treatment responses.

  8. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of isolated rectal endometriosis: long term complication of incomplete treatment for pelvic endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Kwack, Jae-Young; You, Seul Ki; Kwon, Yong-Soon

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman visited our hospital with cyclic hematochezia for four months. The patient had the history of laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy because of severe dysmenorrhea two years ago at another tertiary hospital. According to the medical records, the past surgical treatment was incomplete excision of pelvic endometriotic lesions, especially in rectal serosal lesions. A colonoscopy and abdominopelvic computed tomography showed an isolated tumor mimicking neoplasm, in which a biopsy under colonoscopy was performed and the lesion was endometriosis pathologically. Laparoscopic anterior resection (LAR) was performed. There were no complications during intraoperative and postoperative period and the patient was discharged 7 days after the LAR. It is important for reducing of long-term complication like rectal endometriosis that complete and safe excision of pelvic endometriosis with expert surgical strategy. PMID:27375735

  9. Approach of trans-rectal NIR optical tomography probing for the imaging of prostate with trans-rectal ultrasound correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daqing; Jiang, Zhen; Xu, Guan; Musgrove, Cameron; Bunting, Charles F.

    2008-02-01

    The trans-rectal implementation of NIR optical tomography makes it possible to assess functional status like hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in prostate non-invasively. Trans-rectal NIR tomography may provide tissue-specific functional contrast that is potentially valuable for differentiation of cancerous lesions from normal tissues. Such information will help to determine if a prostate biopsy is needed or can be excluded for an otherwise ambiguous lesion. The relatively low spatial resolution due to the diffuse light detection in trans-rectal NIR tomography, however, limits the accuracy of localizing a suspicious tissue volume. Trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) is the clinical standard for guiding the positioning of biopsy needle owing to its resolution and convenience; nevertheless, TRUS lacks the pathognomic specificity to guide biopsy to only the suspicious lesions. The combination of trans-rectal NIR tomography with TRUS could potentially give better differentiation of cancerous tissue from normal background and to accurately localize the cancer-suspicious contrast obtained from NIR tomography. This paper will demonstrate the design and initial evaluation of a trans-rectal NIR tomography probe that can conveniently integrate with a commercial TRUS transducer. The transrectal NIR tomography obtained from this probe is concurrent with TRUS at matching sagittal imaging plane. This design provides the flexibility of simple correlation of trans-rectal NIR with TRUS, and using TRUS anatomic information as spatial prior for NIR image reconstruction.

  10. [The treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Alberda, Wijnand J; Verhoef, Cornelis; Nuyttens, Joost J; Rothbarth, Joost; Burger, Jacobus W A

    2015-01-01

    Its incidence has decreased in recent decades due to advances in the treatment of patients with primary rectal cancer, but LRRC still occurs in 6-10% of these patients. LRRC is often accompanied by severe, progressive pain and has a major impact on quality of life. Curative treatment is possible based on surgical resection combined with chemoradiotherapy. Radical resection is the most important prognostic factor in curative treatment. Neo-adjuvant systemic therapy may further improve outcomes in LRRC patients. Many patients are not eligible for surgical treatment due to the presence of metastases or irresectability of the local recurrence. These patients should receive optimal palliative care for the disabling pain. Radiotherapy is effective against local pain in around 75% of patients but the duration of palliation is limited.

  11. Rectal Douching and Implications for Rectal Microbicides among Populations Vulnerable to HIV in South America: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Jerome T.; Kinsler, Janni J.; Imrie, John; Nureña, César R.; Sánchez, Jorge; Cunningham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While gel-formulated Rectal Microbicides (RM) are the first to enter clinical trials, rectal douching in preparation for anal intercourse is a common practise, thus RMs formulated as douches may be a convenient alternative to gels. Nonetheless, little is known about potential users’ thoughts regarding douche-formulated RMs or rectal douching practises, data needed to inform the advancement of douche-based RMs. This qualitative study examined thoughts regarding douches, their use as a RM and current douching practises among men who have sex with men and transgender women. Methods Ten focus groups and 36 in-depth interviews were conducted (N=140) to examine the overall acceptability of RM, of which one component focused on rectal douching. Focus groups and interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded; text relating to rectal douching was extracted and analysed. Sociodemographic information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results Support for a douche-formulated RM centred on the possibility of combined pre-coital hygiene and HIV protection, and it was believed that a deeply-penetrating liquid douche would confer greater HIV protection than a gel. Drawbacks included rectal dryness; impracticality and portability issues; and, potential side effects. Non-commercial douching apparatus use was common and liquids used included detergents, vinegar, bleach, lemon juice and alcohol. Conclusions A douche-formulated RM while desirable and perceived as more effective than a gel-formulated RM also generated questions regarding practicality and side-effects. Of immediate concern were the non-commercial liquids already being used which likely damage rectal epithelia, potentially increasing HIV infection risk. Pre-coital rectal douching is common and a RM formulated as such is desirable, but education on rectal douching practices is needed now. PMID:23966338

  12. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P < 0.05). Our result suggested that pretreatment status of TP and HIF-1α were found to predict pathologic response and outcomes in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study.

  13. Rectal wall sparing by dosimetric effect of rectal balloon used during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Teh, Bin S; Dong, Lei; McGary, John E; Mai, Wei-Yuan; Grant, Walter; Butler, E Brian

    2005-01-01

    The use of an air-filled rectal balloon has been shown to decrease prostate motion during prostate radiotherapy. However, the perturbation of radiation dose near the air-tissue interfaces has raised clinical concerns of underdosing the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effects of an air-filled rectal balloon on the rectal wall/mucosa and prostate gland. Clinical rectal toxicity and dose-volume histogram (DVH) were also assessed to evaluate for any correlation. A film phantom was constructed to simulate the 4-cm diameter air cavity created by a rectal balloon. Kodak XV2 films were utilized to measure and compare dose distribution with and without air cavity. To study the effect in a typical clinical situation, the phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned on a Siemens DR CT scanner for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. A target object was drawn on the phantom CT images to simulate the treatment of prostate cancer. Because patients were treated in prone position, the air cavity was situated superiorly to the target. The treatment used a serial tomotherapy technique with the Multivane Intensity Modulating Collimator (MIMiC) in arc treatment mode. Rectal toxicity was assessed in 116 patients treated with IMRT to a mean dose of 76 Gy over 35 fractions (2.17-Gy fraction size). They were treated in the prone position, immobilized using a Vac-Loktrade mark bag and carrier-box system. Rectal balloon inflated with 100 cc of air was used for prostate gland immobilization during daily treatment. Rectal toxicity was assessed using modifications of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and late effects Normal Tissue Task Force (LENT) scales systems. DVH of the rectum was also evaluated. From film dosimetry, there was a dose reduction at the distal air-tissue interface as much as 60% compared with the same geometry without the air cavity for 15-MV photon beam and 2x2-cm field size. The dose beyond the

  14. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  15. Using rectal irrigation for faecal incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Clare

    Claire Bohr describes how she introduced rectal irrigation as a treatment for children with faecal incontinence who had failed to respond to conservative treatment. She won a Nursing Times Award in the continence care category for this service in 2008.

  16. Veliparib, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  17. High Rate of Sexual Dysfunction Following Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Caglar; Tinay, Ilker; Yegen, Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although rectal cancer is a very common malignancy and has an improved cure rate in response to oncological treatment, research on rectal-cancer survivors' sexual function remains limited. Sexual dysfunction (SD) after rectal cancer treatment was measured, and possible predisposing factors that may have an impact on the development of this disorder were identified. Methods Patients undergoing curative rectal cancer surgery from January 2012 to September 2013 were surveyed using questionnaires. The female sexual function index or the International Index of Erectile Function was recorded. A multiple logistic regression was used to test associations of clinical factors with outcomes. Results Fifty-six men (56%) and 28 women (44%) who completed the questionnaire were included in the study. A total of 76 patients of the 86 patients (90.5%) with the diagnosis of rectal cancer who were included in this study reported different levels of SD after radical surgery. A total of 64 patients (76%) from the whole cohort reported moderate to severe SD after treatment of rectal cancer. Gender (P = 0.011) was independently associated with SD. Female patients reported significantly higher rates of moderate to severe SD than male patients. Patients were rarely treated for dysfunction. Conclusion Sexual problems after surgery for rectal cancer are common, but patients are rarely treated for SD. Female patients reported higher rates of SD than males. These results point out the importance of sexual (dys)function in survivors of rectal cancer. More attention should be drawn to this topic for clinical and research purposes. PMID:25360427

  18. [Rectal impalement with rupture of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Wahnschaff, F; Gerstorfer, M; Roder, J

    2011-06-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old farmer who fell from a ladder onto the handle of a wheelbarrow and sustained a rectal impalement with rupture of the small intestine. After the clinical diagnostics an emergency laparotomy was carried out with primary suturing of the rectal perforation. Furthermore there were two perforations of the small intestine which were treated with an ileostomy. The replacement of the ileostomy was carried out after 7 weeks. PMID:21113567

  19. Laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Walter R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent published trials have failed to demonstrate that laparoscopic resection is not inferior to open resection of rectal cancer in terms of pathologic outcomes. However, there have been numerous studies showing the benefit of laparoscopic resection in terms of short-term complications and quality of life. Fewer complications and shorter hospital stays improve the chance of maintaining functional status, which is very important for the elderly population. Thus, laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer remains a viable option for the elderly.

  20. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B; Galante, Pedro A F; Perez, Rodrigo O; Camargo, Anamaria A

    2015-11-10

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice.

  1. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice. PMID:26451609

  2. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Appelt, Ane L.; Ploen, John; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D{sub 50,i}, and the normalized dose-response gradient, {gamma}{sub 50,i}. Results: A highly significant dose-response relationship was found (P=.002). For complete response (TRG1), the dose-response parameters were D{sub 50,TRG1} = 92.0 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.3-144.9 Gy), {gamma}{sub 50,TRG1} = 0.982 (CI 0.533-1.429), and for major response (TRG1-2) D{sub 50,TRG1} and {sub 2} = 72.1 Gy (CI 65.3-94.0 Gy), {gamma}{sub 50,TRG1} and {sub 2} = 0.770 (CI 0.338-1.201). Tumor size and N category both had a significant effect on the dose-response relationships. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a significant dose-response relationship for tumor regression after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer for tumor dose levels in the range of 50.4-70 Gy, which is higher than the dose range usually considered.

  3. Feasibility of transanal endoscopic total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: results of a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Byung Kwan; Hyun, Jong Hee; Chang, Hee Jin; Han, Kyung Su

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of transanal total mesorectal excision (TME) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods This study enrolled 12 patients with clinically node negative rectal cancer located 4–12 cm from the anal verge who underwent transanal endoscopic TME with the assistance of single port laparoscopic surgery between September 2013 and August 2014. The primary endpoint was TME quality; secondary endpoints included number of harvested lymph nodes and postoperative complications within 30 days (NCT01938027). Results The 12 patients included 7 males and 5 females, of median age 59 years and median body mass index 24.2 kg/m2. Tumors were located on average 6.7 cm from the anal verge. Four patients (33.3%) received preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Median operating time was 195 minutes and median blood loss was 50 mL. There were no intraoperative complications and no conversions to open surgery. TME was complete or nearly complete in 11 patients (91.7%). Median distal resection and circumferential resection margins were 18.5 mm and 10 mm, respectively. Median number of harvested lymph nodes was 15. Median length of hospital stay was 9 days. There were no postoperative deaths. Six patients experienced minor postoperative complications, including urinary dysfunction in 2, transient ileus in 3, and wound abscess in 1. Conclusion This pilot study showed that high-quality TME was possible in most patients without serious complications. Transanal TME for patients with rectal cancer may be feasible and safe, but further investigations are necessary to evaluate its long-term functional and oncologic outcomes and to clarify its indications. PMID:27757396

  4. Intracellular and cell-free (infectious) HIV-1 in rectal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, M; Favia, A; Monno, L; Lopalco, P; Caputi, O; Scardigno, A C; Pastore, G; Fiore, J R; Angarano, G

    2001-12-01

    The intestinal mucosa contains most of the total lymphocyte pool and plays an important role in viral transmission, but only slight attention has been given to the immunological and virological aspects of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection at this site. In this study, before initiating or changing antiretroviral therapy, paired blood samples and rectal biopsies (RB) were obtained from 26 consecutive HIV-infected subjects. HIV-1 isolation and biological characterization, DNA, and HIV-1 RNA titration were assessed, as were in vitro tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-beta (IL-1beta) spontaneous production. The rate of HIV-1 isolation from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and RBs was 75% and 58%, respectively. All RB-derived isolates were nonsyncytium inducing (NSI), independent of the phenotype of blood-derived isolates. Proviral DNA and detectable HIV-1 RNA levels were measured in 100% and 77% of RBs, respectively. A statistical correlation was observed between HIV-1 DNA and HIV-1 RNA levels in rectal mucosa (P = 0.0075), whereas no correlation was found between these levels in blood samples (P > 0.05). Antiretroviral treatment did not seem to influence HIV-1 detection in RBs. Higher levels of in vitro proinflammmatory cytokine production were found in the RBs of most infected patients when compared with healthy controls. Therefore, the rectal mucosa is an important HIV-1 reservoir that demonstrates a discordant viral evolution with respect to blood. Both the virus type and the mucosa pathway of immunoactive substances might have important implications for therapeutic decision-making and monitoring and could influence the bidirectional transmission of HIV-1 in mucosal surfaces.

  5. Pre-operative Neutrophils/Lymphocyte Ratio in Rectal Cancer Patients with Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lino-Silva, Leonardo S.; Salcedo-Hernández, Rosa A.; Ruiz-García, Erika B.; García-Pérez, Leticia; Herrera-Gómez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies have reported that an elevation in neutrophils/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is correlated with poor survival in patients with colorectal cancer, but in rectal cancer (RC), it has been reported only in a few studies. It is necessary to separate colon cancer and rectal cancer to clarify the prognostic significance of NLR, especially in patients who received chemoradiotherapy. Methods: It is a comparative, observational retrospective study of a cohort of 175 patients. We grouped the patients into two based on their NLR (0-3 vs. > 3) to correlate with disease-specific survival (DSS) and pathologic complete response (pCR). Results: The average NLR was 2.65 + 1.32 (range 0.58-6.89), and 144 (82.3%) patients had an NLR of 0-3. The median follow-up was 33.53 months. There were no differences in pCR between the two groups. The 5-year DSS was 78.8%. NLR did not correlate with survival. Mesorectal quality, pT3-4 tumors, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, positive margins and recurrence were statistically significant predictors of increased mortality in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, only overall recurrence correlated with poor survival. The analysis of the association of NLR with outcomes with different cut points (2.0, 2.5, 4 and 5) did not show differences in DSS and pCR. Conclusion: In our cohort, the NLR did not serve as a prognostic marker in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and who received chemoradiotherapy and did not correlate with pCR as well. PMID:27703284

  6. Predictors of pathologic complete response after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Euncheol; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Kim, Mi Young; Oh, Young Ki; Baek, Sung Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify possible predictors of pathologic complete response (pCR) of rectal cancer after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 53 patients with rectal cancer who underwent preoperative CCRT followed by radical surgery at a single center between January 2007 and December 2012. The median radiotherapy dose to the pelvis was 54.0 Gy (range, 45.0 to 63.0 Gy). Five-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy was administered via continuous infusion with leucovorin. Results: The pCR rate was 20.8%. The downstaging rate was 66%. In univariate analyses, poor and undifferentiated tumors (p = 0.020) and an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (p = 0.040) were significantly associated with pCR, while female gender (p = 0.070), initial carcinoembryonic antigen concentration of <5.0 ng/dL (p = 0.100), and clinical stage T2 (p = 0.100) were marginally significant factors. In multivariate analysis, an interval of ≥7 weeks from finishing CCRT to surgery (odds ratio, 0.139; 95% confidence interval, 0.022 to 0.877; p = 0.036) was significantly associated with pCR, while stage T2 (odds ratio, 5.363; 95% confidence interval, 0.963 to 29.877; p = 0.055) was a marginally significant risk factor. Conclusion: We suggest that the interval from finishing CCRT to surgery is a predictor of pCR after preoperative CCRT in patients with rectal cancer. Stage T2 cancer may also be an important predictive factor. We hope to perform a robust study by collecting data during treatment to obtain more advanced results. PMID:27306776

  7. A phase II study of axitinib in advanced neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, J R; Cives, M; Hwang, J; Weber, T; Nickerson, M; Atreya, C E; Venook, A; Kelley, R K; Valone, T; Morse, B; Coppola, D; Bergsland, E K

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are highly vascular neoplasms overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Axitinib is a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGFR-1, -2 and -3, currently approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. We performed an open-label, two-stage design, phase II trial of axitinib 5 mg twice daily in patients with progressive unresectable/metastatic low-to-intermediate grade carcinoid tumors. The primary end points were progression-free survival (PFS) and 12-month PFS rate. The secondary end points included time to treatment failure (TTF), overall survival (OS), overall radiographic response rate (ORR), biochemical response rate and safety. A total of 30 patients were enrolled and assessable for toxicity; 22 patients were assessable for response. After a median follow-up of 29 months, we observed a median PFS of 26.7 months (95% CI, 11.4–35.1), with a 12-month PFS rate of 74.5% (±10.2). The median OS was 45.3 months (95% CI, 24.4–45.3), and the median TTF was 9.6 months (95% CI, 5.5–12). The best radiographic response was partial response (PR) in 1/30 (3%) and stable disease (SD) in 21/30 patients (70%); 8/30 patients (27%) were unevaluable due to early withdrawal due to toxicity. Hypertension was the most common toxicity that developed in 27 patients (90%). Grade 3/4 hypertension was recorded in 19 patients (63%), leading to treatment discontinuation in six patients (20%). Although axitinib appears to have an inhibitory effect on tumor growth in patients with advanced, progressive carcinoid tumors, the high rate of grade 3/4 hypertension may represent a potential impediment to its use in unselected patients. PMID:27080472

  8. Preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer: comparison of three radiation dose and fractionation schedules

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The standard radiation dose for patients with locally rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy is 45–50 Gy in 25–28 fractions. We aimed to assess whether a difference exists within this dose fractionation range. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to compare three dose fractionation schedules. Patients received 50 Gy in 25 fractions (group A), 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (group B), or 45 Gy in 25 fractions (group C) to the whole pelvis, as well as concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Radical resection was scheduled for 8 weeks after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Results: Between September 2010 and August 2013, 175 patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy at our institution. Among those patients, 154 were eligible for analysis (55, 50, and 49 patients in groups A, B, and C, respectively). After the median follow-up period of 29 months (range, 5 to 48 months), no differences were found between the 3 groups regarding pathologic complete remission rate, tumor regression grade, treatment-related toxicity, 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, or overall survival. The circumferential resection margin width was a prognostic factor for 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, whereas ypN category was associated with distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. High tumor regression grading score was correlated with 2-year distant metastasis-free survival and disease-free survival in univariate analysis. Conclusion: Three different radiation dose fractionation schedules, within the dose range recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, had no impact on pathologic tumor regression and early clinical outcome for locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:27306773

  9. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen; Everaert, Hendrik; Hoorens, Anne; Sermeus, Alexandra; Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3-4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade {>=}3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade {>=}3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  10. Biological Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Rectal Cancer: Challenges and Pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Roels, Sarah; Slagmolen, Pieter; Lee, John A.; Loeckx, Dirk; Maes, Frederik; Stroobants, Sigrid; Ectors, Nadine; Penninckx, Freddy; Haustermans, Karin

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of integrating multiple imaging modalities for image-guided radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) were performed before, during, and after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with resectable rectal cancer. The FDG-PET signals were segmented with an adaptive threshold-based and a gradient-based method. Magnetic resonance tumor volumes (TVs) were manually delineated. A nonrigid registration algorithm was applied to register the images, and mismatch analyses were carried out between MR and FDG-PET TVs and between TVs over time. Tumor volumes delineated on the images after CRT were compared with the pathologic TV. Results: Forty-five FDG-PET/CT and 45 MR images were analyzed from 15 patients. The mean MRI and FDG-PET TVs showed a tendency to shrink during and after CRT. In general, MRI showed larger TVs than FDG-PET. There was an approximately 50% mismatch between the FDG-PET TV and the MRI TV at baseline and during CRT. Sixty-one percent of the FDG-PET TV and 76% of the MRI TV obtained after 10 fractions of CRT remained inside the corresponding baseline TV. On MRI, residual tumor was still suspected in all 6 patients with a pathologic complete response, whereas FDG-PET showed a metabolic complete response in 3 of them. The FDG-PET TVs delineated with the gradient-based method matched closest with pathologic findings. Conclusions: Integration of MRI and FDG-PET into radiotherapy seems feasible. Gradient-based segmentation is recommended for FDG-PET. Spatial variance between MRI and FDG-PET TVs should be taken into account for target definition.

  11. Gastrin-releasing peptide, a mammalian analog of bombesin, is present in human neuroendocrine lung tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, D. G.; Roth, K. A.; Evans, C. J.; Barchas, J. D.; Bensch, K. G.

    1984-01-01

    Several reports have indicated that the amphibian peptide bombesin is present in oat-cell carcinoma of the human lung. The recent observation that gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), a 27-amino acid peptide isolated from porcine intestine, may be the mammalian analog of bombesin led the authors to look for this peptide in human pulmonary tumors. Examination of 36 human lung tumors (8 carcinoids, 8 oat-cell carcinomas, and 20 non-oat-cell carcinomas) by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay demonstrated the presence of high, although variable, levels of GRP in neuroendocrine tumors, and not in other histologic types. These findings indicate that bombesin immunoreactivity in human lung tumors should be attributed to GRP or GRP-like molecules and that GRP may be a useful marker of neuroendocrine differentiation. Images Figure 1 PMID:6093543

  12. Rectal microbicides: clinically relevant approach to the design of rectal specific placebo formulations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to identify the critical formulation parameters controlling distribution and function for the rectal administration of microbicides in humans. Four placebo formulations were designed with a wide range of hydrophilic characteristics (aqueous to lipid) and rheological properties (Newtonian, shear thinning, thermal sensitive and thixotropic). Aqueous formulations using typical polymers to control viscosity were iso-osmotic and buffered to pH 7. Lipid formulations were developed from lipid solvent/lipid gelling agent binary mixtures. Testing included pharmaceutical function and stability as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity. Results The aqueous fluid placebo, based on poloxamer, was fluid at room temperature, thickened and became shear thinning at 37°C. The aqueous gel placebo used carbopol as the gelling agent, was shear thinning at room temperature and showed a typical decrease in viscosity with an increase in temperature. The lipid fluid placebo, myristyl myristate in isopropyl myristate, was relatively thin and temperature independent. The lipid gel placebo, glyceryl stearate and PEG-75 stearate in caprylic/capric triglycerides, was also shear thinning at both room temperature and 37°C but with significant time dependency or thixotropy. All formulations showed no rectal irritation in rabbits and were non-toxic using an ex vivo rectal explant model. Conclusions Four placebo formulations ranging from fluid to gel in aqueous and lipid formats with a range of rheological properties were developed, tested, scaled-up, manufactured under cGMP conditions and enrolled in a formal stability program. Clinical testing of these formulations as placebos will serve as the basis for further microbicide formulation development with drug-containing products. PMID:21385339

  13. Thymidylate Synthase Gene Polymorphism Affects the Response to Preoperative 5-Fluorouracil Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Hyuk; Kang, Jeonghyun; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Shin, Sang Joon; Keum, Ki Chang; Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Hoguen; Choi, Sung Ho; Lee, Mi-Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: This study aims to correlate thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms with the tumor response to preoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU-based preoperative CRT were prospectively enrolled in this study. Thymidylate synthase expression and TS gene polymorphisms were evaluated in tumor obtained before preoperative CRT and were correlated with the pathologic response, as assessed by histopathologic staging (pTNM) and tumor regression grade. Results: Patients exhibited 2R/3R and 3R/3R tandem repeat polymorphisms in the TS gene. With regard to TS expression in these genotypes, 2R/3RC and 3RC/3RC were defined as the low-expression group and 2R/3RG, 3RC/3RG, and 3RG/3RG as the high-expression group. There was no significant correlation between TS expression and tumor response. There was no significant difference in the tumor response between patients homozygous for 3R/3R and patients heterozygous for 2R/3R. However, 13 of 14 patients in the low-expression group with a G>C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (2R/3RC [n = 5] or 3RC/3RC [n = 9]) exhibited a significantly greater tumor downstaging rate, as compared with only 12 of 30 patients in the high-expression group without the SNP (2R/3RG [n = 10], 3RC/3RG [n = 9], or 3RG/3RG [n = 11]) (p = 0.001). The nodal downstaging rate was also significantly greater in this low-expression group, as compared with the high-expression group (12 of 14 vs. 14 of 30, p = 0.014). However, there was no significant difference in the tumor regression grade between these groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that SNPs within the TS enhancer region affect the tumor response to preoperative 5-FU-based CRT in rectal cancer.

  14. The best timing for administering systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimodaira, Yusuke; Harada, Kazuto; Lin, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, outcomes for patients with rectal cancer have improved considerably. However, several questions have emerged as survival times have lengthened and quality of life has improved for these patients. Currently patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are often recommended multimodality therapy with fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CT) and radiation followed by total mesorectal excision (TME), with consideration given to FOLFOX before chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Recently, Garcia-Aguilar and colleagues reported in Lancet Oncology that the addition of mFOLFOX6 administered between CRT and surgery affected the number of patients achieving pathologic complete response (pathCR), which is of great interest from the standpoint of pursuit of optimal timing of systemic CT delivery. This was a multicenter phase II study consisting of 4 sequential treatment groups of patients with LARC, and they reported that patients given higher number CT cycles between CRT and surgery achieved higher rates of pathCR than those given standard treatment. There was no association between response improvement and tumor progression, increased technical difficulty, or surgical complications. Ongoing phase III clinical trial further assessing this strategy might result in a paradigm shift. PMID:26889491

  15. Laparoscopic ovarian transposition prior to pelvic irradiation in a young female patient with advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Kyoichi; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Ohshiro, Taihei; Fujita, Shin

    2015-12-01

    In the report, we describe the first case of laparoscopic ovarian transposition prior to pelvic radio-chemo therapy in a young female patient with advanced rectal cancer in Japan. A 14-year-old female visited a hospital because of consistent diarrhea and melena. Colonoscopy examination showed a bulky tumor of the rectum, which was diagnosed as moderately to poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis was cT3N2aM1a (due to lymph node in pelvic side wall), cStage IVA. In an attempt to improve local control and sphincter preservation, neoadjuvant concurrent radio-chemo therapy was planned. Considering that pelvic irradiation particularly in young female might cause ovarian failure, laparoscopic ovarian transposition was carried out prior to pelvic irradiation. Sequentially the patient underwent low anterior resection of the rectum and lymphadenectomy including pelvic side wall. The menstruation was maintained with delay for 6 months after adjuvant chemotherapy. There is no evidence of cancer recurrence at 3 years after the surgery.In premenopausal patients with rectal cancer undergoing pelvic irradiation, laparoscopic ovarian transposition is one of the choices to prevent ovarian failure. PMID:26943437

  16. Volvulus of the Sigmoid Colon Associated With Rectal Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Byung-Kwon; Baek, Sung-Uhn

    2015-01-01

    Sigmoid volvulus is one of the three most common causes of acute colonic obstruction. Predisposing factors include chronic constipation, adhesion from a prior abdominal surgery, and megacolon. However, concomitant presentation of volvulus of the sigmoid colon and rectal cancer is extremely rare. We report a case of a 50-year-old woman with coexisting volvulus of the sigmoid colon and rectal cancer. The patient presented with abdominal distension and pain for 2 days. On computed tomography, the whole colon was dilated with gas and feces. A whirl sign with rotation of the inferior mesenteric vessel was identified. The rectum had irregular wall thickening. Colonoscopy showed a circumscribed, ulcerofungating mass approximately 6 cm from the anal verge. The sigmoid colon was obstructed at a point approximately 25 cm from the anal verge. The mucosa was hyperemic and edematous with the pathognomonic spiral pattern. Endoscopic reduction was not successful. On laparotomy, the sigmoid colon was rotated around its mesentery. It was severely distended with edematous, hyperemic serosa. A tumor of the rectum was identified in the mid-rectum. The patient underwent low anterior resection and protective ileostomy. Pathologic findings confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum. The postoperative course was complicated by an ileus, which was managed with conservative treatment.

  17. Evaluation of epirubicin in thermogelling and bioadhesive liquid and solid suppository formulations for rectal administration.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Li; Lin, Yijun; Lin, Hong-Ru

    2014-01-01

    Temperature sensitive Pluronic (Plu) and pH-sensitive polyacrylic acid (PAA) were successfully mixed in different ratios to form in situ gelling formulations for colon cancer therapy. The major formulations were prepared as the liquid and solid suppository dosage forms. Epirubicin (Epi) was chosen as a model anticancer drug. In vitro characterization and in vivo pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of Epi in six Plu/PAA formulations were evaluated. Our in vitro data indicate that Epi in Plu 14%/PAA 0.75% of both solid and liquid suppositories possess significant cytotoxicity, strong bioadhesive force, long-term appropriate suppository base, sustained release, and high accumulation of Epi in rat rectums. These solid and liquid suppositories were retained in the upper rectum of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for at least 12 h. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study using SD rats showed that after rectal administration of solid and liquid suppositories, Epi had greater area under the curve and higher relative bioavailability than in a rectal solution. These solid and liquid suppositories exhibited remarkable inhibition on the tumor growth of CT26 bearing Balb/c mice in vivo. Our findings suggest that in situ thermogelling and mucoadhesive suppositories demonstrate a great potential as colon anticancer delivery systems for protracted release of chemotherapeutic agents.

  18. Evaluation of Epirubicin in Thermogelling and Bioadhesive Liquid and Solid Suppository Formulations for Rectal Administration

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yu-Li; Lin, Yijun; Lin, Hong-Ru

    2014-01-01

    Temperature sensitive Pluronic (Plu) and pH-sensitive polyacrylic acid (PAA) were successfully mixed in different ratios to form in situ gelling formulations for colon cancer therapy. The major formulations were prepared as the liquid and solid suppository dosage forms. Epirubicin (Epi) was chosen as a model anticancer drug. In vitro characterization and in vivo pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of Epi in six Plu/PAA formulations were evaluated. Our in vitro data indicate that Epi in Plu 14%/PAA 0.75% of both solid and liquid suppositories possess significant cytotoxicity, strong bioadhesive force, long-term appropriate suppository base, sustained release, and high accumulation of Epi in rat rectums. These solid and liquid suppositories were retained in the upper rectum of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for at least 12 h. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study using SD rats showed that after rectal administration of solid and liquid suppositories, Epi had greater area under the curve and higher relative bioavailability than in a rectal solution. These solid and liquid suppositories exhibited remarkable inhibition on the tumor growth of CT26 bearing Balb/c mice in vivo. Our findings suggest that in situ thermogelling and mucoadhesive suppositories demonstrate a great potential as colon anticancer delivery systems for protracted release of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24384838

  19. Characteristics and Prognostic Significance of Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Assessed Circumferential Margin in Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoji; Li, Xinxiang; Xu, Linghui; Shi, Debing; Tong, Tong; Huang, Dan; Ding, Ying; Cai, Sanjun; Peng, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To study the characteristics and prognostic significance of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging- (MRI-) assessed circumferential margin (CRM) in rectal cancer. Methods. Patients underwent preoperative high resolution pelvic MRI, followed by resection of primary tumor. The relationship between MRI-assessed CRM and pathological CRM (pCRM) was studied, and survival analysis was used to determine the prognostic significance of MRI-assessed CRM. Results. Of all the 203 patients, the total accuracy of MRI-assessed CRM for predicting involvement of pCRM was 84.2%, sensitivity was 50%, and specificity was 86.8%. Anterior tumors were more possible to assess involvement of CRM by MRI, while the false positive rate was significantly higher than lateral or posterior tumor (87.5% versus 50%, p = 0.0002). The 3-year local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were 35.6%, 58.1%, and 85.2% in patients with involved mrCRM, compared with 8.9%, 78.9%, and 92.3% in patients with clear mrCRM. In multivariate analysis, MRI-assessed CRM found an independent risk factor for local recurrence, with a hazard ratio of 3.49 (p = 0.003). Conclusions. High resolution MRI was accurate to assess CRM preoperatively, while anterior tumor should be assessed more cautiously. Involvement of mrCRM was significantly associated with local recurrence regardless of pCRM status.

  20. Rectal suppository: commonsense and mode of insertion.

    PubMed

    Abd-el-Maeboud, K H; el-Naggar, T; el-Hawi, E M; Mahmoud, S A; Abd-el-Hay, S

    1991-09-28

    Rectal suppository is a well-known form of medication and its use is increasing. The commonest shape is one with an apex (pointed end) tapering to a base (blunt end). Because of a general lack of information about mode of insertion, we asked 360 lay subjects (Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and 260 medical personnel (physicians, pharmacists, and nurses) by questionnaire which end they inserted foremost. Apart from 2 individuals, all subjects suggested insertion with the apex foremost. Commonsense was the most frequent basis for this practice (86.9% of lay subjects and 84.6% of medical personnel) followed by information from a relative, a friend, or medical personnel, or from study at medical school. Suppository insertion with the base or apex foremost was compared in 100 subjects (60 adults, 40 infants and children). Retention with the former method was more easily achieved in 98% of the cases, with no need to introduce a finger in the anal canal (1% vs 83%), and lower expulsion rate (0% vs 3%). The designer of the "torpedo-shaped" suppository suggested its insertion with apex foremost. Our data suggest that a suppository is better inserted with the base foremost. Reversed vermicular contractions or pressure gradient of the anal canal might press it inwards.

  1. Rectal suppository: commonsense and mode of insertion.

    PubMed

    Abd-el-Maeboud, K H; el-Naggar, T; el-Hawi, E M; Mahmoud, S A; Abd-el-Hay, S

    1991-09-28

    Rectal suppository is a well-known form of medication and its use is increasing. The commonest shape is one with an apex (pointed end) tapering to a base (blunt end). Because of a general lack of information about mode of insertion, we asked 360 lay subjects (Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and 260 medical personnel (physicians, pharmacists, and nurses) by questionnaire which end they inserted foremost. Apart from 2 individuals, all subjects suggested insertion with the apex foremost. Commonsense was the most frequent basis for this practice (86.9% of lay subjects and 84.6% of medical personnel) followed by information from a relative, a friend, or medical personnel, or from study at medical school. Suppository insertion with the base or apex foremost was compared in 100 subjects (60 adults, 40 infants and children). Retention with the former method was more easily achieved in 98% of the cases, with no need to introduce a finger in the anal canal (1% vs 83%), and lower expulsion rate (0% vs 3%). The designer of the "torpedo-shaped" suppository suggested its insertion with apex foremost. Our data suggest that a suppository is better inserted with the base foremost. Reversed vermicular contractions or pressure gradient of the anal canal might press it inwards. PMID:1681170

  2. Pediatric Rectal Exam: Why, When, and How.

    PubMed

    Orenstein, Susan R; Wald, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    The digital rectal examination (DRE) is performed in children less often than is indicated. Indications for the pediatric DRE include diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and anemia. Less well-recognized indications may include abdominal mass, urinary symptoms, neurologic symptoms, urogenital or gynecologic symptoms, and anemia. Indeed, we believe that it should be considered part of a complete physical examination in children presenting with many different complaints. Physicians avoid this part of the physical examination in both children and adults for a number of reasons: discomfort on the part of the health care provider; belief that no useful information will be provided; lack of adequate training and experience in the performance of the DRE; conviction that planned "orders" or testing can obviate the need for the DRE; worry about "assaulting" a patient, particularly one who is small, young, and subordinate; anticipation that the exam will be refused by patient or parent; and concern regarding the time involved in the exam. The rationale and clinical utility of the DRE will be summarized in this article. In addition, the components of a complete pediatric DRE, along with suggestions for efficiently obtaining the child's consent and cooperation, will be presented. PMID:26739462

  3. Automated functional image-guided radiation treatment planning for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ciernik, Ilja Frank . E-mail: ciernik@usz.ch; Huser, Marius; Burger, Cyrill; Davis, J. Bernard; Szekely, Gabor

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: Computer tomography-based (CT-based) tumor-volume definition is time consuming and is subject to clinical interpretation. CT is not accessible for standardized algorithms for the purpose of treatment-volume planning. We have evaluated the accuracy of target-volume definition based on the positron emission tomography (PET) data from an integrated PET/CT system with 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) for standardized target-volume delineation. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with rectal cancer who were undergoing preoperative radiation therapy (RT) were studied. A standardized region-growing algorithm was tested to replace the CT-derived gross tumor volume by the PET-derived gross tumor volume (PET-GTV) or the biologic target volume (BTV). A software tool was developed to automatically delineate the appropriate tumor volume as defined by the FDG signal, the PET-GTV, and the planning target volume (PTV). The PET-derived volumes were compared with the target volumes from CT. Results: The BTV defined for appropriate GTV assessment was set at a single peak threshold of 40% of the signal of interest. Immediate treatment volume definition based on the choice of a single-tumor volume-derived PET-voxel resulted in a tumor volume that strongly correlated with the CT-derived GTV (r {sup 2} = 0.84; p < 0.01) and the volume as assessed on subsequent anatomic-pathologic analysis (r {sup 2} = 0.77; p < 0.01). In providing sufficient extension margins from the CT-derived GTV and the PET-derived GTV, to PTV, respectively, the correlation of the CT-derived and PET-derived PTV was sufficiently accurate for PTV definition for external-beam therapy (r {sup 2} = 0.96; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Automated segmentation of the PET signal from rectal cancer may allow immediate and sufficiently accurate definition of a preliminary working PTV for preoperative RT. If required, correction for anatomic precision and geometric resolution may be applied in a second step

  4. Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Receiving Radio-Chemotherapy: A Novel Clinical-Pathologic Score Correlates With Global Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Berardi, Rossana; Mantello, Giovanna; Scartozzi, Mario; Del Prete, Stefano; Luppi, Gabriele; Martinelli, Roberto; Fumagalli, Marco; Grillo-Ruggieri, Filippo; Bearzi, Italo; Mandolesi, Alessandra; Marmorale, Cristina; Cascinu, Stefano

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the importance of downstaging of locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant treatment. Methods and Materials: The study included all consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy) in different Italian centers from June 1996 to December 2003. A novel score was used, calculated as the sum of numbers obtained by giving a negative or positive point, respectively, to each degree of increase or decrease in clinical to pathologic T and N status. Results: A total of 317 patients were eligible for analysis. Neoadjuvant treatments performed were as follows: radiotherapy alone in 75 of 317 patients (23.7%), radiotherapy plus chemotherapy in 242 of 317 patients (76.3%). Worse disease-free survival was observed in patients with a lower score (Score 1 = -3 to +3 vs. Score 2 = +4 to +7; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results suggest that a novel score, calculated from preoperative and pathologic tumor and lymph node status, could represent an important parameter to predict outcome in patients receiving neoadjuvant treatment for rectal cancer. The score could be useful to select patients for adjuvant chemotherapy after neoadjuvant treatment and surgery.

  5. Prognostic and Predictive Value of Baseline and Posttreatment Molecular Marker Expression in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, Federica . E-mail: bertolini.federica@policlinico.mo.it; Bengala, Carmelo; Losi, Luisa; Pagano, Maria; Iachetta, Francesco; Dealis, Cristina; Jovic, Gordana; Depenni, Roberta; Zironi, Sandra; Falchi, Anna Maria; Luppi, Gabriele; Conte, Pier Franco

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate expression of a panel of molecular markers, including p53, p21, MLH1, MSH2, MIB-1, thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and tissue vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), before and after treatment in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer, to correlate the constitutive profile and dynamics of expression with pathologic response and outcome. Methods and Materials: Expression of biomarkers was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in tumor samples from 91 patients with clinical Stage II and III rectal cancer treated with preoperative pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy) plus concurrent 5-fluorouracil by continuous intravenous infusion. Results: A pathologic complete remission was observed in 14 patients (15.4%). Patients with MLH1-positive tumors had a higher pathologic complete response rate (24.3% vs. 9.4%; p = 0.055). Low expression of constitutive p21, absence of EGFR expression after chemoradiotherapy, and high Dworak's tumor regression grade (TRG) were significantly associated with improved disease-free survival and overall survival. A high MIB-1 value after chemoradiotherapy was significantly associated with worse overall survival. Multivariate analysis confirmed the prognostic value of constitutive p21 expression as well as EGFR expression and MIB-1 value after chemoradiotherapy among patients not achieving TRG 3-4. Conclusions: In our study, we observed the independent prognostic value of EGFR expression after chemoradiotherapy on disease-free survival. Moreover, our study suggests that a constitutive high p21 expression and a high MIB-1 value after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy treatment could predict worse outcome in locally advanced rectal cancer.

  6. [A Case of Brain Metastasis from Rectal Cancer with Synchronous Liver and Lung Metastases after Multimodality Treatment--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Masaru; Tominaga, Ben; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Yuuya; Watanabe, Shuuichi; Adikrisna, Rama; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Yabata, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of brain metastasis from rectal cancer a long time after the initial resection. A 62-year-old woman, diagnosed with lower rectal cancer with multiple synchronous liver and lung metastases, underwent abdominoperineal resection after preoperative radiochemotherapy (40 Gy at the pelvis, using the de Gramont regimen FL therapy: 1 kur). The histological diagnosis was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Various regimens of chemotherapy for unresectable and metastatic colorectal cancer were administered, and a partial response was obtained; thereby, the metastatic lesions became resectable. The patient underwent partial resection of the liver and lung metastases. Pathological findings confirmed that both the liver and lung lesions were metastases from the rectal cancer. A disease-free period occurred for several months; however, there were recurrences of the lung metastases, so we started another round of chemotherapy. After 8 months, she complained of vertigo and dizziness. A left cerebellar tumor about 3 cm in diameter was revealed by MRI and neurosurgical excision was performed. Pathological findings confirmed a cerebellar metastasis from the rectal cancer. Twenty months after resection of the brain tumor, the patient complained of a severe headache. A brain MRI showed hydrocephalia, and carcinomatous meningitis from rectal cancer was diagnosed by a spinal fluid cytology test. A ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was inserted, but the cerebrospinal pressure did not decreased and she died 20 months after the first surgery. Although brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, the number of patients with brain metastasis is thought to increase in the near future. Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer is effective enough to prolong the survival period even if multiple metastases have occurred. However, after a long survival period with lung metastases such as in our case, there is a high probability of developing brain metastases.

  7. Rectal reservoir and sensory function studied by graded isobaric distension in normal man.

    PubMed Central

    Akervall, S; Fasth, S; Nordgren, S; Oresland, T; Hultén, L

    1989-01-01

    The rectal expansion and concomitant sensory function on graded, isobaric, rectal distension within the interval 5-60 cm H2O was investigated in 36 healthy young volunteers. Anal pressure and electromyography (EMG) from the external anal sphincter were simultaneously recorded. Rectal distension caused an initial rapid expansion followed by transient, often repeated, reflex rectal contractions and a slow gradual increase of rectal volume. The maximal volume displaced by the first reflex rectal contraction was 18 (13) ml, which was less than 10% of the volume at 60 s. The pressure threshold for appreciation of rectal filling was 12 cm H2O (95% CL 5-15 cm H2O) and coincided with the threshold for rectoanal inhibition. Urge to defecate was experienced at 28 cm H2O (15-50 cm H2O) distension pressure, which was close to the threshold for maximal rectal contraction, also coinciding with the appearance of the external anal sphincter reflex. The interindividual variation of rectal volume on distension with defined pressures varied widely, indicating a considerable variation of rectal compliance in normal man. No correlation was found between rectal volume and sex or anthropometric variables. The relative variations in pressure thresholds for eliciting rectal sensation and rectoanal reflexes were less than the corresponding threshold volumes. It was concluded that the dynamic rectal response to distension reflects a well graded reflex adjustment ideal for a reservoir. PMID:2714682

  8. Biopsy Specimens Obtained 7 Days After Starting Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) Provide Reliable Predictors of Response to CRT for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Sadahiro, Sotaro; Tanaka, Akira; Okada, Kazutake; Kamata, Hiroko; Kamijo, Akemi; Murayama, Chieko; Akiba, Takeshi; Kawada, Shuichi

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) significantly decreases local recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer. Various biomarkers in biopsy specimens obtained before CRT have been proposed as predictors of response. However, reliable biomarkers remain to be established. Methods and Materials: The study group comprised 101 consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received preoperative CRT with oral uracil/tegafur (UFT) or S-1. We evaluated histologic findings on hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) staining and immunohistochemical expressions of Ki67, p53, p21, and apoptosis in biopsy specimens obtained before CRT and 7 days after starting CRT. These findings were contrasted with the histologic response and the degree of tumor shrinkage. Results: In biopsy specimens obtained before CRT, histologic marked regression according to the Japanese Classification of Colorectal Carcinoma (JCCC) criteria and the degree of tumor shrinkage on barium enema examination (BE) were significantly greater in patients with p21-positive tumors than in those with p21-negative tumors (P=.04 and P<.01, respectively). In biopsy specimens obtained 7 days after starting CRT, pathologic complete response, histologic marked regression according to both the tumor regression criteria and JCCC criteria, and T downstaging were significantly greater in patients with apoptosis-positive and p21-positive tumors than in those with apoptosis-negative (P<.01, P=.02, P=.01, and P<.01, respectively) or p21-negative tumors (P=.03, P<.01, P<.01, and P=.02, respectively). The degree of tumor shrinkage on both BE as well as MRI was significantly greater in patients with apoptosis-positive and with p21-positive tumors than in those with apoptosis-negative or p21-negative tumors, respectively. Histologic changes in H and E-stained biopsy specimens 7 days after starting CRT significantly correlated with pathologic complete response and marked regression on both JCCC and tumor

  9. Identification of Predictive Markers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Carcinomas by Proteomic Isotope Coded Protein Label (ICPL) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Croner, Roland S.; Sevim, Müzeyyen; Metodiev, Metodi V.; Jo, Peter; Ghadimi, Michael; Schellerer, Vera; Brunner, Maximillian; Geppert, Carol; Rau, Tilman; Stürzl, Michael; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Matzel, Klaus E.; Hohenberger, Werner; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kellermann, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) is an established procedure in stage union internationale contre le cancer (UICC) II/III rectal carcinomas. Around 53% of the tumours present with good tumor regression after nCRT, and 8%–15% are complete responders. Reliable selection markers would allow the identification of poor or non-responders prior to therapy. Tumor biopsies were harvested from 20 patients with rectal carcinomas, and stored in liquid nitrogen prior to therapy after obtaining patients’ informed consent (Erlangen-No.3784). Patients received standardized nCRT with 5-Fluoruracil (nCRT I) or 5-Fluoruracil ± Oxaliplatin (nCRT II) according to the CAO/ARO/AIO-04 protocol. After surgery, regression grading (Dworak) of the tumors was performed during histopathological examination of the specimens. Tumors were classified as poor (Dworak 1 + 2) or good (Dworak 3 + 4) responders. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) for tumor enrichment was performed on preoperative biopsies. Differences in expressed proteins between poor and good responders to nCRT I and II were identified by proteomic analysis (Isotope Coded Protein Label, ICPL™) and selected markers were validated by immunohistochemistry. Tumors of 10 patients were classified as histopathologically poor (Dworak 1 or 2) and the other 10 tumor samples as histopathologically good (Dworak 3 or 4) responders to nCRT after surgery. Sufficient material in good quality was harvested for ICPL analysis by LCM from all biopsies. We identified 140 differentially regulated proteins regarding the selection criteria and the response to nCRT. Fourteen of these proteins were synchronously up-regulated at least 1.5-fold after nCRT I or nCRT II (e.g., FLNB, TKT, PKM2, SERINB1, IGHG2). Thirty-five proteins showed a complete reciprocal regulation (up or down) after nCRT I or nCRT II and the rest was regulated either according to nCRT I or II. The protein expression of regulated proteins such as PLEC1, TKT, HADHA and TAGLN was

  10. [Prevention of intraoperative incidental injuries during sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer and management of postoperative complication].

    PubMed

    Han, Fanghai; Li, Hongming

    2016-06-01

    Prevention of intraoperative incidental injuries during radical operation for rectal cancer and management of postoperative complication are associated with successful operation and prognosis of patients. This paper discusses how to prevent such intraoperative incidental injuries and how to manage postoperative complication. (1) Accurate clinical evaluation should be performed before operation and reasonable treatment decision should be made, including determination of the distance from transection to lower margin of the tumor, T and M staging evaluated by MRI, fascia invasion of mesorectum, metastasis of lateral lymph nodes, metastatic station of mesentery lymph node, association between levator ani muscle and anal sphincter, course and length of sigmoid observed by Barium enema, length assessment of pull-through bowel. Meanwhile individual factors of patients and tumors must be realized accurately. (2) Injury of pelvic visceral fascia should be avoided during operation. Negative low and circumference cutting edge must be ensured. Blood supply and adequate length of pull-down bowel must be also ensured. Urinary system injury, pelvic bleeding and intestinal damage should be avoided. Team cooperation and anesthesia procedure should be emphasized. Capacity of handling accident events should be cultivated for the team. (3) intraoperative incidental injuries during operation by instruments should be avoided, such as poor clarity of camera due to spray and smog, ineffective instruments resulted from repeated usage. (4) As to the prevention and management of postoperative complication of rectal cancer operation, prophylactic stoma should be regularly performed for rectal cancer patients undergoing anterior resection, while drainage tube placement does not decrease the morbidities of anastomosis and other complications. After sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer, attentions must be paid to the occurrence of anastomotic bleeding, pelvic bleeding, anastomotic

  11. Long-term Oncologic Outcome Following Preoperative Combined Modality Therapy and Total Mesorectal Excision of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guillem, Jose G.; Chessin, David B.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Shia, Jinru; Mazumdar, Madhu; Enker, Warren; Paty, Philip B.; Weiser, Martin R.; Klimstra, David; Saltz, Leonard; Minsky, Bruce D.; Wong, W Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Our aims were to (1) determine the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative combined modality therapy (CMT) followed by total mesorectal excision (TME), (2) identify factors predictive of oncologic outcome, and (3) determine the oncologic significance of the extent of pathologic tumor response. Summary Background Data: Locally advanced (T3–4 and/or N1) rectal adenocarcinoma is commonly treated with preoperative CMT and TME. However, the long-term oncologic results of this approach and factors predictive of a durable outcome remain largely unknown. Methods: Two hundred ninety-seven consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma at a median distance of 6cm from the anal verge (range 0–15 cm) were treated with preoperative CMT (radiation: 5040 centi-Gray (cGy) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy) followed by TME from 1988 to 2002. A prospectively collected database was queried for long-term oncologic outcome and predictive clinicopathologic factors. Results: With a median follow-up of 44 months, the estimated 10-year overall survival (OS) was 58% and 10 year recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 62%. On multivariate analysis, pathologic response >95%, lymphovascular invasion and/or perineural invasion (PNI), and positive lymph nodes were significantly associated with OS and RFS. Patients with a >95% pathologic response had a significantly improved OS (P = 0.003) and RFS (P = 0.002). Conclusions: Treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer with preoperative CMT followed by TME can provide for a durable 10-year OS of 58% and RFS of 62%. Patients who achieve a >95% response to preoperative CMT have an improved long-term oncologic outcome, a novel finding that deserves further study. PMID:15849519

  12. Significance and prognostic value of increased serum direct bilirubin level for lymph node metastasis in Chinese rectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chun; Fang, Long; Li, Jing-Tao; Zhao, Hong-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the significance of increased serum direct bilirubin level for lymph node metastasis (LNM) in Chinese rectal cancer patients, after those with known hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases were excluded. METHODS: A cohort of 469 patients, who were treated at the China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Ministry of Health (Beijing, China), in the period from January 2003 to June 2011, and with a pathological diagnosis of rectal adenocarcinoma, were recruited. They included 231 patients with LNM (49.3%) and 238 patients without LNM. Follow-up for these patients was taken through to December 31, 2012. RESULTS: The baseline serum direct bilirubin concentration was (median/inter-quartile range) 2.30/1.60-3.42 μmol/L. Univariate analysis showed that compared with patients without LNM, the patients with LNM had an increased level of direct bilirubin (2.50/1.70-3.42 vs 2.10/1.40-3.42, P = 0.025). Multivariate analysis showed that direct bilirubin was independently associated with LNM (OR = 1.602; 95%CI: 1.098-2.338, P = 0.015). Moreover, we found that: (1) serum direct bilirubin differs between male and female patients; a higher concentration was associated with poor tumor classification; (2) as the baseline serum direct bilirubin concentration increased, the percentage of patients with LNM increased; and (3) serum direct bilirubin was associated with the prognosis of rectal cancer patients and higher values indicated poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: Higher serum direct bilirubin concentration was associated with the increased risk of LNM and poor prognosis in our rectal cancers. PMID:26937145

  13. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  14. Rectal Cancer Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Prezzi, D; Goh, V

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has in recent years progressively established itself as one of the most valuable modalities for the diagnosis, staging and response assessment of rectal cancer and its use has largely focused on accurate morphological assessment. The potential of MRI, however, extends beyond detailed anatomical depiction: aspects of tissue physiology, such as perfusion, oxygenation and water molecule diffusivity, can be assessed indirectly. Functional MRI is rapidly evolving as a promising non-invasive assessment tool for tumour phenotyping and assessment of response to new therapeutic agents. In spite of promising experimental data, the evidence base for the application of functional MRI techniques in rectal cancer remains modest, reflecting the relatively poor agreement on technical protocols, image processing techniques and quantitative methodology to date, hampering routine integration into clinical management. This overview outlines the established strengths and the critical limitations of anatomical MRI in rectal cancer; it then introduces some of the functional MRI techniques and quantitative analysis methods that are currently available, describing their applicability in rectal cancer and reviewing the relevant literature; finally, it introduces the concept of a multi-parametric quantitative approach to rectal cancer.

  15. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  16. Rectal Cancer Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Prezzi, D; Goh, V

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has in recent years progressively established itself as one of the most valuable modalities for the diagnosis, staging and response assessment of rectal cancer and its use has largely focused on accurate morphological assessment. The potential of MRI, however, extends beyond detailed anatomical depiction: aspects of tissue physiology, such as perfusion, oxygenation and water molecule diffusivity, can be assessed indirectly. Functional MRI is rapidly evolving as a promising non-invasive assessment tool for tumour phenotyping and assessment of response to new therapeutic agents. In spite of promising experimental data, the evidence base for the application of functional MRI techniques in rectal cancer remains modest, reflecting the relatively poor agreement on technical protocols, image processing techniques and quantitative methodology to date, hampering routine integration into clinical management. This overview outlines the established strengths and the critical limitations of anatomical MRI in rectal cancer; it then introduces some of the functional MRI techniques and quantitative analysis methods that are currently available, describing their applicability in rectal cancer and reviewing the relevant literature; finally, it introduces the concept of a multi-parametric quantitative approach to rectal cancer. PMID:26586163

  17. Voiding Dysfunction after Total Mesorectal Excision in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Noh, Tae Il; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Gu; Um, Jun Won; Min, Byung Wook

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the voiding dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Methods This was part of a prospective study done in the rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery with TME between November 2006 and June 2008. Consecutive uroflowmetry, post-voided residual volume, and a voiding questionnaire were performed at preoperatively and postoperatively. Results A total of 50 patients were recruited in this study, including 28 male and 22 female. In the comparison of the preoperative data with the postoperative 3-month data, a significant decrease in mean maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume were found. In the comparison with the postoperative 6-month data, however only the maximal flow rate was decreased with statistical significance (P=0.02). In the comparison between surgical methods, abdominoperineal resection patients showed delayed recovery of maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume. There was no significant difference in uroflowmetry parameters with advances in rectal cancer stage. Conclusions Voiding dysfunction is common after rectal cancer surgery but can be recovered in 6 months after surgery or earlier. Abdominoperineal resection was shown to be an unfavorable factor for postoperative voiding. Larger prospective study is needed to determine the long-term effect of rectal cancer surgery in relation to male and female baseline voiding condition. PMID:22087426

  18. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  19. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  20. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer