Science.gov

Sample records for rectal carcinoid tumors

  1. Multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Doi, Momoko; Ikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Kawamura, Takuji; Katsura, Kanade

    2016-08-01

    We report multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins who, respectively, had 42 and 36 carcinoid tumors in the lower rectum. This is the first report about carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins. Both twins developed a similar number of rectal carcinoids with a similar distribution. Investigation of their genetic background may provide information about the origin of these tumors.

  2. An Unusual Case of Rectal and Ileal Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abdulsamad, Molham; Abbas, Naeem; Balar, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is the most common neuroendocrine tumor affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The coexistence of multifocal carcinoid lesions is a well-established phenomenon. Although intubation of the terminal ileum is not routinely attempted during colonoscopy, it can occasionally reveal the presence of some incidental findings. We present a patient with known rectal carcinoid, who was found to have another carcinoid lesion in the terminal ileum during surveillance colonoscopy. The patient underwent right hemicolectomy, and no chemotherapy was required as the patient was found to have stage 1 carcinoid tumor. PMID:28203126

  3. The effect of preceding biopsy on complete endoscopic resection in rectal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Pyo; Sung, In-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Sun-Young; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup

    2014-04-01

    Biopsy of rectal carcinoid tumor is commonly taken before endoscopic resection. However the preceding biopsy can inhibit complete resection by causing blurred tumor border and fibrosis of the tissue. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of preceding biopsy on complete endoscopic resection in rectal carcinoid tumor. It was also determined if rectal carcinoid tumors can be macroscopically distinguished by endoscopy. We reviewed retrospectively the records of patients with rectal carcinoid tumor who had undergone an endoscopic treatment at our hospital, during a 7-yr period. The resection margin was clear in 57 of 98 cases. The preceding biopsy was taken in 57 cases and the biopsy was significantly associated with the risk of incomplete tumor resection (OR, 3.696; 95% CI, 1.528-8.938, P = 0.004). In 95.9% of the cases, it was possible to suspect a carcinoid tumor by macroscopic appearance during initial endoscopy. The preceding biopsy may disturb complete resection of rectal carcinoid tumor. In most cases, the carcinoid tumor could be suspected by macroscopic appearance. Therefore the preceding biopsy is not essential, and it may be avoided for the complete resection.

  4. Rectal carcinoid tumor metastasis to a skull base meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jennifer; Gupta, Amit; Badve, Chaitra; Cohen, Mark L; Wolansky, Leo J

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors that most frequently develop in the gastrointestinal tract or lungs and have high potential for metastasis. Metastasis to the brain is rare, but to another intracranial tumor is extremely rare. Of the intracranial tumors, meningiomas are the most common to host metastases, which may be related to its rich vascularity and E-cadherin expression. We describe the case of a 65-year-old female with active chemotherapy-treated neuroendocrine carcinoma who presented with left-sided facial numbness, headaches, and blurry vision. Initial imaging revealed a 1 cm irregular dural-based left petrous apex mass suggestive of a meningioma that was re-imaged four months later as a rapidly enlarging, extra-axial, mass extending into the cavernous sinus, effacing Meckel’s cave that resembled a trigeminal schwannoma. Pathology revealed a carcinoid tumor metastatic to meningioma. While the mass displayed characteristic imaging findings of a schwannoma, rapid growth in the setting of known active malignancy should prompt the clinician to consider mixed pathology from metastatic disease or a more aggressive meningioma. PMID:26825133

  5. [Four resections of metachronous liver metastases and lateral lymph node metastases of a rectal carcinoid tumor - a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takayuki; Koyama, Fumikazu; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Shinji; Ueda, Takeshi; Nishigori, Naoto; Inoue, Takashi; Kawasaki, Keijirou; Obara, Shinsaku; Fujii, Hisao; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    The authors present a case of rectal carcinoid tumor with lateral lymph node metastases and liver metastases that was successfully treated by 4 resections. A 70-year-old man was diagnosed with a rectal carcinoid tumor (20 mm in diameter) with submucosal (SM) invasion. Radical resection was performed at 25 months, 38 months, and 57 months, when abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed metachronous liver metastases of the rectal carcinoid tumor. At 50 months, metachronous lateral lymph node metastases were also revealed. Three hepatectomies and a laparoscopic lateral lymph node dissection were performed. The patient is currently free of disease at 25 months after the last intervention.

  6. Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing cancers. They usually start in the lining of the digestive tract or in the lungs. They grow ... trouble breathing. Surgery is the main treatment for carcinoid tumors. If they haven't spread to other parts of the body, surgery can cure the cancer.

  7. [A case of rectal carcinoid tumor with lymph node and liver metastasis 5 years after curative resection].

    PubMed

    Shindo, Yoshitaro; Hazama, Shoichi; Maeda, Yoshinari; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Tamesa, Takao; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Kawano, Hiroo; Oka, Masaaki

    2013-11-01

    A 65-year-old man was diagnosed with a rectal carcinoid tumor (10 mm in diameter) in July 2007. We performed low anterior resection with lymph node dissection. Histological depth of penetration of the rectal wall by the primary tumor was up to the submucosa, and lymph node metastasis was observed at station 251 (Japanese Classification of Colorectal Carcinoma, seventh Edition). Five years later, abdominal enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple liver tumors and swelling of the right obturator lymph nodes. During surgery, ultrasonography revealed 10 hypoechoic masses in both hepatic lobes. We performed right pelvic lymph node dissection, partial hepatectomy (S5/6, S7, and S8), and microwave coagulation therapy. After surgery, the patient was treated with octreotide long-acting repeatable( LAR). The patient remained disease-free for 10 months after surgery. Our findings suggest that careful monitoring is necessary for metachronous lymph node and liver metastasis during follow-up treatment for rectal carcinoid tumors.

  8. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Treating Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery to Treat Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  9. Transcatheter arterial embolization with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere®) leads to life-threatening tumor lysis syndrome in a rectal carcinoid patient with hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yuan-Hao; Tsai, Ming-Tsun; Kuo, Chen-Yu; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Li, Chung-Pin; Chen, Jinn-Yang; Chao, Yee

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal carcinoids appears to be increasing, and the rectum is the third most common location. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere®) has been reported as an effective method for hepatic metastases of rectal carcinoids. Complications are uncommon and usually of minor consequence. We report an unusual case of a 34-year-old man with tumor lysis syndrome following TAE with Embosphere® in a patient with multiple hepatic metastases of a rectal carcinoid. Early detection and effective treatment are essential for this rare but potentially catastrophic complication. PMID:23986828

  10. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  11. Synchronous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon and Rectal Carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    Vootla, Vamshidhar; Ahmed, Rafeeq; Niazi, Masooma; Balar, Bhavna; Nayudu, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Primary colonic adenocarcinoma and synchronous rectal carcinoids are rare tumors. Whenever a synchronous tumor with a nonmetastatic carcinoid component is encountered, its prognosis is determined by the associate malignancy. The discovery of an asymptomatic gastrointestinal carcinoid during the operative treatment of another malignancy will usually only require resection without additional treatment and will have little effect on the prognosis of the individual. This article reports a synchronous rectal carcinoid in a patient with hepatic flexure adenocarcinoma. We present a case of a 46-year-old Hispanic woman with a history of hypothyroidism, uterine fibroids and hypercholesterolemia presenting with a 2-week history of intermittent abdominal pain, mainly in the right upper quadrant. She had no family history of cancers. Physical examination was significant for pallor. Laboratory findings showed microcytic anemia with a hemoglobin of 6.6 g/dl. CT abdomen showed circumferential wall thickening in the ascending colon near the hepatic flexure and pulmonary nodules. Colonoscopy showed hepatic flexure mass and rectal nodule which were biopsied. Pathology showed a moderately differentiated invasive adenocarcinoma of the colon (hepatic flexure mass) and a low-grade neuroendocrine neoplasm (carcinoid of rectum). The patient underwent laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and chemotherapy. In patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the colon and rectum, carcinoids could be missed due to their submucosal location, multicentricity and indolent growth pattern. Studies suggest a closer surveillance of the GI tract for noncarcinoid synchronous malignancy when a carcinoid tumor is detected and vice versa. PMID:27920648

  12. [Metastatic bronchial carcinoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Bouledrak, K; Walter, T; Souquet, P J; Lombard-Bohas, C

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial carcinoids are uncommon pulmonary neoplasms and represent 1 to 2 % of all lung tumors. In early stage of disease, the mainstay and only curative treatment is surgery. Bronchial carcinoids are generally regarded as low-grade carcinomas and metastatic dissemination is unusual. The management of the metastatic stage is not currently standardized due to a lack of relevant studies. As bronchial carcinoids and in particular their metastatic forms are rare, we apply treatment strategies that have been evaluated in gastrointestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, bronchial carcinoids have their own characteristic. A specific therapeutic feature of these metastatic tumors is that they require a dual approach: both anti-secretory for the carcinoid syndrome, and anti-tumoral.

  13. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Progressive Carcinoid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Atypical Carcinoid Tumor; Foregut Carcinoid Tumor; Hindgut Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Midgut Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1

  14. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinbo; Hu, Zhijian; Wu, Junwei; Bai, Lishan; Chai, Xinqun

    2011-11-19

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor is rare and poses a challenge for diagnosis and management. We presented a case of primary hepatic carcinoid tumor in a 53-year-old female with a complaint of right upper abdominal pain. Computer tomography scans revealed a hypervascular mass in segment 4 of the liver. An ultrasonography-guided biopsy showed a carcinoid tumor. No other lesions were found by the radiological investigations. Surgery resection was performed and histopathological examination revealed a primary hepatic carcinoid tumor. Three years later, recurrence was found and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization was performed. After transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, the patient has been free of symptom and had no radiological disease progression for over 6 months. Surgical resection combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization is effective to offer excellent palliation.

  15. Stages of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  16. What Happens after Treatment for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Lung Carcinoid Tumors? For many people with carcinoid tumors, ... Lung Carcinoid Tumor Treatment Stops Working More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  17. What Are the Key Statistics for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carcinoid Tumors What Are the Key Statistics About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? About 1% to 2% of all ... Lung Carcinoid Tumor Research and Treatment? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  18. Rectal carcinoids are on the rise: early detection by screening endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Scherübl, H

    2009-02-01

    Rectal carcinoids are on the rise; in the United States the age-adjusted incidence has increased by 800% -1000% in the last 35 years. The incidence of carcinoids of the stomach, pancreas, or small bowels has also multiplied. The reasons for these epidemiological changes are not yet understood. Both screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy lead to a shift to smaller-sized (< or =13 mm) rectal carcinoids and earlier tumor stages at diagnosis. During the last 35 years the overall 5-year survival of patients with rectal carcinoid disease has increased by almost 20% (in the US). Thus, endoscopic screening of the colorectum is effective in the early diagnosis not only of colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas but also of carcinoids. Rectal carcinoids that are 10.0 mm or less and do not infiltrate the muscularis propria can be removed endoscopically. If histological angioinvasion or lymph node metastases are found, surgical lymph node dissection has to be considered. Before deciding on definitive therapy, rectal carcinoids should be staged by means of endoscopic ultrasonography, CT, or MRI and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

  19. What Are the Key Statistics about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors What Are the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? Although the exact number ... a Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor? What Are the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? What’s New in Gastrointestinal ...

  20. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? It is important to have honest, ... Your Doctor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  2. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  3. General Information about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  4. [A case of laparoscopic surgery for a rectal carcinoid after ALTA therapy for an internal hemorrhoid].

    PubMed

    Aomatsu, Naoki; Nakamura, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakao, Shigetomi; Uchima, Yasutake; Aomatsu, Keiho

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of laparoscopic surgery for a rectal carcinoid after aluminum potassium and tannic acid (ALTA) therapy for an internal hemorrhoid. A 66-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of bleeding during defecation. He was diagnosed via anoscopy with Goligher grade II internal hemorrhoids. Examination via colonoscopy revealed 2 yellowish submucosal tumors in the lower rectum that were 5mm and 10mm in diameter. A rectal carcinoid tumor was diagnosed based on histopathology. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated no metastases to the liver or lymph nodes. First, we performed ALTA therapy for the internal hemorrhoids. Two weeks later, we performed laparoscopic-assisted low anterior resection (D2) for the rectal carcinoid. The patient was discharged without complications and has not experienced recurrence during the 2 years of follow-up care.

  5. What's New in Lung Carcinoid Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lung Carcinoid Tumor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors What’s New in Lung Carcinoid Tumor Research and Treatment? Many ... controlling when our cells grow and divide into new cells. Certain genes that cause cells to grow, ...

  6. Duodenal carcinoid tumor - a case report.

    PubMed

    Debnath, C R; Debnath, M R; Haque, M A; Das, S N; Moshwan, M M; Karim, R; Uddoula, M S

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are well differentiated neuroendochrine tumors which most frequently involve the gastrointestinal tract; however duodenal carcinoid tumors are rare. They can present with various clinical symptoms and are difficult to diagnose. A 52 years old lady presented with the symptoms of recurrent upper abdominal pain, burning sensation of whole body and passage of loose stool. On endoscopy of upper GIT, there was a duodenal polyp. Polyp was removed by endoscopic resection and tissue was taken for biopsy. Histological findings of biopsy specimen shows carcinoid tumor. As duodenal carcinoid tumor is a rare presentation so we are going to present this case in this article.

  7. What Happens after Treatment for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? For some people with gastrointestinal (GI) carcinoid tumor, treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. ...

  8. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors by Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumors of the stomach. Patients with these conditions who have stomach carcinoid tumors are treated differently from patients without these conditions. Type 1: Patients with high gastrin levels but low levels of stomach acid are said to have type 1 tumors. ...

  9. Pulmonary carcinoid tumor associated with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    DePace, N L; Elquezabal, A; Hardenburg, H C

    1980-04-01

    A patient with carcinoid tumor of the lung associated with nephrotic syndrome was treated. Excision of the tumor resulted in remission of marked proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema. A review of the literature disclosed many neoplasms associated with the nephrotic syndrome; however, no association of the nephrotic syndrome and a carcinoid tumor of the lung has previously been reported, to our knowledge.

  10. Carcinoid Tumor: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Has any treatment been effective in reducing severe edema associated with a carcinoid of the liver? There are many possible causes of edema in association with carcinoid involving the liver. These ...

  11. Metastatic carcinoid tumor--atypical presentation.

    PubMed

    Pleşa, Alina; Sarca, Emanuela; Maxim, Roxana

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is a slow-growing type of neuroendocrine tumor, originating in the enterochromaffin cells and secreting mainly serotonin. Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are found throughout the intestinal tract, the appendix and terminal ileum being the most common locations, and are classified by site of origin and by degree of differentiation, with well-differentiated lesions representing those tumors formerly referred to as carcinoid tumors. The clinical symptoms are characterized by flushing, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and/or bronchial constriction and occur almost exclusively in patients with liver metastases due to the release of bioactive peptides and amines directly into the systemic circulation. We report the clinical, serological and histological diagnosis of a 67-years-old male patient with congestive heart failure secondary to carcinoid heart disease in the context of liver metastases of an ileum carcinoid tumor.

  12. Combined classical carcinoid and goblet cell carcinoid tumor: a new morphologic variant of carcinoid tumor of the appendix.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Runjan; Klimstra, David S; Henson, Donald E; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge

    2010-08-01

    Carcinoid tumors are the most common neoplasms of the appendix. Histologically they have been categorized as classical, tubular, or goblet cell types. Goblet cell carcinoid has been regarded as a distinctive tumor type, not related to classic carcinoids, and to our knowledge combinations of these 2 tumor types have not been described in detail. In this report, we describe 5 cases of combined classical carcinoid and goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) tumors of the appendix. Four men and 1 woman, (mean age 53.4 y) presented with acute appendicitis (4 cases), whereas 1 presented with a pelvic mass owing to widespread pelvic disseminated disease. The tumors (0.6 to 6.0 cm) were located in the mid-portion and the tip of the appendix. Four patients were treated with right hemicolectomies (the patient with disseminated pelvic and ovarian metastases also had a pelvic exenteration), and 1 was treated with an appendectomy only. Four patients are alive and asymptomatic, whereas the patient with disseminated pelvic disease died 6 months after surgery. All 5 appendiceal tumors had microscopic features of both classical carcinoid and GCC, either intimately admixed or separate but closely apposed. The extent of the 2 components varied, with classical carcinoid representing 60% to 90% of the tumor. Both components stained for the general neuroendocrine markers, however, staining in the classic component was greater. The Mib-1 proliferation index varied from 1-15%, again with higher Mib-1 indices seen in the GCC component of all 5 cases. The pelvic soft tissue and ovarian metastases in case 4 consisted predominantly of a signet ring cell carcinoma with a minor component of goblet cells and was interpreted as an adenocarcinoma ex-GCC. In view of the fact that these combined carcinoid tumors appear to behave more as goblet cell carcinoids, detailed microscopic examination of classical carcinoid tumors of the appendix is suggested and larger series with longer follow-up is required to

  13. Do We Know What Causes Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... We Know What Causes Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? Can Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Be Prevented? Back To Top Imagine a world free from cancer. Help make it a reality. DONATE Cancer Information ...

  14. Metastatic carcinoid tumor obstructing left ventricular outflow.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, George S; Horstmanshof, Douglas A; Guniganti, Uma M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare and usually indicate metastatic disease. Characterizing a tumor and reaching an exact diagnosis can be difficult. Diagnosis has been aided greatly by advances in imaging, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance with the use of gadolinium-pentetic acid. Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms that are found most often in the intestinal tract, although they can also develop in the lung, stomach, or heart. Herein, we report the case of a 72-year-old woman with a history of intestinal carcinoid disease and presenting symptoms of dizziness, fatigue, and chest pain. We used cardiovascular magnetic resonance with gadolinium enhancement to identify a large mass obstructing left ventricular outflow. The histopathologic results of an endomyocardial biopsy confirmed that the mass was a left-sided metastatic carcinoid cardiac tumor. To our knowledge, we are reporting the 1st combined use of clinical evaluation, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and histopathologic studies to reach such a diagnosis.

  15. PHACES syndrome associated with carcinoid endobronchial tumor.

    PubMed

    Mama, Nadia; H'mida, Dorra; Lahmar, Imen; Yacoubi, Mohamed Tahar; Tlili-Graiess, Kalthoum

    2014-05-01

    PHACES syndrome consists of the constellation of manifestations including posterior fossa anomalies of the brain (most commonly Dandy-Walker malformations), hemangiomas of the face and scalp, arterial abnormalities, cardiac defects, eye anomalies and sternal defects. We present a case with a possible PHACES syndrome including sternal cleft and supraumbilical raphé, precordial skin tag, persistent left superior vena cava and subtle narrowing of the aorta with an endobronchial carcinoid tumor. All these anomalies were discovered on chest multi-detector CT. This is a unique case of PHACES syndrome associated with carcinoid tumor. Review of the literature revealed 3 cases of PHACES syndrome with glial tumor. The authors tried to find the relationship between PHACES syndrome and carcinoid tumors or gliomas, which all derive from the neural crest cells.

  16. Glucagon-, glicentin-, and pancreatic polypeptide-like immunoreativities in rectal carcinoids and related colorectal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fiocca, R.; Capella, C.; Buffa, R.; Fontana, R.; Solcia, E.; Hage, E.; Chance, R. E.; Moody, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Three nonargentaffin rectal carcinoids have been investigated immunohistochemically. In one case most tumor cells reacted with antiglucagon sera as well as with antiglicentin, antibovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP), and antihuman pancreatic polypeptide (HPP) sera; they were identified ultrastructurally as L cells. Another case showed glucagon-, glicentin-, and BPP-immunoreactive cells but lacked HPP immunoreactivity. In the third case glucagon- and glicentin-immunoreactive cells were well represented, while PP immunoreactivities were scarce. Parallel investigations of human rectal and sigmoid mucosa showed numerous cells reacting with glucagon, glicentin, and BPP antisera, most of which lacked HPP immunoreactivity. Cells reacting with glucagon and glicentin antisera, while lacking PP immunoreactivities, were also found. Thus, both tumor and nontumor cells produce glucagonlike immunoreactive (GLI) peptides--one of which may be glicentin or a related molecule--as well as PP-related sequences, although differing histochemically and ultrastructurally from glucagon or PP cells of the human pancreas. It is concluded that nonargentaffin rectal carcinoids are histogenetically linked to nonargentaffin endocrine cells of the human rectum. Images p[92]-a Figures 1-3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7395969

  17. What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... others. Risk factors for lung carcinoid tumors include: Gender Lung carcinoids occur more often in women than ... would like to unsubscribe/opt out from our communications, please follow this link: http://www.cancer.org/ ...

  18. Primary renal carcinoid tumor: A radiologic review

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Leslie; Shaban, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is the classic famous anonym of neuroendocrine neoplasms. Primary renal carcinoid tumors are extremely rare, first described by Resnick and colleagues in 1966, with fewer than a total of 100 cases reported in the literature. Thus, given the paucity of cases, the clinical and histological behavior is not well understood, impairing the ability to predict prognosis. Computed tomography and (occasionally) octreotide studies are used in the diagnosis and followup of these rare entites. A review of 85 cases in the literature shows that no distinctive imaging features differentiate them from other primary renal masses. The lesions tend to demonstrate a hypodense appearance and do not usually enhance in the arterial phases, but can occasionally calcify. Octreotide scans do not seem to help in the diagnosis; however, they are more commonly used in the postoperative followup. In addition, we report a new case of primary renal carcinoid in a horseshoe kidney. PMID:27186242

  19. Esophageal carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Makoto; Abe, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Yu; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Iwano, Daisuke; Yoshizawa, Kazuya; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Kanno, Nana; Nishise, Syouichi; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2015-05-01

    The present report describes a rare case of esophageal carcinoid tumor that was treated by endoscopic resection. A 43-year-old woman underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy at her family clinic for screening of the upper digestive tract and a small lesion resembling a submucosal tumor was detected in the lower esophagus. A biopsy sample from the lesion was diagnosed as esophageal carcinoid tumor and the patient visited our hospital for detailed examination. The tumor was approximately 3 mm in diameter and its surface appeared to be covered with normal squamous epithelium. The tumor had a shiny reddish surface without ulceration or erosion. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging showed structures resembling reticular vessels under the epithelium. Endoscopic ultrasonography depicted the tumor as a low-echoic mass within the lamina propria. Computed tomography did not detect the tumor and no metastatic lesions were evident in other organs. With the patient's informed consent, the tumor was resected using endoscopic submucosal dissection, with a sufficient free margin in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Magnifying endoscopic examination showed the resected tumor to have abundant reticular vessels. Finally, the tumor was diagnosed immunopathologically as an esophageal carcinoid tumor (neuroendocrine cell tumor, grade 1), without lymphatic or vascular invasion.

  20. A case of carotid body tumor concomitant with carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Mun, Mi Jin; Lee, Jin Choon; Lee, Byung Joo

    2015-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors typically fall into two broad categories: those of epithelial origin and those of neural derivation. The former group includes carcinoid tumors and the latter includes paraganglioma. Although paraganglioma and carcinoid tumor have different biologic behaviors, their overlapping histological appearance can pose diagnostic challenges. Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors arising from the enterochromaffin cells disseminated throughout the gastrointestinal and bronchopulmonary systems. Carotid body tumor is the most common type of extra-adrenal paraganglioma. Paraganglioma tends to grow slowly but can compress adjacent vessel and nerve. A 63-year-old woman showed huge mass extending from carotid body to skull base, encircling internal and external carotid arteries on magnetic resonance image. Surgical removal of carotid body tumor was done after embolization procedure. Postoperative histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical analysis were consistent with paraganglioma concomitant with carcinoid tumor in carotid body. Primary cervical carcinoid tumor is extremely rare, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of concomitant existence of paraganglioma and carcinoid tumor in carotid body.

  1. Carcinoid Tumor in Accidental, Asymptomatic Meckel's Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valeria; Merkel, Keresztely; Zolnai, Zsofia

    2013-01-01

    Although Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital gastrointestinal disorder, it is controversial whether asymptomatic diverticula in adults should be respected. The authors report the case of a patient who was operated due to ileus caused by adhesions and a Meckel's diverticulum without any sign of inflammation was accidentally noted and removed. As a surprise, the pathological examination of the diverticulum proved carcinoid tumor, a neuroendocrine malignant tumor. The case raises the importance of the removal of asymptomatic Meckel's diverticulum.

  2. Carcinoid Tumor in Accidental, Asymptomatic Meckel's Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valeria; Merkel, Keresztely; Zolnai, Zsofia

    2013-01-01

    Although Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital gastrointestinal disorder, it is controversial whether asymptomatic diverticula in adults should be respected. The authors report the case of a patient who was operated due to ileus caused by adhesions and a Meckel's diverticulum without any sign of inflammation was accidentally noted and removed. As a surprise, the pathological examination of the diverticulum proved carcinoid tumor, a neuroendocrine malignant tumor. The case raises the importance of the removal of asymptomatic Meckel's diverticulum. PMID:24470856

  3. [Case of primary renal carcinoid tumor with hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yasuaki; Seike, Kensaku; Maeda, Shinichi; Tashiro, Kazuhiro

    2010-04-01

    Carcinoid tumors are low-grade malignant tumors that arise from neuroendocrine cells. Primary renal carcinoid tumors are extremely uncommon. A 63-year-old woman presented with a right abdominal mass and fever. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a mass in the right kidney; the mass measured 120 mm in diameter and showed hemorrhage. The patient underwent an uneventful right radical nephrectomy, and histological appearance was typical of carcinoid tumor. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated strong cytoplasmic labeling for neuron-specific enolase and synaptophysin. Additional examinations of the gastrointestinal tract did not show any evidence of carcinoid tumors. The patient remains free from disease recurrence at 8 months after the operation. The prognosis for primary renal carcinoid tumor is relatively optimistic. Complete surgical excision is the only recommended treatment for localized renal carcinoid tumor.

  4. Rectal Carcinoid Tumor With Liver Metastases Treated by Local Excision and Orthotopic Liver Transplant With Long-term Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vennarecci, Giovanni; Mascianà, Gianluca; de Werra, Edoardo; Guglielmo, Nicola; Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Coluzzi, Mariagrazia; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria

    2017-03-28

    In patients affected by unresectable liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumor, liver transplant represents currently the only realistic chance for cure. The first attempt to establish selection criteria for liver transplant in patients affected by neuroendocrine tumor liver metastases was made by Mazzaferro and associates in 2007. We report the case of a 46-year-old man who came to our institution in 2006 with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Diagnosis of rectal neuroendocrine tumor with bilobar liver nodules was made; the patient underwent transanal local resection. A liver biopsy confirmed the metastatic nature of the hepatic lesion, showing a low-grade neuroendocrine tumor (G1, proliferation index Ki-67 <2%). The patient underwent 2 sessions of transarterial chemoembolization that resulted in stable disease. Afterward, the patient underwent a liver transplant, using the piggyback technique without a venous-venous bypass. His postoperative course was uneventful. The patient has been disease-free for 3 years. Posttransplant treatment has played a key role in increasing the overall survival of the patient and assuring him a good quality of life. He died 9 years (102 mo) after liver transplant.

  5. Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Ayub, Adil; Naeem, Buria; Najam, Sehrish; Ahmed, Zubair; Jafri, Wasim; Hamid, Saeed

    2016-03-01

    Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor (PHCT) represents an extremely rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported to date. These tumors are rarely associated with metastasis and surgical resection is usually curative. Herein, we report two cases of PHCT associated with poor outcomes due to late diagnosis. Both cases presented late with non-specific symptoms. One patient presented after a 2-week history of symptoms and the second case had a longstanding two years symptomatic interval during which he remained undiagnosed and not properly worked up. Both these cases were diagnosed with hepatic carcinoid tumor, which originates from neuroendocrine cells. Case 1 opted for palliative care and expired in one month’s time. Surgical resection was advised to the second case, but he left against medical advice.

  6. Bioprosthetic tricuspid valve replacement in carcinoid heart disease from primary ovarian carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Tsugu, Toshimitsu; Iwanaga, Shiro; Murata, Mitsushige; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-07-01

    Carcinoid heart disease (CHD) commonly occurs in association with primary gastrointestinal tract carcinoid tumors with hepatic metastases. Unlike primary gastrointestinal tract carcinoid tumors, primary ovarian carcinoid tumors may cause CHD without hepatic metastases, accounting for only 0.3 % of all carcinoid tumors. Only 37 cases of CHD from primary ovarian carcinoid tumors have been reported. We present a case of CHD in which tricuspid valve thickening and shortening led to reduced valve mobility with the resulting severe tricuspid regurgitation. Considering these characteristics of an abnormal tricuspid valve, we suspected CHD, but prosthetic valve replacement was performed without sufficient systemic examination before surgery. Two years after valve replacement, the patient underwent excision of a mass in the lower abdomen, which was diagnosed as an ovarian carcinoid tumor by histopathological examination. The patient has been observed for more than 3 years after tricuspid valve replacement. She has not experienced bioprosthetic valve leaflet degeneration or dysfunction, although it has been reported that bioprosthetic valves may degenerate in patients with carcinoid tumors. Sufficient systemic examinations should be performed to explore the cause of disease.

  7. Limitation of liver function tests in metastatic carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moinuddin, M.; Dean, P.; Vander Zwaag, R.; Dragutsky, M.

    1987-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of liver function tests (LFT) as indicators of metastatic carcinoid tumors, a retrospective study was performed. The LFT results of 17 patients with carcinoid tumors metastatic to the liver were compared with 17 patients with other malignant tumors. In the noncarcinoid group, 82.4% of the patients had elevated alkaline phosphatase (AP) or gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), whereas only 28.6% of carcinoid patients had abnormal enzymes. The medians of all LFT values were significantly higher in noncarcinoid patients than in the carcinoid group, except for glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT). Our data indicate that LFT are helpful in screening for liver metastases in patients with noncarcinoid tumors, but are unreliable in carcinoid tumors. Imaging tests should be used to rule out liver metastases in carcinoid tumors, irrespective of LFT results.

  8. Fine needle aspiration cytology of thymic carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Wang, D Y; Kuo, S H; Chang, D B; Yang, P C; Lee, Y C; Hsu, H C; Luh, K T

    1995-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors of the thymus are very rare, and their cytologic findings have not been reported previously in English. Retrospective study of fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytologic features in four histopathologically verified thymic carcinoid tumors are described here in detail. The FNA cytology of thymic carcinoids is characterized by predominantly single and some loose clusters of small, round to oval cells with scanty cytoplasm, interspersed with some larger cells with moderate to abundant, granular cytoplasm. The differential diagnosis of the cytologic features between carcinoid tumor and other mediastinal tumors is also discussed.

  9. In vitro chemoresistance testing in well differentiated carcinoid tumors.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Well-differentiated, “typical” carcinoid tumors traditionally have a very poor response to chemotherapy. We hypothesized that tumor specimens from well differentiated carcinoid tumors would be highly resistant to the effects of chemotherapy when tested against a variety of antineoplastic agents in v...

  10. The rare malignancy of the hepatobiliary system: ampullary carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Mustafa; Ozsoy, Yucel; Canda, Aras Emre; Nalbant, Olcay Ak; Haskaraca, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Carcinoid tumors are low-grade tumors originating from endoderm and mostly involving the gastrointestinal system. However; they may be seen in any site within the gastrointestinal system. Case Presentation. A 69-year-old female patient. The results of blood tests were observed to be consistent with obstructive jaundice. A mass appearance was not encountered on tomographic examination. Papilla that was tumor-like macroscopically was seen in the second part of the duodenum in diagnostic endoscopy. Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy surgical procedure was applied. On pathological examination of the mass, a tumoral mass was detected in ampulla vateri localization, 1.5 × 1 × 0.8 cm in size, which, in immunohistochemical staining, was evaluated as a neuroendocrine tumor. Also, Metastasis was observed. Conclusion. The rarest type of carcinoid tumor is ampullary located carcinoid tumor, and tumor size is not a reliable indicator for tumor aggressivity in ampullary carcinoid tumors.

  11. Primary carcinoid tumor of the frontal sinus: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chu, Michael W; Karakla, Daniel W; Silverberg, Marc; Han, Joseph K

    2010-10-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, indolent, neuroendocrine tumors that are most commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract and lungs. They occasionally develop in the head and neck, either as a primary tumor or, more commonly, as a metastasis. The most common sites of head and neck carcinoids are the larynx and middle ear. Only a few cases of carcinoid in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses have been reported. We describe a case of primary typical carcinoid of the frontal sinus in a 61-year-old man, and we review the clinical, imaging, surgical, and histochemical findings in this case. The patient was treated with endoscopic resection. A subsequent workup for metastatic and occult primary disease was negative, confirming that the frontal sinus was the primary source. At follow-up 12 months postoperatively, the patient remained without disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a primary typical carcinoid tumor originating in the frontal sinus.

  12. Intramedullary spinal metastasis of a carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jay I; Yanamadala, Vijay; Shin, John H

    2015-12-01

    We report an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a bronchial carcinoid, and discuss its mechanisms and management. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases from any cancer are rare, and bronchial carcinoids account for only a small fraction of lung cancers. To our knowledge, an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a bronchial carcinoid has been described only once previously.

  13. [Retrospective evaluation of carcinoid tumors of the appendix in children].

    PubMed

    San Vicente, B; Bardají, C; Rigol, S; Obiols, P; Melo, M; Bella, R

    2009-04-01

    Carcinoids of the appendix are rare in children. Usually diagnosed incidentally on histologic investigation following appendectomy for acute apendicitis. To investigate the significance of the diagnosis of appendiceal carcinoid tumors in children, we conducted a retrospective study in our institution. Between 1990 and 2007 a total of 1158 appendectomy were done. In four patients the diagnosis was appendiceal carcinoid. We studied treatment, follow-up and prognosis of this patients. Indicacion for appendectomy was acute pain in lower right quadrant. The median tumor diameter was lower than 1 cm and the appropriate treatment was appendectomy. The prognosis was excellent in all the patients.

  14. What Are the Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing: What You Need to Know . Race and gender Carcinoid tumors are more common among African Americans ... would like to unsubscribe/opt out from our communications, please follow this link: http://www.cancer.org/ ...

  15. Increased incidence of second primary malignancy in patients with carcinoid tumors: case report and literature review.

    PubMed Central

    Rivadeneira, D. E.; Tuckson, W. B.; Naab, T.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increased incidence of second noncarcinoid neoplasms in patients with carcinoid tumors. This article reports a case of a synchronous malignant ileal carcinoid tumor in a patient with an adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon. This report illustrates the increased association of carcinoid tumors with other gastrointestinal malignancies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8667441

  16. An incidental finding of carcinoid tumor of the cystic duct.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoang U; Chan, Cyrus C; Knotts, F Barry

    2013-04-04

    Cystic duct carcinoids are extremely rare tumors. We present a 58-year-old female with carcinoid tumor found within the cystic duct margin following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. She subsequently underwent surgical resection with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. No standard guidelines currently exist regarding surgical excision of these rare tumors. Therefore, we conducted a thorough review of the literature to recommend complete oncologic surgical resection with re-establishment of biliary continuity as the mainstay of definitive treatment; adjuvant therapy currently remains investigational. Long-term prognosis is good with this approach.

  17. An incidental finding of carcinoid tumor of the cystic duct

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hoang U.; Chan, Cyrus C.; Knotts, F. Barry

    2013-01-01

    Cystic duct carcinoids are extremely rare tumors. We present a 58-year-old female with carcinoid tumor found within the cystic duct margin following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. She subsequently underwent surgical resection with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. No standard guidelines currently exist regarding surgical excision of these rare tumors. Therefore, we conducted a thorough review of the literature to recommend complete oncologic surgical resection with re-establishment of biliary continuity as the mainstay of definitive treatment; adjuvant therapy currently remains investigational. Long-term prognosis is good with this approach. PMID:24964431

  18. Association of carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma are two uncommon malignancies. Patients and methods We report the case of 24-year-old man who presented with respiratory disease. Imaging investigations showed a right lung tumor and histological analysis confirmed a typical carcinoid tumor. As part of initial staging, brain MRI revealed an asymptomatic right frontal lesion. First, a right pulmonary lobectomy was performed without adjuvant treatment. In second time, brain tumorectomy was performed. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of low grade glioma (LGG). The patient remained in complete remission 2.5 years after the initial diagnosis. Results This is the first case reporting the association between LGG and lung carcinoid tumor, while no association between LGG and a systemic tumor have been published to date. Association of lung carcinoid tumor with other malignant diseases has been reported but remained uncommon. Only minimal data support a potential molecular common origin. Conclusion This exceptional association may be fortuitous. However, their concomitant diagnoses suggest a potential association between both rare diseases. A genetic susceptibility remains possible. PMID:23137305

  19. Carcinoid tumor of the ileoanal pouch in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Murray; Pricolo, Victor; Chen, Sonja

    2013-01-04

    Carcinoid tumors have been reported to occur in various locations, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. The relationship between the development of carcinoids and ulcerative colitis has been an unclear and controversial one. The association of ulcerative colitis and the development of ileal-pouch carcinoids has not, however, been well documented. We report a case of carcinoid tumor arising in an ileoanal pouch and discuss its unique diagnostic and therapeutic considerations.

  20. Appendiceal carcinoid tumor in children: implications for less radical surgery?

    PubMed

    Malkan, A D; Wahid, F N; Fernandez-Pineda, I; Sandoval, J A

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of an appendiceal carcinoid tumor found incidentally or during the course of diagnostic or therapeutic procedures is a burden to both the patient and clinician. The role of the correct surgical operation is paramount for lesions suspected to be malignant. In the pediatric population, appendiceal carcinoids continue to challenge the clinician in choosing the optimal treatment when lesions are larger than 2 cm or involve the appendical base. While the criteria used to define these distinct lesions are available in most cases, the management and treatment are still debated and controversial when considering more radical surgical intervention. The purpose of this article is to give an overview regarding the history, diagnosis, histopathology, management, and controversies associated with appendiceal carcinoid in the pediatric population.

  1. Primary carcinoid tumor of the skin: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Jedrych, Jaroslaw; Pulitzer, Melissa

    2014-04-01

    Primary carcinoid tumor of the skin (PCTS) is an uncommon indolent neoplasm, with 10 cases described in the literature. The tumors affect patients in the sixth to ninth decades of life (mean = 66.3 years) with an equal gender distribution and predilection for the head and trunk. They present as slowly enlarging nodules of variable duration, ranging from 1 to 60 years (mean = 11.4 years). PCTS is characterized by architectural, cytomorphologic, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features typical of a low-grade neoplasm with neuroendocrine differentiation. PCTS typically follows a benign clinical course and therefore has to be distinguished from cutaneous metastases of visceral carcinoid tumors, which herald dissemination of malignancy and poor prognosis. While the distinction from other histologically similar entities can be achieved by histopathological examination, PCTS can be distinguished from a visceral metastasis only by a judicious clinicopathologic correlation. Herein we describe the clinical presentation, histological appearance, and management of these tumors.

  2. Postoperative radiotherapy for residual tumor of primary mediastinal carcinoid teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Lingli; Sun, Lan; Zhou, Yu; Gong, Youling; Xue, Jianxin; Gao, Jun; Lu, You

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman had presented with dry cough for 2 months. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan showed a 12 cm × 8 cm ×5 cm mass in the anterior mediastinum. Due to intimately involving the aortic arch, tumor was removed incompletely. Residual tumor remained approximate 2 cm × 3 cm × 4 cm. Histologic diagnosis was a mature cystic teratoma containing a carcinoid. Subsequently, radiotherapy (RT) was administrated on residual tumor for a total dose of 50 Gy at 2 Gy/d fraction in 25 fractions. At 2-year follow-up, the patient had stable disease. In conclusion, adjuvant radiotherapy with 50 Gy is an effective approach for residual tumor of mediastinal carcinoid teratoma. PMID:23585961

  3. Ligation-assisted endoscopic submucosal resection with circumferential mucosal incision for duodenal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Harada, Hideaki; Suehiro, Satoshi; Shimizu, Takanori; Katsuyama, Yasushi; Hayasaka, Kenji; Ito, Hideto

    2015-09-14

    Here we present the case of a 64-year-old female with a duodenal carcinoid tumor treated by ligation-assisted endoscopic submucosal resection (ESMR-L) with circumferential mucosal incision (CMI). Band ligation was effective in resecting the duodenal carcinoid tumor after CMI, with an uneventful post-procedural course. Histopathological examination showed clear tumor margins at deeper tissue levels. Thus, in the present case, ESMR-L with CMI was useful for the treatment of duodenal carcinoid tumor.

  4. Paraneoplastic neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder associated with stomach carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Talal; Al-Sarawi, Adnan; Binfalah, Mohamed; Dermime, Said

    2014-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO), or Devic's syndrome, is an autoimmune central nervous system demyelinating disorder primarily affecting the spinal cord and the optic nerves. It is characterized by the presence of NMO antibodies, alongside clinical and radiological findings. NMO and NMO-spectrum disorders (NMO-SD) have been reported in autoimmune disorders, and are infrequently described as a paraneoplastic syndrome with cancers of lung, breast, and carcinoid tumors of the thyroid. We report a patient who presented with severe vomiting, blurring of vision, vertigo, diplopia, left hemiparesis and hemisensory loss and ataxia. She was found to have a longitudinally-extensive demyelinating lesion extending from the medulla to the upper cervical spinal cord on MRI. Her gastric endoscopy revealed carcinoid tumor of the stomach, and classic paraneoplastic antibodies in the serum were negative. She had extremely high serum gastrin level and high titer of NMO IgG autoantibody. The patient made an excellent recovery with tumor resection and immunotherapy, with both clinical and radiological improvement. On rare instances, NMO or NMO-SD may present as a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome associated with carcinoid tumor of the stomach.

  5. Review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of type I gastric carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linda; Ozao, Junko; Warner, Richard; Divino, Celia

    2011-08-01

    Gastric carcinoid tumors comprise 7% of all gastrointestinal carcinoids and have significantly increased in incidence over the past few decades. Seventy to 80% of gastric carcinoids are type I, which usually are clinically asymptomatic and found incidentally at endoscopic evaluation for abdominal pain or anemia. In this review, advances in understanding the pathophysiology of type I gastric carcinoid are highlighted. In addition, various current diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. Although type I carcinoids generally hold a benign course, rigorous investigation is needed to ensure accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment. This includes appropriate diagnostic procedures and imaging and accurate staging of tumor. Tumor size, depth of invasion, presence of metastasis, and the tumor's gastrin dependency dictate treatment options. Appropriate treatments can consist of endoscopic resection, antrectomy, medical management, or frequent follow-up. This article provides a systematic method of evaluating and treating type I gastric carcinoid.

  6. Laser excision of a typical carcinoid tumor of the larynx: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cevizci, Raşit; Karakullukçu, Barış; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Balm, Alfons J

    2010-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas of the larynx include a range of rare tumors which have variable biologic behavior, affecting treatment and prognosis. Among these, typical carcinoid tumors are the least common type. Prognosis of typical carcinoid tumor is better than atypical carcinoid tumor and small cell carcinoma of the larynx. Conservation surgery is the preferred treatment modality. Transoral CO2 laser surgery can be a good alternative for appropriate cases because of the functional results and less morbidity. In this article, a 71-year-old female presented with complaints of feeling a mass during swallowing. Fiberoptic examination of the larynx revealed a mass located on the right aryepiglottic fold and biopsy revealed the tumor as a typical carcinoid tumor. We describe CO2 laser excision of a typical carcinoid tumor of the larynx in this case report.

  7. A case of carcinoid tumor of the terminal ileum and simultaneous ovarian dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hosam

    2011-04-01

    Carcinoid tumors are slow-growing malignant neoplasms associated with an indolent clinical course. About 60% of such tumors are located within the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we describe the first case, to our knowledge, of a carcinoid tumor of the terminal ileum and a simultaneous ovarian dermoid cyst. A 57-year-old woman was presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and clinical signs of mechanical bowel obstruction. Radiograph and computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed hydroaeric levels. Laparotomy revealed a mass in the terminal ileum and a right ovarian cystic mass. Right hemicolectomy and right oopherectomy were performed. The histopathological workup showed a carcinoid tumor of the terminal ileum and ovarian dermoid cyst. Small intestinal carcinoid tumor, an uncommon disease, has been reported earlier to coincide with various neoplasms. No association between small intestinal carcinoid tumor and ovarian dermoid cyst has been reported earlier in the English literature.

  8. Resolution of right-sided heart failure symptoms after resection of a primary ovarian carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Todd; Adamson, Kathi; Yang, Eugene

    2014-10-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare neuroendocrine malignancies that typically originate from the gastrointestinal tract. Patients who are diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease generally have poor prognoses because of advanced metastases during staging and few therapeutic options. We present the case of a 61-year-old woman with right-sided heart failure, secondary to carcinoid heart disease caused by a primary ovarian carcinoid tumor. After undergoing surgical resection of the left ovary and fallopian tube, the patient experienced complete resolution of her heart failure symptoms. In addition to the patient's case, we discuss the diagnosis, nature, and treatment of this rare condition.

  9. Lung parenchymal invasion in pulmonary carcinoid tumor: an important histologic feature suggesting the diagnosis of atypical carcinoid and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sang Yun; Lee, Jae Jun; Cho, Junhun; Hyeon, Jiyeon; Han, Joungho; Kim, Hong Kwan

    2013-05-01

    The majority of previous studies on pulmonary carcinoid tumor have usually focused on clinical behavior or outcome, seldom considering histopathologic features. We retrospectively collected 63 cases of resected pulmonary carcinoid tumors from 1995 to 2011 at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. The clinical and pathological features were correlated and survival analyses were performed. Forty cases (63.5%) were classified as typical carcinoid (TC) and 23 cases (36.5%) were classified as atypical carcinoid (AC) according to WHO classification criteria. AC patients showed a higher frequency of current smoking status and a higher stage of the tumor by the American Joint Committee on Cancer than TC patients. The disease was associated with death and recurrence in five and seven patients, respectively, with almost all of the associations found in AC patients. The five-year survival rate of TC and AC were 100% and 83.5%, respectively, with AC showing poorer prognosis than TC in overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) (p=0.005 and p=0.002). Lung parenchymal invasion was observed more commonly in AC than in TC (39.1% vs 12.5%, p=0.01) and was a poor prognostic factor in OS and DFS. Rosette-like arrangements were found only in six cases of AC, while abundant basophilic cytoplasm mimicking paraganglioma and ossification were found only in TC. Through the comprehensive study of pulmonary carcinoid tumor in Korea, we suggest that lung parenchymal invasion could be a useful histologic feature to suspect the diagnosis of AC in daily practice as well as to predict the prognosis of carcinoid tumor.

  10. Treatment of Lung Carcinoid by Type and Extent of Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carcinoid Tumor Treating Lung Carcinoid Tumors Treatment of Lung Carcinoid, by Type and Extent of Disease The ... those that can’t be removed completely Resectable lung carcinoid tumors Resectable carcinoid tumors haven’t spread ...

  11. Carcinoid and neuroendocrine tumors: building on success.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Pamela L

    2015-06-01

    We have come a long way in our understanding and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors since the term "karzinoide" was coined in 1907. Neuroendocrine tumors are a group of biologically and clinically heterogeneous neoplasms that most commonly originate in the lungs, GI tract, and pancreas. The selection of initial and subsequent therapies requires careful consideration of both tumor and treatment characteristics. With recent advances, we now have more tools for the diagnosis and treatment of our patients. This comprehensive review article summarizes recent advances in the field of neuroendocrine tumors and places them into context for best management practices.

  12. Atypical Carcinoid Tumor with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Rearrangement Successfully Treated by an ALK Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masayuki; Uchiyama, Naoki; Shigemasa, Rie; Matsumura, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Ryota; Nomura, Akihiro

    This is the first report in which crizotinib, an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, reduced an atypical carcinoid tumor with ALK rearrangement. A 70-year-old man developed a tumor in the left lung and multiple metastases to the lung and brain. The pathology of transbronchial biopsied specimens demonstrated an atypical carcinoid pattern. Combined with immunohistochemical findings, we diagnosed the tumor as atypical carcinoid. ALK gene rearrangement was observed by both immunohistochemical (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. He was treated with chemotherapy as first-line therapy, however, the tumor did not respond to chemotherapy. Thereafter, he was treated with crizotinib, which successfully reduced the tumors.

  13. Intestinal ischaemia associated with carcinoid tumor: a case report with review of the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yener, O

    2013-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neuroendocrine neoplasms that are often indolent and may not become clinically apparent until there is a metastatic spread or evidence of carcinoid syndrome. A 44-year-old man presented to our clinic department with a history of previous left colon cancer operation, chronic crampy left lower quadrant pain, mass and severe anemia. A MR scan was obtained which demonstrated a calcified mesenteric mass 12×8×10 cm diameter with surrounding left colon mesenteric infiltration. The liver was normal. A case of ischaemic ileal necrosis is reported. It was associated with elastic vascular sclerosis produced by mesenteric metastases of an ileal carcinoid tumor. It is postulated that intestinal ischaemia may be of more importance in the production of abdominal pain by carcinoid tumors than has been generally accepted, and that it is the result of functional and structural changes in and around the mesenteric blood vessels, caused by substances secreted by the carcinoid tumor.

  14. Primary ovarian carcinoid tumor showing unusual histology and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Yoon, Gun; Jang, Hye-In; Song, Sang Yong; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor of the ovary is uncommon. We herein report a very rare case of primary ovarian carcinoid tumor with aggressive histology and an unusual immunophenotype. A 21-year-old woman presented with a palpable abdominal mass. Computed tomographic scan revealed a large, extensively necrotic solid mass in the left ovary. The patient underwent a left salpingo-oophorectomy. Grossly, the left adnexa showed a large, vaguely lobulated ovarian tumor measuring 22×15×13 cm. Histologically, the tumor had a readily identifiable neuroendocrine growth pattern, but some areas showed solid growth pattern associated with mild nuclear pleomorphism and multiple foci of punctate necrosis. Furthermore, mitotic figures were recognized in 8 per 10 high-power fields, and a few foci of large coagulative tumor necrosis were also noted. In addition, the tumor tissue exhibited uniform, strong nuclear β-catenin immunoreactivity, indicating the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in the individual tumor cells. In summary, we described the first case of primary ovarian carcinoid tumor with loss of neuroendocrine growth pattern, increased mitotic activity and large areas of coagulative tumor necrosis. According to the WHO classification of pulmonary carcinoid tumor, this case may be classified as "atypical" carcinoid. However, currently, no primary ovarian atypical carcinoid exists in the classification system. Due to its rarity, there are no established diagnostic criteria and clinical data on patient outcomes for ovarian carcinoid tumors with aggressive histology. Additional reports are clearly necessary. We also showed for the first time the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in carcinoid tumor cells, suggestive of a role for β-catenin in the tumorigenesis of ovarian atypical carcinoid tumor or its aggressive histology.

  15. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the abdomen (diaphragm), the membranes surrounding the space between the lungs (mediastinal pleura), or membranes of ... tumor of any size has grown into the space between the lungs (mediastinum), the heart, the large ...

  16. Carcinoid Tumors of Digestive Organs: a Clinicopathologic Study of 13 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    The author investigated clinicopathologic features of 13 cases of carcinoid tumor in the digestive organs. The 13 cases of carcinoid were identified from 18,267 pathological specimens of digestive organs in the last 10 years in our pathology laboratory. The tumor locations were rectum in 9 cases, duodenum in 2 cases, liver in 1 case, and stomach in 1 case. The age of the patients ranged from 52 to 82 years with a mean of 63 years. Male to female ratio was 7 : 6. The presenting symptoms were abnormal pain in 3 cases and asymptomatic in 10 cases. None of the cases showed carcinoid syndrome. The diameter ranged from 5 mm to 25 mm in gastrointestinal carcinoids, and 60 mm in the hepatic carcinoid. The treatment was endoscopic mucosal resection in 10 cases and surgical resection in 3 cases. The outcome is good except for hepatic atypical carcinoid which showed metastases and died of systemic metastasis. Histologically, 12 carcinoid tumors were typical carcinoids, and one (liver) was atypical carcinoid. Organoid pattern was present in 12 cases. Trabecular arrangement, ribbon arrangement, rosette formation, and pseudoglandular arrangement were recognized in 12 cases, in 8 cases, in 7 cases, and in 5 cases, respectively. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for at least one of pan-neuroendocrine markers including chromogranin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, CD56, and glucagon. Of these, synaptophysin was positive in 11/13 (85%), neuron-specific enolase 10/13 (80%), chromogranin 8/13 (62%), CD56 6/13 (46%), and glucagon 4/13 (31%). In summary, the author reported the incidence of digestive organ carcinoid tumors, and the clinicopathologic features of the 13 cases with carcinoid. PMID:27956948

  17. A 12-mm carcinoid tumor of the minor duodenal papilla with lymph node metastases.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Yasuyuki; Kurumiya, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Keisuke; Sekoguchi, Ei; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ito, Akira; Tomida, Akihiro; Onishi, Sakura; Shirotsuki, Ryo; Okubo, Kenji; Narita, Michihiko

    2013-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors located in the minor duodenal papilla are extremely rare, with only a few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we report the case of a 71-year-old man with a 12-mm carcinoid tumor at the minor duodenal papilla with lymph node metastases. Multidetector-row computed tomography with contrast enhancement revealed a 12-mm well-enhanced tumor in the duodenum. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a 12-mm submucosal tumor at the minor papilla of the duodenum. Biopsy specimens revealed a carcinoid tumor, and a subtotal stomach-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. Carcinoid tumors at the minor duodenal papilla have a high prevalence of nodal disease, even for tumors <2 cm in diameter. Therefore, we believe that radical resection with tumor-free margins (i.e. pancreatoduodenectomy) is the treatment of choice.

  18. Primary carcinoid tumor of the urinary bladder with prominent subnuclear eosinophilic granules.

    PubMed

    Zozumi, Masataka; Nakai, Mayumi; Matsuda, Ikuo; Hao, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yasuo; Nojima, Michio; Yamamoto, Shingo; Hirota, Seiichi

    2012-02-15

    Primary carcinoid tumor of the urinary bladder is a very rare neoplasm. We report here a case of primary carcinoid tumor of the urinary bladder with an unusual cytological feature in a 72-year-old Japanese man. A bladder polypoid mass was incidentally found by ultrasonography during the follow-up of a benign prostate hyperplasia. Histological examination of the transurethrally resected tissue revealed that the upper part of the mass was a tumor showing tubuloglandular anastomosing structures. Most of the tumor cells had peculiar subnuclear eosinophilic granules. The features of the granules were reminiscent of those observed in neuroendocrine cells of the intestine. The tumor cells were immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin. The tumor was diagnosed as carcinoid tumor of pure form of the urinary bladder. The lower part of the mass showed the findings of glandular cystitis, as its coexistence with carcinoid tumors of the bladder has often been described in previous reports.

  19. A Rare Primary Neuroendocrine Tumor (Typical Carcinoid) of the Sublingual Gland

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Kousuke; Uchida, Fumihiko; Kanno, Naomi; Hasegawa, Shogo; Yanagawa, Toru; Bukawa, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    A typical carcinoid is extremely rare in the oral cavity. We here present a case of a typical carcinoid arising in the sublingual gland of a 62-year-old woman. The tumor was removed by primary excision with 10 mm surgical margins and submandibular dissection. Examination of the tumor showed medium-sized tumor cells that were positive for CD56 and chromogranin A, with no necrosis, and with a mitotic count less than 1/10 HPF. A pathological diagnosis of typical carcinoid was made from both morphological and immunological examinations. One year after excision surgery, there was no tumor recurrence or neck metastasis. PMID:27840746

  20. Resection of Carcinoid Tumor Metastatic to the Right Ventricle and Tricuspid Valve.

    PubMed

    Williams, Adam R; Wang, Andrew; Kim, Han; Milano, Carmelo A

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoid tumors rarely metastasize to the heart, and previous reports involved the myocardium only. We present a case of carcinoid tumor metastatic to the right ventricle (RV) and tricuspid valve. Preoperative cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) showed the tumor arising from the right ventricular free wall and involving the tricuspid valve apparatus. The tumor was resected through a right atriotomy and required tricuspid valve replacement.

  1. Late recurrent pulmonary typical carcinoid tumor: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ciment, Ari; Gil, Joan; Teirstein, Alvin

    2006-10-01

    Carcinoid tumors are uncommon pulmonary neoplasms. They are classified histologically as either atypical or typical. Atypical carcinoids are aggressive malignancies that require radical surgical resection and have a guarded prognosis with a propensity to metastasize and recur. Typical carcinoids are low-grade malignancies with relatively less metastatic or recurring potential and are usually treated with simple excision. Recurrence of a typical pulmonary carcinoid tumor more than a decade after initial resection is very rare. A patient with recurrence of a typical carcinoid tumor 11 years after resection of the primary lesion with one involved lymph node is reported here. Late recurrences are rare in both atypical and typical varieties, but are much more common in atypical carcinoids. The patient reported here represents the fifth case of recurrence of a typical carcinoid tumor more than ten years after resection. This suggests that, after resection of a typical carcinoid neoplasm, patients should be monitored carefully, especially if lymph node metastases are present at the time of surgery.

  2. Combined adenocarcinoma-carcinoid tumor of transverse colon.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Prosanta Kumar; Halder, Shyamal

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old male presented with painless hematochezia associated with episodic cramps in upper abdomen, watery diarrhea, and a slowly growing mass in upper abdomen. Examination revealed a firm 6 x 5 cm, intra-abdominal, epigastric mass. Colonoscopy up to 90 cm showed a stenosing, ulcero-proliferative lesion in the transverse colon. No synchronous lesion was detected. Biopsy revealed mucin secreting adenocarcinoma. Exploration showed the growth involving the transverse colon proximal to the splenic flexure with a part of ileum, approximately three feet proximal to ileo-caecal junction, adherent to it. No significant mesenteric lymph node enlargement was evident. The patient underwent resection of the growth along with the segment of adherent ileum. Continuity was re-established by a colo-colic and ileo-ileal anastomosis respectively. Patient received adjuvant chemotherapy. Post-operative histopathology demonstrated a composite histological pattern with an admixture of carcinoid tumor and adenocarcinoma, invasion of ileal serosa and adenocarcinomatous deposits in mesocolic lymph nodes, the tumor staging being (T4, N0, M0/Stage II) for carcinoid and (T4, N1, M0/Stage III) for adenocarcinoma. Patient was followed-up for a year and was doing well without any evidence of recurrence.

  3. A carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater treated by endoscopic snare papillectomy.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Dae-Keun; Moon, Gyoo; Han, Jimin; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung-Koo

    2004-12-01

    Here, a case of a patient with incidental finding of a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, who was treated with endoscopic snare papillectomy, is reported. A 62-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, which was found during follow-up endoscopy after an endoscopic mucosal resection of early gastric cancer. No lymphadenopathy or visceral metastasis was found on an abdominal CT scan, In-111 octerotide scan and EUS. The ampulla was then en bloc removed by endoscopic snare papillectomy. The resected specimen revealed a 0.7 x 0.5 x 0.1 cm sized carcinoid tumor. All margins of resection were negative for tumor. After six months of follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence and metastasis, either endoscopically or radiologically. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of an ampullary carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic snare papillectomy in Korea.

  4. Skeletal metastasis of carcinoid tumors: Two case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hori, Takeshi; Yasuda, Taketoshi; Suzuki, Kayo; Kanamori, Masahiko; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2012-05-01

    Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms derived from enterochromaffin cells. Skeletal metastases from carcinoid tumors are considered to be extremely rare. In this study, we present two cases of carcinoid tumors that metastasized to the bone. Furthermore, we review 50 published case reports and reveal the features of skeletal metastasis of carcinoid tumors. The first case involved a 59-year-old man with a history of multiple metastases of a lung carcinoid tumor. The patient complained of back pain and numbness in the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed metastases in the thoracic spine. A spinal decompression was performed and the symptoms were resolved. The second case involved a 74-year-old man had been diagnosed with a lung carcinoid tumor 15 years previously and complained of left thigh pain. A radiograph showed osteolytic lesions in the shaft of the left femur. We repaired the femur using an intramedullary nail following curettage of the tumor. A radiograph of the femur revealed a callus on the pathological fracture. The patient was able to walk using a crutch 3 months after surgery. We reviewed 50 cases that described skeletal metastasis from carcinoid tumors. The average age of the patients was 54.9 years and 33 patients (66%) were male. The most common site of skeletal metastasis was the spine. We also investigated the survival rate of patients who developed skeletal metastasis from carcinoid tumors. The findings showed that survival of patients who developed osteolytic skeletal metastasis was worse than that of patients who developed osteosclerotic skeletal metastasis.

  5. Concurrent small bowel adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor in Crohn's disease--case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Boltin, Doron; Levi, Zohar; Halpern, Marisa; Fraser, Gerald M

    2011-10-01

    Adenocarcinomas of the large and small bowel, as well as intestinal carcinoid tumors have been reported at increased rates in Crohn's disease. We herein report a rare case of concurrent adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor of the small bowel presenting as intestinal obstruction and found incidentally at laparotomy in a 55 year old male with longstanding ileal Crohn's disease. We performed a Medline Pubmed search for cases of synchronous or composite adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor in the setting of Crohn's disease and identified four similar cases. Concurrent adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor occurred both in newly diagnosed and longstanding Crohn's disease, most commonly involved the terminal ileum and presented with symptoms mimicking Crohn's disease. Diagnosis was made incidentally at laparotomy in all cases. Lymph node involvement was variable. Clinicians should be aware of this rare entity for expeditious surgical intervention.

  6. Aprepitant for the management of refractory emesis in a patient with a small bowel carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kyeremateng, Sam; Boland, Jason W

    2014-06-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common distressing symptoms with multiple etiologies. Serotonin and substance P can induce nausea and vomiting by binding to specific receptors (5-hydroxytryptamine3 [5HT3] and neurokinin-1 [NK-1] receptors respectively). Carcinoid tumors, which originate from enterochromaffin cells of the neuroendocrine system, secrete several biologically active amines and peptides, including serotonin and substance P, that are responsible for the distant effects of this tumor. The authors present an 88-year-old lady with metastatic carcinoid tumor, with evidence of carcinoid syndrome. She had nausea and vomiting that became unresponsive to 5HT3 receptor antagonists and other antiemetics. As substance P is released from carcinoid tumors and has a role in the pathogenesis of emesis, the NK-1 receptor antagonist aprepitant was trialed. This provided complete and sustained improvement of the nausea and vomiting until her death 2 months later. This case demonstrates the potential role and rationale of NK-1 receptor antagonists in the management of resistant emesis in patients with carcinoid tumors. Clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of these drugs in the management of emesis in patients with carcinoid syndrome.

  7. A case of very well-differentiated adenocarcinoma with carcinoid tumor in the ascending colon.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Hayato; Sakurai, Shinji; Tsukagoshi, Ritsuko; Suzuki, Masaki; Tabe, Yuichi; Fukasawa, Takaharu; Kiriyama, Shinsuke; Fukuchi, Minoru; Naitoh, Hiroshi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumors with mixed glandular and neuroendocrine characteristics with at least 30% of each component are classified as mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) by the World Health Organization 2010 classification. We report here a case of very well-differentiated adenocarcinoma accompanied by carcinoid tumor, categorized as MANEC. A 41-year-old Japanese man was clinically diagnosed with ascending colon cancer and underwent right hemicolectomy. Using an immunohistologic technique, the pathologic diagnosis was very well-differentiated adenocarcinoma accompanied by carcinoid tumor and marked eosinophil infiltration, which was categorized as MANEC. By immunohistochemical analysis, tumor cells of the carcinoid component exhibited very low proliferation activity. Our case was thought to be MANEC without high malignant potential. MANEC as per the World Health Organization 2010 classification seems to include tumors with diverse grades of malignancy, and it might need to have subclassifications according to the malignancy potential of the tumor cells.

  8. Primary carcinoid tumor of the ovary arising in a mature cystic teratoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ting, W H; Hsiao, S M; Lin, H H; Wei, M C

    2014-01-01

    Primary ovarian carcinoid tumors are rare entities, they may appear with other teratomatous components, and can be often being mistaken as part of mature cystic teratomas. Consistent with their rarity and low incidence, imaging clues that could have led to suspicion of this tumor are not well-documented. Herein, the authors present a rare case of primary ovarian carcinoid tumor in a mature cystic teratoma, who initially presented with complaints of abdominal distension for months. Contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated a multilobular mass with different density components including fat, soft tissue, and calcification materials, as well as rich vascular supply from the right ovarian vein. Serum tumor markers were within normal limits. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed and the pathological diagnosis was mature cystic teratoma with coexisting primary ovarian carcinoid tumor, insular type. The patient has remained well with no residual disease for over one year of follow-up.

  9. Medial hypertrophy of the ovarian vein: a novel type of vascular pathology associated with a primary ovarian carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Dessauvagie, Benjamin F; Lai, Patrick H; Oost, Ebo; Thomas, Anitha; Stewart, Colin J R

    2015-01-01

    Primary carcinoid tumors of the ovary are rare accounting for only 1% of neoplasms that are associated with the carcinoid syndrome. However, the carcinoid syndrome can occur in the absence of hepatic metastases due to the release of vasoactive peptides directly into the systemic circulation via the ovarian vein. We present a 69-yr-old woman presenting with carcinoid valvular disease and congestive cardiac failure who was found to have a primary left ovarian carcinoid tumor. At operation it was noted that the left ovarian vein had an unusually firm and thickened appearance, and histologic examination revealed marked fibromuscular medial hypertrophy with luminal compression. There was no associated vascular elastosis. This ovarian venous alteration appears to represent a novel addition to the spectrum of cardiovascular injuries associated with carcinoid tumors.

  10. Small cell carcinoma of the colon arising in a carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Saif, M Wasif

    2013-04-01

    Small cell carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare and clinically aggressive tumors. A case is presented of a 70 year-old woman who presented with small bowel obstruction and was found to have a cecal mass. She underwent right hemicolectomy, and histopathology showed a small cell carcinoma arising in the background of a carcinoid tumor. Although small cell carcinomas of the colon have frequently been found in association with colonic adenomas, this appears to be the first report of a low-grade carcinoid tumor in combination with a small cell carcinoma.

  11. Carcinoid syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... things such as blue cheese, chocolate, or red wine. Exams and Tests Most of these tumors are ... outlook is more favorable thanks to new treatment methods. Possible Complications Complications of carcinoid syndrome may include: ...

  12. Rectal and appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors.

    PubMed

    Khoddami, Maliheh; Sanae, Shahram; Nikkhoo, Bahram

    2006-07-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are neoplasms characterized by spindle cell proliferation and a fiboinflammatory vascular stroma. Herein, we presented the successful treatment of a rectal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in an 11-year-old boy who presented with diarrhea and abdominal pain of 1(1/2) months duration and an appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a 29-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain of two months duration with associated tenderness and rebound tenderness in the right lower abdomen. Histologically, our cases had inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors very similar to that of other sites; the spindle cells were positive for vimentin and muscle-specific actin.

  13. A Carcinoid Tumor of the Ampulla of Vater Treated by Endoscopic Snare Papillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pyun, Dae-Keun; Moon, Gyoo; Han, Jimin; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung-Koo

    2004-01-01

    Here, a case of a patient with incidental finding of a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, who was treated with endoscopic snare papillectomy, is reported. A 62-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, which was found during follow-up endoscopy after an endoscopic mucosal resection of early gastric cancer. No lymphadenopathy or visceral metastasis was found on an abdominal CT scan, In-111 octerotide scan and EUS. The ampulla was then en bloc removed by endoscopic snare papillectomy. The resected specimen revealed a 0.7×0.5×0.1 cm sized carcinoid tumor. All margins of resection were negative for tumor. After six months of follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence and metastasis, either endoscopically or radiologically. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of an ampullary carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic snare papillectomy in Korea. PMID:15683115

  14. Intranuclear Pseudo-inclusions and Grooves in Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Maral; Kumar, Perikala Vijayananda

    2016-02-01

    Cytologic findings of pulmonary carcinoid have been well described. We report new cytological findings in a case of carcinoid tumor. The patient is a 36-year-old man presenting with hemoptysis of about six months in duration. Chest CT scans showed a well-defined round polypoid lesion measuring 1 × 1 cm within the right upper lobe of the bronchus with hyperinflation of the right upper lobe. Trans-bronchial fine needle aspiration and biopsy were done. Cytologic smears showed isolated and loose clusters of uniform round to spindle shape cells with round centrally located nuclei, fine granular (salt and pepper) chromatin and pale cytoplasm. Intranuclear pseudo-inclusions and grooves were seen in some tumor cells. No mitotic figures or necrosis were evident. A cytological diagnosis of carcinoid tumor was made and histopathologic examination and subsequent immunohistochemical study confirmed the diagnosis. Carcinoid tumor may be reliably diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology smears. Intranuclear pseudo-inclusions and grooves may be evident in tumor cells.

  15. Carcinoid Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... size). The Latest News Project Zebra Report: Real-World Insights from the Carcinoid and NET Patient Community ... release the first ever Project Zebra Report: Real-World Insights from the Carcinoid and Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient ...

  16. [Typical pulmonary carcinoid tumor: evolution, related prognostic factors and lymphadenectomy indications].

    PubMed

    Bagan, P; Das-Neves-Pereira, J C; Rivera, C; Gibault, L; Badia, A; Mordant, P; Riquet, M; Le Pimpec Barthes, F

    2014-01-01

    The bronchopulmonary typical carcinoid tumors are often considered as non-metastatic neoplasia. The appearance of metastases is observed in 10% of the cases. We detail here studies based on the identification of the risk factors of metastases occurrence to adapt the lung surgery and lymph node dissection to the individual patient risk.

  17. Role of computed tomography angiography in detection and staging of small bowel carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Raman, Siva P; Horton, Karen M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-01-01

    Small-bowel carcinoid tumors are the most common form (42%) of gastrointestinal carcinoids, which by themselves comprise 70% of neuroendocrine tumors. Although primary small bowel neoplasms are overall rare (3%-6% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms), carcinoids still represent the second most common (20%-30%) primary small-bowel malignancy after small bowel adenocarcinoma. Their imaging evaluation is often challenging. State-of-the-art high-resolution multiphasic computed tomography together with advanced postprocessing methods provides an excellent tool for their depiction. The manifold interactive parameter choices however require knowledge of when to use which technique. Here, we discuss the imaging appearance and evaluation of duodenal, jejunal and ileal carcinoid tumors, including the imaging features of the primary tumor, locoregional mesenteric nodal metastases, and distant metastatic disease. A protocol for optimal lesion detection is presented, including the use of computed tomography enterography, volume acquisition, computed tomography angiography and three-dimensional mapping. Imaging findings are illustrated with a series of challenging cases which illustrate the spectrum of possible disease in the small bowel and mesentery, the range of possible appearances in the bowel itself on multiphase data and extraluminal findings such as the desmoplastic reaction in mesentery and hypervascular liver metastases. Typical imaging pitfalls and pearls are illustrated. PMID:26435774

  18. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwangzoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Results Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Conclusion Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary. PMID:27592514

  19. Renal Carcinoid Tumor Metastatic to the Uvea, Medial Rectus Muscle, and the Contralateral Lacrimal Gland.

    PubMed

    Kiratli, Hayyam; Uzun, Salih; Tarlan, Berçin; Ateş, Deniz; Baydar, Dilek Ertoy; Söylemezoğlu, Figen

    2015-01-01

    Renal carcinoid tumor is an exceedingly rare malignancy. A 57-year-old man with a renal carcinoid tumor discovered after metastasizing to intraocular and bilateral orbital structures is described. The patient presented with a blind painful OS and a right superotemporal subconjunctival mass. Imaging studies revealed a large left intraocular tumor, a mass in the left medial rectus muscle, and right lacrimal gland enlargement. The OS was enucleated, and incisional biopsies were performed from the other 2 lesions. Histopathological studies demonstrated metastatic neuroendocrine tumor with chromogranin and synaptophysin positivity. Systemic work up revealed a right renal mass and multiple hepatic metastatic lesions. Radical nephrectomy was performed, and octreotide, capecitabine, and temozolomide were administered. Removal of the primary tumor and the eye that had no prospect for useful vision and further treatment with octreotide, capecitabine, and temozolomide provided a disease progression-free period of 24 months and allowed the patient to function normally.

  20. [Primary retroperitoneal carcinoid tumor associated with multiple endcrine neoplasia (men) type 1: a case report].

    PubMed

    Chiba, Syuji; Numakura, Kazuyuki; Satoyoshi, Kiyofumi; Saito, Mitsuru; Horikawa, Yohei; Takayama, Koichiro; Nara, Taketoshi; Kanda, Sohei; Miura, Yoshiko; Maita, Shinya; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Obara, Takashi; Kumazawa, Teruaki; Narita, Shintaro; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Satoh, Shigeru; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2011-11-01

    We report an extremely rare case of a 69-year-old man having a retroperitoneal carcinoid tumor associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 1. The patient whose son and daughter were previously diagnosed with MEN type 1 was admitted to the Department of Endocrinology at our hospital for evaluation of this disorder. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography revealed a parathyroid and retroperitoneal tumor (43 mm x 34 mm). The patient did not consent to surgical management of the tumor; however three years later, a follow-up CT revealed tumor enlargement (55 mm x 50 mm). We were unable to rule out a malignancy, and subsequently resected the tumor. A pathological diagnosis of retroperitoneal carcinoid was made. No local recurrence or metastasis have been observed for 21 months.

  1. Carcinoid tumor of the middle ear: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo; Chen, Fei; Li, Jin-Nan; Liu, Shi-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors of the middle ear are very rare. Here we describe a 37-year-old man with multiple recurrent carcinoid tumor of the right middle ear. The CT demonstrated the recurrent mass that filled the tympanum and mastoid with osteolytic invasion, and the tumor was removed by surgery. The pathological findings showed the tumor cells, without necrosis and mitotic activity, had round, oval, or slightly irregular nuclei and finely-dispersed chromatin, arranged in cords, nests, and glandular structures. They were strongly positive for synaptophysin and CD56, but were negative for S-100 and chromogranin A. Ki-67 proliferation activity was low (<2%). With a review of the literature, the clinical, pathological characteristics and treatment modalities of this rare tumor are discussed.

  2. Review of renal carcinoid tumor with focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, N; Tanaka, A; Ohe, C; Mikami, S; Nagashima, Y; Inoue, K; Shuin, T; Taguchi, T; Tominaga, A; Alvarado-Cabrero, I; Petersson, F; Brunelli, M; Martignoni, G; Michal, M; Hes, O

    2013-01-01

    Renal carcinoid tumor is a rare neoplasm. In this article, we review this neoplasm with a focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects. The majority of patients present in the fourth to seventh decades, but there is no gender predilection. Clinically, patients with renal carcinoid tumor frequently present with abdominal, back or flank pain. This tumor is occassionally associated with horseshoe kidney and/or mature cystic teratoma located in the kidney. Macroscopically, these tumors are well demarcated with a lobulated appearance and yellow or tan-brown color cut surface. Microscopically, these tumors are composed of monomorphic round to polygonal cells with granular amphophilic to eosinophilic cytoplasm. Tumor cells are arranged in trabecular, ribbon-like, gyriform, insular, glandular and solid patterns. The nuclei are round to oval and with evenly distributed nuclear chromatin, frequently with a "salt and pepper"-pattern. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells demonstrate immuno-labeling for chromogranin A and synaptophysin. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells contain abundant dense core neurosecretory granules. In previous genetic studies, abnormalities of chromosomes 3 or 13 have been reported. The clinical behavior of renal carcinoid tumors is variable, but is more indolent than most renal cell carcinomas. Further investigations are warranted in order to elucidate the critical genetic abnormalities responsible for the pathogenesis of this rare entity in renal neoplastic pathology.

  3. Acute appendicitis with a neuroendocrine tumor G1 (carcinoid): pitfalls of conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki A; Fujimoto, Taketoshi; Kato, Yo; Sasaki, Mayumi; Ikusue, Toshikazu

    2016-08-01

    A man in his early thirties presented to our clinic with right lower abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) revealed a swollen appendix and an appendicolith. Abscess formation was not observed but ongoing appendiceal rupture was not ruled out. Three months after successful conservative therapy, the lumen of the apical portion was kept dilated and laparoscopic interval appendectomy was performed. No tumorous findings were observed macroscopically. However, histology revealed many tiny nests infiltrating the submucosa, muscular layer, and subserosa at the root of the appendix. An appendiceal neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1; carcinoid) was diagnosed immunohistologically. Neither CT nor US visualized the tumor because of its non-tumor-forming but infiltrative growth. In conclusion, after successful conservative treatment, interval appendectomy should be considered to uncover a possible appendiceal NET G1 (carcinoid), particularly when dilatation of the distal lumen is kept under observation.

  4. Diagnosing and Managing Carcinoid Heart Disease in Patients With Neuroendocrine Tumors: An Expert Statement.

    PubMed

    Davar, Joseph; Connolly, Heidi M; Caplin, Martyn E; Pavel, Marianne; Zacks, Jerome; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Dobson, Rebecca; Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona; Steeds, Richard P; Dreyfus, Giles; Pellikka, Patricia A; Toumpanakis, Christos

    2017-03-14

    Carcinoid heart disease is a frequent occurrence in patients with carcinoid syndrome and is responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of carcinoid heart disease is poorly understood; however, chronic exposure to excessive circulating serotonin is considered one of the most important contributing factors. Despite recognition, international consensus guidelines specifically addressing the diagnosis and management of carcinoid heart disease are lacking. Furthermore, there is considerable variation in multiple aspects of screening and management of the disease. The aim of these guidelines was to provide succinct, practical advice on the diagnosis and management of carcinoid heart disease as well as its surveillance. Recommendations and proposed algorithms for the investigation, screening, and management have been developed based on an evidence-based review of the published data and on the expert opinion of a multidisciplinary consensus panel consisting of neuroendocrine tumor experts, including oncologists, gastroenterologists, and endocrinologists, in conjunction with cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons.

  5. Two different types of carcinoid tumors of the lung: immunohistochemical and ultrastructural investigation and their histogenetic consideration.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung-Whan

    2013-02-01

    Carcinoid tumors have been an interesting clinical and pathological entity for pathologists because of their unique histopathologic pattern of "Zellballen" (cell ball) and the hormones they produce demonstrable by histochemical and biochemical methods, including immunohistochemistry, and the presence of cytoplasmic dense-core particles demonstrable by electron microscopy. Since carcinoid tumors were established as an entity more than a century ago by Oberndorfer, who was credited with coining the term "carcinoid," meaning carcinoma-like tumors, tumors presenting with similar characteristics have been reported in most of parenchymal organs, including lungs. Carcinoid tumors in the lungs usually occur as bronchocentric tumors and present with typical histopathologic characteristics of carcinoid tumors, but they may present with significant variation in their cellular compositions, in contrast to the midgut carcinoid tumors. In the latter, tumor cells are quite similar to enterochromaffin granule containing crypt cells, which are regarded as their progenitor cells. Currently, a similar histogenetic explanation is applied to all carcinoid tumors occurring elsewhere. The bronchus is one of the most common anatomic sites in which the carcinoid tumors occur. However, bronchial carcinoid tumors differ from the midgut counterparts in microscopic appearance, showing more variability in cellular shape and composition from the classical form of midgut carcinoid tumors. In the lungs, neuroendocrine cells (NEC) are normally found in two different ways. Firstly, they are found as randomly scattered single cells (Kultchitsky cells) similar to enteric counterparts, and, secondly, they are found in aggregates known as "neuroepithelial bodies" (NEB) usually found in the branching point of bronchi. Interestingly, they keep a close anatomic relationship with parasympathetic nerve structures and even form synapses. NEB are usually found in the early stage of fetal development and are

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of a carcinoid tumor using iodine-131 meta-iodobenzylguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Den Hartog Jager, F.C.; Van Gennip, A.H.; Marcuse, H.R.; Taal, B.G.

    1986-03-01

    Scintigraphy using I-131 meta-iodobenzylguanidine has been introduced as an effective method to detect pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas, and the radiopharmaceutical also is applied in therapy of these tumors. The authors present a case of a metastatic gastric carcinoid tumor, another neural crest tumor, concentrating I-131 MIBG, which was documented by conventional scintigraphy and SPECT in correlation with CT scans and colloid scintigrams of the liver. Two therapeutic attempts in this patient, using I-131 MIBG, are described. The metabolic basis of this phenomenon is discussed, and the importance of I-131 MIBG imaging in the detection of neural crest tumors is underlined.

  7. [Appendiceal carcinoid tumors. Evaluation of long-term outcomes in a tertiary level].

    PubMed

    Suárez-Grau, Juan Manuel; García-Ruiz, Salud; Rubio-Chaves, Carolina; Bustos-Jiménez, Manuel; Docobo-Durantez, Fernando; Padillo-Ruiz, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: los tumores apendiculares se encuentran en cerca de 1% de las apendicectomías y representan 0.5% de las neoplasias intestinales. El tipo de tumor más frecuente es el carcinoide apendicular, que casi siempre es un hallazgo durante la apendicectomía por otro motivo. Su pronóstico es excelente y la supervivencia es mayor de 95% a cinco años de la intervención. Objetivo: reportar una serie de casos y analizar la supervivencia media a cinco años posteriores a la identificación el tumor. Material y métodos: análisis retrospectivo (1990-2010) de pacientes con tumor carcinoide apendicular intervenidos en el servicio de Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo del Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, España. Se analizaron: la supervivencia a cinco años, la necesidad de tratamiento complementario y las pruebas para seguimiento en la consulta. Resultados: se encontraron 42 pacientes intervenidos por tener un tumor carcinoide apendicular. En 38 pacientes la operación fue de urgencia, la mayoría por sospecha de apendicitis aguda, sin que en ninguno se hubiera establecido el diagnóstico de tumor carcinoide antes de la operación. El síntoma predominante al ingreso fue el dolor abdominal. El tratamiento quirúrgico fue: apendicectomía en 34 pacientes (12 por laparoscopia), en el intraoperatorio siete pacientes requirieron resecciones colónicas mayores debido a la afectación del colon; sólo uno requirió la reintervención para completar la hemicolectomía derecha. Al momento del diagnóstico dos pacientes tenían enfermedad diseminada (metástasis hepáticas). La supervivencia a cinco años fue superior a 95%, sin recidivas o tratamiento posterior de la enfermedad. Conclusiones: el tumor carcinoide apendicular difícilmente se diagnostica antes del procedimiento quirúrgico. La apendicectomía suele ser suficiente aunque en algunos pacientes las resecciones colónicas son necesarias por diseminación. La supervivencia a 5 años es

  8. Acute appendicitis and carcinoid tumor in Meckel's diverticulum. Three pathologies in one: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mudatsakis, N; Paraskakis, S; Lasithiotakis, K; Andreadakis, E; Karatsis, P

    2011-10-01

    Incidental carcinoid tumor of the Meckel's diverticulum is an uncommon event. Herein, a case of a carcinoid tumor in Meckel's diverticulum that was incidentally found in a patient with acute appendicitis is presented. A 42-year-old Caucasian man presented with acute abdomen and clinical signs of acute appendicitis. A typical appendectomy was performed during which further abdominal exploration revealed a Meckel's diverticulum 60 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve, with an irregular and somewhat indurated serosal region on one side. A stapled diverticulectomy was performed. Pathology revealed an incidental carcinoid tumor measuring 1 cm within the Meckel's diverticulum. CT scan of the abdomen and 24-h urine 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid results were normal. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged at the 5th postoperative day. He is alive and without evidence of disease 23 months after the operation. Coexistence of acute appendicitis along with an incidental Meckel's diverticulum raises controversies in their surgical management. We discuss the issues in managing patients with two or more of these coexistent pathologies.

  9. Primary carcinoid tumor in a retroperitoneal mature teratoma: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Koji; Ueda, Junji; Toubo, Taro; Nakamura, Masafumi; Oda, Yoshinao; Eguchi, Toru; Tanaka, Masao

    2013-06-01

    Primary retroperitoneal teratoma in an adult is rare, as is the occurrence of a malignant tumor within a mature teratoma, known as "malignant transformation". A 24-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for investigation of an abdominal mass. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multilocular mass in the right upper abdomen. The tumor consisted of fat, soft tissue, and bone, with a slightly enhanced solid component. The tumor was diagnosed preoperatively as a retroperitoneal mature teratoma with an immature component, and excised. Histologically, it was composed mainly of mature fat, soft tissue, and bone, accompanied by a solid component of prostate-like tissue. In addition, a latent carcinoid tumor was recognized in the middle of the tumor. The tumor was finally diagnosed as a primary carcinoid tumor within the retroperitoneal mature teratoma. The patient has been followed-up for 24 months since her operation without any evidence of recurrence. We report this case to highlight the possibility of malignant transformation in adult retroperitoneal teratoma, even when the preoperative diagnosis is benign mature teratoma.

  10. [Unsuspected bronchial carcinoid tumor detected in a somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1 and hypergastrinemia].

    PubMed

    Marín-Oyaga, V; Tirado-Hospital, J L; Cuenca-Cuenca, J I; Guerrero-Vázquez, R; Luján-Rodríguez, D; Vázquez-Albertino, R

    2013-03-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1) is characterized by the presence of tumors in parathyroid glands, anterior pituitary gland, endocrine pancreas and duodenum. However, other tumors may also occur. One of them is the carcinoid tumor, which in this context, is more common in the gastrointestinal tract. Less common is the presence of carcinoid tumors of bronchial origin, which with histologic confirmation, may occur in 5-8% of cases and that appears more frequently in patients with hypergastrinemia. We report a patient with MEN1 syndrome, hypergastrinemia and an incidental finding in a somatostatin receptor scintigraphy of an unsuspected bronchial carcinoid tumor that was confirmed histologically.

  11. An unusual coincidence of multiple synchronous kidney tumors with a metachronous rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Böor, Andrej; Jurkovic, Ivan; Dudríková, Katarína

    2003-01-01

    In synchronous surgery specimens (right-sided nephrectomy and left-sided partial nephrectomy), a unique combination of a papillary (chromophil) renal cell carcinoma (4 x 3.7 x 3.5 cm) and a renal oncocytoma (11 x 10 x 9 mm) in the right kidney and a renal carcinoid (2.5 x 2.3 x 1.1 cm) in the resected part of the left kidney has been found. This multiplicity and bilaterality, based on the findings of three distinct histogenetic types of kidney tumors, was accompanied by a metachronous rectal adenocarcinoma discovered 14 months later. After surgery, no radiation or other oncologic therapy was given. At present, our patient is well without any evidence of neoplastic disease three years after primary diagnosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a combination of three distinct histogenetic types of synchronous renal tumors associated with a metachronous rectal adenocarcinoma treated with simple surgery. In the absence of cytogenetic studies, the possibility of a the presence of a hereditary renal cancer syndrome must be considered.

  12. A case of parenchymal-sparing right mainstem bronchial sleeve resection for carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Pont, Bert Du; Decaluwé, Herbert; Van Raemdonck, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    Introduction Neuroendocrine tumors are rare bronchial carcinomata often presenting in a central airway. Resection usually includes a sleeve of the bronchus with the underlying lobe. Case report We present a 19-year old male with retro-obstructive pneumonia from a tumor in the right mainstem bronchus. Bronchoscopy showed an obstructive mass confirmed as being a typical carcinoid on biopsy. Sleeve resection of the mainstem bronchus only was successfully performed sparing the entire right lung. Discussion and conclusion This type of limited tumoral resection should be reserved for carefully selected patients with a low-grade neoplasm without extrabronchial extension and with both tumor-negative lymph nodes and bronchial margins on frozen section.

  13. [Primary Carcinoid Tumor of the Urinary Bladder: A Case Report and Questionnaire Survey on the Reported Cases in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Norichika; Arai, Hiroki; Honda, Masahito; Yoshida, Kyotaro

    2015-11-01

    An 83-year-old man presented with asymptomatic macroscopic hematuria while being treated for prostate cancer with hormonal therapy in January 2009. Cystoscopy revealed a 5 mm surface-smooth non pedunculated tumor lateral to the left ureteral orifice. Transurethral resection was carried out to examine the histology of the tumor. Histopathologic examination revealed the tumor arranged in a pseudoglandular pattern covered with erosive urothelial cells. The tumor had inconspicuous nucleoli, and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. An immunohistochemical study showed the tumor cells were positively stained for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, CD56, and NSE. Ki67 index of the tumor was below 2 %, indicating that the tumor was a carcinoid tumor. He showed no carcinoid syndrome, and neither recurrence nor metastasis has been detected for 66 months.

  14. Composite renal cell carcinoma with clear cell renal cell carcinomatous and carcinoid tumoral elements: a first case report.

    PubMed

    Bressenot, A; Delaunay, C; Gauchotte, G; Oliver, A; Boudrant, G; Montagne, K

    2010-02-01

    Renal endocrine tumours are extremely rare, and carcinoid tumoral elements in renal cell carcinoma have never been reported. This is the first report of a composite renal cell carcinoma containing a clear cell renal cell carcinoma associated with carcinoid tumoral elements, in a patient with synchronous metastatic disease. In the absence of specific radiological and clinical manifestations, typical morphological features as well as an immunostaining profile of neuroendocrine differentiation were identified by microscopy. Secondary nodal and liver localisations were characterised by carcinoid elements only. Despite antiangiogenic therapy, liver metastasis progressed, suggesting that adjuvant therapy cannot be based on the presence of the clear cell renal cell carcinoma component. In this context, extensive tissue sampling is recommended to reveal the endocrine component that is the most aggressive element of such a composite carcinoma.

  15. Oncocytic carcinoid tumor of the lung with intense F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT).

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Yuki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Rieko; Hosokawa, Kohei; Kajihara, Makoto; Shimizu, Teruhiko; Takahashi, Tadaaki; Sakai, Shinya; Sawada, Shigeki; Yamashita, Motohiro; Ohtani, Haruhiko

    2013-10-01

    The present report describes a case of typical carcinoid tumor with intense fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. The most of tumor cells were characterized by eosinophilic cytoplasm resulting from accumulation of mitochondria, which was called an oncocytic carcinoid tumor. Glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) was expressed in a membranous pattern in the oncocytic component. Oncocytic carcinoid tumors could show intense FDG uptake due to the numerous intracellular mitochondria and the membranous overexpression of GLUT-1. Thus, it could be a potential pitfall of interpreting FDG-PET/CT image.

  16. Endobronchial Carcinoid and Concurrent Carcinoid Syndrome in an Adolescent Female

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Jonathan; Ong, Thida

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial carcinoid tumors are the most common intrabronchial tumors in children and adolescents. Common signs and symptoms include persistent cough and wheezing not responsive to bronchodilators, hemoptysis, and recurrent fever. Diagnosis is frequently made by imaging and direct visualization with flexible bronchoscopy; surgery remains the gold standard treatment, and lung-sparing resections should be performed whenever possible. Though carcinoid syndrome—characterized by flushing, palpitations, wheezing, shortness of breath, and diarrhea—has been found in association with adult bronchial carcinoid tumors, to our knowledge only one previous study has reported the presence of carcinoid syndrome in a pediatric patient with an endobronchial carcinoid. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl with chronic cough found to have an endobronchial carcinoid tumor and signs and symptoms consistent with carcinoid syndrome. PMID:27895950

  17. [Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-producing Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor Presenting as Cushing Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Daisuke; Sawada, Takahiro; Ebisui, Osamu; Kito, Katsumi; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    The patient was a 57-year-old female who felt muscle weakness and visited a physician. Hypokalemia was pointed out, and she was referred to our hospital for detailed examination and treatment. Hormone-related tests and imaging were performed, and the patient was diagnosed as Cushing syndrome. Moreover, an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing tumor was suspected. The whole body was examined to find a tumor, but no apparent lesion was found, except for a small nodule of 5-mm in size was present in the right middle pulmonary lobe on chest computed tomography (CT). It was decided to perform surgical resection for both diagnosis and treatment. Pathological diagnosis was a typical carcinoid. On immunostaining, ACTH-positive cells were detected, and the lesion was definitely diagnosed as an ectopic ACTH-producing tumor. Since the ACTH level after surgery returned to normal, the lesion was concluded to be completely excised.

  18. Dual Tracer PET Imaging (68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG) Features in Pulmonary Carcinoid: Correlation with Tumor Proliferation Index

    PubMed Central

    Bhatkar, Dhiraj; Utpat, Ketaki; Basu, Sandip; Joshi, Jyotsna M.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoid tumors are rare group of lung neoplasms representing 1% of all the lung tumors. The typical bronchial carcinoids showed higher and more selective uptake of 68Ga-DOTATATE than of 18F-FDG on PET-CT. The Ki-67(MIB-1), a tumor proliferation index is a prognostic marker in neuroendocrine tumors for estimating tumor progression. Atypical carcinoids have higher Ki-67 index and have an increased propensity to metastasize as compared to typical ones. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET imaging along with Ki-67 can be correlated for better management of patients with neuroendocrine tumors. We describe the dual tracer imaging features in a patient of pulmonary carcinoid with avid 68Ga-DOTATATE and minimal 18FDG (18Flurodeoxyglucose) uptake diagnosed on the basis of imaging and bronchoscopic biopsy and its correlation with tumor proliferation index. PMID:28242984

  19. Goblet cell carcinoids of the appendix: Tumor biology, mutations and management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Malignant neoplasms of the appendix are rare and represent less than 1% of gastrointestinal cancers. Goblet cell carcinoids (GCC) tumors are a distinctive group of heterogeneous appendiceal neoplasm that exhibit unique clinical and pathologic features. This review focuses on the current diagnostic procedures, pathogenesis, possible signaling mechanisms and treatment options for GCC. Perspectives for future research are discussed. The tumor likely arises from pluripotent intestinal epithelial crypt base stem cells. Previous findings of Notch signaling as a tumor suppressor in Neuroendocrine tumors may have a similar role in this tumor too. Loss of Notch signaling may be the driver mutation with other successive downstream mutations likely favors them into progressing and behavior similar to poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with minimal neuroendocrine differentiation. A multidisciplinary approach is suggested for optimal outcomes. Surgery remains the main treatment modality. Simple appendectomy may be sufficient in early stages while right hemicolectomy is recommended for advanced tumors. Cytoreductive surgery with heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy may improve survival in a select few with metastatic peritoneal disease. These tumors have an unpredictable behavior even in early stages and local recurrence and delayed metastases may be seen. Lifelong surveillance is warranted. PMID:27830037

  20. Carcinoid Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content ASCO Conquer Cancer Foundation Journal of Clinical Oncology Journal of Oncology Practice ASCO University Donate eNEWS SIGNUP f Cancer. ... of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. ...

  1. [Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor with Cushing's Syndrome in a Patient who Underwent Pulmonary Resection by Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Mishina, Taijiro; Miyajima, Masahiro; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary carcinoid tumor with Cushing's syndrome is comparatively rare disease. It is difficult to make an early diagnosis due to small size lesion in its early stage. We report a case of pulmonary carcinoid tumor with Cushing's syndrome successfully localised by positron emission tomography/computed tomography and was resected in the early stage. The levels of serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone( ACTH) decreased immediately after surgery, and the symptoms of Cushing's syndrome were relieved.

  2. Phase III trial of chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and streptozotocin compared with interferon alpha for advanced carcinoid tumors: FNCLCC-FFCD 9710.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Laetitia; Bonnetain, Frank; Rougier, Philippe; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Gamelin, Eric; Etienne, Pierre-Luc; Cadiot, Guillaume; Mitry, Emmanuel; Smith, Denis; Cvitkovic, Frédérique; Coudert, Bruno; Ricard, Floriane; Bedenne, Laurent; Seitz, Jean-François

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this randomized multicenter phase III trial was to compare chemotherapy and interferon (IFN) in patients with metastatic carcinoid tumors. Patients with documented progressive, unresectable, metastatic carcinoid tumors were randomized between 5-fluorouracil plus streptozotocin (day 1-5) and recombinant IFN-alpha-2a (3 MU x 3 per week). Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). From February 1998 to June 2004, 64 patients were included. The two arms were well matched for median age, sex ratio, PS 0-1, previous chemotherapy, surgery, or radiotherapy. The median PFS for chemotherapy was 5.5 months versus 14.1 for IFN (hazard ratio=0.75 (0.41-1.36)). Overall survival (OS), tolerance, and effects on carcinoid symptoms were not significantly different. Despite a trend in favor of IFN, there was no difference in PFS and OS in advanced metastatic carcinoid tumors and therapeutic effect of both treatments was mild.

  3. The CCK(2) receptor antagonist, YF476, inhibits Mastomys ECL cell hyperplasia and gastric carcinoid tumor development.

    PubMed

    Kidd, M; Siddique, Z-L; Drozdov, I; Gustafsson, B I; Camp, R L; Black, J W; Boyce, M; Modlin, I M

    2010-06-08

    YF476 is a potent and highly selective cholecystokin 2 (CCK(2)) receptor antagonist of the benzodiazepine class. It inhibits gastric neuroendocrine enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell secretion, proliferation and spontaneous formation of gastric neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids) in cotton rats. The Mastomys rodent species exhibits a genetic predisposition to gastric ECL neuroendocrine tumor formation which can be accelerated by acid suppression and induction of hypergastrinemia. In this respect, it mimics the human condition of atrophic gastritis, hypergastrinemia and gastric carcinoid development. We investigated whether YF476 could inhibit acid suppression-induced ECL cell hyperplasia and neoplasia in this model. In addition, we examined whether YF476 could reverse established ECL cell hyperplasia and neoplasia. Targeting the CCK(2) receptor during Loxtidine-induced hypergastrinemia resulted in a reduction in ECL cell secretion (plasma and mucosal histamine, and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) transcripts, p<0.05) and proliferation (numbers of HDC-positive cells, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cyclin D1 transcription). This was associated with a decrease in ECL cell hyperplasia and a 60% reduction in gastric ECL cell microcarcinoid (tumors <0.3mm in size) formation. YF476 inhibited ECL cell neoplasia (gastric carcinoid) in animals with hyperplasia, inhibited the formation of ECL cell tumors when co-administered with Loxtidine and reversed the growth and developement of gastric ECL cell carcinoids in long-term acid suppressed Mastomys. Variable importance analysis using a logistic multinomial regression model indicated the effects of YF476 were specific to the ECL cell and alterations in ECL cell function reflected inhibition of transcripts for HDC, Chromogranin A (CgA), CCK(2) and the autocrine growth factor, CTGF. We conclude that specifically targeting the CCK(2) receptor inhibits gastrin-mediated ECL cell secretion and ECL cell proliferation and tumor

  4. Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome associated with bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumor in youth: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Ya; Liu, Xu-Dong; Li, Wei-Nan; Dong, Si-Yuan; Qu, Xiao-Han; Gong, Shu-Lei; Shao, Ming-Rui; Zhang, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome (CushingPS) caused by bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumors presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The present study reports the case of an 18-year-old male patient presenting with rapid weight gain, polyuria, polydipsia and progressive muscle weakness. Chemical and imaging findings suggested ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropin. Whole-body (18)fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)FDG-PET/CT) positron-emission tomography revealed an increased uptake of (18)FDG-PET/CT in the right middle lung mass and lobar lymph node. Postoperative pathology confirmed the presence of a typical carcinoid, as well as a lobar lymph node metastasis. The patient underwent a right middle lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node resection, which resulted in symptom clearance, followed by rapid weight loss. No CushingPS or tumor recurrence was observed at the 3-month postoperative follow-up.

  5. Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome associated with bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumor in youth: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    LI, WEN-YA; LIU, XU-DONG; LI, WEI-NAN; DONG, SI-YUAN; QU, XIAO-HAN; GONG, SHU-LEI; SHAO, MING-RUI; ZHANG, LIN

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome (CushingPS) caused by bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumors presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The present study reports the case of an 18-year-old male patient presenting with rapid weight gain, polyuria, polydipsia and progressive muscle weakness. Chemical and imaging findings suggested ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropin. Whole-body 18fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG-PET/CT) positron-emission tomography revealed an increased uptake of 18FDG-PET/CT in the right middle lung mass and lobar lymph node. Postoperative pathology confirmed the presence of a typical carcinoid, as well as a lobar lymph node metastasis. The patient underwent a right middle lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node resection, which resulted in symptom clearance, followed by rapid weight loss. No CushingPS or tumor recurrence was observed at the 3-month postoperative follow-up. PMID:27347101

  6. Carcinoid tumor of the lung with massive ossification: report of a case showing the evidence of osteomimicry and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tsubochi, Hiroyoshi; Endo, Shunsuke; Oda, Yoshinao; Dobashi, Yoh

    2013-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is one of the commonly encountered primary pulmonary neoplasms. Although it has been known to be accompanied by calcification and/or ossification, presentation with a large ossified mass is rare. We describe here the case of a 29-year-old female with the radiological finding of a single bony nodular lesion. Pathological examination of the surgically resected specimen led to the diagnosis of carcinoid tumor of the lung with massive ossification. Although histological features showed the tumor of low grade malignancy, subcarinal and right hilar lymph nodes were found to be positive for metastasis. Further immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the tumor cells expressed the osteogenic inducer protein, bone morphogenic protrein-2 [BMP-2] and osteoblastic marker protein, osteocalcin. We interpreted this to mean that the carcinoid tumor cells had acquired an osteoblastic phenotype and had subsequently developed marked intratumoral ossification. The relevant literature is reviewed and possible mechanisms of tumor-related osteogenesis are discussed.

  7. Ectopic Cushing syndrome associated with thymic carcinoid tumor as the first presentation of MEN1 syndrome-report of a family with MEN1 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Rahmanian, Masoud; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Soltani, Akbar; Soltanzade, Akbar; Mahrampour, Elnaz; Amoli, Mahsa M

    2014-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1(MEN1) is an autosomal dominant syndrome. Although thymic carcinoid tumor is recognized as a part of MEN1 syndrome but functioning thymic carcinoid tumor as the first presentation of the MEN1 seems to be very rare. In this report, we present a 29-year-old male who developed ectopic Cushing syndrome secondary to thymic carcinoid tumor and was diagnosed as MEN1 syndrome 2 years later. Further evaluation revealed the presence of carcinoid tumor and other MEN 1 manifestations in several other member of family. Genetic evaluation showed presence of a previously reported mutation in exon 10(R527X) of MEN1 gene in these patients. This presentation showed that thymic neuroendocrine tumor could be the first manifestation of the MEN1 syndrome and it might be diagnosed as a dominant manifestation of this syndrome in a family. We suggest biochemical or genetic screening for MEN-1 syndrome for patients with thymic carcinoid.

  8. The role of endogenous gastrin in the development of enterochromaffin-like cell carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis: a study with the specific gastrin receptor antagonist AG-041R.

    PubMed

    Chiba, T; Kinoshita, Y; Sawada, M; Kishi, K; Baba, A; Hoshino, E

    1998-01-01

    We examined the effects of a newly synthesized gastrin receptor antagonist, AG-041R, on the growth of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis both in vitro and in vivo. AG-041R was as potent as the well known gastrin antagonist L365,260 in inhibiting not only the gastrin-induced release of histamine from but also histidine decarboxylase (HDC) gene expression in the ECL carcinoid tumor cells. AG-041R also inhibited gastrin-induced DNA synthesis and c-fos gene expression in the tumor cells. Furthermore, AG-041R significantly inhibited the growth of the transplanted Mastomys ECL carcinoid tumors in vivo. From these data, it is concluded that endogenous gastrin is involved in the growth of ECL carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis. Moreover, AG-041R is shown to have a potential as an anti-neoplastic agent for ECL carcinoid tumor of the stomach.

  9. Typical laryngeal carcinoid tumor with recurrence and lymph node metastasis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinying; Chen, Haihong; Zhou, Shuihong

    2014-01-01

    Typical carcinoid tumor of the larynx is an extremely rare lesion which arises from neuroendocrine cells scanning in the laryngeal mucosa or submucosal glands. Conventionally, it is a well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma, conservative surgery represents the treatment of choice, and the patient usually has a good prognosis with rarely recurrence and metastasis. In this report, we present a case of typical laryngeal carcinoid tumor with recurrence and lymph node metastasis. The patient was a 58-year-old man, complaints of intermittent burning pain in his both ears for 2 years, and for the recent one month the pain turn to continuous accompanied with a mild discomfort in the throat, he had neither hoarseness, dysphagia, nor any otorrhea and hearing loss. The patient was scheduled to undergo a tracheotomy and then a biopsy under supporting laryngoscopy. During the operation, the frozen section diagnosis from the first and the second time both indicated that the biopsy specimens originated from musculo-epithelia, it couldn’t be differed from malignant to benign. So the mass was simply removed under supporting laryngoscopy. The histopathology from paraffin sections revealed typical carcinoid of the larynx and the second procedure consisted of supraglottic laryngectomy with clear margins, the otalgia resolved and the patient had no difficulty with phonation or swallowing. After 1 year follow-up, the patient was found a mass on his right neck with symptom free, B-ultrasonography indicated several enlargement lymph nodes with some merged on both sides of the neck, the patient was scheduled to undergo a “total-laryngectomy with radical neck dissection on the left side and an elective neck dissection on the right side”. The specimens were positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A and synaptophysin, a final diagnosis of typical carcinoid was made for the recurrence lesion and the metastasis of the lymph nodes. Though the post-operative recovery was uneventful, the

  10. Typical laryngeal carcinoid tumor with recurrence and lymph node metastasis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinying; Chen, Haihong; Zhou, Shuihong

    2014-01-01

    Typical carcinoid tumor of the larynx is an extremely rare lesion which arises from neuroendocrine cells scanning in the laryngeal mucosa or submucosal glands. Conventionally, it is a well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma, conservative surgery represents the treatment of choice, and the patient usually has a good prognosis with rarely recurrence and metastasis. In this report, we present a case of typical laryngeal carcinoid tumor with recurrence and lymph node metastasis. The patient was a 58-year-old man, complaints of intermittent burning pain in his both ears for 2 years, and for the recent one month the pain turn to continuous accompanied with a mild discomfort in the throat, he had neither hoarseness, dysphagia, nor any otorrhea and hearing loss. The patient was scheduled to undergo a tracheotomy and then a biopsy under supporting laryngoscopy. During the operation, the frozen section diagnosis from the first and the second time both indicated that the biopsy specimens originated from musculo-epithelia, it couldn't be differed from malignant to benign. So the mass was simply removed under supporting laryngoscopy. The histopathology from paraffin sections revealed typical carcinoid of the larynx and the second procedure consisted of supraglottic laryngectomy with clear margins, the otalgia resolved and the patient had no difficulty with phonation or swallowing. After 1 year follow-up, the patient was found a mass on his right neck with symptom free, B-ultrasonography indicated several enlargement lymph nodes with some merged on both sides of the neck, the patient was scheduled to undergo a "total-laryngectomy with radical neck dissection on the left side and an elective neck dissection on the right side". The specimens were positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A and synaptophysin, a final diagnosis of typical carcinoid was made for the recurrence lesion and the metastasis of the lymph nodes. Though the post-operative recovery was uneventful, the

  11. Erroneous diagnosis of small cell lung cancer based on small biopsies with far-reaching consequences: case report of a typical carcinoid tumor

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Bettina; Kampe, Sandra; Theegarten, Dirk; Aigner, Clemens

    2017-01-01

    Although neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the lung are frequently discussed together, carcinoids are very different from high-grade small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). SCLC is found in heavy-smoking, older patients, whereas smoking is not strongly associated with carcinoid tumors. We present the case of a 46-year-old never smoking woman who was misdiagnosed with SCLC. The patient was not responsive to radio-chemotherapy plus prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI); she had a typical carcinoid (TC) tumor according to the final pathology report. We aim to demonstrate that diagnosis of SCLC based on cytology or small biopsy specimens must be scrutinized when the clinical constellation is unusual, or when the follow-up assessment shows no response to systemic treatment. PMID:28275490

  12. Large presacral tailgut cyst with a carcinoid tumor in a male: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Charalampakis, Vasileios; Stamatiou, Dimitrios; Christodoulakis, Manousos; Kafousi, Maria; Chryssou, Evangelia; de Bree, Eelco; Melissas, John

    2014-05-01

    Tailgut cysts are developmental hamartomas found in the presacral space. They are usually detected incidentally during physical examinations or imaging studies. However, they may cause symptoms due to compression of nearby organs. Due to their potential malignant transformation, surgical resection is warranted, while routine biopsy is considered controversial because of the concern about infection of the tailgut cyst and needle-track implantation of malignant cells. The co-existence of a carcinoid in a tailgut cyst is extremely rare. Only 16 cases have been reported previously, the vast majority of which were found in females. We herein present the case of a carcinoid in a tailgut cyst found in a male patient, discuss the potential pathogenesis of tailgut carcinoids, and underline the fact that their previous consideration of the condition as a female-restricted entity should be rejected.

  13. Concurrent primary carcinoid tumor arising within mature teratoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma in the horseshoe kidney: report of a rare case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ke; You, Qihan; Zhao, Ming; Yao, Hongtian; Xiang, Hua; Wang, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Primary carcinoid tumor arising in a mature teratoma of the horseshoe kidney is exceptionally rare and only 4 such cases have been reported in the world literature to date. The simultaneous occurrence of different subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) or RCC coexistence with non-RCC neoplasms from the same kidney is unusual and infrequently reported. Herein we report a case of primary carcinoid tumor arising within mature teratoma, concurrent with a clear cell RCC in the horseshoe kidney of a 37-year-old man. Histologically, both the carcinoid tumor and clear cell RCC demonstrated the characteristic morphology in their classic forms. In addition to the carcinoid tumor, the mature teratoma consisted of variably sized, large cystic spaces lined by cytologically bland mucinous columnar epithelium, pseudostratified columnar epithelium, ciliated epithelium and mature smooth muscle fibers were also identified within the cystic wall. Furthermore, foci of round, small nodules composed of mature prostatic acinus were noted in the teratoma which was confirmed by exhibiting strong immunoreactivity for prostate specific antigen. The present case serves to expand the histologic component that may be encountered in the mature terotoma of the kidney and further broadens the spectrum of primary tumors occurring in the horseshoe kidney.

  14. Incidental finding of carcinoid tumor on Meckel's diverticulum: case report and literature review, should prophylactic resection be recommended?

    PubMed

    Caracappa, Daniela; Gullà, Nino; Lombardo, Francesco; Burini, Gloria; Castellani, Elisa; Boselli, Carlo; Gemini, Alessandro; Burattini, Maria Federica; Covarelli, Piero; Noya, Giuseppe

    2014-05-08

    Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract and is caused by incomplete obliteration of the vitelline duct during intrauterine life. MD affects less than 2% of the population. In most cases, MD is asymptomatic and the estimated average complication risk of MD carriers, which is inversely proportional to age, ranges between 2% and 4%. The most common MD-related complications are gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal obstruction and acute phlogosis. Excision is mandatory in the case of symptomatic diverticula regardless of age, while surgical treatment for asymptomatic diverticula remains controversial. According to the majority of studies, the incidental finding of MD in children is an indication for surgical resection, while the management of adults is not yet unanimous. In this case report, we describe the prophylactic resection of an incidentally detected MD, which led to the removal of an occult mucosal carcinoid tumor. In literature, the association of MD and carcinoid tumor is reported as a rare finding. Even though the strategy for adult patients of an incidental finding of MD during surgery performed for other reasons divides the experts, we recommend prophylactic excision in order to avoid any further risk.

  15. Thymic and Bronchial Carcinoid Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: The Mayo Clinic Experience from 1977 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Singh Ospina, Naykky; Thompson, Geoffrey B; C Nichols, Francis; Cassivi, Stephen D; Young, William F

    2015-12-01

    The clinical features of thymic carcinoid (TC) and bronchial carcinoid (BC) tumors as part of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) have been rarely described and their importance in clinical practice is debated. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and outcome of this uncommon manifestation of MEN1 in a tertiary care center setting. We present the clinical features of patients with MEN1 and either TC or BC evaluated at the Mayo Clinic from 1977 to 2013. A total of 348 patients with MEN1 were evaluated and the prevalence of TC was 2.0% (n = 7) and of BC 4.9% (n = 17). The majority of the patients with BC were men (61%) diagnosed on routine screening (77%) and BC was not the confirmed cause of death in any patient. In contrast, TC patients were all men and during follow-up 43% died due to TC complications. We conclude that TC and BC tumors are uncommon, but important components of MEN1. BC were most commonly diagnosed during routine screening and associated with an indolent course. TC were predominantly seen in men and associated with a more aggressive behavior.

  16. [Severe tricuspid insufficiency and primary carcinoid tumor of the ovary. Long term success after valve replacement. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Herreman, F; Vernant, P; Cachera, J P; Monier, P

    1978-01-01

    The case is reported of carcinoid heart disease in a lady of 70 with intractable congestive cardiac failure 5 years after the removal of a primary carcinoid tumour of the ovary. The special features of primary carcinoid tumours of the ovary are recalled, with emphasis on their rarity and of the absence of liver metastases. The various features of carcinoid syndrome are recalled in the light of current knowledge of the pathogenesis. A review of the literature on cardiac involvement in primary carcinoid tumours of the ovary, amounting to 10 cases, is included. The possibility of surgical cure of the heart lesions in carcinoid tumour by a prosthetic tricuspid valve are discussed, in the light of the 6 reported cases and the present one. Our report is the first one of replacement of the valve after removal of a primary ovarien carcinoid tumour, and the excellent result has been maintained after three years.

  17. A Case of Primary Combined Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Neuroendocrine (Atypical Carcinoid) Tumor in the Floor of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Fumihiko; Kanno, Naomi; Yanagawa, Toru; Bukawa, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    The combined squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with neuroendocrine (atypical carcinoid (AC)) tumor is extremely rare in the head and neck. We present here the first case of SCC with AC arising in the floor of the mouth of 65-year-old man. The tumor is comprised of two components of SCC and AC in the biopsy specimen. Neuroendocrine tumor component was classified as AC from the punctate necrosis and 2–10>/10 HPF. Immunohistochemical staining was HMW-CK/34B (+) and P63 (+) in SCC and synaptophysin (+) and CD56 (+) in AC. The pathological diagnosis of SCC with AC was made from both the morphological and immunological exam. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy was performed with radiotherapy 70.2 Gy and chemotherapy of CDDP and VP-16. Although the treatment effect was complete response both of primary tumor and of neck metastases, the recurrence of the primary tumor was after 6 months. Bilateral modified radical neck dissection and tumor resection of the floor of the mouth with reconstructive surgery of anterior lateral thigh free flap were performed. Although the primary and neck tumor did not recur, the multiple lung metastases and mediastinum lymph node metastases occurred at 6 months after surgery. PMID:28116178

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of a large metastatic carcinoid tumor: success with a note of caution

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, Bradley W.; Harvey, Harold A.; Dye, Charles E.; Dougherty-Hamod, Brandy; Moyer, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle infusion (EUS-FNI) of alcohol is the most reported method for EUS-guided tumor ablation. Several studies have reported successful EUS-guided ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, these tumors have been relatively small (< 3 cm). In this report, a 50-year-old man with a metastatic carcinoid tumor with a large porta hepatis mass was referred to our clinic for EUS-guided ethanol ablation. After two separate EUS-FNI ablations, there was a 36 % reduction in tumor size (9.0 × 11.4 cm to 6.7 × 9.8 cm) with associated tumor lysis syndrome. Chromogranin A levels decreased from 460 to 132 ng/mL. The patient reported complete resolution of abdominal pain within 2 weeks, but only mild improvement in flushing and diarrhea. In conclusion, large metastatic neuroendocrine tumors can be successfully treated with EUS-guided ethanol ablation. Evidence-based guidelines are needed with regard to the appropriate volume of ethanol injected in EUS-guided ablation to promote the efficacy and safety of this emerging procedure. PMID:26135103

  19. Carcinoid Heart Disease in a Primary Ovarian Carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    T., Kolouch; H., Linkova; O., Lang; V., Ciprova; L., Brunerova

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoids are very rare, and only their insular form is associated with carcinoid syndrome. We herein describe a case report of an elderly woman who presented with typical carcinoid syndrome, which is routinely characterized by right-sided heart failure, diarrhoea, flushes, and other common manifestations. Further examination and biochemical testing of the patient confirmed suspected carcinoid tumor. However, the tumor was surprisingly localized in the left ovary. The presence of the patient’s severe combined tricuspid valve disease would create impossible surgical management conditions, so we decided to first perform cardio-surgery with tricuspid valve replacement. After tumor removal, levels of hydroxyindolacetic acid did not normalize and although the patient was asymptomatic, a small lesion was detected by tectrotyd scan paravertebrally. Treatment with lanreotide led to complete remission with negative biochemical and imaging signs of tumor. Thus, to summarize, carcinoid tumor even in an atypical localization (ovary) should be considered in elderly female patients with severe combined tricuspid valve disease due to carcinoid syndrome. PMID:27122940

  20. The use of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of composite and collision tumors: exemplified by pleural mesothelioma and carcinoid tumor of the lung.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Nelson G

    2012-07-01

    A case of a collision lymph node metastasis of a mesothelioma and a carcinoid tumor in a 73-year-old man with a history of asbestos exposure is reported. An interesting finding in this case was that both the mesothelioma and its lymph node metastases exhibited a wide variety of histologic patterns, including one characterized by a solid growth of large cells with abundant, clear, and foamy cytoplasm and another exhibiting deciduoid features. Pathologists should be aware that mesotheliomas can present very unusual morphologic features, such as those seen in the present case, and therefore, should be included in the differential diagnosis of those tumors that can display similar morphology and can metastasize to the serosal membranes. Reexamination of the pneumonectomy specimen in the current case identified a primary peripheral carcinoid tumor. The recognition of a nonasbestos-related tumor in a patient with mesothelioma is important since its presence may have an impact on the patient's life expectancy and, therefore, may affect any compensation settlement.

  1. Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumor G1 with a Solitary Hepatic Metastatic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kohei; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimada, Seitarou; Ando, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Matsui, Koshi; Imura, Joji; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    Rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is a relatively rare tumor. NET is classified as G1, G2, or G3 according to the degree of mitosis or Ki-67 proliferation index, which reflect the malignant potential of the tumor, such as metastasis. Advanced cases with metastasis are indicated for chemotherapy treatment. However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited. Therefore, resection is considered, even in metastatic cases, if complete resection is possible. We herein report a case of small rectal NET discovered with hepatic metastasis classified as G1. The patient showed good progress with no recurrence after undergoing hepatectomy and endoscopic resection of rectal NET. PMID:28154272

  2. CDX2 may be a useful marker to distinguish primary ovarian carcinoid from gastrointestinal metastatic carcinoids to the ovary.

    PubMed

    Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar; Lioyd, Joshua; Xu, Haodong; Cao, Dengfeng; Barner, Ross; Zhao, Chengquan

    2013-11-01

    Primary ovarian carcinoids and metastatic tumors share similar morphologic features. Metastatic carcinoids must be excluded from primary ones for prognostic and therapeutic reasons. Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors are much more common with the majority arising from small intestine and appendix. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of immunohistochemistry for CDX2 in differentiating primary ovarian from metastatic carcinoids of primary gastrointestinal origin. Thirty primary pure ovarian carcinoids, 16 primary ovarian carcinoids arising in association with benign teratomas, 10 ovarian carcinoids metastatic from primary gastrointestinal tract and 70 gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors were studied for the expression of CDX2 by immunohistochemistry. CDX2 expression revealed that 40 (57.1%) of 70 cases of gastrointestinal carcinoids and 9 (90%) of 10 ovarian metastatic carcinoids showed positive nuclear staining (diffuse or focal). On the other hand, 3 (18.8%) of 16 primary carcinoids with teratomatous elements showed weak positivity. Among the 70 gastrointestinal carcinoids, CDX2 was positive in 38 (90.5%) of 42 cases in the duodenum, small intestine, appendix, and only in 2 (11.8%) of 17 cases of colorectal carcinoids and none of the 11 cases in the stomach. It is concluded that CDX2 may be a useful marker to distinguish primary ovarian carcinoid from metastasis from small intestinal and appendiceal neuroendocrine tumors.

  3. Type 1 and 2 gastric carcinoid tumors: long-term follow-up of the efficacy of treatment with a slow-release somatostatin analogue.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Sylvain; Pagenault, Mael; de Lajarte-Thirouard, Anne-Sophie; Bretagne, Jean-François

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about the long-term results of treating gastric carcinoid tumors with a slow-release somatostatin analogue. We report three patients with type 1 and 2 gastric carcinoid tumors who were treated in the above mentioned way and followed for 27-50 months. In all cases, alternative endoscopic or surgical management was considered but deemed inappropriate. Treatment with a slow-release somatostatin analogue was begun in light of a favorable recent report. The result was regression or complete disappearance of macroscopic fundal tumors. No side-effects were reported and, most notably, none of the patients developed gallstones. This small study may help define the optimal duration, dose, and administration interval of the treatment. Slow-release somatostatin analogue is a safe and efficacious treatment for type 1 and 2 gastric carcinoid tumors, and can be used when tumors are growing rapidly. Slow-release somatostatin analogue represents an alternative to repeated endoscopic treatment or high-risk surgery.

  4. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Gastrointestinal Cancer, Cancer of the Stomach and Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1986-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer provides only palliation with perhaps increased survival time in some patients. The primary treatment of gastric carcinomas is surgical, as this is the only hope for cure. It is estimated that 80 to 85 percent of patients with newly diagnosed cases of stomach cancer will be dead of their disease within five years. Radiation therapy alone is seldom employed, except as a palliative measure to control hemorrhage or pain. There are no data to suggest that postoperative radiation increases survival rates. Single-agent chemotherapy is of temporary palliative value in 20 to 30 percent of cases with a duration of response from three to five months. Combination chemotherapy has shown a somewhat higher response rate than single-agent therapy. In advanced gastric cancer, there is no evidence of improved long-term disease-free survival rates with any combination yet reported. The treatment of carcinoid cancer of the intestinal tract is surgical removal, as this offers the only hope of cure. Radiation therapy is of little benefit, except for moderate palliation in cases of extensive liver metasasis. Carcinoid cancers are moderately sensitive to chemotherapy. While some adjuvant chemotherapy trials suggest improvement, major survival gains remain to be demonstrated. Uncertainty as to the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers is probably due to lack of data. PMID:3528508

  5. Cushing's syndrome secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion from carcinoid tumor within an ovarian mature teratoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Baoyou; Wu, Xueqing; Zhou, Qing; Hu, Yan; Zhao, Hongqin; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Qian; Zheng, Feiyun

    2014-03-01

    A 46-year-old woman with Cushing's syndrome secondary to ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion caused by primary ovarian mature teratoma with carcinoid components was presented in our case. The patient manifested sustained hypercortisolemia without circadian rhythm and a lack of suppression of either low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (LDDST) or high-dose dexamethasone suppression test (HDDST). There was no evidence of a pituitary mass or secretion of other hormones. After careful clinical evaluation, no other tumor masses were found. Resection of the ovarian tumors led to sharp reduction of serum ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Immunohistochemistry showed positivity in CgA, Syn, CK, NSE. To the best of our knowledge, there are rare reports of an ACTH-secreting carcinoid components located in an ovarian mature teratoma, and bilateral ovarian mature teratoma makes it rarer.

  6. Cytopathologic characteristics of the primary strumal carcinoid tumor of the ovary: a case report with emphasis on differential diagnostic considerations.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshitetsu; Haba, Reiji; Kushida, Yoshio; Kadota, Kyuichi; Katsuki, Naomi; Miyai, Yumi; Shibuya, Shinsuke; Sasaki, Makiko; Bando, Kenji; Matsunaga, Toru; Hata, Toshiyuki

    2013-09-01

    Primary strumal carcinoid tumor of the ovary (SCTO) is an extremely rare entity, though the survival rate is excellent if the disease is confined to one ovary. A case is presented here in which intraoperative squash smears in a 45-year-old woman with a left adnexal mass revealed dispersed or small clusters of neoplastic cells forming loosely cohesive gland-like structures with abundant cytoplasm. The nuclear chromatin was finely granular with a "salt and pepper" appearance and occasional tiny nucleoli. The position of the nucleus presented a vaguely plasmacytoid appearance. Small fragments of thyroidal colloid-like structures were also identified. A cytopathologic diagnosis of a SCTO was suggested. Further evaluation and immunohistochemical studies were conducted on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. Cords or nests of uniform cells with abundant cytoplasm, and eccentric nuclei with coarse chromatin and occasional colloidal tissue were identified on H&E sections. The tumor cells showed diffuse and strong cytoplasmic staining for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, CD56, and vimentin but were negative for calretinin, α-inhibin or CDX2. The proliferative index with MIB-1 was around 3%. Thyroidal colloid-like structures were immunoreactive for thyroglobulin and TTF-1 stains. The diagnosis of primary SCTO was confirmed based on cytopathologic, histopathological, and immunohistochemical results, and the location of the tumor. Awareness of the cytopathological findings of SCTO can assist in diagnosing this rare entity correctly.

  7. The predictive value of mean platelet volume, plateletcrit and red cell distribution width in the differentiation of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without type I gastric carcinoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Ali; Keskin, Onur; Yakut, Mustafa; Kalkan, Cagdas; Soykan, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is an autoimmune and inflammatory condition that may predispose to gastric carcinoid tumors or adenocarcinomas. The early diagnosis of these tumors is important in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. Platelet indices such as mean platelet volume and plateletcrit levels increase in inflammatory, infectious and malign conditions. The primary aim of this study was to explore wheter platelet indices and red cell distribution width have any predictive role in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without gastric carcinoid tumors. Also secondary aim of this study was to investigate whether any changes exist betwenn autoimmune gastritis and functional dyspepsia patients by means of platelet indices. Plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.03%, p < 0.001) and red cell distribution width (16.11 ± 3.04 vs. 13.41 ± 0.95%, p < 0.001) were significantly higher in autoimmune gastritis patients compared to control group. Receiver operating curve analysis suggested that optimum plateletcrit cut-off point was 0.20% (AUC: 0.646), and 13.95% as the cut off value for red cell distribution width (AUC: 0.860). Although plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.21 ± 0.04%, p = 0.220) and mean platelet volume (8.94 ± 1.44 vs. 8.68 ± 0.89 fl, p = 0.265) were higher in autoimmune gastritis patients without carcinoid tumor compared to patients with carcinoid tumors, these parameters were not statistically significant. Changes in plateletcrit and red cell distribution width values may be used as a marker in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis and fucntional dyspepsia patients but not useful in patients with gastric carcinoid tumor type I.

  8. Liver metastasis secondary to primary mesenteric carcinoid.

    PubMed

    Juanmartiñena Fernández, José Francisco; Fernández Urién, Ignacio; Amat Villegas, Irene; Prieto Martínez, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neoplasms that display neuroendocrine properties. The term carcinoid is generally applied to well-differentiated neoplasms, while neuroendocrine carcinoma is reserved only for poorly differentiated lesions. They can be found throughout the different regions of the gastrointestinal system, although they have predilection for the ileum.

  9. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  10. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  11. The role of endogenous gastrin in the development of enterochromaffin-like cell carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis: a study with the specific gastrin receptor antagonist AG-041R.

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, T.; Kinoshita, Y.; Sawada, M.; Kishi, K.; Baba, A.; Hoshino, E.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the effects of a newly synthesized gastrin receptor antagonist, AG-041R, on the growth of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis both in vitro and in vivo. AG-041R was as potent as the well known gastrin antagonist L365,260 in inhibiting not only the gastrin-induced release of histamine from but also histidine decarboxylase (HDC) gene expression in the ECL carcinoid tumor cells. AG-041R also inhibited gastrin-induced DNA synthesis and c-fos gene expression in the tumor cells. Furthermore, AG-041R significantly inhibited the growth of the transplanted Mastomys ECL carcinoid tumors in vivo. From these data, it is concluded that endogenous gastrin is involved in the growth of ECL carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis. Moreover, AG-041R is shown to have a potential as an anti-neoplastic agent for ECL carcinoid tumor of the stomach. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10461356

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma of the cecum developing in a patient with long-standing ulcerative colitis and a coexistent carcinoid tumor in the appendix: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saqib; Watson, Nicholas; Shamim, Kiran; Menon, Achyuth; Abdullah, Khorrum

    2015-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the colon is a rare tumor that accounts for 0.1%-0.2% of colonic malignancies. However, pure SCC of the cecum is extremely rare. Although SCC of the colon is a rare complication of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), SCC of the cecum in the context of IBD has not been previously reported in the English literature. We report a case of the coexistence of SCC of the cecum and a carcinoid tumor in a 46-year-old female with long-standing pan-ulcerative colitis.

  13. Anorectal function and outcomes after transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Karakayali, Feza Y.; Tezcaner, Tugan; Moray, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that allows full-thickness resection and suture closure of the defect for large rectal adenomas, selected low-risk rectal cancers, or small cancers in patients who have a high risk for major surgery. Our aim, in the given prospective study was to report our initial clinical experience with TAMIS, and to evaluate its effects on postoperative anorectal functions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 10 patients treated with TAMIS for benign and malignant rectal tumors, preoperative and postoperative anorectal function was evaluated with anorectal manometry and Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. RESULTS: The mean distance of the tumors from the anal verge was 5.6 cm, and mean tumor diameter was 2.6 cm. All resection margins were tumor free. There was no difference in preoperative and 3-week postoperative anorectalmanometry findings; only mean minimum rectal sensory volume was lower at 3 weeks after surgery. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all patients except one which resolved by 6 weeks after surgery.The mean postoperative follow-up was 28 weeks without any recurrences. CONCLUSION: Transanal minimally invasive surgery is a safe and effective procedure for treatment of rectal tumors and can be performed without impairing anorectal functions. PMID:26622116

  14. Ewing sarcoma mimicking atypical carcinoid tumor: detection of unexpected genomic alterations demonstrates the use of next generation sequencing as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Leona A; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Bueno, Raphael; Dal Cin, Paola; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Sholl, Lynette M; Kuo, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, tumors are being analyzed for a variety of mutations and other genomic changes, with the goals of guiding personalized therapy and directing patients to appropriate clinical trials based on genotype, as well as identifying previously unknown genomic changes in different tumor types and thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of human cancers. Next generation sequencing is a powerful research tool now gaining traction in the clinic. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of next generation sequencing assays in providing diagnostic information when evaluating tumor specimens. This is illustrated by a case previously thought to represent an atypical carcinoid tumor, in which an EWSR1-ERG translocation was detected during next generation sequencing using a hybrid capture approach, leading to a revised diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma. The role of translocation detection in these assays is also discussed.

  15. Rare case of breast tumor secondary to rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Lisette Delgado; Chelliah, Thandavababu; Meisher, Irina; Niranjan, Selvanayagam

    2008-10-01

    Primary breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Metastatic cancer to the breast is very rare. Colorectal cancers usually metastasize to the liver and the lung; other sites of metastasis from colon cancer are uncommon and are usually found in association with extensive liver and/or lung metastases. This is a report of a rare case of aggressive rectal cancer with metastasis to the breast without liver or lung metastases.

  16. Low thrombospondin 2 expression is predictive of low tumor regression after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yih; Chang, I-Wei; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Li, Chien-Feng; Lee, Sung-Wei; Lin, Li-Ching; Lee, Ying-En; He, Hong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay of treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Several heparin-binding associated proteins have been reported to play a critical role in cancer progression. However, the clinical relevancies of such proteins and their associations with CCRT response in rectal cancer have not yet to be fully elucidated. Methods: The analysis of a public transcriptome of rectal cancer indicated that thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) is a predictive factor for CCRT response. Immunohistochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate the expression of THBS2 in pretreatment biopsy specimens from rectal cancer patients without distant metastasis. Furthermore, the relationships between THBS2 expression and various clinicopathological factors or survival were analyzed. Results: Low expression of THBS2 was significantly associated with advanced pretreatment tumor (P<0.001) and nodal status (P=0.004), post-treatment tumor (P<0.001) and nodal status (P<0.001), increased vascular invasion (P=0.003), increased perineural invasion (P=0.023) and inferior tumor regression grade (P=0.015). In univariate analysis, low THBS2 expression predicted worse outcomes for disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival and metastasis-free survival (all P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, low expression of THBS2 still served as a negative prognostic factor for disease-free survival (Hazard ratio=3.057, P=0.002) and metastasis-free survival (Hazard ratio=3.362, P=0.012). Conclusion: Low THBS2 expression was correlated with advanced disease status and low tumor regression after preoperative CCRT and that it acted as an independent negative prognostic factor in rectal cancer. THBS2 may represent a predictive biomarker for CCRT response in rectal cancer. PMID:26807188

  17. [Clinical and histopathological results after the neo-adjuvant treatment of advanced rectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Varga, László; Baradnay, Gellért; Hohn, József; Simonka, Zsolt; Hideghéthy, Katalin; Maráz, Anikó; Nikolényi, Alíz; Veréb, Blanka; Tiszlavicz, László; Németh, István; Mán, Eszter; Lázár, György

    2010-06-01

    The role of the surgical intervention is decisive in treating colorectal tumors. The neo-adjuvant radio-chemotherapy has improved the efficacy of the treatment of advanced rectum tumors. In order to decrease the size and stage of advanced rectal carcinoma and to increase the rate of resecability, we introduced neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. We carried out neo-adjuvant and surgical treatment in case of 67 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma (T 2-4 N 1-2 M 0 ) between June 1, 2005 and July 31, 2008. The average age of the patients was 61.2 years, the division according to sex was 44 males/23 females. Regarding the local stage of the rectal process or the proximity to the sphincter, we applied radio-chemotherapy (radiotherapy 25 times altogether 45 Gy and on the first and last week for 5-5 days they received 350 mg/m 2 /day 5-FU and 20 mg/m 2 /day leucovorin chemotherapy, recently complemented with 3 x 1.8 Gy advanced boost radiation aiming at the macroscopic tumor site with security zone). Patients underwent surgery 8 weeks on average after restaging examinations. Thirty-eight patients underwent anterior rectal resection with double stapler procedure; there were 18 abdominoperineal rectal extirpations, 7 Hartmann operations and 4 per annum excisions. Compared to the preoperative staging, the histological evaluation of the resected specimens showed total remission (pT 0 N 0 ) in 11% and partial remission in 43%. The morbidity necessitating reoperation was 5.9%, without mortality and suture insufficiency. The long-term neo-adjuvant oncological treatment led to down-staging of rectal tumors in most cases and increased the resecability and rate of resection operations.

  18. Carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Anne Marie C

    2014-11-01

    The patient, C.P., is a 59-year-old woman who was diagnosed with metastatic carcinoid of the terminal ileum in May 2003. In June 2003, she underwent an extensive resection including hemicolectomy, cholecystectomy, distal pancreatectomy, and splenectomy with metastatic disease in her pancreas, mesentery, and liver. She had been treated with octreotide, everolimus, oxaliplatin, and multiple hepatic artery embolizations in the past eight years and, most recently, capecitabine and bevacizumab with monthly octreotide. She has had intermittent pleural effusions not requiring intervention and a trace pericardial effusion. Her tumor is functional, meaning it demonstrates hormonal hypersecretion which causes flushing, diarrhea, bronchospasm, and abdominal pain.

  19. Perforated Meckel's diverticulum containing a carcinoid tumor successfully treated by the laparoscopic approach: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Curbelo-Peña, Yuhamy; Dardano-Berriel, Juan; Guedes-De la Puente, Xavier; Saladich-Cubero, Maria; Stickar, Tomas; De Caralt-Mestres, Enric

    2016-01-01

    Mekel's diverticulum is a gastrointestinal malformation. Occurs in one of every 40 patients. It is usually asymptomatic whereas complications can be developed in 2% to 4%. The report is based on a 41-year old male, who attended to emergency, complaining of right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Blood tests showed high level of inflammatory markers. With acute appendicitis as presumptive diagnosis, laparoscopy was performed. The intraoperative findings were: a perforated Mekel's diverticulum with normal cecal appendix. Mechanical diverticular resection was made. The patient was successfully recovered from surgery. Histopathology examination showed: Meckel's diverticulum perforated with acute inflammation and neuroendocrine tumor (G1) pT1. Mekel's diverticulum is rarely affected by inflammatory complications and just few cases are associated with tumors. However, has ever been described before, coexisting both situations, being our patient the first reported with this exceptional clinical presentation, and treated successfully by laparoscopic approach. PMID:27251847

  20. Is endoscopic ultrasonography essential for endoscopic resection of small rectal neuroendocrine tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Bum; Kim, Dong Jun; Kim, Hyung Wook; Choi, Cheol Woong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Su Jin; Nam, Hyeong Seok

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the importance of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for small (≤ 10 mm) rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) treatment. METHODS Patients in whom rectal NETs were diagnosed by endoscopic resection (ER) at the Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital between 2008 and 2014 were included in this study. A total of 120 small rectal NETs in 118 patients were included in this study. Histologic features and clinical outcomes were analyzed, and the findings of endoscopy, EUS and histology were compared. RESULTS The size measured by endoscopy was not significantly different from that measured by EUS and histology (r = 0.914 and r = 0.727 respectively). Accuracy for the depth of invasion was 92.5% with EUS. No patients showed invasion of the muscularis propria or metastasis to the regional lymph nodes. All rectal NETs were classified as grade 1 and demonstrated an L-cell phenotype. Mean follow-up duration was 407.54 ± 374.16 d. No patients had local or distant metastasis during the follow-up periods. CONCLUSION EUS is not essential for ER in the patient with small rectal NETs because of the prominent morphology and benign behavior. PMID:28373770

  1. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery for Patients With Rectal Tumors: A Single Institution's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kilius, Alfredas; Petrulis, Kestutis; Samalavicius, Narimantas E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to look at our complication rates and recurrence rates, as well as the need for further radical surgery, in treating patients with benign and early malignant rectal tumors by using transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). Methods Our study included 130 patients who had undergone TEM for rectal adenomas and early rectal cancer from December 2009 to December 2015 at the Department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Lithuania. Patients underwent digital and endoscopic evaluation with multiple biopsies. For preoperative staging, pelvic magnetic resonance imaging or endorectal ultrasound was performed. We recorded the demographics, operative details, final pathologies, postoperative lengths of hospital stay, postoperative complications, and recurrences. Results The average tumor size was 2.8 ± 1.5 cm (range, 0.5–8.3 cm). 102 benign (78.5%) and 28 malignant tumors (21.5%) were removed. Of the latter, 23 (82.1%) were pT1 cancers and 5 (17.9%) pT2 cancers. Of the 5 patients with pT2 cancer, 2 underwent adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, 1 underwent an abdominoperineal resection, 1 refused further treatment and 1 was lost to follow up. No intraoperative complications occurred. In 7 patients (5.4%), postoperative complications were observed: urinary retention (4 patients, 3.1%), postoperative hemorrhage (2 patients, 1.5%), and wound dehiscence (1 patient, 0.8%). All complications were treated conservatively. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 2.3 days. Conclusion TEM in our experience demonstrated low complication and recurrence rates. This technique is recommended for treating patients with a rectal adenoma and early rectal cancer and has good prognosis. PMID:28289660

  2. Rectal carcinoma with metachronous metastasis to the extrahepatic bile duct without liver tumor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Kobayashi, Ryu; Kato, Shingo; Watanabe, Seitaro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Shimamura, Takeshi; Kubota, Kensuke; Maeda, Shin; Nakajima, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Oshiro, Hisashi; Endo, Itaru

    2011-08-01

    In July 2003, a 63-year-old man received a low anterior resection for rectal cancer. In February 2006, he underwent a right hepatectomy for a solitary metastatic liver tumor; the liver tumor had not invaded the bile duct, and a curative resection was performed. In August 2008, an enhanced computed tomography examination revealed a massive focal lesion at the point of the common bile duct. Endoscopic ultrasonography clearly revealed a hyperechoic polypoid lesion that had spread laterally on the surface of the slightly dilated bile duct and had a smooth outer hyperechoic layer. No lymph nodes were present in this region. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed an irregular stricture, and a biopsy was performed through the scope. Microscopic examination revealed a tumor characterized as a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma resembling the liver tumor. We diagnosed the intrabiliary tumor as a metachronous metastatic bile duct tumor from rectal cancer without involvement of the liver parenchyma. This is a very rare case, with recurrence only in an extrahepatic bile duct after the complete resection of a metastatic liver tumor. This is the first clinical, pathological, and radiological description of this rare condition.

  3. Predictive Factors of Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Farnault, Bertrand; de Chaisemartin, Cecile; Esterni, Benjamin; Lelong, Bernard; Viret, Frederic; Giovannini, Marc; Monges, Genevieve; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Bories, Erwan; Turrini, Olivier; Viens, Patrice; Salem, Naji

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery is the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to correlate tumor response to survival and to identify predictive factors for tumor response after chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2008, 168 patients with histologically proven locally advanced adenocarcinoma treated by preoperative chemoradiation before total mesorectal excision were retrospectively studied. They received a radiation dose of 45 Gy with a concomitant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. Analysis of tumor response was based on lowering of the T stage between pretreatment endorectal ultrasound and pathologic specimens. Overall and progression-free survival rates were correlated with tumor response. Tumor response was analyzed with predictive factors. Results: The median follow-up was 34 months. Five-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were, of 44.4% and 74.5% in the whole population, 83.4% and 83.4%, respectively, in patients with pathological complete response, 38.6% and 71.9%, respectively, in patients with tumor downstaging, and 29.1and 58.9% respectively, in patients with absence of response. A pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level of <5 ng/ml was significantly independently associated with pathologic complete tumor response (p = 0.019). Pretreatment small tumor size (p = 0.04), pretreatment CEA level of <5 ng/ml (p = 0.008), and chemotherapy with capecitabine (vs. 5-FU) (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with tumor downstaging. Conclusions: Downstaging and complete response after CRT improved progression-free survival and overall survival of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. In multivariate analysis, a pretreatment CEA level of <5 ng/ml was associated with complete tumor response. Thus, small tumor size, a pretreatment CEA level of < 5ng/ml, and use of capecitabine were associated with tumor downstaging.

  4. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate Measured by Magnetic Resonance Volumetry Correlated With Pathologic Tumor Response of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlates with the pathologic tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 405 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-T4) who had undergone preoperative CRT and radical proctectomy. The tumor volume was measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry before and after CRT but before surgery. We analyzed the correlation between the TVRR and the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and tumor regression grade (TRG). Downstaging was defined as ypStage 0-I (ypT0-T2N0M0), and the TRG proposed by Dworak et al. was used. Results: The mean TVRR was 65.0% {+-} 22.3%. Downstaging and complete regression occurred in 167 (41.2%) and 58 (14.3%) patients, respectively. The TVRRs according to ypT classification (ypT0-T2 vs. ypT3-T4), ypN classification (ypN0 vs. ypN1-N2), downstaging (ypStage 0-I vs. ypStage II-III), good regression (TRG 3-4 vs. TRG 1-2), and complete regression (TRG 4 vs. TRG 1-3) were all significantly different (p <.05). When the TVRR was categorized into three groups (<60%, 60-80%, and >80%), the rates of ypT0-T2, ypN0, downstaging, and good regression were all significantly greater for patients with a TVRR of {>=}60%, as was the complete regression rate for patients with a TVRR >80% (p <.05). Conclusion: The TVRR measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlated significantly with the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and TRG after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  5. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  6. Clinical Parameters Predicting Pathologic Tumor Response After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Dae Yong Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin; Koom, Woong Sub; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To identify pretreatment clinical parameters that could predict pathologic tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study involved 351 patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery between October 2001 and July 2006. Tumor responses to preoperative CRT were assessed in terms of tumor downstaging and tumor regression. Statistical analyses were performed to identify clinical factors associated with pathologic tumor response. Results: Tumor downstaging (defined as ypT2 or less) was observed in 167 patients (47.6%), whereas tumor regression (defined as Dworak's Regression Grades 3 or 4) was observed in 103 patients (29.3%) and complete regression in 51 patients (14.5%). Multivariate analysis found that predictors of downstaging were pretreatment hemoglobin level (p = 0.045), cN0 classification (p < 0.001), and serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (p < 0.001), that predictors of tumor regression were cN0 classification (p = 0.044) and CEA level (p < 0.001), and that the predictor of complete regression was CEA level (p = 0.004). Conclusions: The data suggest that pretreatment CEA level is the most important clinical predictor of pathologic tumor response. It may be of benefit in the selection of treatment options as well as the assessment of individual prognosis.

  7. Transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging measurement of extramural tumor spread in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rafaelsen, Søren R; Vagn-Hansen, Chris; Sørensen, Torben; Pløen, John; Jakobsen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the agreement between transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in classification of ≥ T3 rectal tumors. METHODS: From January 2010 to January 2012, 86 consecutive patients with ≥ T3 tumors were included in this study. The mean age of the patients was 66.4 years (range: 26-91 years). The tumors were all ≥ T3 on TRUS. The sub-classification was defined by the penetration of the rectal wall: a: 0 to 1 mm; b: 1-5 mm; c: 6-15; d: > 15 mm. Early tumors as ab (≤ 5 mm) and advanced tumors as cd (> 5 mm). All patients underwent TRUS using a 6.5 MHz transrectal transducer. The MRI was performed with a 1.5 T Philips unit. The TRUS findings were blinded to the radiologist performing the interpretation of the MRI images and measuring the depth of extramural tumor spread. RESULTS: TRUS found 51 patients to have an early ≥ T3 tumors and 35 to have an advanced tumor, whereas MRI categorized 48 as early ≥ T3 tumors and 38 as advanced tumors. No patients with tumors classified as advanced by TRUS were found to be early on MRI. The kappa value in classifying early versus advanced T3 rectal tumors was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.85-1.00). We found a kappa value of 0.74 (95% CI: 0.63-0.86) for the total sub-classification between the two methods. The mean maximal tumor outgrowth measured by TRUS, 5.5 mm ± 5.63 mm and on MRI, 6.3 mm ± 6.18 mm, P = 0.004. In 19 of the 86 patients the following CT scan or surgery revealed distant metastases; of the 51 patients in the ultrasound ab group three (5.9%) had metastases, whereas 16 (45.7%) of 35 in the cd group harbored distant metastases, P = 0.00002. The odds ratio of having distant metastases in the ultrasound cd group compared to the ab group was 13.5 (95% CI: 3.5-51.6), P = 0.00002. The mean maximal ultrasound measured outgrowth was 4.3 mm (95% CI: 3.2-5.5 mm) in patients without distant metastases, while the mean maximal outgrowth was 9.5 mm (95% CI: 6.2-12.8 mm) in the patients with metastases

  8. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, < 5 cm from anal verge; and patients facing tumors with enlarged nodes and/or CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  9. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  10. Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma in a patient with rectal laterally spreading tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, MIN; YIN, LINGDI; YAO, YULING; WANG, LEI; XU, GUIFANG; ZHANG, XIAOQI; LV, YING; SUN, QI; FAN, XIANGSHAN; ZOU, XIAOPING

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma (LELGC) is a rare neoplasm of the stomach that accounts for 1–4% of all gastric cancer cases. It is characterized by the presence of a lymphoid stroma with cells arranged primarily in micro alveolar, thin trabecular and primitive tubular patterns or isolated cells. In the present study, the case of a 50-year-old male patient with LELGC and rectal laterally spreading tumor is presented. Following endoscopic submucosal dissection, a diagnosis of carcinoma was reached and the patient underwent total radical gastrectomy. The postoperative pathological stage was IA T1bN0cM0 according to the Tumor-Node-Metastasis classification of gastric carcinoma, and the patient recovered well. The present case is reported to summarize the endoscopic and pathological characteristics of LELGC. PMID:27073504

  11. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a predictor of tumor downstaging in locally advanced rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun-Sang . E-mail: k423j@cnu.ac.kr; Kim, Jin-Man; Li, Shengjin; Yoon, Wan-Hee; Song, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Yeo, Seung-Gu; Nam, Ji Sook; Cho, Moon-June

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively whether levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression can predict tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 183 patients with rectal cancer (cT3-T4 or N+) were enrolled in this study. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy consisted of 50.4 Gy of pelvic radiation with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin bolus intravenous chemotherapy in 94 patients or oral capecitabine and leucovorin in 89 patients. EGFR expression in pretreatment paraffin-embedded tumor biopsy specimens was assessed by immunohistochemistry. EGFR expression was determined from the intensity and extent of staining. Tumor downstaging was defined as a reduction of at least one T-stage level. Results: Tumor downstaging occurred in 97 patients (53%), and the tumors showed a pathologic complete response in 27 patients (15%). Positive EGFR expression was observed in 140 (76%) of 183 patients. EGFR expression levels were low in 113 patients (62%) and high in 70 patients (38%). On logistic regression analysis, the significant predictive factor for increased tumor downstaging was a low level of EGFR expression and preoperative chemotherapy using oral capecitabine (odds ratio, 0.437; p 0.012 vs. odds ratio, 3.235; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: A high level of EGFR expression may be a significant predictive molecular marker for decreased tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

  13. A comparative study of volumetric analysis, histopathologic downstaging, and tumor regression grade in evaluating tumor response in locally advanced rectal cancer following preoperative chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nam Kyu . E-mail: namkyuk@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Hogeun; Seong, Jinsil; Keum, Ki Chang; Rha, Sun Young; Chung, Hyun Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare tumor volume reduction rate, histopathologic downstaging, and tumor regression grade (TRG) among tumor responses in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between 2002 and 2004, 30 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer underwent preoperative CRT, followed by surgical resection. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed before and after CRT. Histopathologic tumor staging and tumor regression were reviewed. We compared pre- and post-CRT tumor volume and percent of volume reduction, according to histopathologic downstaging and TRG. Results: The tumor volume reduction rates ranged from 14.6% to 100%. Mean pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were significantly smaller in patients who showed T downstaging than in those who did not (p 0.040, 0.014). The mean tumor volume reduction was 66.4% vs. 55.2% (p 0.361). However, the mean pre- and post-CRT tumor volume and mean tumor volume reduction rate between patients who showed N downstaging and those who did not were not statistically different (p = 0.176, 0.767, and 0.899). With respect to TRG, the mean pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were not statistically significant (p = 0.108, 0.708, and 0.120). Conclusion: Tumor volume reduction rate does not correlate with histopathologic downstaging and TRG. It might be hazardous to evaluate tumor response with respect to volume reduction and to select the surgical method on this basis.

  14. Invasive atypical thymic carcinoid: three case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shan; Wang, Zhong-Tang; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zong, Shi-Xiang; Li, Bao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Atypical thymic carcinoid is an extremely rare thymic neuroendocrine tumor derived from the neuroendocrine system. The aims of this paper were to investigate the clinical features of atypical thymic carcinoid and collate information and experience to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. We describe three cases of atypical carcinoid of the thymus; clinical features, pathological data, treatment modalities, and short-term patient outcomes were summarized and analyzed. The initial clinical symptoms and signs of all three patients were nonspecific and an anterior mediastinal mass was found in each patient on chest computed tomography scan. All three patients underwent surgical resection (total thymectomy and complete excision of the tumor), followed by postoperative radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. The diagnoses of three patients were confirmed by pathological and immunohistochemical evaluation. We also present a review of the literature to collate as much information as possible and provide a reference for proper diagnosis and treatment of atypical thyroid carcinoid. PMID:27785065

  15. Pre-surgical bronchoscopic treatment for typical endobronchial carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Carmine; Mazzarella, Gennaro; De Rosa, Nicolina; Cesaro, Cristiano; La Cerra, Giuseppe; Grella, Edoardo; Perrotta, Fabio; Curcio, Carlo; Guerra, Germano; Bianco, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Carcinoids are tumors that originate from diffuse neuroendocrine system cells (APUD cells) and represent 1-2% of all pulmonary tumors. Although surgical resection remains the mainstay of treatment, bronchoscopic radical resection of typical carcinoids in selected cases exhibiting endoluminal growth and small implant base has also been explored. Bronchoscopic removal of endobronchial lesions may also reduce the risk of post-obstructive infections and improve pulmonary function, allowing the patient to undergo surgery in better clinical and respiratory state. In this paper we have evaluated the impact on surgical planning and outcome of preoperative bronchoscopic resection in treatment of endobronchial typical carcinoids. Our observations further support the role of bronchoscopic treatment before surgery in endobronchial typical carcinoids.

  16. Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rectal cancer and its correlation with tumor differentiation

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, FU; LU, JIANPING; CHEN, LUGUANG; WANG, ZHEN; CHEN, YUKUN

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a novel imaging modality that can be used to reflect the microcirculation, although its value in diagnosing rectal cancer is unknown. The present study aimed to explore the clinical application of DCE-MRI in the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer, and its correlation with tumor differentiation. To achieve this, 40 pathologically confirmed patients with rectal cancer and 15 controls were scanned using DCE-MRI. The Tofts model was applied to obtain the perfusion parameters, including the plasma to extravascular volume transfer (Ktrans), the extravascular to plasma volume transfer (Kep), the extravascular fluid volume (Ve) and the initial area under the enhancement curve (iAUC). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to determine the diagnostic value. The results demonstrated that the time-signal intensity curve of the rectal cancer lesion exhibited an outflow pattern. The Ktrans, Kep, Ve, and iAUC values were higher in the cancer patients compared with controls (P<0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficients of Ktrans, Kep, Ve and iAUC, as measured by two independent radiologists, were 0.991, 0.988, 0.972 and 0.984, respectively (all P<0.001), indicating a good consistency. The areas under the ROC curves for Ktrans and iAUC were both >0.9, resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 93.3% for Ktrans, and of 92.5%, and 93.3% or 100%, for iAUC, respectively. In the 40 rectal cancer cases, there was a moderate correlation between Ktrans and iAUC, and pathological differentiation (0.3rectal cancer and differentiation, and therefore may provide novel insights into the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer. PMID:27073650

  17. Association Between the Cytogenetic Profile of Tumor Cells and Response to Preoperative Radiochemotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    González-González, María; Garcia, Jacinto; Alcazar, José A.; Gutiérrez, María L.; Gónzalez, Luis M.; Bengoechea, Oscar; Abad, María M.; Santos-Briz, Angel; Blanco, Oscar; Martín, Manuela; Rodríguez, Ana; Fuentes, Manuel; Muñoz-Bellvis, Luis; Orfao, Alberto; Sayagues, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy to locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients has proven efficient in a high percentage of cases. Despite this, some patients show nonresponse or even disease progression. Recent studies suggest that different genetic alterations may be associated with sensitivity versus resistance of rectal cancer tumor cells to neoadjuvant therapy. We investigated the relationship between intratumoral pathways of clonal evolution as assessed by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (51 different probes) and response to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy, evaluated by Dworak criteria in 45 rectal cancer tumors before (n = 45) and after (n = 31) treatment. Losses of chromosomes 1p (44%), 8p (53%), 17p (47%), and 18q (38%) and gains of 1q (49%) and 13q (75%) as well as amplification of 8q (38%) and 20q (47%) chromosomal regions were those specific alterations found at higher frequencies. Significant association (P < 0.05) was found between alteration of 1p, 1q, 11p, 12p, and 17p chromosomal regions and degree of response to neoadjuvant therapy. A clear association was observed between cytogenetic profile of the ancestral tumor cell clone and response to radiochemotherapy; cases presenting with del(17p) showed a poor response to neoadjuvant treatment (P = 0.03), whereas presence of del(1p) was more frequently observed in responder patients (P = 0.0002). Moreover, a significantly higher number of copies of chromosomes 8q (P = 0.004), 13q (P = 0.003), and 20q (P = 0.002) were found after therapy versus paired pretreatment rectal cancer samples. Our results point out the existence of an association between tumor cytogenetics and response to neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. Further studies in larger series of patients are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:25474426

  18. Mismatch Repair Gene Expression as a Predictor of Tumor Responses in Patients With Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Seok Hyung; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the predictive and prognostic value of expression of mismatch repair (MMR) protein, including MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 in rectal cancer patients with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. MMR protein expression was measured by immunohistochemistry in both pretreatment biopsies (pre-) and pathologic specimens (post-) from 209 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy and radical surgery. The patients were followed for a median period of 44 months. A pathologic complete response (pCR) was observed in 30 patients (14.4%). The expression levels of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 were not significantly different between the pCR and non-pCR groups. A multivariate analysis revealed that tumor differentiation, postoperative chemotherapy, and pre-MSH6 expression were independent predictors of overall survival; ypN category and perineural invasion were independent predictors of disease-free survival. The pre-MSH6 expression was significantly associated with tumor budding and expression of all MMR proteins. On multivariate analysis, ypN category and post-MSH6 expression were independent predictors for local recurrence. In our study, we observed the independent prognostic value of MSH6 expression in pretreatment tissue on overall survival and MSH6 expression after chemoradiation on local recurrence. Constitutive MSH6 expression before and after preoperative therapy may be a useful tool for prediction of oncologic outcome in locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:26817916

  19. Tumor deposits: markers of poor prognosis in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu-Ning; Xiao, Wei-Wei; Xi, Shao-Yan; OuYang, Pu-Yun; You, Kai-Yun; Zeng, Zhi-Fan; Ding, Pei-Rong; Zhang, Hui-Zhong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Xu, Rui-Hua; Gao, Yuan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor deposits (TDs) were reported to be poor prognoses in colorectal carcinoma, but the significance in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) (T3-4/N+) following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (neo-CRT) and surgery is unclear. Since adjuvant chemotherapy showed no benefit for LARC following neo-CRT, it is of great value to investigate whether TDs can identify the subgroup of patients who may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Between 2004 and 2012, 310 LARC patients following neo-CRT and surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), distant metastasis free survival (DMFS) and local recurrence free survival (LRFS) were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test and Cox models. Results TDs-positive patients showed adverse OS, DFS and DMFS (all P≤0.001), but not LRFS (P = 0.273). In multivariate analysis, TDs continued to be associated with poor OS (HR = 2.44, 95% CI 1.32-4.4, P = 0.004) and DFS (HR = 1.99, 95% CI 1.21-3.27, P = 0.007), but not DMFS (HR = 1.77, 95% CI 0.97-3.20, P = 0.061) or LRFS (HR = 1.85, 95% CI 0.58-5.85, P = 0.298). Among TDs-positive patients, adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved OS (P = 0.045) and DMFS (P = 0.026), but not DFS (P = 0.127) or LRFS (P = 0.862). Conclusions TDs are predictive of poor survival in LARC after neo-CRT. Fortunately, TDs-positive patients appear to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26695441

  20. Nodal tumor response according to the count of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations during preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jaesung; Oh, Young-Taek; Noh, O Kyu; Chun, Mison; Park, Jun-Eun; Cho, Sung-Ran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the relationship between the circulating lymphocyte subpopulation counts during preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and tumor response in locally advanced rectal cancer. Materials and Methods From August 2015 to June 2016, 10 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by surgery were enrolled. Patients received conventional fractionated radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) with fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Surgical resection was performed at 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of preoperative CRT. The absolute blood lymphocyte subpopulation was obtained prior to and after 4 weeks of CRT. We analyzed the association between a tumor response and change in the lymphocyte subpopulation during CRT. Results Among 10 patients, 2 (20%) had evidence of pathologic complete response. In 8 patients with clinically node positive, 4 (50%) had nodal tumor response. All lymphocyte subpopulation counts at 4 weeks after CRT were significantly lower than those observed during pretreatment (p < 0.01). A high decrease in natural killer (NK) cell, count during CRT (baseline cell count − cell count at 4 weeks) was associated with node down staging (p = 0.034). Conclusion Our results suggest that the change of lymphocyte subset to preoperative CRT may be a predictive factor for tumor response in rectal cancer. PMID:27927012

  1. The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming-ming; Luo, Hui-yan; Wang, Feng-hua; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Li, Yu-hong; Xu, Rui-hua

    2016-01-01

    The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits in colorectal cancer has been widely demonstrated. However, there are still debates in the prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy. In this study, rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy followed by resection of primary tumors registered in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database from 2010-2012 were analyzed. There were 4,813 cases eligible for this study, and tumor deposits were found in 514 (10.7%) cases. The presence of tumor deposits was significantly associated with some aggressive characteristics, including poorer tumor differentiation, more advanced ypT category, ypN category and ypTNM stage, distant metastasis, elevated carcinoembryonic antigen, higher positive rates of circumferential resection margin and perineural invasion (all P < = 0.001). Tumor deposit was also an independent negative prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.25 (1.51 – 3.35)). N1c category had significant worse survival compared with N0 category (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.41 (1.24 – 4.69)). In conclusion, tumor deposit was a significant and independent prognostic factor, and the N1c category by the 7th edition of AJCC/TNM staging system was applicable in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy. PMID:27655707

  2. What Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the inhaled air into your bloodstream and pass carbon dioxide (a waste product from the body) into the ... exhale. Taking in oxygen and getting rid of carbon dioxide are your lungs’ main functions. A thin lining ...

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression correlated with tumor response in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Diclehan . E-mail: diclehan@yahoo.com; Uner, Aytug; Akyurek, Nalan; Erpolat, Petek; Dursun, Ayse; Pak, Yucel

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze whether the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors are associated with tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients who had undergone preoperative chemoradiotherapy were evaluated retrospectively. Treatment consisted of pelvic radiotherapy and two cycles of 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks later. MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry of the preradiation biopsy and surgical specimens. The intensity and extent of staining were evaluated separately, and a final score was calculated by multiplying the two scores. The primary endpoint was the correlation of expression with tumor response, with the secondary endpoint the effect of chemoradiotherapy on the expression. Results: Preoperative treatment resulted in downstaging in 20 patients (45%) and no clinical response in 24 (55%). The pathologic tumor response was complete in 11 patients (25%), partial in 23 (52%), and none in 10 (23%). Positive MMP-9 staining was observed in 20 tumors (45%) and was associated with the clinical nodal stage (p = 0.035) and the pathologic and clinical response (p < 0.0001). The staining status of the other markers was associated with neither stage nor response. The overall pathologic response rate was 25% in MMP-9-positive patients vs. 52% in MMP-9-negative patients (p = 0.001). None of the 11 patients with pathologic complete remission was MMP-9 positive. Conclusions: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression correlated with a poor tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal carcinoma patients.

  4. [A Case of Unresectable Advanced Rectal Cancer with a Pancreatic Tumor That Was Successfully Treated with FOLFIRINOX].

    PubMed

    Yabe, Nobushige; Murai, Shinji; Ozawa, Hiroki; Yokose, Takahiro; Oto, Ippei; Yoshikawa, Takahisa; Kitasato, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Hirotomo; Kojima, Kenji; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-11-01

    A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital department in September 2014 because of a positive fecal occult blood test.Colonoscopy showed a type 2 tumor in half of the AV 15 cm rectosigmoid colon.Histology of the biopsy indicated a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and the RAS gene test found wild type.On CT examination, there were multiple liver lung metastases and a 30mm diameter tumor with pancreatic duct extension to the pancreatic body.A PET-CT examination had a high SUVmax at the same site.Because of the location of the tumor EUS-FNA was not used.However, the possibility of pancreatic body cancer could not be denied after the CT examination.Treatment by radical resection was impossible because of the spread of the cancer so we selected chemotherapy.Undeniable pancreatic metastasis of rectal cancer, pancreatic cancer was used as a prognostic factor as double cancer of rectal cancer and pancreatic cancer, from that UGT1A1 test side effects appearance was a low-risk decision, was selected FOLFIRINOX in the treatment regimen.After 25 cycles, the pancreatic body tumor and liver metastases and also the primary tumor were reduced, the multiple lung metastases disappeared, and disease control was good.Side effects were diarrhea on the day of administration of irinotecan, but this was controllable by administering oral loperamide when starting the infusion.Grade 3 or more peripheral neuropathy has not developed, and this regimen is continuing.Pancreatic cancer is a solid cancer with a poor prognosis; if you do not reach the tissue diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic cancer, was a case in which no choice but to select a regimen to carcinoma of the prognostic.

  5. Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer

  6. Thymic carcinoids in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Teh, B T; Zedenius, J; Kytölä, S; Skogseid, B; Trotter, J; Choplin, H; Twigg, S; Farnebo, F; Giraud, S; Cameron, D; Robinson, B; Calender, A; Larsson, C; Salmela, P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical, pathologic, and genetic features of thymic carcinoids in the setting of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and to study means for detection and prevention of this tumor in patients with MEN1. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Thymic carcinoid is a rare malignancy, with approximately 150 cases reported to date. It may be associated with MEN1 and carries a poor prognosis, with no effective treatment. Its underlying etiology is unknown. METHODS: Ten patients with MEN1 from eight families with anterior mediastinal tumors were included in a case series study at tertiary referring hospitals. Clinicopathologic studies were done on these patients, with a review of the literature. Mutation analysis was performed on the MEN1 gene in families with clusterings of the tumor to look for genotype-phenotype correlation. Loss of heterozygosity was studied in seven cases to look for genetic abnormalities. RESULTS: Histologic studies of all tumors were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid. Clustering of this tumor was found in some of the families-three pairs of brothers and three families with first- or second-degree relatives who had thymic carcinoid. All patients described here were men, with a mean age at detection of 44 years (range 31 to 66). Most of the patients had chest pain or were asymptomatic; none had Cushing's or carcinoid syndrome. All tumors were detected by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest. The results of octreoscans performed in three patients were all positive. Histopathologic studies were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid and did not stain for ACTH. Mutation analysis of the families with clustering revealed mutations in different exons/introns of the MEN1 gene. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies of seven tumors did not show LOH in the MEN1 region, but two tumors showed LOH in the 1p region. CONCLUSIONS: MEN1-related thymic carcinoids constitute approximately 25

  7. Feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for lower rectal tumors with hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shinwa; Toyonaga, Takashi; Morita, Yoshinori; Hoshi, Namiko; Ishida, Tsukasa; Ohara, Yoshiko; Yoshizaki, Tetsuya; Kawara, Fumiaki; Umegaki, Eiji; Azuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids. METHODS: The outcome of ESD for 23 lesions with hemorrhoids (hemorrhoid group) was compared with that of 48 lesions without hemorrhoids extending to the dentate line (non-hemorrhoid group) during the same study period. RESULTS: Median operation times (ranges) in the hemorrhoid and non-hemorrhoid groups were 121 (51-390) and 130 (28-540) min. The en bloc resection rate and the curative resection rate in the hemorrhoid group were 96% and 83%, and they were 100% and 90% in the non-hemorrhoid group, respectively. In terms of adverse events, perforation and postoperative bleeding did not occur in both groups. In terms of the clinical course of hemorrhoids after ESD, the rate of complete recovery of hemorrhoids after ESD in lesions with resection of more than 90% was significantly higher than that in lesions with resection of less than 90%. CONCLUSION: ESD on lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids could be performed safely, similarly to that on rectal lesions extending to the dentate line without hemorrhoids. In addition, all hemorrhoids after ESD improved to various degrees, depending on the resection range. PMID:27468216

  8. FAIM2, as a novel diagnostic maker and a potential therapeutic target for small-cell lung cancer and atypical carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hio Chung; Kim, Jong In; Chang, Hee Kyung; Woodard, Gavitt; Choi, Young Sik; Ku, Ja-Lok; Jablons, David M.; Kim, Il-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Lung neuroendocrine (NE) tumors are a heterogeneous group of tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells that includes typical carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and large cell NE cancer. The subtyping of NE tumors is based on the number of mitoses per high powered field and the presences of necrosis. However, the best diagnostic criteria to differentiate various subtypes of lung NE tumors remains controversial and few diagnostic markers distinguish typical and atypical carcinoid. In this study, we show that FAIM2, an inhibitory molecule in the Fas-apoptosis pathway, is significantly overexpressed in SCLC compared to non-small cell lung cancer. In addition, FAIM2 expression is significantly higher in atypical carcinoid than typical carcinoid. As atypical carcinoid has been shown to have worse clinical outcomes than typical carcinoid, our data suggests that FAIM2 may be a useful diagnostic marker for atypical carcinoid. Knockdown of FAIM2 expression increases Fas-induced apoptotic cell death in SCLC cells. Etoposide treatment combined with FAIM2 inhibition also shows modest but significant reduction of viable SCLC cells. Taken together, our results suggest that FAIM2 is a potential NE tumor marker with higher expression in atypical carcinoid and SCLC, and could be a new therapeutic target for SCLC. PMID:27677402

  9. Outcome of extralevator abdominoperineal excision over conventional abdominoperineal excision for low rectal tumor: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Xu, Huirong; Shang, Zhenhua; Chen, Shouzhen; Chen, Fan; Deng, Qiming; Luo, Li; Zhu, Liang; Shi, Benkang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A meta-analysis was undertaken to provide an evidence-based basis of clinical trials comparing extralevator abdominoperineal excision with conventional abdominoperineal excision for low rectal tumor. Methods: We searched through the major medical databases such as PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, Science Citation Index, Web of Science for all published studies without any limit on language from January 2009 until January 2015. The following search terms were used: extralevator abdominoperineal excision or cylindrical abdominoperineal resection or conventional abdominoperineal excision or abdominoperineal excision or rectal cancer. Furthermore, Additional related studies were manually searched in the reference lists of all published reviews and retrieved articles. Results: In this meta-analysis, there are a total number of 1797 patients included: 1099 patients in the ELAPE group and 698 in the APE group, and there are not statistically differences between groups in CRM [RR=0.65, 95% CI (0.41, 1.04), P=0.07] and wound complications [RR=1.14, 95% CI (1.09, 1.66), P=0.45] between ELAPE and APE. However, ELAPE has a lower rate of intraoperation perforation [RR=0.44; 95% CI (0.33, 0.60); P<0.00001] and local recurrence [RR=0.45, 95% CI (0.27, 0.77), P=0.003] than APE in terms of short follow-up time. PMID:26628967

  10. High-performance size-based microdevice for the detection of circulating tumor cells from peripheral blood in rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Jia, Chunping; Huang, Ting; Sheng, Weiqi; Li, Guichao; Zhang, Honglian; Jing, Fengxiang; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Since individualized therapy becomes more and more important in the treatment of rectal cancer, an accurate and effective approach should be established in the clinical settings to help physicians to make their decisions. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), originated from either primary or metastatic cancer, could provide important information for diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. However, the implication and development of CTCs are limited due to the extreme rarity of these tumor cells. In this study we fabricated a simple and high-performance microfluidic device, which exploited numerous filtered microchannels in it to enrich the large-sized target tumor cells from whole blood. A very high CTC capture efficiency (average recovery rate: 94%) was obtained in this device at the optimum flow rate of 0.5 mL/h and channel height of 5 µm. Additionally, we used this device for detecting CTCs in 60 patients with rectal cancer. The CTC counts of rectal cancer patients were significantly higher than those in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the CTC counts detected by this device were significantly higher than those by EpCAM bead-based method for rectal cancer patients with various stage. Especially, for localized rectal cancer patients, the positive rates of samples with more than 3 CTCs per 5 mL blood by use of microdevice vs. EpCAM-based ones were 100% vs. 47%, respectively. Thus, this device provides a new and effective tool for accurate identification and measurement of CTCs in patients with rectal cancer, and has broad potential in clinical practice.

  11. Therapeutic options for gastrointestinal carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Modlin, Irvin M; Latich, Igor; Kidd, Mark; Zikusoka, Michelle; Eick, Geeta

    2006-05-01

    Although wide surgical resection is the optimal curative therapy for carcinoid tumors, in most patients the presence of metastatic disease at diagnosis usually renders excision a palliative procedure. This nevertheless decreases tumor burden, facilitates symptom control, and prevents complications caused by bleeding, perforation, or bowel obstruction resulting from fibrosis. In the stomach (types I and II) and rectum endoscopic excision may be adequate provided the lesion(s) are local. Long-term therapy is focused on symptom alleviation and improvement of quality of life using somatostatin analogues, particularly in a subcutaneous depot formulation. In some instances interferons may have a role but their usage often is associated with substantial adverse events. Conventional chemotherapy and external radiotherapy either alone or in a variety of permutations are of minimal efficacy and should be balanced against the decrease in quality of life often engendered by such agents. Hepatic metastases may be amenable to surgery, radiofrequency ablation, or embolization either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents or isotopically loaded microspheres. Rarely hepatic transplantation may be of benefit although controversy exists as to its actual use. Peptide-receptor-targeted radiotherapy for advanced disease using radiolabeled octapeptide analogs (111In/90Yt/177Lu-octreotide) appear promising but data are limited and its status remains investigational. A variety of antiangiogenesis and growth factor-targeted agents have been evaluated, but as yet have shown little promise. The keystone of current therapy remains the long-acting somatostatin analogues that alleviate symptomatology and substantially improve quality of life with minimal adverse effects.

  12. MRI Predictive Factors for Tumor Response in Rectal Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy - Implications for Induction Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Stanley K.T.; Tait, Diana

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics at baseline and following chemoradiation therapy (CRT) most strongly associated with histopathologic response were investigated and survival outcomes evaluated in accordance with imaging and pathological response. Methods and Materials: Responders were defined as mrT3c/d-4 downstaged to ypT0-2 on pathology or low at risk mrT2 downstaged to ypT1 or T0. Multivariate logistic regression of baseline and posttreatment MRI: T, N, extramural venous invasion (EMVI), circumferential resection margin, craniocaudal length <5 cm, and MRI tumor height ≤5 cm were used to identify independent predictor(s) for response. An association between induction chemotherapy and EMVI status was analyzed. Survival outcomes for pathologic and MRI responders and nonresponders were analyzed. Results: Two hundred eighty-one patients were eligible; 114 (41%) patients were pathology responders. Baseline MRI negative EMVI (odds ratio 2.94, P=.007), tumor height ≤5 cm (OR 1.96, P=.02), and mrEMVI status change (positive to negative) following CRT (OR 3.09, P<.001) were the only predictors for response. There was a strong association detected between induction chemotherapy and ymrEMVI status change after CRT (OR 9.0, P<.003). ymrT0-2 gave a positive predictive value of 80% and OR of 9.1 for ypT0-2. ymrN stage accuracy of ypN stage was 75%. Three-year disease-free survival for pathology and MRI responders were similar at 80% and 79% and significantly better than poor responders. Conclusions: Tumor height and mrEMVI status are more important than baseline size and stage of the tumor as predictors of response to CRT. Both MRI- and pathologic-defined responders have significantly improved survival. “Good response” to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer with ypT0-2 carries significantly better 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival. Use of induction chemotherapy for improving mrEMVI status and knowledge of MRI

  13. Distinct patterns of chronic gastritis associated with carcinoid and cancer and their role in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Solcia, E.; Rindi, G.; Fiocca, R.; Villani, L.; Buffa, R.; Ambrosiani, L.; Capella, C.

    1992-01-01

    A series of 60 gastric endocrine tumors comprised 44 body-fundus argyrophil carcinoids, of which 23 arose in a background of hypergastrinemia and type A chronic atrophic gastritis (A-CAG), mainly with histologic patterns suggestive of an autoimmune process. Only 22 percent (compared with 19 percent of 58 tumor-free A-CAG cases) of 36 carcinoids and 21 percent of 19 A-CAG carcinoids investigated had Helicobacter pylori (HP) colonization, against 50 percent of 14 CAG-associated neuroendocrine carcinomas or mixed endocrine-exocrine tumors, 84 percent of 150 cases with early gastric cancer (p < 0.001 versus carcinoids), mostly with B- or AB-type CAG, 76 percent of 97 tumor-free AB-CAG, and 95 percent of 151 tumor-free B-CAG cases. Secondary hypergastrinemia and local mechanisms activated by chronic autoimmune gastritis are among factors involved in the pathogenesis of relatively indolent CAG-associated carcinoids, whereas active HP gastritis in cooperation with environmental carcinogens may likely cause more severe epithelial transformation, leading to ordinary cancer and, possibly, to neuroendocrine carcinomas or mixed endocrine-exocrine tumors. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:1341079

  14. Cytohistology of papillary carcinoid and emerging concept of pulmonary neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Grace C H

    2016-01-01

    This timely review starts by reporting the clinical, cytologic and histologic features of a morphologic variant of pulmonary carcinoid tumor forming exclusively of papillae. This growth pattern is so rare that it was not included in 2014 WHO classification of pulmonary neuroendocrine neoplasms. The current concept is reviewed, and example of spindle cell carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, and small cell carcinoma are illustrated with fine needle aspiration cytology, surgical and clinical follow-up. Finally, the new findings in cell biology and molecular biology that led to the emerging concept that carcinoids and high-grade neuroendocrine lung carcinomas are separate biological entities are reviewed and summarized in a tumorigenic module.

  15. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  16. Different optical spectral characteristics in a necrotic transmissible venereal tumor and a cystic lesion in the same canine prostate observed by triple-band trans-rectal optical tomography under trans-rectal ultrasound guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhen; Holyoak, G. Reed; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Rock, Kendra; Ownby, Charlotte L.; Slobodov, Gennady; Bunting, Charles F.; Piao, Daqing

    2011-03-01

    Different optical spectral characteristics were observed in a necrotic transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) and a cystic lesion in the same canine prostate by triple-wavelength trans-rectal optical tomography under trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance. The NIR imager acquiring at 705nm, 785nm and 808nm was used to quantify both the total hemoglobin concentration (HbT) and oxygen saturation (StO2) in the prostate. The TVT tumor in the canine prostate as a model of prostate cancer was induced in a 7-year old, 27 kg dog. A 2 mL suspension of 2.5x106 cells/mL of homogenized TVT cells recovered from an in vivo subcutaneously propagated TVT tumor in an NOD/SCID mouse were injected in the cranial aspect of the right lobe of the canine prostate. The left lobe of the prostate had a cystic lesion present before TVT inoculation. After the TVT homogenate injection, the prostate was monitored weekly over a 9-week period, using trans-rectal NIR and TRUS in grey-scale and Doppler. A TVT mass within the right lobe developed a necrotic center during the later stages of this study, as the mass presented with substantially increased [HbT] in the periphery, with an area of reduced StO2 less than the area of the mass itself shown on ultrasonography. Conversely, the cystic lesion presented with slightly increased [HbT] in the periphery of the lesion shown on ultrasound with oxygen-reduction inside and in the periphery of the lesion. There was no detectable change of blood flow on Doppler US in the periphery of the cystic lesion. The slightly increased [HbT] in the periphery of the cystic lesion was correlated with intra-lesional hemorrhage upon histopathologic examination.

  17. Bilateral Choroidal Metastases from Endobronchial Carcinoid Treated with Somatostatin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyn, Deborah; Lamont, Jan; Vanderstraeten, Erik; Van Belle, Simon; Platteau, Elise; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Hoornaert, Kristien P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe a patient with bilateral multifocal choroidal metastases from an endobronchial carcinoid treated with a somatostatin analogue. Method: A 60-year-old woman presenting with photopsia in the left eye underwent an extensive ophthalmic examination, including fluorescein angiography, OCT and ultrasound. Results: Fundoscopy revealed a small retinal tear in the left eye, for which she received laser treatment. In addition, choroidal masses were detected in both eyes. Her medical history of a pneumectomy for a bronchial carcinoid six years earlier together with recent elevated chromogranin A blood levels prompted a diagnosis of choroidal metastases. Subsequently, a Gallium-68 DOTANOC positron emitting tomography/computer tomography scan revealed a spinal cord metastasis and mediastinal as well as mesenterial lymph node invasion. Systemic treatment with Sandostatin®, a somatostatin analogue was started. Up until two years after the initial presentation and treatment, these choroidal lesions remained stable without any signs of growth. Conclusion: Endobronchial carcinoid tumors have an indolent nature and long-term follow-up is recommended for early detection of metastases. Although treatment with somatostatin analogues rarely induces complete tumor regression, tumor stabilization and prevention of symptoms related to hormone secretion is achieved. This well-tolerated systemic treatment provides a worthy alternative treatment for choroidal metastasis compared to classic radiotherapy without any risk of radiation or laser-related visual loss. PMID:27843513

  18. Less than 12 lymph nodes in the surgical specimen after neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy: an indicator of tumor regression in locally advanced rectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Gurawalia, Jaiprakash; Nayak, Sandeep P.; Kurpad, Vishnu; Pandey, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of lymph node retrieved in the surgical specimen is important for tumor staging and has paramount impact on prognosis in colorectal cancer and imitates the adequacy of lymph node surgical clearance. The paucity of lymph node yields in patients undergoing resection after preoperative chemo radiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer has seen. Lower total number of lymph nodes in the total mesoractal excision (TME) specimen after CRT, could a marker of better tumor response. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the prospectively managed data of patients underwent excision for rectal cancer, who treated by neoadjuvant radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. From 2010 to 2014, 364 patients underwent rectal cancer surgery, of which ninety-one treated with neoadjuvant treatment. Standard surgical and pathological protocols were followed. Patients were categorized into two groups based on the number of total harvested lymph nodes with group 1, having 12 or more nodes harvested, and group 2 including patients who had <12 lymph nodes harvested. The total number of lymph nodes retrieved from the surgical specimen was correlated with grade of tumor regression with neoadjuvant treatment. Results Out of 91 patients, 38 patients (42%) had less than 12 lymph nodes examined in specimen. The difference in median number of lymph nodes was observed significantly as 9 (range, 2–11) versus 16 (range, 12–32), in group 2 and 1, respectively (P<0.01). Patients with fewer lymph node group were comparable with respect to age, BMI, pre-operative staging, neoadjuvant treatment. Pathological complete response in tumor pCR was seen with significantly higher rate (40% vs. 26%, P<0.05) in group 2. As per Mandard criteria, there was significant difference in tumor regression grade (TRG) between both the groups (P<0.05). Among patients with metastatic lymph nodes, median LNR was lower in <12 lymph nodes group at 0.167 (range, 0.09–0.45) versus

  19. Olanzapine and Betamethasone Are Effective for the Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting due to Metastatic Brain Tumors of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, M.; Komuro, K.; Ohara, K.

    2014-01-01

    Brain lesions originating from metastasis of colorectal cancer represent 3–5% of all brain metastases and are relatively rare. Of all distant metastases of colorectal cancer, those to the liver are detected in 22–29% of cases, while those to the lungs are detected in 8–18% of cases. In contrast, brain metastasis is quite rare, with a reported incidence ranging from 0.4 to 1.8%. Treatments for metastatic brain tumors include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and supportive care with steroids, etc. Untreated patients exhibit a median survival of only approximately 1 month. The choice of treatment for brain metastasis depends on the number of lesions, the patient's general condition, nerve findings and presence of other metastatic lesions. We herein report the case of a 78-year-old male who presented with brain metastases originating from rectal carcinoma. He suffered from nausea, vomiting, anorexia and vertigo during body movement. He received antiemetics, glycerol and whole brain radiation therapy; however, these treatments proved ineffective. Olanzapine therapy was started at a dose of 1.25 mg every night. The persistent nausea disappeared the next day, and the frequency of vomiting subsequently decreased. The patient was able to consume solid food. Olanzapine is an antipsychotic that has recently been used as palliative therapy for refractory nausea and vomiting in patients receiving chemotherapy. We consider that olanzapine was helpful as a means of supportive care for the treatment of nausea and vomiting due to brain metastasis. PMID:24574944

  20. Long-term Effect of Radiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients with Mucinous Tumor: A Large Population Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xu; Jia, Senhao; Chen, Wei; Jiang, Zheng; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yinggang; Wang, Guiyu; Wang, Xishan

    2017-01-01

    Due to distinct biological behavior of mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) and signet ring cell cancer (SRC), the efficacy of radiotherapy on long-term outcome for rectal cancer (RC) patients with mucinous tumors is still unclear. Here, we identified 1808 RC patients with MAC/SRC from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results (SEER) database from 2004 to 2013. Patients were divided into two subgroups according to different therapeutic strategies, including surgery alone and surgery combined with radiotherapy. Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox regression models were used to access the influence of therapeutic strategy on long-term survival outcomes. The 5-year and 10-year cancer specific survival (CSS) were improved in stage II and III patients who underwent surgery and radiotherapy compared with patients who underwent surgery alone. These results were further confirmed following propensity score matching. In addition, radiotherapy was deemed as independent good prognostic factor in patient with MAC/SRC. In subgroup analysis, the result also demonstrated that long-term survival was improved following radiotherapy. However, there was no prognostic difference between preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy. In conclusion, radiotherapy could improve survival for RC patients with MAC and SRC, but only for patients in stage II and III. This finding supported the application of radiotherapy in clinical practice. PMID:28272410

  1. Morphine Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Rectal morphine is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Rectal morphine comes as a suppository to insert in the rectum. It is usually inserted every 4 hours. Use ...

  2. Radiation-Induced Thymidine Phosphorylase Upregulation in Rectal Cancer Is Mediated by Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 From Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Li Ge; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jong-Seok; Yun, Eun-Jin; Park, Jong-Il; Park, Hae-Duck; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Lim, Kyu Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The mechanisms of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) regulation induced by radiation therapy (XRT) in various tumors are poorly understood. We investigated the effect and mechanisms of preoperative XRT on TP expression in rectal cancer tissues. Methods and Materials: TP expression and CD68 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels in rectal cancer tissues and cancer cell lines were evaluated before and after XRT in Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunoassay, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction studies. Isolated peripheral blood monocytes were used in the study of chemotaxis under the influence of MCP-1 released by irradiated colon cancer cells. Results: Expression of TP was significantly elevated by 9 Gy of XRT in most rectal cancer tissues but not by higher doses of XRT. In keeping with the close correlation of the increase in both TP expression and the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), anti-TP immunoreactivity was found in the CD68-positive TAMs and not the neoplastic cells. Expression of MCP-1 was increased in most cases after XRT, and this increase was strongly correlated with TP expression. However, this increase in MCP-1 expression occurred in tumor cells and not stromal cells. The XRT upregulated MCP-1 mRNA and also triggered the release of MCP-1 protein from cultured colon cancer cells. The supernatant of irradiated colon cancer cells showed strong chemotactic activity for monocyte migration, but this activity was completely abolished by neutralizing antibody. Conclusions: Use of XRT induces MCP-1 expression in cancer cells, which causes circulating monocytes to be recruited into TAMs, which then upregulate TP expression in rectal cancer tissues.

  3. Toward automatic segmentation and quantification of tumor and stroma in whole-slide images of H and E stained rectal carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geessink, Oscar G. F.; Baidoshvili, Alexi; Freling, Gerard; Klaase, Joost M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2015-03-01

    Visual estimation of tumor and stroma proportions in microscopy images yields a strong, Tumor-(lymph)Node- Metastasis (TNM) classification-independent predictor for patient survival in colorectal cancer. Therefore, it is also a potent (contra)indicator for adjuvant chemotherapy. However, quantification of tumor and stroma through visual estimation is highly subject to intra- and inter-observer variability. The aim of this study is to develop and clinically validate a method for objective quantification of tumor and stroma in standard hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained microscopy slides of rectal carcinomas. A tissue segmentation algorithm, based on supervised machine learning and pixel classification, was developed, trained and validated using histological slides that were prepared from surgically excised rectal carcinomas in patients who had not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Whole-slide scanning was performed at 20× magnification. A total of 40 images (4 million pixels each) were extracted from 20 whole-slide images at sites showing various relative proportions of tumor and stroma. Experienced pathologists provided detailed annotations for every extracted image. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated using cross-validation by testing on 1 image at a time while using the other 39 images for training. The total classification error of the algorithm was 9.4% (SD = 3.2%). Compared to visual estimation by pathologists, the algorithm was 7.3 times (P = 0.033) more accurate in quantifying tissues, also showing 60% less variability. Automatic tissue quantification was shown to be both reliable and practicable. We ultimately intend to facilitate refined prognostic stratification of (colo)rectal cancer patients and enable better personalized treatment.

  4. Two Cases of Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumor Resection Combined with Dissection of the Circular Muscle Layer Using the Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Honjo, Kumpei; Kure, Kazumasa; Ichikawa, Ryosuke; Ro, Hisashi; Takahashi, Rina; Niwa, Koichiro; Ishiyama, Shun; Sugimoto, Kiichi; Kamiyama, Hirohiko; Takahashi, Makoto; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Fukumura, Yuki; Yao, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Generally, lesions of rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) 10 mm or smaller are less malignant and are indicated for endoscopic therapy. However, the vertical margin may remain positive after conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) because NETs develop in a way similar to submucosal tumors (SMTs). The usefulness of EMR with a ligation device, which is modified EMR, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was reported, but no standard treatment has been established. We encountered 2 patients in whom rectal NETs were completely resected by combined dissection and resection of the circular muscle layer using the ESD technique. Case 1 was an 8-mm NET of the lower rectum. Case 2 was NET of the lower rectum treated with additional resection for a positive vertical margin after EMR. In both cases, the circular muscle layer was dissected applying the conventional ESD technique, followed by en bloc resection while conserving the longitudinal muscle layer. No problems occurred in the postoperative course in either case. Rectal NETs are observed in the lower rectum in many cases, and it is less likely that intestinal perforation by endoscopic therapy causes peritonitis. The method employed in these cases, namely combined dissection and resection of the circular muscle layer using the ESD technique, can be performed relatively safely, and it is possible to ensure negativity of the vertical margin. In addition, it may also be useful for additional treatment of cases with a positive vertical margin after EMR. PMID:27990103

  5. [Detection of multiple colon and rectal tumors during diagnostic treatment and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Pikó, Béla; Rahóty, Pál; Krémer, Ildikó; Zsilák, János; Török, Enikõ; Bassam, Ali; Csiffári, Margit; Dimák, Sándor; Kis, Anita; Rus-Gal, Paul; Szabó, Zsolt; Veréb, Blanka; Puskásné Szatmári, Klára

    2011-11-01

    Recognition of the commonly encountered colorectal cancer (CRC) generally begins and takes place because of and based on symptoms and signs, due to the unsettled screening of this type of cancer. Sometimes, because of advanced stage cancer urgent surgical intervention could become necessary and, if this is the case, there is no time and possibility for searching for an eventual second tumor and perhaps the patient's status does not permit performing intraoperative investigations either. The incidence of multiple colon cancer is considered to be between 2.5 and 30% according to the literature. That is why one should exclude them even in the absence of pre- and intraoperative investigations and complaints. On the other hand, colonoscopy and perhaps irrigoscopy of seemingly healthy followed-up patients is mandatory. In the case of the presence of complaints/symptoms denoting impaired intestinal passage seen in a followed-up patient or during the adjuvant setting or metastatic/recurrent disease, treatment and even during hospice care we should evaluate the possibility of a second metachronous tumor. Moreover, if there is no urgency, the multidisciplinary team (oncoteam) should recommend the adequate treatment by balancing gain/utility and risk.

  6. 90Y-Edotreotide for Metastatic Carcinoid Refractory to Octreotide

    PubMed Central

    Bushnell, David L.; O'Dorisio, Thomas M.; O'Dorisio, M. Sue; Menda, Yusuf; Hicks, Rodney J.; Van Cutsem, Eric; Baulieu, Jean-Louis; Borson-Chazot, Francoise; Anthony, Lowell; Benson, Al B.; Oberg, Kjell; Grossman, Ashley B.; Connolly, Mary; Bouterfa, Hakim; Li, Yong; Kacena, Katherine A.; LaFrance, Norman; Pauwels, Stanislas A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Metastatic carcinoid is an incurable malignancy whose symptoms, such as diarrhea and flushing, can be debilitating and occasionally life-threatening. Although symptom relief is available with octreotide, the disease eventually becomes refractory to octreotide, leaving no proven treatment options. The goal of this study was to evaluate the clinical effect of using 90Y-edotreotide to treat symptomatic patients with carcinoid tumors. Patients and Methods Patients enrolled had metastatic carcinoid, at least one sign/symptom refractory to octreotide, and at least one measurable lesion. Study treatment consisted of three cycles of 4.4 GBq (120 mCi) 90Y-edotreotide each, once every 6 weeks. Results Ninety patients were enrolled in the study. Using Southwest Oncology Group tumor response criteria, 67 (74.%) of 90 patients (95% CI, 65.4% to 83.4%) were objectively stable or responded. A statistically significant linear trend toward improvement was demonstrated across all 12 symptoms assessed. Median progression-free survival was significantly greater (P = .03) for the 38 patients who had durable diarrhea improvement than the 18 patients who did not (18.2 v 7.9 months, respectively). Adverse events (AEs) were reported in 96.7% (87 of 90) of patients. These AEs consisted primarily of reversible GI events (76 of 90), which could be caused in part by concomitant administration of amino acid solution given to reduce radiation exposure to the kidneys. There was one case each of grade 3 oliguria and grade 4 renal failure, each lasting 6 days. Conclusion 90Y-edotreotide treatment improved symptoms associated with malignant carcinoid among subjects with no treatment alternatives. Treatment was well-tolerated and had an acceptable expected AE profile. PMID:20194865

  7. Conservation of the Notch1 signaling pathway in gastrointestinal carcinoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy; Traeger, Kelly; Chen, Herbert

    2005-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) carcinoid cells secrete multiple neuroendocrine (NE) markers and hormones including 5-hydroxytryptamine and chromogranin A. We were interested in determining whether activation of the Notch1 signal transduction pathway in carcinoid cells could modulate production of NE markers and hormones. Human pancreatic carcinoid cells (BON cells) were stably transduced with an estrogen-inducible Notch1 construct, creating BON-NIER cells. In the present study, we found that Notch1 is not detectable in human GI carcinoid tumor cells. The induction of Notch1 in human BON carcinoid cells led to high levels of functional Notch1, as measured by CBF-1 binding studies, resulting in activation of the Notch1 pathway. Similar to its developmental role in the GI tract, Notch1 pathway activation led to an increase in hairy enhancer of split 1 (HES-1) protein and a concomitant silencing of human Notch1/HES-1/achaete-scute homolog 1. Furthermore, Notch1 activation led to a significant reduction in NE markers. Most interestingly, activation of the Notch1 pathway caused a significant reduction in 5-hydroxytryptamine, an important bioactive hormone in carcinoid syndrome. In addition, persistent activation of the Notch1 pathway in BON cells led to a notable reduction in cellular proliferation. These results demonstrate that the Notch1 pathway, which plays a critical role in the differentiation of enteroendocrine cells, is highly conserved in the gut. Therefore, manipulation of the Notch1 signaling pathway may be useful for expanding the targets for therapeutic and palliative treatment of patients with carcinoid tumors.

  8. Goblet cells carcinoid with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the vermiform appendix: a step towards the unitary intestinal stem cell theory?

    PubMed

    Gravante, G; Yahia, S; Gopalakrishnan, K; Mathew, G

    2014-06-01

    Associations of various histotypes in appendiceal neoplasms may help elucidate the histogenesis of such uncommon tumors. We present the fourth published case of Goblet Cell Carcinoid (GCC) associated with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the appendix. This association has been described only for GCC and not for classic appendix carcinoids which are thought to originate from neuroendocrine-committed cells. The GCC-mucinous association adds more towards the theory of a pluripotent intestinal stem cell with amphicrine possibilities of differentiation.

  9. Repeated Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography and Perfusion-Computed Tomography Imaging in Rectal Cancer: Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake Corresponds With Tumor Perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Marco H.M.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze both the intratumoral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and perfusion within rectal tumors before and after hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Rectal cancer patients, referred for preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT), underwent FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) and perfusion-CT (pCT) imaging before the start of hypofractionated RT and at the day of the last RT fraction. The pCT-images were analyzed using the extended Kety model, quantifying tumor perfusion with the pharmacokinetic parameters K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, and v{sub p}. The mean and maximum FDG uptake based on the standardized uptake value (SUV) and transfer constant (K{sup trans}) within the tumor were correlated. Also, the tumor was subdivided into eight subregions and for each subregion the mean and maximum SUVs and K{sup trans} values were assessed and correlated. Furthermore, the mean FDG uptake in voxels presenting with the lowest 25% of perfusion was compared with the FDG uptake in the voxels with the 25% highest perfusion. Results: The mean and maximum K{sup trans} values were positively correlated with the corresponding SUVs ({rho} = 0.596, p = 0.001 and {rho} = 0.779, p < 0.001). Also, positive correlations were found for K{sup trans} values and SUVs within the subregions (mean, {rho} = 0.413, p < 0.001; and max, {rho} = 0.540, p < 0.001). The mean FDG uptake in the 25% highest-perfused tumor regions was significantly higher compared with the 25% lowest-perfused regions (10.6% {+-} 5.1%, p = 0.017). During hypofractionated radiotherapy, stable mean (p = 0.379) and maximum (p = 0.280) FDG uptake levels were found, whereas the mean (p = 0.040) and maximum (p = 0.003) K{sup trans} values were found to significantly increase. Conclusion: Highly perfused rectal tumors presented with higher FDG-uptake levels compared with relatively low perfused tumors. Also, intratumor regions with a high FDG

  10. A critical review of the role of local excision in the treatment of early (T1 and T2) rectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Heafner, Thomas A; Glasgow, Sean C

    2014-10-01

    The optimal treatment of early (T1 and T2) rectal adenocarcinomas remains controversial. Local excision and radical resection with total mesorectal excision are the two surgical techniques for excising early rectal cancer. Each has their respective benefits, with local excision allowing for decreased operative morbidity and mortality while radical resection provides an oncologically complete treatment through lymphadenectomy. Local excision can be accomplished via transanal endoscopic microsurgery or transanal excision. There is no significant difference in the recurrence rates (21% vs. 33%) or overall survival (80% vs. 66%) between the two local excision modalities; however, transanal endoscopic microsurgery does allow for a higher rate of R0 resection. Current selection criteria for local excision include well to moderately differentiated tumors without high-risk features such as lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, or mucinous components. In addition, tumors should ideally be <3 cm in size, excised with a clear margin, occupy less than 1/3 of the circumference of the bowel and be mobile/nonfixed. Despite these stringent inclusion criteria, local excision continues to be plagued with a high recurrence rate in both T1 and T2 tumors due to a significant rate of occult locoregional metastases (20% to 33%). For both tumor groups, the recurrence rate in the local excision group is more than double compared to radical resection. However, the overall survival is not significantly different between those with and without metastases. With intense postoperative surveillance, these recurrences can be identified early while they are confined to the pelvis allowing for salvage surgical options. Recently, neoadjuvant therapy followed by local excision has shown favorable short and long-term oncological outcomes to radical resection in the treatment of T2 rectal cancer. Ultimately, the management of early rectal cancer must be individualized to each patient

  11. High-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung highly express enhancer of zeste homolog 2, but carcinoids do not.

    PubMed

    Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer J; Huang, Jiaoti; Li, Faqian; Yang, Qi; McMahon, Loralee A; Xu, Haodong

    2011-06-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2, the catalytic subunit of polycomb repressive complex 2, is a histone methyltransferase and plays an important role in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation. It has been shown to be overexpressed in a number of malignant neoplasms. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 in neuroendocrine tumors of the lung and the potential of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 to serve as a biomarker to segregate carcinoids from high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas. Fifty-four cases, including 25 typical carcinoids, 7 atypical carcinoids, 9 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, and 13 small-cell lung carcinomas, were immunohistochemically studied using a monoclonal antibody against enhancer of zeste homolog 2. All 13 small-cell lung carcinomas demonstrated moderate to strong nuclear staining with 12 exhibiting more than 90% of tumor cells staining. All 9 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas were moderately to strongly positive for enhancer of zeste homolog 2, with 6 cases having staining in more than 80% of tumor cells. In contrast, all 25 typical carcinoids and 6 atypical carcinoids showed only rare scattered enhancer of zeste homolog 2-positive tumor cells, with 1 case of atypical carcinoid exhibiting moderate staining in 40% of tumor cells. A subsequent validation study of the 14 specimens of lung or mediastinal lymph node biopsy and fine-needle aspiration, including 6 small-cell lung carcinomas, 2 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 5 typical carcinoids, and 1 atypical carcinoid, was performed. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 was diffusely and strongly positive in all small-cell lung carcinomas and large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, even with severe crush artifact, whereas it was only positive in rare tumor cells in carcinoids. These findings support the formulation that enhancer of zeste homolog 2 may play an important role in the regulation of biologic behavior of high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas

  12. [Appendiceal carcinoid: report of 3 clinical cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bronzino, P; Cassinelli, G; Cuneo, A; Rassu, P C; Partipilo, F; Bianchi, M; Casaccia, M

    2003-05-01

    The Authors report three cases of appendiceal carcinoids, found during appendectomy for acute appendicitis during the last 15 years. Appendiceal carcinoid is a rare neoplasm, more frequent in females age ranging between 20 and 29 years. Lack of symptoms explains the occasional diagnosis of this disease. The prognosis is related mostly to the size of the tumor, local and lymphatic invasion, presence of metastases, localization inside the appendix, histological type and age of the patient. Therapy is mainly surgical and consists of appendectomy and right colectomy according to different criteria which are being discussed in this article.

  13. The PARP inhibitor ABT-888 potentiates darbazine-induced cell death in carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Somnay, Yash; Lubner, Sam; Gill, Harpreet; Matsumura, Jon Blake; Chen, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Monoagent DNA-alkylating chemotherapies like dacarbazine are among a paucity of medical treatments for advanced carcinoid tumors, but are limited by host toxicity and intrinsic chemoresistance through the base excision repair (BER) pathway via poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Hence, inhibitors of PARP may potentiate DNA-damaging agents by blocking BER and DNA restoration. We show that the PARP inhibitor ABT-888 (Veliparib) enhances the cytotoxic effects of dacarbazine in carcinoids. Two human carcinoid cell lines (BON and H727) treated with a combination of ABT-888 and dacarbazine resulted in synergistic growth inhibition signified by combination indices <1 on the Chou-Talalay scale. ABT-888 administered prior to varying dacarbazine doses promoted the suppression of neuroendocrine biomarkers of malignancy ASCL1 and CgA, shown by Western analysis. ATM phosphorylation and p21Waf1/Cip1 activation, indicative of DNA damage, were increased by ABT-888 when combined with dacarbazine treatment, suggesting BER pathway attenuation by ABT-888. PE Annexin V/7-AAD staining and sorting revealed a profound induction of apoptosis following combination treatment, which was further confirmed by increased PARP cleavage. These results demonstrate that ABT-888 synergizes dacarbazine treatment in carcinoids. Therefore, ABT-888 may help treat carcinoids unresponsive or refractory to mainstay therapies. PMID:27632933

  14. Optimal Timing for Assessment of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer: Do All Patients Benefit From Waiting Longer Than 6 Weeks?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Rodrigo O.; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Sao Juliao, Guilherme P.; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; Sousa, Afonso H.S.; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; Imperiale, Antonio R.; Lynn, Patricio B.; Proscurshim, Igor; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Ono, Carla Rachel; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate the metabolic activity of rectal cancers at 6 and 12 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([{sup 18}FDG]PET/CT) imaging and correlate with response to CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal adenocarcinoma treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT (54 Gy, 5-fluouracil-based) were prospectively studied ( (ClinicalTrials.org) identifier (NCT00254683)). All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies (at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks from CRT completion). Clinical assessment was at 12 weeks. Maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured and recorded at each PET/CT study after 1 h (early) and 3 h (late) from {sup 18}FDG injection. Patients with an increase in early SUVmax between 6 and 12 weeks were considered 'bad' responders and the others as 'good' responders. Results: Ninety-one patients were included; 46 patients (51%) were 'bad' responders, whereas 45 (49%) patients were 'good' responders. 'Bad' responders were less likely to develop complete clinical response (6.5% vs. 37.8%, respectively; P=.001), less likely to develop significant histological tumor regression (complete or near-complete pathological response; 16% vs. 45%, respectively; P=.008) and exhibited greater final tumor dimension (4.3 cm vs. 3.3 cm; P=.03). Decrease between early (1 h) and late (3 h) SUVmax at 6-week PET/CT was a significant predictor of 'good' response (accuracy of 67%). Conclusions: Patients who developed an increase in SUVmax after 6 weeks were less likely to develop significant tumor downstaging. Early-late SUVmax variation at 6-week PET/CT may help identify these patients and allow tailored selection of CRT-surgery intervals for individual patients.

  15. Refractory carcinoid syndrome: a review of treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Riechelmann, Rachel P.; Pereira, Allan A.; Rego, Juliana F. M.; Costa, Frederico P.

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid syndrome (CSy) is a constellation of symptoms that may commonly present in patients with well differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), with somatostatin analogs (SSAs) being the first-line option for symptom management. However, symptomatic progression eventually occurs and in this scenario of a refractory CSy; several treatment options have been studied such as dose escalation of SSA, interferon and liver-directed therapies. Nevertheless, recent phase III trials have contributed to the understanding and management of this condition. We performed a comprehensive review of interventional studies examining refractory CSy to provide the evidence for current treatment options and propose a treatment sequence. PMID:28203303

  16. A Prospective Study of Gastric Carcinoids and Enterochromaffin-Like Cell Changes in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 and Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome: Identification of Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Annibale, Bruno; Marignani, Massimo; Luong, Tu Vinh; Corleto, Vito; Pace, Andrea; Ito, Tetsuhide; Liewehr, David; Venzon, David J.; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Bordi, Cesare; Jensen, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) patients frequently develop Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES). These patients can develop proliferative changes of gastric enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells and gastric carcinoids (ECL-cell tumors). ECL-cell changes have been extensively studied in sporadic ZES patients and can be precursor lesions of gastric carcinoids, but little is known about factors influencing their severity or development of carcinoids in MEN1/ZES patients. Objectives: Our objective was to prospectively analyze ECL-cell changes and gastric carcinoids (ECL-cell tumors) in a large series of MEN1/ZES patients to detect risk factors and deduct clinical guidelines. Setting and Patients: Fifty-seven consecutive MEN1/ZES patients participated in this prospective study at two tertiary-care research centers. Interventions and Outcome Measures: Assessment of MEN1, gastric hypersecretion, and gastroscopy with multiple biopsies was done according to a fixed protocol and tumor status. ECL-cell changes and α-human chorionic gonadotropin staining were assessed in each biopsy and correlated with clinical, laboratory, and MEN1 features. Results: ECL-cell proliferative changes were universally present, advanced changes in 53% and carcinoids in 23%. Gastric nodules are common and are frequently associated with carcinoids. Patients with high fasting serum gastrin levels, long disease duration, or a strong α-human chorionic gonadotropin staining in a biopsy are at higher risk for an advanced ECL-cell lesion and/or gastric carcinoid. Conclusions: Gastric carcinoids and/or advanced ECL-cell changes are frequent in MEN1/ZES patients, and therefore, regular surveillance gastroscopy with multiple routine biopsies and biopsies of all mucosal lesions are essential. Clinical/laboratory data and biopsy results can be used to identify a subgroup of MEN1/ZES patients with a significantly increased risk for developing gastric carcinoids, allowing development of better

  17. How Are Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRA). Radionuclide scans Scans using small amounts of radioactivity and special cameras can be helpful in looking ... camera can be used to show where the radioactivity has collected in the body. More scans may ...

  18. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... been. Radionuclide scans Scans using small amounts of radioactivity and special cameras may be helpful in looking ... camera can be used to show where the radioactivity has collected in the body. More scans may ...

  19. What Is a Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for energy and rids the body of solid waste. After food is chewed and swallowed, it enters the esophagus. ... The colon absorbs water and mineral nutrients from food and serves as a storage place for waste. The waste left after this process goes into ...

  20. Can Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... may also be found when parts of the gastrointestinal system are removed to treat other diseases. For example, a person with stomach pain or bleeding may have a test called an upper endoscopy to look for an ulcer. In this test, the doctor looks at the stomach ... Medical Review: February 26, 2015 ...

  1. Management of occult adrenocorticotropin-secreting bronchial carcinoids: limits of endocrine testing and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Loli, P; Vignati, F; Grossrubatscher, E; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Zurleni, F; Lomuscio, G; Rossetti, O; Ravini, M; Vanzulli, A; Bacchetta, C; Galli, C; Valente, D

    2003-03-01

    The differential diagnosis and the identification of the source of ACTH in occult ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to a bronchial carcinoid still represents a challenge for the endocrinologist. We report our experience in six patients with occult bronchial carcinoid in whom extensive hormonal, imaging, and scintigraphic evaluation was performed. All patients presented with hypercortisolism associated with high plasma ACTH values. The CRH test and high dose dexamethasone suppression test suggested an ectopic source of ACTH in three of six patients. During bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling, none of the patients showed a central to peripheral ACTH gradient. At the time of diagnosis, none of the patients had radiological evidence of the ectopic source of ACTH, whereas pentetreotide scintigraphy identified the lesion in two of four patients. Finally, a chest computed tomography scan revealed the presence of a bronchial lesion in all patients, and pentetreotide scintigraphy identified four of six lesions. In all patients a bronchial carcinoid was found and removed. In one patient with scintigraphic evidence of residual disease after two operations, radioguided surgery, using a hand-held gamma probe after iv administration of radiolabeled pentetreotide, was performed; this allowed detection and removal of residual multiple mediastinal lymph node metastases. In conclusion, our data show that there is not a single endocrine test or imaging procedure accurate enough to diagnose and localize occult ectopic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids. Radioguided surgery appears to be promising in the presence of multiple tumor foci and previous incomplete removal of the tumor.

  2. Interobserver agreement of proliferation index (Ki-67) outperforms mitotic count in pulmonary carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Warth, Arne; Fink, Ludger; Fisseler-Eckhoff, Annette; Jonigk, Danny; Keller, Marius; Ott, German; Rieker, Ralf J; Sinn, Peter; Söder, Stephan; Soltermann, Alex; Willenbrock, Klaus; Weichert, Wilko

    2013-05-01

    Evaluation of proliferative activity is a cornerstone in the classification of endocrine tumors; in pulmonary carcinoids, the mitotic count delineates typical carcinoid (TC) from atypical carcinoid (AC). Data on the reproducibility of manual mitotic counting and other methods of proliferation index evaluation in this tumor entity are sparse. Nine experienced pulmonary pathologists evaluated 20 carcinoid tumors for mitotic count (hematoxylin and eosin) and Ki-67 index. In addition, Ki-67 index was automatically evaluated with a software-based algorithm. Results were compared with respect to correlation coefficients (CC) and kappa values for clinically relevant grouping algorithms. Evaluation of mitotic activity resulted in a low interobserver agreement with a median CC of 0.196 and a median kappa of 0.213 for the delineation of TC from AC. The median CC for hotspot (0.658) and overall (0.746) Ki-67 evaluation was considerably higher. However, kappa values for grouped comparisons of overall Ki-67 were only fair (median 0.323). The agreement of manual and automated Ki-67 evaluation was good (median CC 0.851, median kappa 0.805) and was further increased when more than one participant evaluated a given case. Ki-67 staining clearly outperforms mitotic count with respect to interobserver agreement in pulmonary carcinoids, with the latter having an unacceptable low performance status. Manual evaluation of Ki-67 is reliable, and consistency further increases with more than one evaluator per case. Although the prognostic value needs further validation, Ki-67 might perspectively be considered a helpful diagnostic parameter to optimize the separation of TC from AC.

  3. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) Followed by Laparoscopic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: Predictors of the Tumor Response and the Long-Term Oncologic Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jun-Gi; Cho, Hyun Min; Shim, Byoung Yong

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the predictors of a tumor response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and the long-term oncologic outcomes of preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery for patients who suffer from rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study involved 274 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and who had been treated with preoperative CRT and curative laparoscopic total mesorectal excision between January 2003 and January 2009. We assessed the long-term oncologic outcomes, in terms of recurrence and survival, of the treated patients. Results: Forty-two (15.3%) of the 274 patients had complete pathologic responses (pCR). The pre-CRT carcinoembryonic antigen level was the only significant predictor of a pCR on the multivariate analysis (p = 0.01). The overall survival at 5 years was 73.1%, with a mean survival period of 59.7 months (95% CI, 57.1-62.3). The disease-free survival at 5 years was 67.3% with a mean survival period of 54.7 months (95% CI, 51.7-57.8). The pCR group had a higher rate of overall survival at 5 years than did the non-pCR group, and the difference was significant (86.0% vs. 71.2%; hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.96; p = 0.03). The cumulative incidences of local and distant recurrences at 5 years were 5.8% and 28.3%, respectively. A total of 84.5% (234 of 274) of the patients had their anal sphincters preserved. Grade 3 or 4 acute and long-term toxic effects occurred in 22.2% and 8.4% of the patients, respectively. Conclusion: Preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery seems safe and feasible with favorable long-term outcomes and a high rate of sphincter preservation for the patients with low-lying tumors of the rectum.

  4. Polysialic acid of the neural cell adhesion molecule distinguishes small cell lung carcinoma from carcinoids.

    PubMed Central

    Komminoth, P.; Roth, J.; Lackie, P. M.; Bitter-Suermann, D.; Heitz, P. U.

    1991-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) exists in various types of neuroendocrine cells and their tumors. A typical feature of NCAM is polysialic acid, of which the chain length is developmentally regulated. The authors have performed a comparative immunohistochemical study on small cell lung carcinomas and bronchial as well as gastrointestinal carcinoids with the monoclonal antibody (MAb) 735 reactive with the long-chain form of polysialic acid. The small cell lung carcinomas, irrespective of their histological type, were positive for polysialic acid. Metastatic tumor cell complexes also exhibited immunostaining. The tumor cell-surface-associated immunostaining for polysialic acid was sensitive to endoneuraminidase. The mature and atypical bronchial and gastrointestinal carcinoids were not immunoreactive for polysialic acid. Cytoplasmic staining in groups of cells of carcinoids (2 of 28 cases) was due to nonspecific antibody binding, which could be prevented by increased ion strength. These data indicate that neuroendocrine tumors of the lung can be distinguished by their content of highly sialylated NCAM. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1651057

  5. Long-term follow up of patients affected by pulmonary carcinoid at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pusceddu, S; Catena, L; Valente, M; Buzzoni, R; Formisano, B; Del Vecchio, M; Ducceschi, M; Tavecchio, L; Fabbri, A; Bajetta, E

    2010-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the lung involve an heterogeneous group of tumors representing a wide range of histological variants, from well-differentiated typical carcinoid (TC) tumors to poorly differentiated small cell carcinomas. The epidemiology, clinical outcome, and management of these neoplasms differ significantly from other lung malignancies. The main aim of this report consists in describing the single Center experience of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan on neuroendocrine lung tumors, with an emphasis on bronchopulmonary carcinoid subtypes. From 1986 to 2009, 91 cases of carcinoid tumors were diagnosed; these were divided in two series, according to typical (66 patients) or atypical [25] histotypes. These two groups were compared in relation to various features, including pathologic classification, clinical behavior, treatment modalities and long-term survival. At the moment of diagnosis 11 patients had locally advanced/metastatic disease, while 80 patients showed non metastatic disease. The comparative analysis between typical and atypical series disclosed significant differences in terms of long-term survival; in fact, 5-year and 10-year survival rates were 98 % and 94 % for the first carcinoid series versus 76 % and 18 % for the atypical series, respectively (p<0.001). The median overall survival (OS) was 76 months (range 3-182) for atypical carcinoids and has not yet been reached for TCs patients. PMID:22263011

  6. Long-term follow up of patients affected by pulmonary carcinoid at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, S; Catena, L; Valente, M; Buzzoni, R; Formisano, B; Del Vecchio, M; Ducceschi, M; Tavecchio, L; Fabbri, A; Bajetta, E

    2010-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the lung involve an heterogeneous group of tumors representing a wide range of histological variants, from well-differentiated typical carcinoid (TC) tumors to poorly differentiated small cell carcinomas. The epidemiology, clinical outcome, and management of these neoplasms differ significantly from other lung malignancies. The main aim of this report consists in describing the single Center experience of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan on neuroendocrine lung tumors, with an emphasis on bronchopulmonary carcinoid subtypes. From 1986 to 2009, 91 cases of carcinoid tumors were diagnosed; these were divided in two series, according to typical (66 patients) or atypical [25] histotypes. These two groups were compared in relation to various features, including pathologic classification, clinical behavior, treatment modalities and long-term survival. At the moment of diagnosis 11 patients had locally advanced/metastatic disease, while 80 patients showed non metastatic disease. The comparative analysis between typical and atypical series disclosed significant differences in terms of long-term survival; in fact, 5-year and 10-year survival rates were 98 % and 94 % for the first carcinoid series versus 76 % and 18 % for the atypical series, respectively (p<0.001). The median overall survival (OS) was 76 months (range 3-182) for atypical carcinoids and has not yet been reached for TCs patients.

  7. Feasibility of an Adaptive Strategy in Preoperative Radiochemotherapy for Rectal Cancer With Image-Guided Tomotherapy: Boosting the Dose to the Shrinking Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Passoni, Paolo; Fiorino, Claudio; Slim, Najla; Ronzoni, Monica; Ricci, Vincenzo; Di Palo, Saverio; De Nardi, Paola; Orsenigo, Elena; Tamburini, Andrea; De Cobelli, Francesco; Losio, Claudio; Iacovelli, Nicola A.; Broggi, Sara; Staudacher, Carlo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of preoperative adaptive radiochemotherapy by delivering a concomitant boost to the residual tumor during the last 6 fractions of treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with T3/T4N0 or N+ rectal cancer were enrolled. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of oxaliplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} on days −14, 0, and +14, and 5-fluorouracil 200 mg/m{sup 2}/d from day −14 to the end of radiation therapy (day 0 is the start of radiation therapy). Radiation therapy consisted of 41.4 Gy in 18 fractions (2.3 Gy per fraction) with Tomotherapy to the tumor and regional lymph nodes (planning target volume, PTV) defined on simulation CT and MRI. After 9 fractions simulation CT and MRI were repeated for the planning of the adaptive phase: PTV{sub adapt} was generated by adding a 5-mm margin to the residual tumor. In the last 6 fractions a boost of 3.0 Gy per fraction (in total 45.6 Gy in 18 fractions) was delivered to PTV{sub adapt} while concomitantly delivering 2.3 Gy per fraction to PTV outside PTV{sub adapt}. Results: Three patients experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity; 2 of 3 showed toxicity before the adaptive phase. Full dose of radiation therapy, oxaliplatin, and 5-fluorouracil was delivered in 96%, 96%, and 88% of patients, respectively. Two patients with clinical complete response (cCR) refused surgery and were still cCR at 17 and 29 months. For the remaining 23 resected patients, 15 of 23 (65%) showed tumor regression grade 3 response, and 7 of 23 (30%) had pathologic complete response; 8 (35%) and 12 (52%) tumor regression grade 3 patients had ≤5% and 10% residual viable cells, respectively. Conclusions: An adaptive boost strategy is feasible, with an acceptable grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity rate and a very encouraging tumor response rate. The results suggest that there should still be room for further dose escalation of the residual tumor with the aim of increasing pathologic complete response and/or c

  8. Carcinoid Heart Disease without Liver Involvement Caused by a Primary Ovarian Carcinoid Tumour.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Chirag; Goel, Sunny; Stern, Eric; Warner, Richard; Castillo, Javier; Croft, Lori; Lavine, Ronald; Zacks, Jerome

    2015-07-01

    Carcinoid heart disease, caused by primary ovarian carcinoid tumour, is a rare form of valvular heart disease. This form of heart disease usually presents with symptoms of right-sided valvular dysfunction, ultimately leading to right-sided heart failure. This entity is unique as it develops in the absence of liver metastasis. We report a case of 75 year-old woman with primary ovarian carcinoid tumour who presented with symptoms of severe right-sided heart failure and successfully underwent pulmonic and tricuspid valve replacement along with a right ventricular (RV) outflow patch enlargement. This patient later underwent uneventful resection of the primary ovarian carcinoid tumour, with complete resolution of her symptoms.

  9. A Rare Combination of Ovarian and Uterine Leiomyomas with Goblet Cell Carcinoid of the Appendix

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaikh, Abdulrahman F.; Darwish, Abdulla; Nagaraj, Veena; Alsada, Abeer

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of the rare combination of unilateral ovarian leiomyoma, uterine leiomyoma, and goblet cell carcinoid tumor of the appendix in a premenopausal woman who presented with right iliac pain. Immunohistochemistry study for desmin (muscle marker) and chromogranin and synaptophysin (neuroendocrine markers) confirmed immunophenotyping origin. Interestingly, both tumors showed positive reaction for estrogen receptor. To our knowledge, such a combination has not been reported previously in the literature. In this paper, the pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of both types of tumors are discussed. PMID:25685587

  10. [A Systematic Analysis of Oncogene and Tumor Suppressor Genes for Panitumumab-Resistant Rectal Cancer with Wild RAS Gene - A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yosuke; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Yagi, Ryoma; Okamura, Takuma; Nakano, Masato; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Nogami, Hitoshi; Maruyama, Satoshi; Takii, Yasumasa; Miura, Kohei; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-11-01

    A 58-year-old man was admitted with the complaint of bloody stools. Colonoscopy and computed tomography revealed a rectal cancer with a liver metastasis and multiple lung metastases. After administering a regimen comprising 3 courses of XELOX plus bevacizumab chemotherapy, the sizes of the primary and metastatic lesions decreased remarkably. Abdominoperineal resection was performed for local control of the cancer; the specimen from the initial tumor was found to be KRAS wild type. After 14 courses of XELOX chemotherapy, brain metastases were detected. Although 3 courses of IRIS plus panitumumab were administered, the liver, lung, and brain metastases spread rapidly. A comprehensive genomic analysis focused on cancer-related genes with CancerPlex®found a mutation of the BRAF gene(I326V). BRAF is a downstream molecule of KRAS in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. Therefore, this mutation of the BRAF gene has the possibility of causing resistance against panitumumab that was found in this case. Furthermore, we expect that the systematic analysis of oncogene and suppressor oncogenes will enable us to choose the optimal regimen of chemotherapy or molecular targeting therapy for each patient with colorectal cancer.

  11. Early prediction of histopathological response of rectal tumors after one week of preoperative radiochemotherapy using 18 F-FDG PET-CT imaging. A prospective clinical study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) is standard in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Initial data suggest that the tumor’s metabolic response, i.e. reduction of its 18 F-FDG uptake compared with the baseline, observed after two weeks of RCT, may correlate with histopathological response. This prospective study evaluated the ability of a very early metabolic response, seen after only one week of RCT, to predict the histopathological response to treatment. Methods Twenty patients with LARC who received standard RCT regimen followed by radical surgery participated in this study. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV-MAX), measured by PET-CT imaging at baseline and on day 8 of RCT, and the changes in FDG uptake (ΔSUV-MAX), were compared with the histopathological response at surgery. Response was classified by tumor regression grade (TRG) and by achievement of pathological complete response (pCR). Results Absolute SUV-MAX values at both time points did not correlate with histopathological response. However, patients with pCR had a larger drop in SUV-MAX after one week of RCT (median: -35.31% vs −18.42%, p = 0.046). In contrast, TRG did not correlate with ΔSUV-MAX. The changes in FGD-uptake predicted accurately the achievement of pCR: only patients with a decrease of more than 32% in SUV-MAX had pCR while none of those whose tumors did not show any decrease in SUV-MAX had pCR. Conclusions A decrease in ΔSUV-MAX after only one week of RCT for LARC may be able to predict the achievement of pCR in the post-RCT surgical specimen. Validation in a larger independent cohort is planned. PMID:22853868

  12. 5-HIAA excretion is not associated with bone metabolism in carcinoid syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, S C; de Herder, W W; Kwekkeboom, D J; Zillikens, M C; Feelders, R A; van Schaik, R H N; van Driel, M; van Leeuwen, J P T M

    2012-06-01

    In patients with a carcinoid syndrome and neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive tract (carcinoids), elevated circulating serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) levels can be demonstrated. It can be hypothesized that bone metabolism will be affected in these patients, since serotonin receptors are expressed on bone cells and serotonin effects on bone have been demonstrated. However, to date, no data are available on bone metabolism parameters in patients with neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive tract (carcinoids). In the current retrospective study we have measured serum bone formation markers P1CP (pro-collagen type I C-terminal), and osteocalcin, and the bone resorption marker NTx (collagen breakdown product N-terminal), in a group of 61 carcinoid patients with increased circulating serotonin levels as demonstrated by increased excretion of the serotonin breakdown product, 5-hydroxy indole acetic acid (5-HIAA), in the urine (>50 μmol/24 h, so-called "hyper-secretors") and a control group of 23 carcinoid patients, without increased 5-HIAA excretion (so-called non-secretors). The 24-h urinary excretion of 5-HIAA reflects the 24-h production of serotonin. Measurements of markers of bone metabolism were performed in serum samples obtained before the start of medical treatment. The hypersecretor group had on average a 10-fold higher urinary 5-HIAA excretion than the control (non-secretor) group. No significant differences in bone metabolism parameters could be demonstrated between hyper-secretors and controls (non-secretors). Correlation and regression analyses could not demonstrate significant age- and sex-adjusted correlations between urinary 5-HIAA excretion and any of the markers for bone turnover. A limitation is that the exposure time to elevated levels of serotonin is unknown, which might have been too short to induce effects on bone metabolism. Treatment of human pre-osteoblasts SV-HFO with serotonin didn't change alkaline phosphatase activity throughout

  13. Ectopic ACTH secretion due to a bronchopulmonary carcinoid localized by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Iser, G; Pfohl, M; Dörr, U; Weiss, E M; Seif, F J

    1994-11-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old woman with an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secreting bronchopulmonary carcinoid. This patient showed the typical long history of Cushing's syndrome, including hypokaliemia, impaired glucose tolerance, high levels of ACTH and beta-endorphin, and coproduction of other peptides. At the onset of clinical symptoms in 1979 an adrenal adenoma was suspected, and left-sided adrenalectomy was performed. The symptoms soon recurred, and the diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome was made. As no ACTH-secreting tumor was found, the right adrenal was resected, and the patient was followed up regularly. Fourteen years later chest roentgenography and computed tomography revealed a para-aortic pulmonary lesion, which was suspicious for a bronchopulmonary carcinoid. ACTH and beta-endorphin were excessively, pancreatic polypeptide slightly elevated at that time. The final diagnosis was made using somatostatin receptor scintigraphy which confirmed the hormonal activity of the suspicious lesion; no additional focus was found. This method turned out to be not only a useful additional localization technique but also a promising tool for characterization and staging of a suspected ACTH-producing carcinoid. The tumor was resected curatively, and the diagnosis was confirmed histologically.

  14. Everolimus and Vatalanib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  15. TU-CD-BRB-09: Prediction of Chemo-Radiation Outcome for Rectal Cancer Based On Radiomics of Tumor Clinical Characteristics and Multi-Parametric MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, K; Yue, N; Shi, L; Hu, X; Chen, Q; Sun, X; Niu, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tumor clinical characteristics and quantitative multi-parametric MR imaging features for prediction of response to chemo-radiation treatment (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods: Forty-three consecutive patients (59.7±6.9 years, from 09/2013 – 06/2014) receiving neoadjuvant CRT followed by surgery were enrolled. All underwent MRI including anatomical T1/T2, Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE)-MRI and Diffusion-Weighted MRI (DWI) prior to the treatment. A total of 151 quantitative features, including morphology/Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) texture from T1/T2, enhancement kinetics and the voxelized distribution from DCE-MRI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from DWI, along with clinical information (carcinoembryonic antigen CEA level, TNM staging etc.), were extracted for each patient. Response groups were separated based on down-staging, good response and pathological complete response (pCR) status. Logistic regression analysis (LRA) was used to select the best predictors to classify different groups and the predictive performance were calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Individual imaging category or clinical charateristics might yield certain level of power in assessing the response. However, the combined model outperformed than any category alone in prediction. With selected features as Volume, GLCM AutoCorrelation (T2), MaxEnhancementProbability (DCE-MRI), and MeanADC (DWI), the down-staging prediciton accuracy (area under the ROC curve, AUC) could be 0.95, better than individual tumor metrics with AUC from 0.53–0.85. While for the pCR prediction, the best set included CEA (clinical charateristics), Homogeneity (DCE-MRI) and MeanADC (DWI) with an AUC of 0.89, more favorable compared to conventional tumor metrics with an AUC ranging from 0.511–0.79. Conclusion: Through a systematic analysis of multi-parametric MR imaging features, we are able to build models with

  16. Valvular Disorders in Carcinoid Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid heart disease is a rare but important cause of intrinsic right heart valve disorders leading to right heart failure. Occasionally, left-sided heart valves may also be involved. The characteristic cardiac pathological findings of carcinoid heart disease are endocardial thickening as a result of fibrous deposits on the endocardium. Echocardiographic examination and right heart catheterization are very useful for the diagnosis of the lesion. If more cardiac valves are affected, multiple valve replacement should be considered. The management of the pulmonary valve lesion depends on the extent of the diseased valve, either by valvulotomy, valvectomy, or valve replacement. Percutaneous valve implantations in the pulmonary and in the inferior vena cava positions have been advocated for high-risk patients. PMID:27982350

  17. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Scott, Si; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, Sd

    2012-07-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications.

  18. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression

    PubMed Central

    Scott, SI; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, SD

    2012-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications. PMID:24960730

  19. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  20. Cardiac Surgery for Carcinoid Heart Disease: A Weapon Not to Be Misused.

    PubMed

    Bonou, Maria; Kapelios, Chris J; Kaltsas, Gregory; Perreas, Konstantinos; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Barbetseas, John

    2017-01-01

    Carcinoid heart disease (CHD) complicates approximately 25% of patients with a carcinoid tumor and carcinoid syndrome and leads to heart valve degeneration with mixed-stenotic and regurgitation pathology and consequent heart failure (HF) leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Cardiac surgery in symptomatic, severe CHD leads to significantly better functional capacity and prolonged survival when compared to medical treatment alone. Recent studies have shown improvement in postoperative outcomes of patients undergoing surgery for CHD over the last decades. The trend for early diagnosis and application of surgery prior to the manifestation of HF symptoms, which tended to develop during the previous years, does not seem justifiable based on the findings of recent studies. Therefore, the optimal timing of intervention in CHD and the type of valve that should preferably be used remain issues of controversy. This review comprehensively examines the existing literature on the treatment options for patients with CHD, with a special focus on short- and long-term survival after cardiac surgery, and discusses the selection of the exact patient profile and intervention timing that are more likely to optimize the benefit-to-risk ratio for surgical intervention.

  1. Diagnosis and management of typical and atypical lung carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Sara; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Macerelli, Marianna; Proto, Claudia; Vitali, Milena; Signorelli, Diego; Ganzinelli, Monica; Scanagatta, Paolo; Duranti, Leonardo; Trama, Annalisa; Buzzoni, Roberto; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Pastorino, Ugo; de Braud, Filippo; Garassino, Marina Chiara

    2016-04-01

    An estimated 20% to 30% of all neuroendocrine tumours originate in the bronchial tree and lungs. According to the 2015 World Health Organization categorization, these tumours are separated into four subtypes characterized by increasing biological aggressiveness: typical carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and small-cell carcinoma. Although typical and atypical lung carcinoids account for less than 1-5% of all pulmonary malignancies, the incidence of these neoplasms has risen significantly in recent decades. Surgery is the treatment of choice for loco-regional disease but for advanced lung carcinoids there is no recognized standard of care and successful management requires a multidisciplinary approach. The aim of this review is to provide a useful guide for the clinical management of lung carcinoids.

  2. A case of bronchial carcinoid: diagnosis and follow-up with 111In-DTPA-octreotide.

    PubMed

    Orsolon, P; Bagni, B; Basadonna, P; Geatti, O; Talmassons, G; Guerra, U P

    1995-12-01

    Scintigraphy with radiolabelled analogue of somatostatin is highly sensitive in detecting carcinoid tumors especially if performed with Single Photon Computed Tomography (SPECT). In this report we describe our experience with 111In-DTPA-Octreotide in a female patient affected by a small asymptomatic intrabronchial carcinoid demonstrated by CT scan and bronchial endoscopy performed after recurrent left pneumonias. Planar views and SPECT images, using 111In-DTPA-Octreotide, were collected before and four hours after the first endoscopic laser resection. All groups of SPECT images were positive in the left parahilar region but at a different degree. Scans performed after resection showed a low degree of uptake which was considered to be probably secondary to local swelling; CT scan was negative. Follow up endoscopic biopsy repeated at six months, showed a relapse always in the same site; CT scan of the thorax was again negative. 111In-DTPA-Octreotide images obtained at twelve months were positive always in the left parahilar region, CT scan was negative but another biopsy was not possible. Therefore it was suspected a relapse of the carcinoid which was probably growing only through the bronchial wall without spreading towards the bronchial lumen and/or the lung parenchima. In this occasion, it was also thought that images collected four hours after resection could be positive not only for swelling but for a relapse as well. In every scintigraphic session, SPECT images presented higher quality than planar. This case suggests that 111In-DTPA-Octreotide SPECT is a non-invasive diagnostic technique which could be applied as a follow-up tool especially to patients with no-secreting carcinoid neoplasm and/or with negative or doubtful endoscopic and radiological investigations.

  3. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  4. [Surgical treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Salinas-Aragón, L E; Camacho-Mauries, D; Medina-Franco, H

    2010-01-01

    Rectal affection accounts for 30% of colorectal cancer. The standard of treatment is surgical resection, which often is curative. For superior and middle-rectal involvement, low anterior resection (LAR) is the preferred procedure. For tumors involving the lower portion of the rectum, abdominoperineal resection (APR) or LAR are the options of treatment, depending on sphincter involvement. The main surgical objective is to achieve a R0 resection with an appropriated total mesorrectal excision, greater number of lymph nodes and negative distal and radial margins. These surgical parameters have been used as quality indicators and have prognostic implications in terms of overall and disease-free survival. Total mesorectal excision with preservation of hypogastric nerves has shown a reduction in rates of sexual and bladder dysfunction as well as lower local recurrence. At specialized centers such procedures are performed by minimal invasive surgery; however the number of meta-analysis is scarce.

  5. AACE/ACE DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF MIDGUT CARCINOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Katznelson, Laurence; Vinik, Aaron I.; Wong, Richard; Randolph, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a collection of complex tumors that arise from the diffuse endocrine system, primarily from the digestive tract. Carcinoid tumors most commonly originate from the small intestine. These tumors are either referred to as small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors or midgut carcinoids (MGCs). The purpose of this review article is to survey the diagnostic and therapeutic pathways for patients with MGC and provide an overview of the complex multidisciplinary care involved in improving their quality of life, treatment outcomes, and survival. Methods The current literature regarding the diagnosis and management of MGCs was reviewed. Results Dry flushing and secretory diarrhea are the hallmarks of the clinical syndrome of MGC. Managing MGC requires attention to the overall symptom complex, including the physical effects of the tumor and biomarker levels. The somatostatin analogs (SAs) octreotide and lanreotide are highly efficacious for symptomatic improvement. MGCs require resection to encompass the primary tumor and mesenteric lymph node metastases and should include cholecystectomy if the patient is likely to receive SA therapy. Debulking of liver metastasis by resection in combination with ablative therapies and other liver-directed modalities may help palliate symptoms and hormonal overproduction in carefully selected patients. Quality of life is an important measure of patients’ perception of the burden of their disease and impact of treatment modalities and may be a useful guide in deciding changes in therapy to alter apparent health status. Conclusion MGC is a challenging malignancy that requires the input of a multidisciplinary team to develop the best treatment plan. Consultation with expert centers that specialize in NETs may also be indicated for complex cases. With expert care, patients can be cured or live with the disease and enjoy good quality of life. PMID:25962092

  6. [Endocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal and pancreatic systems. Multiple endocrine adenoma from another viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Klempa, I; Helmstädter, V; Feurle, G; Röttger, P

    1980-05-01

    The 24 endocrine pancreatic tumors and 14 carcinoids were examined immunohistochemically for cholecystokinin, insulin, gastrin, GIP, glucagon, sercretin, VIP, motilin, neurotensin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, and ACTH. In 12 tumors of the pancreas more than one peptide-containing cell type was observed. The clinical symptoms showed hypersecretion of only one of the hormones, however. The midgut carcinoids (jejunum, appendix) represented the classical view of the carcinoid as an argentaffin cell tumor secreting 5-hydroxytryptamine. Tumors originating in the foregut (bronchus, stomach, duodenum) and hindgut carcinoids (rectum) were nonargentaffine, containing and secreting various polypeptide hormones. We conclude that light microscopic immunohistochemical methods are useful in distinguishing endocrine from nonendocrine tumors and multihormonal syndromes (MEA) in the classification of predominant hormone-secreting tumors.

  7. Robotic rectal surgery: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Staderini, Fabio; Foppa, Caterina; Minuzzo, Alessio; Badii, Benedetta; Qirici, Etleva; Trallori, Giacomo; Mallardi, Beatrice; Lami, Gabriele; Macrì, Giuseppe; Bonanomi, Andrea; Bagnoli, Siro; Perigli, Giuliano; Cianchi, Fabio

    2016-11-15

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery has demonstrated its superiority over the open approach, however it still has some technical limitations that lead to the development of robotic platforms. Nevertheless the literature on this topic is rapidly expanding there is still no consensus about benefits of robotic rectal cancer surgery over the laparoscopic one. For this reason a review of all the literature examining robotic surgery for rectal cancer was performed. Two reviewers independently conducted a search of electronic databases (PubMed and EMBASE) using the key words "rectum", "rectal", "cancer", "laparoscopy", "robot". After the initial screen of 266 articles, 43 papers were selected for review. A total of 3013 patients were included in the review. The most commonly performed intervention was low anterior resection (1450 patients, 48.1%), followed by anterior resections (997 patients, 33%), ultra-low anterior resections (393 patients, 13%) and abdominoperineal resections (173 patients, 5.7%). Robotic rectal surgery seems to offer potential advantages especially in low anterior resections with lower conversions rates and better preservation of the autonomic function. Quality of mesorectum and status of and circumferential resection margins are similar to those obtained with conventional laparoscopy even if robotic rectal surgery is undoubtedly associated with longer operative times. This review demonstrated that robotic rectal surgery is both safe and feasible but there is no evidence of its superiority over laparoscopy in terms of postoperative, clinical outcomes and incidence of complications. In conclusion robotic rectal surgery seems to overcome some of technical limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery especially for tumors requiring low and ultra-low anterior resections but this technical improvement seems not to provide, until now, any significant clinical advantages to the patients.

  8. Sequential PET/CT with [18F]-FDG Predicts Pathological Tumor Response to Preoperative Short Course Radiotherapy with Delayed Surgery in Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using Logistic Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pecori, Biagio; Lastoria, Secondo; Caracò, Corradina; Celentani, Marco; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Avallone, Antonio; Rega, Daniela; De Palma, Giampaolo; Mormile, Maria; Budillon, Alfredo; Muto, Paolo; Bianco, Francesco; Aloj, Luigi; Petrillo, Antonella; Delrio, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that FDG PET/CT may predict pathological response in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Aim of the current study is evaluate if pathological response can be similarly predicted in LARC patients after short course radiation therapy alone. Methods: Thirty-three patients with cT2-3, N0-2, M0 rectal adenocarcinoma treated with hypo fractionated short course neoadjuvant RT (5x5 Gy) with delayed surgery (SCRTDS) were prospectively studied. All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies at baseline, 10 days from RT end (early), and 53 days from RT end (delayed). Maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax), mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) of the primary tumor were measured and recorded at each PET/CT study. We use logistic regression analysis to aggregate different measures of metabolic response to predict the pathological response in the course of SCRTDS. Results: We provide straightforward formulas to classify response and estimate the probability of being a major responder (TRG1-2) or a complete responder (TRG1) for each individual. The formulas are based on the level of TLG at the early PET and on the overall proportional reduction of TLG between baseline and delayed PET studies. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that in the course of SCRTDS it is possible to estimate the probabilities of pathological tumor responses on the basis of PET/CT with FDG. Our formulas make it possible to assess the risks associated to LARC borne by a patient in the course of SCRTDS. These risk assessments can be balanced against other health risks associated with further treatments and can therefore be used to make informed therapy adjustments during SCRTDS. PMID:28060889

  9. Massive zosteriform cutaneous metastasis from rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damin, D C; Lazzaron, A R; Tarta, C; Cartel, A; Rosito, M A

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a large and rapidly growing skin lesion approximately six months after resection of a rectal carcinoma. The lesion measured 40 cm in size, extended from the suprapubic area to the proximal half of the left groin, and showed a particular zosteriform aspect. Biopsy confirmed a metastatic skin adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastases from rectal cancer are very uncommon. Their gross appearance is not distinctive, although the skin tumors are usually solid, small (less than 5 cm) and painless nodules or papules. Early biopsies for suspicious skin lesions are needed in patients with a history of colorectal cancer.

  10. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    PubMed Central

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  11. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  12. Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Kidney: A Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Teegavarapu, Purnima Sravanti; Rao, Priya; Matrana, Marc; Cauley, Diana H.; Wood, Christopher G; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal neuroendocrine tumors (NET), comprising carcinoid tumors and small cell carcinomas, are a rare group of neoplasms. The rarity of these tumors poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Our purpose was to characterize the cases treated at a tertiary cancer center and to evaluate patients' outcomes with the available treatment modalities. Methods This is a retrospective study of patients with renal NET seen at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between January 1, 2001, and January 1, 2011. Patient and tumor data were analyzed by descriptive statistical methods. Results Three cases of carcinoid tumors and six cases of small cell carcinoma were identified. The median age at diagnosis was 53 years for patients with carcinoid and 65 years for patients with small cell carcinoma. The most common presenting symptoms were back pain, flank pain, and hematuria. The morphological appearance of the tumor cells and their immunohistochemical reactivity for neuroendocrine markers and cytokeratin helped establish the diagnosis. Nephrectomy was the mainstay of treatment for carcinoid tumors, yielding good long-term results, even in the presence of metastases. Surgery and chemotherapy were utilized for small cell carcinoma of the kidney. The median overall survival for patients with small cell carcinoma of the kidney was 17.3 months. Conclusion Renal carcinoid tumors are indolent and are associated with prolonged survival, while small cell carcinomas of the kidney are aggressive tumors with relatively short overall survival. Although palliative in nature, cytotoxic chemotherapy is the mainstay of therapy and is best given before surgery. PMID:25088468

  13. Atypical carcinoid presenting as dumb-bell-shaped tumour in the normal kidney.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Gupta, Pallav

    2013-09-24

    Carcinoid tumours are low-grade malignant neoplasms with neuroendocrine differentiation and occur frequently in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. Primary carcinoid tumours of the kidney are rare and a majority of these tumours occur in anomalous kidney and exhibit typical renal carcinoid morphology. We reported a middle-aged man with primary atypical carcinoid tumour occurring in a normal kidney. The patient was diagnosed as having renal cell carcinoma owing to a lack of neuroendocrinal clinical features. Immunohistochemical staining of the nephrectomy specimen helped in the diagnosis of atypical renal carcinoid.

  14. Robotic rectal surgery: State of the art

    PubMed Central

    Staderini, Fabio; Foppa, Caterina; Minuzzo, Alessio; Badii, Benedetta; Qirici, Etleva; Trallori, Giacomo; Mallardi, Beatrice; Lami, Gabriele; Macrì, Giuseppe; Bonanomi, Andrea; Bagnoli, Siro; Perigli, Giuliano; Cianchi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery has demonstrated its superiority over the open approach, however it still has some technical limitations that lead to the development of robotic platforms. Nevertheless the literature on this topic is rapidly expanding there is still no consensus about benefits of robotic rectal cancer surgery over the laparoscopic one. For this reason a review of all the literature examining robotic surgery for rectal cancer was performed. Two reviewers independently conducted a search of electronic databases (PubMed and EMBASE) using the key words “rectum”, “rectal”, “cancer”, “laparoscopy”, “robot”. After the initial screen of 266 articles, 43 papers were selected for review. A total of 3013 patients were included in the review. The most commonly performed intervention was low anterior resection (1450 patients, 48.1%), followed by anterior resections (997 patients, 33%), ultra-low anterior resections (393 patients, 13%) and abdominoperineal resections (173 patients, 5.7%). Robotic rectal surgery seems to offer potential advantages especially in low anterior resections with lower conversions rates and better preservation of the autonomic function. Quality of mesorectum and status of and circumferential resection margins are similar to those obtained with conventional laparoscopy even if robotic rectal surgery is undoubtedly associated with longer operative times. This review demonstrated that robotic rectal surgery is both safe and feasible but there is no evidence of its superiority over laparoscopy in terms of postoperative, clinical outcomes and incidence of complications. In conclusion robotic rectal surgery seems to overcome some of technical limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery especially for tumors requiring low and ultra-low anterior resections but this technical improvement seems not to provide, until now, any significant clinical advantages to the patients. PMID:27895814

  15. Tumor Delineation Based on Time-Activity Curve Differences Assessed With Dynamic Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Marco Aerts, Hugo; Ollers, Michel C.; Bosmans, Geert; Lee, John A.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Ruysscher, Dirk de; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Dekker, Andre L.A.J.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To develop an unsupervised tumor delineation method based on time-activity curve (TAC) shape differences between tumor tissue and healthy tissue and to compare the resulting contour with the two tumor contouring methods mostly used nowadays. Methods and Materials: Dynamic positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) acquisition was performed for 60 min starting directly after fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) injection. After acquisition and reconstruction, the data were filtered to attenuate noise. Correction for tissue motion during acquisition was applied. For tumor delineation, the TAC slope values were k-means clustered into two clusters. The resulting tumor contour (Contour I) was compared with a contour manually drawn by the radiation oncologist (Contour II) and a contour generated using a threshold of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV; Contour III). Results: The tumor volumes of Contours II and III were significantly larger than the tumor volumes of Contour I, with both Contours II and III containing many voxels showing flat TACs at low activities. However, in some cases, Contour II did not cover all voxels showing upward TACs. Conclusion: Both automated SUV contouring and manual tumor delineation possibly incorrectly assign healthy tissue, showing flat TACs, as being malignant. On the other hand, in some cases the manually drawn tumor contours do not cover all voxels showing steep upward TACs, suspected to be malignant. Further research should be conducted to validate the possible superiority of tumor delineation based on dynamic PET analysis.

  16. Rectal prolapse as initial clinical manifestation of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-W; Hsiao, C-W; Wu, C-C; Jao, S-W

    2008-04-01

    Rectal prolapse as the initial clinical manifestation of colorectal cancer is uncommon. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon after presenting with complete rectal prolapse. The tumor caused rectosigmoid intussusception and then it prolapsed out through the anus. She underwent rectosigmoidectomy and rectopexy. The postoperative course was uneventful. The relationship between colorectal cancer and rectal prolapse has not been clearly established. This case report describes an unusual presentation of colorectal cancer. It suggests that rectal prolapse can present as the initial symptom of colorectal cancer and may also be a presenting feature of the occult intra-abdominal pathology. The importance of adequate investigation such as colonoscopy should be emphasized in patients who develop a new onset of rectal prolapse.

  17. Genetic variants in the TGFβ-signaling pathway influence expression of miRNAs in colon and rectal normal mucosa and tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Trivellas, Andromahi; Pellatt, Andrew J; Mullany, Lila E; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Herrick, Jennifer S

    2017-01-05

    The TGF-β signaling pathway is involved in regulation of cell growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We test the hypothesis that genetic variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway alters miRNA expression.We use data from 1188 colorectal cancer cases to evaluate associations between 80 SNPs in 21 genes.Seven variants eIF4E rs12498533, NFκB1 rs230510, TGFB1 rs4803455, TGFBR1 rs1571590 and rs6478974, SMAD3 rs3743343, and RUNX1 rs8134179 were associated with expression level of miRNAs in normal colorectal mucosa. RUNX2 rs12333172 and BMPR1B rs13134042 were associated with miRNAs in normal colon mucosa; eIF4EBP3 rs250425, SMAD3 rs12904944, SMAD7 rs3736242, and PTEN rs532678 were associated with miRNA expression in normal rectal mucosa. Evaluation of the differential expression between carcinoma and normal mucosa showed that SMAD3 rs12708491 and rs2414937, NFκB1 rs230510 and rs3821958, and RUNX3 rs6672420 were associated with several miRNAs for colorectal carcinoma. Evaluation of site-specific differential miRNA expression showed that BMPR1B rs2120834, BMPR2 rs2228545, and eIF4EBP3 rs250425 were associated with differential miRNA expression in colon tissue and SMAD3 rs12901071, rs1498506, and rs2414937, BMPR2 rs2228545, and RUNX2 rs2819854, altered differential miRNA expression in rectal tissue.These data support the importance of the TGF-β signaling pathway to the carcinogenic process, possibly through their influence on miRNA expression levels.

  18. Correlation in Rectal Cancer Between Clinical Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy and Sphincter or Organ Preservation: 10-Year Results of the Lyon R 96-02 Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ortholan, Cecile; Romestaing, Pascale; Chapet, Olivier; Gerard, Jean Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in rectal cancer, the benefit of a neoadjuvant radiation dose escalation with endocavitary contact radiotherapy (CXRT) in addition to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This article provides an update of the Lyon R96-02 Phase III trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with T2 to T3 carcinoma of the lower rectum were randomly assigned to neoadjuvant EBRT 39 Gy in 13 fractions (43 patients) vs. the same EBRT with CXRT boost, 85 Gy in three fractions (45 patients). Median follow-up was 132 months. Results: The 10-year cumulated rate of permanent colostomy (CRPC) was 63% in the EBRT group vs. 29% in the EBRT+CXRT group (p < 0.001). The 10-year rate of local recurrence was 15% vs. 10% (p = 0.69); 10-year disease-free survival was 54% vs. 53% (p = 0.99); and 10-year overall survival was 56% vs. 55% (p = 0.85). Data of clinical response (CR) were available for 78 patients (36 in the EBRT group and 42 in the EBRT+CXRT group): 12 patients were in complete CR (1 patient vs. 11 patients), 53 patients had a CR {>=}50% (24 patients vs. 29 patients), and 13 patients had a CR <50% (11 patients vs. 2 patients) (p < 0.001). Of the 65 patients with CR {>=}50%, 9 had an organ preservation procedure (meaning no rectal resection) taking advantage of major CR. The 10-year CRPC was 17% for patients with complete CR, 42% for patients with CR {>=}50%, and 77% for patients with CR <50% (p = 0.014). Conclusion: In cancer of the lower rectum, CXRT increases the complete CR, turning in a significantly higher rate of long-term permanent sphincter and organ preservation.

  19. Carcinoid tumours of the bronchus: a 33 year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, R; Bates, M

    1984-01-01

    The term adenoma of the bronchus is discussed, and 79 cases of bronchial carcinoid seen from 1951 to 1983 are reviewed. The symptoms, radiological findings, and bronchoscopic appearances are described. There was no case of the carcinoid syndrome. In no case did haemorrhage cause any serious problem after biopsy at rigid bronchoscopy. In three patients the tumour was reported to be an oat cell carcinoma-in two on the basis of material obtained at fibreoptic bronchoscopy. Resection was by pneumonectomy in 10 cases, lobectomy in 52, segmentectomy in six, a bronchoplastic procedure without resection of lung in seven cases, enucleation in two, and a wedge resection in one case. There was one case of atypical carcinoid which was found at operation to be unresectable. A 5-30 year follow up in 57 cases revealed a recurrence of tumour in two cases, nine and 16 years after lung resection. No recurrence occurred in the nine cases treated by conservative bronchial resection with conservation of lung tissue. An actuarially assessed life table analysis shows survival rates of 94% after 10 years, 80% after 15 years, and 64% after 25 years without recurrence. The similarity of carcinoid to oat cell carcinoma is noted and the serious clinical implications of this are analysed, especially in view of the increasing use of fibreoptic bronchoscopy. The malignant potential of carcinoid and the extent of pulmonary resection is discussed. It is concluded that a carcinoid tumour of the lung has only slight malignant potential and that it may be treated by bronchotomy or sleeve resection of the bronchus in suitable cases. If serious infective changes have occurred in the lung distal to the tumour or if the tumour has extended into the lung parenchyma (88% of cases in this series) lung resection will be necessary. The follow up period should be for at least 25 years, in view of the incidence of late recurrence. PMID:6089366

  20. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for small submucosal tumors of the rectum compared with endoscopic submucosal resection with a ligation device

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Hideaki; Suehiro, Satoshi; Murakami, Daisuke; Nakahara, Ryotaro; Shimizu, Takanori; Katsuyama, Yasushi; Miyama, Yasunaga; Hayasaka, Kenji; Tounou, Shigetaka

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for small rectal submucosal tumors (SMTs). METHODS Between August 2008 and March 2016, 39 patients were treated with endoscopic submucosal resection with a ligation device (ESMR-L) (n = 21) or ESD (n = 18) for small rectal SMTs in this study. Twenty-five lesions were confirmed by histological evaluation of endoscopic biopsy prior to the procedure, and 14 lesions were not evaluated by endoscopic biopsy. The results for the ESMR-L group and the ESD group were retrospectively compared, including baseline characteristics and therapeutic outcomes. RESULTS The rate of en bloc resection was 100% in both groups. Although the rate of complete endoscopic resection was higher in the ESD group than in the ESMR-L group (100% vs 95.2%), there were no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.462). In one patient in the ESMR-L group with a previously biopsied tumor, histological complete resection with a vertical margin involvement of carcinoid tumor could not be achieved, whereas there was no incomplete resection in the ESD group. The mean length of the procedure was significantly greater in the ESD group than in the ESMR-L group (14.7 ± 6.4 min vs 5.4 ± 1.7 min, P < 0.05). The mean period of the hospitalization was also significantly longer in the ESD group than in the ESMR-L group (3.7 ± 0.9 d vs 2.8 ± 1.5 d, P < 0.05). Postoperative bleeding was occurred in one patient in the ESMR-L group. CONCLUSION Both ESMR-L and ESD were effective for treatment of small rectal SMTs. ESMR-L was simpler to perform than ESD and took less time. PMID:28250899

  1. [Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors and preneoplasic lesions].

    PubMed

    Rouquette Lassalle, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    In the recently published 2015 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the lungs, all neuroendocrine tumors of the lungs are presented for the first time in one single chapter. In this classification, high-grade small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) are differentiated from intermediate grade atypical carcinoids (AC) and low-grade typical carcinoids as well as from preinvasive lesion diffuse neuroendocrine hyperplasia DIPNECH. In the 2004 WHO classification, SCLC and carcinoids each had a separate chapter and LCNEC was listed in the chapter on large cell carcinoma of the lungs. The new WHO classification also gives some recommendations for the diagnosis on small biopsies. This review describes morphological, immunohistochemical, and genomic characteristic of these tumors according to the new classification.

  2. Rectal culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  3. Rectal imaging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vining, D J

    1998-09-01

    Rectal imaging has evolved substantially during the past 25 years and now offers surgeons exquisite anatomic detail and physiologic information. Dynamic cystoproctography, helical computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging, and immunoscintigraphy have become standards for the diagnosis of rectal disease, staging of neoplasia, and survey of therapeutic results. The indications, limitations, and relative costs of current imaging methods are reviewed, and advances in imaging technology that promise future benefits to colorectal surgeons are introduced.

  4. [A case of peritonitis carcinomatosa from goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix treated by intraperitoneal paclitaxel and systemic S-1 chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shingen; Kimura, Shigeaki; Kashima, Masahiro; Shichijo, Kana; Yoshida, Sumiko; Harada, Eiji; Matsushita, Takaya; Oshima, Yasushi; Tamaki, Yasutami; Horiuchi, Noriaki; Takeichi, Toshiaki; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Masuda, Kazuhiko; Iwasaka, Naohito; Shinomiya, Sadao

    2008-12-01

    Goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix is a rare neoplasm and clinically tends to take a malignant course. Most cases are young and early stage, and the surgical strategy is available. But appropriate chemotherapy for inoperable cases with peritoneal dissemination is not established. A 77-year-old woman with a past history of appendectomy was admitted to our hospital complaining of abdominal fullness. Abdominal computed tomography showed massive ascites and slight contrast enhancement of appendix. A tumor was found by colonoscopic examination at the orifice of vermiform and was diagnosed pathologically as goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix. Laparoscopy showed multiple peritoneal dissemination. We performed intraperitoneal paclitaxel(PTX)administration at 70 mg/m(2) week without any resection of the tumor. Ascites were reduced immediately, but drug-induced interstitial pneumonia occurred due to PTX. After steroid therapy, we switched to systemic S-1 therapy. For about one year, her tumor was controlled but became worse thirteen months after diagnosis and died. It is thought that intraabdominal paclitaxel administration and systemic S-1 therapy can be one of appropriate forms of chemotherapy for inoperable peritoneal carcinomatosis from goblet cell carcinoid of appendix.

  5. Atypical carcinoid and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung: a proteomic dataset from formalin-fixed archival samples

    PubMed Central

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Abbondio, Marcello; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Eccher, Albino; Rindi, Guido; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Uzzau, Sergio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a dataset generated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples from two rare lung neuroendocrine tumor subtypes (namely, two atypical carcinoids, ACs, and two large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, LCNECs). Samples were subjected to a shotgun proteomics pipeline, comprising full-length protein extraction, SDS removal through spin columns, in solution trypsin digestion, long gradient liquid chromatography peptide separation and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1260 and 2436 proteins were identified in the AC and LCNEC samples, respectively, with FDR <1%. MS data are available in the PeptideAtlas repository at http://www.peptideatlas.org/PASS/PASS00375. PMID:27054153

  6. What's New in Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... approach is still only available in the United States as a part of a clinical trial . Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is made up of doctors and master’s-prepared nurses with deep knowledge of cancer care as well as journalists, ...

  7. Intussusception secondary to a carcinoid tumor in an adult patient☆

    PubMed Central

    Wiener-Carrillo, Isidoro; González-Alvarado, Carlos; Cervantes-Valladolid, Mario; Echaverry-Navarrete, Denis; Zubieta-O’Farrill, Gregorio; Gudiño-Chávez, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intussusception in adult patients represents 5% of all intussusceptions and 1–5% of bowel obstructions in adults. In contrast to pediatric patients, 90% of the time, in adults, it's caused by well-established pathologic mechanisms, such as carcinoma, polyps, diverticula, Meckel diverticula, stenosis, or benign neoplasms. Small intestine intussusceptions are more frequent, but colonic intussusceptions are caused 50% of the time by malignant neoplasms, especially adenocarcinoma. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a 70-year-old woman, with no relevant familial history, who presented with a 3-day symptomatology consisting of epigastric, colic, diffuse, abdominal pain of moderate intensity, which progressed till reaching a severe intensity, also referring abdominal distension, nausea, and gastrointestinal-content vomits. DISCUSSION In adult patients, the exact mechanism of intussusception is unknown in 8–20% of the cases, however, secondary intussusception can occur with any lesion of the intestinal wall or any irritant factor in its lumen that alters normal peristaltic activity and that could serve as a trigger to start an intussusception of one bowel segment over another the most common site is the small intestine. CONCLUSION Intussusception represents an unusual problem in adult patients; it requires a high clinical suspicion, mainly as a differential diagnosis in patients with intestinal obstruction, and it clinically presents as a subacute or chronic illness. CT represents the most useful diagnostic tool. An attempt to perform reduction procedures in small intestine intussusceptions can be done, however, in ileocolic or colonic intussusceptions, a formal resection of the segment is recommended. PMID:24727207

  8. A thymic carcinoid in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris).

    PubMed

    Powe, Joshua; Castleman, William; Fiorello, Christine

    2005-09-01

    An 18-yr-old Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) presented with acute onset hind limb paresis. Radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging revealed a caudal abdominal aortic thrombus and a cranial mediastinal mass. Necropsy confirmed aortic thrombosis. Necrotizing enteritis and multifocal renal thrombosis were also noted. The cranial mediastinum contained a bilobed mass that histologically and ultrastructurally was consistent with a carcinoid.

  9. Prognosis of patients with carcinoid heart disease after valvular surgery.

    PubMed

    Manoly, Imthiaz; McAnelly, Sarah-Louise; Sriskandarajah, Sanjeevan; McLaughlin, Kenneth Edward

    2014-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. We addressed the following question: in patients who are diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease (CHD), do valvular surgeries improve their prognosis? Fifty percent of the patients with clinically diagnosed carcinoid syndrome had cardiac involvement which was present either as valvular dysfunction or as cardiac metastases. These patients often require surgery due to their heightened risk of cardiac disease. Altogether 217 relevant papers were identified as a result of the below-mentioned search, of which 10 papers represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Of the patients who were identified to have carcinoid heart disease in different studies, 193 patients had valve procedure, mainly replacements at tricuspid, mitral and aortic valve positions and either valvuloplasty or replacement at pulmonary valve. Tricuspid and pulmonary valves represented the majority of the excised valves among patients undergoing valvular surgery for CHD. The pathology of carcinoid valve was attributed to the presence of plaque, causing thickening and retraction. Pure regurgitation was the most common finding in all the valves except pulmonary valve which had both stenosis and insufficiency. Thirty-day mortality was 17% (range 1-63%) and long-term survivors were reported to be alive at an average of 58 months (28-80 months) after the valve surgery. The evidence demonstrates that surgical intervention can lead to improved prognosis and reduce the symptoms of heart failure. Postoperative mortality was mainly due to the carcinoid disease itself and not as a complication of the surgery. Therefore, surgery could be considered for symptomatic palliation in carefully selected individuals.

  10. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-17

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  11. Overexpression of PY1289-HER3 in sporadic pulmonary carcinoid from patients bearing MEN1 gene variants

    PubMed Central

    LATTANZIO, ROSSANO; VESCHI, SERENA; ACETO, GITANA MARIA; CURIA, MARIA CRISTINA; CAMA, ALESSANDRO; DE LELLIS, LAURA; FANTINI, FABIANA; ANGELUCCI, DOMENICO; IACOBELLI, STEFANO; PIANTELLI, MAURO; BATTISTA, PASQUALE

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptors (HERs) (HER1/HER2/HER3/HER4) and their phosphorylated forms (p-HER1/p-HER2/p-HER3/p-HER4) in pulmonary carcinoids (PCs). HER and p-HER protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays in 37 specimens of sporadic PCs, 29 typical carcinoids (TCs) and 8 atypical carcinoids (ACs). When compared with the ACs, the TCs did not exhibit any differences in terms of HER/p-HER expression. The tumors of this study have previously been characterized for the expression of menin and the mutational status of menin 1 (MEN1), a gene strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of PCs. In the present study, it was found that the cytoplasmic (‘disarrayed’), but not nuclear (‘arrayed’) expression of menin was positively correlated with HER3 (P=0.004), HER4 (P=0.015), p-HER1 (P=0.005), p-HER3 (P<0.001), and p-HER4 (P=0.001) expression. Moreover, HER3 and p-HER3 were found to be significantly more expressed in PCs with MEN1 variants, than in tumors with MEN1 wild-type (P=0.000 and P=0.025, respectively). These findings suggest the potential clinical use of HER inhibitors in the treatment of patients with PCs, particularly for individuals with p-HER3-positive PCs harboring MEN1 gene variants. PMID:27347164

  12. Carcinoid heart disease from ovarian primary presenting with acute pericarditis and biventricular failure

    PubMed Central

    Vergani, D; Massironi, L; Lombardi, F; Fiorentini, C

    1998-01-01

    A case is described of a 54 year old woman who had acute pericarditis with large exudative effusion accompanied by severe right and left ventricular failure. The patient was finally diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian carcinoid teratoma. She was treated with octreotide—a somatostatin analogue—followed by radical surgical resection of the neoplasm. At one year follow up only mild carcinoid tricuspid regurgitation remained. Only 16 cases of carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian primary have been described in literature. Moreover clinically manifest acute, non-metastatic pericarditis and left heart failure are not considered as possible presentations of carcinoid heart disease, whatever the origin. In a recent series a small pericardial effusion was considered an infrequent and unexpected echocardiographic finding in carcinoid heart patients. One case of "carcinoid pericarditis" has previously been described as a consequence of pericardial metastasis. Left sided heart involvement is usually caused by bronchial carcinoids or patency of foramen ovale; both were excluded in the case presented.

 Keywords: carcinoid heart disease;  ovarian tumour;  acute pericarditis;  heart failure PMID:10065036

  13. An Unusual Case of Synchronous Carcinoid of Ovary and Gall Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Rupali; Arora, Raksha; Bhasin, Sangeeta; Khurana, Nita

    2013-01-01

    Multifocal carcinoid is a known phenomenon. We present a rare combination of an ovarian carcinoid synchronous with gallbladder carcinoid. This rare combination has not been reported so far. An asymptomatic 45-years-old perimenopausal lady was diagnosed to have a metastatic ovarian cancer, but on laparotomy she was found to have a primary synchronous metastatic gall bladder as well. On histopathological evaluation she was found to have two separate primary carcinoids. Subsequently the patient received chemotherapy and is completely asymptomatic on follow up. Further research needs to be undertaken and guidelines need to be formulated for management of these cases. PMID:24371533

  14. Age and cellular context influence rectal prolapse formation in mice with caecal wall colorectal cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Tommelein, Joke; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; De Vlieghere, Elly; Wagemans, Glenn; Gespach, Christian; Boterberg, Tom; Demetter, Pieter; Ceelen, Wim; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In patients with rectal prolapse is the prevalence of colorectal cancer increased, suggesting that a colorectal tumor may induce rectal prolapse. Establishment of tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice after orthotopic inoculations of human colorectal cancer cells into the caecal wall is a widely used approach for the study of human colorectal cancer progression and preclinical evaluation of therapeutics. Remarkably, 70% of young mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor showed symptoms of intussusception of the large bowel associated with intestinal lumen obstruction and rectal prolapse. The quantity of the COLO320DM bioluminescent signal of the first three weeks post-inoculation predicts prolapse in young mice. Rectal prolapse was not observed in adult mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor or young mice carrying a HT29 caecal tumor. In contrast to HT29 tumors, which showed local invasion and metastasis, COLO320DM tumors demonstrated a non-invasive tumor with pushing borders without presence of metastasis. In conclusion, rectal prolapse can be linked to a non-invasive, space-occupying COLO320DM tumor in the gastrointestinal tract of young immunodeficient mice. These data reveal a model that can clarify the association of patients showing rectal prolapse with colorectal cancer. PMID:27689329

  15. Tailoring treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma: immunohistochemistry for predictive biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Payal

    2011-04-01

    Over the past couple of decades, multimodality treatment for the management of resectable rectal cancer has substantially improved the outcome of affected patients. However, the broad and unpredictable response to tumor of patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapeutic interventions shows that our understanding of the molecular events leading to radioresistance in patients affected with this malignancy remains sparse. Multiple attempts by individual molecular markers in gene array and tissue microarray studies have emerged with the goal of identifying predictors of a response to chemoradiation in patients with rectal cancer. In this report, we discuss the status of the markers currently available in an attempt to tailor specific targeted therapies for rectal cancer in the neoadjuvant setting.

  16. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  17. Clinical application of multimodality imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Yang; Zhe, Hong

    2013-12-11

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of rectal cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are mainstay techniques of radiotherapy for rectal cancer. However, the success of these techniques is heavily reliant on accurate target delineation and treatment planning. Computed tomography simulation is a cornerstone of rectal cancer radiotherapy, but there are limitations, such as poor soft-tissue contrast between pelvic structures and partial volume effects. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) can overcome these limitations and provide additional information for rectal cancer treatment planning. PET can also reduce the interobserver variation in the definition of rectal tumor volume. However, there is a long way to go before these image modalities are routinely used in the clinical setting. This review summarizes the most promising studies on clinical applications of multimodality imaging in target delineation and treatment planning for rectal cancer radiotherapy.

  18. Adenomatous tumors of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Stanley; Koss, Shira

    2015-04-01

    Adenomatous tumors are an uncommon cause of a middle ear mass. Clinical findings may be nonspecific, leading to difficulties in differentiation from other middle ear tumors. Controversy also exists whether to classify middle ear adenoma and carcinoid as separate neoplasms, or alternatively within a spectrum of the same pathologic entity. Most adenomatous middle ear tumors are indolent in behavior, with a benign histologic appearance and slowly progressive growth. The mainstay of treatment is complete surgical resection, which affords the greatest likelihood of cure.

  19. Use of radioguided surgery with [111In]-pentetreotide in the management of an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grossrubatscher, E; Vignati, F; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Belloni, P A; Vanzulli, A; Bramerio, M; Marocchi, A; Rossetti, O; Zurleni, F; Loli, P

    2005-01-01

    Intraoperative [111In]-pentetreotide scintigraphy with a hand-held gamma detector probe has recently been proposed to increase the intraoperative detection rate of small neuroendocrine tumors and their metastases. We report a case of a 28-yr-old woman with ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid, in whom the use of radioguided surgery improved disease management. At presentation, radiolabeled pentetreotide scintigraphy was the only procedure able to detect the ectopic source of ACTH. After radiologic confirmation, the patient underwent removal of a bronchial carcinoid, with disease persistence. After surgery, pentetreotide scintigraphy showed pathologic uptake in the mediastinum not previously detected at surgery and only subsequently confirmed by radiologic studies. Despite a second thoracic exploration, hormonal, scintigraphic, and radiological evidence of residual disease persisted. Radioguided surgery was then performed using a hand-held gamma probe 48 h after iv administration of a tracer dose of radiolabeled [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]-pentetreotide, which permitted detection and removal of multiple residual mediastinal lymph node metastases. Clinical and radiologic cure, with no evidence of tracer uptake at pentetreotide scintigraphy, was subsequently observed. The use of an intraoperative gamma counter appears a promising procedure in the management of metastatic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids.

  20. Metachronous penile metastasis from rectal cancer after total pelvic exenteration.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuta; Shida, Dai; Nasu, Keiichi; Matsunaga, Hiroki; Warabi, Masahiro; Inoue, Satoru

    2012-10-14

    Despite its abundant vascularization and extensive circulatory communication with neighboring organs, metastases to the penis are a rare event. A 57-year-old male, who had undergone total pelvic exenteration for rectal cancer sixteen months earlier, demonstrated an abnormal uptake within his penis by positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A single elastic nodule of the middle penis shaft was noted deep within Bucks fascia. No other obvious recurrent site was noted except the penile lesion. Total penectomy was performed as a curative resection based on a diagnosis of isolated penile metastasis from rectal cancer. A histopathological examination revealed an increase of well differentiated adenocarcinoma in the corpus spongiosum consistent with his primary rectal tumor. The immunohistochemistry of the tumor cells demonstrated positive staining for cytokeratin 20 and negative staining for cytokeratin 7, which strongly supported a diagnosis of penile metastasis from the rectum. The patient is alive more than two years without any recurrence.

  1. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  2. Array comparative genomic hybridization-based characterization of genetic alterations in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Voortman, Johannes; Lee, Jih-Hsiang; Killian, Jonathan Keith; Suuriniemi, Miia; Wang, Yonghong; Lucchi, Marco; Smith, William I; Meltzer, Paul; Wang, Yisong; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2010-07-20

    The goal of this study was to characterize and classify pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors based on array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Using aCGH, we performed karyotype analysis of 33 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumors, 13 SCLC cell lines, 19 bronchial carcinoids, and 9 gastrointestinal carcinoids. In contrast to the relatively conserved karyotypes of carcinoid tumors, the karyotypes of SCLC tumors and cell lines were highly aberrant. High copy number (CN) gains were detected in SCLC tumors and cell lines in cytogenetic bands encoding JAK2, FGFR1, and MYC family members. In some of those samples, the CN of these genes exceeded 100, suggesting that they could represent driver alterations and potential drug targets in subgroups of SCLC patients. In SCLC tumors, as well as bronchial carcinoids and carcinoids of gastrointestinal origin, recurrent CN alterations were observed in 203 genes, including the RB1 gene and 59 microRNAs of which 51 locate in the DLK1-DIO3 domain. These findings suggest the existence of partially shared CN alterations in these tumor types. In contrast, CN alterations of the TP53 gene and the MYC family members were predominantly observed in SCLC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the aCGH profile of SCLC cell lines highly resembles that of clinical SCLC specimens. Finally, by analyzing potential drug targets, we provide a genomics-based rationale for targeting the AKT-mTOR and apoptosis pathways in SCLC.

  3. Metastatic Midgut Carcinoid in the Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Lois, Konstantinos B; Skinner, Jane; Petrides, George; James, Robert Andrew; Perros, Petros

    2015-09-01

    Metastasis of neuroendocrine tumor to the myocardium is rare. We present a case of 64-year-old woman, who presented initially with abdominal pain and large adnexal mass. The image-guided biopsy showed low-grade neuroendocrine tumor with Ki67 less than 2% within the ovarian tissue. CT staging revealed bilateral adnexal masses, liver metastases, and primary lesion in the terminal ileum. Octreoscan showed marked tracer uptake within the lower esophagus not related to obvious mass on CT scan; the echocardiography confirmed the presence of a 2.7 cm LV/LA mass. In this case, close correlation between ECHO and the octreoscan obviated need for myocardial biopsy.

  4. Phase I Study of Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil for Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-02

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  5. Gene Expression Analysis of Sporadic Early-Onset Rectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nfonsam, V; Xu, W; Koblinski, J; Jandova, J

    2016-01-01

    Background Overall declines in incidence of rectal cancer (RC) in patients older than 50 years have been mostly attributed to improvement in treatment modalities and introduction of age-based screening. Recent studies, however, have shown a rise in the incidence of RC in patients younger than 50 years. The etiology of early-onset (EO) RC is not well understood. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular features of (EO) RC and show its uniqueness compared to late-onset (LO) disease. Methods Two cohorts of patients with sporadic RC were identified. Tumors and matching non-involved tissues from six (EO) RC patients (< 50 years) and six (LO) RC patients (>65 years) were obtained from Pathology archives. Deparaffinized tissues were macro-dissected from FFPE sections, RNA isolated and used for expression profiling of 770 cancer related genes representing 13 canonical pathways. Statistical analysis was performed using the Gene Expression R-script module within the nCounter software v2.6. A gene was considered to be above background if the average count for the target gene was greater than the average counts for the eight negative control genes and if the P value of the t-test was less than 0.05. Results When we compared rectal tumors to non-involved rectal tissues, changes in expression levels of 171 genes were statistically significant in early-onset group and 151 genes in late-onset group. Further comparative gene expression analysis between early- and late-onset rectal tumors normalized to their matching non-involved tissues revealed that changes in expression of 65 genes were unique to early-onset rectal tumors with 16 genes being up- and 49 genes down-regulated using the cutoff criteria of expression levels difference >2 fold and p-value <0.01. At the pathway level, MAPK signaling was the most deregulated pathway in early-onset rectal tumors compared to PI3K-AKT signaling pathway being the most deregulated in late-onset rectal tumors. Conclusions Results of

  6. Adjuvant therapy of resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-08-01

    The two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer are surgery followed by postoperative combined modality therapy and preoperative combined modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. Preoperative therapy (most commonly combined modality therapy) has gained acceptance as a standard adjuvant therapy. The potential advantages of the preoperative approach include decreased tumor seeding, less acute toxicity, increased radiosensitivity due to more oxygenated cells, and enhanced sphincter preservation. There are a number of new chemotherapeutic agents that have been developed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Phase I/II trials examining the use of new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with pelvic radiation therapy are in progress.

  7. Pulmonary and tricuspid valvuloplasty in carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Fudge, James C

    2016-12-28

    A 26-year-old female with carcinoid heart disease consisting of severe pulmonary and tricuspid valve stenosis was admitted with line associated sepsis. She recovered from sepsis with antibiotics and aggressive fluid resuscitation but became grossly volume overloaded with evidence of tense ascites and lower extremity edema. She developed worsening renal and hepatic function due to congestive nephropathy and hepatopathy, which did not respond to intravenous diuretics, and she was deemed too sick for surgical pulmonary and tricuspid valve replacement. Pulmonary and tricuspid valvuloplasty was performed as a rescue measure to alleviate her congestive symptoms and improve her candidacy for valve replacement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Clinical impact of HLA class I expression in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Speetjens, Frank M.; de Bruin, Elza C.; Morreau, Hans; Zeestraten, Eliane C. M.; Putter, Hein; van Krieken, J. Han; van Buren, Maaike M.; van Velzen, Monique; Dekker-Ensink, N. Geeske; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To determine the clinical impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression in irradiated and non-irradiated rectal carcinomas. Experimental design Tumor samples in tissue micro array format were collected from 1,135 patients. HLA class I expression was assessed after immunohistochemical staining with two antibodies (HCA2 and HC10). Results Tumors were split into two groups: (1) tumors with >50% of tumor cells expressing HLA class I (high) and (2) tumors with ≤50% of tumor cells expressing HLA class I (low). No difference in distribution or prognosis of HLA class I expression was found between irradiated and non-irradiated patients. Patients with low expression of HLA class I (15% of all patients) showed an independent significantly worse prognosis with regard to overall survival and disease-free survival. HLA class I expression had no effect on cancer-specific survival or recurrence-free survival. Conclusions Down-regulation of HLA class I in rectal cancer is associated with poor prognosis. In contrast to our results, previous reports on HLA class I expression in colorectal cancer described a large population of patients with HLA class I negative tumors, having a good prognosis. This difference might be explained by the fact that a large proportion of HLA negative colon tumors are microsatellite instable (MSI). MSI tumors are associated with a better prognosis than microsatellite stable (MSS). As rectal tumors are mainly MSS, our results suggest that it is both, oncogenic pathway and HLA class I expression, that dictates patient’s prognosis in colorectal cancer. Therefore, to prevent confounding in future prognostic analysis on the impact of HLA expression in colorectal tumors, separate analysis of MSI and MSS tumors should be performed. PMID:17874100

  9. GLUT-1 expression and response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Sarah; Sheehan, Katherine M; McNamara, Deborah A; Deasy, Joseph; Bouchier-Hayes, David J; Kay, Elaine W

    2009-12-15

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is used in locally advanced rectal cancer to reduce local recurrence and improve operability, however a proportion of tumors do not undergo significant regression. Identification of predictive markers of response to chemoradiotherapy would improve patient selection and may allow response modification by targeting of specific pathways. The aim of this study was to determine whether expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) and p53 in pretreatment rectal cancer biopsies was predictive of tumor response to chemoradiotherapy. Immunohistochemical staining for GLUT-1 and p53 was performed on 69 pretreatment biopsies and compared to tumor response in the resected specimen as determined by the tumor regression grade (TRG) scoring system. GLUT-1 expression was significantly associated with reduced response to chemoradiotherapy and increasing GLUT expression correlated with poorer response (p=0.02). GLUT-1 negative tumors had a 70% probability of good response (TRG3/4) compared to a 31% probability of good response in GLUT-1 positive tumors. GLUT-1 may be a useful predictive marker of response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

  10. Diode Laser in Management of Tracheobronchial Typical Carcinoid: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhambhani, Navin; Masurkar, Vishwanath; Thombre, Sonal

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchial carcinoids are relatively uncommon neoplasms with malignant (though indolent) potential and variable behavior. Clinical presentation is usually similar to any obstructive tracheobronchial lesions or rarely with presentation of carcinoid syndrome. Management varies from Pneumonectomy to use of lung sparing bronchoscoplastic techniques. We report the case of a 32-year-old male patient diagnosed with carcinoid of left main bronchus. Patient was successfully treated with trans-bronchoscopic diode laser. At 24 months of follow up patient remains asymptomatic and recurrence-free. PMID:26500999

  11. Adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid (appendiceal-type crypt cell adenocarcinoma) is a morphologically distinct entity with highly aggressive behavior and frequent association with peritoneal/intra-abdominal dissemination: an analysis of 77 cases.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michelle D; Basturk, Olca; Shaib, Walid L; Xue, Yue; Balci, Serdar; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Akkas, Gizem; Memis, Bahar; Robinson, Brian S; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Staley, Charles A; Staley, Christopher A; Winer, Joshua H; Russell, Maria C; Knight, Jessica H; Goodman, Michael; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-10-01

    High-grade versions of appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids ('adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoids') are poorly characterized. We herein document 77 examples. Tumors occurred predominantly in females (74%), mean age 55 years (29-84), most with disseminated abdominal (77% peritoneal, 58% gynecologic tract involvement) and stage IV (65%) disease. Many presented to gynecologic oncologists, and nine had a working diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. Metastases to liver (n=3) and lung (n=1) were uncommon and none arose in adenomatous lesions. Tumors had various histologic patterns, in variable combinations, most of which were fairly specific, making them recognizable as appendiceal in origin, even at metastatic sites: I: Ordinary goblet cell carcinoid/crypt pattern (rounded, non-luminal acini with well-oriented goblet cells), in variable amounts in all cases. II: Poorly cohesive goblet cell pattern (diffusely infiltrative cords/single files of signet ring-like/goblet cells). III: Poorly cohesive non-mucinous cell (diffuse-infiltrative growth of non-mucinous cells). IV: Microglandular (rosette-like glandular) pattern without goblet cells. V: Mixed 'other' carcinoma foci (including ordinary intestinal/mucinous). VI: goblet cell carcinoid pattern with high-grade morphology (marked nuclear atypia). VII: Solid sheet-like pattern punctuated by goblet cells/microglandular units. Ordinary nested/trabecular ('carcinoid pattern') was very uncommon. In total, 33(52%) died of disease, with median overall survival 38 months and 5-year survival 32%. On multivariate analysis perineural invasion and younger age (<55) were independently associated with worse outcome while lymph-vascular invasion, stage, and nodal status trended toward, but failed to reach, statistical significance. Worse behavior in younger patients combined with female predilection and ovarian-affinity raise the possibility of hormone-assisted tumor progression. In conclusion, 'adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid' is

  12. Comparative clinicopathological characteristics of colon and rectal T1 carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ichimasa, Katsuro; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Miyachi, Hideyuki; Kouyama, Yuta; Hayashi, Takemasa; Wakamura, Kunihiko; Hisayuki, Tomokazu; Kudo, Toyoki; Misawa, Masashi; Mori, Yuichi; Matsudaira, Shingo; Hidaka, Eiji; Hamatani, Shigeharu; Ishida, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis significantly influences the management of patients with colorectal carcinoma. It has been observed that the biology of colorectal carcinoma differs by location. The aim of the current study was to retrospectively compare the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with colon and rectal T1 carcinomas, particularly their rates of lymph node metastasis. Of the 19,864 patients who underwent endoscopic or surgical resection of colorectal neoplasms at Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, 557 had T1 surgically resected carcinomas, including 457 patients with colon T1 carcinomas and 100 patients with rectal T1 carcinomas. Analysed clinicopathological features included patient age, gender, tumor size, morphology, tumor budding, invasion depth, vascular invasion, histological grade, lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis. Rectal T1 carcinomas were significantly larger than colon T1 carcinomas (mean ± standard deviation: 23.7±13.1 mm vs. 19.9±11.0 mm, P<0.01) and were accompanied by significantly higher rates of vascular invasion (48.0% vs. 30.2%, P<0.01). Significant differences were not observed among any other clinicopathological factors. In conclusion, tumor location itself was not a risk factor for lymph node metastasis in colorectal T1 carcinomas, even though on average, rectal T1 carcinomas were larger and accompanied by a significantly higher rate of vascular invasion than colon T1 carcinomas. PMID:28356962

  13. Complications from carcinoid syndrome: review of the current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mota, José Mauricio; Sousa, Luana Guimarães; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours may develop carcinoid syndrome (CS), which is characterised by flushing, abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, and bronchospasms. In this scenario, long-term secretion of vasoactive substances—serotonin, tachynins, and others, may induce fibrogenic responses in local or distant tissues, leading to complications such as carcinoid heart disease (CHD), mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal fibrosis. Rare cases of lung/pleural fibrosis and scleroderma have also been described. Despite it not being well described yet, current evidence suggests the pathogenesis of such fibrogenic complications relies on signalling through 5-HT2B and TGF-β1. Medical management is still very limited and lacks prospective and randomised studies for definitive recommendations. Surgical procedures remain the best definitive treatment option for CHD and abdominal fibrosis. Recently, cognitive impairment has also been described as a potential consequence of CS. This review critically discusses the literature concerning the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment options for CS-related long-term complications. PMID:27594907

  14. Ultrastructural cytochemistry of platelets and megakaryocytes in the carcinoid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J C; Maldonado, J E; Mann, K G; Moertel, C G

    1976-09-01

    Platelets and megakaryocytes from 11 patients with the carcinoid syndrome have been studied by transmission electron microscopy. Cells fixed in phosphate-buffered glutaraldehyde are oval to discoid, with pseudopods, a dilated open-channel system, and a prominent dense tubular system as defined by peroxidase activity and alkaline bismuth stain. Atypical with hexagonal lattices and treaded substructures and large (diameter greater than 0.5 mum), phosphatase-positive, debris-containing vacuoles are four times more numerous than in normal platelets. Incubation of platelets in a 0.05% suspension of latex results in particle incorporation into phagosomes and the debris-containing vacuoles. Molybdate-dichromate stain reveals two classes of dense bodies, one of which (with a reticular core) is 20 times more numerous than in normal platelets. Bone marrow megakaryocytes lack both dense bodies and debris vacuoles analogous to those found in circulating platelets. These results suggest autophagy or endocytosis abnormalities and provide evidence for multiple types of dense bodies in carcinoid platelets.

  15. The accuracy of endorectal ultrasonography in rectal cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    COTE, ADRIAN; GRAUR, FLORIN; LEBOVICI, ANDREI; MOIS, EMIL; AL HAJJAR, NADIM; MARE, CODRUTA; BADEA, RADU; IANCU, CORNEL

    2015-01-01

    . The accuracy of ERUS is higher in diagnosing rectal cancer in stages T1, T2 and even in stage T3 with malignant tumor which is not occlusive. ERUS is less accurate for T staging of locally advanced and stenotic tumours. PMID:26609269

  16. Update and Debate Issues in Surgical Treatment of Middle and Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sung; AL-Asari, Sami F.

    2012-01-01

    Based on a review of the literature, this paper provides an update on surgical treatment of middle and low rectal cancer and discusses issues of debate surrounding that treatment. The main goal of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is radical resection of the tumor and surrounding lymphatic tissue. Local excision of early rectal cancer can be another treatment option, in which the patient can avoid possible complications related to radical surgery. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has been recommended for patients with cT3-4N0 or any T N+ rectal cancer because CRT shows better local control and less toxicity than adjuvant CRT. However, recent clinical trials showed promising results for local excision after neoadjuvant CRT in selected patients with low rectal cancer. In addition, the "wait and see" concept is another modality that has been reported for the management of tumors that show complete clinical remission after neoadjuvant CRT. Although radical surgery for middle and low rectal cancer is the cornerstone therapy, an ultralow anterior resection with or without intersphincteric resection (ISR) has become an alternative standard surgical method for selected patients. Many studies have reported on the oncological safety of the ISR, but few of them have addressed the issue the functional outcome. Furthermore, an abdominoperineal resection (APR) has problems with high rates of tumor perforations and positive circumferential resection margins, and those factors have contributed to its having a high rate of local recurrence and a poor survival rate for rectal cancer compared with sphincter-saving procedures. Recently, great efforts have been made to reduce these problems, and the total levator excision or the extended APR concept has emerged. Surgical management for low rectal cancer should aim to radically excise the tumor and to preserve as much of the sphincter function as possible by using multidisciplinary approaches. However, further prospective

  17. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent; Gronbaek, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea restricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has not yet been evaluated in any group of patients. We aimed to test the performance of 3D-Transit in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and to compare the patients’ regional gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) and colonic motility patterns with those of healthy subjects. Methods Fifteen healthy volunteers and seven patients with neuroendocrine tumor and at least 3 bowel movements per day were investigated with 3D-Transit and standard radiopaque markers. Results Total GITT assessed with 3D-Transit and radiopaque markers were well correlated (Spearman’s rho = 0.64, P = 0.002). Median total GITT was 12.5 (range: 8.5–47.2) hours in patients versus 25.1 (range: 13.1–142.3) hours in healthy (P = 0.007). There was no difference in gastric emptying (P = 0.778). Median small intestinal transit time was 3.8 (range: 1.4–5.5) hours in patients versus 4.4 (range: 1.8–7.2) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.044). Median colorectal transit time was 5.2 (range: 2.9–40.1) hours in patients versus 18.1 (range: 5.0–134.0) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.012). Median frequency of pansegmental colonic movements was 0.45 (range: 0.03–1.02) per hour in patients and 0.07 (range: 0–0.61) per hour in healthy subjects (P = 0.045). Conclusions Three-dimensional Transit allows assessment of regional GITT in patients with diarrhea. Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have faster than normal gastrointestinal transit due to faster small intestinal and colorectal transit times. The latter is caused by an increased frequency of pansegmental colonic movements. PMID:26130638

  18. Massive parallel sequencing and digital gene expression analysis reveals potential mechanisms to overcome therapy resistance in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Walter, Robert Fred Henry; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Christoph, Daniel; Werner, Robert; Schmeller, Jan; Flom, Elena; Trakada, Georgia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Adamidis, Vasilis; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Kollmeier, Jens; Mairinger, Thomas; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Schmidt, Kurt Werner; Mairinger, Fabian Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. 25% show neuroendocrine differentiation (typical/atypical carcinoids, large-/small-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas). Carcinoids present with long survival rates, but metastatic carcinoids correlate with decreased survival and are commonly insensitive to standard chemotherapy or radiation. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Material and methods: 70 representative tumor specimens were used for next-generation sequencing analysis of 14 genes related to therapy response. Additionally, mRNA-expression profiles of 60 matching samples were determined for 13 selected drug targets by using the NanoString nCounter technology. Results: A number of features known to sensitize tumors for different targeted therapies could be identified, which hopefully improve the clinical management of this subgroup of lung neoplasias. In particular, EGFR expression was observed in the investigated tumors in a noteworthy manner. Additionally, MDM2 was strongly expressed in the majority of all samples whereas the expression of its physiological inhibitor, CDKN2A, was nearly absent in all low-grade tumors. TP53 showed a high frequency of variants in high-grade tumors but mutations were rare in carcinoids. Conclusion: Based on our results, therapeutic approaches with MDM2-inhibitors and monoclonal anti-EGFR antibodies may be promising in pulmonary carcinoid tumors.

  19. Massive parallel sequencing and digital gene expression analysis reveals potential mechanisms to overcome therapy resistance in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Robert Fred Henry; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Christoph, Daniel; Werner, Robert; Schmeller, Jan; Flom, Elena; Trakada, Georgia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Adamidis, Vasilis; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Kollmeier, Jens; Mairinger, Thomas; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Schmidt, Kurt Werner; Mairinger, Fabian Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. 25% show neuroendocrine differentiation (typical/atypical carcinoids, large-/small-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas). Carcinoids present with long survival rates, but metastatic carcinoids correlate with decreased survival and are commonly insensitive to standard chemotherapy or radiation. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Material and methods: 70 representative tumor specimens were used for next-generation sequencing analysis of 14 genes related to therapy response. Additionally, mRNA-expression profiles of 60 matching samples were determined for 13 selected drug targets by using the NanoString nCounter technology. Results: A number of features known to sensitize tumors for different targeted therapies could be identified, which hopefully improve the clinical management of this subgroup of lung neoplasias. In particular, EGFR expression was observed in the investigated tumors in a noteworthy manner. Additionally, MDM2 was strongly expressed in the majority of all samples whereas the expression of its physiological inhibitor, CDKN2A, was nearly absent in all low-grade tumors. TP53 showed a high frequency of variants in high-grade tumors but mutations were rare in carcinoids. Conclusion: Based on our results, therapeutic approaches with MDM2-inhibitors and monoclonal anti-EGFR antibodies may be promising in pulmonary carcinoid tumors. PMID:27994651

  20. Healthcare and economic impact of diarrhea in patients with carcinoid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Broder, Michael S; Chang, Eunice; Romanus, Dorothy; Cherepanov, Dasha; Neary, Maureen P

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine healthcare resource utilization patterns and costs accrued by carcinoid syndrome (CS) patients with and without diarrhea. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using MarketScan® data from 1/1/2002-12/31/2012. Newly diagnosed CS patients had 1 medical claim for CS (ICD-9-CM code 259.2) plus either ≥ 1 additional claim for CS or for carcinoid tumors (ICD-9-CM 209.x), and had no evidence of CS for 1 year prior to index CS diagnosis, in commercially-insured patients < 65 years old. Patients were required to have continuous enrollment one year prior and after index date (first claim with CS diagnosis in the ID period). We identified patients with evidence of non-infectious diarrhea (ICD-9-CM codes 564.5 and 787.91) within one year from the index date. Overall and CS-related healthcare resource utilization and costs were compared between patients with and without non-infectious diarrhea during the one year period after the index date. RESULTS: There were 2822 newly diagnosed CS patients; 534 (18.9%) had evidence of non-infectious diarrhea. Compared to patients without non-infectious diarrhea, non-infectious diarrhea patients more commonly had at ≥ 1 CS-related hospitalization (13.7% vs 7.2%), ≥ 1 CS-related ED visit (11.0% vs 4.4%), and CS-related office visits in one year (6.9 vs 4.1; all P < 0.001). After adjusting for demographics, region, number of chronic conditions and the Charlson Comorbidity Index, the proportions of patients with any and with CS-related hospitalizations were 9.7% and 6.8% higher, respectively, among non-infectious diarrhea patients compared to those with without non-infectious diarrhea (P < 0.001). Unadjusted costs were significantly higher among non-infectious diarrhea patients vs those without non-infectious diarrhea. The non-infectious diarrhea group was also more costly, with adjusted mean annual costs of $81610, compared to $51719 in the group without non-infectious diarrhea (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION

  1. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some throat ...

  2. ¹H NMR-based metabolic profiling of human rectal cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectal cancer is one of the most prevalent tumor types. Understanding the metabolic profile of rectal cancer is important for developing therapeutic approaches and molecular diagnosis. Methods Here, we report a metabonomics profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human rectal cancer subjects (n = 127) and normal controls (n = 43) using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomics assay, which is a highly sensitive and non-destructive method for the biomarker identification in biological systems. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyze the 1H-NMR profiling data to identify the distinguishing metabolites of rectal cancer. Results Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed among the different stages of rectal cancer tissues (stage I = 35; stage II = 37; stage III = 37 and stage IV = 18) and normal controls. A total of 38 differential metabolites were identified, 16 of which were closely correlated with the stage of rectal cancer. The up-regulation of 10 metabolites, including lactate, threonine, acetate, glutathione, uracil, succinate, serine, formate, lysine and tyrosine, were detected in the cancer tissues. On the other hand, 6 metabolites, including myo-inositol, taurine, phosphocreatine, creatine, betaine and dimethylglycine were decreased in cancer tissues. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of energy, amino acids, ketone body and choline metabolism, which may be correlated with the progression of human rectal cancer. Conclusion Our findings firstly identify the distinguishing metabolites in different stages of rectal cancer tissues, indicating possibility of the attribution of metabolites disturbance to the progression of rectal cancer. The altered metabolites may be as potential biomarkers, which would

  3. Rectal cancer and Fournier’s gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects. PMID:26290629

  4. Update on management of midgut neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mehrvarz Sarshekeh, Amir; Halperin, Daniel M; Dasari, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Midgut neuroendocrine tumors are typically indolent but can be fatal when advanced. They can also cause significant morbidity due to the characteristic carcinoid syndrome. Somatostatin analogs continue to be the mainstay of treatment given their antiproliferative properties, as well as inhibitory effects on hormones that cause carcinoid syndrome. There have been several recent advances in the systemic therapy of these tumors including consolidation of somatostatin analogs as the cornerstone of therapy, completion of pivotal trials with mTOR inhibitors, and the establishment of novel approaches including peptide receptor radionuclide therapy and oral inhibitors of peripheral tryptophan hydroxylase in tumor and symptom control, respectively. In this review article, the recent advances are summarized and an updated approach to management is proposed. PMID:27347369

  5. Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Fisseler-Eckhoff, Annette; Demes, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors may develop throughout the human body with the majority being found in the gastrointestinal tract and bronchopulmonary system. Neuroendocrine tumors are classified according to the grade of biological aggressiveness (G1–G3) and the extent of differentiation (well-differentiated/poorly-differentiated). The well-differentiated neoplasms comprise typical (G1) and atypical (G2) carcinoids. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas as well as small cell carcinomas (G3) are poorly-differentiated. The identification and differentiation of atypical from typical carcinoids or large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and small cell carcinomas is essential for treatment options and prognosis. Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors are characterized according to the proportion of necrosis, the mitotic activity, palisading, rosette-like structure, trabecular pattern and organoid nesting. The given information about the histopathological assessment, classification, prognosis, genetic aberration as well as treatment options of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors are based on own experiences and reviewing the current literature available. Most disagreements among the classification of neuroendocrine tumor entities exist in the identification of typical versus atypical carcinoids, atypical versus large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas and large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas versus small cell carcinomas. Additionally, the classification is restricted in terms of limited specificity of immunohistochemical markers and possible artifacts in small biopsies which can be compressed in cytological specimens. Until now, pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors have been increasing in incidence. As compared to NSCLCs, only little research has been done with respect to new molecular targets as well as improving the classification and differential diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors of the lung. PMID:24213466

  6. Strong PMSA Radioligand Uptake by Rectal Carcinoma: Who Put the "S" in PSMA?

    PubMed

    Stoykow, Christian; Huber-Schumacher, Sabine; Almanasreh, Nadja; Jilg, Cordula; Ruf, Juri

    2017-03-01

    We present a case of a 71-year-old patient with newly diagnosed rectal adenocarcinoma and hepatic metastases. Restaging after chemotherapy revealed a good response of the rectal primary while liver metastases were progressive. As the patient also had a history of prostate cancer, a Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT scan was performed to noninvasively further assess hepatic metastases. However, a definite differentiation between tumor entities was not possible because not only the liver metastases but also the rectal primary showed radioligand uptake (moderate and strong, respectively). Consecutive liver biopsy revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of intestinal origin.

  7. Abdominosacral resection for locally recurring rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Filiberto; Gronchi, Alessandro; Corbellini, Carlo; Milione, Massimo; Leo, Ermanno

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate feasibility and outcome of abdominal-sacral resection for treatment of locally recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS A population of patients who underwent an abdominal-sacral resection for posterior recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum at the National Cancer Institute of Milano, between 2005 and 2013, is considered. Retrospectively collected data includes patient characteristics, treatment and pathology details regarding the primary and the recurrent rectal tumor surgical resection. A clinical and instrumental follow-up was performed. Surgical and oncological outcome were investigated. Furthermore an analytical review of literature was conducted in order to compare our case series with other reported experiences. RESULTS At the time of abdomino-sacral resection, the mean age of patients was 55 (range, 38-64). The median operating time was 380 min (range, 270-480). Sacral resection was performed at S2/S3 level in 3 patients, S3/S4 in 3 patients and S4/S5 in 4 patients. The median operating time was 380 ± 58 min. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 1750 mL (range, 200-680). The median hospital stay was 22 d. Overall morbidity was 80%, mainly type II complication according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Microscopically negative margins (R0) is obtained in all patients. Overall 5-year survival after first surgical procedure is 60%, with a median survival from the first surgery of 88 ± 56 mo. The most common site of re-recurrence was intrapelvic. CONCLUSION Sacral resection represents a feasible approach to posterior rectal cancer recurrence without evidence of distant spreading. An accurate staging is essential for planning the best therapy. PMID:28070232

  8. Stages of Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a monoclonal antibody or angiogenesis inhibitor ). Chemotherapy to control the growth of the tumor . Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of both, as palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve the quality of life . Placement of a stent to help ...

  9. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental.

  10. Can endobronchial or endotracheal metastases appear from rectal adenocarcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Serbanescu, GL; Anghel, RM

    2017-01-01

    Background: Endobronchial and endotracheal metastases from extra-pulmonary solid tumors are rare. Patients and methods: We reported the case of a patient diagnosed with endobronchial and endotracheal metastases from rectal adenocarcinoma. Case report: Patient P.G., 62 years old, was diagnosed with a rectal tumor in 2011, for which, a surgical intervention was performed (pT3 pN2a M0, stage IIIB). Afterwards, she underwent adjuvant chemotherapy and concomitant radiochemotherapy. In September 2013, the chest CT showed 2 nodules for which, an incomplete surgical resection was done and which were histopathologically diagnosed as metastases from rectal cancer. The patient continued the treatment with chemotherapy associated with Bevacizumab and after 6 months only Bevacizumab for maintenance. In June 2015, the chest CT pointed out a nodule in the right upper lobe and the bronchoscopy highlighted a 4-5 mm lesion at the level of the right primary bronchus, whose biopsy proved the rectal origin. Afterwards, another surgical intervention was performed. Unfortunately, the postoperative chest CT revealed an intratracheal tissue mass (11/ 7mm) and multiple metastases in the right lung. The bronchoscopy showed 2 endotracheal lesions, out of which one was biopsied (histopathological result of metastasis from rectal cancer). Despite the fact that chemotherapy was continued, other endobronchial lesions appeared. All of them were removed and the patient started radiotherapy on the tracheal area. Afterwards, she refused to continue chemotherapy. The last bronchoscopy highlighted one endobronchial and two endotracheal secondary malignant lesions. Conclusion: Endobronchial and endotracheal metastases must be taken into consideration in all the patients with a history of extra-pulmonary cancer. Abbreviations: CT = computed tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, IMRT = intensity-modulated radiotherapy, ESMO = European Society for Medical Oncology, NCCN = National Comprehensive

  11. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. Warren; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-04-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007.

  12. Prototype of a rectal wall ultrasound image analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Ng, Wan S.; Abeyratne, Udantha R.; Tsang, Charles B.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a software system prototype for rectal wall ultrasound image processing, image display and 3D reconstruction and visualization of the rectal wall structure, which is aimed to help surgeons cope with large quantities of rectal wall ultrasound images. On the core image processing algorithm part, a novel multigradient field active contour model proposed by authors is used to complete the multi-layer boundary detection of the rectal wall. A novel unifying active contour model, which combines region information, gradient information and contour's internal constraint, is developed for tumor boundary detection. The region statistical information is described accurately by Gaussian Mixture Model, whose parameter solution is computed by Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The whole system is set up on Java platform. Java JAI technology is used for 2D image display, Java3D technology is employed for 3D reconstruction and visualization. The system prototype is currently composed of three main modules: image processing, image display and 3D visualization.

  13. Local management of rectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Touzios, John; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2008-11-01

    The treatment of rectal neoplasia, whether benign or malignant, challenges the surgeon. The challenge in treating rectal cancer is selecting the proper approach for the appropriate patient. In a small number of rectal cancer patients local excision may be the best approach. In an attempt to achieve two goals-cure of disease with a low rate of local failure and maintenance of function and quality of life-multiple approaches can be utilized. The key to obtaining a good outcome for any one patient is balancing the competing factors that impact on these goals. Any effective treatment aimed at controlling rectal cancer in the pelvis must take into account the disease in the bowel wall itself and the disease, or potential disease, in the mesorectum. The major downside of local excision techniques is the potential of leaving untreated disease in the mesorectum. Local management techniques avoid the potential morbidity, mortality, and functional consequences of a major abdominal radical resection and are thus quite effective in achieving the maintenance of function and quality of life goal. The issue for the transanal techniques is how they fare in achieving the first goal-cure of the cancer while keeping local recurrence rates to an absolute minimum. Without removing both the rectum and the mesorectum there is no completely accurate way to determine whether a rectal cancer has moved outside the bowel wall, so any decision on local management of a rectal neoplasm is a calculated risk. For benign neoplasia, the challenge is removing the lesion without having to resort to a major abdominal procedure.

  14. Trebananib And Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-05

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVB Uterine Sarcoma

  15. Pre-treatment high-resolution rectal MRI and treatment response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, George J.; You, Y. Nancy; Park, In Ja; Kaur, Harmeet; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Skibber, John M.; Ernst, Randy D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Use of rectal MRI evaluation of patients with rectal cancer for primary tumor staging and for identification for poor prognostic features is increasing. MR imaging permits precise delineation of tumor anatomy and assessment of mesorectal tumor penetration and radial margin risk. Objective To evaluate the ability of pre-treatment rectal MRI to classify tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Design Retrospective, consecutive cohort study, central review. Setting Tertiary academic hospital. Patients 62 consecutive patients with locally advanced (stage cII-cIII)rectal cancer who underwent rectal cancer protocol high resolution MRI prior to surgery(12/09-3/11). Main Outcome Measures Probability of good (ypT0-2N0) vs. poor (≥ypT3N0) response as a function of mesorectal tumor depth, lymph node status, extramural vascular invasion, and grade assessed by uni- and multi-variate logistic regression. Results Tumor response was good in 25, 40.3% and poor in 37, 59.7%.Median interval from MRI to OP was 7.9weeks (IQR: 7.0–9.0). MRI tumor depth was <1 mm in 10 (16.9%), 1–5 mm in 30 (50.8%), and >5 mm in 21(33.9%). LN status was positive in 40 (61.5%) and vascular invasion was present in 16 (25.8%). Tumor response was associated with MRI tumor depth (P=0.001), MRI lymph nodes status (P=<0.001)and vascular invasion (P=0.009). Multivariate regression indicated >5mm MRI tumor depth (OR=0.08, 95% CI=0.01–0.93, p=0.04) and MRI LN positivity (OR=0.12, 95% CI=0.03–0.53, p=0.005) were less likely to achieve a good response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Limitations Uncertain generalizability in centers with limited experience with MRI staging for rectal cancer. Conclusion MRI assessment of tumor depth and lymph node status in rectal cancer is associated to tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. These factors should therefore be considered for stratification of patients for novel treatment strategies reliant on pathologic response to treatment or for

  16. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery as optimal option in treatment of rare rectal lesions: A single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Ortenzi, Monica; Ghiselli, Roberto; Cappelletti Trombettoni, Maria Michela; Cardinali, Luca; Guerrieri, Mario

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the outcomes of transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) in the treatment of rare rectal condition like mesenchymal tumors, condylomas, endometriosis and melanoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed a twenty-three years database. Fifty-two patients were enrolled in this study. The lesions were considered suitable for TEM if they were within 20 cm from the anus. All of them underwent an accurate preoperative workup consisting in clinical examination, total colonoscopy with biopsies, endoscopic ultrasonography, and pelvic computerized tomography or pelvic magnetic resonance imaging. Operative time, intraoperative complications, rate of conversion, tumor size, postoperative morbidity, mortality, the length of hospital stay, local and distant recurrence were analyzed. RESULTS Among the 1328 patients treated by TEM in our department, the 52 patients with rectal abnormalities other than adenoma or adenocarcinoma represented 4.4%. There were 30 males (57.7%) and 22 females (42.3%). Mean age was 55 years (median = 60, range = 24-78). This series included 14 (26.9%) gastrointestinal stromal tumors, 21 neuroendocrine tumors (40.4%), 1 ganglioneuroma (1.9%), 2 solitary ulcers in the rectum (3.8%), 6 cases of rectal endometriosis (11.5%), 6 cases of rectal condylomatosis (11.5%) and 2 rectal melanomas (3.8%). Mean lesion diameter was 2.7 cm (median: 4, range: 0.4-8). Mean distance from the anal verge was 9.5 cm (median: 10, range: 4-15). One patient operated for rectal melanoma developed distant metastases and died two years after the operation. We experienced 2 local recurrences (3.8%) with an overall survival equal to 97.6% (95%CI: 95%-99%) at the end of follow-up and a disease free survival of 98% (95%CI: 96%-99%). CONCLUSION We could conclude that TEM is an important therapeutical option for rectal rare conditions. PMID:27668073

  17. Comparison of laparoscopic vs. open surgery for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zihai; Wang, Zheng; Huang, Shijie; Zhong, Shizhen; Lin, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the safety of laparoscopic radical resection for rectal cancer. A total of 64 cases of rectal cancer patients undergoing radical surgery between January, 1998 and March, 2010 were collected. The patients were divided into the laparoscopic rectal surgery group (LS group, n=31) and the open surgery group (OS group, n=33). Operation time, postoperative recovery, complications and tumor-free survival rate were compared between the two groups. The inclusion criteria were as follows: Standard Karnofsky score >70 prior to surgery, definitive pathological diagnosis and complete clinical data. The exclusion criteria were concomitant tumors affecting survival. With the Dixon operation, the LS group had a longer operation time compared with the OS group (271.2±56.2 vs. 216.0±62.7 min, respectively; P=0.036), and an earlier time of oral intake (3.0±0.9 vs. 4.7±1.0 days, respectively; P=0.000). There were no significant differences between the LS and OS groups in terms of intraoperative blood loss, number of lymph nodes retrieved, duration of postoperative hyperthermia and hospitalization time (P>0.05). With the Miles operation, there were no obvious differences between the LS and OS groups regarding operation time, intraoperative blood loss, number of lymph nodes retrieved, time of oral intake, duration of postoperative hyperthermia and hospitalization time (P>0.05). Furthermore, there were no significant differences between the LS and OS groups with the Dixon or Miles operation in terms of 3-year tumor-free survival rate (P>0.05). Thus, laparoscopic surgery appears to be a safe and feasible option for the treatment of rectal cancer. PMID:28357087

  18. Clinical value of MRI-detected extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pratik; Rao, Sheng Xiang; Zeng, Meng Su

    2017-01-01

    Extramural venous invasion (EMVI) is associated with a poor prognosis and a poor overall survival rate in rectal cancer. It can independently predict local and distant tumor recurrences. Preoperative EMVI detection in rectal cancer is useful for determining the treatment strategy. EMVI status is beneficial for the post-treatment evaluation and analysis of rectal cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic modality with no radiation effects. High-resolution MRI can detect EMVI with high accuracy. In addition, MRI results are equal to or even better than pathological results in the detection of medium to large EMVI in rectal cancer. MRI-detected EMVI (mrEMVI) can be used as a potential biomarker that facilitates treatment methods. This review highlights the importance of MRI before and after rectal cancer treatment. In addition, we analyze the prognostic correlation between mrEMVI and circulating tumor cells (CTC) in rectal cancer. This article may help shed light on the significance of mrEMVI.

  19. Eltrombopag Use in Thrombocytopenia for Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection of a Gastric Carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, Tonya; Martin, Beth; Rouse, Robert V.; Soetikno, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia is a contraindication for therapeutic endoscopy due to the risk of bleeding. Platelet transfusions can temporarily increase platelet count, but are difficult to administer in the 2 weeks following endoscopic resection, during which the patient is at high risk for delayed bleeding. We present the use of a novel thrombopoietin receptor agonist, eltrombopag, to sustain platelet levels for the safe and complete endoscopic submucosal dissection of a gastric carcinoid in a patient with severe thrombocytopenia due to cirrhosis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. We performed complete and safe endoscopic removal of a gastric carcinoid after correcting the thrombocytopenia. PMID:26157896

  20. Primary pure carcinoid tumour of the testis: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Takada, Hideki; Iwatsuki, Shoichiro; Itoh, Yasunori; Sato, Shinya; Hayase, Masa; Yasui, Takahiro

    2016-10-05

    Primary testicular carcinoid tumours (TCT) are very rare, and a large tumour size and the presence of carcinoid syndrome predict a malignant course. Histologically, it is difficult to differentiate between benign and malignant TCTs. We report a case of a primary pure TCT with an unusual presentation in a 23- year-old man, who had an asymptomatic, enlarged scrotum on the right side for 7 years. On gross examination, the tumour was 9.6 cm in diameter. The Ki-67 labelling index was 19.8%. High inguinal orchidectomy was performed, and 30 months after surgery the patient remains asymptomatic.

  1. Corticotropin-releasing hormone, proopiomelanocortin, and glucocorticoid receptor gene expression in adrenocorticotropin-producing tumors in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Suda, T; Tozawa, F; Dobashi, I; Horiba, N; Ohmori, N; Yamakado, M; Yamada, M; Demura, H

    1993-01-01

    To differentiate between ectopic ACTH syndrome and Cushing's disease, gene expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), and glucocorticoid receptor was examined in 10 pituitary adenomas (Cushing's disease) and in 10 ectopic ACTH-producing tumors. CRH increased plasma ACTH levels in all patients with Cushing's disease and in five patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome whose tumors contained CRH and CRH mRNA. In five CRH nonresponders, CRH was not detected in tumors that contained no CRH mRNA or that contained only long-size CRH mRNA. Dexamethasone (Dex) decreased plasma ACTH levels in all patients with Cushing's disease and in three patients with ectopic ACTH-producing bronchial carcinoid. These tumors contained glucocorticoid receptor mRNA. CRH increased and Dex decreased ACTH release and POMC mRNA levels in pituitary adenoma and bronchial carcinoid cells. PMA increased POMC mRNA levels only in carcinoid cells. These results reveal characteristics of ectopic ACTH-producing tumors: long-size CRH mRNA and PMA-induced POMC gene expression. In addition, there are two ectopic ACTH syndrome subtypes: tumors containing ACTH with CRH (CRH responder) and tumors without CRH. Dex decreases ACTH release and POMC mRNA levels in some bronchial carcinoids. Therefore, CRH and Dex tests have limited usefulness in differentiating between Cushing's disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome. Images PMID:8254033

  2. Defining the distal margin of rectal cancer for surgical planning

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Takashi; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the distal rectal tumor margin is essential in selecting the appropriate surgical procedure. However, there is no standard measurement method. The National Cancer Institute consensus group recommends use of the anal verge (AV) as a landmark, and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology recommends use of the anorectal ring (ARR). In addition, whether measurements should be made on double contrast barium enema (BE) radiographs or magnetic resonance (MR) images remains controversial. We measured the distal tumor margin on both BE and MR images obtained preoperatively from 52 patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. The distances from the distal end of the tumor to the AV and the ARR were measured on both types of images, and the variability was investigated by Bland-Altman analysis. The mean distance from the tumor to the AV was 8.9 cm on the BE radiographs and 7.7 cm on the MR images (P=0.013). The mean distances to the ARR were 6.8 and 5.6 cm, respectively (P=0.070). Significant proportional bias was shown as the measured distances increased, the difference between the BE- and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measurements increased. Use of one or the other landmark did not affect selection of the appropriate surgical procedure. We conclude that an approximate 1-cm underestimation should be taken into account when MRI-based measurement of the distal rectal tumor margin is used to choose between sphincter-saving resection and abdominoperineal resection. PMID:28280625

  3. Clinically relevant study end points in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martos, Carlos; Guerrero, Angel; Minsky, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    In rectal cancer currently there are no clearly validated early end points which can serve as surrogates for long-term clinical outcome such as local control and survival. However, the use of a variety of response rates (i.e. pathological complete response, downsizing the primary tumor, tumor regression grade (TRG), radiological response) as endpoints in early (phase II) clinical trials is common since objective response to therapy is an early indication of activity. Disease-free survival (DFS) has been proposed as the most appropriate end point in adjuvant trials and is one of the most frequently used in newer rectal cancer trials. Due to the devastating nature of local recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer, local control (which is itself a subset of the overall DFS endpoint) is still considered an important endpoint. Recently, circumferential resection margin (CRM) has been proposed as novel early end point because the CRM status can account for effects on DFS and overall survival after chemoradiation, radiation (RT), or surgery alone. Consensus is needed to define the most appropriate end points in both early and phase III trials in locally advanced cancer.

  4. Expression of the p73 protein in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Daniella; Gao Jingfang; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate p73 expression in normal mucosa, primary tumor, and metastasis in relation to radiotherapy (RT) response and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: p73 was immunohistochemically examined on biopsies (unirradiated, n = 102), distant (from the large bowel, n = 82), and adjacent (adjacent to primary tumor, n = 89) normal mucosa samples, primary tumors (n = 131), and lymph node metastasis (n = 32) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Seventy-four patients received surgery alone and 57 received additional RT. Results: Cytoplasmic p73 was increased in the primary tumor compared with the distant or adjacent mucosa (p {<=} 0.0001). Nuclear (p = 0.02) and cytoplasmic (p = 0.003) p73 was higher in irradiated distant mucosa samples than in unirradiated ones, and nuclear p73 tended to be increased in irradiated primary tumors compared with unirradiated ones (p = 0.06). p73 was positively related to cyclooxygenase-2 expression in irradiated tumors (p = 0.03). p73-negative tumors tended to have a lower local recurrence after RT compared with unirradiated cases (p 0.06). Conclusions: Normal epithelial cells seem more sensitive to RT than tumor cells regarding p73 expression. Patients with p73-negative rectal tumors may have a lower risk of local recurrence after RT.

  5. Chrysin suppresses the achaete-scute complex-like1 and alters the neuroendocrine phenotype of carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Somnay, Yash R.; Dull, Barbara Zarebczan; Eide, Jacob; Jaskula-Sztul, Renata; Chen, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoids are neuroendocrine neoplasms that cause significant morbidity and mortality, and for which few effective therapies are available. Given the recent identification of the anti-cancer flavonoid chrysin, we sought to investigate its therapeutic potential in carcinoids. Here, we report chrysin’s ability to modulate the achaete-scute complex-like1 (ASCL1), a neuroendocrine-specific transcription factor highly implicated in the malignant phenotype of carcinoids and other neuroendocrine cancers. Moreover, we elucidate the role of ASCL1 in carcinoid growth and bioactivity. Treatment of two carcinoid cell lines (BON and H727) with varying chrysin concentrations suppressed cell proliferation, while reducing expression of ASCL1 and the neuroendocrine biomarker chromogranin A (CgA), demonstrated by Western blotting. Propidium iodide and PE AnnexinV/7-AAD staining and sorting following chrysin treatment revealed S/G2 phase arrest and apoptosis, respectively. This was corroborated by chrysin-induced cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP and activation of p21Waf1/Cip1. Furthermore, direct ASCL1 knockdown with an ASCL1-specific small interfering RNA inhibited CgA and synaptophysin expression as well as carcinoid proliferation, while also reducing cyclin B1 and D1, and increasing p21Waf1/Cip1 and p27Kip1 expression, suggesting an arrest of the cell-cycle. Collectively, these findings warrant the deliberation of targeted ASCL1 suppression by chrysin or other agents as a therapeutic approach for carcinoid management. PMID:26403073

  6. Can C-Arm Cone-Beam CT Detect a Micro-Embolic Effect After TheraSphere Radioembolization of Neuroendocrine and Carcinoid Liver Metastasis?

    PubMed Central

    Pellerin, Olivier; Lin, MingDe; Bhagat, Nikhil; Shao, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Rational and Objective Radioembolization with yttrium-90 microspheres is a therapy that is used for hepatic tumors. 20–30 μm microspheres loaded with Y90 are supposedly occluding tumor vessels at the capillary level. Then, these spheres deliver high-dose radiation to the tumor. However, this theoretical embolic effect has never been appreciated in imaging. Dual-Phase cone-beam computed tomography (DPCBCT) is a multi-phasic intra-procedural scan that uses only one contrast media injection to visualize early (feeding vessel) and delayed (capillary level) tumor enhancement. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a micro-embolic effect induced by TheraSpheres® (MDS Nordion, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) at the capillary level by using DPCBCT imaging. Materials and Methods 14 patients with 72 carcinoid or neuroendocrine tumors were treated with radioembolization, and all underwent DPCBCT (Allura Xper, Philips Healthcare) imaging before and immediately after radioembolization with TheraSpheres®. Tumor enhancement was measured in each phase by drawing a region of interest within the tumors. Results 72 tumors were evaluated: average tumor density in the early arterial phase was 241 and 230 Hounsfield units (HU) (p<0.001) before and after radioembolization, respectively; the average density in the delayed arterial phase was 226 and 161 HU (p<0.001) before and after radioembolization, respectively. Average difference in tumor attenuation before and after radioembolization in early arterial and delayed phase was 11 HU and 64 HU (p<0.001), respectively. Conclusion The significant decrease in tumor enhancement in the DPCBCT delayed phase after TheraSpheres® injection indicates that there is an appreciable microembolic effect at the tumor capillary bed level. PMID:23484809

  7. Subcutaneous octreotide treatment of a growth hormone-releasing hormone-secreting bronchial carcinoid: superiority of continuous versus intermittent administration to control hormonal secretion.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, S; De Paepe, L; Abs, R; Rahier, J; Selvais, P; Maiter, D

    1995-09-01

    Diagnosis of ectopic acromegaly was made in a 21-year-old female patient who 3 years before had undergone a right pneumectomy for a disseminated bronchial carcinoid. Plasma growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) concentrations were markedly elevated (6440 ng/l; normal value < 100 ng/l), as were serum GH (187 micrograms/l; normal < 5 micrograms/l) and plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels (6.7 U/ml; normal < 2 U/ml). Retrospective immunohistochemical examination of the carcinoid tumor was positive for GHRH and the tumoral content of GHRH was 2130 ng/g wet weight. Subcutaneous treatment with octreotide was begun and first resulted in a profound inhibition of GH hypersecretion, normalization of plasma IGF-I and only partial reduction of GHRH concentrations. However, the initial dose of 3 x 100 micrograms had to be increased gradually to 4 x 750 micrograms because of a progressive deterioration of the hormonal control. After 15 months of intermittent therapy, octreotide was administered by continuous sc infusion. This treatment improved compliance, allowed the daily dose of octreotide to be reduced to 1500 micrograms and normalized serum GH levels. A near-normalization of the plasma IGF-I concentrations was also obtained, whereas the suppression of plasma GHRH concentrations remained incomplete. Despite favorable evolution of the endocrine parameters, intramedullar metastases were diagnosed and required radiation therapy. This observation emphasizes the superiority of continuous over intermittent administration of octreotide in the treatment of ectopic acromegaly. It also shows that the somatostatin analog acts more at the pituitary level to inhibit GH secretion than at the site of the neuroendocrine tumor.

  8. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  9. Atypical endocrine tumors of the lung.

    PubMed

    McDowell, E M; Wilson, T S; Trump, B F

    1981-01-01

    Seven malignant peripheral lung tumors that were diagnosed using light microscopy as large-cell carcinomas or as epidermoid or adenocarcinomas were studied by light and electron microscopic histochemistry. All tumors contained numerous dense-core granules. The cells were joined by desmosomes and contained well-developed tonofilament bundles. Serotonin was demonstrated in six of seven tumors and argyrophilic granules were demonstrated in five of six tumors tested. Four tumors produced mucus. All tumors extended to the visceral pleura and two invaded the chest wall. The existence of lung tumors that contain serotonin and bear argyrophilic putative endocrine granules, but that do not have a light-microscopic histology characteristic of either carcinoid or oat-cell carcinomas, is confirmed. The presumptive endocrine nature of such tumors usually passes unrecognized because they lack criteria to allow diagnosis by routine methods.

  10. Rectal dose to prostate cancer patients treated with proton therapy with or without rectal spacer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heeteak; Polf, Jerimy; Badiyan, Shahed; Biagioli, Matthew; Fernandez, Daniel; Latifi, Kujtim; Wilder, Richard; Mehta, Minesh; Chuong, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a spacer inserted in the prerectal space could reduce modeled rectal dose and toxicity rates for patients with prostate cancer treated in silico with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. A total of 20 patients were included in this study who received photon therapy (12 with rectal spacer (DuraSeal™ gel) and 8 without). Two PBS treatment plans were retrospectively created for each patient using the following beam arrangements: (1) lateral-opposed (LAT) fields and (2) left and right anterior oblique (LAO/RAO) fields. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were generated for the prostate, rectum, bladder, and right and left femoral heads. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model and compared between patients with and without the rectal spacer. A significantly lower mean rectal DVH was achieved in patients with rectal spacer compared to those without. For LAT plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 4.19 and 13.5%, respectively. For LAO/RAO plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 5.07 and 13.5%, respectively. No significant differences were found in any rectal dosimetric parameters between the LAT and the LAO/RAO plans generated with the rectal spacers. We found that ≥ 9 mm space resulted in a significant decrease in NTCP modeled for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity. Rectal spacers can significantly decrease modeled rectal dose and predicted ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated in silico with PBS. A minimum of 9 mm separation between the prostate and anterior rectal wall yields the largest benefit.

  11. Comparison of non-Gaussian and Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion weighted imaging of rectal cancer at 3.0 T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guangwen; Wang, Shuangshuang; Wen, Didi; Zhang, Jing; Wei, Xiaocheng; Ma, Wanling; Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Mian; Wu, Guosheng; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Water molecular diffusion in vivo tissue is much more complicated. We aimed to compare non-Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) including intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM), stretched-exponential model (SEM) and Gaussian diffusion model at 3.0 T MRI in patients with rectal cancer, and to determine the optimal model for investigating the water diffusion properties and characterization of rectal carcinoma. Fifty-nine consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma underwent DWI with 16 b-values at a 3.0 T MRI system. DWI signals were fitted to the mono-exponential and non-Gaussian diffusion models (IVIM-mono, IVIM-bi and SEM) on primary tumor and adjacent normal rectal tissue. Parameters of standard apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), slow- and fast-ADC, fraction of fast ADC (f), α value and distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC) were generated and compared between the tumor and normal tissues. The SEM exhibited the best fitting results of actual DWI signal in rectal cancer and the normal rectal wall (R2 = 0.998, 0.999 respectively). The DDC achieved relatively high area under the curve (AUC = 0.980) in differentiating tumor from normal rectal wall. Non-Gaussian diffusion models could assess tissue properties more accurately than the ADC derived Gaussian diffusion model. SEM may be used as a potential optimal model for characterization of rectal cancer. PMID:27934928

  12. A case of metastatic carcinoma of anal fistula caused by implantation from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rina; Ichikawa, Ryosuke; Ito, Singo; Mizukoshi, Kosuke; Ishiyama, Shun; Sgimoto, Kiichi; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Yao, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    This case involved an 80-year-old man who was seen for melena. Further testing revealed a tubular adenocarcinoma 50 mm in size in the rectum. In addition, an anal fistula was noted behind the anus along with induration. A biopsy of tissue from the external (secondary) opening of the fistula also revealed adenocarcinoma. Nodules suspected of being metastases were noted in both lung fields. The patient was diagnosed with rectal cancer, a cancer arising from an anal fistula, and a metastatic pulmonary tumor, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy was begun. A laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection was performed 34 days after 6 cycles of mFOLFOX-6 therapy. Based on pathology, the rectal cancer was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and this adenocarcinoma had lymph node metastasis (yp T3N2aM1b). There was no communication between the rectal lesion and the anal fistula, and a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma resembling the rectal lesion was noted in the anal fistula. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that both the rectal lesion and anal fistula were cytokeratin 7 (CK7) (-) and cytokeratin 20 (CK20) (+), and the patient's condition was diagnosed as implantation of rectal cancer in an anal fistula.In instances where an anal fistula develops in colon cancer, cancer implantation in that fistula must also be taken into account, and further testing should be performed prior to surgery.

  13. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Triple Negative Breast Cancer (Currently Accruing Only Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients Since 6/8/2007)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  14. Magnamosis: a novel technique for the management of rectal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Katie W; Rollins, Michael D; Feola, G Peter; Scaife, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of rectal atresia treated using magnets to create a rectal anastomosis. This minimally invasive technique is straightforward and effective for the treatment of rectal atresia in children. PMID:25096648

  15. Rectal neuroendocrine neoplasms: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) are very rare, among which second most common type is the rectal NENs in China. Patients with rectal NENs may experience non-specific symptoms such as pain, perianal bulge, anemia, and bloody stools, and surgery is considered as the first treatment for rectal NENs. We report a case of rectal NENs in a 68-year-old male patient with bloody stools, who received surgery and postoperative pathology revealed an elevated well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:28138616

  16. Significance of Cox-2 expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachkoria, Ketevan; Zhang Hong; Adell, Gunnar; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiao-feng.sun@ibk.liu.se

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has reduced local recurrence of rectal cancers, but the result is not satisfactory. Further biologic factors are needed to identify patients for more effective radiotherapy. Our aims were to investigate the relationship of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression to radiotherapy, and clinicopathologic/biologic variables in rectal cancers with or without radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cox-2 expression was immunohistochemically examined in distal normal mucosa (n = 28), in adjacent normal mucosa (n = 107), in primary cancer (n = 138), lymph node metastasis (n = 30), and biopsy (n = 85). The patients participated in a rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Results: Cox-2 expression was increased in primary tumor compared with normal mucosa (p < 0.0001), but there was no significant change between primary tumor and metastasis. Cox-2 positivity was or tended to be related to more p53 and Ki-67 expression, and less apoptosis (p {<=} 0.05). In Cox-2-negative cases of either biopsy (p = 0.01) or surgical samples (p = 0.02), radiotherapy was related to less frequency of local recurrence, but this was not the case in Cox-2-positive cases. Conclusion: Cox-2 expression seemed to be an early event involved in rectal cancer development. Radiotherapy might reduce a rate of local recurrence in the patients with Cox-2 weakly stained tumors, but not in those with Cox-2 strongly stained tumors.

  17. Technical aspects of image-based treatment planning of rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Robert; Drzymala, Robert

    2003-10-01

    The role of 3-dimensional treatment planning in the management of rectal cancer is not well defined. This report reviews technical guidelines for simulation, defining target volumes, and suggested beam configurations. Outcome from pilot clinical trials, with emphasis on the impact of volume and dose on tumor response and treatment morbidity is discussed.

  18. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by transanal local excision for T3 distal rectal cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YEO, SEUNG-GU

    2016-01-01

    Local excision (LE) for rectal cancer is currently indicated for selected T1 stage tumors. However, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer not only improves local disease control, but also leads to a decrease in the stage and size of the primary mural tumor, along with a decrease in the risk of regional lymphadenopathy. The present study reports the outcome of a patient with T3N0M0 rectal cancer who was treated with LE following preoperative CRT. The distal pole of the tumor was located 2 cm from the anal verge. Preoperative pelvic radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy was administered in 28 fractions. Chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was administered during the first and last weeks of radiotherapy. The tumor response to CRT, was found to be marked at 7 weeks after CRT completion, and a complete response was presumed clinically. Transanal full-thickness LE was performed, and pathological examination revealed the absence of residual cancer cells. After 30 months of close follow-up, the patient was alive with no evidence of disease, and treatment-associated severe toxicities were not observed. Although a longer follow-up period is required, this case report suggests that LE may also be a feasible alternative treatment for T3 rectal cancer, which exhibits a marked response to preoperative CRT, particularly in elderly and comorbid patients contraindicated for radical surgery, or patients who are reluctant to undergo sphincter-ablation surgery. PMID:27073466

  19. Paraneoplastic leukocytosis associated with a rectal adenomatous polyp in a dog.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J P; Christopher, M M; Ellison, G W; Homer, B L; Buchanan, B A

    1992-09-01

    A dog with a rectal adenomatous polyp had extreme neutrophilic leukocytosis, monocytosis, and eosinophilia consistent with a paraneoplastic syndrome. Resolution of the leukogram abnormalities after tumor excision supported this belief. Except for a lack of circulating myeloblasts, the dog had leukogram findings consistent with a neutrophilic leukemoid reaction.

  20. HIF-1α expression correlates with cellular apoptosis, angiogenesis and clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liu; Tao, Lin; Dawei, He; Xuliang, Li; Xiaodong, Luo

    2014-07-01

    Regional hypoxia caused by accelerated cell proliferation and overgrowth is an important characteristic of neoplasm. Hypoxia can cause a series of changes in gene transcription and protein expression, thereby not only inducing tumor cell resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy but also promoting tumor invasion and metastasis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between HIF-1α expression and cellular apoptosis, angiogenesis and clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma. In 113 rectal carcinoma cases, cellular apoptosis was analyzed by the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, whereas the levels of HIF-1α expression, VEGF expression, microvessel density (MVD) and lymphatic vessel density(LVD) were examined by immunohistochemical staining. HIF-1 expression was detected in 67 of 113 rectal carcinoma cases (59.3 %). A positive correlation was found among HIF-1α expression, cellular apoptosis and angiogenesis. The 5-year survival rate in the HIF-1α-negative group was significantly higher than that in the HIF-1α-positive group (81.34 % versus 50 %, P < 0.05). According to the Cox regression analysis, HIF-1α expression, VEGF expression and cellular apoptosis index were independent risk factors for clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma. Aberrant HIF-1α expression correlates with apoptosis inhibition, angiogenesis and poor prognosis in rectal carcinoma.

  1. Variation in the CYP19A1 gene and risk of colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S; Kadlubar, Susan; Caan, Bette J; Potter, John D; Wolff, Roger K

    2011-07-01

    CYP19A1, or aromatase, influences estrogen-metabolizing enzymes and may influence cancer risk. We examine variation in the CYP19A1 gene and risk of colorectal cancer using data from population-based case-control studies (colon n = 1,574 cases, 1,970 controls; rectal n = 791 cases, 999 controls). Four SNPs were statistically significantly associated with colon cancer and four were associated with rectal cancer. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, the AA genotype of rs12591359 was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer (OR 1.44 95% CI 1.16-1.80) and the AA genotype of rs2470144 was associated with a reduced risk of rectal cancer (OR 0.65 95% CI 0.50-0.84). Variants of CYP19A1 were associated with CIMP+ and CIMP+/KRAS2-mutated tumors. CT/TT genotypes of rs1961177 were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of a MSI+ colon tumor (OR 1.77 95% CI 1.26-2.37). We observed statistically significant interactions between genetic variation in NFκB1 and CYP19A1 for both colon and rectal cancer. Our data suggest the importance of CYP19A1 in the development of colon and rectal cancer and that estrogen may influence risk through an inflammation-related mechanism.

  2. Adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid (appendiceal-type crypt cell adenocarcinoma) is a morphologically distinct entity with highly aggressive behavior and frequent association with peritoneal/intra-abdominal dissemination: an analysis of 77 cases

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Michelle D; Basturk, Olca; Shaib, Walid L; Xue, Yue; Balci, Serdar; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Akkas, Gizem; Memis, Bahar; Robinson, Brian S; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Staley, Charles A; Staley, Christopher A; Winer, Joshua H; Russell, Maria C; Knight, Jessica H; Goodman, Michael; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    High-grade versions of appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids (‘adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoids’) are poorly characterized. We herein document 77 examples. Tumors occurred predominantly in females (74%), mean age 55 years (29–84), most with disseminated abdominal (77% peritoneal, 58% gynecologic tract involvement) and stage IV (65%) disease. Many presented to gynecologic oncologists, and nine had a working diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. Metastases to liver (n =3) and lung (n =1) were uncommon and none arose in adenomatous lesions. Tumors had various histologic patterns, in variable combinations, most of which were fairly specific, making them recognizable as appendiceal in origin, even at metastatic sites: I: Ordinary goblet cell carcinoid/crypt pattern (rounded, non-luminal acini with well-oriented goblet cells), in variable amounts in all cases. II: Poorly cohesive goblet cell pattern (diffusely infiltrative cords/single files of signet ring-like/goblet cells). III: Poorly cohesive non-mucinous cell (diffuse-infiltrative growth of non-mucinous cells). IV: Microglandular (rosette-like glandular) pattern without goblet cells. V: Mixed ‘other’ carcinoma foci (including ordinary intestinal/mucinous). VI: goblet cell carcinoid pattern with high-grade morphology (marked nuclear atypia). VII: Solid sheet-like pattern punctuated by goblet cells/microglandular units. Ordinary nested/trabecular (‘carcinoid pattern’) was very uncommon. In total, 33(52%) died of disease, with median overall survival 38 months and 5-year survival 32%. On multivariate analysis perineural invasion and younger age (<55) were independently associated with worse outcome while lymph-vascular invasion, stage, and nodal status trended toward, but failed to reach, statistical significance. Worse behavior in younger patients combined with female predilection and ovarian-affinity raise the possibility of hormone-assisted tumor progression. In conclusion, ‘adenocarcinoma ex

  3. Critical appraisal of laparoscopic vs open rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Winson Jianhong; Chew, Min Hoe; Dharmawan, Angela Renayanti; Singh, Manraj; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Loi, Carol Tien Tau; Tang, Choong Leong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term clinical and oncological outcomes of laparoscopic rectal resection (LRR) and the impact of conversion in patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: An analysis was performed on a prospective database of 633 consecutive patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgical resection. Patients were compared in three groups: Open surgery (OP), laparoscopic surgery, and converted laparoscopic surgery. Short-term outcomes, long-term outcomes, and survival analysis were compared. RESULTS: Among 633 patients studied, 200 patients had successful laparoscopic resections with a conversion rate of 11.1% (25 out of 225). Factors predictive of survival on univariate analysis include the laparoscopic approach (P = 0.016), together with factors such as age, ASA status, stage of disease, tumor grade, presence of perineural invasion and vascular emboli, circumferential resection margin < 2 mm, and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. The survival benefit of laparoscopic surgery was no longer significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.148). Neither 5-year overall survival (70.5% vs 61.8%, P = 0.217) nor 5-year cancer free survival (64.3% vs 66.6%, P = 0.854) were significantly different between the laparoscopic group and the converted group. CONCLUSION: LRR has equivalent long-term oncologic outcomes when compared to OP. Laparoscopic conversion does not confer a worse prognosis. PMID:27358678

  4. Locally advanced rectal cancer: the importance of a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Rossana; Maccaroni, Elena; Onofri, Azzurra; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Tiberi, Michela; Ferrini, Consuelo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-12-14

    Rectal cancer accounts for a relevant part of colorectal cancer cases, with a mortality of 4-10/100000 per year. The development of locoregional recurrences and the occurrence of distant metastases both influences the prognosis of these patients. In the last two decades, new multimodality strategies have improved the prognosis of locally advanced rectal cancer with a significant reduction of local relapse and an increase in terms of overall survival. Radical surgery still remains the principal curative treatment and the introduction of total mesorectal excision has significantly achieved a reduction in terms of local recurrence rates. The employment of neoadjuvant treatment, delivered before surgery, also achieved an improved local control and an increased sphincter preservation rate in low-lying tumors, with an acceptable acute and late toxicity. This review describes the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, focusing on the effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and of post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy both in the standard combined modality treatment programs and in the ongoing research to improve these regimens.

  5. Palliative Treatment of Rectal Carcinoma Recurrence Using Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Mylona, Sophia Karagiannis, Georgios Patsoura, Sofia; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria; Thanos, Loukas

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the palliative treatment of recurrent unresectable rectal tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed with the patient under conscious sedation with a seven- or a nine-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 Degree-Sign C and a power of 90-110 W. All patients went home under instructions the next day of the procedure. Brief Pain Inventory score was calculated before and after (1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months) treatment. Results: Complete tumor necrosis rate was 77.8% (21 of a total 27 procedures) despite lesion location. BPI score was dramatically decreased after the procedure. The mean preprocedure BPI score was 6.59, which decreased to 3.15, 1.15, and 0.11 at postprocedure day 1, week 1, and month 1, respectively, after the procedure. This decrease was significant (p < 0.01 for the first day and p < 0.001 for the rest of the follow-up intervals (paired Student t test; n - 1 = 26) for all periods during follow-up. Six patients had partial tumor necrosis, and we were attempted to them with a second procedure. Although the necrosis area showed a radiographic increase, no complete necrosis was achieved (secondary success rate 65.6%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. Conclusion: CT-guided RF ablation is a minimally invasive, safe, and highly effective technique for treatment of malignant rectal recurrence. The method is well tolerated by patients, and pain relief is quickly achieved.

  6. Rare tumors of the rectum. Narrative review.

    PubMed

    Errasti Alustiza, José; Espín Basany, Eloy; Reina Duarte, Angel

    2014-11-01

    Most rectal neoplasms are adenocarcinomas, but there is a small percentage of tumors which are of other histological cell lines such as neuroendocrine tumors, sarcomas, lymphomas and squamous cell carcinomas, which have special characteristics and different treatments. We have reviewed these rare tumors of the rectum from a clinical and surgical point of view.

  7. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  8. 17-Week Delay Surgery after Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer with Complete Pathological Response

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marisa D.; Gomes, Manuel T.; Moreno, Filipa; Rocha, Anabela; Lopes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) followed by curative surgery still remains the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The main purpose of this multimodal treatment is to achieve a complete pathological tumor response (ypCR), with better survival. The surgery delay after CRT completion seems to increase tumor response and ypCR rate. Usually, time intervals range from 8 to 12 weeks, but the maximum tumor regression may not be seen in rectal adenocarcinomas until several months after CRT. About this issue, we report a case of a 52-year-old man with LARC treated with neoadjuvant CRT who developed, one month after RT completion, an acute myocardial infarction. The need to increase the interval between CRT and surgery for 17 weeks allowed a curative surgery without morbidity and an unexpected complete tumor response in the resected specimen (given the parameters presented in pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 11 weeks after radiotherapy completion). PMID:26579325

  9. Oxaliplatin-based combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2003-08-01

    There are two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer. The first is surgery, and, if the tumor is T3 and/or N1-2, this is followed by postoperative combined-modality therapy. The second, for patients with ultrasound T3 or clinical T4 disease, is preoperative combined-modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. In this review, the results of these approaches as well as novel combined-modality approaches using oxaliplatin-based regimens will be presented.

  10. Metachronous metastasis to the penis from a rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ketata, Sabeur; Boulaire, Jean Loup; Soulimane, Benamar; Bargain, Alain

    2007-09-01

    Penile metastases arise most frequently from genitourinary cancers, but can also arise from tumors of the large bowel; other primary sites are extremely uncommon. We report the case of a 59-year-old patient with 2 penile metastases from a rectal adenocarcinoma, which was discovered 26 years after abdominoperineal resection. Penile biopsy was carried out and established the metastatic nature. The patient underwent palliative chemotherapy treatment with cetuximab/irinotecan. All previously reported cases of penile metastasis from the rectum are reviewed. Regardless of the treatment options, the prognosis of such metastasis remains poor.

  11. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  12. Transsphincteric tumor resection in case of a pararectal solitary fibrous tumor

    PubMed Central

    Troja, Achim; El-Sourani, Nader; Antolovic, Dalibor; Raab, Hans Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Transsphincteric resection of rectal tumors was first described about 120 years ago. Nowadays, this approach faded into obscurity due to standardized guidelines and practice in surgical oncology including lymphadenectomy, mesorectal excision and radical dissection of veins. However, transsphincteric resection seems reasonable in some cases, especially if an abdominal approach can be avoided. In the following, we will present and describe the technique of the transsphincteric approach with its variations in rectal surgery in the case of a rare pararectal tumor. PMID:26773876

  13. Comparison of Digital Rectal Examination and Serum Prostate Specific Antigen in the Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Clinical Trial of 6,630 Men.

    PubMed

    Catalona, William J; Richie, Jerome P; Ahmann, Frederick R; Hudson, M'Liss A; Scardino, Peter T; Flanigan, Robert C; DeKernion, Jean B; Ratliff, Timothy L; Kavoussi, Louis R; Dalkin, Bruce L; Waters, W Bedford; MacFarlane, Michael T; Southwick, Paula C

    2017-02-01

    To compare the efficacy of digital rectal examination and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the early detection of prostate cancer, we conducted a prospective clinical trial at 6 university centers of 6,630 male volunteers 50 years old or older who underwent PSA determination (Hybritech Tandom-E or Tandem-R assays) and digital rectal examination. Quadrant biopsies were performed if the PSA level was greater than 4 μg./l. or digital rectal examination was suspicious, even if transrectal ultrasonography revealed no areas suspicious for cancer. The results showed that 15% of the men had a PSA level of greater than 4 μg./l., 15% had a suspicious digital rectal examination and 26% had suspicious findings on either or both tests. Of 1,167 biopsies performed cancer was detected in 264. PSA detected significantly more tumors (82%, 216 of 264 cancers) than digital rectal examination (55%, 146 of 264, p = 0.001). The cancer detection rate was 3.2% for digital rectal examination, 4.6% for PSA and 5.8% for the 2 methods combined. Positive predictive value was 32% for PSA and 21% for digital rectal examination. Of 160 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy and pathological staging 114 (71%) had organ confined cancer: PSA detected 85 (75%) and digital rectal examination detected 64 (56%, p = 0.003). Use of the 2 methods in combination increased detection of organ confined disease by 78% (50 of 64 cases) over digital rectal examination alone. If the performance of a biopsy would have required suspicious transrectal ultrasonography findings, nearly 40% of the tumors would have been missed. We conclude that the use of PSA in conjunction with digital rectal examination enhances early prostate cancer detection. Prostatic biopsy should be considered if either the PSA level is greater than 4 μg./l. or digital rectal examination is suspicious for cancer, even in the absence of abnormal transrectal ultrasonography findings.

  14. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  15. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  16. [The preoperative staging of rectal neoplasms: the clinical exam and diagnostic imaging].

    PubMed

    Grande, M; Danza, F M

    1999-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer remains an important clinical problem. Although there was been great progress in surgical management, the survival of patients with locally advanced disease has not improved significantly during the past decades. Preoperative staging and evaluation of the risk of recurrence may help in the choice of operation. It is difficult for clinicians to quantify reliably with digital examination the degree of fixation of the tumor, and they usually cannot distinguish nodal metastases except in advanced cases. The more frequent overstaging of small tumors within one quadrant of the rectum is a major drawback of digital examination. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance seems to underestimate the extension of rectal tumors, but both can be helpful in selecting patients with advanced tumors for whom preoperative adjuvant treatment is being considered. Endoluminal ultrasound is superior in staging tumors confined to the rectal wall, but is not the ideal tool for staging: the results are examiner dependent, the field of vision in depth is limited, and stricturing tumors cannot be passed by the ultrasound transducer. Imaging diagnostic attendibility confirms the preeminent role of intraoperative exploration in the assessment of neoplastic diffusion in order to plan a correct surgical treatment.

  17. Notch Signaling in Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Judy S.; Singleton, Ciera S.; Miele, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoids and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from the neuroendocrine cells of the GI tract, endocrine pancreas, and the respiratory system. NETs remain significantly understudied with respect to molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, particularly the role of cell fate signaling systems such as Notch. The abundance of literature on the Notch pathway is a testament to its complexity in different cellular environments. Notch receptors can function as oncogenes in some contexts and tumor suppressors in others. The genetic heterogeneity of NETs suggests that to fully understand the roles and the potential therapeutic implications of Notch signaling in NETs, a comprehensive analysis of Notch expression patterns and potential roles across all NET subtypes is required. PMID:27148486

  18. Temsirolimus and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Paraganglioma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Regional Pheochromocytoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  19. Local advanced rectal cancer perforation in the midst of preoperative chemoradiotherapy: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Takase, Nobuhisa; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Sumi, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kanaji, Shingo; Matsuda, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Takeru; Oshikiri, Taro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Koma, Yu-Ichiro; Komatsu, Masato; Sasaki, Ryohei; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Standard chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for local advanced rectal cancer (LARC) rarely induce rectal perforation. Here we report a rare case of rectal perforation in a patient with LARC in the midst of preoperative CRT. A 56-year-old male was conveyed to our hospital exhibiting general malaise. Colonoscopy and imaging tests resulted in a clinical diagnosis of LARC with direct invasion to adjacent organs and regional lymphadenopathy. Preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based CRT was started. At 25 d after the start of CRT, the patient developed a typical fever. Computed tomography revealed rectal perforation, and he underwent emergency sigmoid colostomy. At 12 d after the surgery, the remaining CRT was completed according to the original plan. The histopathological findings after radical operation revealed a wide field of tumor necrosis and fibrosis without lymph node metastasis. We share this case as important evidence for the treatment of LARC perforation in the midst of preoperative CRT. PMID:28138443

  20. The novel somatostatin receptor 2/dopamine type 2 receptor chimeric compound BIM-23A758 decreases the viability of human GOT1 midgut carcinoid cells.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, Kathrin; Andersen, Sandra; Vlotides, George; Spöttl, Gerald; Zhang, Shengwen; Datta, Rakesh; Culler, Michael; Göke, Burkhard; Auernhammer, Christoph J

    2013-01-01

    The majority of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the gastroenteropancreatic system coexpress somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) and dopamine type 2 receptors (D2R), thus providing a rationale for the use of novel SSTR2/D2R chimeric compounds in NET disease. Here we investigate the antitumor potential of the SSTR2/D2R chimeric compounds BIM-23A760 and BIM-23A758 in comparison to the selective SSTR2 agonist BIM-23023 and the selective D2R agonist BIM-53097 on human NET cell lines of heterogeneous origin. While having only minor effects on human pancreatic and bronchus carcinoid cells (BON1 and NCI-H727), BIM-23A758 induced significant antitumor effects in human midgut carcinoid cells (GOT1). These effects involved apoptosis induction as well as inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt signaling. Consistent with their antitumor response to BIM-23A758, GOT1 cells showed relatively high expression levels of SSTR2 and D2R mRNA. In particular, GOT1 cells highly express the short transcript variant of D2R. In contrast to BIM-23A758, the SSTR2/D2R chimeric compound BIM-23A760 as well as the individual SSTR2 and D2R agonistic compounds BIM-23023 and BIM-53097 induced no or only minor antitumor responses in the examined NET cell lines. Taken together, our findings suggest that the novel SSTR2/D2R chimeric compound BIM-23A758 might be a promising substance for the treatment of NETs highly expressing SSTR2 and D2R. In particular, a sufficient expression of the short transcript variant of DR2 might play a pivotal role for effective treatment.

  1. Primary neuroendocrine tumors of the ear, nose and throat: A report of three cases and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MHAWEJ, RACHAD; FARAH, CHADI; HADDAD, AMINE; TABCHY, BASSAM

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to review all cases of neuroendocrine tumors of the ear, nose and throat in a tertiary care center, as well as the data published in the literature. The study presents all the cases of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) in the Hotel Dieu De France Hospital (Beirut, Lebanon) between January 2004 and January 2014. The data reported in the English and French literature is also reviewed with regard to the typical clinical presentation and management of these tumors. Three cases of NETs presented to the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery during the study period. One case was of an atypical carcinoid (AC) tumor of the larynx, one case was of a typical carcinoid tumor in the middle ear and the third case was, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of an AC tumor of the nasopharynx. Overall, NETs are rare in the head and neck. The clinical presentation can mimic any other tumor in the same localization in the absence of a carcinoid syndrome. Management of these tumors remains controversial, but a complete excision of the tumor is crucial, followed by possible adjuvant treatment. PMID:26622884

  2. Role of endoscopic submucosal dissection in treatment of rectal gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Koptas, Włodzimierz; Zelga, Piotr; Dziki, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A significant rise in incidence of rectal gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) has been observed in the last decade. Most detected gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are well differentiated and less than 2 cm in diameter. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a new method for endoscopic treatment of such tumors, difficult to resect by conventional endoscopic techniques and thus subject to surgical treatment. Aim To present the results of the endoscopic treatment of GEP NET tumors in the rectum using ESD in single academic center. Material and methods From June 2013 to April 2014, 4 cases of GEP-NET in the rectum were treated by ESD in our center. Effectiveness of dissection, complications and tumor recurrence after 3 months of treatment were then retrospectively investigated. Results The group contained 2 patients with primary rectal GEP-NET (1 male, 1 female; age range: 48–60 years) and 2 with scars after incomplete polypectomy of rectal GEP-NET (1 male, 1 female; 61–65 years). Primary rectal GEP-NET diameters were 0.6 cm and 1.5 cm. Scar resection specimen diameters were 0.7 cm and 1 cm. Mean resection time was 28 min. The en bloc resection rate was 100% (2 of 2) and the histologically complete resection was confirmed in both cases. No foci of neuroendocrine neoplasia were reported in dissected scars. No complications were observed. After 3 months, 3 patients underwent follow-up colonoscopy – no local recurrence was reported. Conclusions Endoscopic submucosal dissection of rectal GEP-NET should be recommended as a treatment of choice when dealing with lesions over 1 cm in diameter without invasion of the muscle layer. Due to technical difficulties, performing this procedure should be reserved for centers with appropriately trained endoscopic staff. PMID:28337231

  3. High Rate of Positive Circumferential Resection Margins Following Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Rickles, Aaron S.; Dietz, David W.; Chang, George J.; Wexner, Steven D.; Berho, Mariana E.; Remzi, Feza H.; Greene, Frederick L.; Fleshman, James W.; Abbas, Maher A.; Peters, Walter; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R.T.; Fleming, Fergal J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify predictors of positive circumferential resection margin following rectal cancer resection in the United States. Background Positive circumferential resection margin is associated with a high rate of local recurrence and poor morbidity and mortality for rectal cancer patients. Prior study has shown poor compliance with national rectal cancer guidelines, but whether this finding is reflected in patient outcomes has yet to be shown. Methods Patients who underwent resection for stage I-III rectal cancer were identified from the 2010-2011 National Cancer Database. The primary outcome was a positive circumferential resection margin. The relationship between patient, hospital, tumor, and treatment-related characteristics was analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analysis. Findings A positive circumferential resection margin was noted in 2,859 (17.2%) of the 16,619 patients included. Facility location, clinical T and N stage, histologic type, tumor size, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, type of operation, and operative approach were significant predictors of positive circumferential resection margin on multivariable analysis. Total proctectomy had nearly a 30% increased risk of positive margin compared to partial proctectomy (OR 1.293, 95%CI 1.185-1.411) and a laparoscopic approach had nearly 22% less risk of a positive circumferential resection margin compared to an open approach (OR 0.882, 95%CI 0.790-0.985). Interpretation Despite advances in surgical technique and multimodality therapy, rates of positive circumferential resection margin remain high in the United States. Several tumor and treatment characteristics were identified as independent risk factors, and advances in rectal cancer care are necessary to approach the outcomes seen in other countries. PMID:26473651

  4. Acute inflammatory bowel disease complicating chronic alcoholism and mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-05-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

  5. Acute Inflammatory Bowel Disease Complicating Chronic Alcoholism and Mimicking Carcinoid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome. PMID:22949895

  6. Design of a rectal probe for diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging for chemotherapy and radiotherapy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giessen, Martijn; Santoro, Ylenia; Mirzaei Zarandi, Soroush; Pigazzi, Alessio; Cerussi, Albert E.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2014-03-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) has shown great potential for the early detection of non-responding tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer, already one day after therapy starts. Patients with rectal cancer receive similar chemotherapy treatment. The rectum geometry and tissue properties of healthy and tumor tissue in the rectum and the requirement of surface contact impose constraints on the probe design. In this work we present the design of a DOSI probe with the aim of early chemotherapy/radiotherapy effectiveness detection in rectal tumors. We show using Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements that the colon tissue can be characterized reliably using a source-detector separation in the order of 10 mm. We present a design and rapid prototype of a probe for DOSI measurements that can be mounted on a standard laparoscope and that fits through a standard rectoscope. Using predominantly clinically approved components we aim at fast clinical translation.

  7. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  8. Technical feasibility of laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or recurrent rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Takashi

    2016-01-14

    Relatively little is known about the oncologic safety of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. Recently, large randomized clinical trials showed that laparoscopic surgery was not inferior to open surgery, as evidenced by survival and local control rates. However, patients with T4 tumors were excluded from these trials. Technological advances in the instrumentation and techniques used by laparoscopic surgery have increased the use of laparoscopic surgery for advanced rectal cancer. High-definition, illuminated, and magnified images obtained by laparoscopy may enable more precise laparoscopic surgery than open techniques, even during extended surgery for T4 or locally recurrent rectal cancer. To date, the quality of evidence regarding the usefulness of laparoscopy for extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision has been low because most studies have been uncontrolled series, with small sample sizes, and long-term data are lacking. Nevertheless, laparoscopic extended surgery for rectal cancer, when performed by specialized laparoscopic colorectal surgeons, has been reported safe in selected patients, with significant advantages, including a clear visual field and less blood loss. This review summarizes current knowledge on laparoscopic extended surgery beyond total mesorectal excision for primary or locally recurrent rectal cancer.

  9. Tissue effects of glutamine in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Hernando-Martín, Mercedes; Calleja-Fernández, Alicia; Cano-Rodríguez, Isidoro; Cordido, Fernando; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D

    2015-04-01

    Introducción: El objetivo fue evaluar los efectos de la administración de glutamina sobre la regresión tumoral y sobre el tejido sano en pacientes con cáncer rectal que recibieron quimiorradioterapia. Material y métodos: Se incluyó 10 pacientes con cáncer rectal operado después de quimiorradioterapia, un subgrupo de un ensayo clínico que comparó glutamina con placebo en la prevención de enteritis aguda. Un patólogo experto analizó las muestras de tumor y tejido sano, buscando datos de regresión tumoral, mucífagos y daño por radiación. Resultados: No hubo diferencias entre placebo y glutamina en el grado de regresión tumoral. Todos los pacientes con glutamina presentaron mucífagos, frente al 28,6% con placebo (p = 0,038). El daño sobre tejido sano fue similar en los pacientes con glutamina y placebo, y entre aquellos con y sin enteritis. Conclusión: La glutamina no ejerce un efecto protector frente a la quimiorradioterapia sobre el tumor o el tejido rectal sano.

  10. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  11. Future of therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2013-06-01

    Since 2004, the standard of care for patients with cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer has been preoperative chemoradiation followed by surgery and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. A number of advances have occurred and are defining the future of rectal cancer therapy. Among these are short course radiation, the impact of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, selective radiation and selective surgery, and new chemoradiation regimens with novel agents. This review will examine these developments and assess their impact on the future therapy of rectal cancer.

  12. A rare cause of chronic rectal bleeding in children; solitary rectal ulcer: case report.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Abdulkerim; Tander, Burak; Temiz, Muhyittin; Barış, Sancar; Arıtürk, Ender

    2011-03-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer causing lower gastrointestinal bleeding is extremely rare in children. Rare presentation, non-specific symptoms, insufficient experience, and characteristics mimicking other rectal diseases may cause misdiagnosis or delay of diagnosis in some pediatric patients. Here, we report a 10-year-old boy with solitary rectal ulcer diagnosed two years after onset of the symptoms who responded well to the conservative therapy, including high-fiber diet, laxatives, defecation training, and sucralfate enema.

  13. Paediatric rectal prolapse in Rwanda.

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, E J; Duckett, J; Lewin, J

    1996-01-01

    During the 1994 crisis in Rwanda, a high incidence of full-thickness rectal prolapse was noted among the refugee children in the south-west of the country. The prolapses arose as a result of acute diarrhoeal illness superimposed on malnutrition and worm infestation. We used a modification of the Thiersch wire technique in 40 of these cases during two months working in a refugee camp. A catgut pursestring was tied around the anal margin under local, regional or general anaesthesia. This was effective in achieving short-term control of full-thickness prolapse until the underlying illness was corrected. Under the circumstances, no formal follow-up could be arranged; however, no complications were reported and only one patient presented with recurrence. Images Figure 1 PMID:9014879

  14. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew M.; Jesus, Eliane C.; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C.; Silva, Israel T.; Nunes, Diana N.; Setubal, João C.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4–V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  15. Tissue-Associated Bacterial Alterations in Rectal Carcinoma Patients Revealed by 16S rRNA Community Profiling.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew M; Jesus, Eliane C; Lopes, Ademar; Aguiar, Samuel; Begnami, Maria D; Rocha, Rafael M; Carpinetti, Paola Avelar; Camargo, Anamaria A; Hoffmann, Christian; Freitas, Helano C; Silva, Israel T; Nunes, Diana N; Setubal, João C; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic and inflammatory forms of colorectal cancer (CRC) account for more than 80% of cases. Recent publications have shown mechanistic evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria in the development of both CRC-forms. Whereas, colon and rectal cancer have been routinely studied together as CRC, increasing evidence show these to be distinct diseases. Also, the common use of fecal samples to study microbial communities may reflect disease state but possibly not the tumor microenvironment. We performed this study to evaluate differences in bacterial communities found in tissue samples of 18 rectal-cancer subjects when compared to 18 non-cancer controls. Samples were collected during exploratory colonoscopy (non-cancer group) or during surgery for tumor excision (rectal-cancer group). High throughput 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of the V4-V5 region was conducted on the Ion PGM platform, reads were filtered using Qiime and clustered using UPARSE. We observed significant increases in species richness and diversity in rectal cancer samples, evidenced by the total number of OTUs and the Shannon and Simpson indexes. Enterotyping analysis divided our cohort into two groups, with the majority of rectal cancer samples clustering into one enterotype, characterized by a greater abundance of Bacteroides and Dorea. At the phylum level, rectal-cancer samples had increased abundance of candidate phylum OD1 (also known as Parcubacteria) whilst non-cancer samples had increased abundance of Planctomycetes. At the genera level, rectal-cancer samples had higher abundances of Bacteroides, Phascolarctobacterium, Parabacteroides, Desulfovibrio, and Odoribacter whereas non-cancer samples had higher abundances of Pseudomonas, Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Lactobacillus, and Bacillus. Two Bacteroides fragilis OTUs were more abundant among rectal-cancer patients seen through 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, whose presence was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and enrichment verified by digital

  16. Predictors of Rectal Tolerance Observed in a Dose-Escalated Phase 1-2 Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.W. Nathan; Cho, L. Chinsoo; Straka, Christopher; Christie, Alana; Lotan, Yair; Pistenmaa, David; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Nanda, Akash; Kueplian, Patrick; Brindle, Jeffrey; Cooley, Susan; Perkins, Alida; Raben, David; Xie, Xian-Jin; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To convey the occurrence of isolated cases of severe rectal toxicity at the highest dose level tested in 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer; and to rationally test potential causal mechanisms to guide future studies and experiments to aid in mitigating or altogether avoiding such severe bowel injury. Methods and Materials: Clinical and treatment planning data were analyzed from 91 patients enrolled from 2006 to 2011 on a dose-escalation (45, 47.5, and 50 Gy in 5 fractions) phase 1/2 clinical study of SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Results: At the highest dose level, 6.6% of patients treated (6 of 91) developed high-grade rectal toxicity, 5 of whom required colostomy. Grade 3+ delayed rectal toxicity was strongly correlated with volume of rectal wall receiving 50 Gy >3 cm{sup 3} (P<.0001), and treatment of >35% circumference of rectal wall to 39 Gy (P=.003). Grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was significantly correlated with treatment of >50% circumference of rectal wall to 24 Gy (P=.010). Conclusion: Caution is advised when considering high-dose SBRT for treatment of tumors near bowel structures, including prostate cancer. Threshold dose constraints developed from physiologic principles are defined, and if respected can minimize risk of severe rectal toxicity.

  17. Renaissance of contact x-ray therapy for treating rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Myint, Arthur Sun; Croce, Olivier; Lindegaard, Jacob; Jensen, Anie; Myerson, Robert; Hannoun-Lévi, Jean-Michel; Marcie, Serge

    2011-07-01

    Contact x-ray therapy (CXRT) with 50 kV has proven to be an efficient radiation therapy technique to achieve local control and rectal preservation for early rectal adenocarcinoma. Despite these results, CXRT has not been used due to the shortage of the no longer manufactured Philips RT 50™ unit. Recently, a new CXRT machine (Papillon 50™) became available on the market. This machine delivers a beam of 50 kV with a dose rate close to 15 Gy/min and has a percentage depth dose of 50% at 6-7 mm. The applicator size varies from 2-3 cm in diameter. Due to the original design of the main tube, treatment delivery is quick and more comfortable for the patients. An online viewing system incorporated in the tube allows a good visualization of the tumor with improved accuracy of radiation delivery. An international collaborative trial (Contact Endoscopic Microsurgery [CONTEM]) was set up to accrue approximately 300 cases of rectal adenocarcinoma staged T1, T2 or early T3 tumors in the UK, France, Denmark and Sweden. This trial should confirm the role of CXRT in curative treatment with organ preservation for early rectal cancers.

  18. Do Older Americans Undergo Stoma Reversal Following Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Hu, Yue-Yung; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective For low-lying rectal cancers, proximal diversion can reduce anastomotic leak after sphincter preserving surgery; however, evidence suggests that such temporary diversions are often not reversed. We aimed to evaluate non-reversal and delayed stoma reversal in elderly patients undergoing low anterior resection (LAR). Design SEER-Medicare linked analysis from 1991-2007. Settings and Participants 1,179 primary stage I-III rectal cancer patients over age 66 who underwent LAR with synchronous diverting stoma. Main Outcome Measures 1) Stoma creation and reversal rates. 2) Time to reversal. 3) Characteristics associated with reversal and shorter time to reversal. Results Within 18 months of LAR, 51% (603/1179) of patients underwent stoma reversal. Stoma reversal was associated with age < 80 years (p<0.0001), male gender (p=0.018), less comorbidities (p=0.017), higher income [quartile 4 vs. 1, (p=0.002)], early tumor stage [1 vs. 3; (p<0.001)], neoadjuvant radiation (p<0.0001), rectal tumor location [vs. rectosigmoid, (p=0.001)], more recent diagnosis (p=0.021), and shorter length of stay on LAR admission (p=0.021). Median time to reversal was 126 days (IQR: 79-249). Longer time to reversal was associated with older age (p=0.031), presence of comorbidities (p=0.014), more advanced tumor stage (p=0.007), positive lymph nodes (p=0.009), receipt of adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.008), more recent diagnosis (p=0.004) and longer LOS on LAR admission (p <0.0001). Conclusions Half of elderly rectal cancer patients who undergo LAR with temporary stoma have not undergone stoma reversal by 18 months. Identifiable risk factors predict both non-reversal and longer time to reversal. These results help inform pre-operative discussions and promote realistic expectations for elderly rectal cancer patients. PMID:23298948

  19. How to Use Rectal Suppositories Properly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lubricate the suppository tip with a water-soluble lubricant such as K-Y Jelly, not petroleum jelly (Vaseline). If you do not have this lubricant, moisten your rectal area with cool tap water. ...

  20. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  1. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  2. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resource Library Brochures and Product Store Career Center DC&R Journal Access Member Directory Educational Resources American ... Care After Colon and Rectal Cancer Crohn’s Disease DC&R Journal Diseases and Conditions Find A Surgeon ...

  3. Long-term survival of a patient with metachronous rectal metastasis from primary cecal cancer who underwent repetitive resection and chemotherapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Jiro; Nakachi, Takeshi; Tabuchi, Takanobu; Ubukata, Hideyuki; Tabuchi, Takafumi

    2014-04-23

    There are few reported cases of colorectal metastasis from cancers of other organs, particularly other segments of the colon. Here we describe the long-term survival of a 68-year-old male patient with metachronous rectal metastasis from cecal cancer who underwent repetitive resection and chemotherapy. The patient underwent ileocecal resection and hepatectomy for cecal cancer with liver metastasis (T3, N1a, M1a, Stage IVA) in 2006. The patient subsequently underwent splenectomy for splenic metastasis in 2007. In August 2008, barium enema revealed compression of the rectal wall, and abdominal computed tomography (CT) detected a mass along the rectum extending into the pelvis. Rectal metastasis from cecal cancer was suspected and Hartmann's operation with bilateral seminal vesicle dissection was performed. Histological examination of the excised tumor revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma formed in the muscularis propria of the rectum and infiltrating the connective tissue between the seminal vesicle and rectum. However, no tumor was detected in the rectal mucosa or submucosa. These histological findings supported the diagnosis of rectal metastasis from cecal cancer. The patient has been monitored at our clinic for 60 months after surgical removal of the rectal metastasis. The findings from this case should alert oncologists to the potential danger of rectal metastasis from primary colon cancer and the benefits of timely complete resection in terms of improved patient outcomes.

  4. Cancer of the uterine cervix: dosimetric guidelines for prevention of late rectal and rectosigmoid complications as a result of radiotherapeutic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pourquier, H.; Dubois, J.B.; Delard, R.

    1982-11-01

    This paper is the report of a dosimetric study of 41 rectal and rectosigmoid complications after radiotherapeutic treatment (1974-1978) of 287 cervical uterine tumors. Treatment consisted of external irradiation (25 MeV linear accelerator) and intracavitary irradiation (Fletcher-Suit applicator) at different doses depending on tumor stage. Dosimetric measurements were expressed as the maximum rectal dose and mean rectal dose on the anterior surface of the rectum, as proposed by the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie. Rectal doses were also studied as a function of intracavitary irradiation and intracavitary + external irradiation (maximum rectal and mean cummulative doses for each). The results show a significant difference in the state of the patients with and without complications, based on the dose reaching the rectum. The maximum and the mean cumulative rectal doses serve as one of the primary indicators for predicting complications. These values should therefore be determined before placement of intracavitary sources or, at the latest, before the second intracavitary applications. We have shown that there is no fixed threshold dose, but that it varies from one region to another, depending on level of external irradiation. Our results argue in favor of adapting individual patient therapy based on simple precautions, which are adjustable to all treatment modalities. This method could lead to complete elimination of late rectal and rectosigmoid complications arising from radiotherapeutic treatment of cervical uterine cancer.

  5. Cancer of the uterine cervix: dosimetric guidelines for prevention of late rectal and rectosigmoid complications as a result of radiotherapeutic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pourquier, H.; Dubois, J.B.; Delard, R.

    1982-11-01

    This paper is the report of a dosimetric study of 41 rectal and rectosigmoid complications after radiotherapeutic treatment (1974-1978) of 287 cervical uterine tumors. Treatment consisted of external irradiation (25 MeV linear accelerator) and intracavitary irradiation (Fletcher-Suit applicator) at different doses depending on tumor stage. Dosimetric measurements were expressed as the maximum rectal dose and mean rectal dose on the anterior surface of the rectum, as proposed by the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie. Rectal doses were also studied as a function of intracavitary irradiation + external irradiation (maximum rectal and mean cumulative doses for each).The results show a significant difference in the state of the patients with and without complications, based on the dose reaching the rectum. The maximum and the mean cumulative rectal doses serve as one of the primary indicators for predicting complications. These values should therefore be determined before placement of intracavitary sources or, at the latest, before the second intracavitary application. We have shown that there is no fixed threshold dose, but that it varies from one region to another, depending on level of external irradiation. Our results argue in favor of adapting individual patient therapy based on simple precautions, which are applicable to all treatment modalities. This method could lead to complete elimination of late rectal and rectosigmoid complications arising from radiotherapeutic treatment of cervical uterine cancer.

  6. The Prognostic Impact of Protein Expression of E-Cadherin-Catenin Complexes Differs between Rectal and Colon Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aamodt, Rolf; Bondi, Johan; Andersen, Solveig Norheim; Bakka, Arne; Bukholm, Geir; Bukholm, Ida R K

    2010-01-01

    The E-cadherin-catenin complex provides cell-cell adhesion. In order for a carcinoma to metastasize, cancer cells must let go of their hold of neighboring cells in the primary tumor. The presence of components of the E-cadherin-catenin complex in 246 rectal adenocarcinomas was examined by immunohistochemistry and compared to their presence in 219 colon carcinomas. The expression data were correlated to clinical information from the patients' records. There were statistically significant differences in protein expression between the rectal and the colon carcinomas regarding membranous beta-catenin, gamma-catenin, p120-catenin, and E-cadherin, as well as nuclear beta-catenin. In the rectal carcinomas, there was a significant inverse association between the expression of p120-catenin in cell membranes of the primary tumors and the occurrence of local recurrence, while membranous protein expression of beta-catenin was inversely related to distant metastases.

  7. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  8. Prognostic Significance of Microvessel Density Determining by Endoglin in Stage II Rectal Carcinoma: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martinovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Drazen; Martinovic, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Background. The role of endoglin in the Dukes B rectal cancer is still unexplored. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of endoglin (CD105) in resected rectal cancer and to evaluate the relationship between microvessels density (MVD), clinicopathological factors, and survival rates. Methods. The study included 95 primary rectal adenocarcinomas, corresponding to 67 adjacent and 73 distant normal mucosa specimens from surgical resection samples. Tumor specimens were paraffin-embedded and immunohistochemical staining for the CD105 endothelial antigen was performed to count CD105-MVD. For exact measurement of the CD105-MVD used a computer-integrated system Alphelys Spot Browser 2 was used. Results. The intratumoral CD105-MVD was significantly higher compared with corresponding adjacent mucosa (P < 0.0001) and distant mucosa specimens (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the CD105-MVD according to patients age, gender, tumor location, grade of differentiation, histological type, depth of tumor invasion, and tumor size. The overall survival rate was significantly higher in the low CD105-MVD group of patients than in the high CD105-MVD group of patients (log-rank test, P = 0.0406). Conclusion. CD105-assessed MVD could help to identify patients with possibility of poor survival in the group of stage II RC. PMID:26089870

  9. Transcriptomic profiles differentiate normal rectal epithelium and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hogan, J; Dejulius, K; Liu, X; Coffey, J C; Kalady, M F

    2015-05-01

    Adenocarcinoma is a histologic diagnosis based on subjective findings. Transcriptional profiles have been used to differentiate normal tissue from disease and could provide a means of identifying malignancy. The goal of this study was to generate and test transcriptomic profiles that differentiate normal from adenocarcinomatous rectum. Comparisons were made between cDNA microarrays derived from normal epithelium and rectal adenocarcinoma. Results were filtered according to standard deviation to retain only highly dysregulated genes. Genes differentially expressed between cancer and normal tissue on two-groups t test (P < 0.05, Bonferroni P value adjustment) were further analyzed. Genes were rank ordered in terms of descending fold change. For each comparison (tumor versus normal epithelium), those 5 genes with the greatest positive fold change were grouped in a classifier. Five separate tests were applied to evaluate the discriminatory capacity of each classifier. Genetic classifiers derived comparing normal epithelium with malignant rectal epithelium from pooled stages had a mean sensitivity and specificity of 99.6% and 98.2%, respectively. The classifiers derived from comparing normal and stage I cancer had comparable mean sensitivities and specificities (97% and 98%, respectively). Areas under the summary receiver-operator characteristic curves for each classifier were 0.981 and 0.972, respectively. One gene was common to both classifiers. Classifiers were tested in an independent Gene Expression Omnibus-derived dataset. Both classifiers retained their predictive properties. Transcriptomic profiles comprising as few as 5 genes are highly accurate in differentiating normal from adenocarcinomatous rectal epithelium, including early-stage disease.

  10. Patient factors may predict anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Dana M.; Mora Pinzon, Maria C.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Saclarides, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Anastomotic complications following rectal cancer surgery occur with varying frequency. Preoperative radiation, BMI, and low anastomoses have been implicated as predictors in previous studies, but their definitive role is still under review. The objective of our study was to identify patient and operative factors that may be predictive of anastomotic complications. Methods A retrospective review was performed on patients who had sphincter-preservation surgery performed for rectal cancer at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2011. Results 123 patients were included in this study, mean age was 59 (26–86), 58% were male. There were 33 complications in 32 patients (27%). Stenosis was the most frequent complication (24 of 33). 11 patients required mechanical dilatation, and 4 had operative revision of the anastomosis. Leak or pelvic abscess were present in 9 patients (7.3%); 4 were explored, 2 were drained and 3 were managed conservatively. 4 patients had permanent colostomy created due to anastomotic complications. Laparoscopy approach, BMI, age, smoking and tumor distance from anal verge were not significantly associated with anastomotic complications. After a multivariate analysis chemoradiation was significantly associated with overall anastomotic complications (Wall = 0.35, p = 0.05), and hemoglobin levels were associated with anastomotic leak (Wald = 4.09, p = 0.04). Conclusion Our study identifies preoperative anemia as possible risk factor for anastomotic leak and neoadjuvant chemoradiation may lead to increased risk of complications overall. Further prospective studies will help to elucidate these findings as well as identify amenable factors that may decrease risk of anastomotic complications after rectal cancer surgery. PMID:25685338

  11. Effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Baeten, Coen . E-mail: C.Baeten@surgery.azm.nl; Castermans, Karolien; Lammering, Guido; Hillen, Femke; Wouters, Bradly G.; Hillen, Harry; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Baeten, Cornelius G.M.I.

    2006-11-15

    Background: We and others have shown that angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration are important prognostic factors in rectal cancer. However, little is known about its possible changes in response to radiotherapy (RTX), which is frequently given to rectal tumors as a neoadjuvant treatment to improve the prognosis. We therefore investigated the biologic effects of RTX on these parameters using fresh-frozen biopsy samples of tumor and normal mucosa tissue before and after RTX. Methods: Biopsy samples were taken from a total of 34 patients before and after either a short course or long course of RTX combined with chemotherapy. The following parameters were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction: Microvessel density, leukocyte infiltration, proliferating epithelial and tumor cells, proliferating endothelial cells, adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells, and the angiogenic mRNA profile. Results: The tumor biopsy samples taken after RTX treatment demonstrated a significant decrease in microvessel density and the number of proliferating tumor cells and proliferating endothelial cells (p < 0.001). In contrast, the leukocyte infiltration, the levels of basic fibroblast growth factor in carcinoma tissue, and the adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells in normal as well as carcinoma tissue increased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data show that together with an overall decrease in tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation, RTX results in an increase in the expression of adhesion molecules that stimulate leukocyte infiltration. This suggests the possibility that, in addition to its direct cytotoxic effect, radiation may also stimulate an immunologic tumor response that could contribute to the documented improvement in local tumor control and distal failure rate of rectal cancers.

  12. Differences in microbial signatures between rectal mucosal biopsies and rectal swabs.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Pérez, Félix; McCoy, Amber N; Okechukwu, Charles; Carroll, Ian M; Smith, Kevin M; Jeremiah, Kim; Sandler, Robert S; Asher, Gary N; Keku, Temitope O

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence the microbiota of the large bowel may influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer as well as other diseases including type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome. Current sampling methods to obtain microbial specimens, such as feces and mucosal biopsies, are inconvenient and unappealing to patients. Obtaining samples through rectal swabs could prove to be a quicker and relatively easier method, but it is unclear if swabs are an adequate substitute. We compared bacterial diversity and composition from rectal swabs and rectal mucosal biopsies in order to examine the viability of rectal swabs as an alternative to biopsies. Paired rectal swabs and mucosal biopsy samples were collected in un-prepped participants (n = 11) and microbial diversity was characterized by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of the 16S rRNA gene. Microbial community composition from swab samples was different from rectal mucosal biopsies (p = 0.001). Overall the bacterial diversity was higher in swab samples than in biopsies as assessed by diversity indexes such as: richness (p = 0.01), evenness (p = 0.06) and Shannon's diversity (p = 0.04). Analysis of specific bacterial groups by qPCR showed higher copy number of Lactobacillus (p < 0.0001) and Eubacteria (p = 0.0003) in swab samples compared with biopsies. Our findings suggest that rectal swabs and rectal mucosal samples provide different views of the microbiota in the large intestine.

  13. Co-Targeting the PI3K and RAS Pathways for the Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Joseph D.; Li, Jing; Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y.; Mustain, W. Conan; Elliott, Victoria A.; Kim, Ji Tae; Harris, Jennifer W.; Campbell, Katherine; Weiss, Heidi; Wang, Chi; Song, Jun; Anthony, Lowell; Townsend, Courtney M.; Evers, B. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background The precise involvement of the PI3K/mTOR and RAS/MEK pathways in carcinoid tumors is not well defined. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to evaluate the role these pathways play in carcinoid cell proliferation, apoptosis, and secretion and to determine the effects of combined treatment on carcinoid tumor inhibition. Methods The human neuroendocrine cell lines BON (pancreatic carcinoid), NCI-H727 (lung carcinoid), and QGP-1 (somatostatinoma) were treated with either the pan-PI3K inhibitor, BKM120, or the dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitor, BEZ235, alone or in combination with the MEK inhibitor, PD0325901; proliferation, apoptosis, and protein expression were assessed. Peptide secretion was evaluated in BON and QGP-1 cells. The anti-proliferative effect of BEZ235, alone or combined with PD0325901, was then tested in vivo. Results Both BKM120 and BEZ235 decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis; combination with PD0325901 significantly enhanced the antineoplastic effects of either treatment alone. In contrast, neurotensin (NT) peptide secretion was markedly stimulated with BKM120 treatment, but not BEZ235. The combination of BEZ235 + PD0325901 significantly inhibited the growth of BON xenografts without systemic toxicity. Conclusions Both BKM120 and BEZ235 effectively inhibited NET cell proliferation and stimulated apoptosis. However, inhibition of the PI3K pathway alone with BKM120 significantly stimulated NT peptide secretion; this did not occur with the dual inhibition of both PI3K and mTOR using BEZ235 suggesting that this would be a more effective treatment regimen for NETs. Moreover, the combination of BEZ235 and the MEK inhibitor PD0325901 was a safe and more effective therapy in vivo compared with single agents alone. PMID:24443523

  14. Genomic CGH-assessed structural DNA alterations in rectal carcinoma as related to local recurrence following primary operation for cure.

    PubMed

    Kodeda, K; Asting, A Gustafsson; Lönnroth, C; Derwinger, K; Wettergren, Y; Nordgren, S; Gustavsson, B; Lundholm, K

    2012-10-01

    Several factors determine overall outcome and possible local recurrence after curative surgery for rectal carcinoma. Surgical performance is usually believed to be the most pertinent factor, followed by adjuvant oncological treatment and tumor histopathology. However, chromosomal instability is common in colorectal cancer and tumor clones are assumed to differ in aggressiveness and potential of causing local recurrence. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate if genetic alterations in primary rectal carcinoma are predictive of local recurrences. A large clinical database with linked bio-bank allowed for careful matching of two patient groups (R0) resected for rectal carcinoma. One group had developed early, isolated local recurrences and the other group seemed cured after 93 months follow-up. DNA from the primary tumors was analysed with array-CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) including 55,000 genomic probes. DNA from all primary tumors in both groups displayed previously reported and well-recognised DNA aberrations in colorectal carcinoma. Significant copy number gains were confirmed in the 4q31.1-31.22 region in DNA from tumors with subsequent local recurrence. Twenty-two affected genes in this region code for products with high relevance in tumor biology (p53 regulation, cell cycle activity, transcription). DNA from rectal carcinoma displayed well-known aberrations as described for colon carcinoma with no obvious prediction of local rectal recurrence. Gains in the 4q31.1-31.22 DNA region are highly potential for local recurrence despite R0 resection to be confirmed in larger patient materials.

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Rectal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a monoclonal antibody or angiogenesis inhibitor ). Chemotherapy to control the growth of the tumor . Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of both, as palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve the quality of life . Placement of a stent to help ...

  16. General Information about Rectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a monoclonal antibody or angiogenesis inhibitor ). Chemotherapy to control the growth of the tumor . Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of both, as palliative therapy to relieve symptoms and improve the quality of life . Placement of a stent to help ...

  17. Genetic variation in C-reactive protein (CRP) in relation to colon and rectal cancer risk and survival

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Curtin, Karen; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Duggan, David J.; Samowitz, Wade S.; Peters, Ulrike; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation has been shown to be influenced by genetic variation in the CRP gene. Methods In this study, we test the hypothesis that genetic variation in CRP influences both the risk of developing colon and rectal cancer and survival. Two population-based studies of colon cancer (n=1574 cases, 1970 controls) and rectal (n=791 cases, 999 controls) were conducted. We evaluated four CRP tagSNPs: rs1205 (G>A, 3’ UTR); rs1417938 (T>A, intron); rs1800947 (G>C, L184L); and rs3093075 (C>A, 3’ flanking). Results The CRP rs1205 AA genotype was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer (OR 1.3, 95%CI 1.1-1.7), whereas the rs3093075 A allele was associated with a reduced risk of rectal cancer (OR 0.7, 95%CI 0.5-0.9). The strongest association for the rs1205 polymorphism and colon cancer was observed among those with KRAS2 mutations (OR 1.5, 95%CI 1.1-2.0). The CRP rs1205 AA genotype also was associated with an increased risk of CIMP+ rectal tumors (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.2-5.3); conversely, the rs1417938 A allele was associated with a reduced risk of CIMP+ rectal tumors (OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3-0.9). We observed interactions between CRP rs1800947 and BMI and family history of CRC in modifying risk of both colon and rectal cancer. Conclusions These data suggest that genetic variation in the CRP gene influences risk of both colon and rectal cancer development. PMID:20949557

  18. [Adjuvant chemotherapy of the colonic and rectal carcinoma: concepts and uptodate results].

    PubMed

    Weber, W; Nagel, G A

    1977-06-18

    The aim of adjuvant chemotherapy is the destruction of micrometastases after surgical removal of a malignant tumor. This treatment modality is gaining in importance in the light of experimental data and lcinical success in pediatric tumors. Results of ongoing studies in colo-rectal cancer show a marginal effect of prophylactic treatment with 5-fluorouracil. The treatment benefits in trials with historical controls are much greater than in studies with simultaneous controls. Use of historical controls is therefore of doubtful value. Ongoing trials use the combination of 5-fluorouracil and methyl-CCNU, which has been shown to double the remission rate in advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy of colo-rectal cancer is still experimental and justified only in the framework of clinical trials.

  19. A long and distant journey: a case of rectal cancer with metastasis to the orbit.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, Michelle; Kwong, Wilson T

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 33-year-old man with acute onset of eye pain and diplopia as the presenting symptoms of rectal cancer with orbital metastasis. Colorectal cancer with orbital metastasis is exceedingly rare with only 7 cases worldwide despite the prevalence of colorectal cancer. The rarity of this presentation may be related to the long path through multiple vascular beds that tumor emboli from the rectum must travel in order to reach the orbit.

  20. Rectal Motion in Patients Receiving Preoperative Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, James D.; Dawson, Laura A.; Sampson, Elliott; Bayley, Andrew; Scott, Sandra; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Timothy; Cummings, Bernard; Dinniwell, Robert; Kim, John J.; Ringash, Jolie; Wong, Rebecca; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the movement of rectum, mesorectum, and rectal primary during a course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer had a planning CT scan with rectal contrast before commencement of preoperative chemoradiation. The scan was repeated during Weeks 1, 3, and 5 of chemoradiation. The rectal primary (gross tumor volume), rectum, mesorectum, and bladder were contoured on all four scans. An in-house biomechanical model-based deformable image registration technique, Morfeus, was used to measure the three-dimensional spatial change in these structures after bony alignment. The required planning target volume margin for this spatial change, after bone alignment, was also calculated. Results: Rectal contrast was found to introduce a systematic error in the position of all organs compared with the noncontrast state. The largest change in structures during radiotherapy was in the anterior and posterior directions for the mesorectum and rectum and in the superior and inferior directions for the gross tumor volume. The planning target volume margins required for internal movement for the mesorectum based on the three scans acquired during treatment are 4 mm right, 5 mm left, 7 mm anterior, and 6 mm posterior. For the rectum, values were 8 mm right, 8 mm left, 8 mm anterior, and 9 mm posterior. The greatest movement of the rectum occurred in the upper third. Conclusions: Contrast is no longer used in CT simulation. Assuming bony alignment, a nonuniform margin of 8 mm anteriorly, 9 mm posteriorly, and 8 mm left and right is recommended.

  1. Gastroduodenal adenocarcinomas and rectal adenoma in a cougar (Felis concolor) infected with Helicobacter-like organisms and spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshikazu; Aono, Itsushi; Ohya, Tatsuo; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Kadota, Koichi

    2002-02-01

    A 14-year-old female cougar died from gastroduodenal adenocarcinomas and rectal adenoma. At necropsy, polypoid tumor masses of various sizes were scattered on the mucosal surfaces of the stomach, duodenum, and rectum. Histologically, the gastric tumor was diagnosed as an intestinal type adenocarcinoma and the tumor cells metastasized to the mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and lung. Helicobacter-like organisms were detected in the lumina lined by foveolar epithelium. In the duodenum, the carcinoma cells were localized in the limina propria and many of them were intensely positive for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In contrast, the rectal adenoma had a lower number of PCNA-positive cells. In the rectum, chronic inflammation with numerous spirochetes was also noted. These results indicated that the occurrence of the gastrointestinal tumors might be associated with the bacterial infection described above.

  2. Granular Cell Tumor of Rectum: A Very Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Savitha V.

    2017-01-01

    Granular cell tumors are predominantly benign, occurring more commonly in women, with about 10% developing in the gastrointestinal tract. Rectal location of this tumor is very rare. We herein report one such case of a 61-year-old man with granular cell tumor in the rectum who underwent endoscopic curative resection. PMID:28255473

  3. Endoscopic resection of sparganosis presenting as colon submucosal tumor: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Keun; Baek, Dong Hoon; Lee, Bong Eun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Song, Geun Am; Park, Do Youn

    2016-05-21

    Human sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by infection with the tapeworm Sparganum, the migrating plerocercoid (second stage) larva of Spirometra species. Sparganosis usually involves subcutaneous tissues and/or muscles of various parts of the body, but involvement of other sites such as the brain, eye, peritoneopleural cavity, urinary track, scrotum, and abdominal viscera has also been documented. Infections caused by sparganum have a worldwide distribution but are most common in Southeast Asia such as China, Japan, and South Korea. Rectal sparganosis is an uncommon disease but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unusual and suspicious rectal submucosal tumors. We report a case of rectal sparganosis presenting as rectal submucosal tumor. We performed endoscopic submucosal dissection of the rectal submucosal tumor. The sparganosis was confirmed based on the presence of calcospherules in the submucosal layer on histological examination. Moreover, the result of the immunoglobulin G antibody test for sparganosis was positive but became negative after endoscopic submucosal dissection. Though rare, rectal sparganosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of rectal submucosal tumor-like lesions. This case suggests that physicians should make effort to exclude sparganosis through careful diagnostic approaches, including detailed history taking and serological tests for parasites. In this report, we aimed to highlight the clinical presentation of Sparganum infection as a rectal submucosal tumor.

  4. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-07-15

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery.

  5. Rare Presentation of Gastroesophageal Carcinoma with Rectal Metastasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Karki, Niraj; Sapkota, Binita; Niazi, Masooma; Remy, Prospere

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Gastroesophageal carcinoma with rectal metastasis Symptoms: Bloating • constipation • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy • flexible sigmoidoscopy • lower endoscopic ultrasound Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Gastroesophageal cancers, previously considered rare, are rapidly increasing worldwide. We present here a unique case of gastroesophageal carcinoma with metastasis to the rectum. Case Report: A 60-year-old female patient presented with constipation, bloating, and weight loss of 4-month duration. She had undergone sleeve gastrectomy 6 years before. Endoscopies performed revealed a friable-looking mucosa in the lower esophagus and a polypoid rectal mass. Histopathological examination from both the esophageal and rectal lesions revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. Immunohistochemistry stain from both specimens was positive for CK7 supporting the gastric site primary with metastasis to the rectum. Further evaluation also revealed metastasis to bone and malignant pleural effusion. Chemotherapy with palliative intent was initiated. Conclusions: Colorectal metastasis is commonly seen from cancers of the breast, stomach, melanoma, kidney, prostate, and ovaries. However, colorectal metastasis from gastroesophageal cancer has never been reported in the medical literature. Diagnosis relies on histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical staining of the tumor. Treatment depends on the tumor stage. Tumors with widespread metastatic disease are candidates for palliative chemotherapy. PMID:27558656

  6. Expression of PRL proteins at invasive margin of rectal cancers in relation to preoperative radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, Asa R.; Svanvik, Joar; Adell, Gunnar; Sun Xiaofeng . E-mail: xiasu@ibk.liu.se

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: PRL-3 (phosphatase of regenerating liver) is involved in metastasis of colorectal cancer; however, its therapeutic implication in cancer patients has not been studied. We investigated the relationships of PRL expression to radiotherapy (RT) in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was immunohistochemically examined in distant (n = 36) and adjacent (n = 82) normal mucosa, primary tumor (n = 125), biopsy specimens (n = 96), and lymph node metastasis (n = 30) from rectal cancer patients participating in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Results: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression was increased from the distant to adjacent mucosa and to the primary tumor (p < 0.05). PRL was highly expressed at the invasive margin in 28% of the primary tumors and 26% of the metastases. In the RT group, strong PRL expression at the invasive margin was related to distant recurrence (p 0.006) and poor survival (p = 0.01), but not in the non-RT group. The survival significance remained even after adjusting for Dukes' stage and differentiation (p = 0.02). Additional multivariate analyses showed that the correlation with prognostic significance of PRL differed between the RT and non-RT groups (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Phosphatase of regenerating liver expression (rather than PRL-3 alone) at the invasive margin predicted resistance to RT and unfavorable survival in rectal cancer patients with preoperative RT.

  7. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-01-01

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery. PMID:26191350

  8. Management of rectal carcinoma: impact of computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    van Waes, P.F.G.M.; Koehler, P.R.; Feldberg, M.A.M.

    1983-06-01

    Twenty-one patients with rectal carcinoma were examined preoperatively in order to assess the accuracy of CT in recognizing the extraluminal extension of the tumor and its effect on treatment planning. Evaluation was done by barium enema, endoscopy, and standard CT augmented by nonreconstructed coronal and sagittal sections. The information was compared with the operative and pathologic findings. Correct staging was achieved in 19 out of 21 patients. In two patients, CT overestimated the extent of the disease. In two patients, small distant metastases detected at surgery were not appreciated; however, the extent of pelvic disease was accurately assessed. In 17 patients, CT added new important information unobtainable by standard techniques. This new information affected treatment planning in 10 patients.

  9. [A Case of Rectal Cancer Successfully Treated with Surgery and Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Metachronous Lung Metastases].

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yu; Hosoda, Yohei; Tachi, Hidekazu; Sugimoto, Takashi; Okabe, Asami; Nishiyama, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Nobuko; Komoto, Izumi; Kiyochi, Hidenori; Tsunekawa, Shoji; Tanaka, Toru; Taki, Yoshiro; Imamura, Masayuki

    2016-11-01

    A 64-year-old woman underwent polypectomy for a rectal polyp(Isp). Pathological findings were invasion of the submucosa( 3,500 mm diameter), and she underwent anterior resection for rectal cancer(RS, pT1b, pN0, cM0, Stage I )without adjuvant chemotherapy. Lung masses were found in her right(8mm)and left lung(7mm). The tumors enlarged during the 4 month follow-up period. We decided to perform left partial pneumonectomy. The tumor was diagnosed as a lung metastasis from colon cancer by pathology. Because the right tumor was located towards the center, performing right pneumonectomy would have been quite invasive and we feared occult metastases. We decided to apply SRT(50 Gy)to the right tumor. The tumor shrunk and became a scar after treatment. There were no complications such as radiation pneumonitis. The patient was in good health without any recurrence for 12 months after SRT. Surgical resection is an optimal method to control lung metastasis from colon cancer if the lesion is operable. However, in the case of a tumor centrally located, surgical resection may cause deterioration of lung function. There are also cases with contraindications for surgery due to co-morbidities. In addition, there is no consensus on observation periods to exclude occult metastases. SRT can be an effective treatment for lung metastases from colon cancer when there are bilateral lung metastases and no metastases outside the lungs.

  10. Predictive and Prognostic Molecular Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dayde, Delphine; Tanaka, Ichidai; Jain, Rekha; Tai, Mei Chee; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2017-01-01

    The standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) followed by radical surgery. Response to nCRT varies among patients and pathological complete response is associated with better outcome. However, there is a lack of effective methods to select rectal cancer patients who would or would not have a benefit from nCRT. The utility of clinicopathological and radiological features are limited due to lack of adequate sensitivity and specificity. Molecular biomarkers have the potential to predict response to nCRT at an early time point, but none have currently reached the clinic. Integration of diverse types of biomarkers including clinicopathological and imaging features, identification of mechanistic link to tumor biology, and rigorous validation using samples which represent disease heterogeneity, will allow to develop a sensitive and cost-effective molecular biomarker panel for precision medicine in rectal cancer. Here, we aim to review the recent advance in tissue- and blood-based molecular biomarker research and illustrate their potential in predicting nCRT response in rectal cancer. PMID:28272347

  11. A watch-and-wait approach to the management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D

    2013-10-01

    There has been increasing interest in whether a watch-and-wait strategy can be pursued instead of routine surgery in selected rectal cancer patients who have a clinical complete response (cCR) after chemoradiation. The watch-and-wait approach could potentially reduce treatment-related toxicity in selected rectal cancer patients. A large study from Brazil and a prospective trial from the Netherlands appear to support this approach, although multiple other studies have raised concerns about the high rate of local recurrence with this strategy. This article reviews current evidence in support of a watch-and-wait approach to rectal cancer management, and discusses the challenges and limitations of this approach. Among these are the facts that current methods of assessing tumor response have limited accuracy, and that a cCR does not necessarily imply pathologic complete response. Careful patient selection and systematic methods of response assessment and follow-up will be critical to the success of nonoperative approaches. Based on the available evidence, ideally a watch-and-wait approach for patients with rectal cancer should be pursued within the context of a prospective clinical trial.

  12. [Metachronous metastasis from rectal adenocarcinoma to the penis--case report].

    PubMed

    Küronya, Zsófia; Bodrogi, István; Lövey, József; Plótár, Vanda; Manninger, Sándor; Pápai, Zsuzsanna

    2009-09-01

    Despite of its rich vascularization and extensive circulatory communication with neighboring organs, penile metastases are rare. Even more infrequent is a penile metastasis of rectum tumors. Since the first report of rectal carcinoma with metastasis to the penis (Ehbert 1870), approximately 50 cases have been reported, most of them from the USA, the remaining from Western Europe, the Middle East and Japan. The first Hungarian case is reported now of penile metastasis of a rectal carcinoma. The case of a 65-year-old man is presented: isolated penile metastasis discovered 4.5 years after the primary rectal cancer resection. IHC tissue diagnosis and detailed clinical investigations confirmed metastatic rectal adenocarcinoma. As our patient refused penectomy and KRAS mutation was proven, FOLFIRI chemotherapy was initiated without cetuximab. This was followed by chemoradiotherapy that resulted only in transient regression. Currently the patient receives the FOLFOX regimen. At present the patient is in good performance status,without pain. The size and the number of penile metastases have not shown significant changes. According to the literature the average survival of patients with penile metastases treated with radiochemotherapy is 8 months. New chemotherapeutic modalities may improve the survival.

  13. Predictive and Prognostic Molecular Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dayde, Delphine; Tanaka, Ichidai; Jain, Rekha; Tai, Mei Chee; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2017-03-07

    The standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) followed by radical surgery. Response to nCRT varies among patients and pathological complete response is associated with better outcome. However, there is a lack of effective methods to select rectal cancer patients who would or would not have a benefit from nCRT. The utility of clinicopathological and radiological features are limited due to lack of adequate sensitivity and specificity. Molecular biomarkers have the potential to predict response to nCRT at an early time point, but none have currently reached the clinic. Integration of diverse types of biomarkers including clinicopathological and imaging features, identification of mechanistic link to tumor biology, and rigorous validation using samples which represent disease heterogeneity, will allow to develop a sensitive and cost-effective molecular biomarker panel for precision medicine in rectal cancer. Here, we aim to review the recent advance in tissue- and blood-based molecular biomarker research and illustrate their potential in predicting nCRT response in rectal cancer.

  14. Chromosomal copy number changes of locally advanced rectal cancers treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Grade, Marian; Gaedcke, Jochen; Wangsa, Danny; Varma, Sudhir; Beckmann, Jaje; Liersch, Torsten; Hess, Clemens; Becker, Heinz; Difilippantonio, Michael J.; Ried, Thomas; Ghadimi, B. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Standard treatment of rectal cancer patients comprises preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by radical surgery. However, clinicians are faced with the problem that response rates vary from one individual to another. Predictive biomarkers would therefore be helpful. Materials and Methods In order to identify genomic imbalances that might assist in stratifying tumors into responsive or non-responsive, we used metaphase comparative genomic hybridization to prospectively analyze pre-therapeutic biopsies from 42 patients with locally advanced rectal cancers. These patients were subsequently treated with 5-FU based preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Results Based on downsizing of the T-category, 21 rectal cancers were later classified as responsive, while 21 were non-responsive. Comparing these two groups, we could show that gains of chromosomal regions 7q32-q36 and 7q11-q31, and amplifications of 20q11-q13 were significantly associated with responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (P<0.05). However, the probability to detect these copy number changes by chance is high (P=0.21). Conclusion Our primary results suggest that pre-therapeutic evaluation of chromosomal copy number changes may be of value for response prediction of rectal cancers to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. This will require validation in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:19602460

  15. Analysis of anastomotic leakage after rectal surgery: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Junichiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Kazama, Shinsuke; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of anastomotic leakage in rectal surgery is around 10 percent. Poor blood supply to the anastomosis, high anastomotic pressure and tension, increased operative blood loss, long operative time, and male sex are risk factors of anastomotic leakage. In the present study, we examined anastomotic leakage cases in rectal surgery at our institute and tried to ascertain the risk factors. Methods Three hundred fifty-seven consecutive patients who underwent rectal resection with anastomosis between January 2008 and October 2013 were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups according to the existence of anastomotic leakage. Clinicopathological features, operative procedures, and intraoperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. Regarding intraoperative procedure, we focused on the ligation level of the inferior mesenteric artery, installing a transanal drainage tube in the rectum, and constructing a diverting stoma. Results Anastomotic leakage occurred in eight patients. All of them were male (p = 0.0284). There were no statistical differences in other characteristics of the patients or tumors, in operative procedures, or in intraoperative outcomes. Conclusions In the present study, no statistically significant risk factors for anastomotic leakage in rectal surgery were detected, except for male sex. However, the rate of anastomotic leakage at our institute was revealed to be rather low. Our exertion to preserve good blood flow and to prevent high tension and pressure on the anastomosis in operation may have led to this result. PMID:26042185

  16. A PCR blood test outperforms chromogranin A in carcinoid detection and is unaffected by proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Modlin, Irvin M; Aslanian, Harry; Bodei, Lisa; Drozdov, Ignat; Kidd, Mark

    2014-12-01

    A critical requirement in neuroendocrine tumor (NET) management is a blood biomarker test that is sensitive, specific and reproducible. We evaluated a PCR-based 51-transcript signature to detect tumors, compared it with chromogranin A (CgA) and examined the confounding effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which cause falsely elevated CgA levels. The multigene signature was evaluated in two groups. Group 1: 125 prospectively collected NETs: gastroenteropancreatic NETs (n=91, including 42 pancreatic and 40 small intestinal), carcinoids of unknown primary (n=18) and other sites (n=16). Group 2: prospectively collected non-NET patients receiving PPIs (>1 month; dyspepsia, n=19; GERD, n=6; and pancreatitis, n=4) and 50 controls. All samples were analyzed by PCR (marker genes) and ELISA (DAKO-CgA). Sensitivity comparisons included χ(2), non-parametric measurements, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Group 1: 123 NETs were PCR-positive (98.4%) compared with 50 (40%) CgA-positive (χ(2)=97.3, P<10(-26)). Significant differences (P<0.001) were noted between pancreas: PCR 95% vs CgA 29.2% (P<10(-9)) and small intestine: 100 vs 58% (P<10(-4)). The multigene test was elevated in all grades (G1-G3), in both local and disseminated disease, and was not normalized by somatostatin analog therapy. It was also elevated in 97% of CgA normal NETs. Group 2: PPI administration increased CgA in 83% and CgA was elevated in 26% of controls. PCR values were not elevated in either group. PCR performance metrics were as follows: sensitivity 98.4%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 97.8%, and the ROC-derived area under the curve (AUC) was 0.997. These were significantly better than CgA (all metrics <60%; AUC, 0.54; Z-statistic, 10.44, P<0.0001). A 51-panel multigene blood transcript analysis is significantly more sensitive than plasma CgA for NET detection and is unaffected by acid suppression therapy.

  17. Novel radiation techniques for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The concepts for management of rectal cancer have changed drastically over the past few years. Through national bowel cancer screening programmes in the Western countries and the increasing use of endoscopic procedures as diagnostic tool, there is increase in detection of rectal cancer in early stages. There is increase in ageing population worldwide but more so in Western countries. In addition, there is realisation of harm from extirpative surgical procedures which are directed towards managing advanced rectal cancer in the past. Increase in cost of health care burden has also led the investigators to seek alternative treatment options which are effective, safe and cost effective. There are several modern radiation techniques which fits this bill and we need to be aware of newer novel radiation techniques to fulfil this gap. PMID:24982769

  18. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  19. Demonstration of TGF-β and XIIIα in Endocardial Biopsies of Carcinoid Heart Disease Patients: an Immunofluorescence Study

    PubMed Central

    Diepholz, Dorgrit; Wilke, Andreas; Maisch, Bernhard; Steverding, Dietmar

    2011-01-01

    Background Serotonin and other vasoactive substances play a critical role in the development of carcinoid heart disease, but the exact etiology of the illness is still unknown. Methods By using immunofluorescence microscopy, we investigated the expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and the presence of fibrin-stabilizing factor (XIIIα) in endomyocardial biopsy specimens of patients with carcinoid heart disease. In addition, the tissue integrity of the specimens was studied by staining for laminin. Results Both TGF-β and XIIIα co-localized in the endocardium beneath carcinoid plaques: while TGF-β was found within myocytes, XIIIα was detected on the surface of cells in fibrotic lesions stretching out into the tissue. Laminin staining revealed that the integrity of the endocardium was dissolved and that the tissue consisted of hypertrophic and hypotrophic myocytes. Conclusions The results suggest that the presence of TGF-β and XIIIα in carcinoid heart lesions indicates that endocardial damage induced by serotonin and other vasoactive substances gives rise to an overshooting wound healing process.

  20. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben Youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route.

  1. Biology and Treatment of Metastatic Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, Jonathan R.; Nasir, Aejaz; Kvols, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Neuroendocrine malignancies of the gastroenteropancreatic axis include carcinoid and pancreatic endocrine tumors. These heterogeneous neoplasms arise from the enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract and the islet cells of the pancreas. Histologically, most well-differentiated endocrine tumors consist of small, round, monomorphic cells, arranged in islands or trabeculae, with a distinct “salt-and-pepper” pattern of nuclear chromatin. Chromogranin and synaptophysin are useful as immunohistochemical markers of neuroendocrine differentiation. Other common features include the capacity to secrete peptide hormones and biogenic amines. A relatively indolent growth rate is characteristic of most gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors, with the exception of poorly differentiated tumors which are usually aggressive. Treatment strategies are designed to limit tumor progression and palliate hormonal syndromes. This article reviews the diverse biologic characteristics of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors and current treatment options for metastatic disease. PMID:19259290

  2. Transanal Approach to Rectal Polyps and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vinay; Mishra, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    A transanal approach to rectal polyp and cancer excision is often an appropriate alternative to conventional rectal resection, and has a lower associated morbidity. There has been a steady evolution in the techniques of transanal surgery over the past 30 years. It started with traditional transanal excision and was revolutionized by introduction of transanal endoscopic microsurgery in early 1980s. Introduction of transanal minimally invasive surgery made it more accessible to surgeons around the world. Now robotic platforms are being tried in certain institutions. Concerns have been raised about recurrence rates of cancers with transanal approach and success of subsequent salvage operations. PMID:26929754

  3. [Nuclear morphology in false negative and negative rectal biopsies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rilke, F; Clemente, C; Pilotti, S

    1975-01-01

    An typical nuclear structure consisting of a cribriform and condensed chromatin pattern with hyperchromasia, a small nucleolus and a moderately increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio was observed in the epithelial cells of the crypts and in the stromal and muscular cells of 51 out of 70 oncologically negative biopsies of the rectal mucosa. The subsequent retrieval of all clinical and histologia data revealed that the 51 cases included 39 of adenocarcinoma of the large intestine either present (15 cases) at a variable distance from the false negative biopsy or removed previously (24 cases), 7 of extra-intestinal malignant tumor (parotid gland, urinary bladder, endometrium, breast, stomach, metastatic, anus) and 5 with benign conditions of the large intestine. Of the remaining 19 cases whose biopsies did not reveal the atypical nuclear structure 16 had benign lesions of the large intestine and nowhere evidence of malignancy, two had an adenocarcinoma of the large bowel (one present and one removed previously) and one a carcinoma of the anus. In the rectal biopsies examined the atypical nuclear structure was detected in 93.9% of the cases with a malignant tumor either present or removed previously and in 19% of the cases with benign conditions. The morphologic evidence indicated that the atypical nuclear structure was compatible with a possible distrubance of the mitotic cycle since the findings were restricted to the generative compartment of rectal epithelium. The results are discussed in connection with their possible practical use as a diagnostic aid in the evaluation and interpretation of false negative and negative rectal biopsies as well as with their possible significance in the biology of tumor-bearing hosts.

  4. Pancreatic Metastasis from Rectal Cancer that was Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasonography-guided Fine Needle Aspiration (EUS-FNA)

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Itsuki; Katanuma, Akio; Yane, Kei; Kin, Toshifumi; Nagai, Kazumasa; Yamazaki, Hajime; Koga, Hideaki; Kitagawa, Koh; Yokoyama, Kensuke; Ikarashi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Omori, Yuko; Shinohara, Toshiya

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, and there have been only a few reports of its preoperative diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) with immunohistochemical staining. We herein describe the case of a 77-year-old woman in whom a solitary mass in the pancreatic tail was detected 11 years after rectal cancer resection. The patient also had a history of pulmonary tumor resection. We performed EUS-FNA and a histopathological examination showed adenocarcinoma with CD20+, CD7-, and CDX2+ (similar to her rectal cancer). EUS-FNA enabled a histopathological examination, including immunohistochemical staining, which helped to confirm the diagnosis of pancreatic and pulmonary metastasis from rectal cancer. PMID:28154274

  5. The development of metachronous prostate cancer and chronic myeloid leukemia in a patient with metastatic rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Oztop, I; Yaren, A; Demirpence, M; Alacacioglu, I; Tuna, B; Piskin, O; Yilmaz, U

    2008-01-01

    We report herein an unusual case of metachronous triple cancers (rectum, prostate and Philadelphia(+) [Ph(+)] chronic myeloid leukemia [CML]). A metastatic rectal cancer was diagnosed in a 76-year-old male patient, who was treated with transanal tumor resection and chemotherapy. Thirty months from the initial rectal cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer was diagnosed and the patient was administered maximal androgen blockade and received palliative radiotherapy to the lumbar spine because of painful bone metastases. Thirty months after the diagnosis of rectal cancer and 12 months after the diagnosis of prostate cancer the patient developed Ph(+) CML and imatinib treatment was started. After one-year period in remission, CML evolved into accelerated phase and the patient died of intracranial hemorrhage.

  6. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  7. Preoperative chemoradiation of locally advanced T3 rectal cancer combined with an endorectal boost

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Anders . E-mail: andjac@vgs.vejleamt.dk; Mortensen, John P.; Bisgaard, Claus; Lindebjerg, Jan; Hansen, Johnny W.; Rafaelsen, Soren R.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect and feasibility of concurrent radiation and chemotherapy combined with endorectal brachytherapy in T3 rectal cancer with complete pathologic remission as end point. Methods and Materials: The study included 50 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. All patients had T3 tumor with a circumferential margin 0-5 mm on a magnetic resonance imaging scan. The radiotherapy was delivered by a technique including two planning target volumes. Clinical target volume 1 (CTV1) received 60 Gy/30 fractions, and CTV2 received 48.6 Gy/27 fractions. The tumor dose was raised to 65 Gy with endorectal brachytherapy 5 Gy/1 fraction to the tumor bed. On treatment days, the patients received uracil and tegafur 300 mg/m2 concurrently with radiotherapy. Results: Forty-eight patients underwent operation. Histopathologic tumor regression was assessed by the Tumor Regression Grade (TRG) system. TRG1 was recorded in 27% of the patients, and a further 27% were classified as TRG2. TRG3 was found in 40%, and 6% had TRG4. The toxicity was low. Conclusion: The results indicate that high-dose radiation with concurrent chemotherapy and endorectal brachytherapy is feasible with a high rate of complete response, but further trials are needed to define its possible role as treatment option.

  8. Rectal bezoars due to pumpkin seeds.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Mohammad Salman; Al-Wahibi, Khalifa; Baloch, Shafiq; Al-Qadhi, Hani

    2009-01-01

    Rectal bezoars commonly occur due to seeds, especially in children living in countries south of the Mediterranean and in the Middle-East. Dried seeds are considered a delicacy and consumed widely. Inadequate chewing or hastily eating without removing the hull may lead to their impaction as bezoars, which may require manual removal under general anaesthesia.

  9. High Frequency of CD8 Positive Lymphocyte Infiltration Correlates with Lack of Lymph Node Involvement in Early Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Däster, Silvio; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Hirt, Christian; Zlobec, Inti; Delko, Tarik; Nebiker, Christian A.; Soysal, Savas D.; Amicarella, Francesca; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Heberer, Michael; Lugli, Alessandro; Spagnoli, Giulio C.; Kettelhack, Christoph; Terracciano, Luigi; Oertli, Daniel; von Holzen, Urs; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims. A trend towards local excision of early rectal cancers has prompted us to investigate if immunoprofiling might help in predicting lymph node involvement in this subgroup. Methods. A tissue microarray of 126 biopsies of early rectal cancer (T1 and T2) was stained for several immunomarkers of the innate and the adaptive immune response. Patients' survival and nodal status were analyzed and correlated with infiltration of the different immune cells. Results. Of all tested markers, only CD8 (P = 0.005) and TIA-1 (P = 0.05) were significantly more frequently detectable in early rectal cancer biopsies of node negative as compared to node positive patients. Although these two immunomarkers did not display prognostic effect “per se,” CD8+ and, marginally, TIA-1 T cell infiltration could predict nodal involvement in univariate logistic regression analysis (OR 0.994; 95% CI 0.992–0.996; P = 0.009 and OR 0.988; 95% CI 0.984–0.994; P = 0.05, resp.). An algorithm significantly predicting the nodal status in early rectal cancer based on CD8 together with vascular invasion and tumor border configuration could be calculated (P < 0.00001). Conclusion. Our data indicate that in early rectal cancers absence of CD8+ T-cell infiltration helps in predicting patients' nodal involvement. PMID:25609852

  10. Efficacy of Immunohistochemical Staining in Differentiating a Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Poorly Differentiated Rectal Cancer: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rami, Sairafi; Han, Yoon Dae; Jang, Mi; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young

    2016-01-01

    A rectal carcinoma, including primary an adenosquamous and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), is a very rare disease, accounting for 0.025% to 0.20% of all large-bowel malignant tumors. Because SCCs have a higher mortality than adenosquamous carcinomas, determining whether the primary rectal cancer exhibits an adenomatous component or a squamous component is important. While differentiating between these 2 components, especially in poorly differentiated rectal cancer, is difficult, specific immunohistochemical stains enable accurate diagnoses. Here, we report the use of immunohistochemical stains to distinguish between the adenomatous and the squamous components in 2 patients with low rectal cancer, a 58-year-old man and a 73-year-old woman, who were initially diagnosed using the histopathologic results for a poorly differentiated carcinoma. These data suggest that using these immunohistochemical stains will help to accurately diagnose the type of rectal cancer, especially for poorly differentiated carcinomas, and will provide important information to determine the proper treatment for the patient. PMID:27626026

  11. Timing Is Everything: What Is the Optimal Duration After Chemoradiation for Surgery for Rectal Cancer?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Karyn A

    2016-09-06

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice.A 47-year-old woman was referred for management of a newly diagnosed rectal cancer. She presented with a 2-month history of rectal bleeding and change in bowel habits. She underwent a colonoscopy that demonstrated a 5-cm fungating, friable, and partially obstructing mass in the distal rectum, approximately 5 cm from the anal verge. The tumor was palpable on digital rectal examination on the anterior wall of rectum. The biopsy demonstrated a moderately differentiated invasive adenocarcinoma, microsatellite stable. A staging work-up, including a computed tomography scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, demonstrated rectal wall thickening in the midrectum and small lymph nodes in the left perirectal fat. There was a nonspecific 3-mm right lower lobe pulmonary nodule. Rectal magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a 3-cm mass arising from mid-distal rectum with minimal extension beyond muscularis propria into the mesorectal fat, but without invasion of mesorectal fascia (Fig 1). There were at least three small mesorectal lymph nodes present; the largest rounded node measured up to 5 mm, and no additional pelvic lymphadenopathy was identified. Her carcinoembryonic antigen was 1.1, and all other laboratory studies were within normal limits. She was seen in the Colorectal Multidisciplinary Conference for a discussion of her treatment options.

  12. The influence of neoadjuvant therapy for the prognosis in patients with rectal carcinoma: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Peng, Yu; Wang, Lin-Ang; Wei, Xi; Li, Meng-Xia; Qing, Yi; Xia, Wei; Cheng, Ming; Zi, Dan; Li, Chun-Xue; Wang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Rectal cancer, defined as a cancerous lesion of the colon distal to the rectosigmoid junction, is the fourth most common cancer cause of death globally. There were 474 patients with rectal cancer who underwent surgery between October 2007 and May 2013 enrolled in our center. Patients were respectively categorized by neoadjuvant therapy. This study aimed to explore the predictive factors that affected the Progression-free survival and overall survival of the patients with rectal cancer. Clinical characteristics of patients were compared with the groups and potential prognostic factors were analyzed by SPSS 19.0. In our study, neoadjuvant therapy increased the anus-retained rate (64.4 vs 53.4 % P = 0.016) and remission rate in the treatment group, compared to the non-treatment group (62.6 vs 34.8 %; P = 0.000). The neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy, more operative duration, anus retained and micturition damaged are positive prognostic factors of PFS to patients. Poor differentiation, the tumor of ulcer, invasive, and pT4 stage, contributed the poor factors for PFS of patients (P < 0.05). Additionally, the patients with neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy underwent the better prognosis of OS. Adjuvant chemotherapy cannot increase PFS of the patients who accepted neoadjuvant therapy after surgery get pCR, but can improve OS. The anus-retained and neoadjuvant radiotherapy, duration of surgery in rectal cancer have the positive correlation. Micturition damaged and neoadjuvant radiotherapy were positively correlated as well. In conclusion, adjuvant chemotherapy does not improve the PFS of patients with pCR to neoadjuvant therapy, but is good for OS. Further prospective and large population-based clinical studies are needed to establish clinical guidelines for the use of neoadjuvant therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  13. MRE11 and ATM Expression Levels Predict Rectal Cancer Survival and Their Association with Radiotherapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Revoltar, Maxine; Lim, Stephanie H.; Tut, Thein-Ga; Abubakar, Askar; Henderson, Chris J.; Chua, Wei; Ng, Weng; Lee, Mark; De Souza, Paul; Morgan, Matthew; Lee, C. Soon; Shin, Joo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of DNA repair proteins is associated with poor survival in cancer patients. We investigated the combined expression of MRE11 and ATM as a predictive marker of response to radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Methods MRE11 and ATM expression were examined in tumor samples from 262 rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer, including a sub-cohort of 54 patients who were treated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy. The relationship between expression of the two-protein panel and tumor regression grade (TRG) was assessed by Mann–Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristics area under curve (ROC-AUC) analysis. The association between expression of the two-protein panel and clinicopathologic variables and survival was examined by Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression analysis. Results A high score for two-protein combined expression in the tumor center (TC) was significantly associated with worse disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.035) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.003) in the whole cohort, and with DFS (P = 0.028) and OS (P = 0.024) in the neoadjuvant subgroup (n = 54). In multivariate analysis, the two-protein combination panel (HR = 2.178, 95% CI 1.115–4.256, P = 0.023) and perineural invasion (HR = 2.183, 95% CI 1.222–3.899, P = 0.008) were significantly associated with DFS. Using ROC-AUC analysis of good versus poor histological tumor response among patients treated preoperatively with radiotherapy, the average ROC-AUC was 0.745 for the combined panel, 0.618 for ATM alone, and 0.711 for MRE11 alone. Conclusions The MRE11/ATM two-protein panel developed in this study may have clinical value as a predictive marker of tumor response to neoadjuvant radiotherapy, and a prognostic marker for disease-free and overall survival. PMID:27930716

  14. Identification of deregulation of apoptosis and cell cycle in neuroendocrine tumors of the lung via NanoString nCounter expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Robert Fred Henry; Werner, Robert; Ting, Saskia; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Theegarten, Dirk; Christoph, Daniel Christian; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Mairinger, Fabian Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumors of the lung comprise typical (TC) and atypical carcinoids (AC), large-cell neuroendocrine cancer (LCNEC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Cell cycle and apoptosis are key pathways of multicellular homeostasis and deregulation of these pathways is associated with cancerogenesis. Materials and Methods Sixty representative FFPE-specimens (16 TC, 13 AC, 16 LCNEC and 15 SCLC) were used for mRNA expression analysis using the NanoString technique. Eight genes related to apoptosis and ten genes regulating key points of cell cycle were investigated. Results ASCL1, BCL2, CASP8, CCNE1, CDK1, CDK2, CDKN1A and CDKN2A showed lower expression in carcinoids compared to carcinomas. In contrast, CCNE1 and CDK6 showed elevated expression in carcinoids compared to carcinomas. The calculated BCL2/BAX ratio showed increasing values from TC to SCLC. Between SCLC and LCNEC CDK2, CDKN1B, CDKN2A and PNN expression was significantly different with higher expression in SCLC. Conclusion Carcinoids have increased CDK4/6 and CCND1 expression controlling RB1 phosphorylation via this signaling cascade. CDK2 and CCNE1 were increased in carcinomas showing that these use the opposite way to control RB1. BAX and BCL2 are antagonists in regulating apoptosis. BCL2 expression increased over BAX expression with increasing malignancy of the tumor from TC to SCLC. PMID:26008974

  15. Neoadjuvant Long-Course Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Does Time to Surgery Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotopoulou, Ioanna G.; Parashar, Deepak; Qasem, Eyas; Mezher-Sikafi, Rasha; Parmar, Jitesh; Wells, Alan D.; Bajwa, Farrukh M.; Menon, Madhav; Jephcott, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate whether delaying surgery following long-course chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer correlates with pathologic complete response. Pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is standard practice in the UK for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Optimal timing of surgery following CRT is still not clearly defined. All patients with a diagnosis of rectal cancer who had undergone long-course CRT prior to surgery between January 2008 and December 2011 were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata 11. Fifty-nine patients received long-course CRT prior to surgery in the selected period. Twenty-seven percent (16/59) of patients showed a complete histopathologic response and 59.3% (35/59) of patients had tumor down-staging from radiologically-assessed node positive to histologically-proven node negative disease. There was no statistically significant delay to surgery after completion of CRT in the 16 patients with complete response (CR) compared with the rest of the group [IR: incomplete response; CR group median: 74.5 days (IQR: 70–87.5) and IR group median: 72 days (IQR: 57–83), P = 0.470]. Although no statistically significant predictors of either complete response or tumor nodal status down-staging were identified in logistic regression analyses, a trend toward complete response was seen with longer delay to surgery following completion of long-course CRT. PMID:26414816

  16. Neoadjuvant Long-Course Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer: Does Time to Surgery Matter?

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, Ioanna G; Parashar, Deepak; Qasem, Eyas; Mezher-Sikafi, Rasha; Parmar, Jitesh; Wells, Alan D; Bajwa, Farrukh M; Menon, Madhav; Jephcott, Catherine R

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate whether delaying surgery following long-course chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer correlates with pathologic complete response. Pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is standard practice in the UK for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Optimal timing of surgery following CRT is still not clearly defined. All patients with a diagnosis of rectal cancer who had undergone long-course CRT prior to surgery between January 2008 and December 2011 were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata 11. Fifty-nine patients received long-course CRT prior to surgery in the selected period. Twenty-seven percent (16/59) of patients showed a complete histopathologic response and 59.3% (35/59) of patients had tumor down-staging from radiologically-assessed node positive to histologically-proven node negative disease. There was no statistically significant delay to surgery after completion of CRT in the 16 patients with complete response (CR) compared with the rest of the group [IR: incomplete response; CR group median: 74.5 days (IQR: 70-87.5) and IR group median: 72 days (IQR: 57-83), P = 0.470]. Although no statistically significant predictors of either complete response or tumor nodal status down-staging were identified in logistic regression analyses, a trend toward complete response was seen with longer delay to surgery following completion of long-course CRT.

  17. Lack of CD44 variant 6 expression in rectal cancer invasive front associates with early recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Avoranta, Suvi Tuulia; Korkeila, Eija Annika; Syrjänen, Kari Juhani; Pyrhönen, Seppo Olavi; Sundström, Jari Toivo Tapio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic value of CD44 variant 6 (CD44v6), a membranous adhesion molecule, in rectal cancer. METHODS: Altogether, 210 rectal cancer samples from 214 patients treated with short-course radiotherapy (RT, n = 90), long-course (chemo) RT (n = 53) or surgery alone (n = 71) were studied with immunohistochemistry for CD44v6. The extent and intensity of membranous and cytoplasmic CD44v6 staining, and the intratumoral membranous staining pattern, were analyzed. RESULTS: Membranous CD44v6 expression was seen in 84% and cytoplasmic expression in 81% of the cases. In 59% of the tumors with membranous CD44v6 expression, the staining pattern in the invasive front was determined as “front-positive” and in 41% as “front-negative”. The latter pattern was associated with narrower circumferential margin (P = 0.01), infiltrative growth pattern (P < 0.001), and shorter disease-free survival in univariate survival analysis (P = 0.022) when compared to the “front-positive” tumors. CONCLUSION: The lack of membranous CD44v6 in the rectal cancer invasive front could be used as a method to identify patients at increased risk for recurrent disease. PMID:22969228

  18. Prediction of Response to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer by Multiplex Kinase Activity Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Folkvord, Sigurd; Flatmark, Kjersti; Dueland, Svein

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Tumor response of rectal cancer to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) varies considerably. In experimental tumor models and clinical radiotherapy, activity of particular subsets of kinase signaling pathways seems to predict radiation response. This study aimed to determine whether tumor kinase activity profiles might predict tumor response to preoperative CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Sixty-seven LARC patients were treated with a CRT regimen consisting of radiotherapy, fluorouracil, and, where possible, oxaliplatin. Pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens were analyzed using microarrays with kinase substrates, and the resulting substrate phosphorylation patterns were correlated with tumor response to preoperative treatment as assessed by histomorphologic tumor regression grade (TRG). A predictive model for TRG scores from phosphosubstrate signatures was obtained by partial-least-squares discriminant analysis. Prediction performance was evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation and use of an independent test set. Results: In the patient population, 73% and 15% were scored as good responders (TRG 1-2) or intermediate responders (TRG 3), whereas 12% were assessed as poor responders (TRG 4-5). In a subset of 7 poor responders and 12 good responders, treatment outcome was correctly predicted for 95%. Application of the prediction model on the remaining patient samples resulted in correct prediction for 85%. Phosphosubstrate signatures generated by poor-responding tumors indicated high kinase activity, which was inhibited by the kinase inhibitor sunitinib, and several discriminating phosphosubstrates represented proteins derived from signaling pathways implicated in radioresistance. Conclusions: Multiplex kinase activity profiling may identify functional biomarkers predictive of tumor response to preoperative CRT in LARC.

  19. The use of capecitabine in the combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liauw, Stanley L; Minsky, Bruce D

    2008-03-01

    Locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma is treated by combined-modality therapy, which consists of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. A series of randomized trials established a preferred treatment sequence of preoperative radiation therapy and 5-fluorouracil(5-FU)-based chemotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy for patients with stage II/III disease. Capecitabine is an oral prodrug of 5-FU that has potential advantages compared with intravenous 5-FU, including ease of administration and potentially increased therapeutic effect. Capecitabine is converted by a 3-step enzymatic process; the last step involves the enzyme thymidine phosphorylase, which is overexpressed in tumor tissues and is stimulated by concurrent radiation therapy. Over the past 5 years, several phase I/II trials of capecitabine-based therapy were reported. This review discusses the evolution of combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer with specific attention given to the use of capecitabine in conjunction with radiation therapy.

  20. Delaying surgery after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy improves prognosis of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mihmanlı, Mehmet; Kabul Gürbulak, Esin; Akgün, İsmail Ethem; Celayir, Mustafa Fevzi; Yazıcı, Pınar; Tunçel, Deniz; Bek, Tuba Tülin; Öz, Ayhan; Ömeroğlu, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prognostic effect of a delayed interval between neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and surgery in locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS We evaluated 87 patients with locally advanced mid- or distal rectal cancer undergoing total mesorectal excision following an interval period after neoadjuvant CRT at Şişli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul between January 2009 and January 2014. Patients were divided into two groups according to the interval before surgery: < 8 wk (group I) and ≥ 8 wk (group II). Data related to patients, cancer characteristics and pathological examination were collected and analyzed. RESULTS When the distribution of timing between group I (n = 45) and group II (n = 42) was viewed, comparison of interval periods (median ± SD) of groups showed a significant difference of as 5 ± 1.28 wk in group I and 10.1 ± 2.2 wk in group II (P < 0.001). The median follow-up period for all patients was 34.5 (9.9-81) mo. group II had significantly higher rates of pathological complete response (pCR) than group I had (19% vs 8.9%, P = 0.002). Rate of tumor regression grade (TRG) poor response was 44.4% in group I and 9.5% in group II (P < 0.002). A poor pathological response was associated with worse disease-free survival (P = 0.009). The interval time did not show any association with local recurrence (P = 0.79). CONCLUSION Delaying the neoadjuvant CRT-surgery interval may provide nodal down-staging, improve pCR rate, and decrease the rate of TRG poor response. PMID:27672428

  1. The Value of Somatostatin Receptor Imaging with In-111 Octreotide and/or Ga-68 DOTATATE in Localizing Ectopic ACTH Producing Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gözde Özkan, Zeynep; Kuyumcu, Serkan; Balköse, Deniz; Özkan, Berker; Aksakal, Nihat; Yılmaz, Ebru; Şanlı, Yasemin; Türkmen, Cüneyt; Aral, Ferihan; Adalet, Işık

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to evaluate the value of somatostatin receptor imaging (SRI) with In-111 octreotide and Ga-68 DOTATATE in localizing ectopic ACTH producing tumors. Methods: Nineteen patients who had In-111 octreotide somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) and/or Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT to localize ectopic ACTH producing tumors between the years 2000 and 2012 were included retrospectively in our study. The results of SRI were compared with clinical onset, radiological findings and surgical data of the patients. Results: Sixteen In-111 octreotide SRS and five Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT were performed in 19 patients. In eight out of 19 patients, ectopic ACTH secretion site could be detected. In five patients, SRS showed pathologic uptake. In four of these patients, surgery revealed pulmonary carcinoid tumors and in one patient pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. In one patient, Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT revealed pathologic uptake in lung nodule which came out to be pulmonary carcinoid tumor. In another patient who had resection of metastases of atypical carcinoid tumor prior to scans, new metastatic foci were detected both with SRS and Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT imaging. In one patient, although SRS was negative, CT which was performed three years later showed a lung nodule diagnosed as pulmonary carcinoid tumor. In 11 patients, ectopic ACTH secretion site could not be detected. In 10 of those patients, scintigraphic and radiological imaging did not show any lesions and in one patient, Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT was false positive. Conclusion: SRI has a complementary role with radiological imaging in localizing ectopic ACTH secretion sites. PET-CT imaging with Ga-68 peptide conjugates is a promising new modality for this indication. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24003397

  2. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  3. Prognostic Value of MicroRNAs in Preoperative Treated Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Azadeh; Epping, Ingo; Kramer, Frank; Jo, Peter; Bernhardt, Markus; Kitz, Julia; Salinas, Gabriela; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Grade, Marian; Beißbarth, Tim; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer are treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection. Despite similar clinical parameters (uT2-3, uN+) and standard therapy, patients’ prognoses differ widely. A possible prediction of prognosis through microRNAs as biomarkers out of treatment-naïve biopsies would allow individualized therapy options. Methods: Microarray analysis of 45 microdissected preoperative biopsies from patients with rectal cancer was performed to identify potential microRNAs to predict overall survival, disease-free survival, cancer-specific survival, distant-metastasis-free survival, tumor regression grade, or nodal stage. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed on an independent set of 147 rectal cancer patients to validate relevant miRNAs. Results: In the microarray screen, 14 microRNAs were significantly correlated to overall survival. Five microRNAs were included from previous work. Finally, 19 miRNAs were evaluated by qPCR. miR-515-5p, miR-573, miR-579 and miR-802 demonstrated significant correlation with overall survival and cancer-specific survival (p < 0.05). miR-573 was also significantly correlated with the tumor regression grade after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. miR-133b showed a significant correlation with distant-metastasis-free survival. miR-146b expression levels showed a significant correlation with nodal stage. Conclusion: Specific microRNAs can be used as biomarkers to predict prognosis of patients with rectal cancer and possibly stratify patients’ therapy if validated in a prospective study. PMID:27092493

  4. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    SciTech Connect

    Gavioli, Margherita Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible.

  5. SPARCL1 Expression Increases With Preoperative Radiation Therapy and Predicts Better Survival in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kotti, Angeliki Holmqvist, Annica; Albertsson, Maria; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is expressed in various normal tissues and many types of cancers. The function of SPARCL1 and its relationship to a patient's prognosis have been studied, whereas its relationship to radiation therapy (RT) is not known. Our aim was to investigate the expression of SPARCL1 in rectal cancer patients who participated in a clinical trial of preoperative RT. Methods and Materials: The study included 136 rectal cancer patients who were randomized to undergo preoperative RT and surgery (n=63) or surgery alone (n=73). The expression levels of SPARCL1 in normal mucosa (n=29), primary tumor (n=136), and lymph node metastasis (n=35) were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: Tumors with RT had stronger SPARCL1 expression than tumors without RT (P=.003). In the RT group, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival than weak expression in patients with stage III tumors, independent of sex, age, differentiation, and margin status (P=.022; RR = 18.128; 95% confidence interval, 1.512-217.413). No such relationship was found in the non-RT group (P=.224). Further analysis of interactions among SPARCL1 expression, RT, and survival showed statistical significance (P=.024). In patients with metastases who received RT, strong SPARCL1 expression was related to better survival compared to weak expression (P=.041) but not in the non-RT group (P=.569). Conclusions: SPARCL1 expression increases with RT and is related to better prognosis in rectal cancer patients with RT but not in patients without RT. This result may help us to select the patients best suited for preoperative RT.

  6. Irinotecan and Alisertib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-20

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Laser application in tracheobronchial tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, B. Krishna; Krishna, Sharon

    2004-09-01

    Ninety three patients with obstructing tracheobronchial tumors were treated with Neodymium: Yttrium - Aluminum - Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser photocoagulation over a period of six years. There were sixty seven Males and 26 Females with a mean age of 44.3 years (range 6- 79 years). 21 benign and 72 malignant lesions were treated with a total 212 sessions of laser photocoagulation (mean 2.4 sessions). The anatomical distribution of lesions were as follows; larynx 9 (three benign and 6 malignant) trachea 39 (27 benign and 12 malignant) left main bronchus 27 (14 malignant) right main bronchus 24 (14 malignant) and vocal cords - 9 (three malignant). There were 21 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, two adenocarcinomas, one adenoid cystic carcinoma, 7 cases of locally infiltrating tumors from thyroid and esophagus, 6 cases of carcinoid tumor and 16 benign lesions. Twenty one patients had a tracheostomy tube in place when treatment was started. Eighteen of the 21 patients with tracheostomy were weaned off the tube in a mean of 5.5 days from the start of treatment. Lumen was restored in 31 (79.4%) patients. In the other eight (20.6%), lumen was achieved, but not sustained. Complications included bleeding in three cases which were managed conservatively, two cases of pneumothorax, and four cases of bronchospasm. There were six deaths during the follow up but none attributable to the procedure. Laser photocoagulation offered effective treatment in the majority of patients with obstructing tracheobronchial tumors, with acceptable morbidity.

  8. [Subepithelial tumors of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Stupnik, Silvio; Rafaelli, Claudio; González, Graciela Osorio; Pestalardo, María Luján; Quesada, Matías; Viúdez, Pedro

    2009-06-01

    The subepithelial lesions of the gastrointestinal tract are related to mesenchymal tumors and 80% of them are GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumors). However, there are also other tumors, such as: leiomyomas, schwannomas, lipomas, glomus tumors, carcinoid tumors, aberrant pancreas and polyps or inflammatory tumors. Diagnosis of submucosal tumors is often performed during routine endoscopic examination, they are frequently located at the stomach and in most cases are clinically evidenced by their complications. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the elected method for their staging; but other imaging diagnosis methods include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography scan (PET). The differential diagnosis is made by inmunohistochemical techniques, revealing in the GIST the expression of the antigen CD117, and prognostic factors are determined by size and mitotic index. Surgery is the recommended therapeutic, although in small lesions not exceeding 2 cm it has also been suggested the endoscopic resection guided by EUS and a watchful behaviour based on periodical controls in lesions with benignity criteria. The series here exhibited (2 GIST 1 lyposarcoma, 1 schwannoma and 1 inflammatory fibroid polyp) shows that all these tumors were symptomatic; have been diagnosed using endoscopy and recognized by means of histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis after surgery.

  9. Evidence and research in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Beets-Tan, Regina; Borras, Josep M; Krivokapić, Zoran; Leer, Jan Willem; Påhlman, Lars; Rödel, Claus; Schmoll, Hans Joachim; Scott, Nigel; Velde, Cornelius Van de; Verfaillie, Christine

    2008-06-01

    The main evidences of epidemiology, diagnostic imaging, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and follow-up are reviewed to optimize the routine treatment of rectal cancer according to a multidisciplinary approach. This paper reports on the knowledge shared between different specialists involved in the design and management of the multidisciplinary ESTRO Teaching Course on Rectal Cancer. The scenario of ongoing research is also addressed. In this time of changing treatments, it clearly appears that a common standard for large heterogeneous patient groups have to be substituted by more individualised therapies based on clinical-pathological features and very soon on molecular and genetic markers. Only trained multidisciplinary teams can face this new challenge and tailor the treatments according to the best scientific evidence for each patient.

  10. Transanal local excision of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, D R; Sokil, S; Ruiz-Salas, G

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with invasive rectal cancer treated by transanal excision between 1978-1989 are presented. Two patients had poorly differentiated tumours and were converted to abdominoperineal resection and one patient had extensive liver metastases documented preoperatively. The remaining twenty-two, mean age 64 years, fulfilled the criteria for local treatment. Eighty-two percent of tumours were T1 or T2 stage. There was no operative mortality. Six complications in five patients occurred, none requiring surgical intervention. Five patients died of unrelated causes without evidence of recurrence at 4, 4, 14, 26 and 58 months. The length of follow-up for the surviving group (17 patients) was 16 to 115 months (mean 63 months). Two patients developed local recurrence at 32 and 60 months. Transanal excision can be curative for selected rectal cancers.

  11. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: does chemotherapy work?

    PubMed

    Tejani, Mohamedtaki Abdulaziz; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are rare well-differentiated neoplasms which can be functional or non-functional. They tend to have a worse prognosis than their counterpart carcinoid tumors. Current systemic treatment options for advanced, unresectable disease include somatostatin analogs, everolimus and sunitinib. Low response rates and toxicity profiles have, thus far, limited the widespread use of cytotoxic chemotherapy in this setting. In this update, we review three abstracts from the 2014 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium that present outcomes of the use of combination capecitabine and temozolomide in patients with advanced pNET. We summarize their results and discuss the role of this regimen in treatment algorithms for metastatic pNET.

  12. Misdiagnosed Case of Bronchial Carcinoid Presenting with Refractory Dyspnoea and Wheeze: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Avradip; Dutta, Pravati; Pothal, Sudarsan; Manjhi, Rekha

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old male smoker presented with persistent wheezing and occasional coughing that had been ongoing for two years and had been unsuccessfully treated with an inhalational β2 agonist, an anticholinergic and an inhalational steroid in the last year. On clinical examination, a left-sided wheeze was detected. The initial chest X-ray was normal. A computed tomography (CT) scan of thorax demonstrated a mass lesion in the left main bronchus. On subsequent bronchoscopy, an endobronchial polypoid mass was detected in the left main bronchus, completely occluding the bronchial lumen. A biopsy taken from the mass revealed features of bronchial carcinoid. Bronchial carcinoid can present uncommonly with wheezes, resulting in misdiagnosis as bronchial asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). If an asthma or COPD patient does not respond to conventional therapy, a CT scan and subsequent bronchoscopy is warranted. PMID:23966830

  13. Human Phosphatidylethanolamine-Binding Protein 4 Promoted the Radioresistance of Human Rectal Cancer by Activating Akt in an ROS-Dependent Way

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jianming; Yang, Guangen; Lin, Ali; Shen, Zhong; Wang, Dong; Ding, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Human phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 4(hPEBP4) is a novel anti-apoptosis molecule associated with the resistance of tumors to apoptotic agents. Here we sought to investigate the role of hPEBP4 in the radioresistance of rectal cancer. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed hPEBP4 was expressed in 27/33 of rectal cancer specimens, but only in 2/33 of neighboring normal mucosa. Silencing the expression of hPEBP4 with siRNA significantly reduced the clonogenic survival and enhanced the apoptosis of rectal cancer cells on irradiation. Instead, forced overexpression of hPEBP4 promoted its survival and decreased the apoptosis. Western blot showed hPEBP4 could increase the radiation-induced Akt activation, for which reactive oxygen specimen(ROS) was required. The radioresistance effect of hPEBP4 was reversed after given LY-294002 to inhibit Akt activation or antioxidant to abolish the ROS production. We also confirmed that effect of hPEBP4 in vivo with nude mice. Thus we concluded that hPEBP4, specifically expressed in rectal cancer cells, is associated with radioresistance of rectal cancer, implying that modulation of hPEBP4 may have important therapeutic implications in radiotherapy of rectal cancer. PMID:24594691

  14. Altemeier operation for gangrenous rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Abdelhedi, Cherif; Frikha, F; Bardaa, S; Kchaw, A; Mzali, R

    2014-08-08

    A stranguled rectal prolapse is a rare cause of intestinal occlusion. It requires emergency surgery. A patient who underwent emergency perineal proctectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy is described. The postoperative course was uneventful, with an excellent final result after colostomy closure. The successful treatment of this patient illustrates the value of the Altemeier procedure in the difficult and unusual scenario of bowel incarceration.

  15. Increasing trend in retained rectal foreign bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ayantunde, Abraham A; Unluer, Zynep

    2016-01-01

    AIM To highlight the rising trend in hospital presentation of foreign bodies retained in the rectum over a 5-year period. METHODS Retrospective review of the cases of retained rectal foreign bodies between 2008 and 2012 was performed. Patients’ clinical data and yearly case presentation with data relating to hospital episodes were collected. Data analysis was by SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL, United States. RESULTS Twenty-five patients presented over a 5-year period with a mean age of 39 (17-62) years and M: F ratio of 2:1. A progressive rise in cases was noted from 2008 to 2012 with 3, 4, 4, 6, 8 recorded patients per year respectively. The majority of the impacted rectal objects were used for self-/partner-eroticism. The commonest retained foreign bodies were sex vibrators and dildos. Ninty-six percent of the patients required extraction while one passed spontaneously. Two and three patients had retrieval in the Emergency Department and on the ward respectively while 19 patients needed examination under anaesthesia for extraction. The mean hospital stay was 19 (2-38) h. Associated psychosocial issues included depression, deliberate self-harm, illicit drug abuse, anxiety and alcoholism. There were no psychosocial problems identified in 15 patients. CONCLUSION There is a progressive rise in hospital presentation of impacted rectal foreign bodies with increasing use of different objects for sexual arousal. PMID:27830039

  16. Clinical Trial of Oral Nelfinavir Before and During Radiation Therapy for Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Esme J.; Roberts, Corran; Franklin, Jamie M.; Enescu, Monica; West, Nicholas; MacGregor, Thomas P.; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Boyle, Lucy; Blesing, Claire; Wang, Lai-Mun; Mukherjee, Somnath; Anderson, Ewan M.; Brown, Gina; Dutton, Susan; Love, Sharon B.; Schnabel, Julia A.; Quirke, Phil; Muschel, Ruth; McKenna, William G.; Partridge, Michael; Sharma, Ricky A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nelfinavir, a PI3-kinase pathway inhibitor, is a radiosensitizer which increases tumor blood flow in preclinical models. We conducted an early-phase study to demonstrate the safety of nelfinavir combined with hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) and to develop biomarkers of tumor perfusion and radiosensitization for this combinatorial approach. Patients and Methods Ten patients with T3-4 N0-2 M1 rectal cancer received 7 days of oral nelfinavir (1250 mg bd) and a further 7 days of nelfinavir during pelvic RT (25 Gy/5 fractions/7 days). Perfusion CT (p-CT) and DCE-MRI scans were performed pre-treatment, after 7 days of nelfinavir and prior to last fraction of RT. Biopsies taken pre-treatment and 7 days after the last fraction of RT were analysed for tumor cell density (TCD). Results There were 3 drug-related grade 3 adverse events: diarrhea, rash, lymphopenia. On DCE-MRI, there was a mean 42% increase in median Ktrans, and a corresponding median 30% increase in mean blood flow on p-CT during RT in combination with nelfinavir. Median TCD decreased from 24.3% at baseline to 9.2% in biopsies taken 7 days after RT (P=0.01). Overall, 5/9 evaluable patients exhibited good tumor regression on MRI assessed by Tumor Regression Grade (mrTRG). Conclusions This is the first study to evaluate nelfinavir in combination with RT without concurrent chemotherapy. It has shown that nelfinavir-RT is well tolerated and is associated with increased blood flow to rectal tumors. The efficacy of nelfinavir-RT versus RT alone merits clinical evaluation, including measurement of tumor blood flow. PMID:26861457

  17. Giant rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Alder, L.S.; Elver, G.; Foo, F.J.; Dobson, M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST are the most common mesenchymal tumours; however, rectal GISTs account for <5%. In the pelvis they represent a diagnostic challenge with giant GISTs likely to be malignant. They may present with urological, gynaecological or rectal symptoms. Sphincter-preserving surgery can be aided by neoadjuvant therapy. We present an uncommon case of giant rectal GIST masquerading as acute urinary retention. PMID:24968434

  18. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-13

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  19. Rectal Diclofenac Versus Rectal Paracetamol: Comparison of Antipyretic Effectiveness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Aalinezhad, Marzieh; Sarami, Golbahareh; Rangraz, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is the most common complaint in pediatric medicine and its treatment is recommended in some situations. Paracetamol is the most common antipyretic drug, which has serious side effects such as toxicity along with its positive effects. Diclofenac is one of the strongest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs, which has received little attention as an antipyretic drug. Objectives This study was designed to compare the antipyretic effectiveness of the rectal form of Paracetamol and Diclofenac. Patients and Methods This double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted on 80 children aged six months to six years old. One group was treated with rectal Paracetamol suppositories at 15 mg/kg dose and the other group received Diclofenac at 1 mg/kg by rectal administration (n = 40). Rectal temperature was measured before and one hour after the intervention. Temperature changes in the two groups were compared. Results The average rectal temperature in the Paracetamol group was 39.6 ± 1.13°C, and 39.82 ± 1.07°C in the Diclofenac group (P = 0.37). The average rectal temperature, one hour after the intervention, in the Paracetamol and the Diclofenac group was 38.39 ± 0.89°C and 38.95 ± 1.09°C, respectively (P = 0.02). Average temperature changes were 0.65 ± 0.17°C in the Paracetamol group and 1.73 ± 0.69°C in the Diclofenac group (P < 0.001). Conclusions In the first one hour, Diclofenac suppository is able to control the fever more efficient than Paracetamol suppositories. PMID:26889398

  20. Case report: Sigmoid strangulation from evisceration through a perforated rectal prolapse ulcer – An unusual complication of rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer Z.; Kittmer, Tiffaney; Forbes, Shawn; Ruo, Leyo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rectal prolapse occurs particularly in elder females and presentation can sometimes lead to complications such as strangulation and evisceration of other organs through the necrotic mucosa. Presentation of case This is a case of a 61 year-old female with rectal prolapse complicated by rectal perforation through which a segment of sigmoid colon eviscerated and became strangulated. This patient initially presented with sepsis requiring ICU admission, but fully recovered following a Hartmann’s procedure with a sacral rectopexy. Discussion Complications of rectal prolapse include incarceration, strangulation, and rarely, perforation with evisceration of other viscera requiring urgent operation. This report provides a brief overview of complications associated with rectal prolapse, reviews similar cases of transrectal evisceration, and discusses the management of chronic rectal prolapse. Conclusion Prompt surgical consult is warranted if any signs or symptoms suggestive of complications from prolapse are present. PMID:25680532

  1. [A Case of Local Recurrence and Lung Metastasis from a Rectal Cancer Treated with Systemic Chemotherapy and Cyberknife].

    PubMed

    Uchino, Tairin; Mishima, Hideyuki; Osawa, Takaaki; Matsumura, Tatsuki; Komaya, Kenichi; Kimura, Kengo; Ando, Keiichi; Saito, Takuya; Ishiguro, Seiji; Ohashi, Norifumi; Arikawa, Takashi; Komatsu, Shunichiro; Miyachi, Masahiko; Mizumatsu, Shinichiro; Sano, Tsuyoshi

    2015-11-01

    A 73-year-old man underwent abdominoperineal resection for a rectal cancer. He developed a hip pain 3 years and 6 months after the surgery. A CT scan revealed a local recurrence in the perineum and multiple lung metastases in the bilateral lung. He received systemic chemotherapy consisting of XELOX with bevacizumab. Thereafter, the hip pain was slightly relieved. The hip pain worsened 1 year and 6 months after the recurrence. The border between the perineal tumor and skin was very narrow, and conventional radiation therapy could cause a perineal skin necrosis and subsequent poor wound healing. Therefore, we selected a Cyberknife treatment. The hip pain was relieved and a CT scan showed a reduction of the perineal tumor's size after the Cyberknife treatment. A Cyberknife treatment may be effective and promising as palliation for patients with local recurrence of rectal cancer.

  2. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was

  3. Carcinoid Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... specializes in treating cancer (oncologist), disorders of the endocrine system (endocrinologist) or a surgeon. Because appointments can be ... Niederhuber JE, et al., eds. Cancer of the endocrine system. In: Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: ...

  4. Differences in carcinoembryonic antigen levels between colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yunlong; Xuan, Weibo; Chen, Chunlin; Chen, Zhe; Yang, Ziyi; Zuo, Yunfei; Ren, Shuangyi

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the levels of the serum tumor biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in patients with carcinoma of the colon and rectum in different clinical stages. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed types of cancer worldwide and previous studies have reported rapidly updated therapeutic regimes. While the majority of studies focus on CRC as a single entity, certain studies distinguish colon cancer (CC) from rectal cancer (RC), as there is a hypothesis stating that CC and RC are two naturally different entities. CEA is reported to be an important tumor-associated antigen overexpressed in CRC, which is routinely detected as a significant indicator of CRC. Our study aimed to identify potential differences in the expression of CEA between CC and RC, which may, to some degree, reflect the natural differences between the two. We investigated 240 CRC cases between July, 2010 and December, 2012 from The First and Second Affiliated Hospitals of Dalian Medical University, including 117 CC and 123 RC patients with tumors classified by Duke's staging as A-D. The serum CEA level was measured preoperatively by radioimmunoassays as a routinely used auxiliary indicator. The expression of CEA differed between CC and RC, with the former exhibiting variation among the four stages, whereas no variation was observed in RC. In addition, there were differences between CC and RC regarding the CEA level in stage C and D. Furthermore, the CEA level in stage C of CC was significantly lower compared to that in any other stage. In conclusion, the intrinsic distribution of the CEA level between CC and RC suggests that CC and RC may be two naturally different entities; the significantly low CEA level in stage C of CC indicates that stage C may be crucial in the evolution of CC.

  5. Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy on Locally Advanced Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma: A Propensity Score-Matched Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan-wu; Lin, Hui-ming; Lu, Xing-rong; Huang, Ying; Xu, Zong-bin; Huang, Sheng-hui; Wang, Xiao-jie

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To compare the surgical and oncological outcomes of rectal mucinous adenocarcinomas treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus surgery alone. Methods. A total of 167 locally advanced rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery alone between 2008 and 2014 were matched using propensity score; the surgical and oncological outcomes were compared. Results. Ninety-six patients were matched. Postoperative morbidity was similar between groups. Sphincter preservation rate was higher in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (79.2% versus 60.4%, P = 0.045), especially for tumors ≥ 3 cm but ≤5 cm from the anal verge (75.0% versus 44.0%, P = 0.036). With a median follow-up of 54.8 months, the 5-year overall survival rate (neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy versus surgery alone: 79.6% versus 67.1%; P = 0.599) and disease-free survival rate (75.6% versus 64.2%; P = 0.888) were similar. The 5-year local recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (7.7% versus 26.0%, P = 0.036), while no difference was observed in distant metastasis. A poor response to chemoradiation was associated with higher local recurrence (P = 0.037). Conclusions. Compared with surgery alone, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was found to increase the sphincter preservation rate and reduce local recurrence, thus being beneficial for locally advanced rectal mucinous adenocarcinoma patients.

  6. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Seob; Yoon, Yong sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Chang, Heung Moon; Park, Jin-hong; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-Wook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients’ characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. Results All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. Conclusion PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer. PMID:27730804

  7. Transanal Endoscopic Operation for Benign Rectal Lesions and T1 Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Emi; Dedrye, Lieven; Vindevoghel, Koen; Nuytens, Frederiek; Pottel, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Transanal endoscopic operation (TEO) is a minimally invasive technique used for local excision of benign and selected malignant rectal lesions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility, safety, and oncological outcomes of the procedure and to report the experience in 3 centers. Methods: Retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was performed of all patients with benign lesions or ≤cT1N0 rectal cancer who underwent TEO with curative intent at 3 Belgian centers (2012 through 2014). Results: Eighty-three patients underwent 84 TEOs for 89 rectal lesions (37 adenomas, 43 adenocarcinomas, 1 gastrointestinal stromal tumor, 1 lipoma, 2 neuroendocrine tumors, and 5 scar tissues). Operative time was associated with lesion size (P < .001). Postoperative complications occurred in 13 patients: 7 hemorrhages, 1 urinary tract infection, 1 urinary retention, 2 abscesses, 1 anastomotic stenosis, and 1 entrance into the peritoneal cavity. Median hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1–8). During a median follow-up of 13 months (range, 2–27), there was 1 recurrence. Conclusion: Although longer follow-up is still necessary, TEO appears to be an effective method of excising benign tumors and low-risk T1 carcinomas of the rectum. However, TEO should be considered as part of the diagnostic work-up. Furthermore, the resected specimen of a TEO procedure allows adequate local staging in contrast to an endoscopic piecemeal excision. Nevertheless, definitive histology must be appreciated, and in case of unfavorable histology, radical salvage resection still has to be performed. PMID:28144126

  8. Do pathological variables have prognostic significance in rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Lionti, Simona; Domati, Federica; Barresi, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    AIM To clarify which factors may influence pathological tumor response and affect clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma treated with neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery. METHODS Tumor regression grade (TRG) according to the Dworak system and yTNM stage were assessed and correlated with pre-treatment clinico-pathological variables in 215 clinically locally advanced (cTNM stage II and III) rectal carcinomas. Prognostic value of all pathological and clinical factors on disease free survival (DFS) and cancer specific survival (CSS) was analyzed by Kaplan Meier and Cox-regression analyses. RESULTS cN+ status, mucinous histotype or poor differentiation in the pre-treatment biopsy were significantly associated with lower pathological response (low Dworak grade and TNM remaining unchanged/upstaging). Cases showing acellular mucin pools in surgical specimens all had unremarkable clinical courses with no deaths or recurrences during follow-up. Dworak grade had prognostic significance for DFS and CSS. However, compared to the 5-tiered system, a simplified two-tiered grading system, in which grades 0, 1 and 2 were grouped as absent/partial regression and grades 3 and 4 were grouped as total/subtotal regression, was more reproducible and prognostically informative. The two-tiered Dworak system, yN stage, craniocaudal extension of the tumor and radial margin status were significant independent prognostic variables. CONCLUSION Our data suggest that caution should be applied in using a conservative approach in rectal carcinomas with cN+ status, extensive/lower involvement of the rectum and mucinous histotype or poor differentiation. Although Dworak TRG is prognostically significant, a simplified two-tiered system could be preferable. Finally, cases with acellular mucin pools should be carefully evaluated to definitely exclude residual mucinous carcinoma. PMID:28293088

  9. Stage II/III rectal cancer with intermediate response to preoperative radiochemotherapy: Do we have indications for individual risk stratification?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Response to preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is very heterogeneous. Pathologic complete response (pCR) is accompanied by a favorable outcome. However, most patients show incomplete response. The aim of this investigation was to find indications for risk stratification in the group of intermediate responders to RCT. Methods From a prospective database of 496 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, 107 patients with stage II/III cancers and intermediate response to preoperative 5-FU based RCT (ypT2/3 and TRG 2/3), treated within the German Rectal Cancer Trials were studied. Surgical treatment comprised curative (R0) total mesorectal excision (TME) in all cases. In 95 patients available for statistical analyses, residual transmural infiltration of the mesorectal compartment, nodal involvement and histolologic tumor grading were investigated for their prognostic impact on disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Residual tumor transgression into the mesorectal compartment (ypT3) did not influence DFS and OS rates (p = 0.619, p = 0.602, respectively). Nodal involvement after preoperative RCT (ypN1/2) turned out to be a valid prognostic factor with decreased DFS and OS (p = 0.0463, p = 0.0236, respectively). Persistent tumor infiltration of the mesorectum (ypT3) and histologic tumor grading of residual tumor cell clusters were strongly correlated with lymph node metastases after neoadjuvant treatment (p < 0.001). Conclusions Advanced transmural tumor invasion after RCT does not affect prognosis when curative (R0) resection is achievable. Residual nodal status is the most important predictor of individual outcome in intermediate responders to preoperative RCT. Furthermore, ypT stage and tumor grading turn out to be additional auxiliary factors. Future clinical trials for risk-adapted adjuvant therapy should be based on a synopsis of clinicopathologic parameters. PMID:20388220

  10. Definitive high-dose radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Eun Seok; Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Standard management for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) involves preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and radical surgery. However, this level of treatment may be unnecessary for a subgroup of LARC patients. Previous reports have shown that approximately 20% of LARC patients experience a complete tumor response to preoperative CRT. Post-CRT nonoperative management of these patients may prevent morbidities associated with radical surgery. To our knowledge, this case report firstly presents the favorable long-term outcomes of a LARC patient who underwent definitive aim CRT. Methods: The patient was 73 years’ old, and staging workups revealed T3N2bM0 rectal adenocarcinoma. He agreed to receive CRT, but refused surgery. A radiotherapy (RT) dose of 64.8 Gy was prescribed, which was higher than conventional (50.4 Gy) preoperative aim RT. The regimen of concurrent chemotherapy was the same as that used in preoperative aim CRT: 2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. Results: Three months after CRT completion, a complete tumor response was identified clinically. Colonoscopic biopsy after 1 year showed no tumor cells. This patient is alive after 4 years with no evidence of recurrence or severe toxicity. Conclusion: The long-term outcomes of this case indicate the feasibility of definitive high-dose RT with concurrent chemotherapy for LARC. PMID:27749573

  11. Rare Presentation of Gastroesophageal Carcinoma with Rectal Metastasis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Karki, Niraj; Sapkota, Binita; Niazi, Masooma; Remy, Prospere

    2016-08-25

    BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal cancers, previously considered rare, are rapidly increasing worldwide. We present here a unique case of gastroesophageal carcinoma with metastasis to the rectum. CASE REPORT A 60-year-old female patient presented with constipation, bloating, and weight loss of 4-month duration. She had undergone sleeve gastrectomy 6 years before. Endoscopies performed revealed a friable-looking mucosa in the lower esophagus and a polypoid rectal mass. Histopathological examination from both the esophageal and rectal lesions revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. Immunohistochemistry stain from both specimens was positive for CK7 supporting the gastric site primary with metastasis to the rectum. Further evaluation also revealed metastasis to bone and malignant pleural effusion. Chemotherapy with palliative intent was initiated. CONCLUSIONS Colorectal metastasis is commonly seen from cancers of the breast, stomach, melanoma, kidney, prostate, and ovaries. However, colorectal metastasis from gastroesophageal cancer has never been reported in the medical literature. Diagnosis relies on histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical staining of the tumor. Treatment depends on the tumor stage. Tumors with widespread metastatic disease are candidates for palliative chemotherapy.

  12. Response to chemoradiotherapy and lymph node involvement in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    García-Flórez, Luis J; Gómez-Álvarez, Guillermo; Frunza, Ana M; Barneo-Serra, Luis; Fresno-Forcelledo, Manuel F

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To establish the association between lymph node involvement and the response to neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Data of 130 patients with mid and low locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical surgery over a 5-year period were reviewed. Tumor staging was done by endorectal ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy was determined by T-downstaging and tumor regression grading (TRG). Pathologic complete response (pCR) is defined as the absence of tumor cells in the surgical specimen (ypT0N0). The varying degrees TRG were classified according to Mandard’s scoring system. The evaluation of the response is based on the comparison between previous clinico-radiological staging and the results of pathological evaluation. χ2 and Spearman’s correlation tests were used for the comparison of variables. RESULTS: Pathologic complete response (pCR, ypT0N0, TRG1) was observed in 19 cases (14.6%), and other 18 (13.8%) had only very few residual malignant cells in the rectal wall (TRG2). T-downstaging was found in 63 (48.5%). Mean lymph node retrieval was 9.4 (range 0-38). In 37 cases (28.5%) more than 12 nodes were identified in the surgical specimen. Preoperative lymph node involvement was seen in 77 patients (59.2%), 71 N1 and 6 N2. Postoperative lymph node involvement was observed in 41 patients (31.5%), 29 N1 and 12 N2, while the remaining 89 were N0 (68.5%). In relation to ypT stage, we found nodal involvement of 9.4% in ypT0-1, 22.2% in ypT2 and 43.7% in ypT3-4. Of the 37 patients considered “responders” to neoadjuvant therapy (TRG1 and 2), there were only 4 N+ (10.8%) and the remainder N0 (89.2%). In the “non responders” group (TRG 3, 4 and 5), 37 cases were N+ (39.8%) and 56 (60.2%) were N0 (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer is associated with lymph node involvement. PMID:26425268

  13. Prone-position thoracoscopic resection of posterior mediastinal lymph node metastasis from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Noma, Kazuhiro; Koujima, Takeshi; Maeda, Naoaki; Tanabe, Shunsuke; Ohara, Toshiaki; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2015-02-12

    Mediastinal lymph node metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, and barely any reports have described resection of this pathology. We report herein a successful thoracoscopic resection of mediastinal lymph node metastasis in a prone position. A 65-year-old man presented with posterior mediastinal lymph node metastasis after resection of the primary rectal cancer and metachronous hepatic metastasis. Metastatic lymph nodes were resected completely using thoracoscopic surgery in the prone position, which provided advantages of minimal invasiveness, good surgical field, and reduced ergonomic burden on the surgeon. Thoracoscopic resection in the prone position was thought to have the potential to become the standard procedure of posterior mediastinal tumors.

  14. Use of Valtrac™-Secured Intracolonic Bypass in Laparoscopic Rectal Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Feng; Chen, Dong; Wang, Danyang; Lin, Jianjiang; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The occurrence of anastomotic leakage (AL) remains a major concern in the early postoperative stage. Because of the relatively high morbidity and mortality of AL in patients with laparoscopic low rectal cancer who receive an anterior resection, a fecal diverting method is usually introduced. The Valtrac™-secured intracolonic bypass (VIB) was used in open rectal resection, and played a role of protecting the anastomotic site. This study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of the VIB in protecting laparoscopic low rectal anastomosis and to compare the efficacy and complications of VIB with those of loop ileostomy (LI). Medical records of the 43 patients with rectal cancer who underwent elective laparoscopic low anterior resection and received VIB procedure or LI between May 2011 and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed, including the patients’ demographics, clinical features, and operative data. Twenty-four patients received a VIB and 19 patients a LI procedure. Most of the demographics and clinical features of the groups, including Dukes stages, were similar. However, the median distance of the tumor edge from the anus verge in the VIB group was significantly longer (7.5 cm; inter-quartile range [IQR] 7.0–9.5 cm) than that of the L1 group (6.0 cm; IQR 6.0–7.0 cm). None of the patients developed clinical AL. The comparisons between the LI and the VIB groups were adjusted for the significant differences in the tumor level of the groups. After adjustment, the LI group experienced longer overall postoperative hospital stay (14.0 days, IQR: 12.0, 16.0 days; P < 0.001) and incurred higher costs ($6300 (IQR: $5900, $6600)) than the VIB group (7.0 days, $4800; P < 0.05). Stoma-related complications in the ileostomy group included dermatitis (n = 2), stoma bleeding (n = 1), and wound infection after closure (n = 2). No BAR-related complications occurred. The mean time to Valtrac™ ring loosening was 14.1 ± 3

  15. The Impact of Ileostomy-Related Complications on the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, Uma R.; Kao, Lillian S.; You, Y. Nancy; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Skibber, John M.; Feig, Barry W.; Nguyen, Sa; Chang, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radical resection is the primary treatment for rectal cancer. When anastomosis is possible, a temporary ileostomy is used to decrease morbidity from a poorly healed anastomosis. However, ileostomies are associated with complications, dehydration, and need for a second operation. Our purpose was to evaluate the impact of ileostomy related complications on the treatment of rectal cancer. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent sphincter preserving surgery between January 2005 and December 2010 at a tertiary cancer center. The primary outcome was the overall rate of ileostomy related complications. Secondary outcomes included complications related to ileostomy status, ileostomy closure, anastomotic complications at primary resection, rate of stoma closure, and completion of adjuvant chemotherapy. Statistical analyses were performed with STATA 12. Results A total of 294 patients were analyzed, 32% (n=95) were women. Two hundred seventy-one (92%) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The median tumor distance from the anal verge was 7 centimeters (interquartile range 5-10). Two hundred eighty-one (96%) underwent stoma closure at a median 7 months (interquartile range 5.4 – 8.3). The most common complication related to readmission was dehydration (n=32, 11%). Readmission within 60 days of primary resection was associated with delay in initiating adjuvant chemotherapy (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.42-6.38, p=0.004). Conclusion Diverting ileostomies created during surgical treatment of rectal cancers are associated with morbidity; however this is balanced against the risk of anastomosis-related morbidity at rectal resection. Given the potential benefit of fecal diversion, patient-oriented interventions to improve ostomy management, particularly during adjuvant chemotherapy, can be expected to yield marked benefits. PMID:24085329

  16. [A study on low grade malignant tumors arisen in the trachea and the bronchus].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Kubo, Y; Hirasawa, M; Kitada, M; Yatsuyanagi, E; Moriyama, H; Koshiko, S; Sugimoto, H; Hirata, S; Sasajima, T

    1997-10-01

    Twelve patients who suffered from low grade malignant tumors arisen in the trachea and the bronchus (6 of carcinoid, 4 of mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and 2 of adenoid cystic carcinoma) underwent surgical treatment from 1977 to 1996 in our department. Operations included 1 sleeve resection of the trachea, 1 patch plasty of the trachea, 3 sleeve lobectomies, and 7 lobectomies. Lymph node dissection was performed in 9 of 12 cases. Metastases in lymph nodes were not found in all 12 cases. Five year survival rate of low grade malignant tumors arisen in the trachea and the bronchus was 78.8% and better than that of stage I lung cancers.

  17. Weekly administration of paclitaxel attenuated rectal stenosis caused by multiple peritoneal recurrence 8 years after the resection of gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoichi; Yoshida, Ikuo; Tonomura, Shuhei; Sakai, Wakana; Nakamura, Yasuko; Imazu, Hiroki; Matsubara, Toshiki; Ochiai, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    We report a patient with rectal stenosis caused by peritoneal recurrence 8 years after a curative resection of advanced stage gastric carcinoma; the recurrence was effectively treated with the weekly administration of paclitaxel. The patient was a 66-year-old Japanese woman who was admitted to our hospital complaining of abdominal pain and frequent bowel movements. She had undergone total gastrectomy, due to advanced-stage gastric carcinoma with extensive lymph node metastasis, 8 years before, and had taken an oral anticancer agent, fluoropyrimidine, for 4 years after the operation. Colonofiberscopy performed on admission revealed circumferential rectal stenosis located 10 cm from the anal verge. Barium enema study demonstrated extensive poor expansion of the upper and lower rectum and irregularity of the descending colon. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed wall thickening in the rectum and descending colon. These findings were compatible with rectal stenosis caused by the peritoneal recurrence of gastric carcinoma. Weekly administration of paclitaxel was started. The abdominal symptoms soon disappeared when the second cycle of paclitaxel was completed, and they have not appeared since then. The rectal stenosis was attenuated, as confirmed by imaging analyses. Weekly paclitaxel has been effective for more than 13 months, suggesting that the patient is in a state of tumor dormancy of recurrent gastric carcinoma.

  18. Prognostic significance of survivin in rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and postoperative concurrent chemo-radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Il Yu, Jeong; Lee, Hyebin; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Choi, Yoon-La; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Cho, Yong Beom; Huh, Jung Wook; Park, Yoon Ah; Park, Young Suk; Park, Joon Oh; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Won

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims This study is designed to investigate the expression of survivin and p53 in human rectal cancer tissues and analyze associations between expression and clinical outcomes in terms of disease recurrence and survival duration. Results During follow-up (median 119.0, range 6.6 to 161.3 months), tumor recurrence was detected in 50 patients (43.1%), and local recurrence developed as a first failure site in 13 patients (11.2%). Positive immunostaining of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin was observed in about one quarter of patients, and about half of all patients had positive staining for p53. Both survivin and p53 were significant prognostic factors of disease-free survival in the univariate analyses, but only survivin remained a significant prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis. Methods We performed a retrospective study with 116 locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent total mesorectal excision (TME) followed by postoperative concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT). Immunohistochemical staining was conducted using antibodies for survivin or p53, and their expression was analyzed using an individual score that combined the percentage of positive cells and staining intensity. Conclusions Overexpression of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin in locally advanced rectal cancer patients was associated with a higher recurrence rate in rectal cancer patients treated with TME followed by postoperative CCRT. PMID:27391438

  19. Rectal chlamydia - should screening be recommended in women?

    PubMed

    Andersson, Nirina; Boman, Jens; Nylander, Elisabet

    2017-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection in Europe and has large impacts on patients' physical and emotional health. Unidentified asymptomatic rectal Chlamydia trachomatis could be a partial explanation for the high Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence. In this study, we evaluated rectal Chlamydia trachomatis testing in relation to symptoms and sexual habits in women and men who have sex with men. Rectal Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence was 9.1% in women and 0.9% in men who have sex with men. None of the patients reported any rectal symptoms; 59.0% of the women with a rectal Chlamydia trachomatis infection denied anal intercourse and 18.8% did not have a urogenital infection; 9.4% did neither have a urogenital infection nor reported anal sex. We suggest that rectal sampling should be considered in women visiting sexually transmitted infection clinics regardless of rectal symptoms and irrespective of anal intercourse, since our data suggest that several cases of rectal Chlamydia trachomatis otherwise would be missed, thus enabling further disease transmission.

  20. Combined modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D; Röedel, Claus; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The standard adjuvant treatment for cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer is preoperative chemoradiation. However, there are many controversies regarding this approach. These include the role of short course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for all patients and whether the type of surgery after chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? These questions and others remain active areas of clinical investigation.

  1. A new 'enterocompressor' to facilitate rectal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Barraza, R P

    1990-02-01

    A newly devised enterocompressor facilitates low rectal anastomosis in children with Hirschsprung's disease. This simple surgical instrument, composed of two semicylindrical valves, a hinge, and a regulating screw, maintains intestinal anastomoses properly placed and produces spur crushing. In addition, it is inexpensive and reusable. The enterocompressor, used in 33 primary and 15 secondary Duhamel operations, and applied to normalize intestinal transit in 10 colectomies, provided adequate anastomosis and prevented leakage of intestinal contents. This enterocompressor can be used safely in children as young as six months of age.

  2. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  3. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  4. Prediction of response to chemoradiation in rectal cancer by a gene polymorphism in the epidermal growth factor receptor promoter region

    SciTech Connect

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm . E-mail: kalgsp@vgs.vejleamt.dk; Nielsen, Jens Nederby; Lindebjerg, Jan; Brandslund, Ivan; Jakobsen, Anders

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been associated with radioresistance in solid tumors. Recently a polymorphism in the Sp1 recognition site of the EGFR promoter region was identified. The present study investigated the predictive value of this polymorphism for the outcome of chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 77 patients with locally advanced T3 rectal tumors. Treatment consisted of preoperative radiation therapy at a total tumor dose of 65 Gy and concomitant chemotherapy with Uftoral. Blood samples from 63 patients were evaluated for Sp1 -216 G/T polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction analysis. Forty-eight primary tumor biopsies were available for EGFR immunostaining. Patients underwent surgery 8 weeks after treatment. Pathologic response evaluation was performed according to the tumor regression grade (TRG) system. Results: Forty-nine percent had major response (TRG1-2) and 51% moderate response (TRG 3-4) to chemoradiation. The rates of major response were 34% (10/29) in GG homozygote patients compared with 65% (22/34) in patients with T containing variants (p = 0.023). Fifty-eight percent of biopsies were positive for EGFR expression (28/48). The major response rates with regard to EGFR immunostaining were not significantly different. EGFR-positive tumors were found in 83% of the GG homozygote patients compared with 38% of patients with TT or GT variants (p = 0.008). Conclusions: There was a significant correlation between EGFR Sp1 -216 G/T polymorphism and treatment response to chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer. Further investigations of a second set of patient and other treatment schedules are warranted.

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of radiation therapy-induced microcirculation changes in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lussanet, Quido G. de . E-mail: qdlu@rdia.azm.nl; Backes, Walter H.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Padhani, Anwar R.; Baeten, Coen I.; Baardwijk, Angela van; Lambin, Philippe; Beets, Geerard L.; Engelshoven, Jos van; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) allows noninvasive evaluation of tumor microvasculature characteristics. This study evaluated radiation therapy related microvascular changes in locally advanced rectal cancer by DCE-MRI and histology. Methods and Materials: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI was performed in 17 patients with primary rectal cancer. Seven patients underwent 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy radiation therapy (RT) (long RT) before DCE-MRI and 10 did not. Of these 10, 3 patients underwent five fractions of 5 Gy RT (short RT) in the week before surgery. The RT treated and nontreated groups were compared in terms of endothelial transfer coefficient (K{sup PS}, measured by DCE-MRI), microvessel density (MVD) (scored by immunoreactivity to CD31 and CD34), and tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation (scored by immunoreactivity to Ki67). Results: Tumor K{sup PS} was 77% (p = 0.03) lower in the RT-treated group. Histogram analyses showed that RT reduced both magnitude and intratumor heterogeneity of K{sup PS} (p = 0.01). MVD was significantly lower (37%, p 0.03) in tumors treated with long RT than in nonirradiated tumors, but this was not the case with short RT. Endothelial cell proliferation was reduced with short RT (81%, p = 0.02) just before surgery, but not with long RT (p > 0.8). Tumor cell proliferation was reduced with both long (57%, p < 0.001) and short RT (52%, p = 0.002). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI-derived K{sup PS} values showed significant radiation therapy related reductions in microvessel blood flow in locally advanced rectal cancer. These findings may be useful in evaluating effects of radiation combination therapies (e.g., chemoradiation or RT combined with antiangiogenesis therapy), to account for effects of RT alone.

  6. Comparison Between Perfusion Computed Tomography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kierkels, Roel G.J.; Backes, Walter H.; Janssen, Marco H.M.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare pretreatment scans with perfusion computed tomography (pCT) vs. dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent both pCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a dedicated 40-slice CT-positron emission tomography system and a 3-T MRI system. Dynamic contrast enhancement was measured in tumor tissue and the external iliac artery. Tumor perfusion was quantified in terms of pharmacokinetic parameters: transfer constant K{sup trans}, fractional extravascular-extracellular space v{sub e}, and fractional plasma volume v{sub p}. Pharmacokinetic parameter values and their heterogeneity (by 80% quantile value) were compared between pCT and DCE-MRI. Results: Tumor K{sup trans} values correlated significantly for the voxel-by-voxel-derived median (Kendall's tau correlation, tau = 0.81, p < 0.001) and 80% quantile (tau = 0.54, p = 0.04), as well as for the averaged uptake (tau = 0.58, p = 0.03). However, no significant correlations were found for v{sub e} and v{sub p} derived from the voxel-by-voxel-derived median and 80% quantile and derived from the averaged uptake curves. Conclusions: This study demonstrated for the first time that pCT provides K{sup trans} values comparable to those of DCE-MRI. However, no correlation was found for the v{sub e} and v{sub p} parameters between CT and MRI. Computed tomography can serve as an alternative modality to MRI for the in vivo evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in terms of the transfer constant K{sup trans}.

  7. Comparison of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and capecitabine in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae . E-mail: khjung@ncc.re.kr; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Duck-Woo; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Jun Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Son, Seok-Hyun; Yun, Tak; Hong, Chang Won; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with a bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL) vs. capecitabine in terms of radiologic and pathologic findings in preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: The study enrolled 278 patients scheduled for preoperative CRT using two protocols with different chemotherapeutic regimens. Pelvic radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) was delivered concurrently with FL (n = 145) or capecitabine (n = 133). Surgery was performed 6 weeks after CRT completion. Tumor responses to CRT were measured using both radiologic and pathologic examination. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed at the initial workup and just before surgery after completion of preoperative CRT. Post-CRT pathology tests were used to determine tumor stage and regression. Results: Radiologic examination showed that tumor volume decreased by 68.2% {+-} 20.5% in the FL group and 68.3% {+-} 22.3% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.970). Postoperative pathologic T stage determination showed that downstaging occurred in 44.3% of FL and 49.9% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.571). The tumor regression grades after CRT were Grade 1 (minimal response) in 22.6% and 21.0%, Grade 2 (moderate response) in 53.2% and 50.0%, Grade 3 (near-complete response) in 12.9% and 12.9%, and Grade 4 (complete response) in 11.3% and 16.1% of the FL and capecitabine groups, respectively (p = 0.758). Conclusion: In the present study, the radiologic and pathologic findings did not reveal significant differences in short-term tumor responses between preoperative FL and capecitabine CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Long-term results and a prospective randomized trial are needed.

  8. PET/CT and Bremsstrahlung Imaging After 90Y DOTANOC Therapy for Rectal Net With Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Abdülrezzak, Ümmühan; Kula, Mustafa; Tutuş, Ahmet; Buyukkaya, Fikret; Karaca, Halit

    2015-10-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with Lu or Y is promising with successful results in somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. In all radiation therapies, knowledge of the radiation dose received by the target, and other organs in the body is essential to evaluate the risks and benefits of any procedure. We report a case of liver metastases from a rectal neuroendocrine tumor, which was treated with Y DOTANOC. Posttreatment whole-body planar images were acquired through Bremsstrahlung radiations of Y on a γ-camera, and thoracolumbar PET/CT images were acquired on PET.

  9. Focusing the management of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dbeis, Rachel; Smart, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer treatment has undergone major changes over the last 15 years with a focus on individualized care based around MRI assessment of the relationship of the tumour to the mesorectal fascia, improved surgical techniques and targeted use of pre-operative oncological therapies in patients with locally advanced disease. The recognition that some tumours responded completely to pre-operative chemoradiotherapy, and the selective use of a non-operative policy has led to a quest to further identify those patients and their tumour in whom this approach could be used, irrespective of MRI stage. With no clear patient factors identified, the tumour and its gene expression has become a target for research to identify individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms, which may indicate a response to specific treatment, or not. To date some agents have been identified and trialed, such as cetuximab, with individual tumours being assessed for response allowing directed treatment. The reviewed paper by Sebio and colleagues report a study that links polymorphisms in the DNA repair gene XRCC1 with response to neoadjuvant 5-Fluorouracil treatment in rectal cancer patients. However, genetic heterogeneity alone may not explain the variations of drug response and environmental factors may lead to epigenetic effects and therefore alter responses. Therefore whilst this study demonstrates the impact of different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it is only one step forward, but perhaps a step in the right direction. PMID:28149883

  10. Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor in a female wolf (Canis lupus lupus)

    PubMed Central

    SHIRAKI, Ayako; YOSHIDA, Toshinori; KAWASHIMA, Masahi; MURAYAMA, Hirotada; NAGAHARA, Rei; ITO, Nanao; SHIBUTANI, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    A 17-year-old female wolf (Canis lupus lupus) had a right lung mass that was adhered to the thoracic cavity. Histopathological examination revealed that the mass consisted of sheets, cord or ribbon-like structures of monotonous, small, cuboidal cells with round, oval or short-spindle nuclei and scant clear cytoplasm, demarcated by a fine fibrovascular stroma. Focal necrosis, congestion and thrombi were observed. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells diffusely expressed cytokeratin AE1/AE3, and some expressed chromogranin A, neural cell adhesion molecule (CD56) and thyroid transcription factor-1. The number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive tumor cells was low. A diagnosis of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor was based on the resemblance to carcinoids. PMID:28190820

  11. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-02-20

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  12. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  13. Advances in management of adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: Consequences for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Netter, Jeanne; Douard, Richard; Durdux, Catherine; Landi, Bruno; Berger, Anne; Taieb, Julien

    2016-11-01

    More than half the patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal disease at diagnosis with a high risk of recurrence. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy and standardized radical surgery with total mesorectal excision have been established as the 'gold standard' for treating these patients. Pathological staging using the ypTNM classification system to decide on adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) is widely used in clinical practice, but the delivery of ACT is still controversial, as many discrepancies persist in the conclusions of different trials, due to heterogeneity of the inclusion criteria between studies, lack of statistical power, and variations in preoperative and adjuvant regimens. In 2014, a meta-analysis of four randomized phase-III trials (EORTC 22921, I-CNR-RT, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, CHRONICLE) failed to demonstrate any statistical efficacy of fluorouracil (5FU)-based ACT. Three recent randomized trials aimed to compare 5FU with 5FU plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. Two of them (ADORE, CAO/ARO/AIO-04) appeared to find a disease-free survival benefit for patients treated with the combination therapy. Thus, while awaiting new data, it can be said that, as of 2015, patients with yp stage I tumors or histological complete response derived no benefit from adjuvant therapy. On the other hand, the FOLFOX chemotherapy regimen should be proposed for yp stage III patients, and may be considered for yp stage II tumors in fit patients with high-risk factors. Nevertheless, well-designed and sufficiently powered clinical trials dedicated to adjuvant treatments for rectal cancer remain justified in future to achieve a high level of proof in keeping with evidence-based medical standards.

  14. Immunohistochemical Markers as Predictors of Histopathologic Response and Prognosis in Rectal Cancer Treated with Preoperative Adjuvant Therapy: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We explain the state of the art of the immunohistochemical markers of response in rectal cancers treated with neoadjuvant medical therapies and its implication with prognosis. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is widely used to improve the outcome of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, and the evaluation of the effects of medical therapy is to date based on histomorphological examination by applying four grading systems of response to therapy (tumor regression grade (TRG)). The need to identify immunohistochemical markers that could ensure a better assessment of response and possibly provide additional prognostic information has emerged. We identified p53, p27kip1, Ki67, matrix metalloprotease-9, survivin, Ki67 proliferative index, CD133, COX2, CD44v6, thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase, and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase as the most common markers studied in literature to date, and we explained their prognostic potential and their implications in the evaluation of the response to preoperative therapies in rectal cancers. PMID:28326100

  15. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Aravantinou, Meropi; Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings.

  16. [Role of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer : Is MRI-based selection a future model?].

    PubMed

    Kulu, Y; Hackert, T; Debus, J; Weber, M-A; Büchler, M W; Ulrich, A

    2016-07-01

    Following the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) in the curative treatment of rectal cancer, the role of neoadjuvant therapy has evolved. By improving the surgical technique the local recurrence rate could be reduced by TME surgery alone to below 8 %. Even if local control was further improved by additional preoperative irradiation this did not lead to a general survival benefit. Guidelines advocate that all patients in UICC sta