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Sample records for rectal carcinoid tumors

  1. Multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Doi, Momoko; Ikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Kawamura, Takuji; Katsura, Kanade

    2016-08-01

    We report multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins who, respectively, had 42 and 36 carcinoid tumors in the lower rectum. This is the first report about carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins. Both twins developed a similar number of rectal carcinoids with a similar distribution. Investigation of their genetic background may provide information about the origin of these tumors.

  2. An Unusual Case of Rectal and Ileal Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abdulsamad, Molham; Abbas, Naeem; Balar, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is the most common neuroendocrine tumor affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The coexistence of multifocal carcinoid lesions is a well-established phenomenon. Although intubation of the terminal ileum is not routinely attempted during colonoscopy, it can occasionally reveal the presence of some incidental findings. We present a patient with known rectal carcinoid, who was found to have another carcinoid lesion in the terminal ileum during surveillance colonoscopy. The patient underwent right hemicolectomy, and no chemotherapy was required as the patient was found to have stage 1 carcinoid tumor. PMID:28203126

  3. The effect of preceding biopsy on complete endoscopic resection in rectal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Pyo; Sung, In-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Sun-Young; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup

    2014-04-01

    Biopsy of rectal carcinoid tumor is commonly taken before endoscopic resection. However the preceding biopsy can inhibit complete resection by causing blurred tumor border and fibrosis of the tissue. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of preceding biopsy on complete endoscopic resection in rectal carcinoid tumor. It was also determined if rectal carcinoid tumors can be macroscopically distinguished by endoscopy. We reviewed retrospectively the records of patients with rectal carcinoid tumor who had undergone an endoscopic treatment at our hospital, during a 7-yr period. The resection margin was clear in 57 of 98 cases. The preceding biopsy was taken in 57 cases and the biopsy was significantly associated with the risk of incomplete tumor resection (OR, 3.696; 95% CI, 1.528-8.938, P = 0.004). In 95.9% of the cases, it was possible to suspect a carcinoid tumor by macroscopic appearance during initial endoscopy. The preceding biopsy may disturb complete resection of rectal carcinoid tumor. In most cases, the carcinoid tumor could be suspected by macroscopic appearance. Therefore the preceding biopsy is not essential, and it may be avoided for the complete resection.

  4. Carcinoid Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Carcinoid Tumor Carcinoid Tumor This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Carcinoid Tumor. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Carcinoid Tumor Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms ...

  5. Comparison of Endoscopic Mucosal Resection With Circumferential Incision and Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Rectal Carcinoid Tumor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ru; Liu, Xiang; Sun, Siyu; Wang, Sheng; Ge, Nan; Wang, Guoxin; Guo, Jintao

    2016-06-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been a valuable treatment of choice for rectal carcinoid tumors that are endoscopically treatable because of its satisfactory resection rate and low recurrence rate. For treatment of small rectal carcinoids, endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is more often chosen by endoscopists because of its safety and time efficiency. We applied circumferential incision and endoscopic mucosal resection (CI-EMR), which is a modification of EMR, to treat rectal carcinoid tumors and compared their efficacy and safety. Between January 2008 and December 2013, we enrolled 66 patients (30 in the ESD group and 36 in the CI-EMR group) at Shengjing Hospital who were pathologically diagnosed with rectal carcinoid tumors <15 mm in diameter. We retrospectively analyzed en bloc resection rates, pathologic complete resection rates, incidences of complications, follow-up outcomes, and procedure times. The en bloc resection rate and the histologic complete resection rate were similar, but the procedure time was longer in the ESD group than in the CI-EMR group. In cases that were incompletely resected, neither local recurrence nor distant metastasis was detected during follow-up. Similarly minor bleeding occurred in both groups, and no perforation occurred after either procedure. CI-EMR showed comparable en bloc resection and histologically complete resection rates and is technically simpler and minimally invasive compared with ESD. Because of its easier performance and shorter procedure time, CI-EMR may be preferable to ESD for resection of rectal carcinoid tumors <15 mm in diameter without invasion or distant metastases.

  6. A pilot randomized control study to evaluate endoscopic resection using a ligation device for rectal carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Hiroyuki; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Ootani, Akifumi; Tsunada, Seiji; Ogata, Shinichi; Ootani, Hibiki; Shimoda, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Kanako; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Amemori, Sadahiro; Mannen, Kotaro; Mizuguchi, Masanobu; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Rectal carcinoid tumors smaller than 10 mm can be resected with local excision using endoscopy. In order to remove rectal carcinoid tumors completely, we evaluated endoscopic mucosal resection with a ligation device in this pilot control randomized study. METHODS: Fifteen patients were diagnosed with rectal carcinoid tumor (less than 10 mm) in our hospital from 1993 to 2002. There were 9 males and 6 females, with a mean age 61.5 years (range, 34-77 years). The patients had no complaints of carcinoid syndrome symptoms. Fifteen patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: 7 carcinoid tumors were treated by conventional endoscopic resection, and 8 carcinoid tumors were treated by endoscopic resection using a ligation device. RESULTS: All rectal carcinoid tumors were located at the middle to distal rectum. The size of the tumors varied from 3 mm to 10 mm and background characteristics of the patients were not different in the two groups. The rate of complete removal of carcinoid tumors using a ligation device (100%, 8/8) was significantly higher than that of conventional endoscopic resection (57.1%, 4/7). The three patients had tumor involvement of deep margin, for which additional treatment was performed. No complications occurred during or after endoscopic resection using a ligation device. All patients in the both groups were alive during the 3-year observation period. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic resection using a ligation device is a useful and safe method for resection of small rectal carcinoid tumors. PMID:16810752

  7. Rectal carcinoid tumor metastasis to a skull base meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jennifer; Gupta, Amit; Badve, Chaitra; Cohen, Mark L; Wolansky, Leo J

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors that most frequently develop in the gastrointestinal tract or lungs and have high potential for metastasis. Metastasis to the brain is rare, but to another intracranial tumor is extremely rare. Of the intracranial tumors, meningiomas are the most common to host metastases, which may be related to its rich vascularity and E-cadherin expression. We describe the case of a 65-year-old female with active chemotherapy-treated neuroendocrine carcinoma who presented with left-sided facial numbness, headaches, and blurry vision. Initial imaging revealed a 1 cm irregular dural-based left petrous apex mass suggestive of a meningioma that was re-imaged four months later as a rapidly enlarging, extra-axial, mass extending into the cavernous sinus, effacing Meckel’s cave that resembled a trigeminal schwannoma. Pathology revealed a carcinoid tumor metastatic to meningioma. While the mass displayed characteristic imaging findings of a schwannoma, rapid growth in the setting of known active malignancy should prompt the clinician to consider mixed pathology from metastatic disease or a more aggressive meningioma. PMID:26825133

  8. [Four resections of metachronous liver metastases and lateral lymph node metastases of a rectal carcinoid tumor - a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takayuki; Koyama, Fumikazu; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Nakamura, Shinji; Ueda, Takeshi; Nishigori, Naoto; Inoue, Takashi; Kawasaki, Keijirou; Obara, Shinsaku; Fujii, Hisao; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    The authors present a case of rectal carcinoid tumor with lateral lymph node metastases and liver metastases that was successfully treated by 4 resections. A 70-year-old man was diagnosed with a rectal carcinoid tumor (20 mm in diameter) with submucosal (SM) invasion. Radical resection was performed at 25 months, 38 months, and 57 months, when abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed metachronous liver metastases of the rectal carcinoid tumor. At 50 months, metachronous lateral lymph node metastases were also revealed. Three hepatectomies and a laparoscopic lateral lymph node dissection were performed. The patient is currently free of disease at 25 months after the last intervention.

  9. Factors associated with complete local excision of small rectal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Son, Hae-Jung; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Hong, Chang Won; Han, Kyung Su; Kim, Byung Chang; Park, Ji Won; Choi, Hyo Seong; Chang, Hee Jin; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Although small rectal carcinoid tumors can be treated using local excision, complete resection can be difficult because tumors are located in the submucosal layer. We evaluate the factors associated with pathologically complete local resection of rectal carcinoid tumors. Data were analyzed of 161 patients with 166 rectal carcinoid tumors who underwent local excision with curative intent from January 2001 to December 2010. A pathologically complete resection (P-CR) was defined as an en bloc resection with tumor-free lateral and deep margins. The study classified treatments into three categories for analysis: conventional polypectomy (including strip biopsy, snare polypectomy, and hot biopsy), advanced endoscopic techniques (including endoscopic mucosal resection with cap and endoscopic submucosal dissection), and surgical local excision (including transanal excision and transanal endoscopic microsurgery). We evaluated the P-CR rate according to treatment method, tumor size, initial endoscopic impression and the use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) or transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). The mean tumor size was 5.51 ± 2.43 mm (range 2-18 mm) and all lesions were confined to the submucosal layer. The P-CR rates were 30.9, 72.0, and 81.8 % for conventional polypectomy, advanced endoscopic techniques, and surgical local excision, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that P-CR was associated with treatment method, use of EUS or TRUS, and initial endoscopic impression. Multivariate analysis showed that only treatment method was associated with P-CR. Pathologically complete resection of small rectal carcinoid tumors was more likely to be achieved when using advanced endoscopic techniques or surgical local excision rather than conventional polypectomy.

  10. Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing cancers. They usually start in the lining of the digestive tract or in the lungs. They grow ... trouble breathing. Surgery is the main treatment for carcinoid tumors. If they haven't spread to other parts of the body, surgery can cure the cancer.

  11. Analysis of the molecular features of rectal carcinoid tumors to identify new biomarkers that predict biological malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Miki; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Ishigami, Keisuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Tachibana, Mami; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Tokino, Takashi; Maruyama, Reo; Suzuki, Hiromu; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Although gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors are relatively rare in the digestive tract, a quarter of them are present in the rectum. In the absence of specific tumor biomarkers, lymphatic or vascular invasion is generally used to predict the risk of lymph node metastasis. We, therefore, examined the genetic and epigenetic alterations potentially associated with lymphovascular invasion among 56 patients with rectal carcinoid tumors. We also conducted a microRNA (miRNA) array analysis. Our analysis failed to detect mutations in BRAF, KRAS, NRAS, or PIK3CA or any microsatellite instability (MSI); however, we did observe CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) positivity in 13% (7/56) of the carcinoid tumors. The CIMP-positive status was significantly correlated with lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.036). The array analysis revealed that microRNA-885 (miR-885)-5p was the most up-regulated miRNA in the carcinoid tumors with lymphovascular invasion compared with that in those without invasion. In addition, high miR-885-5p expression was independently associated with lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.0002). In conclusion, our findings suggest that miR-885-5p and CIMP status may be useful biomarkers for predicting biological malignancy in patients with rectal carcinoid tumors. PMID:26090613

  12. [A case of rectal carcinoid tumor with lymph node and liver metastasis 5 years after curative resection].

    PubMed

    Shindo, Yoshitaro; Hazama, Shoichi; Maeda, Yoshinari; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Tamesa, Takao; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Kawano, Hiroo; Oka, Masaaki

    2013-11-01

    A 65-year-old man was diagnosed with a rectal carcinoid tumor (10 mm in diameter) in July 2007. We performed low anterior resection with lymph node dissection. Histological depth of penetration of the rectal wall by the primary tumor was up to the submucosa, and lymph node metastasis was observed at station 251 (Japanese Classification of Colorectal Carcinoma, seventh Edition). Five years later, abdominal enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple liver tumors and swelling of the right obturator lymph nodes. During surgery, ultrasonography revealed 10 hypoechoic masses in both hepatic lobes. We performed right pelvic lymph node dissection, partial hepatectomy (S5/6, S7, and S8), and microwave coagulation therapy. After surgery, the patient was treated with octreotide long-acting repeatable( LAR). The patient remained disease-free for 10 months after surgery. Our findings suggest that careful monitoring is necessary for metachronous lymph node and liver metastasis during follow-up treatment for rectal carcinoid tumors.

  13. Comparison of endoscopic resection therapies for rectal carcinoid tumor: endoscopic submucosal dissection versus endoscopic mucosal resection using band ligation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Cheol W; Kang, Dae H; Kim, Hyung W; Park, Su B; Jo, Woo S; Song, Geun A; Cho, Mong

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) has been the endoscopic treatment of choice for rectal carcinoid tumors <10 mm in size. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) may cause more severe complications, longer operation time, and higher cost than EMR. : To compare EMR using band ligation (EMR-B) method with ESD for the endoscopic treatment of rectal carcinoid tumors. From November 2008 to September 2011, we enrolled consecutive patients with rectal carcinoid tumors <10 mm in diameter and without lymph node enlargement. Rate of complete resection rate, incidence of complications, and length of procedures were evaluated. Sixty patients were enrolled (31 ESD cases and 29 EMR-B cases). The mean age was 48.03±13.09 years. Both groups had similar mean tumor diameter (EMR-B 4.34±1.75 vs. ESD 5.22±2.09 mm; P=0.084). Resection time was longer in the ESD group than in the EMR-B group (15.09±5.73 vs. 6.37±5.52 min; P<0.001). The complete resection rate was 80.6% (25 of 31) in the ESD group and 82.8% (24 of 29) in the EMR-B group (P=0.833). In incomplete resection cases, neither local recurrence nor distant metastasis was detected during the follow-up period. Compared with ESD, EMR-B resulted in a comparable histologically complete resection rate and took less time to perform. Given the advantages of easier and shorter procedure time, EMR-B may be considered the treatment of choice for small rectal carcinoid tumors.

  14. What Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carcinoid Tumor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors What Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors? Lung carcinoid tumors (also known as ... lungs, as well as the neuroendocrine system. The lungs The lungs are 2 sponge-like organs in ...

  15. Transcatheter arterial embolization with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere®) leads to life-threatening tumor lysis syndrome in a rectal carcinoid patient with hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yuan-Hao; Tsai, Ming-Tsun; Kuo, Chen-Yu; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Li, Chung-Pin; Chen, Jinn-Yang; Chao, Yee

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal carcinoids appears to be increasing, and the rectum is the third most common location. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with trisacryl gelatin microspheres (Embosphere®) has been reported as an effective method for hepatic metastases of rectal carcinoids. Complications are uncommon and usually of minor consequence. We report an unusual case of a 34-year-old man with tumor lysis syndrome following TAE with Embosphere® in a patient with multiple hepatic metastases of a rectal carcinoid. Early detection and effective treatment are essential for this rare but potentially catastrophic complication. PMID:23986828

  16. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  17. Multiple carcinoid tumors of the rectum: report of two cases suggesting the origin of carcinoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Sasou, Shunichi; Suto, Takeshi; Satoh, Toshihiko; Tamura, Gen; Kudara, Norihiko

    2012-10-01

    Two cases of multiple carcinoid tumors of the rectum with numerous micronests of carcinoid tumors are reported. The patients were 51- and 58-year-old males. Many carcinoid tumors and numerous carcinoid micronests were found in the resected rectum; the total number of carcinoid tumors, groups of micronests, and solitary micronests was 69 in the first case and 62 in the second case. The micronests, consisting of a few to many endocrine cells, were observed in the lamina propria, muscularis mucosa, and/or submucosa. Micronests increased in number, gathered and formed carcinoid tumors, which were up to 8 mm in diameter. It was found that a nest of the carcinoid tumors in the lamina propria showed continuity with the endocrine cells of a crypt in the different carcinoid tumors in both cases. The carcinoid tumor and micronest infiltrated the nerves and ganglions in the muscularis mucosa and submucosa. Nests of the carcinoid tumors and micronests were surrounded by S-100-positive cells. Lymph node metastases of the carcinoid tumor were found in both cases. Rectal carcinoid tumors may originate from endocrine cells of the crypts, and multiple carcinoid tumors may occur heterogeneously. © 2012 The Authors. Pathology International © 2012 Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. [Metastatic bronchial carcinoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Bouledrak, K; Walter, T; Souquet, P J; Lombard-Bohas, C

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial carcinoids are uncommon pulmonary neoplasms and represent 1 to 2 % of all lung tumors. In early stage of disease, the mainstay and only curative treatment is surgery. Bronchial carcinoids are generally regarded as low-grade carcinomas and metastatic dissemination is unusual. The management of the metastatic stage is not currently standardized due to a lack of relevant studies. As bronchial carcinoids and in particular their metastatic forms are rare, we apply treatment strategies that have been evaluated in gastrointestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, bronchial carcinoids have their own characteristic. A specific therapeutic feature of these metastatic tumors is that they require a dual approach: both anti-secretory for the carcinoid syndrome, and anti-tumoral.

  19. Synchronous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon and Rectal Carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    Vootla, Vamshidhar; Ahmed, Rafeeq; Niazi, Masooma; Balar, Bhavna; Nayudu, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Primary colonic adenocarcinoma and synchronous rectal carcinoids are rare tumors. Whenever a synchronous tumor with a nonmetastatic carcinoid component is encountered, its prognosis is determined by the associate malignancy. The discovery of an asymptomatic gastrointestinal carcinoid during the operative treatment of another malignancy will usually only require resection without additional treatment and will have little effect on the prognosis of the individual. This article reports a synchronous rectal carcinoid in a patient with hepatic flexure adenocarcinoma. We present a case of a 46-year-old Hispanic woman with a history of hypothyroidism, uterine fibroids and hypercholesterolemia presenting with a 2-week history of intermittent abdominal pain, mainly in the right upper quadrant. She had no family history of cancers. Physical examination was significant for pallor. Laboratory findings showed microcytic anemia with a hemoglobin of 6.6 g/dl. CT abdomen showed circumferential wall thickening in the ascending colon near the hepatic flexure and pulmonary nodules. Colonoscopy showed hepatic flexure mass and rectal nodule which were biopsied. Pathology showed a moderately differentiated invasive adenocarcinoma of the colon (hepatic flexure mass) and a low-grade neuroendocrine neoplasm (carcinoid of rectum). The patient underwent laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and chemotherapy. In patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the colon and rectum, carcinoids could be missed due to their submucosal location, multicentricity and indolent growth pattern. Studies suggest a closer surveillance of the GI tract for noncarcinoid synchronous malignancy when a carcinoid tumor is detected and vice versa. PMID:27920648

  20. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Progressive Carcinoid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-09

    Atypical Carcinoid Tumor; Foregut Carcinoid Tumor; Hindgut Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Midgut Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1

  1. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Staged? The stage of a cancer ... Your Doctor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  2. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms might ... Your Doctor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  3. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinbo; Hu, Zhijian; Wu, Junwei; Bai, Lishan; Chai, Xinqun

    2011-11-19

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor is rare and poses a challenge for diagnosis and management. We presented a case of primary hepatic carcinoid tumor in a 53-year-old female with a complaint of right upper abdominal pain. Computer tomography scans revealed a hypervascular mass in segment 4 of the liver. An ultrasonography-guided biopsy showed a carcinoid tumor. No other lesions were found by the radiological investigations. Surgery resection was performed and histopathological examination revealed a primary hepatic carcinoid tumor. Three years later, recurrence was found and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization was performed. After transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, the patient has been free of symptom and had no radiological disease progression for over 6 months. Surgical resection combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization is effective to offer excellent palliation.

  4. What's New in Lung Carcinoid Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors What’s New in Lung Carcinoid Tumor Research and Treatment? Many medical centers ... Lung Carcinoid Tumor Research and Treatment? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  5. What Happens after Treatment for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Lung Carcinoid Tumors? For many people with carcinoid tumors, ... Lung Carcinoid Tumor Treatment Stops Working More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  6. What Are the Key Statistics for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carcinoid Tumors What Are the Key Statistics About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? About 1% to 2% of all ... Lung Carcinoid Tumor Research and Treatment? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  7. Disseminated typical bronchial carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Novković, Dobrivoje; Skuletić, Vesna; Vuković, Jelena; Cerović, Snezana; Tomić, Ilija; Karlicić, Vukojica; Stojisavljević, Marko

    2013-05-01

    Bronchial carcinoids belong to a rare type of lung tumors. If they do not expose outstanding neuroendocrine activity, they develop without clearly visible symptoms. They are often detected during a routine examination. According to their clinical pathological features, they are divided into typical and atypical tumors. Typical bronchial carcinoids metastasize to distant organs very rarely. Localized forms are effectively treated by surgery. The methods of conservative treatment should be applied in other cases. We presented a 65-year-old patient with carcinoid lung tumor detected by a routine examination. Additional analysis (chest X-ray, computed tomography of the chest, ultrasound of the abdomen, skeletal scintigraphy, bronhoscopy, histopathological analysis of the bioptate of bronchial tumor, as well as bronchial brushing cytology and immunohistochemical staining performed with markers specific for neuroendocrine tumor) proved a morphologically typical lung carcinoid with dissemination to the liver and skeletal system, which is very rarely found in typical carcinoids. The presented case with carcinoid used to be showed morphological and pathohistological characteristics of typical bronchial carcinoid. With its metastasis to the liver and skeletal system it demonstrated unusual clinical course that used to be considered as rare phenomenon. Due to its frequent asymptomatic course and varied manifestation, bronchial carcinoid could be considered as a diagnostic challenge requiring a multidisciplinary approach.

  8. I-131 MIBG imaging of carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Blinder, R.A.; Feldman, J.M.; Coleman, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    The potential of I-131 MIBG to image carcinoid tumors was evaluated in nine patients with pathologically proven carcinoid. Three patients with foregut carcinoid tumors (2 bronchial and one pancreatic), had abnormal urinary 5-HIAA, and one had the carcinoid syndrome. Six patients had midgut carcinoid tumors (5 ileal and 1 cecal), 5 had abnormal urinary 5-HIAA, and 4 had the carcinoid syndrome. All of the patients with midgut carcinoids had metestatic disease to the liver and/or mesentery. Two hundred microcuries of I-131 MIBG were injected intravenously and the patients were studied at 24 and 48 hours. In all patients except those with bronchial carcinoids Tc-99m sulfur colloid liver exams with computer subtraction were performed during the study. The patients with bronchial carcinoids showed no uptake in the tumors. The patient with a pancreatic carcinoid who had carcinoid syndrome demonstrated tumor uptake in hepatic metastases. Of the six patients with midgut carcinoids, 4 demonstrated MIBG uptake in tumors. One patient with mesenteric disease did not have definitive tumor uptake. A second patient with liver involvement at surgery was negative on the MIBG study. Hepatic CT and scintigraphy were negative and the patient's 5-HIAA was normal. The 4 patients with carcinoid syndrome had abnormal MIBG scans. I-131 MIBG demonstrated tumor in 4 of six patients with midgut carcinoids. MIBG was not concentrated in two carcinoids of bronchial origin. The five patients with carcinoid syndrome had positive scans. MIBG has potential as a diagnostic agent in carcinoid tumors.

  9. Rectal carcinoids are on the rise: early detection by screening endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Scherübl, H

    2009-02-01

    Rectal carcinoids are on the rise; in the United States the age-adjusted incidence has increased by 800% -1000% in the last 35 years. The incidence of carcinoids of the stomach, pancreas, or small bowels has also multiplied. The reasons for these epidemiological changes are not yet understood. Both screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy lead to a shift to smaller-sized (< or =13 mm) rectal carcinoids and earlier tumor stages at diagnosis. During the last 35 years the overall 5-year survival of patients with rectal carcinoid disease has increased by almost 20% (in the US). Thus, endoscopic screening of the colorectum is effective in the early diagnosis not only of colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas but also of carcinoids. Rectal carcinoids that are 10.0 mm or less and do not infiltrate the muscularis propria can be removed endoscopically. If histological angioinvasion or lymph node metastases are found, surgical lymph node dissection has to be considered. Before deciding on definitive therapy, rectal carcinoids should be staged by means of endoscopic ultrasonography, CT, or MRI and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

  10. Stages of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer cells have spread within the stomach and intestines or to other parts of the body. Staging ... the NCI website . Carcinoid Tumors in the Small Intestine It is not clear what the best treatment ...

  11. What Are the Key Statistics about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors What Are the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? Although the exact number ... a Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor? What Are the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? What’s New in Gastrointestinal ...

  12. What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Lung Carcinoid Tumors? A risk factor is anything that ... Can Lung Carcinoid Tumors Be Prevented? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  13. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Lung Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? It is important to have honest, ... Your Doctor About Lung Carcinoid Tumors? More In Lung Carcinoid Tumors About Lung Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk ...

  14. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? It is important to have honest, open ... Doctor About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? More In Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  15. [A case of laparoscopic surgery for a rectal carcinoid after ALTA therapy for an internal hemorrhoid].

    PubMed

    Aomatsu, Naoki; Nakamura, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakao, Shigetomi; Uchima, Yasutake; Aomatsu, Keiho

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of laparoscopic surgery for a rectal carcinoid after aluminum potassium and tannic acid (ALTA) therapy for an internal hemorrhoid. A 66-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of bleeding during defecation. He was diagnosed via anoscopy with Goligher grade II internal hemorrhoids. Examination via colonoscopy revealed 2 yellowish submucosal tumors in the lower rectum that were 5mm and 10mm in diameter. A rectal carcinoid tumor was diagnosed based on histopathology. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated no metastases to the liver or lymph nodes. First, we performed ALTA therapy for the internal hemorrhoids. Two weeks later, we performed laparoscopic-assisted low anterior resection (D2) for the rectal carcinoid. The patient was discharged without complications and has not experienced recurrence during the 2 years of follow-up care.

  16. Clinical outcomes for rectal carcinoid tumors according to a new (AJCC 7th edition) TNM staging system: a single institutional analysis of 122 patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sung; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to describe clinical outcomes of rectal carcinoids according to the 7th American Joint Council on Cancer (AJCC) TNM staging system. We retrospectively reviewed 122 patients who were treated for rectal carcinoids between 1995 and 2010. Among 122 patients, 81.2% (n = 99) were classified as stage I, 4.9% (n = 6) as stage II, 11.5% (n = 14) as stage III, and 2.5% (n = 3) as stage IV. Lymph node (LN) metastasis rates for pT1a, 1b, 2, and 3 stages were 1.2% (1/85), 16.7% (3/18), 0% (0/4) and 84.6% (11/13), respectively. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 88.4%. The 5-year OS rates were estimated to be 100%, 80%, 51.4% and 0% for stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively (P < 0.001). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 82.3%. The 5-year DFS rates were estimated to be 97.7%, 62.5%, 17.1%, and 0% for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively (P < 0.001). Using the new TNM stage, we confirmed a prognostic difference in LN metastasis rates, OS, and DFS for rectal carcinoids. In clinical practice, the new TNM stage can be very useful for predicting prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Scintigraphic imaging of carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M.; Kamanabroo, D.

    1985-05-01

    131-1-metaiodobenzylguanidine (131-1-MIBG) is used for scintigraphic localization and treatment of pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma. Several other tumors, deriving from neuroectoderm (APUD tumors) may also produce catecholamines. 4 patients with surgically proven carcinoid tumors were studied by 131-1-MIBG scintigraphy. Scintigraphic images were performed with a computer assisted gamma camera 2.24, 48 and 72 hours after IV injection of 26 MBq 131-I-MIBG. In one patient single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 185 Mgq 123-I-MIBG was performed additionally. Catecholamines were determined in 24-hours-urinary samples by HPLC. Serotonine was determined in plasma. Catecholamine excretion was normal in all patients, whereas serotonine was elevated in all of them. In 2 of 4 patients slight tracer uptake was observed in some of liver metastases, whereas other metastases in the liver and the primary tumor did not show 131-1-MIBG uptake. In one patient with a carcinoid tumor of the pancreas 131-1-MIBG scintigraphy and SPECT with 123-1-MIBG was positive. In one patient scintigraphy was false negative. MIBG scintigraphy is not only suitable for imaging pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma, but may also localize carcinoid tumors and their metastases.

  18. Surgical management and outcome of rectal carcinoids in a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Wei, Rockson; Lo, Oswens S H; Law, Wai Lun

    2015-02-07

    Rectal carcinoids are an uncommon entity comprising only 1%-2% of all rectal tumors. Rectal carcinoids are frequently diagnosed during colonoscopy, but management after polypectomy is still controversial. The aims of this study were to review the surgical procedures for rectal carcinoids and to compare the outcomes of patients after different treatment modalities in a university hospital in Hong Kong. All rectal carcinoids diagnosed between January 2003 and September 2012 were reviewed retrospectively, including clinicopathological characteristics, their management, and surgical outcomes. There were 54 patients with a median age of 60 years, and 32 were males (59.3%). All patients underwent colonoscopy, and the most had rectal bleeding (53.7%). Two patients were diagnosed incidentally in the surgical specimens of rectal tissues. Eighteen patients were diagnosed to have rectal carcinoids after snaring polypectomy, and no further intervention was required. Twenty-five patients had local resection either by means of transanal resection or transanal endoscopic operation. Radical resection was performed in seven patients in which one had T3N1 disease and the others did not have any lymph node metastasis. In the median follow-up of 30 months (10-108 months), there was no recurrence in the "incidental" or post-polypectomy group. However, two patients with transanal resection and two patients with radical resection developed hepatic metastases after 13-24 months post-treatment. The 5-year overall survival was 100% in patients having snaring polypectomy only, 83% for those with local resection, and 63% in patients who underwent radical surgery (p = 0.04). Our data suggested that that local resection was an effective treatment for small rectal carcinoids and generally brought about good oncological and surgical outcomes. For larger tumors, radical resection seemed to provide acceptable oncological outcomes. Regular surveillance with colonoscopy and endorectal

  19. Duodenal carcinoid tumor - a case report.

    PubMed

    Debnath, C R; Debnath, M R; Haque, M A; Das, S N; Moshwan, M M; Karim, R; Uddoula, M S

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are well differentiated neuroendochrine tumors which most frequently involve the gastrointestinal tract; however duodenal carcinoid tumors are rare. They can present with various clinical symptoms and are difficult to diagnose. A 52 years old lady presented with the symptoms of recurrent upper abdominal pain, burning sensation of whole body and passage of loose stool. On endoscopy of upper GIT, there was a duodenal polyp. Polyp was removed by endoscopic resection and tissue was taken for biopsy. Histological findings of biopsy specimen shows carcinoid tumor. As duodenal carcinoid tumor is a rare presentation so we are going to present this case in this article.

  20. What Happens after Treatment for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? For some people with gastrointestinal (GI) carcinoid tumor, treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. ...

  1. Pulmonary carcinoid tumor associated with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    DePace, N L; Elquezabal, A; Hardenburg, H C

    1980-04-01

    A patient with carcinoid tumor of the lung associated with nephrotic syndrome was treated. Excision of the tumor resulted in remission of marked proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema. A review of the literature disclosed many neoplasms associated with the nephrotic syndrome; however, no association of the nephrotic syndrome and a carcinoid tumor of the lung has previously been reported, to our knowledge.

  2. [Localised bronchiectasis revealing carcinoid tumor].

    PubMed

    Janah, Hind; Jabri, Hasna; Bopaka, Régis Gothard; Khattabi, Wiam El; Afif, Hicham

    2016-01-01

    We here report the case of a 32-year old female patient with a 5-year history of recurrent purulent bronchial syndrome. Radiological assessment showed a left basithoracic finely ringed bright areas related to cylindrical bronchiectasis located in the left lower lobe. Flexible bronchoscopy showed smooth surface, reddish tumor obstructing the entrance of the left basal pyramid. The patient underwent left lower lobectomy associated with mediastinal lymph node dissection. Histological examination of the surgical specimen was in favor of typical carcinoid tumor. Postoperative outcome was uncomplicated and clinical and radiological evolution was good.

  3. [Bronchial carcinoid tumor: study of 60 patients].

    PubMed

    Madrid-Carbajal, Claudia; García-Clemente, Marta; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; Cubillas Martín, Hugo; González-Budiño, Teresa; Casan-Clarà, Pere

    2013-07-21

    To describe the casuistry of bronchial carcinoid tumor in the last 20 years in our hospital and determine survival after surgical treatment. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records from January 1992 to June 2012 of patients diagnosed with carcinoid tumor by the pulmonary service. Fifty-two patients (87%) had typical carcinoid and 8 (13%) atypical carcinoid. The mean age at diagnosis was 60 years (SD: 14.4). There was no relationship between consumption of tobacco and carcinoid tumor. Twenty-two per cent were asymptomatic radiographic finding (incidental finding) Three patients showed carcinoid syndrome and one patient had Cushing syndrome. There was a right dominance and the mean lesion size was between 2.1 and 5 cm. Nine per cent had lymph node involvement, predominantly in atypical carcinoid. Overall survival at 3.5 and 10 years was 94%, 86% and 82%. Survival at 5 years was 90% for typical and 86% for atypical and survival at 10 years was 85% for typical and 57% for atypical carcinoids. Carcinoid tumors are malignant tumors by their ability to metastasize. In our study, both histological type and staging were predictors of survival. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Synchronous Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor and Colon Adenocarcinoma: Case Reports and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Jessica N.; Sathyamurthy, Anjana; Kneib, Jessica L.; Ibdah, Jamal A.; Tahan, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 40; Male, 70 Final Diagnosis: Synchronous gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor and colon adenocarcinoma Symptoms: Weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Colonoscopy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Coexistence of carcinoid tumor and colorectal adenocarcinoma is rare. In this report, we present two cases and review the current literature for synchronous carcinoid tumor and colorectal carcinoma occurrence. Case Reports: In both cases, the rectal carcinoid tumors and sigmoid colon adenocarcinomas were detected by colonoscopy. The colon adenocarcinomas were effectively treated with a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and the carcinoids were successfully removed endoscopically. Our 40-year-old patient was the youngest among 17 reported patient cases. Conclusions: These two cases demonstrate that the diagnosis of gastrointestinal carcinoid requires a complete assessment of the remainder of the colon for another primary cancer to achieve a timely treatment management strategy. PMID:28579603

  5. Primary carcinoid tumor of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Hood, Brian; Bray, Eric; Bregy, Amade; Norenberg, Michael; Weed, Donald; Morcos, Jacques J

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial carcinoid tumors belong to the class of neuroendocrine tumors and their incidence is extremely rare. The pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of carcinoid tumors of the skull base are outlined in this case report. A 61-year-old multimorbid woman presented with transient memory loss. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain demonstrated a left cavernous sinus mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. The lesion was biopsied using the Caldwell-Luc approach, and histology showed a low-grade neuroendocrine tumor. The tumor was subtotally resected with a neurosurgery/head and neck combined preauricular infratemporal and subtemporal extradural approaches to the cavernous sinus. Further histologic evaluation revealed that the tumor was of carcinoid differentiation with no other primary or metastatic sites detectable. Primary intracranial carcinoid tumors, though rare, should be included in the differential diagnosis of extradural and dural-based lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Metastatic carcinoid tumor--atypical presentation.

    PubMed

    Pleşa, Alina; Sarca, Emanuela; Maxim, Roxana

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is a slow-growing type of neuroendocrine tumor, originating in the enterochromaffin cells and secreting mainly serotonin. Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are found throughout the intestinal tract, the appendix and terminal ileum being the most common locations, and are classified by site of origin and by degree of differentiation, with well-differentiated lesions representing those tumors formerly referred to as carcinoid tumors. The clinical symptoms are characterized by flushing, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and/or bronchial constriction and occur almost exclusively in patients with liver metastases due to the release of bioactive peptides and amines directly into the systemic circulation. We report the clinical, serological and histological diagnosis of a 67-years-old male patient with congestive heart failure secondary to carcinoid heart disease in the context of liver metastases of an ileum carcinoid tumor.

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer cells have spread within the stomach and intestines or to other parts of the body. Staging ... the NCI website . Carcinoid Tumors in the Small Intestine It is not clear what the best treatment ...

  8. General Information about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer cells have spread within the stomach and intestines or to other parts of the body. Staging ... the NCI website . Carcinoid Tumors in the Small Intestine It is not clear what the best treatment ...

  9. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer cells have spread within the stomach and intestines or to other parts of the body. Staging ... the NCI website . Carcinoid Tumors in the Small Intestine It is not clear what the best treatment ...

  10. Primary pulmonary carcinoid tumor: a long-term single institution experience/Primary pulmonary carcinoid tumor

    PubMed Central

    Herde, Ryan F.; Kokeny, Kristine E.; Reddy, Chakravarthy B.; Akerley, Wallace L.; Hu, Nan; Boltax, Jonathan P.; Hitchcock, Ying J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Primary carcinoid tumors of the lung are rare tumors which comprise approximately 0.5 to 5% of all lung malignancies in adults and roughly 20 to 30% of all carcinoid tumors. The purpose of this retrospective, descriptive study was to describe the incidence, characteristics, and outcomes of patients treated for primary pulmonary carcinoid tumor at a single institution. Methods All patients with a diagnosis of primary pulmonary carcinoid tumor treated from 1989 to 2009 were reviewed. Data collected included demographics, pathology, tobacco use, clinical presentation, tumor location, tumor spread, treatment and survival. Results There were 59 cases of pulmonary carcinoid tumors: 47 typical (80%) and 12 atypical (20%). All but 4 patients underwent surgery, including 54 (92%) lung-sparing resections and 1 pneumonectomy. Five out of 55 patients received concurrent adjuvant chemoradiation therapy; 4 patients with atypical and 1 with typical histology. Three additional patients with atypical carcinoid were treated only with adjuvant radiotherapy, palliative radiotherapy, or palliative chemotherapy, respectively. The Kaplan-Meier 5- and 10-year overall survivals were both 80% within the entire population. In the 88% of patients who achieved complete remission, disease-free survival was 98%. A review of a large series from the literature is also presented. Conclusions Surgical resection was primary and adequate therapy for most typical carcinoid tumors with high overall survival and disease-free survival. Adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy might be considered for patients with atypical carcinoid tumors who present with adverse pathological findings. PMID:26270444

  11. Combined classical carcinoid and goblet cell carcinoid tumor: a new morphologic variant of carcinoid tumor of the appendix.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Runjan; Klimstra, David S; Henson, Donald E; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge

    2010-08-01

    Carcinoid tumors are the most common neoplasms of the appendix. Histologically they have been categorized as classical, tubular, or goblet cell types. Goblet cell carcinoid has been regarded as a distinctive tumor type, not related to classic carcinoids, and to our knowledge combinations of these 2 tumor types have not been described in detail. In this report, we describe 5 cases of combined classical carcinoid and goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) tumors of the appendix. Four men and 1 woman, (mean age 53.4 y) presented with acute appendicitis (4 cases), whereas 1 presented with a pelvic mass owing to widespread pelvic disseminated disease. The tumors (0.6 to 6.0 cm) were located in the mid-portion and the tip of the appendix. Four patients were treated with right hemicolectomies (the patient with disseminated pelvic and ovarian metastases also had a pelvic exenteration), and 1 was treated with an appendectomy only. Four patients are alive and asymptomatic, whereas the patient with disseminated pelvic disease died 6 months after surgery. All 5 appendiceal tumors had microscopic features of both classical carcinoid and GCC, either intimately admixed or separate but closely apposed. The extent of the 2 components varied, with classical carcinoid representing 60% to 90% of the tumor. Both components stained for the general neuroendocrine markers, however, staining in the classic component was greater. The Mib-1 proliferation index varied from 1-15%, again with higher Mib-1 indices seen in the GCC component of all 5 cases. The pelvic soft tissue and ovarian metastases in case 4 consisted predominantly of a signet ring cell carcinoma with a minor component of goblet cells and was interpreted as an adenocarcinoma ex-GCC. In view of the fact that these combined carcinoid tumors appear to behave more as goblet cell carcinoids, detailed microscopic examination of classical carcinoid tumors of the appendix is suggested and larger series with longer follow-up is required to

  12. Do We Know What Causes Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention Do We Know What Causes Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? Researchers have made great progress in understanding ... than having been inherited. The mutations that cause carcinoid tumors often affect the MEN1 gene, the same ...

  13. Carcinoid Tumor: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... the middle ages in Europe. Centuries of anecdotal observation and more recent experience in carcinoid patients under ... Dr. Kjell Oberg (as well as myself through observation) reports greater than 60% effectiveness from CHRONIC treatment ...

  14. PHACES syndrome associated with carcinoid endobronchial tumor.

    PubMed

    Mama, Nadia; H'mida, Dorra; Lahmar, Imen; Yacoubi, Mohamed Tahar; Tlili-Graiess, Kalthoum

    2014-05-01

    PHACES syndrome consists of the constellation of manifestations including posterior fossa anomalies of the brain (most commonly Dandy-Walker malformations), hemangiomas of the face and scalp, arterial abnormalities, cardiac defects, eye anomalies and sternal defects. We present a case with a possible PHACES syndrome including sternal cleft and supraumbilical raphé, precordial skin tag, persistent left superior vena cava and subtle narrowing of the aorta with an endobronchial carcinoid tumor. All these anomalies were discovered on chest multi-detector CT. This is a unique case of PHACES syndrome associated with carcinoid tumor. Review of the literature revealed 3 cases of PHACES syndrome with glial tumor. The authors tried to find the relationship between PHACES syndrome and carcinoid tumors or gliomas, which all derive from the neural crest cells.

  15. Metastatic carcinoid tumor obstructing left ventricular outflow.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, George S; Horstmanshof, Douglas A; Guniganti, Uma M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare and usually indicate metastatic disease. Characterizing a tumor and reaching an exact diagnosis can be difficult. Diagnosis has been aided greatly by advances in imaging, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance with the use of gadolinium-pentetic acid. Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms that are found most often in the intestinal tract, although they can also develop in the lung, stomach, or heart. Herein, we report the case of a 72-year-old woman with a history of intestinal carcinoid disease and presenting symptoms of dizziness, fatigue, and chest pain. We used cardiovascular magnetic resonance with gadolinium enhancement to identify a large mass obstructing left ventricular outflow. The histopathologic results of an endomyocardial biopsy confirmed that the mass was a left-sided metastatic carcinoid cardiac tumor. To our knowledge, we are reporting the 1st combined use of clinical evaluation, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and histopathologic studies to reach such a diagnosis.

  16. Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor Obstructing Left Ventricular Outflow

    PubMed Central

    Chrysant, George S.; Horstmanshof, Douglas A.; Guniganti, Uma M.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare and usually indicate metastatic disease. Characterizing a tumor and reaching an exact diagnosis can be difficult. Diagnosis has been aided greatly by advances in imaging, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance with the use of gadolinium-pentetic acid. Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms that are found most often in the intestinal tract, although they can also develop in the lung, stomach, or heart. Herein, we report the case of a 72-year-old woman with a history of intestinal carcinoid disease and presenting symptoms of dizziness, fatigue, and chest pain. We used cardiovascular magnetic resonance with gadolinium enhancement to identify a large mass obstructing left ventricular outflow. The histopathologic results of an endomyocardial biopsy confirmed that the mass was a left-sided metastatic carcinoid cardiac tumor. To our knowledge, we are reporting the 1st combined use of clinical evaluation, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and histopathologic studies to reach such a diagnosis. PMID:21720473

  17. Carcinoid tumor with bilateral renal involvement in a child.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Raj P; Varma, Aditi Vian; Chauhan, Aman; Ward, Ken; Craver, Randal

    2011-12-01

    Carcinoid tumors are uncommon in children. Kidneys are rarely involved as they do not possess neuro-endocrine cells. Work up of painless hematuria after abdominal trauma in a 10-year-old boy revealed primary carcinoid tumors with metastasis to both kidneys. We were unable to find any previous reports of renal involvement by carcinoid tumor in children.

  18. Primary renal carcinoid tumor: A radiologic review

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Leslie; Shaban, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is the classic famous anonym of neuroendocrine neoplasms. Primary renal carcinoid tumors are extremely rare, first described by Resnick and colleagues in 1966, with fewer than a total of 100 cases reported in the literature. Thus, given the paucity of cases, the clinical and histological behavior is not well understood, impairing the ability to predict prognosis. Computed tomography and (occasionally) octreotide studies are used in the diagnosis and followup of these rare entites. A review of 85 cases in the literature shows that no distinctive imaging features differentiate them from other primary renal masses. The lesions tend to demonstrate a hypodense appearance and do not usually enhance in the arterial phases, but can occasionally calcify. Octreotide scans do not seem to help in the diagnosis; however, they are more commonly used in the postoperative followup. In addition, we report a new case of primary renal carcinoid in a horseshoe kidney. PMID:27186242

  19. Esophageal carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Makoto; Abe, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Yu; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Iwano, Daisuke; Yoshizawa, Kazuya; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Kanno, Nana; Nishise, Syouichi; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2015-05-01

    The present report describes a rare case of esophageal carcinoid tumor that was treated by endoscopic resection. A 43-year-old woman underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy at her family clinic for screening of the upper digestive tract and a small lesion resembling a submucosal tumor was detected in the lower esophagus. A biopsy sample from the lesion was diagnosed as esophageal carcinoid tumor and the patient visited our hospital for detailed examination. The tumor was approximately 3 mm in diameter and its surface appeared to be covered with normal squamous epithelium. The tumor had a shiny reddish surface without ulceration or erosion. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging showed structures resembling reticular vessels under the epithelium. Endoscopic ultrasonography depicted the tumor as a low-echoic mass within the lamina propria. Computed tomography did not detect the tumor and no metastatic lesions were evident in other organs. With the patient's informed consent, the tumor was resected using endoscopic submucosal dissection, with a sufficient free margin in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Magnifying endoscopic examination showed the resected tumor to have abundant reticular vessels. Finally, the tumor was diagnosed immunopathologically as an esophageal carcinoid tumor (neuroendocrine cell tumor, grade 1), without lymphatic or vascular invasion.

  20. Expanding indications for ESD: submucosal disease (SMT/carcinoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Goto, Osamu; Uraoka, Toshio; Horii, Joichiro; Yahagi, Naohisa

    2014-04-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is useful for submucosal tumors (SMTs) within the superficial submucosal layer, but perforation frequently occurs during ESD for SMTs located at the deeper layer. Endoscopic resection for small esophageal SMTs is acceptable, although candidates for endoscopic removal are rare. Laparoscopic assistance will be effective for minimally invasive endoscopic local resection for certain types of gastric SMT. Endoscopic mucosal resection with a ligation device would be better than ESD for rectal carcinoid in terms of simplicity and effectiveness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Glucagon-, glicentin-, and pancreatic polypeptide-like immunoreativities in rectal carcinoids and related colorectal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fiocca, R.; Capella, C.; Buffa, R.; Fontana, R.; Solcia, E.; Hage, E.; Chance, R. E.; Moody, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Three nonargentaffin rectal carcinoids have been investigated immunohistochemically. In one case most tumor cells reacted with antiglucagon sera as well as with antiglicentin, antibovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP), and antihuman pancreatic polypeptide (HPP) sera; they were identified ultrastructurally as L cells. Another case showed glucagon-, glicentin-, and BPP-immunoreactive cells but lacked HPP immunoreactivity. In the third case glucagon- and glicentin-immunoreactive cells were well represented, while PP immunoreactivities were scarce. Parallel investigations of human rectal and sigmoid mucosa showed numerous cells reacting with glucagon, glicentin, and BPP antisera, most of which lacked HPP immunoreactivity. Cells reacting with glucagon and glicentin antisera, while lacking PP immunoreactivities, were also found. Thus, both tumor and nontumor cells produce glucagonlike immunoreactive (GLI) peptides--one of which may be glicentin or a related molecule--as well as PP-related sequences, although differing histochemically and ultrastructurally from glucagon or PP cells of the human pancreas. It is concluded that nonargentaffin rectal carcinoids are histogenetically linked to nonargentaffin endocrine cells of the human rectum. Images p[92]-a Figures 1-3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7395969

  2. A case of carotid body tumor concomitant with carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Mun, Mi Jin; Lee, Jin Choon; Lee, Byung Joo

    2015-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors typically fall into two broad categories: those of epithelial origin and those of neural derivation. The former group includes carcinoid tumors and the latter includes paraganglioma. Although paraganglioma and carcinoid tumor have different biologic behaviors, their overlapping histological appearance can pose diagnostic challenges. Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neuroendocrine tumors arising from the enterochromaffin cells disseminated throughout the gastrointestinal and bronchopulmonary systems. Carotid body tumor is the most common type of extra-adrenal paraganglioma. Paraganglioma tends to grow slowly but can compress adjacent vessel and nerve. A 63-year-old woman showed huge mass extending from carotid body to skull base, encircling internal and external carotid arteries on magnetic resonance image. Surgical removal of carotid body tumor was done after embolization procedure. Postoperative histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical analysis were consistent with paraganglioma concomitant with carcinoid tumor in carotid body. Primary cervical carcinoid tumor is extremely rare, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of concomitant existence of paraganglioma and carcinoid tumor in carotid body.

  3. Peptide YY producing strumal carcinoid tumor of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Matsunami, K; Takagi, H; Ichigo, S; Murase, T; Ikeda, T; Imai, A

    2011-01-01

    Primary ovarian carcinoid tumor is uncommon and represents less than 0.1% of ovarian malignancies. The strumal carcinoid may be complicated by carcinoid syndrome induced by peptide YY (PYY). We describe a 45-year-old woman with a bilateral ovarian tumor diagnosed through periodical gynecological examination. She presented with severe constipation. Right ovarian cyst laparoscopically resected was diagnosed as a strumal carcinoid tumor; the left one was mature cystic teratoma. No metastatic findings were seen macroscopically on the ovarian surface and pelvic peritoneum. Constipation was drastically improved by resecting the tumor. The carcinoid tumor cells were positive for tumor-producing PYY by mRNA analysis. It is important to be aware of this entity in the pathological diagnosis of ovarian tumors, in the presence of any clinical indicator of carcinoid tumor/syndrome, as it carries a markedly better prognosis and clinical outcome in comparison with most other malignant ovarian tumors.

  4. Carcinoid Tumor in Accidental, Asymptomatic Meckel's Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valeria; Merkel, Keresztely; Zolnai, Zsofia

    2013-01-01

    Although Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital gastrointestinal disorder, it is controversial whether asymptomatic diverticula in adults should be respected. The authors report the case of a patient who was operated due to ileus caused by adhesions and a Meckel's diverticulum without any sign of inflammation was accidentally noted and removed. As a surprise, the pathological examination of the diverticulum proved carcinoid tumor, a neuroendocrine malignant tumor. The case raises the importance of the removal of asymptomatic Meckel's diverticulum.

  5. Carcinoid Tumor in Accidental, Asymptomatic Meckel's Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valeria; Merkel, Keresztely; Zolnai, Zsofia

    2013-01-01

    Although Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital gastrointestinal disorder, it is controversial whether asymptomatic diverticula in adults should be respected. The authors report the case of a patient who was operated due to ileus caused by adhesions and a Meckel's diverticulum without any sign of inflammation was accidentally noted and removed. As a surprise, the pathological examination of the diverticulum proved carcinoid tumor, a neuroendocrine malignant tumor. The case raises the importance of the removal of asymptomatic Meckel's diverticulum. PMID:24470856

  6. [Case of primary renal carcinoid tumor with hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yasuaki; Seike, Kensaku; Maeda, Shinichi; Tashiro, Kazuhiro

    2010-04-01

    Carcinoid tumors are low-grade malignant tumors that arise from neuroendocrine cells. Primary renal carcinoid tumors are extremely uncommon. A 63-year-old woman presented with a right abdominal mass and fever. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a mass in the right kidney; the mass measured 120 mm in diameter and showed hemorrhage. The patient underwent an uneventful right radical nephrectomy, and histological appearance was typical of carcinoid tumor. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated strong cytoplasmic labeling for neuron-specific enolase and synaptophysin. Additional examinations of the gastrointestinal tract did not show any evidence of carcinoid tumors. The patient remains free from disease recurrence at 8 months after the operation. The prognosis for primary renal carcinoid tumor is relatively optimistic. Complete surgical excision is the only recommended treatment for localized renal carcinoid tumor.

  7. Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Ayub, Adil; Naeem, Buria; Najam, Sehrish; Ahmed, Zubair; Jafri, Wasim; Hamid, Saeed

    2016-03-01

    Primary Hepatic Carcinoid Tumor (PHCT) represents an extremely rare clinical entity with only a few cases reported to date. These tumors are rarely associated with metastasis and surgical resection is usually curative. Herein, we report two cases of PHCT associated with poor outcomes due to late diagnosis. Both cases presented late with non-specific symptoms. One patient presented after a 2-week history of symptoms and the second case had a longstanding two years symptomatic interval during which he remained undiagnosed and not properly worked up. Both these cases were diagnosed with hepatic carcinoid tumor, which originates from neuroendocrine cells. Case 1 opted for palliative care and expired in one month’s time. Surgical resection was advised to the second case, but he left against medical advice.

  8. Rectal Carcinoid Tumor With Liver Metastases Treated by Local Excision and Orthotopic Liver Transplant With Long-term Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vennarecci, Giovanni; Mascianà, Gianluca; de Werra, Edoardo; Guglielmo, Nicola; Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Coluzzi, Mariagrazia; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria

    2017-03-28

    In patients affected by unresectable liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumor, liver transplant represents currently the only realistic chance for cure. The first attempt to establish selection criteria for liver transplant in patients affected by neuroendocrine tumor liver metastases was made by Mazzaferro and associates in 2007. We report the case of a 46-year-old man who came to our institution in 2006 with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Diagnosis of rectal neuroendocrine tumor with bilobar liver nodules was made; the patient underwent transanal local resection. A liver biopsy confirmed the metastatic nature of the hepatic lesion, showing a low-grade neuroendocrine tumor (G1, proliferation index Ki-67 <2%). The patient underwent 2 sessions of transarterial chemoembolization that resulted in stable disease. Afterward, the patient underwent a liver transplant, using the piggyback technique without a venous-venous bypass. His postoperative course was uneventful. The patient has been disease-free for 3 years. Posttransplant treatment has played a key role in increasing the overall survival of the patient and assuring him a good quality of life. He died 9 years (102 mo) after liver transplant.

  9. Bioprosthetic tricuspid valve replacement in carcinoid heart disease from primary ovarian carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Tsugu, Toshimitsu; Iwanaga, Shiro; Murata, Mitsushige; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-07-01

    Carcinoid heart disease (CHD) commonly occurs in association with primary gastrointestinal tract carcinoid tumors with hepatic metastases. Unlike primary gastrointestinal tract carcinoid tumors, primary ovarian carcinoid tumors may cause CHD without hepatic metastases, accounting for only 0.3 % of all carcinoid tumors. Only 37 cases of CHD from primary ovarian carcinoid tumors have been reported. We present a case of CHD in which tricuspid valve thickening and shortening led to reduced valve mobility with the resulting severe tricuspid regurgitation. Considering these characteristics of an abnormal tricuspid valve, we suspected CHD, but prosthetic valve replacement was performed without sufficient systemic examination before surgery. Two years after valve replacement, the patient underwent excision of a mass in the lower abdomen, which was diagnosed as an ovarian carcinoid tumor by histopathological examination. The patient has been observed for more than 3 years after tricuspid valve replacement. She has not experienced bioprosthetic valve leaflet degeneration or dysfunction, although it has been reported that bioprosthetic valves may degenerate in patients with carcinoid tumors. Sufficient systemic examinations should be performed to explore the cause of disease.

  10. Limitation of liver function tests in metastatic carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moinuddin, M.; Dean, P.; Vander Zwaag, R.; Dragutsky, M.

    1987-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of liver function tests (LFT) as indicators of metastatic carcinoid tumors, a retrospective study was performed. The LFT results of 17 patients with carcinoid tumors metastatic to the liver were compared with 17 patients with other malignant tumors. In the noncarcinoid group, 82.4% of the patients had elevated alkaline phosphatase (AP) or gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), whereas only 28.6% of carcinoid patients had abnormal enzymes. The medians of all LFT values were significantly higher in noncarcinoid patients than in the carcinoid group, except for glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT). Our data indicate that LFT are helpful in screening for liver metastases in patients with noncarcinoid tumors, but are unreliable in carcinoid tumors. Imaging tests should be used to rule out liver metastases in carcinoid tumors, irrespective of LFT results.

  11. Fine needle aspiration cytology of thymic carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Wang, D Y; Kuo, S H; Chang, D B; Yang, P C; Lee, Y C; Hsu, H C; Luh, K T

    1995-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors of the thymus are very rare, and their cytologic findings have not been reported previously in English. Retrospective study of fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytologic features in four histopathologically verified thymic carcinoid tumors are described here in detail. The FNA cytology of thymic carcinoids is characterized by predominantly single and some loose clusters of small, round to oval cells with scanty cytoplasm, interspersed with some larger cells with moderate to abundant, granular cytoplasm. The differential diagnosis of the cytologic features between carcinoid tumor and other mediastinal tumors is also discussed.

  12. Computed tomography of abdominal carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Picus, D.; Glazer, H.S.; Levitt, R.G.; Husband, J.E.

    1984-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained in 20 patients with primary and/or metastatic abdominal carcinoid tumors. The primary tumors were seen rarely on CT. Mesenteric involvement was seen in eight of the 20 patients, usually as a soft-tissue mass surrounded by fat and radiating soft-tissue strands. Enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes were seen in seven patients, but rarely were they the only manifestation of intraabdominal disease. The most common finding was liver metastases (13 of 20 patients). CT is helpful in evaluating the extent of tumor before surgical exploration an in following the progression of disease once the diagnosis has been established.

  13. In vitro chemoresistance testing in well differentiated carcinoid tumors.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Well-differentiated, “typical” carcinoid tumors traditionally have a very poor response to chemotherapy. We hypothesized that tumor specimens from well differentiated carcinoid tumors would be highly resistant to the effects of chemotherapy when tested against a variety of antineoplastic agents in v...

  14. Primary pulmonary carcinoid tumor with metastasis to endometrial polyp

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Mazdak; Kolev, Valentin; Costin, Dan; Mizrachi, Howard H.; Chuang, Linus; Warner, Richard R.P.; Gretz, Herbert F.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A carcinoid tumor occurring in the endometrium has been documented in the literature, but there is no report in regard to carcinoid tumor metastasis to endometrium. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of a malignant carcinoid metastasis to an endometrial polyp. Patient underwent hysteroscopy, and polypectomy. The pathology demonstrated an endometrial polyp containing a 4 mm x 5 mm nodule of metastatic carcinoid tumor, consistent with metastasis from patient's known pulmonary carcinoid. The tumor was morphologically similar to the tumors of the right lung, with similar immune-profile. DISCUSSION This patient presented with a suspicious pelvic ultrasound. Due to her age, the first priority was to exclude uterine cancer. The endometrial polyp, which was found, had a small focus of metastatic carcinoid tumor. To the best of our knowledge, this finding has not been previously recorded in the literature. Our patient also had a history of metastatic carcinoid tumor to breast. This finding is also very uncommon. CONCLUSION This is the first case in the literature described a malignant carcinoid metastasis to an endometrial polyp. PMID:23127865

  15. The rare malignancy of the hepatobiliary system: ampullary carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Mustafa; Ozsoy, Yucel; Canda, Aras Emre; Nalbant, Olcay Ak; Haskaraca, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Carcinoid tumors are low-grade tumors originating from endoderm and mostly involving the gastrointestinal system. However; they may be seen in any site within the gastrointestinal system. Case Presentation. A 69-year-old female patient. The results of blood tests were observed to be consistent with obstructive jaundice. A mass appearance was not encountered on tomographic examination. Papilla that was tumor-like macroscopically was seen in the second part of the duodenum in diagnostic endoscopy. Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy surgical procedure was applied. On pathological examination of the mass, a tumoral mass was detected in ampulla vateri localization, 1.5 × 1 × 0.8 cm in size, which, in immunohistochemical staining, was evaluated as a neuroendocrine tumor. Also, Metastasis was observed. Conclusion. The rarest type of carcinoid tumor is ampullary located carcinoid tumor, and tumor size is not a reliable indicator for tumor aggressivity in ampullary carcinoid tumors.

  16. Carcinoid tumor and intravenous octreotide infusion during labor and delivery.

    PubMed

    Le, B T; Bharadwaj, S; Malinow, A M

    2009-04-01

    There are limited numbers of reports concerning the management of pregnancy complicated by carcinoid tumors. Octreotide, the synthetic analogue of somatostatin, has been found to be beneficial in preventing the perioperative exacerbation of carcinoid syndrome. We present a case of the successful use of neuraxial analgesia/anesthesia for labor and vaginal delivery in a symptomatic parturient afflicted with carcinoid syndrome, who received an intravenous infusion of octreotide throughout labor and vaginal delivery.

  17. Primary carcinoid tumor of the frontal sinus: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chu, Michael W; Karakla, Daniel W; Silverberg, Marc; Han, Joseph K

    2010-10-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, indolent, neuroendocrine tumors that are most commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract and lungs. They occasionally develop in the head and neck, either as a primary tumor or, more commonly, as a metastasis. The most common sites of head and neck carcinoids are the larynx and middle ear. Only a few cases of carcinoid in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses have been reported. We describe a case of primary typical carcinoid of the frontal sinus in a 61-year-old man, and we review the clinical, imaging, surgical, and histochemical findings in this case. The patient was treated with endoscopic resection. A subsequent workup for metastatic and occult primary disease was negative, confirming that the frontal sinus was the primary source. At follow-up 12 months postoperatively, the patient remained without disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a primary typical carcinoid tumor originating in the frontal sinus.

  18. Generation and sequencing of pulmonary carcinoid tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Asiedu, Michael K; Thomas, Charles F; Tomaszek, Sandra C; Peikert, Tobias; Sanyal, Bharati; Sutor, Shari L; Aubry, Marie-Christine; Li, Peter; Wigle, Dennis A

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary carcinoid tumors account for approximately 5% of all lung malignancies in adults, and comprise 30% of all carcinoid tumors. There are limited reagents available to study these rare tumors, and consequently no major advances have been made for patient treatment. We report the generation and characterization of human pulmonary carcinoid tumor cell lines to study underlying biology, and to provide models for testing novel chemotherapeutic agents. Tissue was harvested from three patients with primary pulmonary typical carcinoid tumors undergoing surgical resection. The tumor was dissociated and plated onto dishes in culture media. The established cell lines were characterized by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and cell proliferation assays. Tumorigenicity was confirmed by soft agar growth and the ability to form tumors in a mouse xenograft model. Exome and RNA sequencing of patient tumor samples and cell lines was performed using standard protocols. Three typical carcinoid tumor lines grew as adherent monolayers in vitro, expressed neuroendocrine markers consistent with the primary tumor, and formed colonies in soft agar. A single cell line produced lung tumors in nude mice after intravenous injection. Exome and RNA sequencing of this cell line showed lineage relationship with the primary tumor, and demonstrated mutations in a number of genes related to neuronal differentiation. Three human pulmonary typical carcinoid tumor cell lines have been generated and characterized as a tool for studying the biology and novel treatment approaches for these rare tumors.

  19. Intramedullary spinal metastasis of a carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jay I; Yanamadala, Vijay; Shin, John H

    2015-12-01

    We report an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a bronchial carcinoid, and discuss its mechanisms and management. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases from any cancer are rare, and bronchial carcinoids account for only a small fraction of lung cancers. To our knowledge, an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a bronchial carcinoid has been described only once previously.

  20. [Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in pediatric bronchial carcinoid tumor].

    PubMed

    Hervás Benito, I; Bello Arques, P; Loaiza, J L; Vercher, J L; Velasco, R P; Rivas Sánchez, A; Ruiz Llorca, C; Martí Vidal, J F; Mateo Navarro, A

    2010-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is a rare neuroendocrine neoplasm with different locations, the most frequent ones during the pediatric age being the appendix and lung. Scintigraphy with (111)In-DTPA-d-Phe(1)-octreotide has led to an importance advance in the diagnosis of extension in carcinoid tumor patients. We present three pediatric patients with bronchial carcinoid studied with somatostatin analogue scintigraphy (SSRS). The first patient (9 years) was studied using the SSRS after surgery due to carcinoid tumor in the right lower lobe in which tumor remains was observed (this being clearer in the tomography study). The second patient (10 years) presented due to endobronchial tumor in the left lower lobe together with atelectasis of the LUL and emphysema of the LLL. Radiology imaging techniques suggested the differential diagnosis between the endobronchial carcinoid tumor or plasma cells or foreign body gramuloma. The SSRS showed an abnormal deposit of activity in the left hemithorax consisted with carcinoid tumor. No other areas suggesting metastasis were observed. After the surgery (endobronchial resection), new controls with SSRS showed absence of disease. The third patient (12 years) came after a lobectomy (RUL) due to bronchial carcinoid. The SSRS did not show any abnormal areas of activity. In the subsequent control (3 months), a deposit of activity was observed in the middle third of the right hemithorax, after which a lobectomy was performed (RLL and ML) that showed small remains of neuroendocrine carcinoid. Subsequent controls were negative. The SSRS has demonstrated great utility in the diagnosis, follow-up and staging of pediatric patients, carriers of neuroendocrine carcinoid tumors. Copyright 2008 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of sub-5 mm rectal carcinoids with lymph node metastases

    PubMed Central

    Toh, James Wei Tatt; Henderson, Christopher; Yabe, Takako Eva; Ong, Evonne; Chapuis, Pierre; Bokey, Les

    2015-01-01

    Minute (<5 mm) and small (5–10 mm) rectal carcinoids discovered during colonoscopy are generally considered to be non-aggressive, and the management and surveillance of patients with this entity are usually limited. We present the case of a 61-year-old Chinese female with multiple sub-5 mm carcinoid tumours in the rectum without any computed tomography (CT) evidence of lymph node or distant metastases. She underwent an ultra-low anterior resection for a sessile rectal polyp with the histological appearance of a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Seven foci of minute carcinoids in the rectum and perirectal lymph node metastastic spread from the carcinoid tumours were also discovered on histopathology. There were no lymph node metastases originating from adenocarcinoma. This case report and review of the literature suggests that minute rectal carcinoids are at risk of metastasizing and that these patients should be investigated for lymph node and distant metastatic spread with CT and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy or its equivalent, as this would influence prognosis and surgical management of these patients. Findings relating to lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, high Ki-67, mitotic rate, depth of tumour invasion, central ulceration, multifocal tumours and size are useful in predicting metastases and may be used in scoring tools. Size alone is not a good predictor of metastastic spread. PMID:25342710

  2. [Retrospective evaluation of carcinoid tumors of the appendix in children].

    PubMed

    San Vicente, B; Bardají, C; Rigol, S; Obiols, P; Melo, M; Bella, R

    2009-04-01

    Carcinoids of the appendix are rare in children. Usually diagnosed incidentally on histologic investigation following appendectomy for acute apendicitis. To investigate the significance of the diagnosis of appendiceal carcinoid tumors in children, we conducted a retrospective study in our institution. Between 1990 and 2007 a total of 1158 appendectomy were done. In four patients the diagnosis was appendiceal carcinoid. We studied treatment, follow-up and prognosis of this patients. Indicacion for appendectomy was acute pain in lower right quadrant. The median tumor diameter was lower than 1 cm and the appropriate treatment was appendectomy. The prognosis was excellent in all the patients.

  3. What Are the Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing: What You Need to Know . Race and gender Carcinoid tumors are more common among African Americans ... would like to unsubscribe/opt out from our communications, please follow this link: http://www.cancer.org/ ...

  4. Imaging features of carcinoid tumors metastatic to the breast

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Katie N.; Dilaveri, Christina A.; Perry, Kyle; Reynolds, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to describe the imaging findings of carcinoid tumors metastatic to the breast, with pathologic and clinical correlations. We searched our surgical database for cases of pathologically proven carcinoid tumors metastatic to the breast from October 1, 2000, to May 31, 2010. Of the approximate 10,000 breast biopsies identified, 7000 had malignant findings. Ten cases of metastatic carcinoid (0.1% of all malignancies), all with imaging studies available for review, were included in the study. All patients were women and had their primary carcinoid in the gastrointestinal tract (n=9) or lung (n = 1). One patient presented with a palpable breast mass and no history of carcinoid tumor; an ileal carcinoid was discovered after the pathologic diagnosis of metastatic carcinoid was established. In the breast, tumors presented as solitary lesions in half the cases. Metastases to the breast typically presented as circumscribed masses mammographically and as hypoechoic circumscribed masses ultrasonographically; some showed increased through-transmission and increased vascularity with color Doppler evaluation. Five patients had octreotide scans; of these, 4 had increased focal activity in the region of metastasis within the breast. Six patients underwent computed tomography. Without contrast, nodular masses were observed; with contrast, the masses showed rapid enhancement during arterial phase imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (n = 4) also showed rapid enhancement and washout kinetics after contrast administration. Recognition of carcinoid metastases to the breast in patients with known or occult primary carcinoid tumors is important to avoid unnecessary treatment for primary breast cancer. PMID:21771708

  5. Bronchial carcinoid tumors: clinical and radiological correlation.

    PubMed

    Squerzanti, Antonella; Basteri, Vittoria; Antinolfi, Gabriele; D'agostino, Fulvio; Scutellari, Pier Nuccio; Ravenna, Franco; Ghirardi, Redenta; Cavallesco, Giorgio

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate the incidence of bronchial carcinoid tumor (BCT) in population affected by various lung tumors, retrospectively reviewed between 1986-2001, and to emphasize the radiographic patterns if they are characteristic. In the above mentioned period, chest x-ray and CT were performed in 1110 patients, both male and female, affected by lung neoplasms. 20 patients were affected by BCT (16 males, and 13 females), aged between 26 and 75 years (mean age 57.5), with histopathologic diagnosis of typical (9 cases, 31%) and atypical (20 cases, 69%) bronchial carcinoid tumors. Localized right lung lesion were as follows: 7 cases in superior, 9 in middle and 4 in inferior lobes; in the left lung, 5 cases in superior, and 4 in inferior lobes. Size of the lesions was as average 2.4 cm in diameter (with a range of 0.5-12 cm). On x-ray and CT images, BCT appeared as a well marginated nodule, of which 9 were peripheral and 20 central. BCT are classified as neuroendocrine carcinomas,and are divided in typical and atypical forms, with variable grade of malignancy. Central neoplasms are symptomatic due to bronchial obstruction (i.e., pneumonia, atelectasis, bronchiectasis, emphysema and/or lung abscess); if airway obstruction is partial, then cough, wheezing and recurrent pulmonary infections occur. Peripheral tumors are generally asymptomatic and they are discovered occasionally, when chest x-ray is made for other reasons. Radiographic features are similar in typical and atypical BCT. In central tumors a rounded well circumscribed hilar mass is noted, with lobulated or bumpy margins. Central cavitation is not referred to. Peripheral BCT appear as a solitary nodule, inferioer then 3 cm in size, marginated, surrounded by normal pulmonary tissue. Signs and symptoms of BCT are evasive and vague. No current clinical or laboratory procedures are useful in confirming the diagnosis; particularly, no imaging modalities are able to differentiate between BCT and other pulmonary tumors. For

  6. [Carcinoid tumor of gastrointestinal tract: about two clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Blasco, María Del Carmen; Boselli O, F Giuliano; Blasco, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors belong to the families of neuroendocrine tumors. The major sites are the gastrointestinal tract 65% and lungs 25%. The small intestine, specifically the ileum, is the most common. These tumors although rare, are more common in tumors of neuroendocrine origin gastro-entero-pancreatic. In both cases we observe the different clinical presentations that may have carcinoid tumor; in case 1 ulceration of the tumor mass causing the elimination of melena, and severe diarrhea caused by neuroendocrine secretion. Case 2 typical course, totally asymptomatic incidental finding.

  7. Clear cell carcinoid tumor of the distal common bile duct

    PubMed Central

    Todoroki, Takeshi; Sano, Takaaki; Yamada, Shuji; Hirahara, Nobutsune; Toda, Naotaka; Tsukada, Katsuhiko; Motojima, Ryuji; Motojima, Teiji

    2007-01-01

    Background Carcinoid tumors rarely arise in the extrahepatic bile duct and can be difficult to distinguish from carcinoma. There are no reports of clear cell carcinoid (CCC) tumors in the distal bile duct (DBD) to the best of our knowledge. Herein, we report a CCC tumor in the DBD and review the literature concerning extrahepatic bile duct carcinoid tumors. Case presentation A 73-old man presented with fever and occult obstructive jaundice. Ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) demonstrated a nodular tumor projection in the DBD without regional lymph node swelling. Under suspicion of carcinoma, we resected the head of the pancreas along with 2nd portion duodenectomy and a lymph node dissection. The surgical specimen showed a golden yellow polypoid tumor in the DBD (0.8 × 0.6 × 0.5 cm in size). The lesion was composed of clear polygonal cells arranged in nests and a trabecular pattern. The tumor invaded through the wall into the fibromuscular layer. Immunohistochemical stains showed that neoplastic cells were positive for neuron-specific enolase (NSE), chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and pancreatic polypeptide and negative for inhibin, keratin, CD56, serotonin, gastrin and somatostatin. The postoperative course was uneventful and he is living well without relapse 12 months after surgery. Conclusion Given the preoperative difficulty in differentiating carcinoid from carcinoma, the pancreaticoduodenectomy is an appropriate treatment choice for carcinoid tumors located within the intra-pancreatic bile duct. PMID:17227590

  8. An incidental finding of carcinoid tumor of the cystic duct.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoang U; Chan, Cyrus C; Knotts, F Barry

    2013-04-04

    Cystic duct carcinoids are extremely rare tumors. We present a 58-year-old female with carcinoid tumor found within the cystic duct margin following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. She subsequently underwent surgical resection with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. No standard guidelines currently exist regarding surgical excision of these rare tumors. Therefore, we conducted a thorough review of the literature to recommend complete oncologic surgical resection with re-establishment of biliary continuity as the mainstay of definitive treatment; adjuvant therapy currently remains investigational. Long-term prognosis is good with this approach.

  9. An incidental finding of carcinoid tumor of the cystic duct

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hoang U.; Chan, Cyrus C.; Knotts, F. Barry

    2013-01-01

    Cystic duct carcinoids are extremely rare tumors. We present a 58-year-old female with carcinoid tumor found within the cystic duct margin following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. She subsequently underwent surgical resection with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. No standard guidelines currently exist regarding surgical excision of these rare tumors. Therefore, we conducted a thorough review of the literature to recommend complete oncologic surgical resection with re-establishment of biliary continuity as the mainstay of definitive treatment; adjuvant therapy currently remains investigational. Long-term prognosis is good with this approach. PMID:24964431

  10. Increased incidence of second primary malignancy in patients with carcinoid tumors: case report and literature review.

    PubMed Central

    Rivadeneira, D. E.; Tuckson, W. B.; Naab, T.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increased incidence of second noncarcinoid neoplasms in patients with carcinoid tumors. This article reports a case of a synchronous malignant ileal carcinoid tumor in a patient with an adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon. This report illustrates the increased association of carcinoid tumors with other gastrointestinal malignancies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8667441

  11. FDG-PET imaging in patients with pulmonary carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Moore, William; Freiberg, Evan; Bishawi, Muath; Halbreiner, Micheal S; Matthews, Robert; Baram, Daniel; Bilfinger, Thomas V

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the imaging findings in patients with pathologically proven carcinoid tumors and determine if SUV can help to differentiate typical from atypical (more aggressive) pulmonary carcinoid tumors. A retrospective review of patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of a pulmonary carcinoid tumor at our institution from 2002 to 2010 that had a preoperative PET scan was performed after institutional review board approval was obtained. PET results, including SUV uptake and location, were recorded as well as all data from pathology reports. Carcinoids were considered to be more aggressive if they showed pathological diagnosis consistent with atypical carcinoid, lymph node invasion, poor histological grade (poorly differentiated), or evidence of systemic metastases. Atypical carcinoid pathology consisted of focal necrosis or a higher mitotic index (2-10 per square millimeter) with features of nests, trabeculae, pleomorphic cells, or dense hyperchromasia. SUV uptake was then evaluated and compared between the typical and atypical carcinoid groups using nonparametric statistical methods. We identified 29 patients from 2002 to 2010 at our institution with a pathological diagnosis of pulmonary carcinoid. Twenty-three were histopathologically typical, and the other 6 showed atypia. Mean (SD) nodule size was 2.4 (1.3) cm in the typical group versus 5.0 (3.2) cm in the atypical group (P = 0.065). Mean (SD) SUV uptake in the typical carcinoid group was 2.7 (1.6) and in the atypical group the SUV was 8.1 (4.1) (P < 0.01). A cutoff SUV of 6 or greater is predictive of malignancy (odds ratio, 23.6; P < 0.01), as well as a nodule size of 3.5 cm or greater (odds ratio, 5.1; P = 0.024). Preoperative PET imaging result is frequently positive in carcinoid tumors, and the biological behavior correlates well with SUV; however, size is not as strong of a predictor of malignancy. Size of 3.5 cm or greater and SUV of 6 or greater have a predictive value of greater than 95

  12. Imaging of carcinoid tumors with iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Bomanji, J.; Levison, D.A.; Zuzarte, J.; Britton, K.E.

    1987-12-01

    Scintigraphy with /sup 123/I-radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) was performed successfully in two patients with metastatic carcinoid tumor. The scintigraphic findings show diversity of the tumor deposits in the uptake of (/sup 123/I)MIBG in the same patient and between patients.

  13. A Case of Carcinoid Tumor-Associated Hypercalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Siyam, Fadi; Abdullah, Obai; Gardner, Michael; Brietzke, Stephen; Sowers, James

    2012-01-01

    Hypercalcemia as a complication of carcinoid tumors is extremely rare. Accordingly, we report the case of a 55-year-old male with metastatic carcinoid tumor and hypercalcemia, which corrected when the patient was treated with octreotide for symptomatic relief of watery diarrhea. The etiology of the hypercalcemia is presumed to be a neoplastic expression of fibroblast growth factor-23, which was found to be inappropriately high-to-normal when other factors such as parathyroid hormone, calcitonin and vitamin D were appropriately low or low-to-normal. PMID:22493603

  14. Association of carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma are two uncommon malignancies. Patients and methods We report the case of 24-year-old man who presented with respiratory disease. Imaging investigations showed a right lung tumor and histological analysis confirmed a typical carcinoid tumor. As part of initial staging, brain MRI revealed an asymptomatic right frontal lesion. First, a right pulmonary lobectomy was performed without adjuvant treatment. In second time, brain tumorectomy was performed. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of low grade glioma (LGG). The patient remained in complete remission 2.5 years after the initial diagnosis. Results This is the first case reporting the association between LGG and lung carcinoid tumor, while no association between LGG and a systemic tumor have been published to date. Association of lung carcinoid tumor with other malignant diseases has been reported but remained uncommon. Only minimal data support a potential molecular common origin. Conclusion This exceptional association may be fortuitous. However, their concomitant diagnoses suggest a potential association between both rare diseases. A genetic susceptibility remains possible. PMID:23137305

  15. Association of carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Tabouret, Emeline; Barrié, Maryline; Vicier, Cecile; Gonçalves, Anthony; Chinot, Olivier; Viens, Patrice; Madroszyk, Anne

    2012-11-08

    Lung carcinoid tumor and low grade glioma are two uncommon malignancies. We report the case of 24-year-old man who presented with respiratory disease. Imaging investigations showed a right lung tumor and histological analysis confirmed a typical carcinoid tumor. As part of initial staging, brain MRI revealed an asymptomatic right frontal lesion. First, a right pulmonary lobectomy was performed without adjuvant treatment. In second time, brain tumorectomy was performed. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of low grade glioma (LGG). The patient remained in complete remission 2.5 years after the initial diagnosis. This is the first case reporting the association between LGG and lung carcinoid tumor, while no association between LGG and a systemic tumor have been published to date. Association of lung carcinoid tumor with other malignant diseases has been reported but remained uncommon. Only minimal data support a potential molecular common origin. This exceptional association may be fortuitous. However, their concomitant diagnoses suggest a potential association between both rare diseases. A genetic susceptibility remains possible.

  16. Carcinoid tumor of the ileoanal pouch in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Murray; Pricolo, Victor; Chen, Sonja

    2013-01-04

    Carcinoid tumors have been reported to occur in various locations, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. The relationship between the development of carcinoids and ulcerative colitis has been an unclear and controversial one. The association of ulcerative colitis and the development of ileal-pouch carcinoids has not, however, been well documented. We report a case of carcinoid tumor arising in an ileoanal pouch and discuss its unique diagnostic and therapeutic considerations.

  17. Unusual presentation of carcinoid tumor as acute cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Saxton, C.R.

    1983-07-01

    The patient described had signs, symptoms, and laboratory data consistent with acute cholecystitis. A sonogram also suggested cholecystitis, and the gallbladder was not displayed by nuclear imaging. Cholecystectomy revealed the absence of stones but showed carcinoid tumor metastatic to the gallbladder.

  18. An Analysis of Trends and Growth Factor Receptor Expression of GI Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Kanika A.; Silva, Scott R.; Johnson, Jessica N.; Doan, Hung Q.; Jackson, Lindsey N.; Gulhati, Pat; Qiu, Suimin; Riall, Taylor S.; Evers, B. Mark

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of our study was twofold: 1) to determine the incidence, patient and tumor characteristics, and outcome of patients with GI carcinoid tumors using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database, and 2) to delineate the expression pattern of growth factor receptors (GFRs) in carcinoid tumors. The SEER database search provided information on patients diagnosed with carcinoid tumors from 1990–2002. Carcinoid tumor sections (n = 46) were stained for the GFRs: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), and HER-2/neu. Over the 12 year analysis period, 18,180 patients were identified with carcinoid tumors of the foregut, midgut, and hindgut; the incidence of carcinoid tumors increased ~2-fold during this time period. Of the patients with carcinoid tumors, there was a trend of increased expression of VEGF-R and IGF-R, particularly in the foregut and midgut carcinoids. Analysis of the SEER database confirms that the incidence of carcinoid tumors is increasing with an approximate doubling in the number of carcinoid cases from 1990–2002. Furthermore, an increase in VEGF-R and IGF-R expression suggests that GFR inhibitors may be effective adjuvant therapy for carcinoid cancer. PMID:19582519

  19. Metastatic carcinoid tumor to the breast: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shimwoo; Levine, Pascale; Heller, Samantha L; Hernandez, Osvaldo; Mercado, Cecilia L; Chhor, Chloe M

    The breast is an unusual site for carcinoid metastasis. Due to increasing survival rates for carcinoid tumors, however, awareness of their rare complications is important. Carcinoid metastasis to the breast typically presents as a palpable breast mass or a mass on screening mammogram. Because imaging findings are nonspecific, the diagnosis is established through histological findings of neuroendocrine features corresponding with the known primary carcinoid pathology. Correctly distinguishing metastatic carcinoid from primary breast carcinoma is crucial to avoid more invasive procedures required for the latter. Two cases of metastatic carcinoid to the breast are presented with review of the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Appendiceal carcinoid tumor in children: implications for less radical surgery?

    PubMed

    Malkan, A D; Wahid, F N; Fernandez-Pineda, I; Sandoval, J A

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of an appendiceal carcinoid tumor found incidentally or during the course of diagnostic or therapeutic procedures is a burden to both the patient and clinician. The role of the correct surgical operation is paramount for lesions suspected to be malignant. In the pediatric population, appendiceal carcinoids continue to challenge the clinician in choosing the optimal treatment when lesions are larger than 2 cm or involve the appendical base. While the criteria used to define these distinct lesions are available in most cases, the management and treatment are still debated and controversial when considering more radical surgical intervention. The purpose of this article is to give an overview regarding the history, diagnosis, histopathology, management, and controversies associated with appendiceal carcinoid in the pediatric population.

  1. Primary carcinoid tumor of the skin: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Jedrych, Jaroslaw; Pulitzer, Melissa

    2014-04-01

    Primary carcinoid tumor of the skin (PCTS) is an uncommon indolent neoplasm, with 10 cases described in the literature. The tumors affect patients in the sixth to ninth decades of life (mean = 66.3 years) with an equal gender distribution and predilection for the head and trunk. They present as slowly enlarging nodules of variable duration, ranging from 1 to 60 years (mean = 11.4 years). PCTS is characterized by architectural, cytomorphologic, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features typical of a low-grade neoplasm with neuroendocrine differentiation. PCTS typically follows a benign clinical course and therefore has to be distinguished from cutaneous metastases of visceral carcinoid tumors, which herald dissemination of malignancy and poor prognosis. While the distinction from other histologically similar entities can be achieved by histopathological examination, PCTS can be distinguished from a visceral metastasis only by a judicious clinicopathologic correlation. Herein we describe the clinical presentation, histological appearance, and management of these tumors.

  2. Postoperative radiotherapy for residual tumor of primary mediastinal carcinoid teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Lingli; Sun, Lan; Zhou, Yu; Gong, Youling; Xue, Jianxin; Gao, Jun; Lu, You

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman had presented with dry cough for 2 months. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan showed a 12 cm × 8 cm ×5 cm mass in the anterior mediastinum. Due to intimately involving the aortic arch, tumor was removed incompletely. Residual tumor remained approximate 2 cm × 3 cm × 4 cm. Histologic diagnosis was a mature cystic teratoma containing a carcinoid. Subsequently, radiotherapy (RT) was administrated on residual tumor for a total dose of 50 Gy at 2 Gy/d fraction in 25 fractions. At 2-year follow-up, the patient had stable disease. In conclusion, adjuvant radiotherapy with 50 Gy is an effective approach for residual tumor of mediastinal carcinoid teratoma. PMID:23585961

  3. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Éden Sartor; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; Corrêa, Isaac José Felippe; Robles, Laercio; Rezende, Marcelo Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumors are extremely rare neoplasms derived from hormone-producing neuroendocrine cells. It is difficult to make their diagnosis before biopsy, surgical resection or necropsy. A recent publication described only 94 cases of these tumors. There is no sex predilection and apparently it has no association with cirrhosis or preexisting hepatic disease. The most effective treatment is hepatectomy, and resection is determined by size and location of the lesions. PMID:25628206

  4. Ligation-assisted endoscopic submucosal resection with circumferential mucosal incision for duodenal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Harada, Hideaki; Suehiro, Satoshi; Shimizu, Takanori; Katsuyama, Yasushi; Hayasaka, Kenji; Ito, Hideto

    2015-09-14

    Here we present the case of a 64-year-old female with a duodenal carcinoid tumor treated by ligation-assisted endoscopic submucosal resection (ESMR-L) with circumferential mucosal incision (CMI). Band ligation was effective in resecting the duodenal carcinoid tumor after CMI, with an uneventful post-procedural course. Histopathological examination showed clear tumor margins at deeper tissue levels. Thus, in the present case, ESMR-L with CMI was useful for the treatment of duodenal carcinoid tumor.

  5. Ligation-assisted endoscopic submucosal resection with circumferential mucosal incision for duodenal carcinoid tumor

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Hideaki; Suehiro, Satoshi; Shimizu, Takanori; Katsuyama, Yasushi; Hayasaka, Kenji; Ito, Hideto

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the case of a 64-year-old female with a duodenal carcinoid tumor treated by ligation-assisted endoscopic submucosal resection (ESMR-L) with circumferential mucosal incision (CMI). Band ligation was effective in resecting the duodenal carcinoid tumor after CMI, with an uneventful post-procedural course. Histopathological examination showed clear tumor margins at deeper tissue levels. Thus, in the present case, ESMR-L with CMI was useful for the treatment of duodenal carcinoid tumor. PMID:26379409

  6. Paraneoplastic neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder associated with stomach carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Talal; Al-Sarawi, Adnan; Binfalah, Mohamed; Dermime, Said

    2014-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO), or Devic's syndrome, is an autoimmune central nervous system demyelinating disorder primarily affecting the spinal cord and the optic nerves. It is characterized by the presence of NMO antibodies, alongside clinical and radiological findings. NMO and NMO-spectrum disorders (NMO-SD) have been reported in autoimmune disorders, and are infrequently described as a paraneoplastic syndrome with cancers of lung, breast, and carcinoid tumors of the thyroid. We report a patient who presented with severe vomiting, blurring of vision, vertigo, diplopia, left hemiparesis and hemisensory loss and ataxia. She was found to have a longitudinally-extensive demyelinating lesion extending from the medulla to the upper cervical spinal cord on MRI. Her gastric endoscopy revealed carcinoid tumor of the stomach, and classic paraneoplastic antibodies in the serum were negative. She had extremely high serum gastrin level and high titer of NMO IgG autoantibody. The patient made an excellent recovery with tumor resection and immunotherapy, with both clinical and radiological improvement. On rare instances, NMO or NMO-SD may present as a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome associated with carcinoid tumor of the stomach. Copyright © 2014 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Primary neuroendocrine tumor (carcinoid tumor) of the testis: a case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Lubana, Sandeep Singh; Singh, Navdeep; Chan, Hon Cheung; Heimann, David

    2015-05-31

    The term carcinoid (Karzinoide) was coined by German pathologist Oberndorfer in 1907. Primary testicular carcinoid tumors (TCT) are rare, constituting 0.23% of all testicular tumors. In this report we describe a case of primary TCT of the testis and present the results of an extensive literature review to cover all the aspects of carcinoid tumor, including the definition, classification, origin, presentation, diagnostic evaluation, management, prognosis, and follow-up. A 34-year-old male presented with chronic right scrotal swelling with recent onset of pain. Radical orchiectomy revealed a solid intratesticular tumor confined to the testis and epididymis, without lymphovascular invasion. Histology was consistent with neuroendocrine carcinoma. The tumor was staged as pT1 N0 M0 S2. Immunohistochemistry was positive for neuroendocrine markers. An extratesticular carcinoid tumor was ruled out. Urinary excretion of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and Chromogranin A were within normal range. It is important to follow serotonin levels since the elevated levels of serotonin can cause carcinoid heart disease. If metastatic lesions are not accessible for resection, a trial of octreotide therapy can be given. This case also adds to the rare reports in the literature of primary carcinoid tumors of the testis having low malignant potential. The literature review highlights new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions and stresses the importance of long-term follow-up due to evidence of delayed metastasis or recurrences and also due to emergence of new complications as a result of improved prognosis and prolonged survival.

  8. Primary renal carcinoid tumor: A rare cystic renal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 21-year-old man with an incidentally detected cystic renal mass. A well-defined, solid mass measuring approximately 8 cm x 6 cm with a cystic component was identified in the left kidney by abdominal multidetector computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography. The mass was well-enhanced on the corticomedullary CT phase and washout of enhancement occurred on the nephrographic phase. The mass contained peripheral wall and septal calcifications in the cystic component. The lesion was resected and diagnosed as a primary renal carcinoid tumor. Primary carcinoid tumors of the kidney are extremely rare. This case is notable because of the rarity of this neoplasm and its unique radiologic and pathologic findings. A review of previously reported cases in the literature is also presented. PMID:24003360

  9. A rectal neuroendocrine neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Varas Lorenzo, Modesto J; Muñoz Agel, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    The incidence of gastric and rectal carcinoids is increasing. This is probably due to endoscopic screening. The prognosis is primarily dependent upon tumor size, aggressiveness (pathology, Ki-67), metastatic disease and stage. However, neuroendocrine carcinoma usually behaves as an adenocarcinoma.

  10. Duodenal and Ampullary Carcinoid Tumors: Size Predicts Necessity for Lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Dogeas, Epameinondas; Cameron, John L; Wolfgang, Cristopher L; Hirose, Kenzo; Hruban, Ralph H; Makary, Martin A; Pawlik, Timothy A; Choti, Michael A

    2017-08-01

    Unlike other neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, management of duodenal and periampullary carcinoids remains controversial. We aimed to determine the metastatic potential and optimal choice of therapy for these neoplasms. A retrospective review of all patients treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1996 and 2012 was conducted. Clinicopathologic factors associated with lymph nodal involvement and clinical outcomes were evaluated. A total of 101 patients were identified. Eighty (79.2%) tumors arose from the duodenum and 21 (20.8%) from the periampullary area. Thirty-five (34.7%) patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), 12 (11.9%) local resection, 38 (37.6%) endoscopic excision, and 16 (15.8%) patients harbored incidental tumors identified in the specimen after PD for another indication. Lymph node (LN) pathologic evaluation was done in 56 patients, among which 27 (48%) had positive LN. Specifically, LN positivity (LN+) for tumors <1 cm in size was 4.5% (1/22), for tumors 1-2 cm 72% (13/18), and for tumors >2 cm 81% (13/16). Tumor size was the only factor associated with LN+ (p = 0.029). Lymph nodal involvement is common for duodenal and periampullary carcinoid tumors, particularly among those >1 cm in size; therefore, resection with lymphadenectomyfor these larger tumors is recommended.

  11. Review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of type I gastric carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linda; Ozao, Junko; Warner, Richard; Divino, Celia

    2011-08-01

    Gastric carcinoid tumors comprise 7% of all gastrointestinal carcinoids and have significantly increased in incidence over the past few decades. Seventy to 80% of gastric carcinoids are type I, which usually are clinically asymptomatic and found incidentally at endoscopic evaluation for abdominal pain or anemia. In this review, advances in understanding the pathophysiology of type I gastric carcinoid are highlighted. In addition, various current diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. Although type I carcinoids generally hold a benign course, rigorous investigation is needed to ensure accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment. This includes appropriate diagnostic procedures and imaging and accurate staging of tumor. Tumor size, depth of invasion, presence of metastasis, and the tumor's gastrin dependency dictate treatment options. Appropriate treatments can consist of endoscopic resection, antrectomy, medical management, or frequent follow-up. This article provides a systematic method of evaluating and treating type I gastric carcinoid.

  12. Laser excision of a typical carcinoid tumor of the larynx: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cevizci, Raşit; Karakullukçu, Barış; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Balm, Alfons J

    2010-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas of the larynx include a range of rare tumors which have variable biologic behavior, affecting treatment and prognosis. Among these, typical carcinoid tumors are the least common type. Prognosis of typical carcinoid tumor is better than atypical carcinoid tumor and small cell carcinoma of the larynx. Conservation surgery is the preferred treatment modality. Transoral CO2 laser surgery can be a good alternative for appropriate cases because of the functional results and less morbidity. In this article, a 71-year-old female presented with complaints of feeling a mass during swallowing. Fiberoptic examination of the larynx revealed a mass located on the right aryepiglottic fold and biopsy revealed the tumor as a typical carcinoid tumor. We describe CO2 laser excision of a typical carcinoid tumor of the larynx in this case report.

  13. Carcinoid tumors: CT and I-131 meta-iodo-benzylguanidine scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Adolph, J.M.; Kimmig, B.N.; Georgi, P.; zum Winkel, K.

    1987-07-01

    The diagnostic value of computed tomography (CT) and iodine-131 meta-iodo-benzylguanidine (MIBG) scintiscanning was studied in nine patients with histologically proved carcinoid tumors of intestinal (n = 4), bronchial (n = 3), or thymic (n = 2) origin. CT scans clearly depicted the tumors and metastases in relation to surrounding vital structures but did not provide findings specific for carcinoids. The appearance on CT of an abdominal soft-tissue mass with a radiating pattern of linear densities was found to be highly suggestive of intestinal carcinoid tumors. I-131 MIBG scintiscans disclosed intense tracer uptake in the tumors and metastases in five patients. MIBG studies correctly depicted nine of nine tumor manifestations in intestinal carcinoids and four of six tumor manifestations in bronchus carcinoids. No MIBG concentration was found in thymus carcinoids. Because of its selective uptake mechanism, I-131 MIBG scintigraphy can allow specific detection and localization of neuroendocrine tumor tissue in patients with suspected carcinoid tumors. MIBG scintigraphy has diagnostic potential as a screening procedure in carcinoid tumors, especially those of intestinal origin.

  14. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors by Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... partial gastrectomy) along with nearby lymph nodes. Small intestine Some small tumors in the duodenum (the first ... vessels and lymph nodes) for larger tumors. Large intestine (other than appendix and rectum) The usual treatment ...

  15. A case of carcinoid tumor of the terminal ileum and simultaneous ovarian dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hosam

    2011-04-01

    Carcinoid tumors are slow-growing malignant neoplasms associated with an indolent clinical course. About 60% of such tumors are located within the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we describe the first case, to our knowledge, of a carcinoid tumor of the terminal ileum and a simultaneous ovarian dermoid cyst. A 57-year-old woman was presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and clinical signs of mechanical bowel obstruction. Radiograph and computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed hydroaeric levels. Laparotomy revealed a mass in the terminal ileum and a right ovarian cystic mass. Right hemicolectomy and right oopherectomy were performed. The histopathological workup showed a carcinoid tumor of the terminal ileum and ovarian dermoid cyst. Small intestinal carcinoid tumor, an uncommon disease, has been reported earlier to coincide with various neoplasms. No association between small intestinal carcinoid tumor and ovarian dermoid cyst has been reported earlier in the English literature.

  16. Renal carcinoid tumor with liver metastasis followed up postoperatively for 9 years.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, BinShen; Ma, XiaoMei; Yan, HongZhu; He, Jin; Xia, ChunYan; Yu, HongYu

    2015-10-06

    We describe a case of renal carcinoid tumor with liver metastasis followed up postoperatively for 9 years. A 33-year-old man presented with left flank dull ache. On the abdominal computed tomography, a solid renal mass in the upper portion of the left kidney was detected. The patient had no other abnormal findings, such as suspected distant metastasis or lymph node metastasis. Radical nephrectomy was performed on 14/9/2005. Histological examination and immunohistochemical staining confirm primary renal carcinoid tumor. 9 years after radical nephrectomy, computed tomography of the abdomen demonstrated a 2 cm × 1.8 cm cyst mass in the right liver. Similar pathologic characteristics were found between the renal carcinoid tumor and liver tumor. We present a primary renal carcinoid tumor with liver metastasis 9 years after radical nephrectomy. With literature review, renal carcinoid tumors exhibit heterogenous behavior.

  17. Resolution of right-sided heart failure symptoms after resection of a primary ovarian carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Todd; Adamson, Kathi; Yang, Eugene

    2014-10-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare neuroendocrine malignancies that typically originate from the gastrointestinal tract. Patients who are diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease generally have poor prognoses because of advanced metastases during staging and few therapeutic options. We present the case of a 61-year-old woman with right-sided heart failure, secondary to carcinoid heart disease caused by a primary ovarian carcinoid tumor. After undergoing surgical resection of the left ovary and fallopian tube, the patient experienced complete resolution of her heart failure symptoms. In addition to the patient's case, we discuss the diagnosis, nature, and treatment of this rare condition.

  18. Lung parenchymal invasion in pulmonary carcinoid tumor: an important histologic feature suggesting the diagnosis of atypical carcinoid and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sang Yun; Lee, Jae Jun; Cho, Junhun; Hyeon, Jiyeon; Han, Joungho; Kim, Hong Kwan

    2013-05-01

    The majority of previous studies on pulmonary carcinoid tumor have usually focused on clinical behavior or outcome, seldom considering histopathologic features. We retrospectively collected 63 cases of resected pulmonary carcinoid tumors from 1995 to 2011 at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. The clinical and pathological features were correlated and survival analyses were performed. Forty cases (63.5%) were classified as typical carcinoid (TC) and 23 cases (36.5%) were classified as atypical carcinoid (AC) according to WHO classification criteria. AC patients showed a higher frequency of current smoking status and a higher stage of the tumor by the American Joint Committee on Cancer than TC patients. The disease was associated with death and recurrence in five and seven patients, respectively, with almost all of the associations found in AC patients. The five-year survival rate of TC and AC were 100% and 83.5%, respectively, with AC showing poorer prognosis than TC in overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) (p=0.005 and p=0.002). Lung parenchymal invasion was observed more commonly in AC than in TC (39.1% vs 12.5%, p=0.01) and was a poor prognostic factor in OS and DFS. Rosette-like arrangements were found only in six cases of AC, while abundant basophilic cytoplasm mimicking paraganglioma and ossification were found only in TC. Through the comprehensive study of pulmonary carcinoid tumor in Korea, we suggest that lung parenchymal invasion could be a useful histologic feature to suspect the diagnosis of AC in daily practice as well as to predict the prognosis of carcinoid tumor.

  19. Calcitonin-producing well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (carcinoid tumor) of the urinary bladder: case report

    PubMed Central

    Mascolo, Massimo; Altieri, Vincenzo; Mignogna, Chiara; Napodano, Giorgio; De Rosa, Gaetano; Insabato, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    Background The occurrence of calcitonin-secreting primary carcinoid tumor of the urinary bladder is extremely rare. Case presentation The case of a 68-year-old male with carcinoid tumor arising in the urinary bladder is presented. Transurethral resection of a polypoid small tumor 0.4 cm in diameter was performed. Immunohistochemical study using neuroendocrine markers allowed a straightforward diagnosis of a low-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (carcinoid tumor) of the urinary bladder. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated calcitonin immunoreactivity in the most of the tumor cells. Conclusion This tumor shows specific clinical, macroscopical and histological features and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of bladder neoplasms. PMID:16048646

  20. Carcinoid and neuroendocrine tumors: building on success.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Pamela L

    2015-06-01

    We have come a long way in our understanding and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors since the term "karzinoide" was coined in 1907. Neuroendocrine tumors are a group of biologically and clinically heterogeneous neoplasms that most commonly originate in the lungs, GI tract, and pancreas. The selection of initial and subsequent therapies requires careful consideration of both tumor and treatment characteristics. With recent advances, we now have more tools for the diagnosis and treatment of our patients. This comprehensive review article summarizes recent advances in the field of neuroendocrine tumors and places them into context for best management practices.

  1. Minute ampullary carcinoid tumor with lymph node metastases: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Senda, Eri; Fujimoto, Koji; Ohnishi, Katsuhiro; Higashida, Akihiro; Ashida, Cho; Okutani, Toshio; Sakano, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Ito, Rieko; Yamada, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Background Carcinoid tumors are usually considered to have a low degree of malignancy and show slow progression. One of the factors indicating the malignancy of these tumors is their size, and small ampullary carcinoid tumors have been sometimes treated by endoscopic resection. Case presentation We report a case of a 63-year-old woman with a minute ampullary carcinoid tumor that was 7 mm in diameter, but was associated with 2 peripancreatic lymph node metastases. Mild elevation of liver enzymes was found at her regular medical check-up. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a markedly dilated common bile duct (CBD) and two enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopy showed that the ampulla was slightly enlarged by a submucosal tumor. The biopsy specimen revealed tumor cells that showed monotonous proliferation suggestive of a carcinoid tumor. She underwent a pylorus-preserving whipple resection with lymph node dissection. The resected lesion was a small submucosal tumor (7 mm in diameter) at the ampulla, with metastasis to 2 peripancreatic lymph nodes, and it was diagnosed as a malignant carcinoid tumor. Conclusion Recently there have been some reports of endoscopic ampullectomy for small carcinoid tumors. However, this case suggests that attention should be paid to the possibility of lymph node metastases as well as that of regional infiltration of the tumor even for minute ampullary carcinoid tumors to provide the best chance for cure. PMID:19159493

  2. Pediatric neuroendocrine carcinoid tumors: Management, pathology, and imaging findings in a pediatric referral center.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Andrew J; Tocchio, Shannon; Kurtom, Waleed; Tadros, Sameh S

    2017-09-01

    While neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors are increasingly recognized in the adult population, they are often not suspected in children. Retrospective review of all well-differentiated neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors was performed based on pathology reports from a quaternary pediatric medical center between January 2003 and June 2016. Clinical presentations, treatment approaches, imaging findings, and outcomes were reviewed and analyzed. A total of 45 cases of pathology-proven carcinoid tumor were reported with an average age of 14.1 years (range: 7-21 years, SD: 2.8 years). Of these cases, 80% (36) were appendiceal, 11% (5) bronchial, 2% (1) colonic, 2% (1) gastric, 2% (1) enteric, and 2% (1) testicular. Metastases were observed in one (3%) appendiceal, one (100%) enteric, and two (40%) bronchial cases. No recurrence was demonstrated in any appendiceal carcinoid cases. Recurrence was seen in one of three extra-appendiceal gastrointestinal tumors. Tumor site and size significantly correlated with metastases and recurrence. Contrary to recent epidemiological investigations in adults, appendiceal carcinoid tumors remain the most common site for pediatric carcinoid tumors. Appendiceal carcinoid tumors exhibited benign clinical courses without recurrence during short-term follow-up. Extra-appendiceal gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors exhibited much more aggressive behavior with greater metastases and recurrence. Bronchial carcinoid tumors demonstrated good clinical response to resection even in cases with mediastinal lymph node involvement. While increased use of urine 5-HIAA levels and somatostatin receptor-specific imaging might improve detection and guide management of extra-appendiceal carcinoid tumors, longer-term follow-up is needed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Primary carcinoid tumor of medulla spinalis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-feng; Zhang, Yan; Yan, Xu; Bie, Li

    2014-12-19

    Carcinoid tumors are slow growing neuroendocrine tumors which can originate from various sites within the body. A carcinoid tumor originating in the medulla spinalis has not previously been reported in the literature. We report a case of a 33-year-old man, presenting with a five-month history of bilateral lower extremity pain, as well as paresthesia, and mild weakness in one lateral lower extremity. A lumbar laminectomy of L3 to L5 and en bloc resection of the tumor was performed. Postoperative histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis of the tumor were consistent with that of a carcinoid tumor. There were no clinical or radiological signs of tumor recurrence or metastasis at the patient's two year postoperative follow-up. During the differential diagnosis of medulla spinalis tumors, the possibility of a primary carcinoid tumor originating within the medulla spinalis should be considered. An accurate tumor classification is imperative to ensure that the most effective course of treatment is pursued.

  4. Treatment of Lung Carcinoid by Type and Extent of Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carcinoid Tumor Treating Lung Carcinoid Tumors Treatment of Lung Carcinoid, by Type and Extent of Disease The ... those that can’t be removed completely Resectable lung carcinoid tumors Resectable carcinoid tumors haven’t spread ...

  5. How Are Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors shrink. Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is ... 2015 Last Revised: February 8, 2016 American Cancer Society medical information is copyrighted material. For reprint requests, ...

  6. Primary Neuroendocrine Tumor (Carcinoid Tumor) of the Testis: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lubana, Sandeep Singh; Singh, Navdeep; Chan, Hon Cheung; Heimann, David

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 34 Final Diagnosis: Primary neuroendocrine tumor of the testis Symptoms: Pain • swelling Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Radical orchiectomy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: The term carcinoid (Karzinoide) was coined by German pathologist Oberndorfer in 1907. Primary testicular carcinoid tumors (TCT) are rare, constituting 0.23% of all testicular tumors. In this report we describe a case of primary TCT of the testis and present the results of an extensive literature review to cover all the aspects of carcinoid tumor, including the definition, classification, origin, presentation, diagnostic evaluation, management, prognosis, and follow-up. Case Report: A 34-year-old male presented with chronic right scrotal swelling with recent onset of pain. Radical orchiectomy revealed a solid intratesticular tumor confined to the testis and epididymis, without lymphovascular invasion. Histology was consistent with neuroendocrine carcinoma. The tumor was staged as pT1 N0 M0 S2. Immunohistochemistry was positive for neuroendocrine markers. An extratesticular carcinoid tumor was ruled out. Urinary excretion of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and Chromogranin A were within normal range. Conclusions: It is important to follow serotonin levels since the elevated levels of serotonin can cause carcinoid heart disease. If metastatic lesions are not accessible for resection, a trial of octreotide therapy can be given. This case also adds to the rare reports in the literature of primary carcinoid tumors of the testis having low malignant potential. The literature review highlights new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions and stresses the importance of long-term follow-up due to evidence of delayed metastasis or recurrences and also due to emergence of new complications as a result of improved prognosis and prolonged survival. PMID:26027014

  7. Atypical Carcinoid Tumor with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Rearrangement Successfully Treated by an ALK Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masayuki; Uchiyama, Naoki; Shigemasa, Rie; Matsumura, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Ryota; Nomura, Akihiro

    This is the first report in which crizotinib, an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, reduced an atypical carcinoid tumor with ALK rearrangement. A 70-year-old man developed a tumor in the left lung and multiple metastases to the lung and brain. The pathology of transbronchial biopsied specimens demonstrated an atypical carcinoid pattern. Combined with immunohistochemical findings, we diagnosed the tumor as atypical carcinoid. ALK gene rearrangement was observed by both immunohistochemical (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization. He was treated with chemotherapy as first-line therapy, however, the tumor did not respond to chemotherapy. Thereafter, he was treated with crizotinib, which successfully reduced the tumors.

  8. Carcinoid tumor of the duodenum and accessory papilla associated with polycythemia vera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Horng-Yuan; Chen, Ming-Jen; Yang, Tsen-Long; Chang, Ming-Chih; Chan, Yu-Jan

    2005-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors have been reported in a wide range of organs but most frequently involve the gastrointestinal tract; however, duodenal carcinoid tumors are rare. We report a 50-year-old male patient complaining of multiple melenas for 3 wk. The panendoscopy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography revealed swelling accessory papilla with an ulcer. The biopsy taken showed a carcinoid tumor. The lesion was removed by wide resection. Patient was found to have an abnormal blood cell count during the follow-up period with elevated levels of hemoglobin and hematocrit of 21.2 g/dL and 63.5%, respectively, thrombocytosis of 501000/µL, and leukocytosis of 20410/µL. He was diagnosed as a polycythemia vera by a hematologist after further evaluation. He received periodic phlebotomy and hydroxyurea treatment. The response was good and his hematocrit was stabilized by periodic phlebotomy in the range of 44-49% during the last 2 years. The possible origin of UGI bleeding by a duodenal carcinoid tumor, although rare, should be considered. There has been one case report of a duodenal carcinoid tumor that involved accessory papilla of the pancreas divisum and one case report of metastatic carcinoid tumor associated with polycythemia vera. It is different in our patient as compared with the latter report, which mentioned a polycythemia vera patient who was found to have a metastatic carcinoid in the 17 years follow-up period. Chemotherapy had been given before the carcinoid tumor was revealed. Our patient had no previous chemotherapy for polycythemia vera before he was found to have duodenal carcinoid tumor; this excludes the possibility of chemotherapy induced carcinoid tumor, although it had been suspected in the previous report. In our patient, the existence of both diseases may be by predisposition of each other since both diseases have an increased incidence of other neoplasm, or they may be coexistent incidentally. PMID:15968742

  9. Intestinal ischaemia associated with carcinoid tumor: a case report with review of the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yener, O

    2013-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neuroendocrine neoplasms that are often indolent and may not become clinically apparent until there is a metastatic spread or evidence of carcinoid syndrome. A 44-year-old man presented to our clinic department with a history of previous left colon cancer operation, chronic crampy left lower quadrant pain, mass and severe anemia. A MR scan was obtained which demonstrated a calcified mesenteric mass 12×8×10 cm diameter with surrounding left colon mesenteric infiltration. The liver was normal. A case of ischaemic ileal necrosis is reported. It was associated with elastic vascular sclerosis produced by mesenteric metastases of an ileal carcinoid tumor. It is postulated that intestinal ischaemia may be of more importance in the production of abdominal pain by carcinoid tumors than has been generally accepted, and that it is the result of functional and structural changes in and around the mesenteric blood vessels, caused by substances secreted by the carcinoid tumor.

  10. Primary Carcinoid Tumor of the Ileal Efferent Limb of an Ileovesicostomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mellis, Adamantios M.; Parker, Daniel C.; Buethe, David D.; Slobodov, Gennady

    2011-01-01

    We report on the evaluation and management of a 47-year-old white male found to have primary carcinoid tumor of the ileal segment of his diverting ileovesicostomy thirty-five months after initial creation. Subsequent to presentation with intermittent gross hematuria, CT urogram highlights an 8 mm enhancing lesion near the enterovesical junction of urinary diversion. Office cystoscopy confirms presence of a lesion that was later endoscopically resected and found to be a well-differentiated carcinoid tumor. Evaluation with serum markers, direct visualization utilizing endoscopy, and imaging was without finding of alternate primary or metastatic lesions. The patient ultimately had the proximal ileal portion of his ileovesicostomy excised and the distal portion converted into an ileal conduit. After briefly discussing the carcinoid tumor and the carcinoid syndrome it may cause, we review the literature on the incidence of carcinoid tumors in a population requiring the use of intestine in the urinary tract. PMID:22606607

  11. Primary ovarian carcinoid tumor showing unusual histology and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Yoon, Gun; Jang, Hye-In; Song, Sang Yong; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor of the ovary is uncommon. We herein report a very rare case of primary ovarian carcinoid tumor with aggressive histology and an unusual immunophenotype. A 21-year-old woman presented with a palpable abdominal mass. Computed tomographic scan revealed a large, extensively necrotic solid mass in the left ovary. The patient underwent a left salpingo-oophorectomy. Grossly, the left adnexa showed a large, vaguely lobulated ovarian tumor measuring 22×15×13 cm. Histologically, the tumor had a readily identifiable neuroendocrine growth pattern, but some areas showed solid growth pattern associated with mild nuclear pleomorphism and multiple foci of punctate necrosis. Furthermore, mitotic figures were recognized in 8 per 10 high-power fields, and a few foci of large coagulative tumor necrosis were also noted. In addition, the tumor tissue exhibited uniform, strong nuclear β-catenin immunoreactivity, indicating the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in the individual tumor cells. In summary, we described the first case of primary ovarian carcinoid tumor with loss of neuroendocrine growth pattern, increased mitotic activity and large areas of coagulative tumor necrosis. According to the WHO classification of pulmonary carcinoid tumor, this case may be classified as "atypical" carcinoid. However, currently, no primary ovarian atypical carcinoid exists in the classification system. Due to its rarity, there are no established diagnostic criteria and clinical data on patient outcomes for ovarian carcinoid tumors with aggressive histology. Additional reports are clearly necessary. We also showed for the first time the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in carcinoid tumor cells, suggestive of a role for β-catenin in the tumorigenesis of ovarian atypical carcinoid tumor or its aggressive histology.

  12. Primary ovarian carcinoid tumor showing unusual histology and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Yoon, Gun; Jang, Hye-In; Song, Sang Yong; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor of the ovary is uncommon. We herein report a very rare case of primary ovarian carcinoid tumor with aggressive histology and an unusual immunophenotype. A 21-year-old woman presented with a palpable abdominal mass. Computed tomographic scan revealed a large, extensively necrotic solid mass in the left ovary. The patient underwent a left salpingo-oophorectomy. Grossly, the left adnexa showed a large, vaguely lobulated ovarian tumor measuring 22×15×13 cm. Histologically, the tumor had a readily identifiable neuroendocrine growth pattern, but some areas showed solid growth pattern associated with mild nuclear pleomorphism and multiple foci of punctate necrosis. Furthermore, mitotic figures were recognized in 8 per 10 high-power fields, and a few foci of large coagulative tumor necrosis were also noted. In addition, the tumor tissue exhibited uniform, strong nuclear β-catenin immunoreactivity, indicating the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in the individual tumor cells. In summary, we described the first case of primary ovarian carcinoid tumor with loss of neuroendocrine growth pattern, increased mitotic activity and large areas of coagulative tumor necrosis. According to the WHO classification of pulmonary carcinoid tumor, this case may be classified as “atypical” carcinoid. However, currently, no primary ovarian atypical carcinoid exists in the classification system. Due to its rarity, there are no established diagnostic criteria and clinical data on patient outcomes for ovarian carcinoid tumors with aggressive histology. Additional reports are clearly necessary. We also showed for the first time the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in carcinoid tumor cells, suggestive of a role for β-catenin in the tumorigenesis of ovarian atypical carcinoid tumor or its aggressive histology. PMID:26191292

  13. Carcinoid Tumors of Digestive Organs: a Clinicopathologic Study of 13 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    The author investigated clinicopathologic features of 13 cases of carcinoid tumor in the digestive organs. The 13 cases of carcinoid were identified from 18,267 pathological specimens of digestive organs in the last 10 years in our pathology laboratory. The tumor locations were rectum in 9 cases, duodenum in 2 cases, liver in 1 case, and stomach in 1 case. The age of the patients ranged from 52 to 82 years with a mean of 63 years. Male to female ratio was 7 : 6. The presenting symptoms were abnormal pain in 3 cases and asymptomatic in 10 cases. None of the cases showed carcinoid syndrome. The diameter ranged from 5 mm to 25 mm in gastrointestinal carcinoids, and 60 mm in the hepatic carcinoid. The treatment was endoscopic mucosal resection in 10 cases and surgical resection in 3 cases. The outcome is good except for hepatic atypical carcinoid which showed metastases and died of systemic metastasis. Histologically, 12 carcinoid tumors were typical carcinoids, and one (liver) was atypical carcinoid. Organoid pattern was present in 12 cases. Trabecular arrangement, ribbon arrangement, rosette formation, and pseudoglandular arrangement were recognized in 12 cases, in 8 cases, in 7 cases, and in 5 cases, respectively. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for at least one of pan-neuroendocrine markers including chromogranin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, CD56, and glucagon. Of these, synaptophysin was positive in 11/13 (85%), neuron-specific enolase 10/13 (80%), chromogranin 8/13 (62%), CD56 6/13 (46%), and glucagon 4/13 (31%). In summary, the author reported the incidence of digestive organ carcinoid tumors, and the clinicopathologic features of the 13 cases with carcinoid. PMID:27956948

  14. A 12-mm carcinoid tumor of the minor duodenal papilla with lymph node metastases.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Yasuyuki; Kurumiya, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Keisuke; Sekoguchi, Ei; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ito, Akira; Tomida, Akihiro; Onishi, Sakura; Shirotsuki, Ryo; Okubo, Kenji; Narita, Michihiko

    2013-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors located in the minor duodenal papilla are extremely rare, with only a few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we report the case of a 71-year-old man with a 12-mm carcinoid tumor at the minor duodenal papilla with lymph node metastases. Multidetector-row computed tomography with contrast enhancement revealed a 12-mm well-enhanced tumor in the duodenum. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a 12-mm submucosal tumor at the minor papilla of the duodenum. Biopsy specimens revealed a carcinoid tumor, and a subtotal stomach-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. Carcinoid tumors at the minor duodenal papilla have a high prevalence of nodal disease, even for tumors <2 cm in diameter. Therefore, we believe that radical resection with tumor-free margins (i.e. pancreatoduodenectomy) is the treatment of choice.

  15. Primary carcinoid tumor of the urinary bladder with prominent subnuclear eosinophilic granules.

    PubMed

    Zozumi, Masataka; Nakai, Mayumi; Matsuda, Ikuo; Hao, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yasuo; Nojima, Michio; Yamamoto, Shingo; Hirota, Seiichi

    2012-02-15

    Primary carcinoid tumor of the urinary bladder is a very rare neoplasm. We report here a case of primary carcinoid tumor of the urinary bladder with an unusual cytological feature in a 72-year-old Japanese man. A bladder polypoid mass was incidentally found by ultrasonography during the follow-up of a benign prostate hyperplasia. Histological examination of the transurethrally resected tissue revealed that the upper part of the mass was a tumor showing tubuloglandular anastomosing structures. Most of the tumor cells had peculiar subnuclear eosinophilic granules. The features of the granules were reminiscent of those observed in neuroendocrine cells of the intestine. The tumor cells were immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin. The tumor was diagnosed as carcinoid tumor of pure form of the urinary bladder. The lower part of the mass showed the findings of glandular cystitis, as its coexistence with carcinoid tumors of the bladder has often been described in previous reports.

  16. [Ovarian carcinoid tumor responsible of permanent facial erythrosis and flushings during sexual intercourse].

    PubMed

    Talvande, B; Dorange, A; Lecouflet, M; Le Nezet, M; Kianifard, B; Maillard, H; Duquenne, M

    2016-11-01

    Ovarian neuroendocrine tumors are extremely rare. In the ovary, the term of neuroendocrine tumor is usually related to carcinoid tumors although it may be sometimes applied to neuroendocrine carcinomas of non-small cells or small cells cancers usually occurring in the lungs. These carcinoid tumors may develop de novo or from other tumors including teratomas. We report a patient who presented with an ovarian carcinoid tumor developed, near or from a dermoid cyst, which was original by its mode of discovery in the dermatology department. Indeed, the patient consulted because of permanent facial erythrosis, with flushes but also facial telangiectasias. During medical examination, classic symptoms of carcinoid syndrome including heart disease were obvious. The occurrence of flushes during coitus should evoke pelvic tumor location. A carcinoid syndrome is naturally evoked in the presence of flushes but it must also be part of the differential diagnosis in a patient with facial erythrosis or telangiectasias, especially if they are associated with diarrhea or right heart failure. The prognosis of carcinoid heart disease is considerably better in case of ovarian location than when it is a primitive carcinoid tumor of lung or from gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2016 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. A Rare Primary Neuroendocrine Tumor (Typical Carcinoid) of the Sublingual Gland

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Kousuke; Uchida, Fumihiko; Kanno, Naomi; Hasegawa, Shogo; Yanagawa, Toru; Bukawa, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    A typical carcinoid is extremely rare in the oral cavity. We here present a case of a typical carcinoid arising in the sublingual gland of a 62-year-old woman. The tumor was removed by primary excision with 10 mm surgical margins and submandibular dissection. Examination of the tumor showed medium-sized tumor cells that were positive for CD56 and chromogranin A, with no necrosis, and with a mitotic count less than 1/10 HPF. A pathological diagnosis of typical carcinoid was made from both morphological and immunological examinations. One year after excision surgery, there was no tumor recurrence or neck metastasis. PMID:27840746

  18. Resection of Carcinoid Tumor Metastatic to the Right Ventricle and Tricuspid Valve.

    PubMed

    Williams, Adam R; Wang, Andrew; Kim, Han; Milano, Carmelo A

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoid tumors rarely metastasize to the heart, and previous reports involved the myocardium only. We present a case of carcinoid tumor metastatic to the right ventricle (RV) and tricuspid valve. Preoperative cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) showed the tumor arising from the right ventricular free wall and involving the tricuspid valve apparatus. The tumor was resected through a right atriotomy and required tricuspid valve replacement.

  19. Combined adenocarcinoma-carcinoid tumor of transverse colon.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Prosanta Kumar; Halder, Shyamal

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old male presented with painless hematochezia associated with episodic cramps in upper abdomen, watery diarrhea, and a slowly growing mass in upper abdomen. Examination revealed a firm 6 x 5 cm, intra-abdominal, epigastric mass. Colonoscopy up to 90 cm showed a stenosing, ulcero-proliferative lesion in the transverse colon. No synchronous lesion was detected. Biopsy revealed mucin secreting adenocarcinoma. Exploration showed the growth involving the transverse colon proximal to the splenic flexure with a part of ileum, approximately three feet proximal to ileo-caecal junction, adherent to it. No significant mesenteric lymph node enlargement was evident. The patient underwent resection of the growth along with the segment of adherent ileum. Continuity was re-established by a colo-colic and ileo-ileal anastomosis respectively. Patient received adjuvant chemotherapy. Post-operative histopathology demonstrated a composite histological pattern with an admixture of carcinoid tumor and adenocarcinoma, invasion of ileal serosa and adenocarcinomatous deposits in mesocolic lymph nodes, the tumor staging being (T4, N0, M0/Stage II) for carcinoid and (T4, N1, M0/Stage III) for adenocarcinoma. Patient was followed-up for a year and was doing well without any evidence of recurrence.

  20. Late recurrent pulmonary typical carcinoid tumor: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ciment, Ari; Gil, Joan; Teirstein, Alvin

    2006-10-01

    Carcinoid tumors are uncommon pulmonary neoplasms. They are classified histologically as either atypical or typical. Atypical carcinoids are aggressive malignancies that require radical surgical resection and have a guarded prognosis with a propensity to metastasize and recur. Typical carcinoids are low-grade malignancies with relatively less metastatic or recurring potential and are usually treated with simple excision. Recurrence of a typical pulmonary carcinoid tumor more than a decade after initial resection is very rare. A patient with recurrence of a typical carcinoid tumor 11 years after resection of the primary lesion with one involved lymph node is reported here. Late recurrences are rare in both atypical and typical varieties, but are much more common in atypical carcinoids. The patient reported here represents the fifth case of recurrence of a typical carcinoid tumor more than ten years after resection. This suggests that, after resection of a typical carcinoid neoplasm, patients should be monitored carefully, especially if lymph node metastases are present at the time of surgery.

  1. Carcinoid tumor of the minor papilla in complete pancreas divisum presenting as recurrent abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tumors of the minor papilla of the duodenum are extremely rare, and they are mostly neuroendocrine tumors, such as somatostatinomas and carcinoid tumors. However, true incidence of carcinoid tumors in minor papilla might be much higher, because patients with minor papillary tumors usually remain asymptomatic. We report a very unusual case of carcinoid tumor in a patient with complete pancreas divisum with a review of the literature. Case presentation A 56-year-old female patient was referred for evaluation of pancreatic duct dilatation noted on abdominal ultrasonography and computerized tomography. She complained of intermittent epigastric pain for 6 months. A MRCP and ERCP revealed complete pancreas divisum with dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. On duodenoscopy, a small, yellows, subepithelial nodule was visualized at the minor papilla; biopsy of this lesion revealed a carcinoid tumor. She underwent a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histologic evaluation showed a single nodule, 1 cm in diameter, in the submucosa with duodenal and vascular invasion and metastasis to the regional lymph nodes. Conclusion Although the size of the carcinoid tumor was small and the tumor was hormonally inactive, the concomitant pancreas divisum led to an early diagnosis, the tumor had aggressive behavior. Carcinoid tumors of the minor papilla should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent abdominal pain or pancreatitis of unknown cause. PMID:20149263

  2. Carcinoid tumor of the minor papilla in complete pancreas divisum presenting as recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Gil; Kim, Tae Nyeun; Kim, Kyeong Ok

    2010-02-12

    Tumors of the minor papilla of the duodenum are extremely rare, and they are mostly neuroendocrine tumors, such as somatostatinomas and carcinoid tumors. However, true incidence of carcinoid tumors in minor papilla might be much higher, because patients with minor papillary tumors usually remain asymptomatic. We report a very unusual case of carcinoid tumor in a patient with complete pancreas divisum with a review of the literature. A 56-year-old female patient was referred for evaluation of pancreatic duct dilatation noted on abdominal ultrasonography and computerized tomography. She complained of intermittent epigastric pain for 6 months. A MRCP and ERCP revealed complete pancreas divisum with dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. On duodenoscopy, a small, yellows, subepithelial nodule was visualized at the minor papilla; biopsy of this lesion revealed a carcinoid tumor. She underwent a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histologic evaluation showed a single nodule, 1 cm in diameter, in the submucosa with duodenal and vascular invasion and metastasis to the regional lymph nodes. Although the size of the carcinoid tumor was small and the tumor was hormonally inactive, the concomitant pancreas divisum led to an early diagnosis, the tumor had aggressive behavior. Carcinoid tumors of the minor papilla should be included in the differential diagnosis of recurrent abdominal pain or pancreatitis of unknown cause.

  3. [Renal carcinoid tumor presenting as bladder tamponade: a case report and review of the Japanese cases].

    PubMed

    Kajita, Yoichiro; Megumi, Yuzuru; Okabe, Tatsushiro

    2005-07-01

    A 65-year-old man presented with sudden onset of gross hematuria and urinary retention. Computed tomographic scan (CT) showed a cystic multilocular enhancing lesion (9 cm in diameter) at the left renal hilum causing thinning and lateral displacement of the left renal parenchyma. Left hydronephrosis and a renal calculi were observed. We performed radical nephrectomy suspecting a cystic renal cell carcinoma. Microscopic examination and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the diagnosis of the carcinoid tumor. The tumor cells were fully positive for neuron-specific enolase and keratin, and partially positive for chromogranin-A. One of the resected lymph nodes was positive for metastasis. Additional gastrointestinal tract examinations for carcinoid tumor were negative. However, he was concurrently diagnosed with poorly differentiated prostate cancer and hormonal therapy was started. He is free of recurrent carcinoid tumor nine months postoperatively. This case is the 31st report of renal carcinoid tumors in Japan.

  4. A carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater treated by endoscopic snare papillectomy.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Dae-Keun; Moon, Gyoo; Han, Jimin; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung-Koo

    2004-12-01

    Here, a case of a patient with incidental finding of a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, who was treated with endoscopic snare papillectomy, is reported. A 62-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, which was found during follow-up endoscopy after an endoscopic mucosal resection of early gastric cancer. No lymphadenopathy or visceral metastasis was found on an abdominal CT scan, In-111 octerotide scan and EUS. The ampulla was then en bloc removed by endoscopic snare papillectomy. The resected specimen revealed a 0.7 x 0.5 x 0.1 cm sized carcinoid tumor. All margins of resection were negative for tumor. After six months of follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence and metastasis, either endoscopically or radiologically. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of an ampullary carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic snare papillectomy in Korea.

  5. [Multidetector computed tomography assessment of the degree of differentiation of bronchial carcinoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Bueno Palomino, A; Zurera Tendero, L; Espejo Herrero, J J; Espejo Pérez, S; Villar Pastor, C

    2013-01-01

    To define the CT findings for bronchial carcinoid tumors and to determine whether these findings enable these tumors to be classified as typical or atypical. We reviewed the chest CT studies performed between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2009 in patients at our hospital diagnosed with bronchial carcinoid tumors. The sample consisted of 52 patients (23 women and 29 men) with a mean age of 47 years (range 11-77 years). The 52 cases were classified as typical or atypical on the basis of the following radiological findings: size, location, focality, type of growth, calcifications, signs secondary to bronchial obstruction, and the presence of significant lymph node enlargement or metastases. These findings were then compared with the histological findings. Typical carcinoid tumors were the most prevalent (46 cases). The variables associated with atypical tumors were: male sex, advanced age at onset, and size >3cm. The accuracy of CT in classifying atypical tumors correctly increased with the number of variables indicative of atypical carcinoid tumors. A negative result for atypical nature made it possible to rule out an atypical carcinoid tumor in 95% of the cases. CT is useful for defining and characterizing carcinoid tumors into typical or atypical, although a precise formula for differentiating between the two types remains to be defined. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Lanreotide Depot: An Antineoplastic Treatment of Carcinoid or Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wolin, Edward M; Manon, Amandine; Chassaing, Christophe; Lewis, Andy; Bertocchi, Laurent; Richard, Joel; Phan, Alexandria T

    2016-12-01

    Peptide drugs for antineoplastic therapies usually have low oral bioavailability and short in vivo half-lives, requiring less preferred delivery methods. Lanreotide depot is a sustained-release somatostatin analog (SSA) formulation produced via an innovative peptide self-assembly method. Lanreotide is approved in the USA and Europe to improve progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with unresectable gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) and also approved in Europe for symptom control in carcinoid syndrome associated with GEP-NETs. This review discusses how the distinct molecule and formulation of lanreotide depot provide advantages to patients and health care providers, as well as the most recent clinical evidence demonstrating the safety and efficacy of lanreotide depot in inhibiting tumor growth and controlling hormonal symptoms in GEP-NETs. The lanreotide depot formulation confers a remarkable pharmacokinetic profile with no excipients, comprised only of lanreotide acetate and water. Of note, lanreotide depot constitutes an example for peptide self-assembly based formulations, providing insights that could help future development of sustained-release formulations of other antineoplastic peptides. Most patients with GEP-NETs will present with inoperable or incurable disease; thus, medical management for symptoms and tumor control plays a crucial role. Recent long-term clinical studies have demonstrated that lanreotide depot is well tolerated, prolongs PFS in GEP-NET patients, and significantly reduces symptoms related to carcinoid syndrome. The unique depot formulation and delivery method of lanreotide confer advantages in the treatment of metastatic GEP-NETs, contributing to improvements in NET-related symptoms and PFS without reducing quality of life in this patient population.

  7. Whole abdominal radiation in the management of metastatic gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, T.J.; Rider, W.D.; Harwood, A.R.; Thomas, G.M.; Cummings, B.J.

    1981-11-01

    Twenty-eight patients with metastatic gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor were treated with whole abdominal radiation. Twenty-one of these patients had the carcinoid syndrome. The prescribed mid-line tumor dose was 2000 to 2500 rad in 20 to 25 fractions in 4 to 5 weeks. The overall 5 year survival was 35% (median survival 2.5 years). A marked survival difference was noted in those patients with carcinoid syndrome compared to the non-functioning group. None of the syndrome patients survived five years (median survival 1.7 years) whereas six of the seven non-syndrome patients are five year survivors.

  8. Skeletal metastasis of carcinoid tumors: Two case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hori, Takeshi; Yasuda, Taketoshi; Suzuki, Kayo; Kanamori, Masahiko; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2012-05-01

    Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms derived from enterochromaffin cells. Skeletal metastases from carcinoid tumors are considered to be extremely rare. In this study, we present two cases of carcinoid tumors that metastasized to the bone. Furthermore, we review 50 published case reports and reveal the features of skeletal metastasis of carcinoid tumors. The first case involved a 59-year-old man with a history of multiple metastases of a lung carcinoid tumor. The patient complained of back pain and numbness in the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed metastases in the thoracic spine. A spinal decompression was performed and the symptoms were resolved. The second case involved a 74-year-old man had been diagnosed with a lung carcinoid tumor 15 years previously and complained of left thigh pain. A radiograph showed osteolytic lesions in the shaft of the left femur. We repaired the femur using an intramedullary nail following curettage of the tumor. A radiograph of the femur revealed a callus on the pathological fracture. The patient was able to walk using a crutch 3 months after surgery. We reviewed 50 cases that described skeletal metastasis from carcinoid tumors. The average age of the patients was 54.9 years and 33 patients (66%) were male. The most common site of skeletal metastasis was the spine. We also investigated the survival rate of patients who developed skeletal metastasis from carcinoid tumors. The findings showed that survival of patients who developed osteolytic skeletal metastasis was worse than that of patients who developed osteosclerotic skeletal metastasis.

  9. Concurrent small bowel adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor in Crohn's disease--case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Boltin, Doron; Levi, Zohar; Halpern, Marisa; Fraser, Gerald M

    2011-10-01

    Adenocarcinomas of the large and small bowel, as well as intestinal carcinoid tumors have been reported at increased rates in Crohn's disease. We herein report a rare case of concurrent adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor of the small bowel presenting as intestinal obstruction and found incidentally at laparotomy in a 55 year old male with longstanding ileal Crohn's disease. We performed a Medline Pubmed search for cases of synchronous or composite adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor in the setting of Crohn's disease and identified four similar cases. Concurrent adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor occurred both in newly diagnosed and longstanding Crohn's disease, most commonly involved the terminal ileum and presented with symptoms mimicking Crohn's disease. Diagnosis was made incidentally at laparotomy in all cases. Lymph node involvement was variable. Clinicians should be aware of this rare entity for expeditious surgical intervention.

  10. Treatment of solitary gastric carcinoid tumor by endoscopic polypectomy in a patient with pernicious anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kadikoylu, Gurhan; Yavasoglu, Irfan; Yukselen, Vahit; Ozkara, Esra; Bolaman, Zahit

    2006-01-01

    Type I gastric carcinoid tumors result from hypergastrinemia in 1%-7% of patients with pernicious anemia. We diagnosed pernicious anemia in a 48-year-old female patient with complaint of fatigue for three months. She had no gastrointestinal symptoms. Endoscopic examination ot the upper gastrointestinal tract revealed atrophic gastritis and a polypoid lesion in the corpus of 3-4 mm in size. Endoscopic polypectomy was performed. Histopathological examination of the specimen revealed positive chromogranin A and synaptophysin stainings compatible with the diagnosis of a carcinoid tumor. Serum gastrin level was increased, urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid was within the normal range. There was no other symptom, sign, or laboratory finding of a carcinoid syndrome in the patient. No metastasis was found with indium-111 octreotide scan, computed tomographies of abdomen and thorax. Type I gastric carcinoid tumors are only rarely solitary and patients with tumors < 1 cm in size may benefit from endoscopic polypectomy. PMID:16830392

  11. Partial abdominal evisceration and intestinal autotransplantation to resect a mesenteric carcinoid tumor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Midgut carcinoids are neuroendocrine tumors that commonly metastasize to the intestinal mesentery, where they predispose to intestinal obstruction, ischemia and/or congestion. Because of their location, many mesenteric carcinoid tumors are deemed unresectable due to the risk of uncontrollable bleeding and prolonged intestinal ischemia. Case Presentation We report the case of a 60-year-old male with a mesenteric carcinoid tumor obstructing his superior mesenteric vein, resulting in intestinal varices and severe recurrent GI bleeds. While his tumor was thought to be unresectable by conventional techniques, it was successfully resected using intestinal autotransplantation to safely gain access to the tumor. This case is the first described application of this technique to carcinoid tumors. Conclusions Intestinal autotransplantation can be utilized to safely resect mesenteric carcinoid tumors from patients who were not previously thought to be surgical candidates. We review the literature concerning both carcinoid metastases to the intestinal mesentery and the use of intestinal autotransplantation to treat lesions involving the mesenteric root. PMID:21281518

  12. Increased accumulation of N-isopropyl-(I-123)p-iodoamphetamine in bronchial carcinoid tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizawa, S.; Higa, T.; Kuroda, Y.; Sano, A.; Murakami, M.; Takahashi, Y. )

    1990-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging with N-isopropyl-(I-123)p-iodoamphetamine (({sup 123}I)IMP) was performed in a patient with recurrent bronchial carcinoid tumor. Increased accumulation of ({sup 123}I)IMP was observed in the known lesions of the brain and neck on both tomographic and planar images. Scintigraphy also revealed unknown metastatic lesions of the paraaortic lymph nodes, which were later confirmed on x-ray CT. Iodine-123-IMP may have a potential role in evaluating carcinoid tumors.

  13. Chemotherapy and irradiation for locally advanced and metastatic pulmonary carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Curtis R.; Wirth, Lori J.; Nishino, Mizuki; Chen, Aileen B.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Kulke, Matthew H.; McNamee, Ciaran J.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The optimal management of locally advanced and metastatic pulmonary carcinoid tumors remains to be determined. Materials and methods A retrospective review was conducted on patients with typical and atypical pulmonary carcinoid tumors treated at our institutions between 1990 and 2012. Results 300 patients were identified with pulmonary carcinoid, (80 patients with atypical carcinoid), of whom 29 presented with metastatic disease (16 atypical). Of evaluable patients, 26 (41%) with stages I–III atypical carcinoid tumors recurred at a median time of 3.7 years (range, 0.4–32), compared to 3 (1%) patients with typical carcinoid (range, 8–12.3). 39 patients were treated with chemotherapy, including 30 patients with metastatic disease (27 atypical), and 7 patients were treated with adjuvant platinum–etoposide chemoradiation (6 atypical, 1 typical, 6 stage IIIA, 1 stage IIB). At a median follow-up of 2 years there were 2 recurrences in the 7 patients receiving adjuvant treatment. Median survival after diagnosis of metastatic disease for patients with atypical pulmonary carcinoid was 3.3 years with a 5-year survival of 24%. Treatment regimens showing efficacy in pulmonary carcinoid include 15 patients treated with octreotide-based therapies (10% response rate (RR), 70% disease control rate (DCR), 15 month median progression-free survival (PFS)), 13 patients treated with etoposide + platinum (23% RR, 69% DCR, 7 month median PFS), and 14 patients treated with temozolomide-based therapies (14% RR, 57% DCR, 10 month median PFS). 8 of 10 patients with octreotide-avid disease treated with an octreotide-based regimen experienced disease control (1 partial response, 7 stable disease) for a median of 18 months (range 6–72 months). Conclusions These results support our previous finding that a subset of pulmonary carcinoid tumors are responsive to chemotherapy. PMID:25218177

  14. Scintigraphic detection of carcinoid tumors with a cost effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dimitroulopoulos, Dimitris; Xynopoulos, Dimitris; Tsamakidis, Klisthenis; Paraskevas, Emmanouel; Zisimopoulos, Athanassios; Andriotis, Efthymios; Fotopoulou, Ekaterini; Kontis, Marios; Paraskevas, Ioannis

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy and the cost-effectiveness of this technique in the detection of gastroenteropancreatic carcinoid tumors and their metastases in comparison with conventional imaging methods. METHODS: Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) was performed in 24 patients with confirmed carcinoids and 7 under investigation. The results were compared with those of conventional imaging methods (chest X-ray, upper abdominal ultrasound, chest CT, upper and lower abdominal CT). Also a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed comparing the cost in Euro of several combinations of SRS with conventional imaging modalities. RESULTS: SRS visualized primary or metastatic sites in 71.0% of cases and 61.3% of conventional imagings. The diagnostic sensitivity of the method was higher in patients with suspected lesions (85.7% vs 57.1%). SRS was less sensitive in the detection of metastatic sites (78.9% vs 84.2%). The undetectable lesions by SRS metastatic sites were all in the liver. Between several imaging combinations, the combinations of chest X-ray/upper abdominal CT/SRS and chest CT/upper abdominal CT/SRS showed the highest sensitivity (88.75%) in terms of the number of detected lesions. The combinations of chest X-ray/upper abdominal US/SRS and chest CT/upper abdominal ultrasound/SRS yielded also a quite similar sensitivity (82%). Compared to the cost of the four sensitive combinations the combination of chest X-ray/upper abdominal ultrasound/SRS presented the lower cost, 1183.99 Euro vs 1251.75 Euro for chest CT/upper abdominal ultrasound/SRS, 1294.93 Euro for chest X/ray/upper abdominal CT/SRS and 1362.75 Euro for chest CT/upper abdominal CT/SRS. CONCLUSION: SRS imaging is a very sensitive method for the detection of gastroenteropancreatic carcinoids but is less sensitive than ultrasound and CT in the detection of liver metastases. Between several imaging combinations, the combination of chest X-ray/upper abdominal CT/SRS shows the

  15. Aprepitant for the management of refractory emesis in a patient with a small bowel carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kyeremateng, Sam; Boland, Jason W

    2014-06-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common distressing symptoms with multiple etiologies. Serotonin and substance P can induce nausea and vomiting by binding to specific receptors (5-hydroxytryptamine3 [5HT3] and neurokinin-1 [NK-1] receptors respectively). Carcinoid tumors, which originate from enterochromaffin cells of the neuroendocrine system, secrete several biologically active amines and peptides, including serotonin and substance P, that are responsible for the distant effects of this tumor. The authors present an 88-year-old lady with metastatic carcinoid tumor, with evidence of carcinoid syndrome. She had nausea and vomiting that became unresponsive to 5HT3 receptor antagonists and other antiemetics. As substance P is released from carcinoid tumors and has a role in the pathogenesis of emesis, the NK-1 receptor antagonist aprepitant was trialed. This provided complete and sustained improvement of the nausea and vomiting until her death 2 months later. This case demonstrates the potential role and rationale of NK-1 receptor antagonists in the management of resistant emesis in patients with carcinoid tumors. Clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of these drugs in the management of emesis in patients with carcinoid syndrome.

  16. Primary carcinoid tumor of the gallbladder: a case report and brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi-Ping; Li, Wei-Min; Liu, Hao-Run; Li, Ning

    2010-02-23

    Primary carcinoid tumor of the gallbladder is rare and comprises less than 1% of all carcinoid tumors. Preoperative diagnosis of carcinoid tumor of the gallbladder is difficult. The imageology findings are similar to those in other gallbladder cancers. A 46-year-old woman was hospitalized with a preoperative diagnosis of gallbladder carcinoma, The patient was referred for surgical opinion and laparotomy was subsequently performed. A 4 x 5 cm mass was found within the gallbladder, located on the free surface of the body and fundus of the gallbladder. Neither metastases nor direct invasion to the liver was found. The entire mass and gallbladder were excised and intact. Histologically, the tumor consisted of small oval cells with round-to-oval neclei and tumor cells formed small nodular, trabeculare and acinar structures. The tumor showed moderate pleomorphism with scattered mitotic figures, but no definite evidence of vascular permeation, perineural invasion or lymphatic permeation was seen. The tumor cells invaded the mucosa extensively, and some penetrated the muscular layer but not through the serosa of the gallbladder into the liver. Immunohistochemical studies revealed strong positive reaction for chromogranin A and NSE. This lesion was proved to be a primary carcinoid tumor of the gallbladder. A brief review of literature, clinical feature, pathology and treatment of this rare disease was discussed. Primary carcinoid tumor of the gallbladder is uncommon. The definite diagnosis is often made on histopathological results after surgery.

  17. [Somatotropic pituitary tumor in a patient with a previous ovarian strumal carcinoid. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Riedemann, Erick; Rojas, Claudio; Quevedo, Iván

    2004-07-01

    Strumal carcinoid is an unusual form of monodermal ovarian teratoma with thyroid-like follicles mixed with typical carcinoid tumor patterns. We report a 49 years old woman presenting with an acromegaly. At the age of 45, an ovarian strumal carcinoid was excised and at three years of follow up, she complained of finger and feet growth. Laboratory showed an elevated serum IGF-1 and a sella turcica magnetic resonance imaging showed an 8 mm microadenoma. She was subjected to a transphenoidal excision and the pathological study disclosed a solid acidophilic pituitary adenoma. Two months after surgery, there was a significant decrease in serum IGT-I levels.

  18. VEGFR-2 expression in carcinoid cancer cells and its role in tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Scott R.; Bowen, Kanika A.; Rychahou, Piotr G.; Jackson, Lindsey N.; Weiss, Heidi L.; Lee, Eun Y.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Evers, B. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are slow growing and highly vascular neuroendocrine neoplasms that are increasing in incidence. Previously, we showed that carcinoid tumors express vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) in the epithelial compartment of carcinoid tumor sections; yet, its role is not completely understood. The purpose of our study was to: (i) assess the expression of VEGFR-2 in the novel human carcinoid cell line BON, (ii) to determine the role of PI3K/Akt signaling on VEGFR-2 expression and (iii) to assess the effect of VEGFR-2 on BON cell invasion, migration and proliferation. We found that, although VEGFR-2 is expressed in BON cells, reduction in VEGFR-2 expression actually enhanced proliferation, invasion, and migration of the BON cell line. Also, expression of VEGFR-2 was inversely related to PI3K signaling. Carcinoid liver metastases in mice demonstrated decreased VEGFR-2 expression. Furthermore, the expression of a truncated, soluble form of VEGFR-2 (sVEGFR-2), a protein demonstrated to inhibit cell growth, was detected in BON cells. The presence of VEGFR-2 in the epithelial component of carcinoid tumors and in the BON cell line suggests an alternate role for VEGFR-2, in addition to its well-defined role in angiogenesis. The expression of sVEGFR-2 may explain the inverse relationship between VEGFR-2 expression and PI3K/Akt signaling and the inhibitory effect VEGFR-2 has on BON cell proliferation, migration and invasion. PMID:20473929

  19. Intradural Carcinoid Tumor Found in a Patient with No History of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Audlin, Jason R; Khullar, Gaurav; Deshaies, Eric M; Kurra, Swamy; Lavelle, William F

    2016-12-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare neoplasms that often arise from the gastrointestinal or respiratory tracts. They often metastasize to bone tissue and pancreatic and hepatic sites. The central nervous system and most specifically the spinal cord are rarely involved. Primary carcinoid tumors of the central nervous system are even rarer. A 58-year-old man presented with progressive bilateral lower extremity weakness and a negative history of cancer. Imaging revealed an intradural mass at the L1 and L2 spinal levels. Surgical resection of the tumor via laminectomy was performed. The tumor was observed to have eroded through the dura and was compressing the spinal nerves. Histopathologically, the mass was observed to be of carcinoid origin. A subsequent octreoscan revealed no primary sites of carcinoid tumor. Postoperatively, the patient was followed for 1.5 years. The patient reported improvement in sensation to his lower extremities with no change in motor findings. Carcinoid tumors of the central nervous system are extremely rare, but they should remain in the differential diagnosis for patients experiencing extremity weakness and back or neck pain with an intradural mass and no primary source of the tumor identified or other manifestations of a primary tumor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A case of very well-differentiated adenocarcinoma with carcinoid tumor in the ascending colon.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Hayato; Sakurai, Shinji; Tsukagoshi, Ritsuko; Suzuki, Masaki; Tabe, Yuichi; Fukasawa, Takaharu; Kiriyama, Shinsuke; Fukuchi, Minoru; Naitoh, Hiroshi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumors with mixed glandular and neuroendocrine characteristics with at least 30% of each component are classified as mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) by the World Health Organization 2010 classification. We report here a case of very well-differentiated adenocarcinoma accompanied by carcinoid tumor, categorized as MANEC. A 41-year-old Japanese man was clinically diagnosed with ascending colon cancer and underwent right hemicolectomy. Using an immunohistologic technique, the pathologic diagnosis was very well-differentiated adenocarcinoma accompanied by carcinoid tumor and marked eosinophil infiltration, which was categorized as MANEC. By immunohistochemical analysis, tumor cells of the carcinoid component exhibited very low proliferation activity. Our case was thought to be MANEC without high malignant potential. MANEC as per the World Health Organization 2010 classification seems to include tumors with diverse grades of malignancy, and it might need to have subclassifications according to the malignancy potential of the tumor cells.

  1. Giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica as first manifestation of typical pulmonary carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, T; Vincent, M B

    2015-12-23

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), a systemic vasculitis of unknown origin, may appear rarely as a paraneoplastic syndrome. Cases secondary to pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors have not been reported. A 75-year-old female developed prednisone-responsive GCA/polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) shortly followed by syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. An 8 mm carcinoid lung tumor with positron emission tomography normal uptake was found. After a thoracoscopic tumor resection the patient experienced complete clinical and laboratory remission. This is the first report of GCA with PMR in the context of carcinoid lung tumor. It emphasizes the role of paraneoplastic vasculitis as a possible cause of GCA.

  2. Primary carcinoid tumor of the ovary arising in a mature cystic teratoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ting, W H; Hsiao, S M; Lin, H H; Wei, M C

    2014-01-01

    Primary ovarian carcinoid tumors are rare entities, they may appear with other teratomatous components, and can be often being mistaken as part of mature cystic teratomas. Consistent with their rarity and low incidence, imaging clues that could have led to suspicion of this tumor are not well-documented. Herein, the authors present a rare case of primary ovarian carcinoid tumor in a mature cystic teratoma, who initially presented with complaints of abdominal distension for months. Contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated a multilobular mass with different density components including fat, soft tissue, and calcification materials, as well as rich vascular supply from the right ovarian vein. Serum tumor markers were within normal limits. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed and the pathological diagnosis was mature cystic teratoma with coexisting primary ovarian carcinoid tumor, insular type. The patient has remained well with no residual disease for over one year of follow-up.

  3. An unusual presentation of a carcinoid tumor of the common bile duct.

    PubMed

    Jethava, Ashif; Muralidharan, Visvanathan; Mesologites, Thalia; Stoica-Mustafa, Elena; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2013-01-10

    Carcinoid tumors arising from the bile ducts account for only a small fraction of biliary tract cancers. We report herein a 42-year-old man with a carcinoid tumor of the common bile duct. He presented with abdominal pain, bloating and dyspepsia. Clinicolaboratory and imaging studies suggested a probable obstructive common bile duct lesion. The patient underwent an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with a stent placement in view of common bile duct decompression. Persistence of symptoms prompted a laparotomy and pancreaticoduodenectomy that revealed a well-differentiated carcinoid tumor originating in the common bile duct. Clinician's familiarity with the unusual sites of origin of neuroendocrine tumors and/or atypical presentation of such tumors may facilitate their early recognition and allow for a timely intervention.

  4. Gastric carcinoid tumor in a patient with a past history of gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chien-Yuan; Chen, Ming-Jen; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Liu, Tsang-Pai; Chan, Yu-Jan; Wang, Tsang-En; Chang, Wen-Hsiung

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract. It may coexist with other type of cancers, and if so, the tumors usually involve the stomach. The most common associated cancers are gastrointestinal carcinomas. We report a 65-year-old woman with a history of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor who had undergone subtotal segmental gastrectomy. New polypoid lesions were detected on a follow-up gastroscopy one year later. The lesions were biopsied and found to be carcinoid tumors. There was serum hypergastrinemia, and type 1 gastric carcinoid tumor was diagnosed. A total gastrectomy was performed. Pathologic examination revealed both carcinoid tumors and a recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PMID:19058321

  5. Medial hypertrophy of the ovarian vein: a novel type of vascular pathology associated with a primary ovarian carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Dessauvagie, Benjamin F; Lai, Patrick H; Oost, Ebo; Thomas, Anitha; Stewart, Colin J R

    2015-01-01

    Primary carcinoid tumors of the ovary are rare accounting for only 1% of neoplasms that are associated with the carcinoid syndrome. However, the carcinoid syndrome can occur in the absence of hepatic metastases due to the release of vasoactive peptides directly into the systemic circulation via the ovarian vein. We present a 69-yr-old woman presenting with carcinoid valvular disease and congestive cardiac failure who was found to have a primary left ovarian carcinoid tumor. At operation it was noted that the left ovarian vein had an unusually firm and thickened appearance, and histologic examination revealed marked fibromuscular medial hypertrophy with luminal compression. There was no associated vascular elastosis. This ovarian venous alteration appears to represent a novel addition to the spectrum of cardiovascular injuries associated with carcinoid tumors.

  6. Small cell carcinoma of the colon arising in a carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Saif, M Wasif

    2013-04-01

    Small cell carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare and clinically aggressive tumors. A case is presented of a 70 year-old woman who presented with small bowel obstruction and was found to have a cecal mass. She underwent right hemicolectomy, and histopathology showed a small cell carcinoma arising in the background of a carcinoid tumor. Although small cell carcinomas of the colon have frequently been found in association with colonic adenomas, this appears to be the first report of a low-grade carcinoid tumor in combination with a small cell carcinoma.

  7. Inhibition of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Akt Signaling Suppresses Tumor Cell Proliferation and Neuroendocrine Marker Expression in GI Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Susan C.; Chen, Herbert; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2010-01-01

    Background Over-activation of PI3K/Akt signaling facilitates tumor proliferation in several cancers. We have shown that various signal transduction pathways promote tumorigenesis in carcinoid tumors, which exhibit endogenously high levels of active, phosphorylated Akt. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway would suppress carcinoid tumor cell growth and neuroendocrine (NE) marker production. Methods Human carcinoid BON cells were treated in vitro with LY294002, a PI3 kinase inhibitor, or transfected with Akt1 siRNA. Tumor cell proliferation was measured by MTT for six days. The effect of LY294002 or Akt1 siRNA treatment was assessed by western analysis. We examined the levels of phosphorylated Akt, total Akt, Akt1, and the NE markers human achaete-scute homolog1 (ASCL1) and chromogranin A (CgA). Results Treatment of BON cells with LY294002 reduced tumor cell proliferation (76%) in a dose-dependent manner. Growth also decreased in Akt1 siRNA transfected cells (29%). Levels of active, phosphorylated Akt and the NE tumor markers, ASCL1 and CgA, were diminished with both LY294002 and Akt1 siRNA treatments proportional to the degree of Akt inhibition. Total Akt, Akt2, and Akt3 levels were unaffected by these experiments. Conclusions These data indicate that PI3K/Akt signaling performs a critical role in human carcinoid tumor cell survival and NE hormone generation. Furthermore, the development of novel therapeutics targeting Akt1 or components of the PI3K/Akt pathway may enhance the management of carcinoid disease. Synopsis Carcinoid tumor cells were treated with a PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, and Akt1 siRNA to delineate the role of PI3K/Akt signaling in carcinoids. The effects of treatment on cellular proliferation and neuroendocrine marker expression were observed. PMID:19588205

  8. Incidental Primary Intradural Carcinoid Tumor in a Patient with Lumbar Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Koustais, Stavros; O'Halloran, Philip J; Hassan, Alfrazdaq; Brett, Francesca; Young, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms derived from enterochromaffin cells. Central nervous system involvement is rare. The reported cases include metastases to brain or spinal cord, and primary skeletal or extradural disease resulting in compressive myeloradiculopathy. There are 2 previously reported cases of primary intradural extramedullary carcinoid tumor, presenting with compressive symptoms. We report the first case of primary incidental intradural extramedullary carcinoid tumor. A 68-year-old man was complaining of a 2-month history of left-sided back pain and sciatica; however, he presented with acutely worse symptoms of severe left sciatica. There was no sphincter dysfunction nor power deficit on examination. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the lumbar spine revealed an L4-5 central disk protrusion causing left L5 nerve root compression, and a heterogeneous enhancing intradural mass at the L2-3 level displacing the cauda equina. An L4-5 microdiscectomy followed by an L2-3 laminectomy and resection of the intradural mass was performed. There was a postoperative left S1 paresthesia that was managed medically; however, the postoperative period was unremarkable. A postoperative MRI of the lumbar spine showed complete resection of the mass. A staging scan revealed an incidental thyroid nodule; however, there was no other disease burden. Histopathology of the resected specimen revealed a primary spinal carcinoid tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of incidental primary intradural spinal carcinoid tumor. Even though intradural spinal carcinoid tumors are exceedingly rare, they should be included in the differential diagnosis of enhancing intradural lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Usefulness of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for selecting carcinoid tumors as candidates to endoscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Varas, M J; Gornals, J B; Pons, C; Espinós, J C; Abad, R; Lorente, F J; Bargalló, D

    2010-10-01

    Carcinoid tumors (CTs) represent the most common type of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Digestive CTs in the gastroduodenal and colorectal tracts may be assessed using endoscopy and echoendoscopy or endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) with the goal of attempting local resection with curative intent without having recourse to surgery. Endpoints in this study included:--Assessing the usefulness of EUS for selecting CTs as candidates to endoscopic excision. --Assessing the effectiveness of local resection (complete carcinoid resection) and the safety (complications) of the technique involved. OUr series included 18 patients (12 males and 6 females) with 23 tumors. Sixteen patients (10 males and 6 females) were selected, with age ranging from 40 to 81 years (mean: 57 years), biopsied, endoscopically treated digestive carcinoid tumors, and a previous negative extension study. Twenty-one 2-to-20-mm (mean size 8 mm) tumors were resected in 23 procedures. After endoscopy plus biopsy and echoendoscopy (EUS), excision was carried out with conventional polypectomy snare mucosectomy and submucosal injection with saline and/or adrenaline in most cases (15), and mucosectomy technique following lesion ligation with elastic bands for six cases. Two cases underwent transanal endoscopic surgery (TEM), one of them following non-curative polypectomy. A total of 23 local procedures were performed with the key goal of assessing efficacy (complete resection: CR) and safety (complications). There were no severe complications except for the last gastric mucosectomy for a 6-mm carcinoid, where a miniperforation occurred that was solved by using 3 clips (1/23: 4.3%).EUS sensitivity was 94%. Complete resection was 90.5% (19/21). The endoscopic mucosal resection of selected carcinoid tumors is a safe, effective technique. EUS is the technique of choice to select patients eligible for endoscopic resection (carcinoids smaller than 20 mm in superficial layers, with an unscathed muscularis propria and

  10. Primary cervical spine carcinoid tumor in a woman with arm paresthesias and weakness: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms derived from the enterochromaffin cells. Central nervous system involvement is rare and has been reported either as metastases to the brain and spine or primary tumors involving the sacrococcygeal spine. We report the first case of a primary carcinoid tumor of the cervical spine. Case presentation A 50-year-old African-American woman presented with a 4-month history of numbness, paresthesias, and mild left-hand weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging of her cervical spine revealed a homogenously enhancing extradural mass, indenting the cervical cord and expanding the left neural foramen at C7–T1. A C7 corpectomy, en bloc resection of the tumor, and anterior C6–T1 fusion were performed to decompress the spinal cord and nerves and provide stability. Postoperative histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical analysis were consistent with carcinoid tumor. There has been no recurrence at the 6-year follow-up visit. Conclusions Primary cervical carcinoid tumor is extremely rare, but should be included in the differential diagnosis of enhancing expansile extradural masses compressing the spinal cord and nerves. Surgical resection may provide a definitive cure. PMID:23972315

  11. Atypical presentation of carcinoid tumor with unresolved right shoulder pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tun, Nay Thi; Oza, Rajen

    2014-05-07

    Carcinoid tumors are variants of neuroendocrine tumors that typically arise from the gastrointestinal tract and the bronchus, but they can involve any organ. Unresolved right shoulder pain manifesting as the first clinical presentation of carcinoid tumor with unknown primary origin is a rare clinical entity. To the best of our knowledge, herein we present the first case report describing metastasis to the right shoulder joint in a patient who presented with bone pain as the first clinical manifestation of metastatic carcinoid tumor of unknown primary origin. Metastasis to the right scapula as the first presentation of an underlying carcinoid tumor in the primary bronchus has been reported previously. A 72-year-old Caucasian woman presented with pain in her right shoulder after a fall. She delayed seeking medical attention for 4 weeks for personal reasons. Her physical examination revealed no erythema or swelling of the right shoulder. However, tenderness was noted on the right subacromial bursa and the right acromioclavicular joint. Her drop arm test was positive. An X-ray of the right upper extremity showed no fracture. She did not respond to methylprednisolone injections or physical therapy. Because of the unresolved right shoulder pain with disturbance of her daily activities, magnetic resonance imaging of the right shoulder was ordered, which revealed permeative destruction of the right scapula. Because the permeative destruction of the bone could have been an osteolytic malignant feature, positron emission tomography-computed tomography was performed, which produced a scan showing osseous metastasis to the right scapula, multiple liver metastases and a 1.7 cm right-lower-lobe pulmonary nodule. Her serotonin and chromogranin A levels were significantly elevated. The patient was treated with palliative cisplatin and etoposide chemotherapy followed by locoregional treatments for metastatic carcinoid tumor. She had mild improvement in her right shoulder pain, as

  12. Intranuclear Pseudo-inclusions and Grooves in Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Maral; Kumar, Perikala Vijayananda

    2016-02-01

    Cytologic findings of pulmonary carcinoid have been well described. We report new cytological findings in a case of carcinoid tumor. The patient is a 36-year-old man presenting with hemoptysis of about six months in duration. Chest CT scans showed a well-defined round polypoid lesion measuring 1 × 1 cm within the right upper lobe of the bronchus with hyperinflation of the right upper lobe. Trans-bronchial fine needle aspiration and biopsy were done. Cytologic smears showed isolated and loose clusters of uniform round to spindle shape cells with round centrally located nuclei, fine granular (salt and pepper) chromatin and pale cytoplasm. Intranuclear pseudo-inclusions and grooves were seen in some tumor cells. No mitotic figures or necrosis were evident. A cytological diagnosis of carcinoid tumor was made and histopathologic examination and subsequent immunohistochemical study confirmed the diagnosis. Carcinoid tumor may be reliably diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology smears. Intranuclear pseudo-inclusions and grooves may be evident in tumor cells.

  13. Carcinoid tumor of the appendix: A consecutive series from 1237 appendectomies

    PubMed Central

    Tchana-Sato, Vincent; Detry, Olivier; Polus, Marc; Thiry, Albert; Detroz, Bernard; Maweja, Sylvie; Hamoir, Etienne; Defechereux, Thierry; Coimbra, Carla; Roover, Arnaud De; Meurisse, Michel; Honoré, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To report the experience of the CHU Sart Tilman, University of Liège, Belgium, in the management of appendiceal carcinoid tumor. METHODS: A retrospective review of 1237 appendectomies performed in one single centre from January 2000 to May 2004, was undertaken. Analysis of demographic data, clinical presentation, histopathology, operative reports and outcome was presented. RESULTS: Among the 1237 appendectomies, 5 appendiceal carcinoid tumors were identified (0.4%) in 4 male and 1 female patients, with a mean age of 29.2 years (range: 6-82 years). Acute appendicitis was the clinical presentation for all patients. Four patients underwent open appendectomy and one a laparoscopic procedure. One patient was reoperated to complete the excision of mesoappendix. All tumors were located at the tip of the appendix with a mean diameter of 0.6 cm (range: 0.3-1.0 cm). No adjuvant therapy was performed. All patients were alive and disease-free during a mean follow-up of 33 mo. CONCLUSION: Appendiceal carcinoid tumor most often presents as appendicitis. In most cases, it is found incidentally during appendectomies and its diagnosis is rarely suspected before histological examination. Appendiceal carcinoid tumor can be managed by simple appendectomy and resection of the mesoappendix, if its size is ≤ 1 cm. PMID:17075987

  14. The First Reported Case of Recurrent Carcinoid Tumor in the External Auditory Canal.

    PubMed

    McCrary, Hilary C; Faucett, Erynne A; Reghunathan, Saranya; Aly, F Zahra; Khan, Rihan; Carmody, Raymond F; Jacob, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous neuroendocrine lesions of the external auditory canal (EAC) are exceptionally rare, with only five cases reported in the literature. In this case report, we present a patient with a recurrent carcinoid tumor in the EAC, which has yet to be described. A 38-year-old woman presenting with otalgia, aural fullness, and decreased hearing was found to have a recurrent EAC carcinoid tumor, 8-years after initial resection at an outside facility. The recurrent tumor involved much of the proximal, anterior bony ear canal and was trans-tympanic, extending to the middle ear and epitympanum; therefore, a lateral temporal bone resection was performed to ensure complete resection. Surgical pathology confirmed the presence a recurrent carcinoid tumor in the EAC, with immunohistochemistry positive for pancytokeratin (MAK6), CD56, and synaptophysin, with chromogranin showing rare cells positive for cytoplasmic granules. There was no evidence of metastasis. Lateral temporal bone resection was successful and the patient is being followed with annual imaging. The patient is considering future hearing rehabilitation with a bone anchored hearing device. This case report highlights the first known case of recurrent carcinoid tumor in the EAC, treated with lateral temporal bone resection. Clinical presentation, imaging, treatment, and pathology are reviewed along with a review of the literature.

  15. A Carcinoid Tumor of the Ampulla of Vater Treated by Endoscopic Snare Papillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pyun, Dae-Keun; Moon, Gyoo; Han, Jimin; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung-Koo

    2004-01-01

    Here, a case of a patient with incidental finding of a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, who was treated with endoscopic snare papillectomy, is reported. A 62-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, which was found during follow-up endoscopy after an endoscopic mucosal resection of early gastric cancer. No lymphadenopathy or visceral metastasis was found on an abdominal CT scan, In-111 octerotide scan and EUS. The ampulla was then en bloc removed by endoscopic snare papillectomy. The resected specimen revealed a 0.7×0.5×0.1 cm sized carcinoid tumor. All margins of resection were negative for tumor. After six months of follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence and metastasis, either endoscopically or radiologically. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of an ampullary carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic snare papillectomy in Korea. PMID:15683115

  16. A carcinoid tumor arising from a mature cystic teratoma in a 25-year-old patient: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Yeon

    2016-04-21

    Mature cystic teratomas (MCTs) are common benign tumors occurring in the ovaries. Malignant transformation of teratomas (TMT) occurs in 1-3% of all MCTs, usually in postmenopausal women. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common tumor type. Primary carcinoid tumors of the ovary are uncommon, representing only 0.3% of all carcinoid tumors and less than 0.1% of all ovarian cancers. A carcinoid tumor of the trabecular type arising from a MCT is presented in a 25-year-old woman. TMT was detected incidentally. Histologically, uniform, polygonal cells were arranged in a cord and trabecular pattern. Immunohistochemical staining showed positivity for neuro-specific enolase, synaptophysin, and CD56. This case represents a very rare example of carcinoid tumor occurring in a woman younger than 30 years of age. Our findings suggest that sufficient tumor sampling is necessary to avoid overlooking small lesions, which, in our case, were not detected on either radiologic or gross examination.

  17. Rectal and appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors.

    PubMed

    Khoddami, Maliheh; Sanae, Shahram; Nikkhoo, Bahram

    2006-07-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are neoplasms characterized by spindle cell proliferation and a fiboinflammatory vascular stroma. Herein, we presented the successful treatment of a rectal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in an 11-year-old boy who presented with diarrhea and abdominal pain of 1(1/2) months duration and an appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a 29-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain of two months duration with associated tenderness and rebound tenderness in the right lower abdomen. Histologically, our cases had inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors very similar to that of other sites; the spindle cells were positive for vimentin and muscle-specific actin.

  18. Carcinoid Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... size). The Latest News Project Zebra Report: Real-World Insights from the Carcinoid and NET Patient Community ... release the first ever Project Zebra Report: Real-World Insights from the Carcinoid and Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient ...

  19. An Ovarian Carcinoid Tumor With Peptide YY-Positive Insular Component: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Erdenebaatar, Chimeddulam; Yamaguchi, Munekage; Saito, Fumitaka; Motooka, Chisato; Tashiro, Hironori; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoid tumors are uncommon and account for 1% of all carcinoid tumors. The insular type of ovarian carcinoid tumor is common in western countries; in contrast, the strumal and trabecular types seem to be common in Asian countries. Strumal and trabecular types are associated with peptide YY (PYY) production, which may cause constipation. Here, we report the case of a 70-yr-old Japanese woman with chronic constipation who was referred to Kumamoto University Hospital because of a right adnexal mass. Imaging tests suggested that the solid mass might be malignant; therefore, abdominal total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and omentectomy were performed. A subsequent histopathologic examination confirmed an insular carcinoid tumor with a trabecular component in the right ovary. Both components were positive for PYY but not for serotonin. The patient complained of diarrhea instead of constipation soon after the surgery. Because PYY-positive insular carcinoid tumor in the ovary has not been previously reported, we reviewed 19 reported cases of patients with PYY-positive ovarian carcinoid tumors. The origins, common histologic types and symptoms caused by specific peptides secreted in ovarian carcinoid tumors differ between western and Asian countries.

  20. Role of computed tomography angiography in detection and staging of small bowel carcinoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Raman, Siva P; Horton, Karen M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2015-01-01

    Small-bowel carcinoid tumors are the most common form (42%) of gastrointestinal carcinoids, which by themselves comprise 70% of neuroendocrine tumors. Although primary small bowel neoplasms are overall rare (3%-6% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms), carcinoids still represent the second most common (20%-30%) primary small-bowel malignancy after small bowel adenocarcinoma. Their imaging evaluation is often challenging. State-of-the-art high-resolution multiphasic computed tomography together with advanced postprocessing methods provides an excellent tool for their depiction. The manifold interactive parameter choices however require knowledge of when to use which technique. Here, we discuss the imaging appearance and evaluation of duodenal, jejunal and ileal carcinoid tumors, including the imaging features of the primary tumor, locoregional mesenteric nodal metastases, and distant metastatic disease. A protocol for optimal lesion detection is presented, including the use of computed tomography enterography, volume acquisition, computed tomography angiography and three-dimensional mapping. Imaging findings are illustrated with a series of challenging cases which illustrate the spectrum of possible disease in the small bowel and mesentery, the range of possible appearances in the bowel itself on multiphase data and extraluminal findings such as the desmoplastic reaction in mesentery and hypervascular liver metastases. Typical imaging pitfalls and pearls are illustrated. PMID:26435774

  1. [Typical pulmonary carcinoid tumor: evolution, related prognostic factors and lymphadenectomy indications].

    PubMed

    Bagan, P; Das-Neves-Pereira, J C; Rivera, C; Gibault, L; Badia, A; Mordant, P; Riquet, M; Le Pimpec Barthes, F

    2014-01-01

    The bronchopulmonary typical carcinoid tumors are often considered as non-metastatic neoplasia. The appearance of metastases is observed in 10% of the cases. We detail here studies based on the identification of the risk factors of metastases occurrence to adapt the lung surgery and lymph node dissection to the individual patient risk.

  2. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumor in a Girl with Initial Histologic Diagnosis of Leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Muhammad; Haq, Mehmood-ul; Ali, Syed Waqas

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial tumors represent the rarest cause of airway obstruction in pediatric population. Due to rarity of the condition, a high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis. We report a patient in whom diagnostic bronchoscopic biopsy was reported as leiomyoma while post resection histopathology showed an atypical carcinoid. PMID:26623257

  3. Renal Carcinoid Tumor Metastatic to the Uvea, Medial Rectus Muscle, and the Contralateral Lacrimal Gland.

    PubMed

    Kiratli, Hayyam; Uzun, Salih; Tarlan, Berçin; Ateş, Deniz; Baydar, Dilek Ertoy; Söylemezoğlu, Figen

    2015-01-01

    Renal carcinoid tumor is an exceedingly rare malignancy. A 57-year-old man with a renal carcinoid tumor discovered after metastasizing to intraocular and bilateral orbital structures is described. The patient presented with a blind painful OS and a right superotemporal subconjunctival mass. Imaging studies revealed a large left intraocular tumor, a mass in the left medial rectus muscle, and right lacrimal gland enlargement. The OS was enucleated, and incisional biopsies were performed from the other 2 lesions. Histopathological studies demonstrated metastatic neuroendocrine tumor with chromogranin and synaptophysin positivity. Systemic work up revealed a right renal mass and multiple hepatic metastatic lesions. Radical nephrectomy was performed, and octreotide, capecitabine, and temozolomide were administered. Removal of the primary tumor and the eye that had no prospect for useful vision and further treatment with octreotide, capecitabine, and temozolomide provided a disease progression-free period of 24 months and allowed the patient to function normally.

  4. [Primary retroperitoneal carcinoid tumor associated with multiple endcrine neoplasia (men) type 1: a case report].

    PubMed

    Chiba, Syuji; Numakura, Kazuyuki; Satoyoshi, Kiyofumi; Saito, Mitsuru; Horikawa, Yohei; Takayama, Koichiro; Nara, Taketoshi; Kanda, Sohei; Miura, Yoshiko; Maita, Shinya; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Obara, Takashi; Kumazawa, Teruaki; Narita, Shintaro; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Satoh, Shigeru; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2011-11-01

    We report an extremely rare case of a 69-year-old man having a retroperitoneal carcinoid tumor associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 1. The patient whose son and daughter were previously diagnosed with MEN type 1 was admitted to the Department of Endocrinology at our hospital for evaluation of this disorder. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography revealed a parathyroid and retroperitoneal tumor (43 mm x 34 mm). The patient did not consent to surgical management of the tumor; however three years later, a follow-up CT revealed tumor enlargement (55 mm x 50 mm). We were unable to rule out a malignancy, and subsequently resected the tumor. A pathological diagnosis of retroperitoneal carcinoid was made. No local recurrence or metastasis have been observed for 21 months.

  5. Carcinoid tumor of the middle ear: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo; Chen, Fei; Li, Jin-Nan; Liu, Shi-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors of the middle ear are very rare. Here we describe a 37-year-old man with multiple recurrent carcinoid tumor of the right middle ear. The CT demonstrated the recurrent mass that filled the tympanum and mastoid with osteolytic invasion, and the tumor was removed by surgery. The pathological findings showed the tumor cells, without necrosis and mitotic activity, had round, oval, or slightly irregular nuclei and finely-dispersed chromatin, arranged in cords, nests, and glandular structures. They were strongly positive for synaptophysin and CD56, but were negative for S-100 and chromogranin A. Ki-67 proliferation activity was low (<2%). With a review of the literature, the clinical, pathological characteristics and treatment modalities of this rare tumor are discussed.

  6. Carcinoid tumor of the middle ear: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo; Chen, Fei; Li, Jin-Nan; Liu, Shi-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors of the middle ear are very rare. Here we describe a 37-year-old man with multiple recurrent carcinoid tumor of the right middle ear. The CT demonstrated the recurrent mass that filled the tympanum and mastoid with osteolytic invasion, and the tumor was removed by surgery. The pathological findings showed the tumor cells, without necrosis and mitotic activity, had round, oval, or slightly irregular nuclei and finely-dispersed chromatin, arranged in cords, nests, and glandular structures. They were strongly positive for synaptophysin and CD56, but were negative for S-100 and chromogranin A. Ki-67 proliferation activity was low (<2%). With a review of the literature, the clinical, pathological characteristics and treatment modalities of this rare tumor are discussed. PMID:25400805

  7. Transanal Endoscopic Operation for Rectal Tumor: Short-term Outcomes and Learning Curve Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Hyuk; Bae, Sung Uk; Han, Yoon Dae; Kang, Jeonghyun; Min, Byung Soh; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2016-06-01

    We aim to report outcomes and learning curve of transanal endoscopic operation (TEO) for rectal tumors, using standard laparoscopic instruments under a magnifying laparoscopic monitor view. From January 2012 to July 2014, local excision was performed using a TEO system in 46 consecutive patients with rectal tumors. Patient and tumor characteristics and perioperative outcomes were prospectively assessed. The median patient age was 56 years for 15 women and 31 men. The mean tumor size was 1.8 cm, and the mean distance from the anal verge was 7.8 cm. The mean operative time was 85 minutes, and the mean postoperative hospital stay was 4.5 days. The postoperative pathologic diagnosis was adenocarcinoma for 17 patients (37%), adenoma for 4 patients (9%), carcinoid tumor for 23 patients (50%), and leiomyoma and lipoma for the 2 remaining patients (2%). A positive resection margin was documented for 4 patients (9%). No mortality was associated with the procedure although postoperative bleeding, leakage, perianal fistula, fecal incontinence, and voiding difficulty developed in 8 patients. According to the cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis, the operation time and hospital stay significantly decreased after 17 case experiences. TEO is a feasible and safe treatment option for local excision of rectal tumors. TEO has the advantage of being a precise surgical procedure with a stable and magnifying endoscopic view. However, TEO requires a learning period and a careful selection of patients through proper indications and preoperative diagnostics.

  8. Regression of liver metastases of occult carcinoid tumor with slow release Lanreotide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bondanelli, Marta; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Cavazzini, Luigi; Al Jandali Rifa’y, Laura; degli Uberti, Ettore C.

    2005-01-01

    Few clinical studies have demonstrated an anti-proliferative activity of somatostatin (SST) analogs in carcinoids. We report the case of a woman with liver metastases of neuroendocrine tumor and no evidence of the primary tumor. The liver metastases were characterized by high proliferation index, immunoreactiviy for somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-1, 2, 3 and 5 and positive octreoscan. Urinary 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, serum serotonin and chromogranin A were elevated. Slow release lanreotide (SR-LAN) therapy for 3 mo controlled clinical and biochemical signs of carcinoid tumor and caused a clear-cut reduction in the diameter of two liver metastases and disappearance of another lesion, with further reduction after 6 and 18 mo. We demonstrated a clear-cut long-lasting anti-proliferative effect of SR-LAN on liver metastases of occult carcinoid with high proliferation index and immunoreactivity for SSTR-1, 2, 3, and 5. Immuno-histochemistry for SSTRs could be a suitable method for the selection of patients with metastatic carcinoid that may benefit from SST analog therapy. PMID:15801004

  9. Review of renal carcinoid tumor with focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, N; Tanaka, A; Ohe, C; Mikami, S; Nagashima, Y; Inoue, K; Shuin, T; Taguchi, T; Tominaga, A; Alvarado-Cabrero, I; Petersson, F; Brunelli, M; Martignoni, G; Michal, M; Hes, O

    2013-01-01

    Renal carcinoid tumor is a rare neoplasm. In this article, we review this neoplasm with a focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects. The majority of patients present in the fourth to seventh decades, but there is no gender predilection. Clinically, patients with renal carcinoid tumor frequently present with abdominal, back or flank pain. This tumor is occassionally associated with horseshoe kidney and/or mature cystic teratoma located in the kidney. Macroscopically, these tumors are well demarcated with a lobulated appearance and yellow or tan-brown color cut surface. Microscopically, these tumors are composed of monomorphic round to polygonal cells with granular amphophilic to eosinophilic cytoplasm. Tumor cells are arranged in trabecular, ribbon-like, gyriform, insular, glandular and solid patterns. The nuclei are round to oval and with evenly distributed nuclear chromatin, frequently with a "salt and pepper"-pattern. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells demonstrate immuno-labeling for chromogranin A and synaptophysin. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells contain abundant dense core neurosecretory granules. In previous genetic studies, abnormalities of chromosomes 3 or 13 have been reported. The clinical behavior of renal carcinoid tumors is variable, but is more indolent than most renal cell carcinomas. Further investigations are warranted in order to elucidate the critical genetic abnormalities responsible for the pathogenesis of this rare entity in renal neoplastic pathology.

  10. Acute appendicitis with a neuroendocrine tumor G1 (carcinoid): pitfalls of conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki A; Fujimoto, Taketoshi; Kato, Yo; Sasaki, Mayumi; Ikusue, Toshikazu

    2016-08-01

    A man in his early thirties presented to our clinic with right lower abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) revealed a swollen appendix and an appendicolith. Abscess formation was not observed but ongoing appendiceal rupture was not ruled out. Three months after successful conservative therapy, the lumen of the apical portion was kept dilated and laparoscopic interval appendectomy was performed. No tumorous findings were observed macroscopically. However, histology revealed many tiny nests infiltrating the submucosa, muscular layer, and subserosa at the root of the appendix. An appendiceal neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1; carcinoid) was diagnosed immunohistologically. Neither CT nor US visualized the tumor because of its non-tumor-forming but infiltrative growth. In conclusion, after successful conservative treatment, interval appendectomy should be considered to uncover a possible appendiceal NET G1 (carcinoid), particularly when dilatation of the distal lumen is kept under observation.

  11. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor of the terminal ileum in a Crohn's disease patient

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, Ugo; De Simone, Matilde; Ferrero, Stefano; Ciulla, Michele M; Lemos, Alessandro; Avesani, Ettore Contessini

    2005-01-01

    Background Several malignancies have been described in association with inflammatory bowel diseases, the most common being adenocarcinoma. Carcinoid tumor and Crohn disease has also been previously reported, however the coexistence of both neoplasms is quite rare and the clinical diagnosis is very difficult. Here we report what we believe to be the fourth case of a mixed adenocarcinoid tumor coexisting with Crohn's disease. Case report The patient presented with clinical and radiological features of intestinal obstruction. Laparotomy showed a stricturing lesion in the last 6 cm of the terminal ileum with proximal dilation. Only the histology of the resected surgical specimen proved the presence of a mixed adenocarcinoid tumor involving the terminal ileum. Conclusion Carcinoid tumor should be suspected in elderly patients with Crohn's disease presenting with intestinal obstruction and laparotomy should be considered to exclude malignancy. PMID:16336666

  12. Recurrence of a carcinoid tumor of the ovary 13 years after the primary surgery: A case report

    PubMed Central

    AMANO, YASUAKI; MANDAI, MASAKI; BABA, TSUKASA; HAMANISHI, JUNZO; YOSHIOKA, YUMIKO; MATSUMURA, NORIOMI; KONISHI, IKUO

    2013-01-01

    The current study presents the case of a patient with a recurrent carcinoid tumor of the ovary, 13-years after the primary surgery. The primary surgery consisted of a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for a left ovarian tumor at 54 years old. Pathologically, the tumor was diagnosed as a carcinoid tumor of the ovary. Following the primary treatment, the patient was admitted to a cardiologist due to carcinoid-induced heart failure. At 67 years old, the patient was referred to Kyoto University Hospital with a solitary mass 8 cm in diameter and located in the paraaortic area, which was detected by routine ultrasonography and subsequent computed tomography (CT) scans. Urinary 5-hydroxyindole acetate (5-HIAA), a serotonin degradation metabolite, was present at elevated levels. With a diagnosis of a recurrent carcinoid tumor, the patient underwent a tumor resection. The pathological diagnosis was that of lymph node metastasis of the trabecular carcinoid. Post-operatively, the 5-HIAA levels returned to normal. Carcinoid tumors occasionally recur following surgery due to borderline malignant potential. Due to the slow growing nature of these tumors, in specific cases, recurrence occurs following a long interval. Therefore, a relatively long follow-up period is required. PMID:24179502

  13. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwangzoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Results Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Conclusion Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary. PMID:27592514

  14. Roentgenologic diagnosis of primary corticotropin-producing carcinoid tumors of the mediastinum

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.R.; Aughenbaugh, G.L.; Wick, M.R.; Baker, B.A.; Salassa, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    A study was undertaken of five patients with Cushing syndrome due to adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) production by thymic carcinoid tumor (primary mediastinal Apudomas), including two recent patients examined by computed tomography (CT) of the chest. Plain roentgenography of the chest initially failed to detect tumor in four of the five patients, while CT of the chest yielded definitive diagnostic information in both patients in whom it was employed. For one of these patients, a mediastinal tumor could be seen retrospectively on plain roentgenograms of the chest, although it had been missed on the first examination. One of the tumors appeared to be partially calcified on CT scan, a finding not previously reported. Blastic osseous metastasis, which is common when malignant carcinoid tumors spread to bone, was seen in one patient. Our data suggest that in patients with suspected ectopic ACTH production, CT scanning of the mediastinum should be performed early in order to avoid delay in diagnosis of an ACTH-secreting carcinoid tumor of the mediastinum.

  15. Primary pure carcinoid tumors of the testis: Clinicopathological and immunophenotypical characteristics of 11 cases

    PubMed Central

    LU, CHANGLI; ZHANG, ZHANG; JIANG, YONG; YANG, ZHIRONG; YANG, QUNPEI; LIAO, DIANYING; BU, HONG

    2015-01-01

    Primary pure carcinoid tumors of the testis (pPCTT) are rare, and there are only a limited number of studies available. In the present study we described the clinicopathological and immunophenotypical characteristics of 11 cases from our institution between 1978 and 2014, and reported our experiences of the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. The patients ranged in age from 26 to 68 years old, with a median age of 48 years. One patient (9%) was classified as pT2 and 10 (91%) were pT1. Histologically, 7 cases were diagnosed as classical carcinoid tumors, while the other 4 cases were identified as atypical carcinoid tumors. The most common growth pattern was a mixed insular, acinar, rosetted, solid and trabecular pattern. Immunohistochemical staining revealed positive expression of neuron-specific enolase in all cases, and CgA, Syn and CD56 markers in 8 (72.7%), 10 (90.9%) and 9 cases (81.7%), respectively. In addition to radical orchiectomy, 9 patients (81.7%) received a combined modality of treatment. Follow-up data were available for 8 patients. Seven were alive at the last follow-up without recurrence, and one patient succumbed to cerebral hemorrhage 7 years after surgery. In summary, localized pPCTT is a rare disease with an indolent clinical course. When a testicular carcinoid tumor is identified, a metastasis or an intestinal primary tumor should be excluded, particularly when the testicular tumor is large. A tumor size ≤6.0 cm and the histological appearance had little relation with metastatic behavior. PMID:26137005

  16. Two different types of carcinoid tumors of the lung: immunohistochemical and ultrastructural investigation and their histogenetic consideration.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung-Whan

    2013-02-01

    Carcinoid tumors have been an interesting clinical and pathological entity for pathologists because of their unique histopathologic pattern of "Zellballen" (cell ball) and the hormones they produce demonstrable by histochemical and biochemical methods, including immunohistochemistry, and the presence of cytoplasmic dense-core particles demonstrable by electron microscopy. Since carcinoid tumors were established as an entity more than a century ago by Oberndorfer, who was credited with coining the term "carcinoid," meaning carcinoma-like tumors, tumors presenting with similar characteristics have been reported in most of parenchymal organs, including lungs. Carcinoid tumors in the lungs usually occur as bronchocentric tumors and present with typical histopathologic characteristics of carcinoid tumors, but they may present with significant variation in their cellular compositions, in contrast to the midgut carcinoid tumors. In the latter, tumor cells are quite similar to enterochromaffin granule containing crypt cells, which are regarded as their progenitor cells. Currently, a similar histogenetic explanation is applied to all carcinoid tumors occurring elsewhere. The bronchus is one of the most common anatomic sites in which the carcinoid tumors occur. However, bronchial carcinoid tumors differ from the midgut counterparts in microscopic appearance, showing more variability in cellular shape and composition from the classical form of midgut carcinoid tumors. In the lungs, neuroendocrine cells (NEC) are normally found in two different ways. Firstly, they are found as randomly scattered single cells (Kultchitsky cells) similar to enteric counterparts, and, secondly, they are found in aggregates known as "neuroepithelial bodies" (NEB) usually found in the branching point of bronchi. Interestingly, they keep a close anatomic relationship with parasympathetic nerve structures and even form synapses. NEB are usually found in the early stage of fetal development and are

  17. Carcinoid tumor of the duodenum: a rare tumor at an unusual site. Case series from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Waisberg, Jaques; Joppert-Netto, George; Vasconcellos, Cidia; Sartini, Gustavo Henrique; Miranda, Lucimar Sonja Villela de; Franco, Maria Isete Fares

    2013-01-01

    Duodenal carcinoids are extremely rare, and their characteristics and biological behavior have not been fully elucidated. To analyze the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with resected duodenal carcinoids. Twenty patients (12 females and 8 males) were investigated. Their average age was 66.4 ± 5.8 years old (43 to 88 years old). The data corresponding to the clinical picture, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with duodenal carcinoid tumors subjected to resection over a period of 18 years (1993-2011) were analyzed. The most common symptoms were dyspepsia (50%) and epigastric pain (45%) followed by weight loss (10%) and vomiting (5%). Carcinoid syndrome was not observed in any patient. The lesion was located on the first part of the duodenum in 15 (75%) patients, the second part in 4 (20%) patients, and the third part in 1 (5%) patient. The diagnosis of a carcinoid tumor was established through an endoscopic excision biopsy in 19 (95%) patients and an histopathological examination of the surgical specimen in 1 (5%) patient. The average tumor size was 1.1 cm ± 0.4 cm (0.3 cm to 6.0 cm). Nineteen (95%) patients were initially treated by endoscopic resection of the duodenal lesion. One patient (5%), whose tumor was on the third part of the duodenum underwent a duodenectomy of the third and fourth duodenal parts and duodenojejunal anastomosis. The duodenal carcinoid resection margin was involved in four (20%) patients. Four (20%) patients were subjected to a partial gastrectomy to fully remove the lesion. The tumor was restricted to the submucosal layer in 16 (80%) cases, and it penetrated into the muscular layer in 4 (20%) cases. All patients exhibited positive chromogranin A, neuron-specific enolase, and/or synaptophysin immunostaining. The average duration of the follow-up period was 39.6 months (3 to 96 months). Twelve (60%) of the 20 cases in this series are alive without any evidence of active disease. Only one (5%) patient died due to

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of a carcinoid tumor using iodine-131 meta-iodobenzylguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Den Hartog Jager, F.C.; Van Gennip, A.H.; Marcuse, H.R.; Taal, B.G.

    1986-03-01

    Scintigraphy using I-131 meta-iodobenzylguanidine has been introduced as an effective method to detect pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas, and the radiopharmaceutical also is applied in therapy of these tumors. The authors present a case of a metastatic gastric carcinoid tumor, another neural crest tumor, concentrating I-131 MIBG, which was documented by conventional scintigraphy and SPECT in correlation with CT scans and colloid scintigrams of the liver. Two therapeutic attempts in this patient, using I-131 MIBG, are described. The metabolic basis of this phenomenon is discussed, and the importance of I-131 MIBG imaging in the detection of neural crest tumors is underlined.

  19. [Carcinoid tumor of the small bowel: value of hydro-MR imaging for diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Azoulay, R; Boudiaf, M; Soyer, Ph; Hamzi, L; Abitbol, M; Najmeh, N; Rymer, R

    2003-12-01

    Hydro-MR imaging is a technique based on the use of a strongly T2-weighted single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence, similar to that used for MR-cholangiography. We report herein one case of carcinoid tumor of the small bowel diagnosed by hydro-MR imaging. This non invasive MR technique showed suggestive features such as radial convergence and segmental dilatation of a small bowel loop, similar to those seen on conventional follow-through studies. This case illustrates the major role that may be played in the future by hydro-MR imaging for the non invasive diagnosis of carcinoid tumor of the small bowel without the use of ionizing radiation.

  20. A case of uncontrolled severe asthma patient with coexisting carcinoid tumor presenting as pneumomediastinum.

    PubMed

    Biçer, Elif Nur; Öztürk, Ayse Bilge; Ozyigit, Leyla Pur; Erus, Suat; Tanju, Serhan; Dilege, Şükrü; Tabak, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inadequately controlled or uncontrolled asthma are at a greater risk of attacks for asthma requiring emergency room visits or hospital admissions. There is a significant correlation between the severity of the disease and the severity of exacerbations. Patients with poorly controlled asthma are at a higher risk for complications. We present a 24-year-old aspirin-intolerant, uncontrolled asthma patient with the complication of pneumomediastinum. Severe symptoms persisted after the resolution of the pneumomediastinum despite intense anti-inflammatory and anti-obstructive therapy. A bronchoscopy revealed an endobronchial lesion and she was diagnosed with a carcinoid tumor. This case is an example of the importance of re-evaluating asthma patients who do not respond to standard medical treatment. Clinicians should be aware of the complications associated with asthma attacks such as pneumomediastinum and the possibility of a differential diagnosis that worsen asthma symptoms such as a carcinoid tumor.

  1. Carcinoid tumor of the cecum presenting with acute appendicitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cakar, E; Bayrak, S; Bektaş, H; Colak, Ș; Guneyi, A; Sevinc, M Mahsuni; Bag, M

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen. Carcinoid tumor of the appendix is a rare incidental finding that can present with the clinical picture of acute appendicitis. During open surgery for acute appendicitis, a 3 cm solid mass, not noticed externally, was palpated at the base of the appendix. The mass and the appendix were excised by en-bloc wedge resection. The histopathological examination of the lesion revealed carcinoid tumor. The aim of this presentation is to remind that neoplasms of the appendix may, although rarely, present the clinical picture of acute appendicitis, and to highlight that they, particularly those located at the base of the appendix and in cecum, may be overlooked during laparoscopy. The importance of preoperative computerized tomography ins uch cases has to be underlined. Celsius.

  2. Multifocal Carcinoid Tumor of Small Intestine: A Rare Cause of Chronic Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Suspected on Capsule Endoscopy and Diagnosed on Double Balloon Enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Jose C.; Rojas, Juan; Gurudu, Suryakanth R.

    2011-01-01

    We reported a case of multifocal carcinoid tumor of small intestine causing chronic obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, suspected on capsule endoscopy and diagnosed on double balloon enteroscopy. PMID:27942327

  3. [Appendiceal carcinoid tumors. Evaluation of long-term outcomes in a tertiary level].

    PubMed

    Suárez-Grau, Juan Manuel; García-Ruiz, Salud; Rubio-Chaves, Carolina; Bustos-Jiménez, Manuel; Docobo-Durantez, Fernando; Padillo-Ruiz, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: los tumores apendiculares se encuentran en cerca de 1% de las apendicectomías y representan 0.5% de las neoplasias intestinales. El tipo de tumor más frecuente es el carcinoide apendicular, que casi siempre es un hallazgo durante la apendicectomía por otro motivo. Su pronóstico es excelente y la supervivencia es mayor de 95% a cinco años de la intervención. Objetivo: reportar una serie de casos y analizar la supervivencia media a cinco años posteriores a la identificación el tumor. Material y métodos: análisis retrospectivo (1990-2010) de pacientes con tumor carcinoide apendicular intervenidos en el servicio de Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo del Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, España. Se analizaron: la supervivencia a cinco años, la necesidad de tratamiento complementario y las pruebas para seguimiento en la consulta. Resultados: se encontraron 42 pacientes intervenidos por tener un tumor carcinoide apendicular. En 38 pacientes la operación fue de urgencia, la mayoría por sospecha de apendicitis aguda, sin que en ninguno se hubiera establecido el diagnóstico de tumor carcinoide antes de la operación. El síntoma predominante al ingreso fue el dolor abdominal. El tratamiento quirúrgico fue: apendicectomía en 34 pacientes (12 por laparoscopia), en el intraoperatorio siete pacientes requirieron resecciones colónicas mayores debido a la afectación del colon; sólo uno requirió la reintervención para completar la hemicolectomía derecha. Al momento del diagnóstico dos pacientes tenían enfermedad diseminada (metástasis hepáticas). La supervivencia a cinco años fue superior a 95%, sin recidivas o tratamiento posterior de la enfermedad. Conclusiones: el tumor carcinoide apendicular difícilmente se diagnostica antes del procedimiento quirúrgico. La apendicectomía suele ser suficiente aunque en algunos pacientes las resecciones colónicas son necesarias por diseminación. La supervivencia a 5 años es

  4. Acute appendicitis and carcinoid tumor in Meckel's diverticulum. Three pathologies in one: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mudatsakis, N; Paraskakis, S; Lasithiotakis, K; Andreadakis, E; Karatsis, P

    2011-10-01

    Incidental carcinoid tumor of the Meckel's diverticulum is an uncommon event. Herein, a case of a carcinoid tumor in Meckel's diverticulum that was incidentally found in a patient with acute appendicitis is presented. A 42-year-old Caucasian man presented with acute abdomen and clinical signs of acute appendicitis. A typical appendectomy was performed during which further abdominal exploration revealed a Meckel's diverticulum 60 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve, with an irregular and somewhat indurated serosal region on one side. A stapled diverticulectomy was performed. Pathology revealed an incidental carcinoid tumor measuring 1 cm within the Meckel's diverticulum. CT scan of the abdomen and 24-h urine 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid results were normal. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged at the 5th postoperative day. He is alive and without evidence of disease 23 months after the operation. Coexistence of acute appendicitis along with an incidental Meckel's diverticulum raises controversies in their surgical management. We discuss the issues in managing patients with two or more of these coexistent pathologies.

  5. Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor as an incidental finding in a patient with rectal polyps.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Xu-Dong; Fan, Ren-Gen; zha, Wen-Zhang; Xu, Yong-Hua; Qing, Cheng-Lin; Jia, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A patient who was diagnosed as rectal polyps in the local hospital went to our hospital for surgical treatment. Abdominal CT demonstrated a large irregular extra-luminal tumor of at least 5 cm cross-section on the ventral side of the lower rectal wall. Intraoperatively, a large irregular extra-luminal tumor (about 5×4.5×4 cm) was found. Anterior resection with end colostomy and rectal stump (Hartmann's procedure) was performed. Postoperative histological examination showed simultaneous development of rectal GIST and polyps.

  6. The endocrine tumor summit 2008: appraising therapeutic approaches for acromegaly and carcinoid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Melmed, Shlomo; Clemmons, David R.; Colao, Annamaria; Cunningham, Regina S.; Molitch, Mark E.; Vinik, Aaron I.; Adelman, Daphne T.; Liebert, Karen J. P.

    2009-01-01

    The Endocrine Tumor Summit convened in December 2008 to address 6 statements prepared by panel members that reflect important questions in the treatment of acromegaly and carcinoid syndrome. Data pertinent to each of the statements were identified through review of pertinent literature by one of the 9-member panel, enabling a critical evaluation of the statements and the evidence supporting or refuting them. Three statements addressed the validity of serum growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations as indicators or predictors of disease in acromegaly. Statements regarding the effects of preoperative somatostatin analog use on pituitary surgical outcomes, their effects on hormone and symptom control in carcinoid syndrome, and the efficacy of extended dosing intervals were reviewed. Panel opinions, based on the level of available scientific evidence, were polled. Finally, their views were compared with those of surveyed community-based endocrinologists and neurosurgeons. PMID:20012914

  7. Primary carcinoid tumor in a retroperitoneal mature teratoma: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Koji; Ueda, Junji; Toubo, Taro; Nakamura, Masafumi; Oda, Yoshinao; Eguchi, Toru; Tanaka, Masao

    2013-06-01

    Primary retroperitoneal teratoma in an adult is rare, as is the occurrence of a malignant tumor within a mature teratoma, known as "malignant transformation". A 24-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for investigation of an abdominal mass. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multilocular mass in the right upper abdomen. The tumor consisted of fat, soft tissue, and bone, with a slightly enhanced solid component. The tumor was diagnosed preoperatively as a retroperitoneal mature teratoma with an immature component, and excised. Histologically, it was composed mainly of mature fat, soft tissue, and bone, accompanied by a solid component of prostate-like tissue. In addition, a latent carcinoid tumor was recognized in the middle of the tumor. The tumor was finally diagnosed as a primary carcinoid tumor within the retroperitoneal mature teratoma. The patient has been followed-up for 24 months since her operation without any evidence of recurrence. We report this case to highlight the possibility of malignant transformation in adult retroperitoneal teratoma, even when the preoperative diagnosis is benign mature teratoma.

  8. [Bronchial carcinoid tumor and scintigraphy of somatostatin receptors: detection of bone metastasis].

    PubMed

    Banzo, J; Abós, M D; Prats, E; García, F; Freile, E; Razola, P; Escalera, T

    2001-10-01

    Surgery is the treatment of choice for bronchial carcinoid tumor (BCT), whenever the staging is adequate. There is little information about the capability of the somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) to detect bone metastases in the carcinoid tumor. This work has aimed to evaluate retrospectively the diagnostic accuracy of the SRS in the detection of bone metastases in BCT. Based on their clinical indication, the patients were classified into two different groups: Group A (n = 4), staging of a known BCT; and Group B (n = 6), treatment control. The SRS results could be correlated with the CT results in all 4 patients from the group A, and in one patient from the group B, and the SRS results were compared with the clinical follow up during at least one year in the other 5 patients. The SRS scan detected the 4 BCT from the group A; in 2 of them the patient staging was superior when the SRS was used than with the CT, whereas the scan overestimated the tumor stage (BCT + sarcoidosis) in another patient. During the clinical course, one of these patients developed bone and liver metastases. The SRS was normal in 5 asymptomatic patients from group B, whereas the scan showed disseminated metastatic disease (liver, bone, spleen and lymph nodes) in another patient. In the 2 patients with bone metastases, the total number of bone metastases detected by the bone scan was 12, and by the SRS 8. The four lesions that were not detected by SRS were located in the ribs (n = 3) and 12-D (n = 1). The capability of the SRS to detect bone metastases makes it more useful in BCT staging. Over the next few years, the role of the bone scan and SRS in the detection of bone metastases in carcinoid tumors needs to be established.

  9. A case of parenchymal-sparing right mainstem bronchial sleeve resection for carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Pont, Bert Du; Decaluwé, Herbert; Van Raemdonck, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    Introduction Neuroendocrine tumors are rare bronchial carcinomata often presenting in a central airway. Resection usually includes a sleeve of the bronchus with the underlying lobe. Case report We present a 19-year old male with retro-obstructive pneumonia from a tumor in the right mainstem bronchus. Bronchoscopy showed an obstructive mass confirmed as being a typical carcinoid on biopsy. Sleeve resection of the mainstem bronchus only was successfully performed sparing the entire right lung. Discussion and conclusion This type of limited tumoral resection should be reserved for carefully selected patients with a low-grade neoplasm without extrabronchial extension and with both tumor-negative lymph nodes and bronchial margins on frozen section.

  10. [Unsuspected bronchial carcinoid tumor detected in a somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1 and hypergastrinemia].

    PubMed

    Marín-Oyaga, V; Tirado-Hospital, J L; Cuenca-Cuenca, J I; Guerrero-Vázquez, R; Luján-Rodríguez, D; Vázquez-Albertino, R

    2013-03-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1) is characterized by the presence of tumors in parathyroid glands, anterior pituitary gland, endocrine pancreas and duodenum. However, other tumors may also occur. One of them is the carcinoid tumor, which in this context, is more common in the gastrointestinal tract. Less common is the presence of carcinoid tumors of bronchial origin, which with histologic confirmation, may occur in 5-8% of cases and that appears more frequently in patients with hypergastrinemia. We report a patient with MEN1 syndrome, hypergastrinemia and an incidental finding in a somatostatin receptor scintigraphy of an unsuspected bronchial carcinoid tumor that was confirmed histologically.

  11. [Primary Carcinoid Tumor of the Urinary Bladder: A Case Report and Questionnaire Survey on the Reported Cases in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Norichika; Arai, Hiroki; Honda, Masahito; Yoshida, Kyotaro

    2015-11-01

    An 83-year-old man presented with asymptomatic macroscopic hematuria while being treated for prostate cancer with hormonal therapy in January 2009. Cystoscopy revealed a 5 mm surface-smooth non pedunculated tumor lateral to the left ureteral orifice. Transurethral resection was carried out to examine the histology of the tumor. Histopathologic examination revealed the tumor arranged in a pseudoglandular pattern covered with erosive urothelial cells. The tumor had inconspicuous nucleoli, and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. An immunohistochemical study showed the tumor cells were positively stained for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, CD56, and NSE. Ki67 index of the tumor was below 2 %, indicating that the tumor was a carcinoid tumor. He showed no carcinoid syndrome, and neither recurrence nor metastasis has been detected for 66 months.

  12. Composite renal cell carcinoma with clear cell renal cell carcinomatous and carcinoid tumoral elements: a first case report.

    PubMed

    Bressenot, A; Delaunay, C; Gauchotte, G; Oliver, A; Boudrant, G; Montagne, K

    2010-02-01

    Renal endocrine tumours are extremely rare, and carcinoid tumoral elements in renal cell carcinoma have never been reported. This is the first report of a composite renal cell carcinoma containing a clear cell renal cell carcinoma associated with carcinoid tumoral elements, in a patient with synchronous metastatic disease. In the absence of specific radiological and clinical manifestations, typical morphological features as well as an immunostaining profile of neuroendocrine differentiation were identified by microscopy. Secondary nodal and liver localisations were characterised by carcinoid elements only. Despite antiangiogenic therapy, liver metastasis progressed, suggesting that adjuvant therapy cannot be based on the presence of the clear cell renal cell carcinoma component. In this context, extensive tissue sampling is recommended to reveal the endocrine component that is the most aggressive element of such a composite carcinoma.

  13. An unusual coincidence of multiple synchronous kidney tumors with a metachronous rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Böor, Andrej; Jurkovic, Ivan; Dudríková, Katarína

    2003-01-01

    In synchronous surgery specimens (right-sided nephrectomy and left-sided partial nephrectomy), a unique combination of a papillary (chromophil) renal cell carcinoma (4 x 3.7 x 3.5 cm) and a renal oncocytoma (11 x 10 x 9 mm) in the right kidney and a renal carcinoid (2.5 x 2.3 x 1.1 cm) in the resected part of the left kidney has been found. This multiplicity and bilaterality, based on the findings of three distinct histogenetic types of kidney tumors, was accompanied by a metachronous rectal adenocarcinoma discovered 14 months later. After surgery, no radiation or other oncologic therapy was given. At present, our patient is well without any evidence of neoplastic disease three years after primary diagnosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a combination of three distinct histogenetic types of synchronous renal tumors associated with a metachronous rectal adenocarcinoma treated with simple surgery. In the absence of cytogenetic studies, the possibility of a the presence of a hereditary renal cancer syndrome must be considered.

  14. [Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-producing Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor Presenting as Cushing Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Daisuke; Sawada, Takahiro; Ebisui, Osamu; Kito, Katsumi; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    The patient was a 57-year-old female who felt muscle weakness and visited a physician. Hypokalemia was pointed out, and she was referred to our hospital for detailed examination and treatment. Hormone-related tests and imaging were performed, and the patient was diagnosed as Cushing syndrome. Moreover, an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing tumor was suspected. The whole body was examined to find a tumor, but no apparent lesion was found, except for a small nodule of 5-mm in size was present in the right middle pulmonary lobe on chest computed tomography (CT). It was decided to perform surgical resection for both diagnosis and treatment. Pathological diagnosis was a typical carcinoid. On immunostaining, ACTH-positive cells were detected, and the lesion was definitely diagnosed as an ectopic ACTH-producing tumor. Since the ACTH level after surgery returned to normal, the lesion was concluded to be completely excised.

  15. Oncocytic carcinoid tumor of the lung with intense F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT).

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Yuki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Rieko; Hosokawa, Kohei; Kajihara, Makoto; Shimizu, Teruhiko; Takahashi, Tadaaki; Sakai, Shinya; Sawada, Shigeki; Yamashita, Motohiro; Ohtani, Haruhiko

    2013-10-01

    The present report describes a case of typical carcinoid tumor with intense fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. The most of tumor cells were characterized by eosinophilic cytoplasm resulting from accumulation of mitochondria, which was called an oncocytic carcinoid tumor. Glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) was expressed in a membranous pattern in the oncocytic component. Oncocytic carcinoid tumors could show intense FDG uptake due to the numerous intracellular mitochondria and the membranous overexpression of GLUT-1. Thus, it could be a potential pitfall of interpreting FDG-PET/CT image.

  16. Endobronchial Carcinoid and Concurrent Carcinoid Syndrome in an Adolescent Female

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Jonathan; Ong, Thida

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial carcinoid tumors are the most common intrabronchial tumors in children and adolescents. Common signs and symptoms include persistent cough and wheezing not responsive to bronchodilators, hemoptysis, and recurrent fever. Diagnosis is frequently made by imaging and direct visualization with flexible bronchoscopy; surgery remains the gold standard treatment, and lung-sparing resections should be performed whenever possible. Though carcinoid syndrome—characterized by flushing, palpitations, wheezing, shortness of breath, and diarrhea—has been found in association with adult bronchial carcinoid tumors, to our knowledge only one previous study has reported the presence of carcinoid syndrome in a pediatric patient with an endobronchial carcinoid. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl with chronic cough found to have an endobronchial carcinoid tumor and signs and symptoms consistent with carcinoid syndrome. PMID:27895950

  17. Dual Tracer PET Imaging (68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG) Features in Pulmonary Carcinoid: Correlation with Tumor Proliferation Index

    PubMed Central

    Bhatkar, Dhiraj; Utpat, Ketaki; Basu, Sandip; Joshi, Jyotsna M.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoid tumors are rare group of lung neoplasms representing 1% of all the lung tumors. The typical bronchial carcinoids showed higher and more selective uptake of 68Ga-DOTATATE than of 18F-FDG on PET-CT. The Ki-67(MIB-1), a tumor proliferation index is a prognostic marker in neuroendocrine tumors for estimating tumor progression. Atypical carcinoids have higher Ki-67 index and have an increased propensity to metastasize as compared to typical ones. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET imaging along with Ki-67 can be correlated for better management of patients with neuroendocrine tumors. We describe the dual tracer imaging features in a patient of pulmonary carcinoid with avid 68Ga-DOTATATE and minimal 18FDG (18Flurodeoxyglucose) uptake diagnosed on the basis of imaging and bronchoscopic biopsy and its correlation with tumor proliferation index. PMID:28242984

  18. Diagnosing and Managing Carcinoid Heart Disease in Patients With Neuroendocrine Tumors: An Expert Statement.

    PubMed

    Davar, Joseph; Connolly, Heidi M; Caplin, Martyn E; Pavel, Marianne; Zacks, Jerome; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Dobson, Rebecca; Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona; Steeds, Richard P; Dreyfus, Giles; Pellikka, Patricia A; Toumpanakis, Christos

    2017-03-14

    Carcinoid heart disease is a frequent occurrence in patients with carcinoid syndrome and is responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of carcinoid heart disease is poorly understood; however, chronic exposure to excessive circulating serotonin is considered one of the most important contributing factors. Despite recognition, international consensus guidelines specifically addressing the diagnosis and management of carcinoid heart disease are lacking. Furthermore, there is considerable variation in multiple aspects of screening and management of the disease. The aim of these guidelines was to provide succinct, practical advice on the diagnosis and management of carcinoid heart disease as well as its surveillance. Recommendations and proposed algorithms for the investigation, screening, and management have been developed based on an evidence-based review of the published data and on the expert opinion of a multidisciplinary consensus panel consisting of neuroendocrine tumor experts, including oncologists, gastroenterologists, and endocrinologists, in conjunction with cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. All rights reserved.

  19. Goblet cell carcinoids of the appendix: Tumor biology, mutations and management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Malignant neoplasms of the appendix are rare and represent less than 1% of gastrointestinal cancers. Goblet cell carcinoids (GCC) tumors are a distinctive group of heterogeneous appendiceal neoplasm that exhibit unique clinical and pathologic features. This review focuses on the current diagnostic procedures, pathogenesis, possible signaling mechanisms and treatment options for GCC. Perspectives for future research are discussed. The tumor likely arises from pluripotent intestinal epithelial crypt base stem cells. Previous findings of Notch signaling as a tumor suppressor in Neuroendocrine tumors may have a similar role in this tumor too. Loss of Notch signaling may be the driver mutation with other successive downstream mutations likely favors them into progressing and behavior similar to poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with minimal neuroendocrine differentiation. A multidisciplinary approach is suggested for optimal outcomes. Surgery remains the main treatment modality. Simple appendectomy may be sufficient in early stages while right hemicolectomy is recommended for advanced tumors. Cytoreductive surgery with heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy may improve survival in a select few with metastatic peritoneal disease. These tumors have an unpredictable behavior even in early stages and local recurrence and delayed metastases may be seen. Lifelong surveillance is warranted. PMID:27830037

  20. Overdiagnosis of a typical carcinoid tumor as an adenocarcinoma of the lung: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Overdiagnosis of bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumors together with overtreatment can cause serious postoperative consequences for the patient. We report of a patient with a typical bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumor, which was initially misdiagnosed and treated as an adenocarcinoma of the lung. GnrH receptors and the associated Raf-1/MEK/ERK-1/2-pathway are potential targets for analogs in cancer treatment. We suspected a correlation between the lack of tumor growth, application of leuprolide and the Raf-1/MEK/ERK-1/2-pathway. Therefore, we examined GnrH receptor status in the examined specimen. Case presentation In 2010 a 77 year-old male patient was shown to have a tumor mass of about 1.7 cm diameter in the inferior lobe of the left lung. Since 2005, this tumor had hitherto been known and showed no progression in size. The patient suffered from prostate cancer 4 years ago and was treated with TUR-P, radiation therapy and the application of leuprolide. We conducted an explorative thoracotomy with atypical segment resection. The first histological diagnosis was a metastasis of prostate cancer with lymphangiosis carcinomatosa. After several immunohistochemical stainings, the diagnosis was changed to adenocarcinoma of the lung. We conducted a re-thoracotomy with lobectomy and systematic lymphadenectomy 12 days later. The tumor stage was pT1 N0 MX G2 L1 V0 R0. Further immunohistochemical studies were performed. We received the results 15 days after the last operation. The diagnosis was ultimately changed to typical carcinoid tumor without any signs of lymphatic vessel invasion. The patient recovered well from surgery, but still suffers from dyspnea and lack of physical performance. Lung function testing revealed no evidence of impairment. Conclusion The use of several immunohistochemical markers, careful evaluation of hematoxylin-eosin sections and the Ki-67 labelling index are important tools in discriminating between carcinoids and other bronchopulmonary

  1. [Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor with Cushing's Syndrome in a Patient who Underwent Pulmonary Resection by Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Mishina, Taijiro; Miyajima, Masahiro; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary carcinoid tumor with Cushing's syndrome is comparatively rare disease. It is difficult to make an early diagnosis due to small size lesion in its early stage. We report a case of pulmonary carcinoid tumor with Cushing's syndrome successfully localised by positron emission tomography/computed tomography and was resected in the early stage. The levels of serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone( ACTH) decreased immediately after surgery, and the symptoms of Cushing's syndrome were relieved.

  2. [Autopsy case of von Recklinghausen's disease associated with lung cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach, and duodenal carcinoid tumor].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Miki; Wakabayashi, Osamu; Araya, Yoshikazu; Jinushi, Eisei; Yoshida, Fumiaki

    2009-09-01

    A 58-year-old man with von Recklinghausen's disease was admitted for further investigation of right chest pain. Chest X-ray revealed multiple emphysematous bullae in both lungs and a tumor shadow in the right upper lobe. Bronchofiberscopy was performed, but an adequate specimen was not obtained. The tumor was diagnosed as a non-small-cell lung cancer with direct invasion to the adjacent rib. Although chemotherapy and radiotherapy resulted in decrease in tumor size, the tumor subsequently increased in size and the patient died 14 months after the first admission. Autopsy revealed multiple emphysematous bullae, poorly differentiated adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung, gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach, and duodenal carcinoid tumor. This case suggests the possibility that von Recklinghausen's disease associated with emphysematous bullae is a risk factor for lung cancer. It has also been suggested that the genetic abnormality responsible for von Recklinghausen's disease increases the risk for various types of malignancy. Although von Recklinghausen's disease is reportedly associated with various malignant tumors, it is quite rare for von Recklinghausen's disease to be associated with triple non-neurogenic tumors. Careful observation is mandatory for patients with von Recklinghausen's disease.

  3. Development of a gastric carcinoid tumor following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsung-Yen; Lai, Jin-Yao; Wang, Chao-Jan; Chen, Shih-Yen; Jaing, Tang-Her; Hsueh, Chuen; Shih, Lee-Yung; Chen, Shih-Hsiang

    2017-06-01

    Gastric carcinoid tumor is rarely diagnosed in children. We report a case of gastric carcinoid tumor that occurred after allogeneic HSCT. A 13-year-old girl with ETP acute lymphoblastic leukemia underwent allogeneic HSCT from a 7/8 HLA-matched unrelated donor. She presented with rashes, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, which were suggestive of GVHD, 7 months after HSCT. Immunosuppressive agents failed to resolve these symptoms well. After a series of evaluations, carcinoid syndrome caused by a gastric carcinoid tumor was diagnosed. The tumor was located in the antral region and resulted in partial gastric outlet obstruction. She received subtotal gastrectomy with regional lymph node dissection. However, she had a flare-up of GVHD 1 month after surgery, and immunosuppressive therapy was intensified accordingly. Although her GVHD was getting better, she developed respiratory syncytial viral pneumonia with rapid progression to respiratory failure. She died of multiple organ failure 2 months postoperatively. This is the first pediatric case of a gastric carcinoid tumor following allogeneic HSCT. Our case also highlights the necessity for pediatric transplant physicians to be aware of carcinoid syndrome caused by this rare tumor in the setting of GVHD with poor response to immunosuppressive agents. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Phase III trial of chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and streptozotocin compared with interferon alpha for advanced carcinoid tumors: FNCLCC-FFCD 9710.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Laetitia; Bonnetain, Frank; Rougier, Philippe; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Gamelin, Eric; Etienne, Pierre-Luc; Cadiot, Guillaume; Mitry, Emmanuel; Smith, Denis; Cvitkovic, Frédérique; Coudert, Bruno; Ricard, Floriane; Bedenne, Laurent; Seitz, Jean-François

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this randomized multicenter phase III trial was to compare chemotherapy and interferon (IFN) in patients with metastatic carcinoid tumors. Patients with documented progressive, unresectable, metastatic carcinoid tumors were randomized between 5-fluorouracil plus streptozotocin (day 1-5) and recombinant IFN-alpha-2a (3 MU x 3 per week). Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). From February 1998 to June 2004, 64 patients were included. The two arms were well matched for median age, sex ratio, PS 0-1, previous chemotherapy, surgery, or radiotherapy. The median PFS for chemotherapy was 5.5 months versus 14.1 for IFN (hazard ratio=0.75 (0.41-1.36)). Overall survival (OS), tolerance, and effects on carcinoid symptoms were not significantly different. Despite a trend in favor of IFN, there was no difference in PFS and OS in advanced metastatic carcinoid tumors and therapeutic effect of both treatments was mild.

  5. Carcinoid Syndrome and Costs of Care During the First Year After Diagnosis of Neuroendocrine Tumors Among Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chan; Chu, Yiyi; Halperin, Daniel M; Dasari, Arvind; Zhou, Shouhao; Xu, Ying; Yao, James C; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina

    2017-06-22

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can secrete hormonal peptides that lead to additional symptom burdens. However, it is largely unknown whether and to what extent the additional symptom burdens translate into higher costs of care. This study aimed to examine the cost pattern of elderly NET patients during the first year of diagnosis, taking into account of the carcinoid syndrome status. We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Medicare data to identify elderly NET patients diagnosed between January 2003 and December 2011. Patients who had at least two claims indicative of carcinoid syndrome during the 3 months before and after the NET diagnosis were considered to have carcinoid syndrome. We adopted a payer's perspective and quantified economic outcomes using the following three measures: (a) total Medicare reimbursement amount, (b) inpatient amount, and (c) outpatient amount. We used a generalized linear model (GLM) to examine the association between syndrome and costs. Our study cohort included 6,749 elderly NET well-differentiated and moderately differentiated patients. Of these patients, 5,633 (83%) were alive 1 year after diagnosis with continuous enrollment, and 1,116 (17%) died within 1 year. The multivariable GLM showed significant association between the syndrome and higher total, inpatient, and outpatient costs among the group who survived the whole year; the association was insignificant among the group who died within the first year of diagnosis. This population-based study showed that NET patients with carcinoid syndrome incurred higher costs of care especially among those who survived the first year of diagnosis. The Oncologist 2017;22:1-13 IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This is the first population-based study that examines the health care costs associated with carcinoid syndrome among neuroendocrine tumor patients. Among patients alive throughout the first year, the unadjusted analyses showed that total median monthly costs were above $1,000 higher

  6. The CCK(2) receptor antagonist, YF476, inhibits Mastomys ECL cell hyperplasia and gastric carcinoid tumor development.

    PubMed

    Kidd, M; Siddique, Z-L; Drozdov, I; Gustafsson, B I; Camp, R L; Black, J W; Boyce, M; Modlin, I M

    2010-06-08

    YF476 is a potent and highly selective cholecystokin 2 (CCK(2)) receptor antagonist of the benzodiazepine class. It inhibits gastric neuroendocrine enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell secretion, proliferation and spontaneous formation of gastric neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids) in cotton rats. The Mastomys rodent species exhibits a genetic predisposition to gastric ECL neuroendocrine tumor formation which can be accelerated by acid suppression and induction of hypergastrinemia. In this respect, it mimics the human condition of atrophic gastritis, hypergastrinemia and gastric carcinoid development. We investigated whether YF476 could inhibit acid suppression-induced ECL cell hyperplasia and neoplasia in this model. In addition, we examined whether YF476 could reverse established ECL cell hyperplasia and neoplasia. Targeting the CCK(2) receptor during Loxtidine-induced hypergastrinemia resulted in a reduction in ECL cell secretion (plasma and mucosal histamine, and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) transcripts, p<0.05) and proliferation (numbers of HDC-positive cells, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cyclin D1 transcription). This was associated with a decrease in ECL cell hyperplasia and a 60% reduction in gastric ECL cell microcarcinoid (tumors <0.3mm in size) formation. YF476 inhibited ECL cell neoplasia (gastric carcinoid) in animals with hyperplasia, inhibited the formation of ECL cell tumors when co-administered with Loxtidine and reversed the growth and developement of gastric ECL cell carcinoids in long-term acid suppressed Mastomys. Variable importance analysis using a logistic multinomial regression model indicated the effects of YF476 were specific to the ECL cell and alterations in ECL cell function reflected inhibition of transcripts for HDC, Chromogranin A (CgA), CCK(2) and the autocrine growth factor, CTGF. We conclude that specifically targeting the CCK(2) receptor inhibits gastrin-mediated ECL cell secretion and ECL cell proliferation and tumor

  7. A Case of Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor with a Superimposed Aspergilloma Presenting As a Covert Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Jin; Yu, Ji Hee; Kim, Nan Hee; Kim, Young Hye; Kim, Young Sik; Seo, Ji A

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome is a challenging diagnosis only responsible for approximately 10% of Cushing syndrome cases. It has been associated with a variety of benign and malignant tumors including a carcinoid tumor accompanied by aspergilloma in our case that was significantly difficult to be detected. We report a patient over 70 years old with uncontrolled hypertension and hypokalemia presenting with generalized edema. Laboratory results revealed ACTH-dependent Cushing syndrome, but imaging studies did not show any discrete lesions secreting ACTH. The petrosal to peripheral ACTH gradient resulted in no evidence of pituitary adenoma. As the only lesion suspicious for ectopic ACTH secretion was a right lower round cystic lesion that did not appear to be a carcinoid tumor on computed tomography scan of the chest, the patient underwent video-assisted thoracic surgical resection to provide a definitive diagnosis. The final diagnosis was a small ectopic ACTH-secreting carcinoid tumor with unusual superimposed aspergilloma in the periphery of the lung. Postoperatively, the abnormal endocrine levels were normalized, and all of the clinical symptoms and signs were ameliorated. This is an informative case of ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS) that was the cause of hypokalemia, hypertension, metabolic alkalosis, and hypercortisolism despite its poorly specific cushingoid morphology and uncommon imaging findings. Therefore, we recommend that clinicians investigate any possible lesion as a potential source of EAS. PMID:28642733

  8. A Case of Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor with a Superimposed Aspergilloma Presenting As a Covert Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Jin; Yu, Ji Hee; Kim, Nan Hee; Kim, Young Hye; Kim, Young Sik; Seo, Ji A

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome is a challenging diagnosis only responsible for approximately 10% of Cushing syndrome cases. It has been associated with a variety of benign and malignant tumors including a carcinoid tumor accompanied by aspergilloma in our case that was significantly difficult to be detected. We report a patient over 70 years old with uncontrolled hypertension and hypokalemia presenting with generalized edema. Laboratory results revealed ACTH-dependent Cushing syndrome, but imaging studies did not show any discrete lesions secreting ACTH. The petrosal to peripheral ACTH gradient resulted in no evidence of pituitary adenoma. As the only lesion suspicious for ectopic ACTH secretion was a right lower round cystic lesion that did not appear to be a carcinoid tumor on computed tomography scan of the chest, the patient underwent video-assisted thoracic surgical resection to provide a definitive diagnosis. The final diagnosis was a small ectopic ACTH-secreting carcinoid tumor with unusual superimposed aspergilloma in the periphery of the lung. Postoperatively, the abnormal endocrine levels were normalized, and all of the clinical symptoms and signs were ameliorated. This is an informative case of ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS) that was the cause of hypokalemia, hypertension, metabolic alkalosis, and hypercortisolism despite its poorly specific cushingoid morphology and uncommon imaging findings. Therefore, we recommend that clinicians investigate any possible lesion as a potential source of EAS.

  9. [Neuroendocrine tumors of the stomach (gastric carcinoids) are on the rise: good prognosis with early detection].

    PubMed

    Scherübl, H; Faiss, S; Jahn, H U; Liehr, R-M; Schwertner, C; Steinberg, J; Stölzel, U; Weinke, T; Zimmer, T; Klöppel, G

    2009-07-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the stomach are on the rise. In the United States they have increased about tenfold in the last 35 years. Prognosis has been much improved over the last three to four decades. Nowadays most of such NETs are diagnosed at an early stage. Quite often gastric NETs are found incidentally during a gastroscopy, performed for other reasons. Most of the asymptomatic, well differentiated gastric NETs are less than 2 cm in diameter. Conservative management and endoscopic surveillance is adequate for well differentiated, multifocal type 1 or type 2 gastric NETs (gastric carcinoids) of 10-20 mm , unless they are angio-invasive, have infiltrated into the muscularis propria or have metastasized. Endoscopic ultrasound is the method of choice to determine tumor size and depth of infiltration. Surgery is, however, indicated for all NETs larger than 20 mm. For optimal management tumor biology, type and stage of the neoplasm as well as the individual situation of the patient have to be taken into account. Most of the patients can be treated conservatively and be followed up with endoscopic surveillance.

  10. Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome associated with bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumor in youth: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Ya; Liu, Xu-Dong; Li, Wei-Nan; Dong, Si-Yuan; Qu, Xiao-Han; Gong, Shu-Lei; Shao, Ming-Rui; Zhang, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome (CushingPS) caused by bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumors presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The present study reports the case of an 18-year-old male patient presenting with rapid weight gain, polyuria, polydipsia and progressive muscle weakness. Chemical and imaging findings suggested ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropin. Whole-body (18)fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)FDG-PET/CT) positron-emission tomography revealed an increased uptake of (18)FDG-PET/CT in the right middle lung mass and lobar lymph node. Postoperative pathology confirmed the presence of a typical carcinoid, as well as a lobar lymph node metastasis. The patient underwent a right middle lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node resection, which resulted in symptom clearance, followed by rapid weight loss. No CushingPS or tumor recurrence was observed at the 3-month postoperative follow-up.

  11. Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome associated with bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumor in youth: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    LI, WEN-YA; LIU, XU-DONG; LI, WEI-NAN; DONG, SI-YUAN; QU, XIAO-HAN; GONG, SHU-LEI; SHAO, MING-RUI; ZHANG, LIN

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic Cushing's syndrome (CushingPS) caused by bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumors presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The present study reports the case of an 18-year-old male patient presenting with rapid weight gain, polyuria, polydipsia and progressive muscle weakness. Chemical and imaging findings suggested ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropin. Whole-body 18fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG-PET/CT) positron-emission tomography revealed an increased uptake of 18FDG-PET/CT in the right middle lung mass and lobar lymph node. Postoperative pathology confirmed the presence of a typical carcinoid, as well as a lobar lymph node metastasis. The patient underwent a right middle lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node resection, which resulted in symptom clearance, followed by rapid weight loss. No CushingPS or tumor recurrence was observed at the 3-month postoperative follow-up. PMID:27347101

  12. A false positive fluorodeoxyglucose lymphadenopathy in a patient with pulmonary carcinoid tumor and previous breast reconstruction after bilateral mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Billè, Andrea; Girelli, Lara; Leo, Francesco; Pastorino, Ugo

    2014-03-01

    We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with a positive fluorodeoxyglucose integrated positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/TC) mammary chain lymphadenopathy and carcinoid tumor of the left lower lobe who had a previous bilateral mastectomy and breast reconstruction for breast cancer. She underwent a right muscle sparing mini-thoracotomy and mammary chain lymphadenectomy; the final histopathology showed granulomatous reaction to silicone.

  13. Carcinoid tumor of the lung with massive ossification: report of a case showing the evidence of osteomimicry and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tsubochi, Hiroyoshi; Endo, Shunsuke; Oda, Yoshinao; Dobashi, Yoh

    2013-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is one of the commonly encountered primary pulmonary neoplasms. Although it has been known to be accompanied by calcification and/or ossification, presentation with a large ossified mass is rare. We describe here the case of a 29-year-old female with the radiological finding of a single bony nodular lesion. Pathological examination of the surgically resected specimen led to the diagnosis of carcinoid tumor of the lung with massive ossification. Although histological features showed the tumor of low grade malignancy, subcarinal and right hilar lymph nodes were found to be positive for metastasis. Further immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the tumor cells expressed the osteogenic inducer protein, bone morphogenic protrein-2 [BMP-2] and osteoblastic marker protein, osteocalcin. We interpreted this to mean that the carcinoid tumor cells had acquired an osteoblastic phenotype and had subsequently developed marked intratumoral ossification. The relevant literature is reviewed and possible mechanisms of tumor-related osteogenesis are discussed.

  14. Transvaginal resection of a rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Hara, Masayasu; Takayama, Satoru; Arakawa, Atsushi; Sato, Mikinori; Nagasaki, Takaya; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2012-09-01

    We herein report a case in which a rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was resected transvaginally. The patient, a 45-year-old female, had a rectal GIST on the anterior wall of the lower rectum. The tumor was within 6 cm of the anal verge, a location which would normally require performing an ultra-low anterior resection using the Double Staple Technique, and a diverting stoma. To minimize the invasiveness of treatment and to reduce the postoperative morbidity, a transvaginal resection was performed. Under general anesthesia, the posterior vaginal mucosa was incised vertically. The tumor was then excised en bloc with the overlying rectovaginal septum and rectal mesenchymal tissue. The defect was repaired primarily, and a diverting stoma was not required. The procedure was uncomplicated, and the patient was discharged home with an intact anal sphincter function and no abdominal incisions. In female patients, transvaginal resection of low anterior rectal lesions may provide a minimally invasive alternative to the traditional ultra-low anterior resection.

  15. [Carcinoid papillomatosis].

    PubMed

    Cardama, J E; Gatti, J C; Cabrera, H N; Bianchi, O; Garófalo, M

    1976-01-01

    Papilomatosis Carcinoides, presents clinical and histological characteristics that may be authentically described as a transition state between the benign papillomatous proliferations and spindle cell carcinoma. It involves a series of clinical conditions, that are described with different names that correspond to the condyloma accuminatum gigantum. [Buschke and Lowenstein) wartic carcinoma [Ackerman], Papillomatosis oral florid [Rock and Fisher], carcinomatoid [Gilbert] profuse conjuntival papillomatosis [Bazex], etc. These latter only refer to partial localizations or a special clinical form. That is why we believe the denonmination Papillomatosis Carcinoides, is preferable, which is its cutaneous, mucose or semimucose forms involves all of them. The treatments applied to the 18 cases presented have been very diverse: they vary from the elimination of the lesions by the application of topical podophylin to large surgical ablations. But most of them showed a regression or cure of their lesions by citostatics [methotrexate] not prevent the proliferative advance of the lessions. These therapeutic data can also contribute to its nosologic classification. In some cases they have an evolutive character with slow progression for years, still being curable with podophylin and in others that due to their chronic evolution with added supuration, and complications of the general health, make surgery necessary. In most cases, the antimetabolities are the therapy of choice the radiations seem inoperative. It may be noted that tumoral papillomatous lesions produced by virus, exist in veterinatian pathology (fibropapillomatosis in the bovine genitals, equine sarcoid, papilomatosis of goats, monkeys, etc.). Noteworthy are those of the oral mucosa of rabbits which are white greyish sesiles or pedunculated small nodules localized mostly on the inferior surface of tongue with a similar histology to the papilomatosis carcinoides. These observations would suggest a viral ethiology

  16. [Unilateral hyperlucent lung induced by a carcinoid tumor: comments on the differential diagnosis and mechanisms of hypoperfusion].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, N; Bugnet, A-S; Demian, M; Massard, G; De Blay, F; Pauli, G

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old woman in whom a systematic thoracic x-ray led to the diagnosis of unilateral hyperlucent lung due to a carcinoid tumor obstructing the main left bronchus almost completely. Injected computed tomography permitted diagnosis of left lung hypoperfusion and visualization of the tumor. After enlarged inferior left lobar resection, normal perfusion was observed six months later on the isotopic lung perfusion scan. Other reported causes of unilateral hyperlucent lung are discussed as well as pathophysiological mechanisms of lung hypoperfusion and hypoxic vasoconstriction.

  17. Residual ovarian tissue mimicking malignancy in a patient with mucinous carcinoid tumor of the ovary. A case report.

    PubMed

    Burke, M; Talerman, A; Carlson, J A; Bibbo, M

    1997-01-01

    Mucinous carcinoid tumor of the ovary is an uncommon lesion in reproductive-age women. If a patient status post total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH-BSO) for this tumor presents with a pelvic mass, recurrence of the tumor must be considered, as must the presence of residual ovarian tissue producing physiologic cysts with mass effect, termed the "ovarian remnant syndrome." Benign ovarian follicle cysts may have cellular atypia and mimic malignancy. A female, one year status post TAH-BSO for mucinous carcinoid tumor of the ovary, presented with pelvic mass. Clinical and radiologic evidence supported the diagnosis of recurrent tumor. Aspiration biopsy material was compatible with malignancy, and immunocytochemical stains supported a neuroendocrine origin of the cells. Surgical excision and histologic examination of the mass revealed ovarian tissue with features of corpus luteum and follicular cyst. Numerous pitfalls exist when considering an unusual tumor. While the patient's history, clinical impressions and immunocytochemistry may strongly suggest malignancy, more common benign entities may mimic malignancy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  18. Ectopic Cushing syndrome associated with thymic carcinoid tumor as the first presentation of MEN1 syndrome-report of a family with MEN1 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Hasani-Ranjbar, Shirin; Rahmanian, Masoud; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Soltani, Akbar; Soltanzade, Akbar; Mahrampour, Elnaz; Amoli, Mahsa M

    2014-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1(MEN1) is an autosomal dominant syndrome. Although thymic carcinoid tumor is recognized as a part of MEN1 syndrome but functioning thymic carcinoid tumor as the first presentation of the MEN1 seems to be very rare. In this report, we present a 29-year-old male who developed ectopic Cushing syndrome secondary to thymic carcinoid tumor and was diagnosed as MEN1 syndrome 2 years later. Further evaluation revealed the presence of carcinoid tumor and other MEN 1 manifestations in several other member of family. Genetic evaluation showed presence of a previously reported mutation in exon 10(R527X) of MEN1 gene in these patients. This presentation showed that thymic neuroendocrine tumor could be the first manifestation of the MEN1 syndrome and it might be diagnosed as a dominant manifestation of this syndrome in a family. We suggest biochemical or genetic screening for MEN-1 syndrome for patients with thymic carcinoid.

  19. Typical laryngeal carcinoid tumor with recurrence and lymph node metastasis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinying; Chen, Haihong; Zhou, Shuihong

    2014-01-01

    Typical carcinoid tumor of the larynx is an extremely rare lesion which arises from neuroendocrine cells scanning in the laryngeal mucosa or submucosal glands. Conventionally, it is a well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma, conservative surgery represents the treatment of choice, and the patient usually has a good prognosis with rarely recurrence and metastasis. In this report, we present a case of typical laryngeal carcinoid tumor with recurrence and lymph node metastasis. The patient was a 58-year-old man, complaints of intermittent burning pain in his both ears for 2 years, and for the recent one month the pain turn to continuous accompanied with a mild discomfort in the throat, he had neither hoarseness, dysphagia, nor any otorrhea and hearing loss. The patient was scheduled to undergo a tracheotomy and then a biopsy under supporting laryngoscopy. During the operation, the frozen section diagnosis from the first and the second time both indicated that the biopsy specimens originated from musculo-epithelia, it couldn't be differed from malignant to benign. So the mass was simply removed under supporting laryngoscopy. The histopathology from paraffin sections revealed typical carcinoid of the larynx and the second procedure consisted of supraglottic laryngectomy with clear margins, the otalgia resolved and the patient had no difficulty with phonation or swallowing. After 1 year follow-up, the patient was found a mass on his right neck with symptom free, B-ultrasonography indicated several enlargement lymph nodes with some merged on both sides of the neck, the patient was scheduled to undergo a "total-laryngectomy with radical neck dissection on the left side and an elective neck dissection on the right side". The specimens were positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A and synaptophysin, a final diagnosis of typical carcinoid was made for the recurrence lesion and the metastasis of the lymph nodes. Though the post-operative recovery was uneventful, the

  20. Typical laryngeal carcinoid tumor with recurrence and lymph node metastasis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinying; Chen, Haihong; Zhou, Shuihong

    2014-01-01

    Typical carcinoid tumor of the larynx is an extremely rare lesion which arises from neuroendocrine cells scanning in the laryngeal mucosa or submucosal glands. Conventionally, it is a well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma, conservative surgery represents the treatment of choice, and the patient usually has a good prognosis with rarely recurrence and metastasis. In this report, we present a case of typical laryngeal carcinoid tumor with recurrence and lymph node metastasis. The patient was a 58-year-old man, complaints of intermittent burning pain in his both ears for 2 years, and for the recent one month the pain turn to continuous accompanied with a mild discomfort in the throat, he had neither hoarseness, dysphagia, nor any otorrhea and hearing loss. The patient was scheduled to undergo a tracheotomy and then a biopsy under supporting laryngoscopy. During the operation, the frozen section diagnosis from the first and the second time both indicated that the biopsy specimens originated from musculo-epithelia, it couldn’t be differed from malignant to benign. So the mass was simply removed under supporting laryngoscopy. The histopathology from paraffin sections revealed typical carcinoid of the larynx and the second procedure consisted of supraglottic laryngectomy with clear margins, the otalgia resolved and the patient had no difficulty with phonation or swallowing. After 1 year follow-up, the patient was found a mass on his right neck with symptom free, B-ultrasonography indicated several enlargement lymph nodes with some merged on both sides of the neck, the patient was scheduled to undergo a “total-laryngectomy with radical neck dissection on the left side and an elective neck dissection on the right side”. The specimens were positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A and synaptophysin, a final diagnosis of typical carcinoid was made for the recurrence lesion and the metastasis of the lymph nodes. Though the post-operative recovery was uneventful, the

  1. The role of endogenous gastrin in the development of enterochromaffin-like cell carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis: a study with the specific gastrin receptor antagonist AG-041R.

    PubMed

    Chiba, T; Kinoshita, Y; Sawada, M; Kishi, K; Baba, A; Hoshino, E

    1998-01-01

    We examined the effects of a newly synthesized gastrin receptor antagonist, AG-041R, on the growth of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis both in vitro and in vivo. AG-041R was as potent as the well known gastrin antagonist L365,260 in inhibiting not only the gastrin-induced release of histamine from but also histidine decarboxylase (HDC) gene expression in the ECL carcinoid tumor cells. AG-041R also inhibited gastrin-induced DNA synthesis and c-fos gene expression in the tumor cells. Furthermore, AG-041R significantly inhibited the growth of the transplanted Mastomys ECL carcinoid tumors in vivo. From these data, it is concluded that endogenous gastrin is involved in the growth of ECL carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis. Moreover, AG-041R is shown to have a potential as an anti-neoplastic agent for ECL carcinoid tumor of the stomach.

  2. A rare association of celiac disease and rectal neuroendocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Deniz; Tanrıverdi, Özgür; Solak Özşeker, Havva; Özşeker, Burak

    2017-07-28

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated enteropathy which is triggered by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Increased risk of all gastrointestinal cancers was found during the first year after diagnosis of CD. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are a heterogeneous tumor group originating from the diffuse neuroendocrine system. Today, the incidences of both GEP-NETs and CD have increased due to the increased availability of diagnostic tools and awareness. Association of GEP-NETs with CD is rarely seen. Here we aimed to present a case in which we diagnosed CD with concurrent rectal NET. Association of CD and rectal NET has not been reported in the literature, and we believe that our case report can contribute to the epidemiological data.

  3. Erroneous diagnosis of small cell lung cancer based on small biopsies with far-reaching consequences: case report of a typical carcinoid tumor

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Bettina; Kampe, Sandra; Theegarten, Dirk; Aigner, Clemens

    2017-01-01

    Although neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the lung are frequently discussed together, carcinoids are very different from high-grade small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). SCLC is found in heavy-smoking, older patients, whereas smoking is not strongly associated with carcinoid tumors. We present the case of a 46-year-old never smoking woman who was misdiagnosed with SCLC. The patient was not responsive to radio-chemotherapy plus prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI); she had a typical carcinoid (TC) tumor according to the final pathology report. We aim to demonstrate that diagnosis of SCLC based on cytology or small biopsy specimens must be scrutinized when the clinical constellation is unusual, or when the follow-up assessment shows no response to systemic treatment. PMID:28275490

  4. Carcinoid tumor associated with adjacent dysplastic columnar epithelium in the renal pelvis: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Sun; Choi, Chan; Kang, Taek Won; Choi, Yoo Duk

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are well documented in the pulmonary and gastrointestinal systems, but very rare in the urinary tract, especially in the renal pelvis. We report on a 60-year-old female patient who presented with left flank pain and fever. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a heterogeneously enhancing mass in the left renal pelvis and a stone at the left proximal ureter. Multiple parenchymal lesions were also observed, which were identified as uneven caliectasis displaying air-fluid levels and renal parenchymal atrophy. The patient underwent simple nephro-ureterectomy. Macroscopically, a polypoid mass was observed in the renal pelvis. Microscopically, the tumor revealed acinar, tubular, and solid pattern and was composed of small, monotonous and hyperchromatic cells. Lining epithelia in renal pelvis and ureter revealed columnar epithelia with dysplastic change. The tumor cells were positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, CD56, and focally positive for cytokeratin. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin and chromogranin A highlighted the neuroendocrine cells in the columnar epithelium. Ki-67 (1:50; MIB-1) labeling index was less than 1% in the area with highest uptake. We report here a case of carcinoid tumor of the renal pelvis that was associated with adjacent dysplastic columnar epithelium. © 2015 Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Atypical carcinoid tumor of the lung: a surveillance, epidemiology, and end results database analysis.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Conor E; Behera, Madhusmita; Kim, Sungjin; Chen, Zhengjia; Saba, Nabil F; Pillai, Rathi N; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Khuri, Fadlo R; Ramalingam, Suresh S

    2015-03-01

    Atypical carcinoid (AC) of the lung is a rare form of thoracic malignancy. The limited knowledge of its biology and outcome stems largely from small, single institution experiences. We analyzed the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (SEER) to better understand the clinical characteristics of this disease. Demographic, treatment, and outcome data on all patients with pulmonary AC were obtained from the SEER database with 18 reporting sites from 1973 to 2010 using SEER*Stat 8.1.2. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS 9.3 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC). There were 947,463 patients diagnosed with lung and bronchus tumors in the SEER database, of which 441 had AC (0.05%). Median age of AC patients was 65 years; 69% were women and 87% of white ethnicity. Metastatic disease was present in 20% of patients at diagnosis. In terms of treatment, 78% of patients underwent resection and 12.5% received radiation. The overall 1-year and 3-year survival rates were 86% and 67%, respectively. The 3-year survival rates for distant (M1), regional (lymph node involvement), and localized (lung only) disease were 26% (13 of 50), 69% (50 of 72), and 85% (99 of 116), respectively. On univariate analysis, patients treated with surgery had reduced risk of death (hazard ratio, HR 0.19; p < 0.001), whereas radiation treatment was associated with increased risk of death (HR 2.45; p < 0.001). AC accounted for less than 1% of all lung cancers diagnosed and was more frequent in women. The best outcomes were observed with surgical resection for localized disease.

  6. Large presacral tailgut cyst with a carcinoid tumor in a male: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Charalampakis, Vasileios; Stamatiou, Dimitrios; Christodoulakis, Manousos; Kafousi, Maria; Chryssou, Evangelia; de Bree, Eelco; Melissas, John

    2014-05-01

    Tailgut cysts are developmental hamartomas found in the presacral space. They are usually detected incidentally during physical examinations or imaging studies. However, they may cause symptoms due to compression of nearby organs. Due to their potential malignant transformation, surgical resection is warranted, while routine biopsy is considered controversial because of the concern about infection of the tailgut cyst and needle-track implantation of malignant cells. The co-existence of a carcinoid in a tailgut cyst is extremely rare. Only 16 cases have been reported previously, the vast majority of which were found in females. We herein present the case of a carcinoid in a tailgut cyst found in a male patient, discuss the potential pathogenesis of tailgut carcinoids, and underline the fact that their previous consideration of the condition as a female-restricted entity should be rejected.

  7. Alcohol consumption and rectal tumor mutations and epigenetic changes.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Wolff, Roger K; Herrick, Jennifer S; Curtin, Karen; Caan, Bette J; Samowitz, Wade

    2010-08-01

    An association between alcohol and rectal cancer has been reported in the epidemiological literature. In this study we further explore the association by examining specific tumor markers with alcohol consumption as well as types of alcoholic beverages consumed. We assessed alcohol consumption with CpG Island Methylator Phenotype, TP53, and KRAS2 mutations in incident rectal cancer cases and compared them with population-based controls. We evaluated type, long-term, and recent alcohol consumption. We observed a trend toward increasing risk of CpG Island Methylator Phenotype positive tumors and long-term alcohol consumption. In contrast, after adjusting for total alcohol intake, recent high beer consumption significantly increased the odds of having a TP53 mutation compared with those who did not drink beer (odds ratio, 1.97; 95% CI 1.24, 3.12). We observed a nonstatistically significant reduced risk of a TP53 mutation among those who drank wine (in particular, red wine) vs nonconsumers of wine. The association between TP53 mutations and recent beer consumption was strongest for transversion mutations. These data suggest that both alcohol and specific constituents of alcoholic beverages contribute to rectal cancer risk among unique disease pathways.

  8. Concurrent primary carcinoid tumor arising within mature teratoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma in the horseshoe kidney: report of a rare case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ke; You, Qihan; Zhao, Ming; Yao, Hongtian; Xiang, Hua; Wang, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Primary carcinoid tumor arising in a mature teratoma of the horseshoe kidney is exceptionally rare and only 4 such cases have been reported in the world literature to date. The simultaneous occurrence of different subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) or RCC coexistence with non-RCC neoplasms from the same kidney is unusual and infrequently reported. Herein we report a case of primary carcinoid tumor arising within mature teratoma, concurrent with a clear cell RCC in the horseshoe kidney of a 37-year-old man. Histologically, both the carcinoid tumor and clear cell RCC demonstrated the characteristic morphology in their classic forms. In addition to the carcinoid tumor, the mature teratoma consisted of variably sized, large cystic spaces lined by cytologically bland mucinous columnar epithelium, pseudostratified columnar epithelium, ciliated epithelium and mature smooth muscle fibers were also identified within the cystic wall. Furthermore, foci of round, small nodules composed of mature prostatic acinus were noted in the teratoma which was confirmed by exhibiting strong immunoreactivity for prostate specific antigen. The present case serves to expand the histologic component that may be encountered in the mature terotoma of the kidney and further broadens the spectrum of primary tumors occurring in the horseshoe kidney.

  9. Concurrent primary carcinoid tumor arising within mature teratoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma in the horseshoe kidney: report of a rare case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ke; You, Qihan; Zhao, Ming; Yao, Hongtian; Xiang, Hua; Wang, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Primary carcinoid tumor arising in a mature teratoma of the horseshoe kidney is exceptionally rare and only 4 such cases have been reported in the world literature to date. The simultaneous occurrence of different subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) or RCC coexistence with non-RCC neoplasms from the same kidney is unusual and infrequently reported. Herein we report a case of primary carcinoid tumor arising within mature teratoma, concurrent with a clear cell RCC in the horseshoe kidney of a 37-year-old man. Histologically, both the carcinoid tumor and clear cell RCC demonstrated the characteristic morphology in their classic forms. In addition to the carcinoid tumor, the mature teratoma consisted of variably sized, large cystic spaces lined by cytologically bland mucinous columnar epithelium, pseudostratified columnar epithelium, ciliated epithelium and mature smooth muscle fibers were also identified within the cystic wall. Furthermore, foci of round, small nodules composed of mature prostatic acinus were noted in the teratoma which was confirmed by exhibiting strong immunoreactivity for prostate specific antigen. The present case serves to expand the histologic component that may be encountered in the mature terotoma of the kidney and further broadens the spectrum of primary tumors occurring in the horseshoe kidney. PMID:24228123

  10. Ghrelin-producing well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (carcinoid) of tailgut cyst. Morphological, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and RT-PCR study of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Boni, Luigi; Finzi, Giovanna; Vigetti, Davide; Papanikolaou, Nikolaos; Tenconi, Silvia Maria; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Clerici, Moira; Garancini, Silvana; Capella, Carlo

    2010-09-01

    Well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids) arising in the presacral space are rare neoplasms that can arise in association with either sacrococcygeal teratomas or tailgut cysts. Although tumors arising in tailgut cysts are more frequent than those associated with teratomas, they are still very rare, and only 13 cases have been reported in the literature. We describe the first case of a carcinoid composed of ghrelin-producing cells arising in a tailgut cyst. Ghrelin production was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods. A 73-year-old woman with back and pelvic pain was found to have a presacral mass histologically diagnosed, on needle biopsy, as a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. Workup did not show another primary tumor or metastatic disease. The patient underwent laparoscopic resection of the mass, and the pathological diagnosis of the surgical specimen was of a tailgut cyst-associated carcinoid composed of ghrelin-producing cells. In addition, we have accurately reviewed the literature on presacral carcinoids, associated or unassociated with tailgut cysts, to give the reader a comprehensive overview of these very rare tumor types.

  11. Incidental finding of carcinoid tumor on Meckel’s diverticulum: case report and literature review, should prophylactic resection be recommended?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Meckel’s diverticulum (MD) is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract and is caused by incomplete obliteration of the vitelline duct during intrauterine life. MD affects less than 2% of the population. In most cases, MD is asymptomatic and the estimated average complication risk of MD carriers, which is inversely proportional to age, ranges between 2% and 4%. The most common MD-related complications are gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal obstruction and acute phlogosis. Excision is mandatory in the case of symptomatic diverticula regardless of age, while surgical treatment for asymptomatic diverticula remains controversial. According to the majority of studies, the incidental finding of MD in children is an indication for surgical resection, while the management of adults is not yet unanimous. In this case report, we describe the prophylactic resection of an incidentally detected MD, which led to the removal of an occult mucosal carcinoid tumor. In literature, the association of MD and carcinoid tumor is reported as a rare finding. Even though the strategy for adult patients of an incidental finding of MD during surgery performed for other reasons divides the experts, we recommend prophylactic excision in order to avoid any further risk. PMID:24884768

  12. Incidental finding of carcinoid tumor on Meckel's diverticulum: case report and literature review, should prophylactic resection be recommended?

    PubMed

    Caracappa, Daniela; Gullà, Nino; Lombardo, Francesco; Burini, Gloria; Castellani, Elisa; Boselli, Carlo; Gemini, Alessandro; Burattini, Maria Federica; Covarelli, Piero; Noya, Giuseppe

    2014-05-08

    Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal tract and is caused by incomplete obliteration of the vitelline duct during intrauterine life. MD affects less than 2% of the population. In most cases, MD is asymptomatic and the estimated average complication risk of MD carriers, which is inversely proportional to age, ranges between 2% and 4%. The most common MD-related complications are gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal obstruction and acute phlogosis. Excision is mandatory in the case of symptomatic diverticula regardless of age, while surgical treatment for asymptomatic diverticula remains controversial. According to the majority of studies, the incidental finding of MD in children is an indication for surgical resection, while the management of adults is not yet unanimous. In this case report, we describe the prophylactic resection of an incidentally detected MD, which led to the removal of an occult mucosal carcinoid tumor. In literature, the association of MD and carcinoid tumor is reported as a rare finding. Even though the strategy for adult patients of an incidental finding of MD during surgery performed for other reasons divides the experts, we recommend prophylactic excision in order to avoid any further risk.

  13. Thymic and Bronchial Carcinoid Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: The Mayo Clinic Experience from 1977 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Singh Ospina, Naykky; Thompson, Geoffrey B; C Nichols, Francis; Cassivi, Stephen D; Young, William F

    2015-12-01

    The clinical features of thymic carcinoid (TC) and bronchial carcinoid (BC) tumors as part of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) have been rarely described and their importance in clinical practice is debated. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and outcome of this uncommon manifestation of MEN1 in a tertiary care center setting. We present the clinical features of patients with MEN1 and either TC or BC evaluated at the Mayo Clinic from 1977 to 2013. A total of 348 patients with MEN1 were evaluated and the prevalence of TC was 2.0% (n = 7) and of BC 4.9% (n = 17). The majority of the patients with BC were men (61%) diagnosed on routine screening (77%) and BC was not the confirmed cause of death in any patient. In contrast, TC patients were all men and during follow-up 43% died due to TC complications. We conclude that TC and BC tumors are uncommon, but important components of MEN1. BC were most commonly diagnosed during routine screening and associated with an indolent course. TC were predominantly seen in men and associated with a more aggressive behavior.

  14. Ossification of a rectal tumor: an uncommon finding.

    PubMed

    Smajda, Stanislas; Danse, Etienne; Mertens de Wilmars, Maud; Humblet, Yves; Kartheuser, Alex; Jouret-Mourin, Anne

    2015-12-01

    The authors report the case of a 29-year-old woman with partially calcified stage cT4N2M0 mucoid adenocarcinoma of the mid-rectum. Concomitant neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was administered. Preoperative CT scan and MRI demonstrated stable disease with a marked increase of its mineralized component. Histology confirmed a mucoid adenocarcinoma with ossified matrix. Osteocytes were identified in the tumor. TNM (5th edition) staging was ypT3N2M1. This case illustrates heterotopic ossification of a rectal tumor, a fairly uncommon finding. The mechanism of heterotopic bone formation within gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma has not been fully elucidated. The impact of this particular feature on patient outcome is unknown. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  15. [Severe tricuspid insufficiency and primary carcinoid tumor of the ovary. Long term success after valve replacement. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Herreman, F; Vernant, P; Cachera, J P; Monier, P

    1978-01-01

    The case is reported of carcinoid heart disease in a lady of 70 with intractable congestive cardiac failure 5 years after the removal of a primary carcinoid tumour of the ovary. The special features of primary carcinoid tumours of the ovary are recalled, with emphasis on their rarity and of the absence of liver metastases. The various features of carcinoid syndrome are recalled in the light of current knowledge of the pathogenesis. A review of the literature on cardiac involvement in primary carcinoid tumours of the ovary, amounting to 10 cases, is included. The possibility of surgical cure of the heart lesions in carcinoid tumour by a prosthetic tricuspid valve are discussed, in the light of the 6 reported cases and the present one. Our report is the first one of replacement of the valve after removal of a primary ovarien carcinoid tumour, and the excellent result has been maintained after three years.

  16. A Case of Primary Combined Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Neuroendocrine (Atypical Carcinoid) Tumor in the Floor of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Fumihiko; Kanno, Naomi; Yanagawa, Toru; Bukawa, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    The combined squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with neuroendocrine (atypical carcinoid (AC)) tumor is extremely rare in the head and neck. We present here the first case of SCC with AC arising in the floor of the mouth of 65-year-old man. The tumor is comprised of two components of SCC and AC in the biopsy specimen. Neuroendocrine tumor component was classified as AC from the punctate necrosis and 2–10>/10 HPF. Immunohistochemical staining was HMW-CK/34B (+) and P63 (+) in SCC and synaptophysin (+) and CD56 (+) in AC. The pathological diagnosis of SCC with AC was made from both the morphological and immunological exam. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy was performed with radiotherapy 70.2 Gy and chemotherapy of CDDP and VP-16. Although the treatment effect was complete response both of primary tumor and of neck metastases, the recurrence of the primary tumor was after 6 months. Bilateral modified radical neck dissection and tumor resection of the floor of the mouth with reconstructive surgery of anterior lateral thigh free flap were performed. Although the primary and neck tumor did not recur, the multiple lung metastases and mediastinum lymph node metastases occurred at 6 months after surgery. PMID:28116178

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of a large metastatic carcinoid tumor: success with a note of caution

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, Bradley W.; Harvey, Harold A.; Dye, Charles E.; Dougherty-Hamod, Brandy; Moyer, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle infusion (EUS-FNI) of alcohol is the most reported method for EUS-guided tumor ablation. Several studies have reported successful EUS-guided ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, these tumors have been relatively small (< 3 cm). In this report, a 50-year-old man with a metastatic carcinoid tumor with a large porta hepatis mass was referred to our clinic for EUS-guided ethanol ablation. After two separate EUS-FNI ablations, there was a 36 % reduction in tumor size (9.0 × 11.4 cm to 6.7 × 9.8 cm) with associated tumor lysis syndrome. Chromogranin A levels decreased from 460 to 132 ng/mL. The patient reported complete resolution of abdominal pain within 2 weeks, but only mild improvement in flushing and diarrhea. In conclusion, large metastatic neuroendocrine tumors can be successfully treated with EUS-guided ethanol ablation. Evidence-based guidelines are needed with regard to the appropriate volume of ethanol injected in EUS-guided ablation to promote the efficacy and safety of this emerging procedure. PMID:26135103

  18. The use of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of composite and collision tumors: exemplified by pleural mesothelioma and carcinoid tumor of the lung.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Nelson G

    2012-07-01

    A case of a collision lymph node metastasis of a mesothelioma and a carcinoid tumor in a 73-year-old man with a history of asbestos exposure is reported. An interesting finding in this case was that both the mesothelioma and its lymph node metastases exhibited a wide variety of histologic patterns, including one characterized by a solid growth of large cells with abundant, clear, and foamy cytoplasm and another exhibiting deciduoid features. Pathologists should be aware that mesotheliomas can present very unusual morphologic features, such as those seen in the present case, and therefore, should be included in the differential diagnosis of those tumors that can display similar morphology and can metastasize to the serosal membranes. Reexamination of the pneumonectomy specimen in the current case identified a primary peripheral carcinoid tumor. The recognition of a nonasbestos-related tumor in a patient with mesothelioma is important since its presence may have an impact on the patient's life expectancy and, therefore, may affect any compensation settlement.

  19. Carcinoid Heart Disease in a Primary Ovarian Carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    T., Kolouch; H., Linkova; O., Lang; V., Ciprova; L., Brunerova

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoids are very rare, and only their insular form is associated with carcinoid syndrome. We herein describe a case report of an elderly woman who presented with typical carcinoid syndrome, which is routinely characterized by right-sided heart failure, diarrhoea, flushes, and other common manifestations. Further examination and biochemical testing of the patient confirmed suspected carcinoid tumor. However, the tumor was surprisingly localized in the left ovary. The presence of the patient’s severe combined tricuspid valve disease would create impossible surgical management conditions, so we decided to first perform cardio-surgery with tricuspid valve replacement. After tumor removal, levels of hydroxyindolacetic acid did not normalize and although the patient was asymptomatic, a small lesion was detected by tectrotyd scan paravertebrally. Treatment with lanreotide led to complete remission with negative biochemical and imaging signs of tumor. Thus, to summarize, carcinoid tumor even in an atypical localization (ovary) should be considered in elderly female patients with severe combined tricuspid valve disease due to carcinoid syndrome. PMID:27122940

  20. L1 cell adhesion molecule as a predictor for recurrence in pulmonary carcinoids and large-cell neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Song; Yi, Seong Yoon; Jun, Hyun Jung; Ahn, Jin Seok; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Lee, Jeeyun; Kim, Youngwook; Cui, Zheng Yun; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Jin-Man; Li, Shengjin; Hwang, In Gyu; Park, Keunchil

    2009-02-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors are a distinct subset of neoplasms with indolent to aggressive behavior. This study was conducted to evaluate the prognostic role of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) in pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors. We retrospectively analyzed L1 expression in 55 cases of completely resected carcinoids and large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, by the immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibody A10-A3 against human L1. L1 immunoreactivity was detected in 34 (61.8%) of 55 specimens. There was a significant correlation between L1 expression and the World Health Organization classification of this tumor (Spearman rank correlation, rho=0.60, p<0.001). With median follow-up of 52.0 months, the 5-year survival rate for patients with low expression of L1 (<20% of tumor cells stained) was significantly better compared with those with high expression of L1 (82.6% vs. 43.7%, p=0.005). L1 was also a significant independent predictor of disease-free survival, and patients with high L1 expression have a higher risk for recurrence compared with those with low L1 expression (hazard ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-8.3; p=0.034). L1 expression is significantly associated with aggressiveness and further studies with larger samples are needed to validate potential prognostic value for pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors.

  1. Type 1 and 2 gastric carcinoid tumors: long-term follow-up of the efficacy of treatment with a slow-release somatostatin analogue.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Sylvain; Pagenault, Mael; de Lajarte-Thirouard, Anne-Sophie; Bretagne, Jean-François

    2007-11-01

    Little is known about the long-term results of treating gastric carcinoid tumors with a slow-release somatostatin analogue. We report three patients with type 1 and 2 gastric carcinoid tumors who were treated in the above mentioned way and followed for 27-50 months. In all cases, alternative endoscopic or surgical management was considered but deemed inappropriate. Treatment with a slow-release somatostatin analogue was begun in light of a favorable recent report. The result was regression or complete disappearance of macroscopic fundal tumors. No side-effects were reported and, most notably, none of the patients developed gallstones. This small study may help define the optimal duration, dose, and administration interval of the treatment. Slow-release somatostatin analogue is a safe and efficacious treatment for type 1 and 2 gastric carcinoid tumors, and can be used when tumors are growing rapidly. Slow-release somatostatin analogue represents an alternative to repeated endoscopic treatment or high-risk surgery.

  2. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Gastrointestinal Cancer, Cancer of the Stomach and Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1986-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer provides only palliation with perhaps increased survival time in some patients. The primary treatment of gastric carcinomas is surgical, as this is the only hope for cure. It is estimated that 80 to 85 percent of patients with newly diagnosed cases of stomach cancer will be dead of their disease within five years. Radiation therapy alone is seldom employed, except as a palliative measure to control hemorrhage or pain. There are no data to suggest that postoperative radiation increases survival rates. Single-agent chemotherapy is of temporary palliative value in 20 to 30 percent of cases with a duration of response from three to five months. Combination chemotherapy has shown a somewhat higher response rate than single-agent therapy. In advanced gastric cancer, there is no evidence of improved long-term disease-free survival rates with any combination yet reported. The treatment of carcinoid cancer of the intestinal tract is surgical removal, as this offers the only hope of cure. Radiation therapy is of little benefit, except for moderate palliation in cases of extensive liver metasasis. Carcinoid cancers are moderately sensitive to chemotherapy. While some adjuvant chemotherapy trials suggest improvement, major survival gains remain to be demonstrated. Uncertainty as to the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers is probably due to lack of data. PMID:3528508

  3. CDX2 may be a useful marker to distinguish primary ovarian carcinoid from gastrointestinal metastatic carcinoids to the ovary.

    PubMed

    Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar; Lioyd, Joshua; Xu, Haodong; Cao, Dengfeng; Barner, Ross; Zhao, Chengquan

    2013-11-01

    Primary ovarian carcinoids and metastatic tumors share similar morphologic features. Metastatic carcinoids must be excluded from primary ones for prognostic and therapeutic reasons. Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors are much more common with the majority arising from small intestine and appendix. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of immunohistochemistry for CDX2 in differentiating primary ovarian from metastatic carcinoids of primary gastrointestinal origin. Thirty primary pure ovarian carcinoids, 16 primary ovarian carcinoids arising in association with benign teratomas, 10 ovarian carcinoids metastatic from primary gastrointestinal tract and 70 gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors were studied for the expression of CDX2 by immunohistochemistry. CDX2 expression revealed that 40 (57.1%) of 70 cases of gastrointestinal carcinoids and 9 (90%) of 10 ovarian metastatic carcinoids showed positive nuclear staining (diffuse or focal). On the other hand, 3 (18.8%) of 16 primary carcinoids with teratomatous elements showed weak positivity. Among the 70 gastrointestinal carcinoids, CDX2 was positive in 38 (90.5%) of 42 cases in the duodenum, small intestine, appendix, and only in 2 (11.8%) of 17 cases of colorectal carcinoids and none of the 11 cases in the stomach. It is concluded that CDX2 may be a useful marker to distinguish primary ovarian carcinoid from metastasis from small intestinal and appendiceal neuroendocrine tumors.

  4. Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumor G1 with a Solitary Hepatic Metastatic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kohei; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimada, Seitarou; Ando, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Matsui, Koshi; Imura, Joji; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    Rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is a relatively rare tumor. NET is classified as G1, G2, or G3 according to the degree of mitosis or Ki-67 proliferation index, which reflect the malignant potential of the tumor, such as metastasis. Advanced cases with metastasis are indicated for chemotherapy treatment. However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited. Therefore, resection is considered, even in metastatic cases, if complete resection is possible. We herein report a case of small rectal NET discovered with hepatic metastasis classified as G1. The patient showed good progress with no recurrence after undergoing hepatectomy and endoscopic resection of rectal NET. PMID:28154272

  5. Cytopathologic characteristics of the primary strumal carcinoid tumor of the ovary: a case report with emphasis on differential diagnostic considerations.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshitetsu; Haba, Reiji; Kushida, Yoshio; Kadota, Kyuichi; Katsuki, Naomi; Miyai, Yumi; Shibuya, Shinsuke; Sasaki, Makiko; Bando, Kenji; Matsunaga, Toru; Hata, Toshiyuki

    2013-09-01

    Primary strumal carcinoid tumor of the ovary (SCTO) is an extremely rare entity, though the survival rate is excellent if the disease is confined to one ovary. A case is presented here in which intraoperative squash smears in a 45-year-old woman with a left adnexal mass revealed dispersed or small clusters of neoplastic cells forming loosely cohesive gland-like structures with abundant cytoplasm. The nuclear chromatin was finely granular with a "salt and pepper" appearance and occasional tiny nucleoli. The position of the nucleus presented a vaguely plasmacytoid appearance. Small fragments of thyroidal colloid-like structures were also identified. A cytopathologic diagnosis of a SCTO was suggested. Further evaluation and immunohistochemical studies were conducted on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. Cords or nests of uniform cells with abundant cytoplasm, and eccentric nuclei with coarse chromatin and occasional colloidal tissue were identified on H&E sections. The tumor cells showed diffuse and strong cytoplasmic staining for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, CD56, and vimentin but were negative for calretinin, α-inhibin or CDX2. The proliferative index with MIB-1 was around 3%. Thyroidal colloid-like structures were immunoreactive for thyroglobulin and TTF-1 stains. The diagnosis of primary SCTO was confirmed based on cytopathologic, histopathological, and immunohistochemical results, and the location of the tumor. Awareness of the cytopathological findings of SCTO can assist in diagnosing this rare entity correctly.

  6. Cushing's syndrome secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion from carcinoid tumor within an ovarian mature teratoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Baoyou; Wu, Xueqing; Zhou, Qing; Hu, Yan; Zhao, Hongqin; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Qian; Zheng, Feiyun

    2014-03-01

    A 46-year-old woman with Cushing's syndrome secondary to ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion caused by primary ovarian mature teratoma with carcinoid components was presented in our case. The patient manifested sustained hypercortisolemia without circadian rhythm and a lack of suppression of either low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (LDDST) or high-dose dexamethasone suppression test (HDDST). There was no evidence of a pituitary mass or secretion of other hormones. After careful clinical evaluation, no other tumor masses were found. Resection of the ovarian tumors led to sharp reduction of serum ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Immunohistochemistry showed positivity in CgA, Syn, CK, NSE. To the best of our knowledge, there are rare reports of an ACTH-secreting carcinoid components located in an ovarian mature teratoma, and bilateral ovarian mature teratoma makes it rarer.

  7. The predictive value of mean platelet volume, plateletcrit and red cell distribution width in the differentiation of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without type I gastric carcinoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Ali; Keskin, Onur; Yakut, Mustafa; Kalkan, Cagdas; Soykan, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is an autoimmune and inflammatory condition that may predispose to gastric carcinoid tumors or adenocarcinomas. The early diagnosis of these tumors is important in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. Platelet indices such as mean platelet volume and plateletcrit levels increase in inflammatory, infectious and malign conditions. The primary aim of this study was to explore wheter platelet indices and red cell distribution width have any predictive role in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without gastric carcinoid tumors. Also secondary aim of this study was to investigate whether any changes exist betwenn autoimmune gastritis and functional dyspepsia patients by means of platelet indices. Plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.03%, p < 0.001) and red cell distribution width (16.11 ± 3.04 vs. 13.41 ± 0.95%, p < 0.001) were significantly higher in autoimmune gastritis patients compared to control group. Receiver operating curve analysis suggested that optimum plateletcrit cut-off point was 0.20% (AUC: 0.646), and 13.95% as the cut off value for red cell distribution width (AUC: 0.860). Although plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.21 ± 0.04%, p = 0.220) and mean platelet volume (8.94 ± 1.44 vs. 8.68 ± 0.89 fl, p = 0.265) were higher in autoimmune gastritis patients without carcinoid tumor compared to patients with carcinoid tumors, these parameters were not statistically significant. Changes in plateletcrit and red cell distribution width values may be used as a marker in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis and fucntional dyspepsia patients but not useful in patients with gastric carcinoid tumor type I.

  8. Liver metastasis secondary to primary mesenteric carcinoid.

    PubMed

    Juanmartiñena Fernández, José Francisco; Fernández Urién, Ignacio; Amat Villegas, Irene; Prieto Martínez, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing neoplasms that display neuroendocrine properties. The term carcinoid is generally applied to well-differentiated neoplasms, while neuroendocrine carcinoma is reserved only for poorly differentiated lesions. They can be found throughout the different regions of the gastrointestinal system, although they have predilection for the ileum.

  9. The role of endogenous gastrin in the development of enterochromaffin-like cell carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis: a study with the specific gastrin receptor antagonist AG-041R.

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, T.; Kinoshita, Y.; Sawada, M.; Kishi, K.; Baba, A.; Hoshino, E.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the effects of a newly synthesized gastrin receptor antagonist, AG-041R, on the growth of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis both in vitro and in vivo. AG-041R was as potent as the well known gastrin antagonist L365,260 in inhibiting not only the gastrin-induced release of histamine from but also histidine decarboxylase (HDC) gene expression in the ECL carcinoid tumor cells. AG-041R also inhibited gastrin-induced DNA synthesis and c-fos gene expression in the tumor cells. Furthermore, AG-041R significantly inhibited the growth of the transplanted Mastomys ECL carcinoid tumors in vivo. From these data, it is concluded that endogenous gastrin is involved in the growth of ECL carcinoid tumors in Mastomys natalensis. Moreover, AG-041R is shown to have a potential as an anti-neoplastic agent for ECL carcinoid tumor of the stomach. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10461356

  10. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma of the cecum developing in a patient with long-standing ulcerative colitis and a coexistent carcinoid tumor in the appendix: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saqib; Watson, Nicholas; Shamim, Kiran; Menon, Achyuth; Abdullah, Khorrum

    2015-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the colon is a rare tumor that accounts for 0.1%-0.2% of colonic malignancies. However, pure SCC of the cecum is extremely rare. Although SCC of the colon is a rare complication of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), SCC of the cecum in the context of IBD has not been previously reported in the English literature. We report a case of the coexistence of SCC of the cecum and a carcinoid tumor in a 46-year-old female with long-standing pan-ulcerative colitis.

  12. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-13

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  13. Anorectal function and outcomes after transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Karakayali, Feza Y.; Tezcaner, Tugan; Moray, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that allows full-thickness resection and suture closure of the defect for large rectal adenomas, selected low-risk rectal cancers, or small cancers in patients who have a high risk for major surgery. Our aim, in the given prospective study was to report our initial clinical experience with TAMIS, and to evaluate its effects on postoperative anorectal functions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 10 patients treated with TAMIS for benign and malignant rectal tumors, preoperative and postoperative anorectal function was evaluated with anorectal manometry and Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. RESULTS: The mean distance of the tumors from the anal verge was 5.6 cm, and mean tumor diameter was 2.6 cm. All resection margins were tumor free. There was no difference in preoperative and 3-week postoperative anorectalmanometry findings; only mean minimum rectal sensory volume was lower at 3 weeks after surgery. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all patients except one which resolved by 6 weeks after surgery.The mean postoperative follow-up was 28 weeks without any recurrences. CONCLUSION: Transanal minimally invasive surgery is a safe and effective procedure for treatment of rectal tumors and can be performed without impairing anorectal functions. PMID:26622116

  14. Prognostic significance of tumor budding in rectal cancer biopsies before neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Ailín C; Gibbons, David; Hanly, Ann M; Hyland, John M P; O'Connell, P Ronan; Winter, Desmond C; Sheahan, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Tumor budding is an increasingly important prognostic feature for pathologists to recognize. The aim of this study was to correlate intra-tumoral budding in pre-treatment rectal cancer biopsies with pathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and with long-term outcome. Data from a prospectively maintained database were acquired from patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Pre-treatment rectal biopsies were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of intra-tumoral budding. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors contributing to cancer-specific death, expressed as hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Of the 185 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, 89 patients met the eligibility criteria, of whom 18 (20%) exhibited budding in a pre-treatment tumor biopsy. Intra-tumoral budding predicted a poor pathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (higher ypT stage, P=0.032; lymph node involvement, P=0.018; lymphovascular invasion, P=0.004; and residual poorly differentiated tumors, P=0.005). No patient with intra-tumoral budding exhibited a tumor regression grade 1 or complete pathological response, providing a 100% specificity and positive predictive value for non-response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Intra-tumoral budding was associated with a lower disease-free 5-year survival rate (33 vs 78%, P<0.001), cancer-specific 5-year survival rate (61 vs 87%, P=0.021) and predicted cancer-specific death (hazard ratio 3.51, 95% confidence interval 1.03-11.93, P=0.040). Intra-tumoral budding at diagnosis of rectal cancer identifies those who will poorly respond to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and those with a poor prognosis.

  15. Ewing sarcoma mimicking atypical carcinoid tumor: detection of unexpected genomic alterations demonstrates the use of next generation sequencing as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Leona A; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Bueno, Raphael; Dal Cin, Paola; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Sholl, Lynette M; Kuo, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, tumors are being analyzed for a variety of mutations and other genomic changes, with the goals of guiding personalized therapy and directing patients to appropriate clinical trials based on genotype, as well as identifying previously unknown genomic changes in different tumor types and thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of human cancers. Next generation sequencing is a powerful research tool now gaining traction in the clinic. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of next generation sequencing assays in providing diagnostic information when evaluating tumor specimens. This is illustrated by a case previously thought to represent an atypical carcinoid tumor, in which an EWSR1-ERG translocation was detected during next generation sequencing using a hybrid capture approach, leading to a revised diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma. The role of translocation detection in these assays is also discussed.

  16. A Case of Multicentric Carcinoid in a Patient with Psoriatic Spondyloarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    George, Nabil; Depala, Archana; Al Sweedan, Laith; Chakravarty, Kuntal

    2015-01-01

    We describe the first case of a patient presenting with multicentric carcinoid occurring in the lung and subsequently in the rectum, with chronic psoriatic arthritis. Although reports have been published regarding carcinoid syndrome occurring alongside rheumatoid arthritis, no reports have been made on such a case. Initial presentation of carcinoid syndrome in this patient was insidious and atypical with few symptoms, including shortness of breath and long standing abdominal bloating. Several years later a sudden change in bowel habit prompted a colonoscopy with biopsy that revealed a carcinoid rectal polyp. The case we report describes a rare presentation of carcinoid syndrome in chronic psoriatic arthropathy. PMID:25802789

  17. A case of multicentric carcinoid in a patient with psoriatic spondyloarthropathy.

    PubMed

    George, Nabil; Depala, Archana; Al Sweedan, Laith; Chakravarty, Kuntal

    2015-01-01

    We describe the first case of a patient presenting with multicentric carcinoid occurring in the lung and subsequently in the rectum, with chronic psoriatic arthritis. Although reports have been published regarding carcinoid syndrome occurring alongside rheumatoid arthritis, no reports have been made on such a case. Initial presentation of carcinoid syndrome in this patient was insidious and atypical with few symptoms, including shortness of breath and long standing abdominal bloating. Several years later a sudden change in bowel habit prompted a colonoscopy with biopsy that revealed a carcinoid rectal polyp. The case we report describes a rare presentation of carcinoid syndrome in chronic psoriatic arthropathy.

  18. Carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Anne Marie C

    2014-11-01

    The patient, C.P., is a 59-year-old woman who was diagnosed with metastatic carcinoid of the terminal ileum in May 2003. In June 2003, she underwent an extensive resection including hemicolectomy, cholecystectomy, distal pancreatectomy, and splenectomy with metastatic disease in her pancreas, mesentery, and liver. She had been treated with octreotide, everolimus, oxaliplatin, and multiple hepatic artery embolizations in the past eight years and, most recently, capecitabine and bevacizumab with monthly octreotide. She has had intermittent pleural effusions not requiring intervention and a trace pericardial effusion. Her tumor is functional, meaning it demonstrates hormonal hypersecretion which causes flushing, diarrhea, bronchospasm, and abdominal pain.

  19. Rare case of breast tumor secondary to rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Lisette Delgado; Chelliah, Thandavababu; Meisher, Irina; Niranjan, Selvanayagam

    2008-10-01

    Primary breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Metastatic cancer to the breast is very rare. Colorectal cancers usually metastasize to the liver and the lung; other sites of metastasis from colon cancer are uncommon and are usually found in association with extensive liver and/or lung metastases. This is a report of a rare case of aggressive rectal cancer with metastasis to the breast without liver or lung metastases.

  20. Perforated Meckel's diverticulum containing a carcinoid tumor successfully treated by the laparoscopic approach: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Curbelo-Peña, Yuhamy; Dardano-Berriel, Juan; Guedes-De la Puente, Xavier; Saladich-Cubero, Maria; Stickar, Tomas; De Caralt-Mestres, Enric

    2016-01-01

    Mekel's diverticulum is a gastrointestinal malformation. Occurs in one of every 40 patients. It is usually asymptomatic whereas complications can be developed in 2% to 4%. The report is based on a 41-year old male, who attended to emergency, complaining of right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Blood tests showed high level of inflammatory markers. With acute appendicitis as presumptive diagnosis, laparoscopy was performed. The intraoperative findings were: a perforated Mekel's diverticulum with normal cecal appendix. Mechanical diverticular resection was made. The patient was successfully recovered from surgery. Histopathology examination showed: Meckel's diverticulum perforated with acute inflammation and neuroendocrine tumor (G1) pT1. Mekel's diverticulum is rarely affected by inflammatory complications and just few cases are associated with tumors. However, has ever been described before, coexisting both situations, being our patient the first reported with this exceptional clinical presentation, and treated successfully by laparoscopic approach. PMID:27251847

  1. Low thrombospondin 2 expression is predictive of low tumor regression after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yih; Chang, I-Wei; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Li, Chien-Feng; Lee, Sung-Wei; Lin, Li-Ching; Lee, Ying-En; He, Hong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay of treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Several heparin-binding associated proteins have been reported to play a critical role in cancer progression. However, the clinical relevancies of such proteins and their associations with CCRT response in rectal cancer have not yet to be fully elucidated. Methods: The analysis of a public transcriptome of rectal cancer indicated that thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) is a predictive factor for CCRT response. Immunohistochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate the expression of THBS2 in pretreatment biopsy specimens from rectal cancer patients without distant metastasis. Furthermore, the relationships between THBS2 expression and various clinicopathological factors or survival were analyzed. Results: Low expression of THBS2 was significantly associated with advanced pretreatment tumor (P<0.001) and nodal status (P=0.004), post-treatment tumor (P<0.001) and nodal status (P<0.001), increased vascular invasion (P=0.003), increased perineural invasion (P=0.023) and inferior tumor regression grade (P=0.015). In univariate analysis, low THBS2 expression predicted worse outcomes for disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival and metastasis-free survival (all P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, low expression of THBS2 still served as a negative prognostic factor for disease-free survival (Hazard ratio=3.057, P=0.002) and metastasis-free survival (Hazard ratio=3.362, P=0.012). Conclusion: Low THBS2 expression was correlated with advanced disease status and low tumor regression after preoperative CCRT and that it acted as an independent negative prognostic factor in rectal cancer. THBS2 may represent a predictive biomarker for CCRT response in rectal cancer. PMID:26807188

  2. [Clinical and histopathological results after the neo-adjuvant treatment of advanced rectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Varga, László; Baradnay, Gellért; Hohn, József; Simonka, Zsolt; Hideghéthy, Katalin; Maráz, Anikó; Nikolényi, Alíz; Veréb, Blanka; Tiszlavicz, László; Németh, István; Mán, Eszter; Lázár, György

    2010-06-01

    The role of the surgical intervention is decisive in treating colorectal tumors. The neo-adjuvant radio-chemotherapy has improved the efficacy of the treatment of advanced rectum tumors. In order to decrease the size and stage of advanced rectal carcinoma and to increase the rate of resecability, we introduced neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. We carried out neo-adjuvant and surgical treatment in case of 67 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma (T 2-4 N 1-2 M 0 ) between June 1, 2005 and July 31, 2008. The average age of the patients was 61.2 years, the division according to sex was 44 males/23 females. Regarding the local stage of the rectal process or the proximity to the sphincter, we applied radio-chemotherapy (radiotherapy 25 times altogether 45 Gy and on the first and last week for 5-5 days they received 350 mg/m 2 /day 5-FU and 20 mg/m 2 /day leucovorin chemotherapy, recently complemented with 3 x 1.8 Gy advanced boost radiation aiming at the macroscopic tumor site with security zone). Patients underwent surgery 8 weeks on average after restaging examinations. Thirty-eight patients underwent anterior rectal resection with double stapler procedure; there were 18 abdominoperineal rectal extirpations, 7 Hartmann operations and 4 per annum excisions. Compared to the preoperative staging, the histological evaluation of the resected specimens showed total remission (pT 0 N 0 ) in 11% and partial remission in 43%. The morbidity necessitating reoperation was 5.9%, without mortality and suture insufficiency. The long-term neo-adjuvant oncological treatment led to down-staging of rectal tumors in most cases and increased the resecability and rate of resection operations.

  3. Evaluation of Hydrogel Suppositories for Delivery of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid and Hematoporphyrin Monomethyl Ether to Rectal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuying; Yin, Huijuan; Lu, Yu; Zhang, Haixia; Wang, Han

    2016-10-12

    We evaluated the potential utility of hydrogels for delivery of the photosensitizing agents 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) to rectal tumors. Hydrogel suppositories containing ALA or HMME were administered to the rectal cavity of BALB/c mice bearing subcutaneous tumors of SW837 rectal carcinoma cells. For comparison, ALA and HMME were also administered by three common photosensitizer delivery routes; local administration to the skin and intratumoral or intravenous injection. The concentration of ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX or HMME in the rectal wall, skin, and subcutaneous tumor was measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry, and their distribution in vertical sections of the tumor was measured using a fluorescence spectroscopy system. The concentration of ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX in the rectal wall after local administration of suppositories to the rectal cavity was 9.76-fold (1 h) and 5.8-fold (3 h) higher than in the skin after cutaneous administration. The maximal depth of ALA penetration in the tumor was ~3-6 mm at 2 h after cutaneous administration. Much lower levels of HMME were observed in the rectal wall after administration as a hydrogel suppository, and the maximal depth of tumor penetration was <2 mm after cutaneous administration. These data show that ALA more readily penetrates the mucosal barrier than the skin. Administration of ALA as an intrarectal hydrogel suppository is thus a potential delivery route for photodynamic therapy of rectal cancer.

  4. Colon and Rectal Cancer Survival by Tumor Location and Microsatellite Instability: The Colon Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Amanda I.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Baron, John A.; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. Objective We assessed differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. Design This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. Settings This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Patients Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997–2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18–74. Main Outcome Measures Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Results Distal colon (hazard ratio=0.59, 95% confidence interval: 0.49–0.71) and rectal cancers (hazard ratio=0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.57–0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically to cases with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, cases with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; cases with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Limitations Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause of death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some case groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Conclusion Proximal colon cancer survival

  5. Colon and rectal cancer survival by tumor location and microsatellite instability: the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Amanda I; Lindor, Noralane M; Jenkins, Mark A; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A

    2013-08-01

    Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. We assessed the differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997 and 2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18 to 74. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Distal colon (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71) and rectal cancers (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically with patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, patients with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause-of-death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some patient groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Proximal colon cancer survival differs from survival for distal colon and rectal cancer in a manner apparently dependent on microsatellite instability status. These

  6. Rare triad of periampullary carcinoid, duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumor and plexiform neurofibroma at hepatic hilum in neurofibromatosis type 1: a case report.

    PubMed

    Abdessayed, Nihed; Gupta, Rahul; Mestiri, Sarra; Bdioui, Ahlem; Trimech, Mounir; Mokni, Moncef

    2017-08-29

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a relatively common inherited disorder. Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 are at high risk of developing neurogenic, neuroendocrine and mesenchymal intra-abdominal tumors. Although coexistence of multiple tumors of different types is frequent in neurofibromatosis type 1, simultaneous occurrence of abdominal tumors of three types in very rare. A 66-year-old lady with neurofibromatosis type 1 presented with painless progressive jaundice for six months. Laboratory investigations revealed iron deficiency anemia and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Tumor markers were normal. Abdominal computed tomography showed a 3 × 2 cm heterogenous mass in the periampullary region with mild dilation of the common bile duct and another 2 × 1.7 cm mass in the fourth portion of the duodenum. Endoscopic biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of periampullary carcinoid. At surgery, multiple small nodules were detected at the hepatic hilum. Frozen section suggested them to be neurofibromas. Patient underwent pancreatoduodenectomy and had uneventful recovery with no recurrence at two months. Microscopic examination of the resected specimen confirmed presence of three tumors: periampullary well differentiated neuroendocrine tumor, gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the fourth part of duodenum and plexiform neurofibroma at the hepatic hilum. Patients of neurofibromatosis type 1 with abdominal symptoms should be treated with high index of clinical suspicion and thoroughly evaluated to rule out multiple tumors.

  7. Assessment of Rectal Tumors with Shear-Wave Elastography before Surgery: Comparison with Endorectal US.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Da; Wang, Wei; Xu, Jian-Bo; Chen, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Wu, Hui; Ye, Jin-Ning; Liu, Jin-Ya; Nie, Zhi-Qiang; Lu, Ming-De; Xie, Xiao-Yan

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To compare the value of endorectal ultrasonography (US) with shear-wave elastography (SWE) in staging rectal tumors before surgery. Materials and Methods This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. In a pilot cohort from April 2015 to January 2016, 70 patients with rectal adenocarcinomas and/or adenomas confirmed with histopathologic examination underwent both endorectal US and SWE. Tumor stiffness and three regions of reference backgrounds, as well as tumor stiffness ratios (SRs) versus these backgrounds, were analyzed. The optimal staging feature was selected by using receiver operating characteristic analysis, and the concordance rate with pathologic stage was analyzed and compared with endorectal US. The results were validated in an independent cohort of 30 patients from February 2016 to July 2016. Results In the pilot study, from rectal adenoma to stage T3 cancers, the tumor stiffness, stiffness of peritumoral fat, tumor SR versus distant perirectal fat, and tumor SR versus normal rectal wall were significantly increased (all P < .05, correlation coefficients between SWE features and pathologic T stages were 0.589-0.853). Receiver operating characteristic analysis of tumor staging demonstrated that tumor stiffness was the optimal feature with the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.991-1.000). The cutoff values of stage T1, T2, and T3 cancers were 26.9 kPa, 70.3 kPa, and 112.0 kPa, respectively. For SWE, the diagnostic concordance rate with pathologic stage (95.7%, weighted κ = 0.962) was higher than that of endorectal US (75.7%, weighted κ = 0.756). In the validation cohort, similar findings were revealed for diagnostic concordance rate (93.3% vs 76.7%; weighted κ = 0.927 vs 0.651) and diagnostic performance of tumor staging (AUC = 0.950-1.000 vs 0.700-0.833). Conclusion By using the feature of tumor stiffness at SWE, the accuracy of

  8. Phase III study of pasireotide long-acting release in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid symptoms refractory to available somatostatin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Edward M; Jarzab, Barbara; Eriksson, Barbro; Walter, Thomas; Toumpanakis, Christos; Morse, Michael A; Tomassetti, Paola; Weber, Matthias M; Fogelman, David R; Ramage, John; Poon, Donald; Gadbaw, Brian; Li, Jiang; Pasieka, Janice L; Mahamat, Abakar; Swahn, Fredrik; Newell-Price, John; Mansoor, Wasat; Öberg, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, we compared pasireotide long-acting release (pasireotide LAR) with octreotide long-acting repeatable (octreotide LAR) in managing carcinoid symptoms refractory to first-generation somatostatin analogues. Adults with carcinoid tumors of the digestive tract were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive pasireotide LAR (60 mg) or octreotide LAR (40 mg) every 28 days. Primary outcome was symptom control based on frequency of bowel movements and flushing episodes. Objective tumor response was a secondary outcome. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated in a post hoc analysis. Adverse events were recorded. At the time of a planned interim analysis, the data monitoring committee recommended halting the study because of a low predictive probability of showing superiority of pasireotide over octreotide for symptom control (n=43 pasireotide LAR, 20.9%; n=45 octreotide LAR, 26.7%; odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27–1.97; P=0.53). Tumor control rate at month 6 was 62.7% with pasireotide and 46.2% with octreotide (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% CI, 0.89–4.32; P=0.09). Median (95% CI) PFS was 11.8 months (11.0 – not reached) with pasireotide versus 6.8 months (5.6 – not reached) with octreotide (hazard ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.20–0.98; P=0.045). The most frequent drug-related adverse events (pasireotide vs octreotide) included hyperglycemia (28.3% vs 5.3%), fatigue (11.3% vs 3.5%), and nausea (9.4% vs 0%). We conclude that, among patients with carcinoid symptoms refractory to available somatostatin analogues, similar proportions of patients receiving pasireotide LAR or octreotide LAR achieved symptom control at month 6. Pasireotide LAR showed a trend toward higher tumor control rate at month 6, although it was statistically not significant, and was associated with a longer PFS than octreotide LAR. PMID:26366058

  9. Is endoscopic ultrasonography essential for endoscopic resection of small rectal neuroendocrine tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Bum; Kim, Dong Jun; Kim, Hyung Wook; Choi, Cheol Woong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Su Jin; Nam, Hyeong Seok

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the importance of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for small (≤ 10 mm) rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) treatment. METHODS Patients in whom rectal NETs were diagnosed by endoscopic resection (ER) at the Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital between 2008 and 2014 were included in this study. A total of 120 small rectal NETs in 118 patients were included in this study. Histologic features and clinical outcomes were analyzed, and the findings of endoscopy, EUS and histology were compared. RESULTS The size measured by endoscopy was not significantly different from that measured by EUS and histology (r = 0.914 and r = 0.727 respectively). Accuracy for the depth of invasion was 92.5% with EUS. No patients showed invasion of the muscularis propria or metastasis to the regional lymph nodes. All rectal NETs were classified as grade 1 and demonstrated an L-cell phenotype. Mean follow-up duration was 407.54 ± 374.16 d. No patients had local or distant metastasis during the follow-up periods. CONCLUSION EUS is not essential for ER in the patient with small rectal NETs because of the prominent morphology and benign behavior. PMID:28373770

  10. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery for Patients With Rectal Tumors: A Single Institution's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kilius, Alfredas; Petrulis, Kestutis; Samalavicius, Narimantas E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to look at our complication rates and recurrence rates, as well as the need for further radical surgery, in treating patients with benign and early malignant rectal tumors by using transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). Methods Our study included 130 patients who had undergone TEM for rectal adenomas and early rectal cancer from December 2009 to December 2015 at the Department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Lithuania. Patients underwent digital and endoscopic evaluation with multiple biopsies. For preoperative staging, pelvic magnetic resonance imaging or endorectal ultrasound was performed. We recorded the demographics, operative details, final pathologies, postoperative lengths of hospital stay, postoperative complications, and recurrences. Results The average tumor size was 2.8 ± 1.5 cm (range, 0.5–8.3 cm). 102 benign (78.5%) and 28 malignant tumors (21.5%) were removed. Of the latter, 23 (82.1%) were pT1 cancers and 5 (17.9%) pT2 cancers. Of the 5 patients with pT2 cancer, 2 underwent adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, 1 underwent an abdominoperineal resection, 1 refused further treatment and 1 was lost to follow up. No intraoperative complications occurred. In 7 patients (5.4%), postoperative complications were observed: urinary retention (4 patients, 3.1%), postoperative hemorrhage (2 patients, 1.5%), and wound dehiscence (1 patient, 0.8%). All complications were treated conservatively. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 2.3 days. Conclusion TEM in our experience demonstrated low complication and recurrence rates. This technique is recommended for treating patients with a rectal adenoma and early rectal cancer and has good prognosis. PMID:28289660

  11. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sleeve above and below the stain and sewing the cuff back onto the shortened sleeve. A ... because it requires a great deal of technical skill. Possible risks and side effects of lung surgery ...

  12. Stenosis rates after endoscopic submucosal dissection of large rectal tumors involving greater than three quarters of the luminal circumference.

    PubMed

    Abe, Seiichiro; Sakamoto, Taku; Takamaru, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Nakajima, Takeshi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Saito, Yutaka

    2016-12-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a minimally invasive treatment option for large rectal tumors. There are limited data available on stenosis rates following ESD of large rectal lesions. We aimed to evaluate the stenosis rate following ESD of large rectal tumors with rectal mucosal defects greater than three quarters of the circumference. We retrospectively identified patients who underwent rectal ESD between January 1998 and July 2014. Patients with rectal mucosal defects greater than three quarters the luminal circumference were included for analysis. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment outcomes and adverse events were assessed. Stenosis was defined as an inability to pass a pediatric colonoscope into the sigmoid colon. None of the patients underwent prophylactic balloon dilation. A total of 363 patients with 370 rectal lesions were treated by ESD. Among these, 26 patients had 26 lesions with rectal mucosal defects greater than three quarters of the luminal circumference. Median tumor size (range) was 80 (47-150) mm. Four lesions (15 %) required between 90 and <100 % circumferential dissection, while complete circumferential ESD was performed in two lesions (8 %). Dissection extended to the anal canal in six patients. The median procedure time was 220 min. En bloc resection and curative resection were achieved in 88.5 and 65.4 %, respectively. Delayed bleeding rates and perforation rates were 7.7 and 0 %, respectively. During a median follow-up period of 9.8 (0-59) months, there were no patients with complaints of constipation or fecal incontinence. One patient (4.2 %) was noted to have rectal stenosis, but was clinically asymptomatic. Endoscopic balloon dilation was not required in any patients. Stenosis may rarely occur after ESD of large rectal lesions with rectal mucosal defects greater than three quarters of the circumference, even without prophylactic endoscopic balloon dilation.

  13. Rectal carcinoma with metachronous metastasis to the extrahepatic bile duct without liver tumor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Kobayashi, Ryu; Kato, Shingo; Watanabe, Seitaro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Shimamura, Takeshi; Kubota, Kensuke; Maeda, Shin; Nakajima, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Oshiro, Hisashi; Endo, Itaru

    2011-08-01

    In July 2003, a 63-year-old man received a low anterior resection for rectal cancer. In February 2006, he underwent a right hepatectomy for a solitary metastatic liver tumor; the liver tumor had not invaded the bile duct, and a curative resection was performed. In August 2008, an enhanced computed tomography examination revealed a massive focal lesion at the point of the common bile duct. Endoscopic ultrasonography clearly revealed a hyperechoic polypoid lesion that had spread laterally on the surface of the slightly dilated bile duct and had a smooth outer hyperechoic layer. No lymph nodes were present in this region. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed an irregular stricture, and a biopsy was performed through the scope. Microscopic examination revealed a tumor characterized as a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma resembling the liver tumor. We diagnosed the intrabiliary tumor as a metachronous metastatic bile duct tumor from rectal cancer without involvement of the liver parenchyma. This is a very rare case, with recurrence only in an extrahepatic bile duct after the complete resection of a metastatic liver tumor. This is the first clinical, pathological, and radiological description of this rare condition.

  14. Predictive Factors of Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Farnault, Bertrand; de Chaisemartin, Cecile; Esterni, Benjamin; Lelong, Bernard; Viret, Frederic; Giovannini, Marc; Monges, Genevieve; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Bories, Erwan; Turrini, Olivier; Viens, Patrice; Salem, Naji

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery is the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to correlate tumor response to survival and to identify predictive factors for tumor response after chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2008, 168 patients with histologically proven locally advanced adenocarcinoma treated by preoperative chemoradiation before total mesorectal excision were retrospectively studied. They received a radiation dose of 45 Gy with a concomitant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. Analysis of tumor response was based on lowering of the T stage between pretreatment endorectal ultrasound and pathologic specimens. Overall and progression-free survival rates were correlated with tumor response. Tumor response was analyzed with predictive factors. Results: The median follow-up was 34 months. Five-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were, of 44.4% and 74.5% in the whole population, 83.4% and 83.4%, respectively, in patients with pathological complete response, 38.6% and 71.9%, respectively, in patients with tumor downstaging, and 29.1and 58.9% respectively, in patients with absence of response. A pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level of <5 ng/ml was significantly independently associated with pathologic complete tumor response (p = 0.019). Pretreatment small tumor size (p = 0.04), pretreatment CEA level of <5 ng/ml (p = 0.008), and chemotherapy with capecitabine (vs. 5-FU) (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with tumor downstaging. Conclusions: Downstaging and complete response after CRT improved progression-free survival and overall survival of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. In multivariate analysis, a pretreatment CEA level of <5 ng/ml was associated with complete tumor response. Thus, small tumor size, a pretreatment CEA level of < 5ng/ml, and use of capecitabine were associated with tumor downstaging.

  15. Carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Saamir A; Banchs, Jose; Iliescu, Cezar; Dasari, Arvind; Lopez-Mattei, Juan; Yusuf, Syed Wamique

    2017-10-01

    Rare neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) that most commonly arise in the gastrointestinal tract can lead to carcinoid syndrome and carcinoid heart disease. Patients with carcinoid syndrome present with vasomotor changes, hypermotility of the gastrointestinal system, hypotension and bronchospasm. Medical therapy for carcinoid syndrome, typically with somatostatin analogues, can help control symptoms, inhibit tumour progression and prolong survival. Carcinoid heart disease occurs in more than 50% of these patients and is the initial presentation of carcinoid syndrome in up to 20% of patients. Carcinoid heart disease has characteristic findings of plaque-like deposits composed of smooth muscle cells, myofibroblasts, extracellular matrix and an overlying endothelial layer which can lead to valve dysfunction. Valvular dysfunction can lead to oedema, ascites and right-sided heart failure. Medical therapy of carcinoid heart disease is limited to symptom control and palliation. Valve surgery for carcinoid heart disease should be considered for symptomatic patients with controlled metastatic carcinoid syndrome. A multidisciplinary approach is needed to guide optimal management. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate Measured by Magnetic Resonance Volumetry Correlated With Pathologic Tumor Response of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlates with the pathologic tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 405 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-T4) who had undergone preoperative CRT and radical proctectomy. The tumor volume was measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry before and after CRT but before surgery. We analyzed the correlation between the TVRR and the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and tumor regression grade (TRG). Downstaging was defined as ypStage 0-I (ypT0-T2N0M0), and the TRG proposed by Dworak et al. was used. Results: The mean TVRR was 65.0% {+-} 22.3%. Downstaging and complete regression occurred in 167 (41.2%) and 58 (14.3%) patients, respectively. The TVRRs according to ypT classification (ypT0-T2 vs. ypT3-T4), ypN classification (ypN0 vs. ypN1-N2), downstaging (ypStage 0-I vs. ypStage II-III), good regression (TRG 3-4 vs. TRG 1-2), and complete regression (TRG 4 vs. TRG 1-3) were all significantly different (p <.05). When the TVRR was categorized into three groups (<60%, 60-80%, and >80%), the rates of ypT0-T2, ypN0, downstaging, and good regression were all significantly greater for patients with a TVRR of {>=}60%, as was the complete regression rate for patients with a TVRR >80% (p <.05). Conclusion: The TVRR measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlated significantly with the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and TRG after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  17. Could tumor characteristics identified by colonoscopy predict the locally advanced rectal carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Cao, Fu-ao; Gong, Hai-feng; Zheng, Jian-ming; Fu, Chuan-gang

    2010-09-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation is now considered the standard care for locally advanced rectal carcinoma (T3-4 or/and N1-2 lesions), but the accuracy of staging examinations including endorectal ultrasonography (ERUS) and MRI is far from excellent. In addition, the above staging equipment or professionals who perform the examinations may not be available in some hospitals, while preoperative colonoscopy and biopsy are usually obtainable in most hospitals. The objective of the present study was to investigate the clinical and pathological characteristics of locally advanced rectal carcinoma and identify candidates for neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This was a retrospective study. Patients who were treated for rectal cancer at Changhai Hospital from January 1999 to July 2008 were identified from our prospectively collected database. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Software System (version 15.0). The Mann-Whitney test, chi-square test and multivariate Logistic regression analysis were performed. A total of 1005 cases were included in this research, of which 761 cases were identified as locally advanced rectal carcinoma depending on postoperative TNM staging. The results of multivariate Logistic regression analysis indicated seven independent risk factors that could be used to predict a locally advanced rectal carcinoma independently: a high grade (including poor differentiation and undifferentiation) (OR: 3.856; 95% CI: 2.064 to 7.204; P = 0.000); large tumor size (OR: 2.455; 95% CI: 1.755 to 3.436; P = 0.000); elevated preoperative serum CEA level (OR: 1.823; 95% CI: 1.309 to 2.537; P = 0.000); non-polypoid tumor type (OR: 1.758; 95% CI: 1.273 to 2.427; P = 0.001); the absence of synchronous polyps (OR: 1.602; 95% CI: 1.103 to 2.327; P = 0.013); the absence of blood in stool (OR: 1.659; 95% CI: 1.049 to 2.624; P = 0.030); and a greater circumferential tumor extent (OR: 1.813; 95% CI: 1.055 to 3.113; P = 0.031). Based on these findings, a Logistic equation was

  18. Clinical Parameters Predicting Pathologic Tumor Response After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Dae Yong Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin; Koom, Woong Sub; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To identify pretreatment clinical parameters that could predict pathologic tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study involved 351 patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery between October 2001 and July 2006. Tumor responses to preoperative CRT were assessed in terms of tumor downstaging and tumor regression. Statistical analyses were performed to identify clinical factors associated with pathologic tumor response. Results: Tumor downstaging (defined as ypT2 or less) was observed in 167 patients (47.6%), whereas tumor regression (defined as Dworak's Regression Grades 3 or 4) was observed in 103 patients (29.3%) and complete regression in 51 patients (14.5%). Multivariate analysis found that predictors of downstaging were pretreatment hemoglobin level (p = 0.045), cN0 classification (p < 0.001), and serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (p < 0.001), that predictors of tumor regression were cN0 classification (p = 0.044) and CEA level (p < 0.001), and that the predictor of complete regression was CEA level (p = 0.004). Conclusions: The data suggest that pretreatment CEA level is the most important clinical predictor of pathologic tumor response. It may be of benefit in the selection of treatment options as well as the assessment of individual prognosis.

  19. Long-term follow-up of a large series of patients with type 1 gastric carcinoid tumors: data from a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dimitrios; Tsolakis, Apostolos V; Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona; Fraenkel, Merav; Alexandraki, Krystallenia; Sougioultzis, Stavros; Gross, David J; Kaltsas, Gregory

    2013-02-01

    To study the clinical presentation, diagnostic approach, response to treatment, and the presence of other pathologies in patients with gastric carcinoid type 1 (GC 1) tumors. Retrospective analysis of 111 patients from four institutions and a mean follow-up of 76 months. The main indications for gastroscopy were upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms. The mean number of lesions, maximum tumoral diameter, and percentage of cells expressing Ki-67 labeling index were 3.6±3.8, 8±12.1 mm and 1.9±2.4% respectively. Serum gastrin and chromogranin A (CgA) levels were elevated in 100/101 and 85/90 patients respectively. Conventional imaging studies demonstrated pathology in 9/111 patients. Scintigraphy with radiolabeled octreotide was positive in 6/60 without revealing any additional lesions. From the 59 patients who had been followed-up without any intervention, five developed tumor progression. Thirty-two patients were treated with long-acting somatostatin analogs (SSAs), leading to a significant reduction of gastrin and CgA levels, number of visible tumors, and CgA immune-reactive tumor cells in 28, 19, 27, and 23 treated patients respectively. Antrectomy and/or gastrectomy were initially performed in 20 patients and a complete response was achieved in 13 patients. The most common comorbidities were vitamin B12 deficiency, thyroiditis, and parathyroid adenomas. Most GCs1 are grade 1 (82.7%) tumors presenting with stage I (73.9%) disease with no mortality after prolonged follow-up. Ocreoscan did not provide further information compared with conventional imaging techniques. Treatment with SSAs proved to be effective for the duration of administration.

  20. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  1. Metastatic rectal neuroendocrine tumor presenting as an inguinal mass: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, Adam; Sebajang, Herawaty; Schwenter, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are a heterogeneous group of rare carcinomas that most often manifest along the gastrointestinal tract. Some of these tumors have the ability to secrete vasoactive peptides and hormones. The present report describes the case of a previously healthy 52-year old man who presented with a painful right inguinal mass. Upon surgical exploration, a lymph node metastasis of a high-grade NET was found. Further investigations revealed a rectal NET with pulmonary, pelvic and penile metastases. The patient was treated with 6 cycles of carboplatin and etoposide. Although initial follow-up imaging after 3 cycles of chemotherapy revealed stable disease, there was progression of the metastases after completion of systemic treatment. Second and third-line chemotherapy regimens were instituted along with pelvic and whole-brain radiation therapy extending the patient's survival to 18 months after the initial diagnosis. This case highlights the aggressive nature high-grade NETs as described in the current literature. Treatment modalities of colorectal NETs include local excision for non-metastatic disease and systemic palliative chemotherapy for advanced disease. However, there are no controlled trials in favor of palliative chemotherapy. Rectal NETs are rare tumors which often have an atypical presentation or present in advanced stages. Currently, surgical options exist for local disease while treatment modalities for more advanced disease is still under investigation. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. [Intestinal carcinoid tumour: Case report].

    PubMed

    Mussan-Chelminsky, Gil; Vidal-González, Pablo; Núñez-García, Edgar; Valencia-García, Luis César; Márquez-Ugalde, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid of the small intestine, is a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor that rarely presents with clinical signs. This tumour can be associated with other conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, presenting a wide range of symptoms. In some cases they have an aggressive and highly symptomatic behaviour; thus, clinical suspicion must be high to make an early diagnosis. A 60 year-old male patient with Crohn's disease and gastrointestinal symptoms attributed to this disease within the last year. He presented with intestinal obstruction initially treated with conservative management with no improvement. Exploratory laparotomy was performed finding a mesenteric tumour that caused the bowel obstruction. Bowel resection with primary anastomosis was performed. The pathology report showed an intestinal carcinoid tumour with lymph node metastases. The patient recovered well, and was discharged without complications to continue medical treatment and follow-up by the Oncology department. In almost 42% of the cases, the most common site of carcinoid tumours is the small intestine, and of these, 41% are presented as locoregional disease. Patients with Crohn's disease present a higher incidence. In these cases, the most common presentation is an acute intestinal obstruction (90%). Surgery is usually curative, and follow up is important as the symptoms of Crohn's disease can hide any recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging measurement of extramural tumor spread in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rafaelsen, Søren R; Vagn-Hansen, Chris; Sørensen, Torben; Pløen, John; Jakobsen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the agreement between transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in classification of ≥ T3 rectal tumors. METHODS: From January 2010 to January 2012, 86 consecutive patients with ≥ T3 tumors were included in this study. The mean age of the patients was 66.4 years (range: 26-91 years). The tumors were all ≥ T3 on TRUS. The sub-classification was defined by the penetration of the rectal wall: a: 0 to 1 mm; b: 1-5 mm; c: 6-15; d: > 15 mm. Early tumors as ab (≤ 5 mm) and advanced tumors as cd (> 5 mm). All patients underwent TRUS using a 6.5 MHz transrectal transducer. The MRI was performed with a 1.5 T Philips unit. The TRUS findings were blinded to the radiologist performing the interpretation of the MRI images and measuring the depth of extramural tumor spread. RESULTS: TRUS found 51 patients to have an early ≥ T3 tumors and 35 to have an advanced tumor, whereas MRI categorized 48 as early ≥ T3 tumors and 38 as advanced tumors. No patients with tumors classified as advanced by TRUS were found to be early on MRI. The kappa value in classifying early versus advanced T3 rectal tumors was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.85-1.00). We found a kappa value of 0.74 (95% CI: 0.63-0.86) for the total sub-classification between the two methods. The mean maximal tumor outgrowth measured by TRUS, 5.5 mm ± 5.63 mm and on MRI, 6.3 mm ± 6.18 mm, P = 0.004. In 19 of the 86 patients the following CT scan or surgery revealed distant metastases; of the 51 patients in the ultrasound ab group three (5.9%) had metastases, whereas 16 (45.7%) of 35 in the cd group harbored distant metastases, P = 0.00002. The odds ratio of having distant metastases in the ultrasound cd group compared to the ab group was 13.5 (95% CI: 3.5-51.6), P = 0.00002. The mean maximal ultrasound measured outgrowth was 4.3 mm (95% CI: 3.2-5.5 mm) in patients without distant metastases, while the mean maximal outgrowth was 9.5 mm (95% CI: 6.2-12.8 mm) in the patients with metastases

  4. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, < 5 cm from anal verge; and patients facing tumors with enlarged nodes and/or CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  5. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  6. Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma in a patient with rectal laterally spreading tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, MIN; YIN, LINGDI; YAO, YULING; WANG, LEI; XU, GUIFANG; ZHANG, XIAOQI; LV, YING; SUN, QI; FAN, XIANGSHAN; ZOU, XIAOPING

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma (LELGC) is a rare neoplasm of the stomach that accounts for 1–4% of all gastric cancer cases. It is characterized by the presence of a lymphoid stroma with cells arranged primarily in micro alveolar, thin trabecular and primitive tubular patterns or isolated cells. In the present study, the case of a 50-year-old male patient with LELGC and rectal laterally spreading tumor is presented. Following endoscopic submucosal dissection, a diagnosis of carcinoma was reached and the patient underwent total radical gastrectomy. The postoperative pathological stage was IA T1bN0cM0 according to the Tumor-Node-Metastasis classification of gastric carcinoma, and the patient recovered well. The present case is reported to summarize the endoscopic and pathological characteristics of LELGC. PMID:27073504

  7. Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumours. Histogenetic, histochemical, immunohistochemical, clinical and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Wilander, E; Lundqvist, M; Oberg, K

    1989-01-01

    The increased knowledge of the pathobiology of gastrointestinal carcinoid (neuroendocrine) tumours and the improved therapeutic possibilities have brought a demand for more precise diagnosis. Although the carcinoid tumours can often be tentatively recognized in routinely processed microscopic slides, their more accurate identification requires additional diagnostic procedures. General neuroendocrine markers such as the argyrophil reaction of Grimelius and immunohistochemistry with application of antibodies against chromogranin A and of neuron-specific enolase are discriminatory staining methods which are used to reveal the neuroendocrine origin of almost all highly differentiated carcinoid tumours of the gastrointestinal tract. Mid-gut carcinoids, which predominate among these tumours almost unexceptionally contain serotonin. This biogenic amine can be demonstrated by the argentaffin reaction of Masson, serotonin immunoreactively or by formalin-induced fluorescence. The characteristic staining pattern of mid-gut carcinoids is almost invariably preserved in the metastatic deposits and consequently the staining methods for identifying serotonin can also be used on metastases to reveal a primary mid-gut carcinoid. The enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell carcinoids of the body and fundic area of the stomach often seen in association with pernicious anaemia are argyrophil with the Sevier-Munger silver stain. Other neuroendocrine tumours, viz. antral, duodenal and rectal carcinoids should be studied by a battery of relevant peptide hormone antisera for adequate diagnosis. During the last decade new peptide hormones have been found in circulation in patients with carcinoid tumours, but serotonin and urinary 5-HIAA are still the most important markers for carcinoids of the mid-gut origin. Other clinically useful tumour markers are chromogranin A + B, pancreatic polypeptide, human chorionic gonadotropin alpha and beta subunits. For localizing procedures, angiography is the

  8. Hypergastrinemia and recurrent type 1 gastric carcinoid in a young Indian male: necessity for antrectomy?

    PubMed

    Senadhi, Viplove; Jani, Niraj

    2011-09-21

    Carcinoid tumors are the most common neuroendocrine tumors. Gastric carcinoids represent 2% of all carcinoids and 1% of all gastric masses. Due to the widespread use of Esophagogastroduodenoscopy for evaluating a variety of upper gastrointestinal symptoms, the detection of early gastric carcinoids has increased. We highlight an alternative management of a young patient with recurrent type 1 gastric carcinoids with greater than 5 lesions, as well as lesions intermittently greater than 1 cm. Gastric carcinoids have a variable presentation and clinical course that is highly dependent on type. Type 1 gastric carcinoids are usually indolent and have a metastasis rate of less than 2%, even with tumors larger than 2 cm. There are a number of experts as well as organizations that recommend endoscopic resection for all type 1 gastric carcinoid lesions less than 1 cm, with a follow-up every 6-12 mo. They also recommend antrectomy for type 1 gastric carcinoids with greater than 5 lesions, lesions 1 cm or greater, or refractory anemia. However, the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy guidelines state that type 1 gastric carcinoid surveillance is controversial based on the evidence and could not make an evidence-based position statement on the best treatment modality. Our report illustrates a rare cause of iron deficiency anemia in a young male (without any medical history) due to multiple recurrent gastric carcinoid type 1 lesions in the setting of atrophic gastritis causing hypergastrinemia, and in the absence of a vitamin B12 deficiency. Gastric carcinoid type 1 can present in young males without an autoimmune history, despite the known predilection for women aged 50 to 70 years. Type 1 gastric carcinoids can be managed by endoscopic resection in patients with greater than 5 lesions, even with lesions larger than 1 cm. This course of treatment enabled the avoidance of early antrectomy in our patient, who expressed a preference against more invasive measures at his

  9. Safety and feasibility of laparoscopic intersphincteric resection for a lower rectal tumor.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, Nobuhisa; Takahashi, Takao; Tanahashi, Toshiyuki; Matsui, Satoshi; Imai, Hisashi; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Osada, Shinji; Yoshida, Kazuhiro

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the short-term surgical outcomes of laparoscopic intersphincteric resection (ISR) for a lower rectal tumor in comparison with a case-control series of patients undergoing open ISR. Quality of life factors and anal function were also evaluated. Between July 2008 and April 2013, 103 patients with lower rectal cancer underwent laparoscopic surgery at the Surgical Oncology Department of Gifu University School of Medicine. A total of 25 patients with lower rectal cancer underwent ISR, and 19/25 patients who underwent laparoscopic ISR were compared with the control group of 6 patients who underwent open ISR. The technical feasibility and safety of ISR, and the short- and long-term outcomes following laparoscopic ISR were evaluated. Additional data associated with fecal incontinence conditions of the postoperative patients were evaluated using the Modified Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life scale. There was no recorded perioperative mortality, three complications were observed to occur in three patients and the morbidity rate was 15.8%. The postoperative complications detected included bleeding in one patient and ileus in two patients of the laparoscopic ISR group. The rate of severe complications of grade ≥3a was 15.8% and that of grade ≥3b was 5.3%. In the matched case-control study, blood loss was significantly lower in the laparoscopic ISR group. The median postoperative hospital stay was 14.1 days in the laparoscopic ISR group, which was significantly shorter compared with in the open ISR group (18.7 days). Cancer recurrence was detected in one (5%) patient in a single inguinal lymph node. No significant differences between the ISR and ultra-low anterior resection (ULAR) groups were observed in the maximum resting and maximum squeeze pressures; the outcomes for anal function and fecal incontinence were the same for ISR and ULAR. Thus, laparoscopic ISR for lower rectal cancer may provide a benefit in the early

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a predictor of tumor downstaging in locally advanced rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun-Sang . E-mail: k423j@cnu.ac.kr; Kim, Jin-Man; Li, Shengjin; Yoon, Wan-Hee; Song, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Yeo, Seung-Gu; Nam, Ji Sook; Cho, Moon-June

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively whether levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression can predict tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 183 patients with rectal cancer (cT3-T4 or N+) were enrolled in this study. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy consisted of 50.4 Gy of pelvic radiation with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin bolus intravenous chemotherapy in 94 patients or oral capecitabine and leucovorin in 89 patients. EGFR expression in pretreatment paraffin-embedded tumor biopsy specimens was assessed by immunohistochemistry. EGFR expression was determined from the intensity and extent of staining. Tumor downstaging was defined as a reduction of at least one T-stage level. Results: Tumor downstaging occurred in 97 patients (53%), and the tumors showed a pathologic complete response in 27 patients (15%). Positive EGFR expression was observed in 140 (76%) of 183 patients. EGFR expression levels were low in 113 patients (62%) and high in 70 patients (38%). On logistic regression analysis, the significant predictive factor for increased tumor downstaging was a low level of EGFR expression and preoperative chemotherapy using oral capecitabine (odds ratio, 0.437; p 0.012 vs. odds ratio, 3.235; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: A high level of EGFR expression may be a significant predictive molecular marker for decreased tumor downstaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

  11. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  12. A comparative study of volumetric analysis, histopathologic downstaging, and tumor regression grade in evaluating tumor response in locally advanced rectal cancer following preoperative chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nam Kyu . E-mail: namkyuk@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Hogeun; Seong, Jinsil; Keum, Ki Chang; Rha, Sun Young; Chung, Hyun Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare tumor volume reduction rate, histopathologic downstaging, and tumor regression grade (TRG) among tumor responses in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between 2002 and 2004, 30 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer underwent preoperative CRT, followed by surgical resection. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed before and after CRT. Histopathologic tumor staging and tumor regression were reviewed. We compared pre- and post-CRT tumor volume and percent of volume reduction, according to histopathologic downstaging and TRG. Results: The tumor volume reduction rates ranged from 14.6% to 100%. Mean pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were significantly smaller in patients who showed T downstaging than in those who did not (p 0.040, 0.014). The mean tumor volume reduction was 66.4% vs. 55.2% (p 0.361). However, the mean pre- and post-CRT tumor volume and mean tumor volume reduction rate between patients who showed N downstaging and those who did not were not statistically different (p = 0.176, 0.767, and 0.899). With respect to TRG, the mean pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were not statistically significant (p = 0.108, 0.708, and 0.120). Conclusion: Tumor volume reduction rate does not correlate with histopathologic downstaging and TRG. It might be hazardous to evaluate tumor response with respect to volume reduction and to select the surgical method on this basis.

  13. Pre-surgical bronchoscopic treatment for typical endobronchial carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Carmine; Mazzarella, Gennaro; De Rosa, Nicolina; Cesaro, Cristiano; La Cerra, Giuseppe; Grella, Edoardo; Perrotta, Fabio; Curcio, Carlo; Guerra, Germano; Bianco, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Carcinoids are tumors that originate from diffuse neuroendocrine system cells (APUD cells) and represent 1-2% of all pulmonary tumors. Although surgical resection remains the mainstay of treatment, bronchoscopic radical resection of typical carcinoids in selected cases exhibiting endoluminal growth and small implant base has also been explored. Bronchoscopic removal of endobronchial lesions may also reduce the risk of post-obstructive infections and improve pulmonary function, allowing the patient to undergo surgery in better clinical and respiratory state. In this paper we have evaluated the impact on surgical planning and outcome of preoperative bronchoscopic resection in treatment of endobronchial typical carcinoids. Our observations further support the role of bronchoscopic treatment before surgery in endobronchial typical carcinoids.

  14. Invasive atypical thymic carcinoid: three case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shan; Wang, Zhong-Tang; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zong, Shi-Xiang; Li, Bao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Atypical thymic carcinoid is an extremely rare thymic neuroendocrine tumor derived from the neuroendocrine system. The aims of this paper were to investigate the clinical features of atypical thymic carcinoid and collate information and experience to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. We describe three cases of atypical carcinoid of the thymus; clinical features, pathological data, treatment modalities, and short-term patient outcomes were summarized and analyzed. The initial clinical symptoms and signs of all three patients were nonspecific and an anterior mediastinal mass was found in each patient on chest computed tomography scan. All three patients underwent surgical resection (total thymectomy and complete excision of the tumor), followed by postoperative radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. The diagnoses of three patients were confirmed by pathological and immunohistochemical evaluation. We also present a review of the literature to collate as much information as possible and provide a reference for proper diagnosis and treatment of atypical thyroid carcinoid. PMID:27785065

  15. Impact of remifentanil use on early postoperative outcomes following brain tumor resection or rectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kanji; Yasunaga, Hideo; Miyata, Hiroaki; Sumitani, Masahiko; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Matsuda, Shinya; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2012-10-01

    Remifentanil, a mu-opioid receptor agonist, has important characteristics for neuroanesthesia, but data about its effects on postoperative recovery and mortality are currently lacking. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database in 2007, we selected patients who underwent elective brain tumor resection with open craniotomy under general anesthesia using either remifentanil or fentanyl and divided them into two categories: remifentanil patients and non-remifentanil patients. After propensity score matching for potential confounders, we compared the in-hospital mortality and postoperative length of stay (LOS) between the two groups. For comparison, the same endpoints were evaluated for patients underwent rectal cancer surgery under general anesthesia with intraoperative epidural anesthesia. In patients who underwent brain tumor resection (936 pairs), remifentanil patients had significantly lower in-hospital mortality (1.5 % vs. 3.0 %; P = 0.029). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio for use of remifentanil for in-hospital mortality was 0.47 (95 % confidence interval, 0.25-0.91; P = 0.025). Remifentanil patients also showed earlier discharge from hospital (median LOS, 17 vs. 19 days; hazard ratio, 1.19, 95 % confidence interval, 1.08-1.30; P < 0.001). In contrast, in 2,756 pairs of patients undergoing rectal cancer surgery, no significant difference was seen in either in-hospital morality (1.2 % vs. 1.3 %; P = 0.518) or median LOS (19 vs. 19 days; P = 0.148) between the two groups. Our data suggest a possible association between use of remifentanil and better early postoperative recovery for patients undergoing neurosurgery with craniotomy. Further studies, including a randomized controlled trial, are required to confirm the present results.

  16. Association Between the Cytogenetic Profile of Tumor Cells and Response to Preoperative Radiochemotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    González-González, María; Garcia, Jacinto; Alcazar, José A.; Gutiérrez, María L.; Gónzalez, Luis M.; Bengoechea, Oscar; Abad, María M.; Santos-Briz, Angel; Blanco, Oscar; Martín, Manuela; Rodríguez, Ana; Fuentes, Manuel; Muñoz-Bellvis, Luis; Orfao, Alberto; Sayagues, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy to locally advanced rectal carcinoma patients has proven efficient in a high percentage of cases. Despite this, some patients show nonresponse or even disease progression. Recent studies suggest that different genetic alterations may be associated with sensitivity versus resistance of rectal cancer tumor cells to neoadjuvant therapy. We investigated the relationship between intratumoral pathways of clonal evolution as assessed by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (51 different probes) and response to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy, evaluated by Dworak criteria in 45 rectal cancer tumors before (n = 45) and after (n = 31) treatment. Losses of chromosomes 1p (44%), 8p (53%), 17p (47%), and 18q (38%) and gains of 1q (49%) and 13q (75%) as well as amplification of 8q (38%) and 20q (47%) chromosomal regions were those specific alterations found at higher frequencies. Significant association (P < 0.05) was found between alteration of 1p, 1q, 11p, 12p, and 17p chromosomal regions and degree of response to neoadjuvant therapy. A clear association was observed between cytogenetic profile of the ancestral tumor cell clone and response to radiochemotherapy; cases presenting with del(17p) showed a poor response to neoadjuvant treatment (P = 0.03), whereas presence of del(1p) was more frequently observed in responder patients (P = 0.0002). Moreover, a significantly higher number of copies of chromosomes 8q (P = 0.004), 13q (P = 0.003), and 20q (P = 0.002) were found after therapy versus paired pretreatment rectal cancer samples. Our results point out the existence of an association between tumor cytogenetics and response to neoadjuvant therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. Further studies in larger series of patients are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:25474426

  17. Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rectal cancer and its correlation with tumor differentiation

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, FU; LU, JIANPING; CHEN, LUGUANG; WANG, ZHEN; CHEN, YUKUN

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a novel imaging modality that can be used to reflect the microcirculation, although its value in diagnosing rectal cancer is unknown. The present study aimed to explore the clinical application of DCE-MRI in the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer, and its correlation with tumor differentiation. To achieve this, 40 pathologically confirmed patients with rectal cancer and 15 controls were scanned using DCE-MRI. The Tofts model was applied to obtain the perfusion parameters, including the plasma to extravascular volume transfer (Ktrans), the extravascular to plasma volume transfer (Kep), the extravascular fluid volume (Ve) and the initial area under the enhancement curve (iAUC). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to determine the diagnostic value. The results demonstrated that the time-signal intensity curve of the rectal cancer lesion exhibited an outflow pattern. The Ktrans, Kep, Ve, and iAUC values were higher in the cancer patients compared with controls (P<0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficients of Ktrans, Kep, Ve and iAUC, as measured by two independent radiologists, were 0.991, 0.988, 0.972 and 0.984, respectively (all P<0.001), indicating a good consistency. The areas under the ROC curves for Ktrans and iAUC were both >0.9, resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 93.3% for Ktrans, and of 92.5%, and 93.3% or 100%, for iAUC, respectively. In the 40 rectal cancer cases, there was a moderate correlation between Ktrans and iAUC, and pathological differentiation (0.3rectal cancer and differentiation, and therefore may provide novel insights into the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer. PMID:27073650

  18. Evaluation of the risk factors associated with rectal neuroendocrine tumors: a big data analytic study from a health screening center.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Jeung Hui; Hong, Sung Noh; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Chang, Dong Kyung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae Jun; Choi, Sun Kyu; Jung, Sin-Ho; Son, Hee Jung; Kim, Young-Ho

    2016-12-01

    Rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is the most common NET in Asia. The risk factors associated with rectal NETs are unclear because of the overall low incidence rate of these tumors and the associated difficulty in conducting large epidemiological studies on rare cases. The aim of this study was to exploit the benefits of big data analytics to assess the risk factors associated with rectal NET. A retrospective case-control study was conducted, including 102 patients with histologically confirmed rectal NETs and 52,583 healthy controls who underwent screening colonoscopy at the Center for Health Promotion of the Samsung Medical Center in Korea between January 2002 and December 2012. Information on different risk factors was collected and logistic regression analysis applied to identify predictive factors. Four factors were significantly associated with rectal NET: higher levels of cholesterol [odds ratio (OR) = 1.007, 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.001-1.013, p = 0.016] and ferritin (OR = 1.502, 95 % CI, 1.167-1.935, p = 0.002), presence of metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.768, 95 % CI, 1.071-2.918, p = 0.026), and family history of cancer among first-degree relatives (OR = 1.664, 95 % CI, 1.019-2.718, p = 0.042). The findings of our study demonstrate the benefits of using big data analytics for research and clinical risk factor studies. Specifically, in this study, this analytical method was applied to identify higher levels of serum cholesterol and ferritin, metabolic syndrome, and family history of cancer as factors that may explain the increasing incidence and prevalence of rectal NET.

  19. Endoscopic treatments for rectal neuroendocrine tumors smaller than 16 mm: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Wu, Wei; Yang, Sheng; Lin, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), including conventional EMR (c-EMR) and modified EMR (m-EMR), was applied to remove small rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). We aim to evaluate treatment outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), m-EMR and c-EMR for rectal NETs <16 mm. The PubMed, Cochrane Library and Elsevier Science Direct were searched to identify eligible articles. After quality assessment and data extraction, meta-analysis was performed. The main outcomes were complete resection rate, overall complication rate, procedure time and local recurrence rate. Compared with c-EMR, ESD could achieve higher complete resection rate (OR = 4.38, 95%CI: 2.43-7.91, p < 0.00001) without increasing overall complication rates (OR = 2.21, 95%CI: 0.56-8.70, p = 0.25). However, ESD was more time-consuming than c-EMR (MD = 6.72, 95%CI: 5.84-7.60, p < 0.00001). Compared with m-EMR, ESD did not differ from m-EMR in complete resection and overall complication rates (OR = 0.80, 95%CI: 0.51-1.27, p = 0.34; OR = 1.91, 95%CI: 0.75-4.86, p = 0.18, respectively). However, ESD was more time-consuming than m-EMR (MD = 12.21, 95%CI: 7.78-16.64, p < 0.00001). Compared with c-EMR, m-EMR could achieve higher complete resection rate (OR = 4.23, 95%CI: 2.39-7.50, p < 0.00001) without increasing overall complication rate (OR = 1.07, 95%CI: 0.35-3.32, p = 0.90). Moreover, m-EMR was not time-consuming than c-EMR (MD = 2.01, 95%CI: -0.37-4.40, p= 0.10). The local recurrence rate was 0.84% (9/1067) during follow-up. Both ESD and m-EMR have great advantages over c-EMR in complete resection rate without increasing safety concern while m-EMR shares similar outcomes with ESD for rectal NETs <16 mm. The results should be confirmed by well-designed, multicenter, randomized controlled trials with large samples and long-term follow-ups from more countries.

  20. Modified simultaneous integrated boost radiotherapy for an unresectable huge refractory pelvic tumor diagnosed as a rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nomiya, Takuma; Akamatsu, Hiroko; Harada, Mayumi; Ota, Ibuki; Hagiwara, Yasuhito; Ichikawa, Mayumi; Miwa, Misako; Kawashiro, Shouhei; Hagiwara, Motohisa; Chin, Masahiro; Hashizume, Eiji; Nemoto, Kenji

    2014-12-28

    A clinical trial of radiotherapy with modified simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique against huge tumors was conducted. A 58-year-old male patient who had a huge pelvic tumor diagnosed as a rectal adenocarcinoma due to familial adenomatous polyposis was enrolled in this trial. The total dose of 77 Gy (equivalent dose in 2 Gy/fraction) and 64.5 Gy was delivered to the center of the tumor and the surrounding area respectively, and approximately 20% dose escalation was achieved with the modified SIB technique. The tumor with an initial maximum size of 15 cm disappeared 120 d after the start of the radiotherapy. Performance status of the patient improved from 4 to 0. Radiotherapy with modified SIB may be effective for patients with a huge tumor in terms of tumor shrinkage/disappearance, improvement of QOL, and prolongation of survival.

  1. Real-time monitoring of tumor response to preoperative radiochemotherapy for rectal carcinoma by nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianhuang; Chen, Zhifen; Wang, Xingfu; Jiang, Weizhong; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-03-01

    The continuing advancement of nonlinear optical imaging techniques has opened many new windows in biological exploration. In this work, the nonlinear optical microscopy, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), was extended to probe tumor response to preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for rectal carcinoma. It was found that MPM has the ability of direct visualization of histopathologic changes in rectal carcinoma following preoperative RCT including stromal fibrosis, colloid response and residual tumors. Our results also showed the capability of MPM using the quantitative analyses of images to quantify these changes. This work may provide the groundwork for further exploration into the application of multiphoton-based endoscopy in a clinical setting.

  2. Primary mature cystic teratoma with carcinoid mimicking an adrenal tumor: Report of a rare association and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Narla, Swetha Lakshmi; Jacob, Sheba; Kurian, Ann; Parameswaran, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are neoplasms comprising of tissues derived from more than one germ layer. Most common sites are gonads, sacrococcygeal, mediastinal, retroperitoneal, and pineal region. Here, we report a case of 2 -year-old previously healthy female toddlerwho presented with fever and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen revealed a right suprarenal nonenhancing cystic mass. Focal calcification was seen in the inferomedial aspect of the cyst. Complete surgical resection of the right adrenal gland was done. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was free of recurrence at 8 months follow-up. Primary retroperitoneal teratomas of the adrenal gland are very uncommon (4% of all primary teratomas) and can mimic a primary adrenal tumor, hence should be included in the differential diagnosis of adrenal masses.

  3. Surgical management of carcinoid heart valve disease.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Javier G; Milla, Federico; Adams, David H

    2012-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine tumors with an unpredictable clinical behavior. In the setting of hepatic metastases, the release of bioactive amines from the tumor into the systemic circulation results in carcinoid syndrome: a constellation of clinical symptoms, among which cutaneous flushing, gastrointestinal hypermotility, and cardiac involvement are the most frequent. Cardiac manifestations, also known as carcinoid heart disease, are secondary to a severe endocardial fibrotic reaction that leads to progressive valve thickening and retraction. Imaging studies commonly reveal severe right-sided valve disease, with fixed leaflets or cusps in a semiopen position. The replacement of the right-sided valves, including the patch enlargement of the right ventricular outflow tract, is currently the only definitive treatment to potentially improve quality of life and provide survival benefit. Although cardiac surgery has been traditionally reserved for those patients with symptomatic right ventricular failure, a significant trend toward improved surgical outcomes has triggered a more liberal referral for valve replacement during the past decade. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CXCR4 and CXCL12 Expression in Rectal Tumors of Stage IV Patients Before and After Local Radiotherapy and Systemic Neoadjuvant Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tamas, Karin; Domanska, Urszula M; van Dijk, Tonnis H; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Havenga, Klaas; Karrenbeld, Arend; Sluiter, Wim J; Beukema, Jannet C; van Vugt, Marcel A T M; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Hospers, Geke A P; Walenkamp, Annemiek M E

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic rectal cancer patients could benefit from novel therapeutic approaches. The signaling network formed by chemokines and their receptors can promote metastasis and resistance to current anticancer treatments. This study assessed the expression of chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand CXCL12 immuhistochemically in stage IV rectal tumors. Paraffin-embedded primary tumor collected before and after local radiotherapy and systemic treatment with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin and capecitabine was analyzed. Receptor and ligand expression was assessed in the cytoplasm and nucleus of tumor, stromal and normal rectal crypt cells. Baseline expression of CXCR4 and CXCL12 was correlated with patients' pathologic response to treatment. At diagnosis (n=46), 89% of the rectal tumors expressed cytoplasmic CXCR4 and 81% CXCL12. Nuclear CXCR4 expression in tumor cells was present in 30% and nuclear CXCL12 expression in 35% of the tumors. After radiochemotherapy and administration of bevacizumab, nuclear CXCL12 expression was observed in 79% of residual tumors, as compared to 31% of the paired tumor samples expressing nuclear CXCL12 before treatment (P=0.001). There were no differences in CXCR4 or CXCL12 expression at baseline between the patients who had (n=9) and did not have (n=30) a pathologic complete response. Our results show that CXCR4 and CXCL12 are extensively expressed in primary rectal tumors of patients presenting with metastatic disease, while radiochemotherapy and bevacizumab further upregulate CXCL12 expression. These data indicate the importance of the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in rectal tumor biology, and may suggest the CXCR4/CXCL12 receptor-ligand pair as a potential therapeutic target in metastatic rectal cancer.

  5. Atypical intermediate-grade mediastinal carcinoid. Case presentation.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Muñoz, Araceli; Onofre-Borja, Melissa; Borrego-Borrego, Rafael; Chávez-Mercado, Leonora; Navarro-Reynoso, Francisco Pascual; Ibarra-Pérez, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 25% of carcinoid tumors develop in the respiratory system. Neuroendocrine carcinoids represent ~5% of all mediastinal tumors and 1-5% of all intrathoracic neoplasms. They contain numerous neurosecretory granules that synthesize, store and release neurohumoral substances that can induce the carcinoid syndrome. A 21-year-old male presented with a rapidly progressive paraneoplastic syndrome unleashed by an acute urethritis. Two left mediastinal masses were identified and resected. Postoperative evolution has been uneventful during the first year. We emphasize the importance of early detection of primary and satellite lesions of these tumors including neurohumoral markers and PET/CT scans as in this case, as well as the participation of a multidisciplinary team.

  6. [Role of computerized tomography following transrectal air insufflation and hypotonization and transrectal ultrasonography in the staging of rectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Osti, M F; Scattoni Padovan, F; Meli, C; Pirolli, C; Sbarbati, S; Notarianni, E; De Angelis d'Ossat, M; Anaveri, G

    1996-11-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) with rectal air inflation was compared with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) in the preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer in 126 patients. Precontrast and postcontrast CT scans were performed with 5 mm thick slices; the rectum was previously inflated with air and antiperistaltic agents were administered. Preoperative results were compared with histologic findings. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of CT in predicting perirectal spread were 76%, 62% and 83%, whereas the corresponding figures for TRUS were 84%, 69% and 92%. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of CT and TRUS for nodal involvement were 58%, 60%, 57% and 72%, 68% and 66%, respectively. These results show that TRUS predicts perirectal spread and detects nodal metastases better than CT. However CT, when performed appropriately, shows tumor spread into perirectal fat and locoregional lymph nodes with high accuracy. Lymphatic involvement is strictly correlated with tumor size: TRUS and CT correctly staged only 57% and 43%, respectively, of the cases with nodal metastases and max. diameter of 5 mm. TRUS sometimes overstaged perirectal tumor growth (13 patients in our series) due to perirectal inflammation (9 cases) or artifacts caused by the presence of air bubbles between the probe and the tumor surface (4 patients). TRUS is a very useful tool for detecting tumor distance from the anal opening; in our series, the distance was incorrectly calculated only in one case (3 cm with TRUS versus 4 cm at surgery).

  7. Mismatch Repair Gene Expression as a Predictor of Tumor Responses in Patients With Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Seok Hyung; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the predictive and prognostic value of expression of mismatch repair (MMR) protein, including MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 in rectal cancer patients with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. MMR protein expression was measured by immunohistochemistry in both pretreatment biopsies (pre-) and pathologic specimens (post-) from 209 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy and radical surgery. The patients were followed for a median period of 44 months. A pathologic complete response (pCR) was observed in 30 patients (14.4%). The expression levels of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 were not significantly different between the pCR and non-pCR groups. A multivariate analysis revealed that tumor differentiation, postoperative chemotherapy, and pre-MSH6 expression were independent predictors of overall survival; ypN category and perineural invasion were independent predictors of disease-free survival. The pre-MSH6 expression was significantly associated with tumor budding and expression of all MMR proteins. On multivariate analysis, ypN category and post-MSH6 expression were independent predictors for local recurrence. In our study, we observed the independent prognostic value of MSH6 expression in pretreatment tissue on overall survival and MSH6 expression after chemoradiation on local recurrence. Constitutive MSH6 expression before and after preoperative therapy may be a useful tool for prediction of oncologic outcome in locally advanced rectal cancer. PMID:26817916

  8. Tumor deposits: markers of poor prognosis in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu-Ning; Xiao, Wei-Wei; Xi, Shao-Yan; OuYang, Pu-Yun; You, Kai-Yun; Zeng, Zhi-Fan; Ding, Pei-Rong; Zhang, Hui-Zhong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Xu, Rui-Hua; Gao, Yuan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor deposits (TDs) were reported to be poor prognoses in colorectal carcinoma, but the significance in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) (T3-4/N+) following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (neo-CRT) and surgery is unclear. Since adjuvant chemotherapy showed no benefit for LARC following neo-CRT, it is of great value to investigate whether TDs can identify the subgroup of patients who may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Between 2004 and 2012, 310 LARC patients following neo-CRT and surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), distant metastasis free survival (DMFS) and local recurrence free survival (LRFS) were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test and Cox models. Results TDs-positive patients showed adverse OS, DFS and DMFS (all P≤0.001), but not LRFS (P = 0.273). In multivariate analysis, TDs continued to be associated with poor OS (HR = 2.44, 95% CI 1.32-4.4, P = 0.004) and DFS (HR = 1.99, 95% CI 1.21-3.27, P = 0.007), but not DMFS (HR = 1.77, 95% CI 0.97-3.20, P = 0.061) or LRFS (HR = 1.85, 95% CI 0.58-5.85, P = 0.298). Among TDs-positive patients, adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved OS (P = 0.045) and DMFS (P = 0.026), but not DFS (P = 0.127) or LRFS (P = 0.862). Conclusions TDs are predictive of poor survival in LARC after neo-CRT. Fortunately, TDs-positive patients appear to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26695441

  9. Magnetic Resonance Tumor Regression Grade and Residual Mucosal Abnormality as Predictors for Pathological Complete Response in Rectal Cancer Postneoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bhoday, Jemma; Smith, Fraser; Siddiqui, Muhammed R; Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Swift, Robert I; Perez, Rodrigo; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Brown, Gina

    2016-10-01

    Pathological complete response after chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer occurs in 10% to 30% of patients. The best method to identify such patients remains unclear. Clinical assessment of residual mucosal abnormality is considered the most accurate method. In our institution, magnetic resonance tumor regression grade is performed as routine to assess response. The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of magnetic tumor regression grade against residual mucosal abnormality in detecting patients with a pathological complete response. Magnetic tumor regression grade scores from reported posttreatment MRI scans were documented. Magnetic tumor regression grade 1 to 3 was defined as likely to predict complete or near complete response. Gross appearances of the mucosa were derived from histopathology reports and used as a surrogate for clinical assessment (previously validated). Final histopathological staging was used to determine response. The study was conducted at Royal Marsden National Health Service Trust, United Kingdom. A total of 143 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, diagnosed between September 1, 2009, and September 1, 2013, who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy before curative surgery were included. The sensitivity of magnetic tumor regression grade and residual mucosal abnormality in detecting patients with pathological complete response were measured : Eighteen patients had a pathological complete response. Seventeen were detected using magnetic resonance tumor regression grade 1 to 3, with sensitivity 94% (95% CI, 0.74-0.99), and 10 were detected using residual mucosal abnormality, with sensitivity 62% (95% CI, 0.38-0.81). There was no statistical difference between the false positive rates for either method. Magnetic tumor regression grade identified 10 times more patients with a pathological complete response (diagnostic OR = 10.2 (95% CI, 1.30-73.73)) compared with clinical assessment with RMA. Residual mucosal abnormality was used

  10. The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming-ming; Luo, Hui-yan; Wang, Feng-hua; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Li, Yu-hong; Xu, Rui-hua

    2016-01-01

    The clinicopathologic relevance and prognostic value of tumor deposits in colorectal cancer has been widely demonstrated. However, there are still debates in the prognostic value of tumor deposits and the applicability of N1c category in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy. In this study, rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy followed by resection of primary tumors registered in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database from 2010-2012 were analyzed. There were 4,813 cases eligible for this study, and tumor deposits were found in 514 (10.7%) cases. The presence of tumor deposits was significantly associated with some aggressive characteristics, including poorer tumor differentiation, more advanced ypT category, ypN category and ypTNM stage, distant metastasis, elevated carcinoembryonic antigen, higher positive rates of circumferential resection margin and perineural invasion (all P < = 0.001). Tumor deposit was also an independent negative prognostic factor for cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.25 (1.51 – 3.35)). N1c category had significant worse survival compared with N0 category (adjusted HR and 95% CI: 2.41 (1.24 – 4.69)). In conclusion, tumor deposit was a significant and independent prognostic factor, and the N1c category by the 7th edition of AJCC/TNM staging system was applicable in rectal cancer with preoperative radiotherapy. PMID:27655707

  11. Tumor location and patient characteristics of colon and rectal adenocarcinomas in relation to survival and TNM classes.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Santi, Irene; Weires, Marianne; Thomsen, Hauke; Sundquist, Jan; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo

    2010-12-21

    Old age at diagnosis is associated with poor survival in colorectal cancer (CRC) for unknown reasons. Recent data show that colonoscopy is efficient in preventing left-sided cancers only. We examine the association of Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) classes with diagnostic age and patient characteristics. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database has data on TNM classes on 6,105 CRC adenocarcinoma patients. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was performed to model tumor characteristics according to age at diagnosis, tumor localization, gender, socioeconomic status, medical region and family history. The results were compared to results from survival analysis. The only parameters systematically associated with TNM classes were age and tumor localization. Young age at diagnosis was a risk factor for aggressive CRC, according to stage, N and M with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 1.80 to 1.93 for diagnosis before age 50 years compared to diagnosis at 80+ years. All tumor characteristics, particularly T, were worse for colon compared to rectal tumors. Right-sided tumors showed worse characteristics for all classifiers but M. The survival analysis on patients diagnosed since 2000 showed a hazard ratio of 0.55 for diagnosis before age 50 years compared to diagnosis at over 80 years and a modestly better prognosis for left-sided compared to right-sided tumors. The results showed systematically more aggressive tumors in young compared to old patients. The poorer survival of old patients in colon cancer was not related to the available tumor characteristics. However, these partially agreed with the limited colonoscopic success with right-sided tumors.

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression correlated with tumor response in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Diclehan . E-mail: diclehan@yahoo.com; Uner, Aytug; Akyurek, Nalan; Erpolat, Petek; Dursun, Ayse; Pak, Yucel

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze whether the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors are associated with tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients who had undergone preoperative chemoradiotherapy were evaluated retrospectively. Treatment consisted of pelvic radiotherapy and two cycles of 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks later. MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry of the preradiation biopsy and surgical specimens. The intensity and extent of staining were evaluated separately, and a final score was calculated by multiplying the two scores. The primary endpoint was the correlation of expression with tumor response, with the secondary endpoint the effect of chemoradiotherapy on the expression. Results: Preoperative treatment resulted in downstaging in 20 patients (45%) and no clinical response in 24 (55%). The pathologic tumor response was complete in 11 patients (25%), partial in 23 (52%), and none in 10 (23%). Positive MMP-9 staining was observed in 20 tumors (45%) and was associated with the clinical nodal stage (p = 0.035) and the pathologic and clinical response (p < 0.0001). The staining status of the other markers was associated with neither stage nor response. The overall pathologic response rate was 25% in MMP-9-positive patients vs. 52% in MMP-9-negative patients (p = 0.001). None of the 11 patients with pathologic complete remission was MMP-9 positive. Conclusions: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression correlated with a poor tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal carcinoma patients.

  13. [A Case of Unresectable Advanced Rectal Cancer with a Pancreatic Tumor That Was Successfully Treated with FOLFIRINOX].

    PubMed

    Yabe, Nobushige; Murai, Shinji; Ozawa, Hiroki; Yokose, Takahiro; Oto, Ippei; Yoshikawa, Takahisa; Kitasato, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Hirotomo; Kojima, Kenji; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-11-01

    A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital department in September 2014 because of a positive fecal occult blood test.Colonoscopy showed a type 2 tumor in half of the AV 15 cm rectosigmoid colon.Histology of the biopsy indicated a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and the RAS gene test found wild type.On CT examination, there were multiple liver lung metastases and a 30mm diameter tumor with pancreatic duct extension to the pancreatic body.A PET-CT examination had a high SUVmax at the same site.Because of the location of the tumor EUS-FNA was not used.However, the possibility of pancreatic body cancer could not be denied after the CT examination.Treatment by radical resection was impossible because of the spread of the cancer so we selected chemotherapy.Undeniable pancreatic metastasis of rectal cancer, pancreatic cancer was used as a prognostic factor as double cancer of rectal cancer and pancreatic cancer, from that UGT1A1 test side effects appearance was a low-risk decision, was selected FOLFIRINOX in the treatment regimen.After 25 cycles, the pancreatic body tumor and liver metastases and also the primary tumor were reduced, the multiple lung metastases disappeared, and disease control was good.Side effects were diarrhea on the day of administration of irinotecan, but this was controllable by administering oral loperamide when starting the infusion.Grade 3 or more peripheral neuropathy has not developed, and this regimen is continuing.Pancreatic cancer is a solid cancer with a poor prognosis; if you do not reach the tissue diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic cancer, was a case in which no choice but to select a regimen to carcinoma of the prognostic.

  14. Study shows colon and rectal tumors constitute a single type of cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The pattern of genomic alterations in colon and rectal tissues is the same regardless of anatomic location or origin within the colon or the rectum, leading researchers to conclude that these two cancer types can be grouped as one, according to The Cancer

  15. How initial tumor stage affects rectal cancer patient follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ode, Kenichi; Patel, Uday; Virgo, Katherine S; Audisio, Riccardo A; Johnson, Frank E

    2009-06-01

    Many believe that follow-up testing for rectal carcinoma patients after primary curative-intent therapy should be rather intensive for high-stage lesions and less intensive for low-stage lesions. We recently carried out a survey of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) to quantify the strategies they use after primary treatment for their own patients. Considerable variability in surveillance exists. Here we report how initial TNM stage affects follow-up intensity. We devised vignettes succinctly describing otherwise healthy patients with rectal carcinoma (stages I-III). We mailed a questionnaire based on the vignettes to the 1,795 ASCRS members. Responses deemed evaluable were entered into a computer database. The effect of TNM stage on follow-up intensity for patients with stage I, II, or III rectal carcinoma treated with radical surgery was assessed by repeated-measures ANOVA. The surveillance modality most frequently utilized was the office visit. In year 1 following surgery for patients with stage I lesions, 3.8+/-2.7 office visits (mean +/- SD) were recommended, decreasing to 1.5+/-1.0 in year 5. For patients with stage III lesions treated with radical surgery +/- adjuvant therapy, 4.0+/-2.8 office visits were recommended in year 1, decreasing to 1.7+/-1.2 in year 5. Similar results were generated for all commonly used surveillance modalities. The intensity of follow-up after curative-intent treatment for rectal carcinoma varies minimally across TNM stages. This suggests that a controlled trial comparing high-intensity versus low-intensity follow-up testing could be carried out without stratification by TNM stage.

  16. Thymic carcinoids in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Teh, B T; Zedenius, J; Kytölä, S; Skogseid, B; Trotter, J; Choplin, H; Twigg, S; Farnebo, F; Giraud, S; Cameron, D; Robinson, B; Calender, A; Larsson, C; Salmela, P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical, pathologic, and genetic features of thymic carcinoids in the setting of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and to study means for detection and prevention of this tumor in patients with MEN1. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Thymic carcinoid is a rare malignancy, with approximately 150 cases reported to date. It may be associated with MEN1 and carries a poor prognosis, with no effective treatment. Its underlying etiology is unknown. METHODS: Ten patients with MEN1 from eight families with anterior mediastinal tumors were included in a case series study at tertiary referring hospitals. Clinicopathologic studies were done on these patients, with a review of the literature. Mutation analysis was performed on the MEN1 gene in families with clusterings of the tumor to look for genotype-phenotype correlation. Loss of heterozygosity was studied in seven cases to look for genetic abnormalities. RESULTS: Histologic studies of all tumors were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid. Clustering of this tumor was found in some of the families-three pairs of brothers and three families with first- or second-degree relatives who had thymic carcinoid. All patients described here were men, with a mean age at detection of 44 years (range 31 to 66). Most of the patients had chest pain or were asymptomatic; none had Cushing's or carcinoid syndrome. All tumors were detected by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest. The results of octreoscans performed in three patients were all positive. Histopathologic studies were consistent with the diagnosis of thymic carcinoid and did not stain for ACTH. Mutation analysis of the families with clustering revealed mutations in different exons/introns of the MEN1 gene. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies of seven tumors did not show LOH in the MEN1 region, but two tumors showed LOH in the 1p region. CONCLUSIONS: MEN1-related thymic carcinoids constitute approximately 25

  17. Feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for lower rectal tumors with hemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shinwa; Toyonaga, Takashi; Morita, Yoshinori; Hoshi, Namiko; Ishida, Tsukasa; Ohara, Yoshiko; Yoshizaki, Tetsuya; Kawara, Fumiaki; Umegaki, Eiji; Azuma, Takeshi

    2016-07-21

    To evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids. The outcome of ESD for 23 lesions with hemorrhoids (hemorrhoid group) was compared with that of 48 lesions without hemorrhoids extending to the dentate line (non-hemorrhoid group) during the same study period. Median operation times (ranges) in the hemorrhoid and non-hemorrhoid groups were 121 (51-390) and 130 (28-540) min. The en bloc resection rate and the curative resection rate in the hemorrhoid group were 96% and 83%, and they were 100% and 90% in the non-hemorrhoid group, respectively. In terms of adverse events, perforation and postoperative bleeding did not occur in both groups. In terms of the clinical course of hemorrhoids after ESD, the rate of complete recovery of hemorrhoids after ESD in lesions with resection of more than 90% was significantly higher than that in lesions with resection of less than 90%. ESD on lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids could be performed safely, similarly to that on rectal lesions extending to the dentate line without hemorrhoids. In addition, all hemorrhoids after ESD improved to various degrees, depending on the resection range.

  18. Feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for lower rectal tumors with hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shinwa; Toyonaga, Takashi; Morita, Yoshinori; Hoshi, Namiko; Ishida, Tsukasa; Ohara, Yoshiko; Yoshizaki, Tetsuya; Kawara, Fumiaki; Umegaki, Eiji; Azuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids. METHODS: The outcome of ESD for 23 lesions with hemorrhoids (hemorrhoid group) was compared with that of 48 lesions without hemorrhoids extending to the dentate line (non-hemorrhoid group) during the same study period. RESULTS: Median operation times (ranges) in the hemorrhoid and non-hemorrhoid groups were 121 (51-390) and 130 (28-540) min. The en bloc resection rate and the curative resection rate in the hemorrhoid group were 96% and 83%, and they were 100% and 90% in the non-hemorrhoid group, respectively. In terms of adverse events, perforation and postoperative bleeding did not occur in both groups. In terms of the clinical course of hemorrhoids after ESD, the rate of complete recovery of hemorrhoids after ESD in lesions with resection of more than 90% was significantly higher than that in lesions with resection of less than 90%. CONCLUSION: ESD on lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids could be performed safely, similarly to that on rectal lesions extending to the dentate line without hemorrhoids. In addition, all hemorrhoids after ESD improved to various degrees, depending on the resection range. PMID:27468216

  19. FAIM2, as a novel diagnostic maker and a potential therapeutic target for small-cell lung cancer and atypical carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hio Chung; Kim, Jong In; Chang, Hee Kyung; Woodard, Gavitt; Choi, Young Sik; Ku, Ja-Lok; Jablons, David M.; Kim, Il-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Lung neuroendocrine (NE) tumors are a heterogeneous group of tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells that includes typical carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and large cell NE cancer. The subtyping of NE tumors is based on the number of mitoses per high powered field and the presences of necrosis. However, the best diagnostic criteria to differentiate various subtypes of lung NE tumors remains controversial and few diagnostic markers distinguish typical and atypical carcinoid. In this study, we show that FAIM2, an inhibitory molecule in the Fas-apoptosis pathway, is significantly overexpressed in SCLC compared to non-small cell lung cancer. In addition, FAIM2 expression is significantly higher in atypical carcinoid than typical carcinoid. As atypical carcinoid has been shown to have worse clinical outcomes than typical carcinoid, our data suggests that FAIM2 may be a useful diagnostic marker for atypical carcinoid. Knockdown of FAIM2 expression increases Fas-induced apoptotic cell death in SCLC cells. Etoposide treatment combined with FAIM2 inhibition also shows modest but significant reduction of viable SCLC cells. Taken together, our results suggest that FAIM2 is a potential NE tumor marker with higher expression in atypical carcinoid and SCLC, and could be a new therapeutic target for SCLC. PMID:27677402

  20. Increased Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy Among Rectal Cancer Patients Taking Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors or Angiotensin Receptor Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Zachary S.; Saha, Sandeep; Magnuson, William J.; Morris, Brett A.; Borkenhagen, Jenna F.; Ching, Alisa; Hirose, Gayle; McMurry, Vanesa; Francis, David M.; Harari, Paul M.; Chappell, Rick; Tsuji, Stuart; Ritter, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are commonly used antihypertensive medications that have been reported to affect aberrant angiogenesis and the dysregulated inflammatory response. Because of such mechanisms, it was hypothesized that these medications might affect the tumor response to neoadjuvant radiation in patients with rectal cancer. METHODS One hundred fifteen patients who were treated with neoadjuvant radiation at the University of Wisconsin (UW) between 1999 and 2012 were identified. Univariate analyses were performed with anonymized patient data. In a second independent data set, 186 patients with rectal cancer who were treated with neoadjuvant radiation at the Queen’s Medical Center of the University of Hawaii (UH) between 1995 and 2010 were identified. These data were independently analyzed as before. Multivariate analyses were performed with aggregate data. RESULTS Among patients taking ACEIs/ARBs in the UW data set, a significant 3-fold increase in the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant therapy (52% vs 17%, P = .001) was observed. This finding was confirmed in the UH data set, in which a significant 2-fold–increased pCR rate (24% vs 12%, P = .03) was observed. Identified patient and treatment characteristics were otherwise balanced between patients taking and not taking ACEIs/ARBs. No significant effect was observed on pCR rates with other medications, including statins, metformin, and aspirin. Multivariate analyses of aggregate data identified ACEI/ARB use as a strong predictor of pCR (odds ratio, 4.02; 95% confidence interval, 2.06–7.82; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS The incidental use of ACEIs/ARBs among patients with rectal cancer is associated with a significantly increased rate of pCR after neoadjuvant treatment. PMID:27203227

  1. Endoluminal loco-regional resection by TEM after R1 endoscopic removal or recurrence of rectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Quaresima, Silvia; Balla, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Giancarlo; Bruzzone, Paolo; Ursi, Pietro; Lezoche, Emanuele; Paganini, Alessandro M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endoluminal loco-regional resection (ELRR) by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) after R1 endoscopic resection or local recurrence of early rectal cancer after operative endoscopy. Twenty patients with early rectal cancer were enrolled, including patients with incomplete endoscopic resection, or complete endoscopic resection of a tumor with unfavorable prognostic factors (group A, ten patients), and local recurrence after endoscopic removal (group B, ten patients). At admission, histology after endoscopic polypectomy was: TisR1(4), T1R0G3(1), T1R1(5) in group A, and TisR0(8), T1R0(2) in group B. All patients underwent ELRR by TEM with nucleotide-guided mesorectal excision (NGME). Mean operative time was 150 minutes. Complications occurred in two patients (10%). Definitive histology was: moderate dysplasia(4), pT0N0(3), pTisN0(5), pT1N0(6), pT2N0(2). Mean number of lymph-nodes was 3.1. Mean follow-up was 79.5 months. All patients are alive and disease-free. ELRR by TEM after R1 endoscopic resection of early rectal cancer or for local recurrence after operative endoscopy is safe and effective. It may be considered as a diagnostic procedure, as well as a curative treatment option, instead of a more invasive TME.

  2. Outcome of extralevator abdominoperineal excision over conventional abdominoperineal excision for low rectal tumor: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Xu, Huirong; Shang, Zhenhua; Chen, Shouzhen; Chen, Fan; Deng, Qiming; Luo, Li; Zhu, Liang; Shi, Benkang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A meta-analysis was undertaken to provide an evidence-based basis of clinical trials comparing extralevator abdominoperineal excision with conventional abdominoperineal excision for low rectal tumor. Methods: We searched through the major medical databases such as PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, Science Citation Index, Web of Science for all published studies without any limit on language from January 2009 until January 2015. The following search terms were used: extralevator abdominoperineal excision or cylindrical abdominoperineal resection or conventional abdominoperineal excision or abdominoperineal excision or rectal cancer. Furthermore, Additional related studies were manually searched in the reference lists of all published reviews and retrieved articles. Results: In this meta-analysis, there are a total number of 1797 patients included: 1099 patients in the ELAPE group and 698 in the APE group, and there are not statistically differences between groups in CRM [RR=0.65, 95% CI (0.41, 1.04), P=0.07] and wound complications [RR=1.14, 95% CI (1.09, 1.66), P=0.45] between ELAPE and APE. However, ELAPE has a lower rate of intraoperation perforation [RR=0.44; 95% CI (0.33, 0.60); P<0.00001] and local recurrence [RR=0.45, 95% CI (0.27, 0.77), P=0.003] than APE in terms of short follow-up time. PMID:26628967

  3. Therapeutic options for gastrointestinal carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Modlin, Irvin M; Latich, Igor; Kidd, Mark; Zikusoka, Michelle; Eick, Geeta

    2006-05-01

    Although wide surgical resection is the optimal curative therapy for carcinoid tumors, in most patients the presence of metastatic disease at diagnosis usually renders excision a palliative procedure. This nevertheless decreases tumor burden, facilitates symptom control, and prevents complications caused by bleeding, perforation, or bowel obstruction resulting from fibrosis. In the stomach (types I and II) and rectum endoscopic excision may be adequate provided the lesion(s) are local. Long-term therapy is focused on symptom alleviation and improvement of quality of life using somatostatin analogues, particularly in a subcutaneous depot formulation. In some instances interferons may have a role but their usage often is associated with substantial adverse events. Conventional chemotherapy and external radiotherapy either alone or in a variety of permutations are of minimal efficacy and should be balanced against the decrease in quality of life often engendered by such agents. Hepatic metastases may be amenable to surgery, radiofrequency ablation, or embolization either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents or isotopically loaded microspheres. Rarely hepatic transplantation may be of benefit although controversy exists as to its actual use. Peptide-receptor-targeted radiotherapy for advanced disease using radiolabeled octapeptide analogs (111In/90Yt/177Lu-octreotide) appear promising but data are limited and its status remains investigational. A variety of antiangiogenesis and growth factor-targeted agents have been evaluated, but as yet have shown little promise. The keystone of current therapy remains the long-acting somatostatin analogues that alleviate symptomatology and substantially improve quality of life with minimal adverse effects.

  4. Measuring the apparent diffusion coefficient in primary rectal tumors: is there a benefit in performing histogram analyses?

    PubMed

    van Heeswijk, Miriam M; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique; Lahaye, Max J; Ayas, Z; Slenter, Jos M G M; Beets, Geerard L; Bakers, Frans C H; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2017-06-01

    The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is a potential prognostic imaging marker in rectal cancer. Typically, mean ADC values are used, derived from precise manual whole-volume tumor delineations by experts. The aim was first to explore whether non-precise circular delineation combined with histogram analysis can be a less cumbersome alternative to acquire similar ADC measurements and second to explore whether histogram analyses provide additional prognostic information. Thirty-seven patients who underwent a primary staging MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI; b0, 25, 50, 100, 500, 1000; 1.5 T) were included. Volumes-of-interest (VOIs) were drawn on b1000-DWI: (a) precise delineation, manually tracing tumor boundaries (2 expert readers), and (b) non-precise delineation, drawing circular VOIs with a wide margin around the tumor (2 non-experts). Mean ADC and histogram metrics (mean, min, max, median, SD, skewness, kurtosis, 5th-95th percentiles) were derived from the VOIs and delineation time was recorded. Measurements were compared between the two methods and correlated with prognostic outcome parameters. Median delineation time reduced from 47-165 s (precise) to 21-43 s (non-precise). The 45th percentile of the non-precise delineation showed the best correlation with the mean ADC from the precise delineation as the reference standard (ICC 0.71-0.75). None of the mean ADC or histogram parameters showed significant prognostic value; only the total tumor volume (VOI) was significantly larger in patients with positive clinical N stage and mesorectal fascia involvement. When performing non-precise tumor delineation, histogram analysis (in specific 45th ADC percentile) may be used as an alternative to obtain similar ADC values as with precise whole tumor delineation. Histogram analyses are not beneficial to obtain additional prognostic information.

  5. High-performance size-based microdevice for the detection of circulating tumor cells from peripheral blood in rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Jia, Chunping; Huang, Ting; Sheng, Weiqi; Li, Guichao; Zhang, Honglian; Jing, Fengxiang; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Since individualized therapy becomes more and more important in the treatment of rectal cancer, an accurate and effective approach should be established in the clinical settings to help physicians to make their decisions. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), originated from either primary or metastatic cancer, could provide important information for diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. However, the implication and development of CTCs are limited due to the extreme rarity of these tumor cells. In this study we fabricated a simple and high-performance microfluidic device, which exploited numerous filtered microchannels in it to enrich the large-sized target tumor cells from whole blood. A very high CTC capture efficiency (average recovery rate: 94%) was obtained in this device at the optimum flow rate of 0.5 mL/h and channel height of 5 µm. Additionally, we used this device for detecting CTCs in 60 patients with rectal cancer. The CTC counts of rectal cancer patients were significantly higher than those in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the CTC counts detected by this device were significantly higher than those by EpCAM bead-based method for rectal cancer patients with various stage. Especially, for localized rectal cancer patients, the positive rates of samples with more than 3 CTCs per 5 mL blood by use of microdevice vs. EpCAM-based ones were 100% vs. 47%, respectively. Thus, this device provides a new and effective tool for accurate identification and measurement of CTCs in patients with rectal cancer, and has broad potential in clinical practice.

  6. MRI Predictive Factors for Tumor Response in Rectal Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy - Implications for Induction Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Stanley K.T.; Tait, Diana

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics at baseline and following chemoradiation therapy (CRT) most strongly associated with histopathologic response were investigated and survival outcomes evaluated in accordance with imaging and pathological response. Methods and Materials: Responders were defined as mrT3c/d-4 downstaged to ypT0-2 on pathology or low at risk mrT2 downstaged to ypT1 or T0. Multivariate logistic regression of baseline and posttreatment MRI: T, N, extramural venous invasion (EMVI), circumferential resection margin, craniocaudal length <5 cm, and MRI tumor height ≤5 cm were used to identify independent predictor(s) for response. An association between induction chemotherapy and EMVI status was analyzed. Survival outcomes for pathologic and MRI responders and nonresponders were analyzed. Results: Two hundred eighty-one patients were eligible; 114 (41%) patients were pathology responders. Baseline MRI negative EMVI (odds ratio 2.94, P=.007), tumor height ≤5 cm (OR 1.96, P=.02), and mrEMVI status change (positive to negative) following CRT (OR 3.09, P<.001) were the only predictors for response. There was a strong association detected between induction chemotherapy and ymrEMVI status change after CRT (OR 9.0, P<.003). ymrT0-2 gave a positive predictive value of 80% and OR of 9.1 for ypT0-2. ymrN stage accuracy of ypN stage was 75%. Three-year disease-free survival for pathology and MRI responders were similar at 80% and 79% and significantly better than poor responders. Conclusions: Tumor height and mrEMVI status are more important than baseline size and stage of the tumor as predictors of response to CRT. Both MRI- and pathologic-defined responders have significantly improved survival. “Good response” to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer with ypT0-2 carries significantly better 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival. Use of induction chemotherapy for improving mrEMVI status and knowledge of MRI

  7. Distinct patterns of chronic gastritis associated with carcinoid and cancer and their role in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Solcia, E.; Rindi, G.; Fiocca, R.; Villani, L.; Buffa, R.; Ambrosiani, L.; Capella, C.

    1992-01-01

    A series of 60 gastric endocrine tumors comprised 44 body-fundus argyrophil carcinoids, of which 23 arose in a background of hypergastrinemia and type A chronic atrophic gastritis (A-CAG), mainly with histologic patterns suggestive of an autoimmune process. Only 22 percent (compared with 19 percent of 58 tumor-free A-CAG cases) of 36 carcinoids and 21 percent of 19 A-CAG carcinoids investigated had Helicobacter pylori (HP) colonization, against 50 percent of 14 CAG-associated neuroendocrine carcinomas or mixed endocrine-exocrine tumors, 84 percent of 150 cases with early gastric cancer (p < 0.001 versus carcinoids), mostly with B- or AB-type CAG, 76 percent of 97 tumor-free AB-CAG, and 95 percent of 151 tumor-free B-CAG cases. Secondary hypergastrinemia and local mechanisms activated by chronic autoimmune gastritis are among factors involved in the pathogenesis of relatively indolent CAG-associated carcinoids, whereas active HP gastritis in cooperation with environmental carcinogens may likely cause more severe epithelial transformation, leading to ordinary cancer and, possibly, to neuroendocrine carcinomas or mixed endocrine-exocrine tumors. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:1341079

  8. Cytohistology of papillary carcinoid and emerging concept of pulmonary neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Grace C H

    2016-01-01

    This timely review starts by reporting the clinical, cytologic and histologic features of a morphologic variant of pulmonary carcinoid tumor forming exclusively of papillae. This growth pattern is so rare that it was not included in 2014 WHO classification of pulmonary neuroendocrine neoplasms. The current concept is reviewed, and example of spindle cell carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, and small cell carcinoma are illustrated with fine needle aspiration cytology, surgical and clinical follow-up. Finally, the new findings in cell biology and molecular biology that led to the emerging concept that carcinoids and high-grade neuroendocrine lung carcinomas are separate biological entities are reviewed and summarized in a tumorigenic module.

  9. Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Metastases From Atypical Laryngeal Carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kui-Rong; Jia, Yuan-Jing; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Wang, Qin-Ying; Bao, Yang-Yang; Feng, Zhi-Ying; Yao, Hong-Tian; Fan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoids is approximately 20%. However, the pathogenesis and natural history of, and prognostic factors for, the condition remain poorly understood. We reported a 54-year-old female presented with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases from atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Laryngoscopy revealed a 0.5 × 1.5-cm reddish mass on the laryngeal surface of the epiglottis. Under general anesthesia, a biopsy sample was obtained via suspension laryngoscopy. Routine pathology revealed atypical laryngeal carcinoid. Immunohistochemical staining of the sections of primary tumor was positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, P53, and CD56. GLUT-1, p-Akt, and PI3K were negative. The Ki-67 index was 15%. Supraglottic laryngectomy and selective right-neck dissection were performed. After 6 months, the patient complained of pain in the right wall of the chest; multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules were evident at that site and in the abdomen. An abdominal nodule was biopsied and pathology revealed that the atypical metastatic carcinoid had metastasized to both cutaneous and subcutaneous areas of the abdomen. Chemotherapy was then prescribed. Currently, the intrathecal drug delivery system remains in place. No local recurrence has been detected. Furthermore, we systematically reviewed clinical manifestations of the disease, pathogenesis, prognostic factors, and treatment. The metastasis rate (cutaneous and subcutaneous) was approximately 12.2%. Thirty patients (62.5%) with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases exhibited contemporaneous lymph node invasion. The 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 44.0%, 22.0%, and 13.0%, respectively. The prognosis of patients with atypical laryngeal carcinoids was poor. Relevant prognostic factors included the level of p53, human papilloma virus status, certain hypoxic markers, and distant metastasis. No

  10. Different optical spectral characteristics in a necrotic transmissible venereal tumor and a cystic lesion in the same canine prostate observed by triple-band trans-rectal optical tomography under trans-rectal ultrasound guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhen; Holyoak, G. Reed; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Rock, Kendra; Ownby, Charlotte L.; Slobodov, Gennady; Bunting, Charles F.; Piao, Daqing

    2011-03-01

    Different optical spectral characteristics were observed in a necrotic transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) and a cystic lesion in the same canine prostate by triple-wavelength trans-rectal optical tomography under trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance. The NIR imager acquiring at 705nm, 785nm and 808nm was used to quantify both the total hemoglobin concentration (HbT) and oxygen saturation (StO2) in the prostate. The TVT tumor in the canine prostate as a model of prostate cancer was induced in a 7-year old, 27 kg dog. A 2 mL suspension of 2.5x106 cells/mL of homogenized TVT cells recovered from an in vivo subcutaneously propagated TVT tumor in an NOD/SCID mouse were injected in the cranial aspect of the right lobe of the canine prostate. The left lobe of the prostate had a cystic lesion present before TVT inoculation. After the TVT homogenate injection, the prostate was monitored weekly over a 9-week period, using trans-rectal NIR and TRUS in grey-scale and Doppler. A TVT mass within the right lobe developed a necrotic center during the later stages of this study, as the mass presented with substantially increased [HbT] in the periphery, with an area of reduced StO2 less than the area of the mass itself shown on ultrasonography. Conversely, the cystic lesion presented with slightly increased [HbT] in the periphery of the lesion shown on ultrasound with oxygen-reduction inside and in the periphery of the lesion. There was no detectable change of blood flow on Doppler US in the periphery of the cystic lesion. The slightly increased [HbT] in the periphery of the cystic lesion was correlated with intra-lesional hemorrhage upon histopathologic examination.

  11. Bilateral Choroidal Metastases from Endobronchial Carcinoid Treated with Somatostatin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyn, Deborah; Lamont, Jan; Vanderstraeten, Erik; Van Belle, Simon; Platteau, Elise; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Hoornaert, Kristien P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe a patient with bilateral multifocal choroidal metastases from an endobronchial carcinoid treated with a somatostatin analogue. Method: A 60-year-old woman presenting with photopsia in the left eye underwent an extensive ophthalmic examination, including fluorescein angiography, OCT and ultrasound. Results: Fundoscopy revealed a small retinal tear in the left eye, for which she received laser treatment. In addition, choroidal masses were detected in both eyes. Her medical history of a pneumectomy for a bronchial carcinoid six years earlier together with recent elevated chromogranin A blood levels prompted a diagnosis of choroidal metastases. Subsequently, a Gallium-68 DOTANOC positron emitting tomography/computer tomography scan revealed a spinal cord metastasis and mediastinal as well as mesenterial lymph node invasion. Systemic treatment with Sandostatin®, a somatostatin analogue was started. Up until two years after the initial presentation and treatment, these choroidal lesions remained stable without any signs of growth. Conclusion: Endobronchial carcinoid tumors have an indolent nature and long-term follow-up is recommended for early detection of metastases. Although treatment with somatostatin analogues rarely induces complete tumor regression, tumor stabilization and prevention of symptoms related to hormone secretion is achieved. This well-tolerated systemic treatment provides a worthy alternative treatment for choroidal metastasis compared to classic radiotherapy without any risk of radiation or laser-related visual loss. PMID:27843513

  12. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  13. Less than 12 lymph nodes in the surgical specimen after neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy: an indicator of tumor regression in locally advanced rectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Gurawalia, Jaiprakash; Nayak, Sandeep P.; Kurpad, Vishnu; Pandey, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of lymph node retrieved in the surgical specimen is important for tumor staging and has paramount impact on prognosis in colorectal cancer and imitates the adequacy of lymph node surgical clearance. The paucity of lymph node yields in patients undergoing resection after preoperative chemo radiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer has seen. Lower total number of lymph nodes in the total mesoractal excision (TME) specimen after CRT, could a marker of better tumor response. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the prospectively managed data of patients underwent excision for rectal cancer, who treated by neoadjuvant radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer. From 2010 to 2014, 364 patients underwent rectal cancer surgery, of which ninety-one treated with neoadjuvant treatment. Standard surgical and pathological protocols were followed. Patients were categorized into two groups based on the number of total harvested lymph nodes with group 1, having 12 or more nodes harvested, and group 2 including patients who had <12 lymph nodes harvested. The total number of lymph nodes retrieved from the surgical specimen was correlated with grade of tumor regression with neoadjuvant treatment. Results Out of 91 patients, 38 patients (42%) had less than 12 lymph nodes examined in specimen. The difference in median number of lymph nodes was observed significantly as 9 (range, 2–11) versus 16 (range, 12–32), in group 2 and 1, respectively (P<0.01). Patients with fewer lymph node group were comparable with respect to age, BMI, pre-operative staging, neoadjuvant treatment. Pathological complete response in tumor pCR was seen with significantly higher rate (40% vs. 26%, P<0.05) in group 2. As per Mandard criteria, there was significant difference in tumor regression grade (TRG) between both the groups (P<0.05). Among patients with metastatic lymph nodes, median LNR was lower in <12 lymph nodes group at 0.167 (range, 0.09–0.45) versus

  14. Appendix carcinoid associated with the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sabine; Barth, Thomas F E; Kornmann, Marko; Henne-Bruns, Doris

    2014-01-01

    The Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare hereditary, autosomal-dominant disorder. It is characterized by a gastrointestinal polyposis and mucocutaneous melanic spots. It has also been reported as a precondition for malignancies with a life-time-hazard for cancer up to 93%, caused by a germline mutation in the STK11 gene. A 21-year-old man presented with nausea and abdominal pain. He had a known history of PJS since the age of 13 when he was treated for intussusception due to a hamartomatous polyp. Preoperative diagnostics revealed a second intussusception and an extensive intestinal polyposis. Intraoperative findings confirmed the suspected diagnoses and desvagination was performed. Nearly 50 polyps were removed from the small intestinum over several longitudinal sections. As the appendix appeared thickened an appendectomy was performed simultaneously. Histology showed hamartomatous polyps and the incidental finding of a pT1 carcinoid of the appendix. The patient recovered well and needed no further treatment for his carcinoid tumor. The mechanism of carcinogenesis in PJS still remains debatable, although the genetic disorder underlying the syndrome is known. A predisposition for carcinoid tumors also stays questionable. To our knowledge there is no description of an association between carcinoid tumors of the appendix and PJS to date. Life-expectancy in patients with PJS is reduced. Causes are the development of malignancies and complications from the polyps such as intussusception. Since there is no treatment possible main focus must be aimed at early recognition of malignancies and the prevention of complications. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Olanzapine and Betamethasone Are Effective for the Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting due to Metastatic Brain Tumors of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, M.; Komuro, K.; Ohara, K.

    2014-01-01

    Brain lesions originating from metastasis of colorectal cancer represent 3–5% of all brain metastases and are relatively rare. Of all distant metastases of colorectal cancer, those to the liver are detected in 22–29% of cases, while those to the lungs are detected in 8–18% of cases. In contrast, brain metastasis is quite rare, with a reported incidence ranging from 0.4 to 1.8%. Treatments for metastatic brain tumors include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and supportive care with steroids, etc. Untreated patients exhibit a median survival of only approximately 1 month. The choice of treatment for brain metastasis depends on the number of lesions, the patient's general condition, nerve findings and presence of other metastatic lesions. We herein report the case of a 78-year-old male who presented with brain metastases originating from rectal carcinoma. He suffered from nausea, vomiting, anorexia and vertigo during body movement. He received antiemetics, glycerol and whole brain radiation therapy; however, these treatments proved ineffective. Olanzapine therapy was started at a dose of 1.25 mg every night. The persistent nausea disappeared the next day, and the frequency of vomiting subsequently decreased. The patient was able to consume solid food. Olanzapine is an antipsychotic that has recently been used as palliative therapy for refractory nausea and vomiting in patients receiving chemotherapy. We consider that olanzapine was helpful as a means of supportive care for the treatment of nausea and vomiting due to brain metastasis. PMID:24574944

  16. Long-term Effect of Radiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients with Mucinous Tumor: A Large Population Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xu; Jia, Senhao; Chen, Wei; Jiang, Zheng; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yinggang; Wang, Guiyu; Wang, Xishan

    2017-01-01

    Due to distinct biological behavior of mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) and signet ring cell cancer (SRC), the efficacy of radiotherapy on long-term outcome for rectal cancer (RC) patients with mucinous tumors is still unclear. Here, we identified 1808 RC patients with MAC/SRC from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results (SEER) database from 2004 to 2013. Patients were divided into two subgroups according to different therapeutic strategies, including surgery alone and surgery combined with radiotherapy. Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox regression models were used to access the influence of therapeutic strategy on long-term survival outcomes. The 5-year and 10-year cancer specific survival (CSS) were improved in stage II and III patients who underwent surgery and radiotherapy compared with patients who underwent surgery alone. These results were further confirmed following propensity score matching. In addition, radiotherapy was deemed as independent good prognostic factor in patient with MAC/SRC. In subgroup analysis, the result also demonstrated that long-term survival was improved following radiotherapy. However, there was no prognostic difference between preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy. In conclusion, radiotherapy could improve survival for RC patients with MAC and SRC, but only for patients in stage II and III. This finding supported the application of radiotherapy in clinical practice. PMID:28272410

  17. Expanding the Spectrum of Colonic Manifestations in Tuberous Sclerosis: L-Cell Neuroendocrine Tumor Arising in the Background of Rectal PEComa.

    PubMed

    Kolin, David L; Duan, Kai; Ngan, Bo; Gerstle, J Ted; Krzyzanowska, Monika K; Somers, Gino R; Mete, Ozgur

    2017-07-21

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous condition that predisposes to numerous proliferative lesions, including perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas), such as lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and angiomyolipomas, and rare neuroendocrine neoplasms. We describe herein a TSC2-harboring tuberous sclerosis patient manifesting with a synchronous well-differentiated L-cell rectal neuroendocrine tumor and leiomyomatosis-like LAM of the rectum. The background large bowel wall was thickened by confluent nodular areas comprising vessels and spindle-to-epithelioid cells, which are immunoreactive for myoid (smooth muscle actin, muscle specific actin, and desmin) and melanocytic markers (HMB45, Melan-A, microphthalmia transcription factor, and CD117). With the exception of TSC-related pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, the association between tuberous sclerosis and neuroendocrine neoplasms remains largely unknown in the gastrointestinal tract. Neuroendocrine tumorigenesis in tuberous sclerosis is often linked to inactivating mutations of TSC2 leading to aberrant activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. In this report, we document, for the first time, two foci of L-cell rectal neuroendocrine tumor arising in the setting of tuberous sclerosis, thus broadening the spectrum of TSC-associated endocrine disorders. Moreover, to our knowledge, this is only the second documented case of gastrointestinal leiomyomatosis-like LAM in a patient with tuberous sclerosis. The current case provides further evidence that, similar to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, neuroendocrine tumors of the luminal gastrointestinal tract may also be a feature of tuberous sclerosis and can be seen in association with PEComas.

  18. Small duodenal carcinoids: a case series comparing endoscopic resection and autoamputation with band ligation.

    PubMed

    Scherer, John R; Holinga, Julie; Sanders, Michael; Chennat, Jennifer; Khalid, Asif; Fasanella, Kenneth; Singhi, Aatur D; McGrath, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    We sought to compare the efficacy and safety of endoscopic ultrasound-guided endoscopic resection (ER) and endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for autoamputation of small duodenal carcinoids. The ideal management of small duodenal carcinoid tumors remains unclear. A retrospective review of duodenal carcinoids over a 10-year period (2002 to 2012) was performed at our tertiary-care teaching hospital. All patients with duodenal carcinoids ≤10 mm in size treated with either ER or EBL were included. The main outcome measurements were the efficacy and safety of endotherapy. A total of 37 patients with 39 subcentimeter duodenal carcinoids were identified. In the EBL group, the mean (SD) tumor size was 6.7±2.1 mm compared with 6.7±1.7 mm in the ER group (P=0.943). The mean Ki-67 index was ≤2% in specimens available for histologic analysis in both groups (16/23 EBL and 15/16 ER). The positive deep margin rate in the ER group was 68.8%. Residual carcinoid tumor cells were detected on follow-up biopsies in 1 patient after EBL, and 2 patients after ER. All underwent subsequent successful endotherapy. No adverse events occurred in the EBL group compared with an 18.8% adverse event rate in the ER group (P=0.066). Endoscopic ultrasound-guided EBL is a safe, effective method for removal of small superficial duodenal carcinoids and seems to be a lower risk alternative to conventional ER with cautery.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging-detected tumor response for locally advanced rectal cancer predicts survival outcomes: MERCURY experience.

    PubMed

    Patel, Uday B; Taylor, Fiona; Blomqvist, Lennart; George, Christopher; Evans, Hywel; Tekkis, Paris; Quirke, Philip; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Moran, Brendan; Heald, Richard; Guthrie, Ashley; Bees, Nicola; Swift, Ian; Pennert, Kjell; Brown, Gina

    2011-10-01

    To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic staging after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer in a prospectively enrolled, multicenter study. In a prospective cohort study, 111 patients who had rectal cancer treated by neoadjuvant therapy were assessed for response by MRI and pathology staging by T, N and circumferential resection margin (CRM) status. Tumor regression grade (TRG) was also assessed by MRI. Overall survival (OS) was estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine associations between staging of good and poor responders on MRI or pathology and survival outcomes after controlling for patient characteristics. On multivariate analysis, the MRI-assessed TRG (mrTRG) hazard ratios (HRs) were independently significant for survival (HR, 4.40; 95% CI, 1.65 to 11.7) and disease-free survival (DFS; HR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.22 to 8.80). Five-year survival for poor mrTRG was 27% versus 72% (P = .001), and DFS for poor mrTRG was 31% versus 64% (P = .007). Preoperative MRI-predicted CRM independently predicted local recurrence (LR; HR, 4.25; 95% CI, 1.45 to 12.51). Five-year survival for poor post-treatment pathologic T stage (ypT) was 39% versus 76% (P = .001); DFS for the same was 38% versus 84% (P = .001); and LR for the same was 27% versus 6% (P = .018). The 5-year survival for involved pCRM was 30% versus 59% (P = .001); DFS, 28 versus 62% (P = .02); and LR, 56% versus 10% (P = .001). Pathology node status did not predict outcomes. MRI assessment of TRG and CRM are imaging markers that predict survival outcomes for good and poor responders and provide an opportunity for the multidisciplinary team to offer additional treatment options before planning definitive surgery. Postoperative histopathology assessment of ypT and CRM but not post-treatment N status were important postsurgical predictors of outcome.

  20. Radiation-Induced Thymidine Phosphorylase Upregulation in Rectal Cancer Is Mediated by Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 From Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Li Ge; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jong-Seok; Yun, Eun-Jin; Park, Jong-Il; Park, Hae-Duck; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Lim, Kyu Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The mechanisms of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) regulation induced by radiation therapy (XRT) in various tumors are poorly understood. We investigated the effect and mechanisms of preoperative XRT on TP expression in rectal cancer tissues. Methods and Materials: TP expression and CD68 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels in rectal cancer tissues and cancer cell lines were evaluated before and after XRT in Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunoassay, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction studies. Isolated peripheral blood monocytes were used in the study of chemotaxis under the influence of MCP-1 released by irradiated colon cancer cells. Results: Expression of TP was significantly elevated by 9 Gy of XRT in most rectal cancer tissues but not by higher doses of XRT. In keeping with the close correlation of the increase in both TP expression and the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), anti-TP immunoreactivity was found in the CD68-positive TAMs and not the neoplastic cells. Expression of MCP-1 was increased in most cases after XRT, and this increase was strongly correlated with TP expression. However, this increase in MCP-1 expression occurred in tumor cells and not stromal cells. The XRT upregulated MCP-1 mRNA and also triggered the release of MCP-1 protein from cultured colon cancer cells. The supernatant of irradiated colon cancer cells showed strong chemotactic activity for monocyte migration, but this activity was completely abolished by neutralizing antibody. Conclusions: Use of XRT induces MCP-1 expression in cancer cells, which causes circulating monocytes to be recruited into TAMs, which then upregulate TP expression in rectal cancer tissues.

  1. [Detection of multiple colon and rectal tumors during diagnostic treatment and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Pikó, Béla; Rahóty, Pál; Krémer, Ildikó; Zsilák, János; Török, Enikõ; Bassam, Ali; Csiffári, Margit; Dimák, Sándor; Kis, Anita; Rus-Gal, Paul; Szabó, Zsolt; Veréb, Blanka; Puskásné Szatmári, Klára

    2011-11-01

    Recognition of the commonly encountered colorectal cancer (CRC) generally begins and takes place because of and based on symptoms and signs, due to the unsettled screening of this type of cancer. Sometimes, because of advanced stage cancer urgent surgical intervention could become necessary and, if this is the case, there is no time and possibility for searching for an eventual second tumor and perhaps the patient's status does not permit performing intraoperative investigations either. The incidence of multiple colon cancer is considered to be between 2.5 and 30% according to the literature. That is why one should exclude them even in the absence of pre- and intraoperative investigations and complaints. On the other hand, colonoscopy and perhaps irrigoscopy of seemingly healthy followed-up patients is mandatory. In the case of the presence of complaints/symptoms denoting impaired intestinal passage seen in a followed-up patient or during the adjuvant setting or metastatic/recurrent disease, treatment and even during hospice care we should evaluate the possibility of a second metachronous tumor. Moreover, if there is no urgency, the multidisciplinary team (oncoteam) should recommend the adequate treatment by balancing gain/utility and risk.

  2. Toward automatic segmentation and quantification of tumor and stroma in whole-slide images of H and E stained rectal carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geessink, Oscar G. F.; Baidoshvili, Alexi; Freling, Gerard; Klaase, Joost M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2015-03-01

    Visual estimation of tumor and stroma proportions in microscopy images yields a strong, Tumor-(lymph)Node- Metastasis (TNM) classification-independent predictor for patient survival in colorectal cancer. Therefore, it is also a potent (contra)indicator for adjuvant chemotherapy. However, quantification of tumor and stroma through visual estimation is highly subject to intra- and inter-observer variability. The aim of this study is to develop and clinically validate a method for objective quantification of tumor and stroma in standard hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained microscopy slides of rectal carcinomas. A tissue segmentation algorithm, based on supervised machine learning and pixel classification, was developed, trained and validated using histological slides that were prepared from surgically excised rectal carcinomas in patients who had not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Whole-slide scanning was performed at 20× magnification. A total of 40 images (4 million pixels each) were extracted from 20 whole-slide images at sites showing various relative proportions of tumor and stroma. Experienced pathologists provided detailed annotations for every extracted image. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated using cross-validation by testing on 1 image at a time while using the other 39 images for training. The total classification error of the algorithm was 9.4% (SD = 3.2%). Compared to visual estimation by pathologists, the algorithm was 7.3 times (P = 0.033) more accurate in quantifying tissues, also showing 60% less variability. Automatic tissue quantification was shown to be both reliable and practicable. We ultimately intend to facilitate refined prognostic stratification of (colo)rectal cancer patients and enable better personalized treatment.

  3. 90Y-Edotreotide for Metastatic Carcinoid Refractory to Octreotide

    PubMed Central

    Bushnell, David L.; O'Dorisio, Thomas M.; O'Dorisio, M. Sue; Menda, Yusuf; Hicks, Rodney J.; Van Cutsem, Eric; Baulieu, Jean-Louis; Borson-Chazot, Francoise; Anthony, Lowell; Benson, Al B.; Oberg, Kjell; Grossman, Ashley B.; Connolly, Mary; Bouterfa, Hakim; Li, Yong; Kacena, Katherine A.; LaFrance, Norman; Pauwels, Stanislas A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Metastatic carcinoid is an incurable malignancy whose symptoms, such as diarrhea and flushing, can be debilitating and occasionally life-threatening. Although symptom relief is available with octreotide, the disease eventually becomes refractory to octreotide, leaving no proven treatment options. The goal of this study was to evaluate the clinical effect of using 90Y-edotreotide to treat symptomatic patients with carcinoid tumors. Patients and Methods Patients enrolled had metastatic carcinoid, at least one sign/symptom refractory to octreotide, and at least one measurable lesion. Study treatment consisted of three cycles of 4.4 GBq (120 mCi) 90Y-edotreotide each, once every 6 weeks. Results Ninety patients were enrolled in the study. Using Southwest Oncology Group tumor response criteria, 67 (74.%) of 90 patients (95% CI, 65.4% to 83.4%) were objectively stable or responded. A statistically significant linear trend toward improvement was demonstrated across all 12 symptoms assessed. Median progression-free survival was significantly greater (P = .03) for the 38 patients who had durable diarrhea improvement than the 18 patients who did not (18.2 v 7.9 months, respectively). Adverse events (AEs) were reported in 96.7% (87 of 90) of patients. These AEs consisted primarily of reversible GI events (76 of 90), which could be caused in part by concomitant administration of amino acid solution given to reduce radiation exposure to the kidneys. There was one case each of grade 3 oliguria and grade 4 renal failure, each lasting 6 days. Conclusion 90Y-edotreotide treatment improved symptoms associated with malignant carcinoid among subjects with no treatment alternatives. Treatment was well-tolerated and had an acceptable expected AE profile. PMID:20194865

  4. Two Cases of Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumor Resection Combined with Dissection of the Circular Muscle Layer Using the Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Honjo, Kumpei; Kure, Kazumasa; Ichikawa, Ryosuke; Ro, Hisashi; Takahashi, Rina; Niwa, Koichiro; Ishiyama, Shun; Sugimoto, Kiichi; Kamiyama, Hirohiko; Takahashi, Makoto; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Fukumura, Yuki; Yao, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Generally, lesions of rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) 10 mm or smaller are less malignant and are indicated for endoscopic therapy. However, the vertical margin may remain positive after conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) because NETs develop in a way similar to submucosal tumors (SMTs). The usefulness of EMR with a ligation device, which is modified EMR, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was reported, but no standard treatment has been established. We encountered 2 patients in whom rectal NETs were completely resected by combined dissection and resection of the circular muscle layer using the ESD technique. Case 1 was an 8-mm NET of the lower rectum. Case 2 was NET of the lower rectum treated with additional resection for a positive vertical margin after EMR. In both cases, the circular muscle layer was dissected applying the conventional ESD technique, followed by en bloc resection while conserving the longitudinal muscle layer. No problems occurred in the postoperative course in either case. Rectal NETs are observed in the lower rectum in many cases, and it is less likely that intestinal perforation by endoscopic therapy causes peritonitis. The method employed in these cases, namely combined dissection and resection of the circular muscle layer using the ESD technique, can be performed relatively safely, and it is possible to ensure negativity of the vertical margin. In addition, it may also be useful for additional treatment of cases with a positive vertical margin after EMR. PMID:27990103

  5. Current concepts in diagnosis and perioperative management of carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Javier G; Silvay, George; Solís, Jorge

    2013-09-01

    Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine tumors with a very unpredictable clinical behavior. In the setting of hepatic metastases, the tumor's release of bioactive substances into the systemic circulation results in carcinoid syndrome: a constellation of symptoms among which cutaneous flushing, gastrointestinal hypermotility, and cardiac involvement are the most prominent. Cardiac manifestations, also known as carcinoid heart disease, are secondary to a severe fibrotic reaction which frequently involves the right-sided valves and may extend towards the subvalvular apparatus leading to valve thickening and retraction. Left-sided involvement is rare and mostly observed in the presence of an interatrial shunt, endobronchial tumor localization, and high tumor activity. Echocardiographic techniques often reveal noncoaptation of the valves, which are fixed in a semiopen position. In patients with advanced lesions and severe valvular dysfunction, surgery is currently the only definitive treatment to potentially improve quality of life and provide survival benefit. Although cardiac surgery has been traditionally reserved for those patients with symptomatic right ventricular failure, a significant trend towards improved surgical outcomes has triggered a more liberal referral for valve replacement. Carcinoid heart disease poses two distinct challenges for the anesthesiologist: carcinoid crisis and low cardiac output syndrome secondary to right ventricular failure. Carcinoid crisis, characterized by flushing, hypotension, and bronchospasm, may be precipitated by catecholamines and histamine releasing drugs used routinely in patients undergoing valve surgery. Although a broader utilization of octreotide have significantly simplified the anesthetic and perioperative management of these patients, a very balanced anesthetic technique is required to identify and manage low cardiac output syndrome.

  6. Conservation of the Notch1 signaling pathway in gastrointestinal carcinoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy; Traeger, Kelly; Chen, Herbert

    2005-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) carcinoid cells secrete multiple neuroendocrine (NE) markers and hormones including 5-hydroxytryptamine and chromogranin A. We were interested in determining whether activation of the Notch1 signal transduction pathway in carcinoid cells could modulate production of NE markers and hormones. Human pancreatic carcinoid cells (BON cells) were stably transduced with an estrogen-inducible Notch1 construct, creating BON-NIER cells. In the present study, we found that Notch1 is not detectable in human GI carcinoid tumor cells. The induction of Notch1 in human BON carcinoid cells led to high levels of functional Notch1, as measured by CBF-1 binding studies, resulting in activation of the Notch1 pathway. Similar to its developmental role in the GI tract, Notch1 pathway activation led to an increase in hairy enhancer of split 1 (HES-1) protein and a concomitant silencing of human Notch1/HES-1/achaete-scute homolog 1. Furthermore, Notch1 activation led to a significant reduction in NE markers. Most interestingly, activation of the Notch1 pathway caused a significant reduction in 5-hydroxytryptamine, an important bioactive hormone in carcinoid syndrome. In addition, persistent activation of the Notch1 pathway in BON cells led to a notable reduction in cellular proliferation. These results demonstrate that the Notch1 pathway, which plays a critical role in the differentiation of enteroendocrine cells, is highly conserved in the gut. Therefore, manipulation of the Notch1 signaling pathway may be useful for expanding the targets for therapeutic and palliative treatment of patients with carcinoid tumors.

  7. Carcinoid Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... a larger size). The Latest News Gallium 68 PET/CT Scanning for Neuroendocrine Tumors — Information and Locations The ... June 1, 2016 approval of the Gallium-68 PET/CT DOTATATE scan using NETSPOT ® heralded a new age ...

  8. 18F-FDG PET/CT and MR findings of ovarian carcinoid within a dermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Masahiro; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Soga, Shigeyoshi; Miyai, Kosuke; Kaji, Tastumi

    2014-09-01

    Ovarian carcinoid is a rare neoplasm of low-grade malignancy occurring within a dermoid cyst or mucinous tumor, predominantly in perimenopausal women. Reports with radiologic features are scarce. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman with an ovarian carcinoid within a dermoid cyst manifested as a multilocular cystic mass with a solid component showing 18F-FDG PET uptake (SUVmax=6.02).

  9. Goblet cells carcinoid with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the vermiform appendix: a step towards the unitary intestinal stem cell theory?

    PubMed

    Gravante, G; Yahia, S; Gopalakrishnan, K; Mathew, G

    2014-06-01

    Associations of various histotypes in appendiceal neoplasms may help elucidate the histogenesis of such uncommon tumors. We present the fourth published case of Goblet Cell Carcinoid (GCC) associated with mucinous adenocarcinoma of the appendix. This association has been described only for GCC and not for classic appendix carcinoids which are thought to originate from neuroendocrine-committed cells. The GCC-mucinous association adds more towards the theory of a pluripotent intestinal stem cell with amphicrine possibilities of differentiation.

  10. Voxel-based dual-time 18F-FDG parametric imaging for rectal cancer: differentiation of residual tumor from postchemoradiotherapy changes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hongyoon; Yoon, Hai-jeon; Kim, Tae Sung; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong

    2013-01-01

    Introduction 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/computed tomography (CT) has been used for evaluation of the response of rectal cancer to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), but differentiating residual tumor from post-treatment changes remains a problem. We propose a voxel-based dual-time 18F-FDG PET parametric imaging technique for the evaluation of residual rectal cancer after CRT. Materials and methods Eighty-six patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent neoadjuvant CRT between March 2009 and February 2011 were selected retrospectively. Standard 60-min postinjection PET/CT scans followed by 90-min delayed images were coregistered by rigid-body transformation. A dual-time parametric image was generated, which divided delayed standardized uptake value (SUV) by 60-min SUV on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Maximum delayed-to-standard SUV ratios (DSR) measured on the parametric images as well as the percentage of SUV decrease from pre-CRT to post-CRT scans (pre/post-CRT response index) were obtained for each tumor and correlated with pathologic response classified by the Dworak tumor regression grade (TRG). Results With respect to the false-positive lesions in the nine post-CRT patients with false-positive standard 18F-FDG scans in case groups who responded to therapy (TRG 3 or 4 tumors), eight were undetectable on dual-time parametric images (P<0.05). The maximum DSR showed significantly higher accuracy for identification of tumor regression compared with the pre/post-CRT response index in receiver-operating characteristic analysis (P<0.01). With a 1.25 cutoff value for the maximum DSR, 85.0% sensitivity, 95.5% specificity, and 93.0% overall accuracy were obtained for identification of good response. Conclusion A voxel-based dual-time parametric imaging technique for evaluation of post-CRT rectal cancer holds promise for differentiating residual tumor from treatment-related nonspecific 18F-FDG uptake. PMID:24128896

  11. Risk of complications and long-term functional alterations after local excision of rectal tumors with transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM).

    PubMed

    Restivo, Angelo; Zorcolo, Luigi; D'Alia, Giuseppe; Cocco, Francesca; Cossu, Andrea; Scintu, Francesco; Casula, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) is a consolidated technique for the excision of rectal tumors. However, many aspects relating to its morbidity, risk of functional alterations, and therapeutic outcomes are still unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of morbidity and fecal incontinence after TEM, and to identify associated risk factors. We prospectively recorded the clinical data of 157 patients who underwent TEM from 1996 to 2013. Among these, 89 patients answered a questionnaire for the assessment of fecal continence at a median follow-up time of 40 months. Intraoperative and postoperative TEM complication rates were 3.8 and 20.4%. The mortality rate was 0.6%. A distance from the anal verge of more than 6 cm correlated with a higher risk of perforation, while patients with cancer were more likely to have postoperative bleeding. Incontinence was reported by 32 (36%) patients, of which 7 (8%) experienced transitory symptoms only, while 25 (28%) reported persistent symptoms. We found a correlation between patients receiving preoperative radiotherapy (RT) and the development of fecal incontinence. The recurrence rate was 3% (1/32) in pT1, 80% (4/5) in pT2, and 100% (1/1) in pT3. After radiotherapy, 7% (1/9) showed a good response (pT0-1), and 18% (2/7) showed no response (pT2-3). TEM is associated with low morbidity but the risk of developing functional alterations is not negligible and should be discussed with the patient before the operation. Good oncological outcomes are possible for early invasive cancers and for selected advanced cancers following a good response to preoperative RT.

  12. Repeated Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography and Perfusion-Computed Tomography Imaging in Rectal Cancer: Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake Corresponds With Tumor Perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Marco H.M.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze both the intratumoral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and perfusion within rectal tumors before and after hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Rectal cancer patients, referred for preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT), underwent FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) and perfusion-CT (pCT) imaging before the start of hypofractionated RT and at the day of the last RT fraction. The pCT-images were analyzed using the extended Kety model, quantifying tumor perfusion with the pharmacokinetic parameters K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, and v{sub p}. The mean and maximum FDG uptake based on the standardized uptake value (SUV) and transfer constant (K{sup trans}) within the tumor were correlated. Also, the tumor was subdivided into eight subregions and for each subregion the mean and maximum SUVs and K{sup trans} values were assessed and correlated. Furthermore, the mean FDG uptake in voxels presenting with the lowest 25% of perfusion was compared with the FDG uptake in the voxels with the 25% highest perfusion. Results: The mean and maximum K{sup trans} values were positively correlated with the corresponding SUVs ({rho} = 0.596, p = 0.001 and {rho} = 0.779, p < 0.001). Also, positive correlations were found for K{sup trans} values and SUVs within the subregions (mean, {rho} = 0.413, p < 0.001; and max, {rho} = 0.540, p < 0.001). The mean FDG uptake in the 25% highest-perfused tumor regions was significantly higher compared with the 25% lowest-perfused regions (10.6% {+-} 5.1%, p = 0.017). During hypofractionated radiotherapy, stable mean (p = 0.379) and maximum (p = 0.280) FDG uptake levels were found, whereas the mean (p = 0.040) and maximum (p = 0.003) K{sup trans} values were found to significantly increase. Conclusion: Highly perfused rectal tumors presented with higher FDG-uptake levels compared with relatively low perfused tumors. Also, intratumor regions with a high FDG

  13. High-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung highly express enhancer of zeste homolog 2, but carcinoids do not.

    PubMed

    Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer J; Huang, Jiaoti; Li, Faqian; Yang, Qi; McMahon, Loralee A; Xu, Haodong

    2011-06-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2, the catalytic subunit of polycomb repressive complex 2, is a histone methyltransferase and plays an important role in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation. It has been shown to be overexpressed in a number of malignant neoplasms. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 in neuroendocrine tumors of the lung and the potential of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 to serve as a biomarker to segregate carcinoids from high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas. Fifty-four cases, including 25 typical carcinoids, 7 atypical carcinoids, 9 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, and 13 small-cell lung carcinomas, were immunohistochemically studied using a monoclonal antibody against enhancer of zeste homolog 2. All 13 small-cell lung carcinomas demonstrated moderate to strong nuclear staining with 12 exhibiting more than 90% of tumor cells staining. All 9 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas were moderately to strongly positive for enhancer of zeste homolog 2, with 6 cases having staining in more than 80% of tumor cells. In contrast, all 25 typical carcinoids and 6 atypical carcinoids showed only rare scattered enhancer of zeste homolog 2-positive tumor cells, with 1 case of atypical carcinoid exhibiting moderate staining in 40% of tumor cells. A subsequent validation study of the 14 specimens of lung or mediastinal lymph node biopsy and fine-needle aspiration, including 6 small-cell lung carcinomas, 2 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 5 typical carcinoids, and 1 atypical carcinoid, was performed. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 was diffusely and strongly positive in all small-cell lung carcinomas and large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, even with severe crush artifact, whereas it was only positive in rare tumor cells in carcinoids. These findings support the formulation that enhancer of zeste homolog 2 may play an important role in the regulation of biologic behavior of high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas

  14. Significance of Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Assessed Tumor Response for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Long-Course Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Fayaz, Mohamed Salah; Demian, Gerges Attia; Fathallah, Wael Moftah; Eissa, Heba El-Sayed; Abozlouf, Sadeq; George, Thomas; Samir, Suzanne Mona

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the predictive and prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–assessed tumor response after long-course neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods This study included 79 patients who had T3 or T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer treated with long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation. MRI-assessed tumor regression grade (mrTRG) was assessed in 64 patients. MRIs were reviewed by the study radiologist. Surgical and pathologic reports for those who underwent surgery were reviewed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated. Progression during therapy, local relapse, metastasis, and death resulting from the tumor were classified as events. Statistical significance was calculated. Results In 11 patients, the tumor completely disappeared on MRI; that is, it had an mrTRG of 1. All but one patient, who chose deferred surgery, had a complete pathologic response (pCR), with a positive predictive value of nearly 100%. Of the 20 patients who had an mrTRG of 2 on MRI, six had a pCR. mrTRG 3, mrTRG 4, and mrTRG 5 were detected in 24, six, and three patients, respectively, of whom only one patient had a pCR. The 2-year DFS was 77%. The mrTRG was significant for DFS. The 2-year DFS was 88% for patients with a good response versus 66% for those with a poor response (P = .046). Conclusion MRI-assessed complete tumor response was strongly correlated with pCR and, therefore, can be used as a surrogate marker to predict absence of viable tumor cells. Our results can be used to implement use of mrTRGs in larger prospective correlative studies as a tool to select patients for whom deferred surgery may be appropriate. Also, those with a poor response may be offered further treatment options before definitive surgery. PMID:28717704

  15. Significance of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Assessed Tumor Response for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Long-Course Chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Fayaz, Mohamed Salah; Demian, Gerges Attia; Fathallah, Wael Moftah; Eissa, Heba El-Sayed; El-Sherify, Mustafa Shawki; Abozlouf, Sadeq; George, Thomas; Samir, Suzanne Mona

    2016-08-01

    To study the predictive and prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assessed tumor response after long-course neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. This study included 79 patients who had T3 or T4 and/or N+ rectal cancer treated with long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation. MRI-assessed tumor regression grade (mrTRG) was assessed in 64 patients. MRIs were reviewed by the study radiologist. Surgical and pathologic reports for those who underwent surgery were reviewed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was estimated. Progression during therapy, local relapse, metastasis, and death resulting from the tumor were classified as events. Statistical significance was calculated. In 11 patients, the tumor completely disappeared on MRI; that is, it had an mrTRG of 1. All but one patient, who chose deferred surgery, had a complete pathologic response (pCR), with a positive predictive value of nearly 100%. Of the 20 patients who had an mrTRG of 2 on MRI, six had a pCR. mrTRG 3, mrTRG 4, and mrTRG 5 were detected in 24, six, and three patients, respectively, of whom only one patient had a pCR. The 2-year DFS was 77%. The mrTRG was significant for DFS. The 2-year DFS was 88% for patients with a good response versus 66% for those with a poor response (P = .046). MRI-assessed complete tumor response was strongly correlated with pCR and, therefore, can be used as a surrogate marker to predict absence of viable tumor cells. Our results can be used to implement use of mrTRGs in larger prospective correlative studies as a tool to select patients for whom deferred surgery may be appropriate. Also, those with a poor response may be offered further treatment options before definitive surgery.

  16. A critical review of the role of local excision in the treatment of early (T1 and T2) rectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Heafner, Thomas A; Glasgow, Sean C

    2014-10-01

    The optimal treatment of early (T1 and T2) rectal adenocarcinomas remains controversial. Local excision and radical resection with total mesorectal excision are the two surgical techniques for excising early rectal cancer. Each has their respective benefits, with local excision allowing for decreased operative morbidity and mortality while radical resection provides an oncologically complete treatment through lymphadenectomy. Local excision can be accomplished via transanal endoscopic microsurgery or transanal excision. There is no significant difference in the recurrence rates (21% vs. 33%) or overall survival (80% vs. 66%) between the two local excision modalities; however, transanal endoscopic microsurgery does allow for a higher rate of R0 resection. Current selection criteria for local excision include well to moderately differentiated tumors without high-risk features such as lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, or mucinous components. In addition, tumors should ideally be <3 cm in size, excised with a clear margin, occupy less than 1/3 of the circumference of the bowel and be mobile/nonfixed. Despite these stringent inclusion criteria, local excision continues to be plagued with a high recurrence rate in both T1 and T2 tumors due to a significant rate of occult locoregional metastases (20% to 33%). For both tumor groups, the recurrence rate in the local excision group is more than double compared to radical resection. However, the overall survival is not significantly different between those with and without metastases. With intense postoperative surveillance, these recurrences can be identified early while they are confined to the pelvis allowing for salvage surgical options. Recently, neoadjuvant therapy followed by local excision has shown favorable short and long-term oncological outcomes to radical resection in the treatment of T2 rectal cancer. Ultimately, the management of early rectal cancer must be individualized to each patient

  17. Value of PAX 8 immunostaining in tumor diagnosis: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Nelson G

    2012-05-01

    PAX 8 is a transcription factor involved in the regulation of organogenesis of the thyroid gland, kidney, and Müllerian system. Recent studies have shown that, among tumors, PAX 8 is commonly expressed in epithelial tumors of the thyroid and parathyroid glands, kidney, thymus, and female genital tract. Although PAX 8 expression has also been reported in certain neuroendocrine tumors, including well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, and duodenal and rectal carcinoids, as well as in B-cell lymphomas, it has recently been shown that the PAX 8 positivity reported in these tumors was due to a cross-reactivity of the antibody used with the N-terminal region of PAX 6 and PAX 5, respectively. Owing to its restricted expression, PAX 8 has proved to be a useful immunohistochemical marker with a wide range of diagnostic applications in surgical pathology, some of which are briefly reviewed.

  18. [Appendiceal carcinoid: report of 3 clinical cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bronzino, P; Cassinelli, G; Cuneo, A; Rassu, P C; Partipilo, F; Bianchi, M; Casaccia, M

    2003-05-01

    The Authors report three cases of appendiceal carcinoids, found during appendectomy for acute appendicitis during the last 15 years. Appendiceal carcinoid is a rare neoplasm, more frequent in females age ranging between 20 and 29 years. Lack of symptoms explains the occasional diagnosis of this disease. The prognosis is related mostly to the size of the tumor, local and lymphatic invasion, presence of metastases, localization inside the appendix, histological type and age of the patient. Therapy is mainly surgical and consists of appendectomy and right colectomy according to different criteria which are being discussed in this article.

  19. The PARP inhibitor ABT-888 potentiates darbazine-induced cell death in carcinoids

    PubMed Central

    Somnay, Yash; Lubner, Sam; Gill, Harpreet; Matsumura, Jon Blake; Chen, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Monoagent DNA-alkylating chemotherapies like dacarbazine are among a paucity of medical treatments for advanced carcinoid tumors, but are limited by host toxicity and intrinsic chemoresistance through the base excision repair (BER) pathway via poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Hence, inhibitors of PARP may potentiate DNA-damaging agents by blocking BER and DNA restoration. We show that the PARP inhibitor ABT-888 (Veliparib) enhances the cytotoxic effects of dacarbazine in carcinoids. Two human carcinoid cell lines (BON and H727) treated with a combination of ABT-888 and dacarbazine resulted in synergistic growth inhibition signified by combination indices <1 on the Chou-Talalay scale. ABT-888 administered prior to varying dacarbazine doses promoted the suppression of neuroendocrine biomarkers of malignancy ASCL1 and CgA, shown by Western analysis. ATM phosphorylation and p21Waf1/Cip1 activation, indicative of DNA damage, were increased by ABT-888 when combined with dacarbazine treatment, suggesting BER pathway attenuation by ABT-888. PE Annexin V/7-AAD staining and sorting revealed a profound induction of apoptosis following combination treatment, which was further confirmed by increased PARP cleavage. These results demonstrate that ABT-888 synergizes dacarbazine treatment in carcinoids. Therefore, ABT-888 may help treat carcinoids unresponsive or refractory to mainstay therapies. PMID:27632933

  20. Serum alpha-fetoprotein-positive gastric carcinoid with liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mori, H; Onji, M; Yoshida, A; Fukunishi, R

    1980-01-01

    The patient was a 60-year-old Japanese male. He complained of epigastralgia and right chest pain of 4 month's duration, and general malaise, nausea and vomiting of 2 month's duration. Physical examination revealed on the right third rib a tender mass with a diameter of 2 cm and hepatomegaly with a multi-nodular surface and red palms. There were no signs of carcinoid syndrome, such as cutaneous flushing. Laboratory examinations disclosed certain biochemical alterations; alkaline phosphatase 810 IU/l, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GTP) 2090 IU/l, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) 23.5 ng/ml and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) 6,800 ng/ml. Both HBs-Ag and HBs-Ab were negative. The patient died in a uremic state, with rapid increases of jaundice and ascites. Autopsy revealed gastric carcinoid with extensive metastases to the liver and the bone marrow. Tumor cells showed argyrophilia but not argentaffinity. Immunofluorescence specific for AFP was positive in the hepatocytes, particularly those adjacent to the metastatic tumor cells but not in the tumor cells, either primary or secondary. 79 cases reported in Japan of serum AFP-positive malignant tumor other than hepatocellular carcinoma and certain other malignancies of germ cell origin are reviewed and discussed.

  1. Delineation of Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) for Radiation Treatment Planning of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using Information From MRI or FDG-PET/CT: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Braendengen, Morten; Hansson, Karl; Radu, Calin; Siegbahn, Albert; Jacobsson, Hans; Glimelius, Bengt

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of target volumes is important to maximize radiation dose to the tumor and minimize it to nontumor tissue. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are standard imaging modalities in rectal cancer. The aim was to explore whether functional imaging with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), combined with CT (FDG-PET/CT) gives additional information to standard pretreatment evaluation and changes the shape and size of the gross tumor volume (GTV). Methods and Materials: From 2007 to 2009, 77 consecutive patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively screened for inclusion in the study at two university hospitals in Sweden, and 68 patients were eligible. Standard GTV was delineated using information from clinical examination, CT, and MRI (GTV-MRI). Thereafter, a GTV-PET was defined in the fused PET-CT, and the target volume delineations were compared for total volume, overlap, and mismatch. Pathologic uptake suspect of metastases was also registered. Results: The median volume of GTV-MRI was larger than that of GTV-PET: 111 cm{sup 3} vs. 87 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.001). In many cases, the GTV-MRI contained the GTV defined on the PET/CT images as subvolumes, but when a GTV total was calculated after the addition of GTV-PET to GTV-MRI, the volume increased, with median 11% (range, 0.5-72%). New lesions were seen in 15% of the patients for whom PET/CT was used. Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT facilitates and adds important information to the standard delineation procedure of locally advanced rectal cancer, mostly resulting in a smaller GTV, but a larger total GTV using the union of GTV-MRI and GTV-PET. New lesions were sometimes seen, potentially changing the treatment strategy.

  2. Diazepam Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Diazepam rectal gel is used in emergency situations to stop cluster seizures (episodes of increased seizure activity) in people who are ... Diazepam comes as a gel to instill rectally using a prefilled syringe with a special plastic tip. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, ...

  3. Refractory carcinoid syndrome: a review of treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Riechelmann, Rachel P.; Pereira, Allan A.; Rego, Juliana F. M.; Costa, Frederico P.

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid syndrome (CSy) is a constellation of symptoms that may commonly present in patients with well differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), with somatostatin analogs (SSAs) being the first-line option for symptom management. However, symptomatic progression eventually occurs and in this scenario of a refractory CSy; several treatment options have been studied such as dose escalation of SSA, interferon and liver-directed therapies. Nevertheless, recent phase III trials have contributed to the understanding and management of this condition. We performed a comprehensive review of interventional studies examining refractory CSy to provide the evidence for current treatment options and propose a treatment sequence. PMID:28203303

  4. Optimal Timing for Assessment of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer: Do All Patients Benefit From Waiting Longer Than 6 Weeks?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Rodrigo O.; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Sao Juliao, Guilherme P.; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; Sousa, Afonso H.S.; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; Imperiale, Antonio R.; Lynn, Patricio B.; Proscurshim, Igor; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Ono, Carla Rachel; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate the metabolic activity of rectal cancers at 6 and 12 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([{sup 18}FDG]PET/CT) imaging and correlate with response to CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal adenocarcinoma treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT (54 Gy, 5-fluouracil-based) were prospectively studied ( (ClinicalTrials.org) identifier (NCT00254683)). All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies (at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks from CRT completion). Clinical assessment was at 12 weeks. Maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured and recorded at each PET/CT study after 1 h (early) and 3 h (late) from {sup 18}FDG injection. Patients with an increase in early SUVmax between 6 and 12 weeks were considered 'bad' responders and the others as 'good' responders. Results: Ninety-one patients were included; 46 patients (51%) were 'bad' responders, whereas 45 (49%) patients were 'good' responders. 'Bad' responders were less likely to develop complete clinical response (6.5% vs. 37.8%, respectively; P=.001), less likely to develop significant histological tumor regression (complete or near-complete pathological response; 16% vs. 45%, respectively; P=.008) and exhibited greater final tumor dimension (4.3 cm vs. 3.3 cm; P=.03). Decrease between early (1 h) and late (3 h) SUVmax at 6-week PET/CT was a significant predictor of 'good' response (accuracy of 67%). Conclusions: Patients who developed an increase in SUVmax after 6 weeks were less likely to develop significant tumor downstaging. Early-late SUVmax variation at 6-week PET/CT may help identify these patients and allow tailored selection of CRT-surgery intervals for individual patients.

  5. A Prospective Study of Gastric Carcinoids and Enterochromaffin-Like Cell Changes in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 and Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome: Identification of Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Annibale, Bruno; Marignani, Massimo; Luong, Tu Vinh; Corleto, Vito; Pace, Andrea; Ito, Tetsuhide; Liewehr, David; Venzon, David J.; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Bordi, Cesare; Jensen, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) patients frequently develop Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES). These patients can develop proliferative changes of gastric enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells and gastric carcinoids (ECL-cell tumors). ECL-cell changes have been extensively studied in sporadic ZES patients and can be precursor lesions of gastric carcinoids, but little is known about factors influencing their severity or development of carcinoids in MEN1/ZES patients. Objectives: Our objective was to prospectively analyze ECL-cell changes and gastric carcinoids (ECL-cell tumors) in a large series of MEN1/ZES patients to detect risk factors and deduct clinical guidelines. Setting and Patients: Fifty-seven consecutive MEN1/ZES patients participated in this prospective study at two tertiary-care research centers. Interventions and Outcome Measures: Assessment of MEN1, gastric hypersecretion, and gastroscopy with multiple biopsies was done according to a fixed protocol and tumor status. ECL-cell changes and α-human chorionic gonadotropin staining were assessed in each biopsy and correlated with clinical, laboratory, and MEN1 features. Results: ECL-cell proliferative changes were universally present, advanced changes in 53% and carcinoids in 23%. Gastric nodules are common and are frequently associated with carcinoids. Patients with high fasting serum gastrin levels, long disease duration, or a strong α-human chorionic gonadotropin staining in a biopsy are at higher risk for an advanced ECL-cell lesion and/or gastric carcinoid. Conclusions: Gastric carcinoids and/or advanced ECL-cell changes are frequent in MEN1/ZES patients, and therefore, regular surveillance gastroscopy with multiple routine biopsies and biopsies of all mucosal lesions are essential. Clinical/laboratory data and biopsy results can be used to identify a subgroup of MEN1/ZES patients with a significantly increased risk for developing gastric carcinoids, allowing development of better

  6. Familial risk of small intestinal carcinoid and adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kharazmi, Elham; Pukkala, Eero; Sundquist, Kristina; Hemminki, Kari

    2013-08-01

    Small intestinal cancer (SIC) is rare, and its etiology is poorly understood. We compared clusters of families with SICs of different histologic subtypes. By using the nationwide family cancer data sets of Sweden and Finland, we identified a cohort of 9964 first-degree relatives of 1799 patients with SIC, diagnosed from 1961 through 2009. Data were collected from time periods as long as 47 years (mean, 35.4 y), and cancer incidence was determined. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated and stratified by sex, age, time period, and cancer type, using the incidence rates for the entire national population as the reference. Among the 1799 SIC cases, 1.1% had a sibling with SIC, so the SIR was 11.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.2-18.2); 1.1% had a parent or child with SIC (SIR, 3.5; 95% CI, 2.0-5.6). The SIR of concordant carcinoid histology of SIC among siblings was 28.4 (95% CI, 14.7-49.6; n = 12) and in parent-child pairs was 9.9 (95% CI, 5.4-16.6; n = 14). The familial risk of concordant histologic subtypes increased for siblings diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, but only 2 familial cases were identified. In family members of patients with SIC of the adenocarcinoma subtype, risks of colorectal and bladder cancer were modestly but significantly increased compared with the general population. Family members of patients with SIC of the carcinoid subtype had an increased risk for kidney cancer and polycythemia vera. Based on data from our population-based study, first-degree relatives of patients with small intestinal carcinoid tumors have developed these tumors with high incidence. Because of the rareness of this tumor, the absolute risk remains moderate even within families. Gastroenterologists could inform patients with small intestinal carcinoids about the familial risk and encourage counseling for their first-degree relatives. Studies are needed to identify genetic factors that affect susceptibility to SIC. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published

  7. What Is a Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... starts in. Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is ... 2015 Last Revised: February 8, 2016 American Cancer Society medical information is copyrighted material. For reprint requests, ...

  8. Can Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... may also be found when parts of the gastrointestinal system are removed to treat other diseases. For example, a person with stomach pain or bleeding may have a test called an upper endoscopy to look for an ulcer. In this test, the doctor looks at the stomach ... Medical Review: February 26, 2015 ...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Catherine E; Mortele, Koenraad J

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to discuss the anatomy of the anorectum, the MRI protocol parameters required to optimize diagnosis of rectal cancer, and the diagnostic MRI criteria essential to stage rectal cancer accurately, using the TNM staging classification. A brief review of more emerging important aspects of rectal cancer staging, such as the circumferential resection margin, extramural vascular invasion, and the staging of low rectal cancers, will also be provided. Finally, the authors will touch upon the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy in the setting of locally advanced rectal cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of occult adrenocorticotropin-secreting bronchial carcinoids: limits of endocrine testing and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Loli, P; Vignati, F; Grossrubatscher, E; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Zurleni, F; Lomuscio, G; Rossetti, O; Ravini, M; Vanzulli, A; Bacchetta, C; Galli, C; Valente, D

    2003-03-01

    The differential diagnosis and the identification of the source of ACTH in occult ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to a bronchial carcinoid still represents a challenge for the endocrinologist. We report our experience in six patients with occult bronchial carcinoid in whom extensive hormonal, imaging, and scintigraphic evaluation was performed. All patients presented with hypercortisolism associated with high plasma ACTH values. The CRH test and high dose dexamethasone suppression test suggested an ectopic source of ACTH in three of six patients. During bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling, none of the patients showed a central to peripheral ACTH gradient. At the time of diagnosis, none of the patients had radiological evidence of the ectopic source of ACTH, whereas pentetreotide scintigraphy identified the lesion in two of four patients. Finally, a chest computed tomography scan revealed the presence of a bronchial lesion in all patients, and pentetreotide scintigraphy identified four of six lesions. In all patients a bronchial carcinoid was found and removed. In one patient with scintigraphic evidence of residual disease after two operations, radioguided surgery, using a hand-held gamma probe after iv administration of radiolabeled pentetreotide, was performed; this allowed detection and removal of residual multiple mediastinal lymph node metastases. In conclusion, our data show that there is not a single endocrine test or imaging procedure accurate enough to diagnose and localize occult ectopic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids. Radioguided surgery appears to be promising in the presence of multiple tumor foci and previous incomplete removal of the tumor.

  11. Interobserver agreement of proliferation index (Ki-67) outperforms mitotic count in pulmonary carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Warth, Arne; Fink, Ludger; Fisseler-Eckhoff, Annette; Jonigk, Danny; Keller, Marius; Ott, German; Rieker, Ralf J; Sinn, Peter; Söder, Stephan; Soltermann, Alex; Willenbrock, Klaus; Weichert, Wilko

    2013-05-01

    Evaluation of proliferative activity is a cornerstone in the classification of endocrine tumors; in pulmonary carcinoids, the mitotic count delineates typical carcinoid (TC) from atypical carcinoid (AC). Data on the reproducibility of manual mitotic counting and other methods of proliferation index evaluation in this tumor entity are sparse. Nine experienced pulmonary pathologists evaluated 20 carcinoid tumors for mitotic count (hematoxylin and eosin) and Ki-67 index. In addition, Ki-67 index was automatically evaluated with a software-based algorithm. Results were compared with respect to correlation coefficients (CC) and kappa values for clinically relevant grouping algorithms. Evaluation of mitotic activity resulted in a low interobserver agreement with a median CC of 0.196 and a median kappa of 0.213 for the delineation of TC from AC. The median CC for hotspot (0.658) and overall (0.746) Ki-67 evaluation was considerably higher. However, kappa values for grouped comparisons of overall Ki-67 were only fair (median 0.323). The agreement of manual and automated Ki-67 evaluation was good (median CC 0.851, median kappa 0.805) and was further increased when more than one participant evaluated a given case. Ki-67 staining clearly outperforms mitotic count with respect to interobserver agreement in pulmonary carcinoids, with the latter having an unacceptable low performance status. Manual evaluation of Ki-67 is reliable, and consistency further increases with more than one evaluator per case. Although the prognostic value needs further validation, Ki-67 might perspectively be considered a helpful diagnostic parameter to optimize the separation of TC from AC.

  12. Prevalence and clinicopathological characteristics of appendiceal carcinoids in Sharjah (United Arab Emirates).

    PubMed

    Anwar, Khurshid; Desai, Munaf; Al-Bloushi, Noura; Alam, Farheen; Cyprian, Farhan Sachal

    2014-07-15

    To determine the incidence and clinico-pathological profile of appendiceal carcinoids in a cohort of patients undergoing emergency appendicectomies for clinically suspected acute appendicitis in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates (UAE). The study included the retrospective data of 964 patients operated for clinically suspected acute appendicitis, and the resected specimens were received at Al-Qasmi Hospital (Sharjah) from January 2010 to December 2010. The data of the patients who were histologically reported to have carcinoid tumors of the appendix were extensively evaluated for the patient's demographics, indication for surgery, surgical procedure, tumor localization in the appendix, diameter of the lesion, concomitant appendicitis, immunohistochemistry studies and clinical follow-up. Out of the 964 patients included in the study, 9 (0.93%) were found to have appendiceal carcinoids. The mean age reported was 28.7 years with a male to female ratio of 2:1. Eight tumors were located near the tip of the appendix with a mean diameter of 3.3 mm, while the remaining one was near the proximal end of the appendix. All the cases were associated with concomitant suppurative appendicitis. In seven reported cases, tumors were confined to the muscular layer while in one case each there was an extension to the serosa and mesoappendix, respectively. All tumors were found to be positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin and neuron-specific enolase on immunohistochemistry but negative for cytokeratin-7. None of the patients developed recurrence or any reportable complications in the short follow-up period (12-26 mo) that was arranged as a six-monthly re-evaluation by abdominal ultrasonography. Our study found a higher incidence of appendiceal carcinoids in patients undergoing emergency appendectomy for acute appendicitis in Sharjah, UAE compared to two previous studies from the Persian Gulf region. Interestingly, tumors were found to be more commonly in young males, which is in

  13. Development of effective prophylaxis against intraoperative carcinoid crisis.

    PubMed

    Woltering, Eugene A; Wright, Anne E; Stevens, Melissa A; Wang, Yi-Zarn; Boudreaux, John P; Mamikunian, Gregg; Riopelle, James M; Kaye, Alan D

    2016-08-01

    The prophylactic use of a preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative high-dose continuous octreotide acetate infusion was evaluated for its ability to minimize the incidence of carcinoid crises during neuroendocrine tumor (NET) cytoreductive surgeries. A retrospective study was approved by the institutional review boards at Ochsner Medical Center-Kenner and Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. Ochsner Medical Center-Kenner operating room and multispecialty NET clinic. One hundred fifty consecutive patients who underwent a total of 179 cytoreductive surgeries for stage IV, small bowel NETs. All patients received a 500-μg/h infusion of octreotide acetate preoperatively, intraoperatively, and postoperatively. Anesthesia and surgical records were reviewed. Carcinoid crisis was defined as a systolic blood pressure of less than 80mm Hg for greater than 10minutes. Patients who experienced intraoperative hypertension or hypotension, profound tachycardia, or a "crisis" according to the operative note were also reviewed. One hundred sixty-nine (169/179; 94%) patients had normal anesthesia courses. The medical records of 10 patients were further investigated for a potential intraoperative crisis using the aforementioned criteria. Upon review, 6 patients were determined to have had a crisis. The final incidence of intraoperative crisis was 3.4% (6/179). A continuous high-dose infusion of octreotide acetate intraoperatively minimizes the incidence of carcinoid crisis. We believe that the low cost and excellent safety profile of octreotide warrant the use of this therapy during extensive surgical procedures for midgut and foregut NETs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) Followed by Laparoscopic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: Predictors of the Tumor Response and the Long-Term Oncologic Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jun-Gi; Cho, Hyun Min; Shim, Byoung Yong

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the predictors of a tumor response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and the long-term oncologic outcomes of preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery for patients who suffer from rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study involved 274 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and who had been treated with preoperative CRT and curative laparoscopic total mesorectal excision between January 2003 and January 2009. We assessed the long-term oncologic outcomes, in terms of recurrence and survival, of the treated patients. Results: Forty-two (15.3%) of the 274 patients had complete pathologic responses (pCR). The pre-CRT carcinoembryonic antigen level was the only significant predictor of a pCR on the multivariate analysis (p = 0.01). The overall survival at 5 years was 73.1%, with a mean survival period of 59.7 months (95% CI, 57.1-62.3). The disease-free survival at 5 years was 67.3% with a mean survival period of 54.7 months (95% CI, 51.7-57.8). The pCR group had a higher rate of overall survival at 5 years than did the non-pCR group, and the difference was significant (86.0% vs. 71.2%; hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.96; p = 0.03). The cumulative incidences of local and distant recurrences at 5 years were 5.8% and 28.3%, respectively. A total of 84.5% (234 of 274) of the patients had their anal sphincters preserved. Grade 3 or 4 acute and long-term toxic effects occurred in 22.2% and 8.4% of the patients, respectively. Conclusion: Preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery seems safe and feasible with favorable long-term outcomes and a high rate of sphincter preservation for the patients with low-lying tumors of the rectum.

  15. [A case of an asynchronic triple tumorous disorder: a rectal adenocarcinoma, a carcinoma of the kidney and a prostatic adenocarcinoma--case report].

    PubMed

    Prosvic, P; Brod'ák, M; Odrázka, K; Morávek, P

    2005-01-01

    The authors describe occurence asynchronic tumor triplicity. In the year 1980 in 56 years old patient had histologically proven rectal adenocarcinoma and consequently was done radical Miles amputation of rectum. In December 1991 in the same patient was histologically proven well differentiated adenocarcinoma of prostate after transurethral resection of prostate. Prostate cancer was threated bilateral orchiectomy (March 1992) and consequently from April to June 1992 was done small-volume irradiation of pelvic by Betatron X-ray, box technique with dosage 70 Gy. In November 1992 there was done radical transperitoneal nephrectomy on right side for renal carcinoma. Histologically was proven moderately differentiated clear cell renal carcinoma. In August 1994 was found suspected pulmonary metastases, wich was proof on CT in the January 1995. Therapy was Imodin, Wobenzym, Vinblastin. Patient was died of generalisation renal cancer in the February 1998. The carcinoma of prostate and rectum wasn't found in the autopsy. The authors emphasize pertinence radical surgical access incuding multiplex malignant tumors and consider to carry out oncology screening in the all of patients with proven malignant tumor.

  16. Polysialic acid of the neural cell adhesion molecule distinguishes small cell lung carcinoma from carcinoids.

    PubMed Central

    Komminoth, P.; Roth, J.; Lackie, P. M.; Bitter-Suermann, D.; Heitz, P. U.

    1991-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) exists in various types of neuroendocrine cells and their tumors. A typical feature of NCAM is polysialic acid, of which the chain length is developmentally regulated. The authors have performed a comparative immunohistochemical study on small cell lung carcinomas and bronchial as well as gastrointestinal carcinoids with the monoclonal antibody (MAb) 735 reactive with the long-chain form of polysialic acid. The small cell lung carcinomas, irrespective of their histological type, were positive for polysialic acid. Metastatic tumor cell complexes also exhibited immunostaining. The tumor cell-surface-associated immunostaining for polysialic acid was sensitive to endoneuraminidase. The mature and atypical bronchial and gastrointestinal carcinoids were not immunoreactive for polysialic acid. Cytoplasmic staining in groups of cells of carcinoids (2 of 28 cases) was due to nonspecific antibody binding, which could be prevented by increased ion strength. These data indicate that neuroendocrine tumors of the lung can be distinguished by their content of highly sialylated NCAM. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1651057

  17. Carcinoid Heart Disease without Liver Involvement Caused by a Primary Ovarian Carcinoid Tumour.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Chirag; Goel, Sunny; Stern, Eric; Warner, Richard; Castillo, Javier; Croft, Lori; Lavine, Ronald; Zacks, Jerome

    2015-07-01

    Carcinoid heart disease, caused by primary ovarian carcinoid tumour, is a rare form of valvular heart disease. This form of heart disease usually presents with symptoms of right-sided valvular dysfunction, ultimately leading to right-sided heart failure. This entity is unique as it develops in the absence of liver metastasis. We report a case of 75 year-old woman with primary ovarian carcinoid tumour who presented with symptoms of severe right-sided heart failure and successfully underwent pulmonic and tricuspid valve replacement along with a right ventricular (RV) outflow patch enlargement. This patient later underwent uneventful resection of the primary ovarian carcinoid tumour, with complete resolution of her symptoms.

  18. Long-term follow up of patients affected by pulmonary carcinoid at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pusceddu, S; Catena, L; Valente, M; Buzzoni, R; Formisano, B; Del Vecchio, M; Ducceschi, M; Tavecchio, L; Fabbri, A; Bajetta, E

    2010-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the lung involve an heterogeneous group of tumors representing a wide range of histological variants, from well-differentiated typical carcinoid (TC) tumors to poorly differentiated small cell carcinomas. The epidemiology, clinical outcome, and management of these neoplasms differ significantly from other lung malignancies. The main aim of this report consists in describing the single Center experience of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan on neuroendocrine lung tumors, with an emphasis on bronchopulmonary carcinoid subtypes. From 1986 to 2009, 91 cases of carcinoid tumors were diagnosed; these were divided in two series, according to typical (66 patients) or atypical [25] histotypes. These two groups were compared in relation to various features, including pathologic classification, clinical behavior, treatment modalities and long-term survival. At the moment of diagnosis 11 patients had locally advanced/metastatic disease, while 80 patients showed non metastatic disease. The comparative analysis between typical and atypical series disclosed significant differences in terms of long-term survival; in fact, 5-year and 10-year survival rates were 98 % and 94 % for the first carcinoid series versus 76 % and 18 % for the atypical series, respectively (p<0.001). The median overall survival (OS) was 76 months (range 3-182) for atypical carcinoids and has not yet been reached for TCs patients. PMID:22263011

  19. Long-term follow up of patients affected by pulmonary carcinoid at the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, S; Catena, L; Valente, M; Buzzoni, R; Formisano, B; Del Vecchio, M; Ducceschi, M; Tavecchio, L; Fabbri, A; Bajetta, E

    2010-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the lung involve an heterogeneous group of tumors representing a wide range of histological variants, from well-differentiated typical carcinoid (TC) tumors to poorly differentiated small cell carcinomas. The epidemiology, clinical outcome, and management of these neoplasms differ significantly from other lung malignancies. The main aim of this report consists in describing the single Center experience of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori of Milan on neuroendocrine lung tumors, with an emphasis on bronchopulmonary carcinoid subtypes. From 1986 to 2009, 91 cases of carcinoid tumors were diagnosed; these were divided in two series, according to typical (66 patients) or atypical [25] histotypes. These two groups were compared in relation to various features, including pathologic classification, clinical behavior, treatment modalities and long-term survival. At the moment of diagnosis 11 patients had locally advanced/metastatic disease, while 80 patients showed non metastatic disease. The comparative analysis between typical and atypical series disclosed significant differences in terms of long-term survival; in fact, 5-year and 10-year survival rates were 98 % and 94 % for the first carcinoid series versus 76 % and 18 % for the atypical series, respectively (p<0.001). The median overall survival (OS) was 76 months (range 3-182) for atypical carcinoids and has not yet been reached for TCs patients.

  20. Feasibility of an Adaptive Strategy in Preoperative Radiochemotherapy for Rectal Cancer With Image-Guided Tomotherapy: Boosting the Dose to the Shrinking Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Passoni, Paolo; Fiorino, Claudio; Slim, Najla; Ronzoni, Monica; Ricci, Vincenzo; Di Palo, Saverio; De Nardi, Paola; Orsenigo, Elena; Tamburini, Andrea; De Cobelli, Francesco; Losio, Claudio; Iacovelli, Nicola A.; Broggi, Sara; Staudacher, Carlo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of preoperative adaptive radiochemotherapy by delivering a concomitant boost to the residual tumor during the last 6 fractions of treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with T3/T4N0 or N+ rectal cancer were enrolled. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of oxaliplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} on days −14, 0, and +14, and 5-fluorouracil 200 mg/m{sup 2}/d from day −14 to the end of radiation therapy (day 0 is the start of radiation therapy). Radiation therapy consisted of 41.4 Gy in 18 fractions (2.3 Gy per fraction) with Tomotherapy to the tumor and regional lymph nodes (planning target volume, PTV) defined on simulation CT and MRI. After 9 fractions simulation CT and MRI were repeated for the planning of the adaptive phase: PTV{sub adapt} was generated by adding a 5-mm margin to the residual tumor. In the last 6 fractions a boost of 3.0 Gy per fraction (in total 45.6 Gy in 18 fractions) was delivered to PTV{sub adapt} while concomitantly delivering 2.3 Gy per fraction to PTV outside PTV{sub adapt}. Results: Three patients experienced grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity; 2 of 3 showed toxicity before the adaptive phase. Full dose of radiation therapy, oxaliplatin, and 5-fluorouracil was delivered in 96%, 96%, and 88% of patients, respectively. Two patients with clinical complete response (cCR) refused surgery and were still cCR at 17 and 29 months. For the remaining 23 resected patients, 15 of 23 (65%) showed tumor regression grade 3 response, and 7 of 23 (30%) had pathologic complete response; 8 (35%) and 12 (52%) tumor regression grade 3 patients had ≤5% and 10% residual viable cells, respectively. Conclusions: An adaptive boost strategy is feasible, with an acceptable grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity rate and a very encouraging tumor response rate. The results suggest that there should still be room for further dose escalation of the residual tumor with the aim of increasing pathologic complete response and/or c

  1. Carcinoid Syndrome and Carcinoid Heart Disease as Manifestations of Non-Metastatic Ovarian Neuroendocrine Tumour.

    PubMed

    Simões-Pereira, Joana; Wang, Lai Mun; Kardos, Attila; Grossman, Ashley

    2017-05-31

    The carcinoid syndrome is rare but it is associated with carcinoid heart disease in more than a half of the cases. Carcinoid heart disease is typically characterised by morphological and functional modifications of right-sided valves. Its aetiology is probable multifactorial but serotonin appears to play a key role in the development of this valvular disease. Unlike gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours, ovarian neuroendocrine tumours can present with carcinoid syndrome and carcinoid heart disease in the absence of liver metastases; such ovarian neuroendocrine tumours are a unique clinical entity. The additional burden of cardiac impairment in these patients represents a significant reduction in survival. Early recognition and surgical valve replacement before advanced heart failure is established may improve the clinical outcome. We report the case of a woman with an ovarian neuroendocrine tumour and highly symptomatic carcinoid heart disease who was submitted to tumour resection followed by valvuloplasty. She demonstrated an outstanding clinical improvement and has remained free of tumour and symptomatology.

  2. Combination of carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide, and sulforaphane, reduces the viability and growth of bronchial carcinoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bronchial carcinoids are pulmonary neuroendocrine cell-derived tumors comprising typical (TC) and atypical (AC) malignant phenotypes. The 5-year survival rate in metastatic carcinoid, despite multiple current therapies, is 14-25%. Hence, we are testing novel therapies that can affect the proliferation and survival of bronchial carcinoids. Methods In vitro studies were used for the dose–response (AlamarBlue) effects of acetazolamide (AZ) and sulforaphane (SFN) on clonogenicity, serotonin-induced growth effect and serotonin content (LC-MS) on H-727 (TC) and H-720 (AC) bronchial carcinoid cell lines and their derived NOD/SCID mice subcutaneous xenografts. Tumor ultra structure was studied by electron microscopy. Invasive fraction of the tumors was determined by matrigel invasion assay. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to study the effect of treatment(s) on proliferation (Ki67, phospho histone-H3) and neuroendocrine phenotype (chromogranin-A, tryptophan hydroxylase). Results Both compounds significantly reduced cell viability and colony formation in a dose-dependent manner (0–80 μM, 48 hours and 7 days) in H-727 and H-720 cell lines. Treatment of H-727 and H-720 subcutaneous xenografts in NOD/SCID mice with the combination of AZ + SFN for two weeks demonstrated highly significant growth inhibition and reduction of 5-HT content and reduced the invasive capacity of H-727 tumor cells. In terms of the tumor ultra structure, a marked reduction in secretory vesicles correlated with the decrease in 5-HT content. Conclusions The combination of AZ and SFN was more effective than either single agent. Since the effective doses are well within clinical range and bioavailability, our results suggest a potential new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of bronchial carcinoids. PMID:23927827

  3. A Rare Combination of Ovarian and Uterine Leiomyomas with Goblet Cell Carcinoid of the Appendix

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaikh, Abdulrahman F.; Darwish, Abdulla; Nagaraj, Veena; Alsada, Abeer

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of the rare combination of unilateral ovarian leiomyoma, uterine leiomyoma, and goblet cell carcinoid tumor of the appendix in a premenopausal woman who presented with right iliac pain. Immunohistochemistry study for desmin (muscle marker) and chromogranin and synaptophysin (neuroendocrine markers) confirmed immunophenotyping origin. Interestingly, both tumors showed positive reaction for estrogen receptor. To our knowledge, such a combination has not been reported previously in the literature. In this paper, the pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of both types of tumors are discussed. PMID:25685587

  4. Value of percent change in tumoral volume measured at T2 -weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI to identify responders after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Gennari, Antonio Giulio; Ricciardi, Maria Chiara; Ulcigrai, Veronica; Angileri, Roberta; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the percent change in tumoral volume measured at T2 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2 WMRI) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) as a method to identify responders after chemo- and radiation therapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma. Forty-five consecutive patients (mean age ± SD: 72 years ± 9.7; male/female = 24/21) with locally advanced rectal carcinoma underwent CRT followed by surgery. Each patient underwent T2 WMRI and DWI at 1.5T before and 6 weeks after the completion of CRT. The percent change in tumoral volume before and 6 weeks after CRT was compared in patients classified as responders and nonresponders according to rectal cancer regression grade. Twenty-five patients were classified as responders with either partial (n = 20) or complete response (n = 5), while 20 patients were classified as nonresponders due to stable disease (n = 18) or disease progression (n = 2). Responders vs. nonresponders differed in the percent change of tumoral volume at T2 WMRI (-67% ± 26% vs. -29% ± 26%; P < 0.05) and DWI images (-72% ± 24% vs. -33% ± 28%; P < 0.05) with a cutoff ≤ -70% for T2 WMRI (sensitivity = 69%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 48-85%; specificity = 100%, 95% CI 81-100%) and ≤66% for DWI (sensitivity = 73%, 95% CI: 52-88%; specificity = 100%, 95% CI 81-100%). The percent change in tumoral volume at T2 WMRI and DWI images can differentiate responders from nonresponders in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma after neoadjuvant CRT. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1415-1424. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Complications and outcomes following rectal pull-through surgery in dogs with rectal masses: 74 cases (2000-2013).

    PubMed

    Nucci, Daniel J; Liptak, Julius M; Selmic, Laura E; Culp, William T N; Durant, April M; Worley, Deanna; Maritato, Karl C; Thomson, Maurine; Annoni, Maurizio; Singh, Ameet; Matz, Brad; Benson, John; Buracco, Paolo

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the incidence of and factors associated with complications following rectal pull-through (RPT) surgery and the outcome for dogs with rectal tumors. Retrospective case series. 74 dogs with rectal masses. Information regarding signalment, history, diagnostic testing, type of rectal disease, surgical details, and postoperative complications, treatments, and outcomes was obtained from medical records and follow-up communications. Survival times were calculated. Descriptive statistics were generated. Regression analyses were used to evaluate the effect of various variables on the development of postsurgical complications and survival time. 58 (78.4%) dogs developed postsurgical complications, the most common of which was fecal incontinence with 42 (56.8%) dogs affected, of which 23 (54.8%) developed permanent incontinence. Other complications included diarrhea (n = 32), tenesmus (23), stricture formation (16), rectal bleeding (8), constipation (7), dehiscence (6), and infection (4). The rectal tumor recurred in 10 dogs. The median survival time was 1,150 days for all dogs and 726 days for dogs with malignant tumors. The 2 most common rectal masses were rectal carcinoma and rectal carcinoma in situ, and the dogs with these tumors had median survival times of 696 and 1,006 days, respectively. Dogs with rectal diseases that underwent RPT surgery had a high incidence of complications; however, those dogs had good local tumor control and survival times. The risk and impact of postsurgical complications on the quality of life and oncological outcomes should be discussed with owners before RPT surgery is performed in dogs with rectal masses.

  6. [A Systematic Analysis of Oncogene and Tumor Suppressor Genes for Panitumumab-Resistant Rectal Cancer with Wild RAS Gene - A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yosuke; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Yagi, Ryoma; Okamura, Takuma; Nakano, Masato; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Nogami, Hitoshi; Maruyama, Satoshi; Takii, Yasumasa; Miura, Kohei; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-11-01

    A 58-year-old man was admitted with the complaint of bloody stools. Colonoscopy and computed tomography revealed a rectal cancer with a liver metastasis and multiple lung metastases. After administering a regimen comprising 3 courses of XELOX plus bevacizumab chemotherapy, the sizes of the primary and metastatic lesions decreased remarkably. Abdominoperineal resection was performed for local control of the cancer; the specimen from the initial tumor was found to be KRAS wild type. After 14 courses of XELOX chemotherapy, brain metastases were detected. Although 3 courses of IRIS plus panitumumab were administered, the liver, lung, and brain metastases spread rapidly. A comprehensive genomic analysis focused on cancer-related genes with CancerPlex®found a mutation of the BRAF gene(I326V). BRAF is a downstream molecule of KRAS in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. Therefore, this mutation of the BRAF gene has the possibility of causing resistance against panitumumab that was found in this case. Furthermore, we expect that the systematic analysis of oncogene and suppressor oncogenes will enable us to choose the optimal regimen of chemotherapy or molecular targeting therapy for each patient with colorectal cancer.

  7. 5-HIAA excretion is not associated with bone metabolism in carcinoid syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, S C; de Herder, W W; Kwekkeboom, D J; Zillikens, M C; Feelders, R A; van Schaik, R H N; van Driel, M; van Leeuwen, J P T M

    2012-06-01

    In patients with a carcinoid syndrome and neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive tract (carcinoids), elevated circulating serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) levels can be demonstrated. It can be hypothesized that bone metabolism will be affected in these patients, since serotonin receptors are expressed on bone cells and serotonin effects on bone have been demonstrated. However, to date, no data are available on bone metabolism parameters in patients with neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive tract (carcinoids). In the current retrospective study we have measured serum bone formation markers P1CP (pro-collagen type I C-terminal), and osteocalcin, and the bone resorption marker NTx (collagen breakdown product N-terminal), in a group of 61 carcinoid patients with increased circulating serotonin levels as demonstrated by increased excretion of the serotonin breakdown product, 5-hydroxy indole acetic acid (5-HIAA), in the urine (>50 μmol/24 h, so-called "hyper-secretors") and a control group of 23 carcinoid patients, without increased 5-HIAA excretion (so-called non-secretors). The 24-h urinary excretion of 5-HIAA reflects the 24-h production of serotonin. Measurements of markers of bone metabolism were performed in serum samples obtained before the start of medical treatment. The hypersecretor group had on average a 10-fold higher urinary 5-HIAA excretion than the control (non-secretor) group. No significant differences in bone metabolism parameters could be demonstrated between hyper-secretors and controls (non-secretors). Correlation and regression analyses could not demonstrate significant age- and sex-adjusted correlations between urinary 5-HIAA excretion and any of the markers for bone turnover. A limitation is that the exposure time to elevated levels of serotonin is unknown, which might have been too short to induce effects on bone metabolism. Treatment of human pre-osteoblasts SV-HFO with serotonin didn't change alkaline phosphatase activity throughout

  8. Epidemiology of carcinoid neoplasms in Vaud, Switzerland, 1974–97

    PubMed Central

    Levi, F; Te, V-C; Randimbison, L; Rindi, G; La Vecchia, C

    2000-01-01

    In Vaud, Switzerland, the incidence of carcinoids based on 218 malignant and 215 benign cases rose from 19.6/106in 1974–85 to 28.2/106in 1986–97, more so among males and malignant neoplasms. Lung was the commonest site for malignant and large intestine for benign carcinoids. Sixty-eight (16%) carcinoids had another neoplasm. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10970700

  9. Early prediction of histopathological response of rectal tumors after one week of preoperative radiochemotherapy using 18 F-FDG PET-CT imaging. A prospective clinical study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) is standard in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Initial data suggest that the tumor’s metabolic response, i.e. reduction of its 18 F-FDG uptake compared with the baseline, observed after two weeks of RCT, may correlate with histopathological response. This prospective study evaluated the ability of a very early metabolic response, seen after only one week of RCT, to predict the histopathological response to treatment. Methods Twenty patients with LARC who received standard RCT regimen followed by radical surgery participated in this study. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV-MAX), measured by PET-CT imaging at baseline and on day 8 of RCT, and the changes in FDG uptake (ΔSUV-MAX), were compared with the histopathological response at surgery. Response was classified by tumor regression grade (TRG) and by achievement of pathological complete response (pCR). Results Absolute SUV-MAX values at both time points did not correlate with histopathological response. However, patients with pCR had a larger drop in SUV-MAX after one week of RCT (median: -35.31% vs −18.42%, p = 0.046). In contrast, TRG did not correlate with ΔSUV-MAX. The changes in FGD-uptake predicted accurately the achievement of pCR: only patients with a decrease of more than 32% in SUV-MAX had pCR while none of those whose tumors did not show any decrease in SUV-MAX had pCR. Conclusions A decrease in ΔSUV-MAX after only one week of RCT for LARC may be able to predict the achievement of pCR in the post-RCT surgical specimen. Validation in a larger independent cohort is planned. PMID:22853868

  10. Accurate Prediction of Pathological Rectal Tumor Response after Two Weeks of Preoperative Radiochemotherapy Using {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Marco H.M.; Ollers, Michel C.; Riedl, Robert G.; Bogaard, Jorgen M.A. van den; Buijsen, Jeroen; Stiphout, Ruud G.P.M. van; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal time point for repeated {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET)-CT imaging during preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) and the best predictive factor for the prediction of pathological treatment response in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 30 patients referred for preoperative RCT treatment were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent sequential PET-CT imaging at four time points: prior to therapy, at day 8 and 15 during RCT, and shortly before surgery. Tumor metabolic treatment responses were correlated with the pathological responses by evaluation of the tumor regression grade (TRG) and the pathological TN (ypT) stage of the resected specimen. Results: Based on their TRG evaluations, 13 patients were classified as pathological responders, whereas 17 patients were classified as pathological nonresponders. The response index (RI) for the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) on day 15 of RCT was found to be the best predictive factor for the pathological response (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.87) compared to the RI on day 8 (AUC = 0.78) or the RI of presurgical PET imaging (AUC = 0.66). A cutoff value of 43% for the reduction of SUV{sub max} resulted in a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 93%. Conclusions: The SUV{sub max}-based RI calculated after the first 2 weeks of RCT provided the best predictor of pathological treatment response, reaching AUCs of 0.87 and 0.84 for the TRG and the ypT stage, respectively. However, a few patients presented with peritumoral inflammatory reactions, which led to mispredictions. Exclusion of these patients further enhanced the predictive accuracy of PET imaging to AUCs of 0.97 and 0.89 for TRG and ypT, respectively.

  11. Ectopic ACTH secretion due to a bronchopulmonary carcinoid localized by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Iser, G; Pfohl, M; Dörr, U; Weiss, E M; Seif, F J

    1994-11-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old woman with an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secreting bronchopulmonary carcinoid. This patient showed the typical long history of Cushing's syndrome, including hypokaliemia, impaired glucose tolerance, high levels of ACTH and beta-endorphin, and coproduction of other peptides. At the onset of clinical symptoms in 1979 an adrenal adenoma was suspected, and left-sided adrenalectomy was performed. The symptoms soon recurred, and the diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome was made. As no ACTH-secreting tumor was found, the right adrenal was resected, and the patient was followed up regularly. Fourteen years later chest roentgenography and computed tomography revealed a para-aortic pulmonary lesion, which was suspicious for a bronchopulmonary carcinoid. ACTH and beta-endorphin were excessively, pancreatic polypeptide slightly elevated at that time. The final diagnosis was made using somatostatin receptor scintigraphy which confirmed the hormonal activity of the suspicious lesion; no additional focus was found. This method turned out to be not only a useful additional localization technique but also a promising tool for characterization and staging of a suspected ACTH-producing carcinoid. The tumor was resected curatively, and the diagnosis was confirmed histologically.

  12. Valvular Disorders in Carcinoid Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid heart disease is a rare but important cause of intrinsic right heart valve disorders leading to right heart failure. Occasionally, left-sided heart valves may also be involved. The characteristic cardiac pathological findings of carcinoid heart disease are endocardial thickening as a result of fibrous deposits on the endocardium. Echocardiographic examination and right heart catheterization are very useful for the diagnosis of the lesion. If more cardiac valves are affected, multiple valve replacement should be considered. The management of the pulmonary valve lesion depends on the extent of the diseased valve, either by valvulotomy, valvectomy, or valve replacement. Percutaneous valve implantations in the pulmonary and in the inferior vena cava positions have been advocated for high-risk patients. PMID:27982350

  13. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Scott, Si; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, Sd

    2012-07-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications.

  14. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression

    PubMed Central

    Scott, SI; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, SD

    2012-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications. PMID:24960730

  15. Everolimus and Vatalanib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. A Study of Appendiceal Crypt Cell Adenocarcinoma (So-Called Goblet Cell Carcinoid and Its Related Adenocarcinoma).

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Daisuke; Papaxoinis, George; Lamarca, Angela; Fulford, Paul; Valle, Juan; Chakrabarty, Bipasha

    2017-08-17

    Goblet cell carcinoids (GCCs) of the appendix are rare tumors, characterized by a carcinoid-like organoid growth pattern. Despite the term carcinoid, neuroendocrine features are inconspicuous, and its behavior is distinct from carcinoid. Its high grade counterpart is designated as adenocarcinoma ex GCC. We conducted a retrospective study of 105 tumors to find prognostic values of a variety of clinico-pathologic features. The tumors were subclassified as low grade, equivalent to classic type, and high grade, defined as loss of organoid pattern, and a proportion (%) of low and high grades were documented in each tumor. Correlations between survival and various clinico-pathologic parameters were investigated. One-third were pure low grade while the remainder contained variable high grade component ranging 5-95%. Neuroendocrine cell component ranged 0-90% (median 5) while mucus cell component ranged 5-100% (median 70). By univariate analysis, size, stage, high grade component, nuclear grade, surgery and chemotherapy correlated with cancer-related survival (CSS), and by multivariate analysis, stage (P=.001), high grade component (P=.008) and tumor size (P=.005) correlated with CSS. There was significant difference in CSS when the cases were grouped in high grade component <40%, 40-90 and ≤90% (P<.001). Our results indicate that staging and proportion of high grade histology may provide important prognostic information. Neuroendocrine component was insignificant in both low and high grade areas. In light of our findings, this tumor type is best regarded as a variant of adenocarcinoma, and the term crypt cell adenocarcinoma more appropriately reflects the nature and origin of this tumor group. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. TU-CD-BRB-09: Prediction of Chemo-Radiation Outcome for Rectal Cancer Based On Radiomics of Tumor Clinical Characteristics and Multi-Parametric MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, K; Yue, N; Shi, L; Hu, X; Chen, Q; Sun, X; Niu, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tumor clinical characteristics and quantitative multi-parametric MR imaging features for prediction of response to chemo-radiation treatment (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods: Forty-three consecutive patients (59.7±6.9 years, from 09/2013 – 06/2014) receiving neoadjuvant CRT followed by surgery were enrolled. All underwent MRI including anatomical T1/T2, Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE)-MRI and Diffusion-Weighted MRI (DWI) prior to the treatment. A total of 151 quantitative features, including morphology/Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) texture from T1/T2, enhancement kinetics and the voxelized distribution from DCE-MRI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from DWI, along with clinical information (carcinoembryonic antigen CEA level, TNM staging etc.), were extracted for each patient. Response groups were separated based on down-staging, good response and pathological complete response (pCR) status. Logistic regression analysis (LRA) was used to select the best predictors to classify different groups and the predictive performance were calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Individual imaging category or clinical charateristics might yield certain level of power in assessing the response. However, the combined model outperformed than any category alone in prediction. With selected features as Volume, GLCM AutoCorrelation (T2), MaxEnhancementProbability (DCE-MRI), and MeanADC (DWI), the down-staging prediciton accuracy (area under the ROC curve, AUC) could be 0.95, better than individual tumor metrics with AUC from 0.53–0.85. While for the pCR prediction, the best set included CEA (clinical charateristics), Homogeneity (DCE-MRI) and MeanADC (DWI) with an AUC of 0.89, more favorable compared to conventional tumor metrics with an AUC ranging from 0.511–0.79. Conclusion: Through a systematic analysis of multi-parametric MR imaging features, we are able to build models with

  18. Transanal endoscopic surgery in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Mora-Lopez, Laura; Alcantara-Moral, Manel; Caro-Tarrago, Aleidis; Gomez-Diaz, Carlos Javier; Navarro-Soto, Salvador

    2014-09-07

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard treatment for rectal cancer, but complications are frequent and rates of morbidity, mortality and genitourinary alterations are high. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) allows preservation of the anal sphincters and, via its vision system through a rectoscope, allows access to rectal tumors located as far as 20 cm from the anal verge. The capacity of local surgery to cure rectal cancer depends on the risk of lymph node invasion. This means that correct preoperative staging of the rectal tumor is necessary. Currently, local surgery is indicated for rectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas invading the submucosa, but not beyond (T1). Here we describe the standard technique for TEM, the different types of equipment used, and the technical limitations of this approach. TEM to remove rectal adenoma should be performed in the same way as if the lesion were an adenocarcinoma, due to the high percentage of infiltrating adenocarcinomas in these lesions. In spite of the generally good results with T1, some authors have published surprisingly high recurrence rates; this is due to the existence of two types of lesions, tumors with good and poor prognosis, divided according to histological and surgical factors. The standard treatment for rectal adenocarcinoma T2N0M0 is TME without adjuvant therapy. In this type of adenocarcinoma, local surgery obtains the best results when complete pathological response has been achieved with previous chemoradiotherapy. The results with chemoradiotherapy and TEM are encouraging, but the scientific evidence remains limited at present.

  19. Diagnosis and management of typical and atypical lung carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Sara; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Macerelli, Marianna; Proto, Claudia; Vitali, Milena; Signorelli, Diego; Ganzinelli, Monica; Scanagatta, Paolo; Duranti, Leonardo; Trama, Annalisa; Buzzoni, Roberto; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Pastorino, Ugo; de Braud, Filippo; Garassino, Marina Chiara

    2016-04-01

    An estimated 20% to 30% of all neuroendocrine tumours originate in the bronchial tree and lungs. According to the 2015 World Health Organization categorization, these tumours are separated into four subtypes characterized by increasing biological aggressiveness: typical carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and small-cell carcinoma. Although typical and atypical lung carcinoids account for less than 1-5% of all pulmonary malignancies, the incidence of these neoplasms has risen significantly in recent decades. Surgery is the treatment of choice for loco-regional disease but for advanced lung carcinoids there is no recognized standard of care and successful management requires a multidisciplinary approach. The aim of this review is to provide a useful guide for the clinical management of lung carcinoids.

  20. Cardiac Surgery for Carcinoid Heart Disease: A Weapon Not to Be Misused.

    PubMed

    Bonou, Maria; Kapelios, Chris J; Kaltsas, Gregory; Perreas, Konstantinos; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Barbetseas, John

    2017-01-01

    Carcinoid heart disease (CHD) complicates approximately 25% of patients with a carcinoid tumor and carcinoid syndrome and leads to heart valve degeneration with mixed-stenotic and regurgitation pathology and consequent heart failure (HF) leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Cardiac surgery in symptomatic, severe CHD leads to significantly better functional capacity and prolonged survival when compared to medical treatment alone. Recent studies have shown improvement in postoperative outcomes of patients undergoing surgery for CHD over the last decades. The trend for early diagnosis and application of surgery prior to the manifestation of HF symptoms, which tended to develop during the previous years, does not seem justifiable based on the findings of recent studies. Therefore, the optimal timing of intervention in CHD and the type of valve that should preferably be used remain issues of controversy. This review comprehensively examines the existing literature on the treatment options for patients with CHD, with a special focus on short- and long-term survival after cardiac surgery, and discusses the selection of the exact patient profile and intervention timing that are more likely to optimize the benefit-to-risk ratio for surgical intervention.

  1. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  2. A case of bronchial carcinoid: diagnosis and follow-up with 111In-DTPA-octreotide.

    PubMed

    Orsolon, P; Bagni, B; Basadonna, P; Geatti, O; Talmassons, G; Guerra, U P

    1995-12-01

    Scintigraphy with radiolabelled analogue of somatostatin is highly sensitive in detecting carcinoid tumors especially if performed with Single Photon Computed Tomography (SPECT). In this report we describe our experience with 111In-DTPA-Octreotide in a female patient affected by a small asymptomatic intrabronchial carcinoid demonstrated by CT scan and bronchial endoscopy performed after recurrent left pneumonias. Planar views and SPECT images, using 111In-DTPA-Octreotide, were collected before and four hours after the first endoscopic laser resection. All groups of SPECT images were positive in the left parahilar region but at a different degree. Scans performed after resection showed a low degree of uptake which was considered to be probably secondary to local swelling; CT scan was negative. Follow up endoscopic biopsy repeated at six months, showed a relapse always in the same site; CT scan of the thorax was again negative. 111In-DTPA-Octreotide images obtained at twelve months were positive always in the left parahilar region, CT scan was negative but another biopsy was not possible. Therefore it was suspected a relapse of the carcinoid which was probably growing only through the bronchial wall without spreading towards the bronchial lumen and/or the lung parenchima. In this occasion, it was also thought that images collected four hours after resection could be positive not only for swelling but for a relapse as well. In every scintigraphic session, SPECT images presented higher quality than planar. This case suggests that 111In-DTPA-Octreotide SPECT is a non-invasive diagnostic technique which could be applied as a follow-up tool especially to patients with no-secreting carcinoid neoplasm and/or with negative or doubtful endoscopic and radiological investigations.

  3. Atypical thymic carcinoid manifesting with nephrotic-range proteinuria in a 7-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Soltysiak, Jolanta; Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Zaorska, Katarzyna; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Derwich, Katarzyna; Zachwieja, Jacek

    2017-08-01

    Nephrotic-range proteinuria as a paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS) is an exceptional presentation, especially in children. It is usually associated with hematologic malignancies. Solid tumors are very rare causes of proteinuria. We present the case of a 7-year-old boy with an extremely rare atypical thymic carcinoid accompanied by nephrotic-range proteinuria as PNS. The kidney biopsy was consistent with minimal change disease (MCD). Tests for a neuroendocrine tumor were performed due to symptoms of hypercortisolemia and an elevated concentration of chromogranin A in the serum. The chest computed tomography revealed a tumor in the anterior mediastinum, which was diagnosed as an atypical thymic carcinoid. A complete resolution of the nephrotic-range proteinuria was observed within 1 week after the first thoracoscopic surgery, with almost complete reduction of the tumor mass. This extremely rare case shows that MCD can occur as a PNS even in children. Nephrotic-range proteinuria can be a symptom of malignant solid tumor. This case highlights the possibility of secondary causes of MCD in children.

  4. Small bowel carcinoid: Location isn't everything!

    PubMed

    Hari, Danielle M; Goff, Stephanie L; Reich, Heidi J; Leung, Anna M; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Ji Hey; Wolin, Edward; Amersi, Farin

    2013-08-27

    To investigate the prognostic significance of the primary site of disease for small bowel carcinoid (SBC) using a population-based analysis. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was queried for histologically confirmed SBC between the years 1988 and 2009. Overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using Log rank testing. Log rank and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to identify predictors of survival using age, year of diagnosis, race, gender, tumor histology/size/location, tumor-node-metastasis stage, number of lymph nodes (LNs) examined and percent of LNs with metastases. Of the 3763 patients, 51.2% were male with a mean age of 62.13 years. Median follow-up was 50 mo. The 10-year OS and DSS for duodenal primaries were significantly better when compared to jejunal and ileal primaries (P = 0.02 and < 0.0001, respectively). On multivariate Cox regression analysis, after adjusting for multiple factors, primary site location was not a significant predictor of survival (P = 0.752 for OS and P = 0.966 DSS) while age, number of primaries, number of LNs examined, T-stage and M-stage were independent predictors of survival. This 21-year, population-based study of SBC challenges the concept that location of the primary lesion alone is a significant predictor of survival.

  5. New cancer or carcinoid progression to small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Ie, Susanti; Boyd, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Carcinoids and small cell lung cancer share neuroendocrine cellular origins. Surgery is the definitive treatment in typical carcinoid with few recurrences. For patients considered to be poor surgical candidates, ablative and cryotherapies have been utilized with good results. The long-term consequences of these alternatives approaches are unclear. We report a case of typical carcinoid treated with various alternative approaches over a period of 6 years with either transformation to small cell lung cancer or the development of a new primary in the same location.

  6. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  7. Immunohistochemical detection of fibroblast growth factor receptors in normal endocrine cells and related tumors of the digestive system.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, S; Uccella, S; Erba, S; Capella, C; Sessa, F

    2001-12-01

    Endocrine tumors (ETs) of the digestive system produce several growth factors including acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors (aFGF and bFGF, respectively), which are thought to be involved in the growth of tumor cells and in the proliferation of tumor stromal cells. Their actions depend on binding to four specific receptors--FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and FGFR4--whose distribution in normal endocrine cells and related tumors of the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) system has previously been examined. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded normal tissues and 60 well-characterized GEP endocrine tumors were immunostained using specific antibodies directed against various GEP hormones, aFGF, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and FGFR4. Acidic FGF immunoreactivity (IR) was found in gut EC cells; FGFR1 immunoreactivity in rare duodenal endocrine cells and in pancreatic A cells; FGFR2 immunoreactivity in gastric and duodenal G cells, pancreatic B cells, and rectal EC cells; FGFR3 immunoreactivity in duodenal G cells; and FGFR4 immunoreactivity in rectal L cells and in pancreatic B, PP, and A cells. Immunoreactivity for at least one of the four FGFRs was found in all tumors, independently of FGFR expression in the putative cell of origin. EC cell tumors, which were all positive for aFGF, were found to express at least three different FGFRs. FGFRs also were localized in the stromal cells of all the tumors examined. The tumor stroma was more abundant in EC cell tumors than in other types of neoplasms. The results suggest that aFGF-FGFR interaction may be involved in the modulation of normal endocrine cell functions and in the regulation of tumor growth and stromal proliferation of EC cell carcinoids.

  8. Laparoscopic versus robotic rectal resection for rectal cancer in a veteran population.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ramiro; Anaya, Daniel A; Li, Linda T; Orcutt, Sonia T; Balentine, Courtney J; Awad, Samir A; Berger, David H; Albo, Daniel A; Artinyan, Avo

    2013-10-01

    Robotic rectal cancer resection remains controversial. We compared the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic vs robotic rectal cancer resection in a high-risk Veterans Health Administration population. Patients who underwent minimally invasive rectal cancer resection were identified from an institutional colorectal cancer database. Baseline characteristics and outcomes were compared between robotic and laparoscopic groups. The robotic group (n = 13) did not differ significantly from the laparoscopic group (n = 59) with respect to baseline characteristics except for a higher rate of previous abdominal surgery. Robotic patients had significantly lower tumors, more advanced disease, a higher rate of preoperative chemoradiation, and were more likely to undergo abdominoperineal resection. Robotic rectal resection was associated with longer operative time. There were no differences in blood loss, conversion rates, postoperative morbidity, lymph nodes harvested, margin positivity, or specimen quality between groups. The robotic approach for rectal cancer resection is safe with similar postoperative and oncologic outcomes compared with laparoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Frequent mutations in chromatin-remodelling genes in pulmonary carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Peifer, Martin; Lu, Xin; Sun, Ruping; Ozretić, Luka; Seidal, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Leenders, Frauke; George, Julie; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Pinther, Berit; Bosco, Graziella; Konrad, Kathryn; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Schneider, Peter M; Bogus, Magdalena; Soltermann, Alex; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Solberg, Steinar; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Ansén, Sascha; Stoelben, Erich; Wright, Gavin M; Russell, Prudence; Wainer, Zoe; Solomon, Benjamin; Field, John K; Hyde, Russell; Davies, Michael Pa; Heukamp, Lukas C; Petersen, Iver; Perner, Sven; Lovly, Christine; Cappuzzo, Federico; Travis, William D; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Haas, Stefan A; Buettner, Reinhard; Thomas, Roman K

    2014-03-27

    Pulmonary carcinoids are rare neuroendocrine tumours of the lung. The molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of these tumours have not been systematically studied so far. Here we perform gene copy number analysis (n=54), genome/exome (n=44) and transcriptome (n=69) sequencing of pulmonary carcinoids and observe frequent mutations in chromatin-remodelling genes. Covalent histone modifiers and subunits of the SWI/SNF complex are mutated in 40 and 22.2% of the cases, respectively, with MEN1, PSIP1 and ARID1A being recurrently affected. In contrast to small-cell lung cancer and large-cell neuroendocrine lung tumours, TP53 and RB1 mutations are rare events, suggesting that pulmonary carcinoids are not early progenitor lesions of the highly aggressive lung neuroendocrine tumours but arise through independent cellular mechanisms. These data also suggest that inactivation of chromatin-remodelling genes is sufficient to drive transformation in pulmonary carcinoids.

  10. Long-standing malignant pancreatic carcinoid treated with octreotide.

    PubMed

    Varas-Lorenzo, M J

    2010-11-01

    A male presented with a metastatic, plasma serotonin-secreting (high 5-HIAA in urine), malignant pancreatic carcinoid with a carcinoid-like syndrome, and was assessed using ultrasounds (US), computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and Octreoscan; he sequentially received chemotherapy, interferon and octreotide, with long-term, 12-year survival after diagnosis. Given this unusual case, the second reported in our country, the overall literature is reviewed.

  11. AACE/ACE DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF MIDGUT CARCINOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Katznelson, Laurence; Vinik, Aaron I.; Wong, Richard; Randolph, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a collection of complex tumors that arise from the diffuse endocrine system, primarily from the digestive tract. Carcinoid tumors most commonly originate from the small intestine. These tumors are either referred to as small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors or midgut carcinoids (MGCs). The purpose of this review article is to survey the diagnostic and therapeutic pathways for patients with MGC and provide an overview of the complex multidisciplinary care involved in improving their quality of life, treatment outcomes, and survival. Methods The current literature regarding the diagnosis and management of MGCs was reviewed. Results Dry flushing and secretory diarrhea are the hallmarks of the clinical syndrome of MGC. Managing MGC requires attention to the overall symptom complex, including the physical effects of the tumor and biomarker levels. The somatostatin analogs (SAs) octreotide and lanreotide are highly efficacious for symptomatic improvement. MGCs require resection to encompass the primary tumor and mesenteric lymph node metastases and should include cholecystectomy if the patient is likely to receive SA therapy. Debulking of liver metastasis by resection in combination with ablative therapies and other liver-directed modalities may help palliate symptoms and hormonal overproduction in carefully selected patients. Quality of life is an important measure of patients’ perception of the burden of their disease and impact of treatment modalities and may be a useful guide in deciding changes in therapy to alter apparent health status. Conclusion MGC is a challenging malignancy that requires the input of a multidisciplinary team to develop the best treatment plan. Consultation with expert centers that specialize in NETs may also be indicated for complex cases. With expert care, patients can be cured or live with the disease and enjoy good quality of life. PMID:25962092

  12. [Surgical treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Salinas-Aragón, L E; Camacho-Mauries, D; Medina-Franco, H

    2010-01-01

    Rectal affection accounts for 30% of colorectal cancer. The standard of treatment is surgical resection, which often is curative. For superior and middle-rectal involvement, low anterior resection (LAR) is the preferred procedure. For tumors involving the lower portion of the rectum, abdominoperineal resection (APR) or LAR are the options of treatment, depending on sphincter involvement. The main surgical objective is to achieve a R0 resection with an appropriated total mesorrectal excision, greater number of lymph nodes and negative distal and radial margins. These surgical parameters have been used as quality indicators and have prognostic implications in terms of overall and disease-free survival. Total mesorectal excision with preservation of hypogastric nerves has shown a reduction in rates of sexual and bladder dysfunction as well as lower local recurrence. At specialized centers such procedures are performed by minimal invasive surgery; however the number of meta-analysis is scarce.

  13. Atypical or typical adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing pulmonary carcinoids and the usefulness of 11C-5-hydroxytryptophan positron emission tomography: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, Jeanette; Ekman, Bertil

    2013-03-19

    Pulmonary carcinoids associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion have a good prognosis if histological examination shows typical pulmonary carcinoid and low proliferation, whereas a poor outcome is linked to atypical pulmonary carcinoid and high proliferation. Here we describe the diagnostic challenges to find the tumor in Cushing's syndrome secondary to ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion in two cases with an atypical and a typical pulmonary carcinoid, respectively. A 63-year-old Caucasian woman presented with aggressive clinical features related to Cushing's syndrome, having very high levels of urinary cortisol and circulating adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no pituitary tumor, and bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling revealed no central peripheral ratio of adrenocorticotropic hormone. Computed tomography and 111Indium-pentetreoide somatostatin receptor scintigraphy could not visualize any ectopic tumor. The patient was referred for an 11C-5-hydroxytryptophan positron emission tomography, and a small 8mm nodule in her left lung was found. The tumor was removed via a lateral thoracic incision and wedge excision. The histological examination showed an atypical carcinoid with Ki-67 index of 9 to 10%, and an additional lobectomy was performed.The second patient, a 22-year-old Caucasian man, also presented with aggressive Cushing's syndrome, with very high urinary cortisol levels and increased circulating cortisol as well as adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. A magnetic resonance imaging scan of the pituitary showed no tumor, whereas a 12×9×14mm tumor was detected in the right lung on the primary computed tomography scan and no further investigation was performed. The tumor was removed via a lateral thoracic incision and wedge excision. A typical carcinoid with Ki-67 index of 1 to 2% was found and no further surgery was performed.After surgical removal, the biochemical disturbances

  14. Predicting Value of Serum Procalcitonin, C-Reactive Protein, Drain Fluid Culture, Drain Fluid Interleukin-6, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Levels in Anastomotic Leakage after Rectal Resection.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Ismail Ahmet; Hatipoglu, Engin; Aghayeva, Afag; Arikan, Akif Enes; Incir, Said; Mamal Torun, Müzeyyen; Dirican, Ahmet; Erguney, Sabri

    2017-04-01

    Anastomotic leak is the most dreaded septic complication of colorectal surgical procedures. Death is proportional to the time between occurrence and diagnosis of the leakage. Biomarkers, which may help to predict anastomotic leakage before appearance of its clinical features, may be beneficial in preventing adverse outcomes. This study investigates a biomarker that might be useful to predict rectal anastomotic leakage before its clinical presentation. Serum procalcitonin and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, bacterial proliferation, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels of drain fluid were evaluated in 50 consecutive patients who underwent low anterior resection without diverting ostomy for rectal carcinoma. Anastomotic leakage occurred in seven of 50 (14%) patients. Serum CRP and procalcitonin levels at post-operative day three were higher in patients with anastomotic leakage (p = 0.01, p = 0.02 respectively). Drain TNF-α values were increased 63.2% on post-operative day five when compared with post-operative day three in patients with anastomotic leakage, but were decreased in patients without leakage. There was no statistical difference for drain IL-6 levels between groups. The bacterial proliferation rate of drain fluid culture in the leakage group was 42.9% at post-operative day three and 85.7% at post-operative day five (p = 0.29 and p = 0.0001, respectively). High serum CRP and procalcitonin values on post-operative day three are alarming, and assessment of anastomotic leakage by abdominal imaging with rectal contrast is suggested. In addition, increasing levels of TNF-α and bacterial proliferation in drain fluid are predictive, whereas IL-6 is not.

  15. [Endocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal and pancreatic systems. Multiple endocrine adenoma from another viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Klempa, I; Helmstädter, V; Feurle, G; Röttger, P

    1980-05-01

    The 24 endocrine pancreatic tumors and 14 carcinoids were examined immunohistochemically for cholecystokinin, insulin, gastrin, GIP, glucagon, sercretin, VIP, motilin, neurotensin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, and ACTH. In 12 tumors of the pancreas more than one peptide-containing cell type was observed. The clinical symptoms showed hypersecretion of only one of the hormones, however. The midgut carcinoids (jejunum, appendix) represented the classical view of the carcinoid as an argentaffin cell tumor secreting 5-hydroxytryptamine. Tumors originating in the foregut (bronchus, stomach, duodenum) and hindgut carcinoids (rectum) were nonargentaffine, containing and secreting various polypeptide hormones. We conclude that light microscopic immunohistochemical methods are useful in distinguishing endocrine from nonendocrine tumors and multihormonal syndromes (MEA) in the classification of predominant hormone-secreting tumors.

  16. Bronchopulmonary Carcinoids causing Cushing Syndrome: Results from a Multicentric Study Suggesting a More Aggressive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lococo, Filippo; Margaritora, Stefano; Cardillo, Giuseppe; Filosso, Perluigi; Novellis, Pierluigi; Rapicetta, Cristian; Carleo, Francesco; Bora, Giulia; Cesario, Alfredo; Stefani, Alessandro; Rossi, Giulio; Paci, Massimiliano

    2016-03-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) caused by bronchopulmonary carcinoids (BCs) is a very rare entity. The aim of this study was to revisit the features of a multicenter clinical series to identify significant prognostic factors. From January 2002 to December 2013, the clinical and pathological data of 23 patients (treated in five different institutions) were retrospectively reviewed. Survival analysis was performed to explore the relative weight of potential prognostic factors. Median age and male/female ratio were 48 years and 14/9, respectively. Most (> 80%) of the patients presented with CS-related symptoms at diagnosis. Tumor location was peripheral in 13 patients (57%) and central in 10 (43%). All patients but two (treated with chemotherapy) underwent surgical resection with curative intent. Definitive cyto/histology was indicative of typical carcinoid (TC) in 16 cases (70%) and atypical carcinoid (AC) in 7 cases (30%). A complete remission of CS was obtained in 16 cases (70%). Lymph nodal involvement was detected in 11 cases (48%), with N2 disease occurring in 7 (∼ 30% of all cases). Four patients (22%) experienced a relapse of the disease after radical surgery. Overall 5-year survival (long-term survival, LTS) was 60%, better in TCs when compared with AC (LTS: 66 v s. 48%, p = 0.28). Log-rank analysis identified ECOG performance status, cTNM and cN staging, pTNM and pN staging, persistence of CS and relapses (local p = 0.006; distant p = 0.001) as significant prognostic factors in this cohort of patients. BCs causing CS are characterized by a high rate of lymph-nodal involvement, a suboptimal prognosis (5-year survival = 60%, 66% in TCs) and a remarkable risk of relapse even after radical resection. Advanced stage, lymph-nodal involvement and the persisting of the CS after treatment correlate with a poor prognosis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Immunological Landscape and Clinical Management of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ruiz, Elísabeth; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of rectal cancer and colon cancer differs due to increased local relapses in rectal cancer. However, the current molecular classification does not differentiate rectal cancer and colon cancer as two different entities. In recent years, the impact of the specific immune microenvironment in cancer has attracted renewed interest and is currently recognized as one of the major determinants of clinical progression in a wide range of tumors. In colorectal cancer, the density of lymphocytic infiltration is associated with better overall survival. Due to the need for biomarkers of response to conventional treatment with chemoradiotherapy in rectal tumors, the immune status of rectal cancer emerges as a useful tool to improve the management of patients. PMID:26941741

  18. Robotic rectal surgery: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Staderini, Fabio; Foppa, Caterina; Minuzzo, Alessio; Badii, Benedetta; Qirici, Etleva; Trallori, Giacomo; Mallardi, Beatrice; Lami, Gabriele; Macrì, Giuseppe; Bonanomi, Andrea; Bagnoli, Siro; Perigli, Giuliano; Cianchi, Fabio

    2016-11-15

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery has demonstrated its superiority over the open approach, however it still has some technical limitations that lead to the development of robotic platforms. Nevertheless the literature on this topic is rapidly expanding there is still no consensus about benefits of robotic rectal cancer surgery over the laparoscopic one. For this reason a review of all the literature examining robotic surgery for rectal cancer was performed. Two reviewers independently conducted a search of electronic databases (PubMed and EMBASE) using the key words "rectum", "rectal", "cancer", "laparoscopy", "robot". After the initial screen of 266 articles, 43 papers were selected for review. A total of 3013 patients were included in the review. The most commonly performed intervention was low anterior resection (1450 patients, 48.1%), followed by anterior resections (997 patients, 33%), ultra-low anterior resections (393 patients, 13%) and abdominoperineal resections (173 patients, 5.7%). Robotic rectal surgery seems to offer potential advantages especially in low anterior resections with lower conversions rates and better preservation of the autonomic function. Quality of mesorectum and status of and circumferential resection margins are similar to those obtained with conventional laparoscopy even if robotic rectal surgery is undoubtedly associated with longer operative times. This review demonstrated that robotic rectal surgery is both safe and feasible but there is no evidence of its superiority over laparoscopy in terms of postoperative, clinical outcomes and incidence of complications. In conclusion robotic rectal surgery seems to overcome some of technical limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery especially for tumors requiring low and ultra-low anterior resections but this technical improvement seems not to provide, until now, any significant clinical advantages to the patients.

  19. Current concepts in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleshman, James W; Smallwood, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    The history of rectal cancer management informs current therapy and points us in the direction of future improvements. Multidisciplinary team management of rectal cancer will move us to personalized treatment for individuals with rectal cancer in all stages.

  20. Sequential PET/CT with [18F]-FDG Predicts Pathological Tumor Response to Preoperative Short Course Radiotherapy with Delayed Surgery in Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using Logistic Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pecori, Biagio; Lastoria, Secondo; Caracò, Corradina; Celentani, Marco; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Avallone, Antonio; Rega, Daniela; De Palma, Giampaolo; Mormile, Maria; Budillon, Alfredo; Muto, Paolo; Bianco, Francesco; Aloj, Luigi; Petrillo, Antonella; Delrio, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that FDG PET/CT may predict pathological response in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Aim of the current study is evaluate if pathological response can be similarly predicted in LARC patients after short course radiation therapy alone. Methods: Thirty-three patients with cT2-3, N0-2, M0 rectal adenocarcinoma treated with hypo fractionated short course neoadjuvant RT (5x5 Gy) with delayed surgery (SCRTDS) were prospectively studied. All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies at baseline, 10 days from RT end (early), and 53 days from RT end (delayed). Maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax), mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) of the primary tumor were measured and recorded at each PET/CT study. We use logistic regression analysis to aggregate different measures of metabolic response to predict the pathological response in the course of SCRTDS. Results: We provide straightforward formulas to classify response and estimate the probability of being a major responder (TRG1-2) or a complete responder (TRG1) for each individual. The formulas are based on the level of TLG at the early PET and on the overall proportional reduction of TLG between baseline and delayed PET studies. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that in the course of SCRTDS it is possible to estimate the probabilities of pathological tumor responses on the basis of PET/CT with FDG. Our formulas make it possible to assess the risks associated to LARC borne by a patient in the course of SCRTDS. These risk assessments can be balanced against other health risks associated with further treatments and can therefore be used to make informed therapy adjustments during SCRTDS. PMID:28060889

  1. Penile metastases of rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Persec, Z; Persec, J; Sovic, T; Rako, D; Savic, I; Marinic, D K

    2014-02-01

    Penile metastases are very rare and arise most frequently from genitourinary cancers. Penile metastases from rectal adenocarcinoma are less common and only 50 or so cases have been reported. We present a 43-year-old man with penile metastases from a rectal adenocarcinoma. Two years before admittance to our department, abdomino-perineal resection of the rectum (Miles operation) was performed for a Dukes B (T3N0M0) rectal adenocarcinoma; the surgical resection margins wee negative. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment were administered. One year after initial management, excision of a local recurrence was performed followed by further chemotherapy. The patient subsequently noticed lesions of the penis measuring up to 1.2 cm in diameter. Biopsy revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma. Computed tomography showed normal structure of penis with subcutaneous nodular thickening. Soon thereafter, the entire shaft of the penis becomes indurated and the patient developed urinary obstruction. A suprapubic cystostomy was performed. The patient died within 6 months. Penile metastases arise most frequently from genitourinary cancers, primarily from the bladder and the prostate gland. Metastasis to the penis from a rectal adenocarcinoma occurs much less commonly. Other reported primary origins of penile metastases include malignancies of the lung, nasopharynx and melanoma. The major symptoms are penile nodular mass, malignant priapism, penile pain and tenderness, difficulty in micturition, and urinary retention. Possible routes of metastasis are arterial, retrograde venous spread, retrograde lymphatic spread, but direct tumor infiltration/extension is also possible. Penile metastases from rectal adenocarcinoma usually occur within 2 years after diagnosis of the primary tumor. The prognosis is very poor regardless of treatment modality. Treatment is more often palliative than curative. Survival usually varies from 7 months to 2 years. Long-term survival (9 years) has been

  2. Atypical carcinoid presenting as dumb-bell-shaped tumour in the normal kidney.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Gupta, Pallav

    2013-09-24

    Carcinoid tumours are low-grade malignant neoplasms with neuroendocrine differentiation and occur frequently in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. Primary carcinoid tumours of the kidney are rare and a majority of these tumours occur in anomalous kidney and exhibit typical renal carcinoid morphology. We reported a middle-aged man with primary atypical carcinoid tumour occurring in a normal kidney. The patient was diagnosed as having renal cell carcinoma owing to a lack of neuroendocrinal clinical features. Immunohistochemical staining of the nephrectomy specimen helped in the diagnosis of atypical renal carcinoid.

  3. Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Kidney: A Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Teegavarapu, Purnima Sravanti; Rao, Priya; Matrana, Marc; Cauley, Diana H.; Wood, Christopher G; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal neuroendocrine tumors (NET), comprising carcinoid tumors and small cell carcinomas, are a rare group of neoplasms. The rarity of these tumors poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Our purpose was to characterize the cases treated at a tertiary cancer center and to evaluate patients' outcomes with the available treatment modalities. Methods This is a retrospective study of patients with renal NET seen at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between January 1, 2001, and January 1, 2011. Patient and tumor data were analyzed by descriptive statistical methods. Results Three cases of carcinoid tumors and six cases of small cell carcinoma were identified. The median age at diagnosis was 53 years for patients with carcinoid and 65 years for patients with small cell carcinoma. The most common presenting symptoms were back pain, flank pain, and hematuria. The morphological appearance of the tumor cells and their immunohistochemical reactivity for neuroendocrine markers and cytokeratin helped establish the diagnosis. Nephrectomy was the mainstay of treatment for carcinoid tumors, yielding good long-term results, even in the presence of metastases. Surgery and chemotherapy were utilized for small cell carcinoma of the kidney. The median overall survival for patients with small cell carcinoma of the kidney was 17.3 months. Conclusion Renal carcinoid tumors are indolent and are associated with prolonged survival, while small cell carcinomas of the kidney are aggressive tumors with relatively short overall survival. Although palliative in nature, cytotoxic chemotherapy is the mainstay of therapy and is best given before surgery. PMID:25088468

  4. Somatostatin receptor subtypes, octreotide scintigraphy, and clinical response to octreotide treatment in patients with neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Kölby, L; Wängberg, B; Ahlman, H; Tisell, L E; Fjälling, M; Forssell-Aronsson, E; Nilsson, O

    1998-07-01

    Several types of neuroendocrine tumor express high numbers of somatostatin receptors (sstr). We have compared the expression of sstr subtypes with the outcome of octreotide scintigraphy in patients with carcinoids and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in comparison with Hürthle cell tumors. The effect of sstr activation (octreotide treatment) on tumor markers was also studied in patients with disseminated carcinoid tumors. Six patients with carcinoid tumors (four midgut and two foregut), and three patients with thyroid tumors (one MTC, one Hürthle cell carcinoma, and one Hürthle cell adenoma) were studied. Octreotide scintigraphy visualized tumor sites in all nine patients. Macroscopic tumor was verified at these sites at subsequent surgical exploration. Using Northern blotting and subtype-specific riboprobes, sstr could be detected in all tumors examined. All five sstr subtypes were detected in most of the carcinoid tumors. All six carcinoids expressed sstr2. This was in contrast to the findings for the thyroid tumors analyzed, which also expressed several sstr subtypes but in some cases lacked expression of sstr2. This was also the case for normal thyroid tissue. Clinically, octreotide treatment of the patients with midgut carcinoid tumors resulted in palliation of hormonal symptoms accompanied by a significant reduction of urinary 5-HIAA levels (28-71%). These results indicate that carcinoid tumors frequently express all five sstr subtypes. The thyroid tumors also expressed multiple sstr but could lack expression of sstr2. Nevertheless, these tumors were visualized by octreotide scintigraphy, indicating that sstr2 expression is not a prerequisite for tumor imaging.

  5. Massive zosteriform cutaneous metastasis from rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damin, D C; Lazzaron, A R; Tarta, C; Cartel, A; Rosito, M A

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a large and rapidly growing skin lesion approximately six months after resection of a rectal carcinoma. The lesion measured 40 cm in size, extended from the suprapubic area to the proximal half of the left groin, and showed a particular zosteriform aspect. Biopsy confirmed a metastatic skin adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastases from rectal cancer are very uncommon. Their gross appearance is not distinctive, although the skin tumors are usually solid, small (less than 5 cm) and painless nodules or papules. Early biopsies for suspicious skin lesions are needed in patients with a history of colorectal cancer.

  6. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    PubMed Central

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  7. Tumor Delineation Based on Time-Activity Curve Differences Assessed With Dynamic Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Marco Aerts, Hugo; Ollers, Michel C.; Bosmans, Geert; Lee, John A.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Ruysscher, Dirk de; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Dekker, Andre L.A.J.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To develop an unsupervised tumor delineation method based on time-activity curve (TAC) shape differences between tumor tissue and healthy tissue and to compare the resulting contour with the two tumor contouring methods mostly used nowadays. Methods and Materials: Dynamic positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) acquisition was performed for 60 min starting directly after fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) injection. After acquisition and reconstruction, the data were filtered to attenuate noise. Correction for tissue motion during acquisition was applied. For tumor delineation, the TAC slope values were k-means clustered into two clusters. The resulting tumor contour (Contour I) was compared with a contour manually drawn by the radiation oncologist (Contour II) and a contour generated using a threshold of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV; Contour III). Results: The tumor volumes of Contours II and III were significantly larger than the tumor volumes of Contour I, with both Contours II and III containing many voxels showing flat TACs at low activities. However, in some cases, Contour II did not cover all voxels showing upward TACs. Conclusion: Both automated SUV contouring and manual tumor delineation possibly incorrectly assign healthy tissue, showing flat TACs, as being malignant. On the other hand, in some cases the manually drawn tumor contours do not cover all voxels showing steep upward TACs, suspected to be malignant. Further research should be conducted to validate the possible superiority of tumor delineation based on dynamic PET analysis.

  8. Carcinoid tumours of the bronchus: a 33 year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, R; Bates, M

    1984-01-01

    The term adenoma of the bronchus is discussed, and 79 cases of bronchial carcinoid seen from 1951 to 1983 are reviewed. The symptoms, radiological findings, and bronchoscopic appearances are described. There was no case of the carcinoid syndrome. In no case did haemorrhage cause any serious problem after biopsy at rigid bronchoscopy. In three patients the tumour was reported to be an oat cell carcinoma-in two on the basis of material obtained at fibreoptic bronchoscopy. Resection was by pneumonectomy in 10 cases, lobectomy in 52, segmentectomy in six, a bronchoplastic procedure without resection of lung in seven cases, enucleation in two, and a wedge resection in one case. There was one case of atypical carcinoid which was found at operation to be unresectable. A 5-30 year follow up in 57 cases revealed a recurrence of tumour in two cases, nine and 16 years after lung resection. No recurrence occurred in the nine cases treated by conservative bronchial resection with conservation of lung tissue. An actuarially assessed life table analysis shows survival rates of 94% after 10 years, 80% after 15 years, and 64% after 25 years without recurrence. The similarity of carcinoid to oat cell carcinoma is noted and the serious clinical implications of this are analysed, especially in view of the increasing use of fibreoptic bronchoscopy. The malignant potential of carcinoid and the extent of pulmonary resection is discussed. It is concluded that a carcinoid tumour of the lung has only slight malignant potential and that it may be treated by bronchotomy or sleeve resection of the bronchus in suitable cases. If serious infective changes have occurred in the lung distal to the tumour or if the tumour has extended into the lung parenchyma (88% of cases in this series) lung resection will be necessary. The follow up period should be for at least 25 years, in view of the incidence of late recurrence. PMID:6089366

  9. Dosimetric impact of inter-observer variability for 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: the rectal tumor target definition case

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess the dosimetric effect induced by inter-observer variability in target definition for 3D-conformal RT (3DCRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (RA) techniques for rectal cancer treatment. Methods Ten patients with rectal cancer subjected to neo-adjuvant RT were randomly selected from the internal database. Four radiation oncologists independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV) in blind mode. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as CTV + 7 mm in the three directions. Afterwards, shared guidelines between radiation oncologists were introduced to give general criteria for the contouring of rectal target and the four radiation oncologists defined new CTV following the guidelines. For each patient, six intersections (I) and unions (U) volumes were calculated coupling the contours of the various oncologists. This was repeated for the contours drawn after the guidelines. Agreement Index (AI = I/U) was calculated pre and post guidelines. Two RT plans (one with 3DCRT technique using 3–4 fields and one with RA using a single modulated arc) were optimized on each radiation oncologist’s PTV. For each plan the PTV volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95%) was calculated for both target and non-target PTVs. Results The inter-operator AI pre-guidelines was 0.57 and was increased up to 0.69 post-guidelines. The maximum volume difference between the various CTV couples, drawn for each patient, passed from 380 ± 147 cm3 to 137 ± 83 cm3 after the introduction of guidelines. The mean percentage for the non-target PTV V95% was 93.7 ± 9.2% before and 96.6 ± 4.9%after the introduction of guidelines for the 3DCRT, for RA the increase was more relevant, passing from 86.5 ± 13.8% (pre) to 94.5 ± 7.5% (post). The OARs were maximally spared with VMAT technique while the variability between pre and post guidelines was not relevant in both techniques. Conclusions The contouring

  10. Dosimetric impact of inter-observer variability for 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: the rectal tumor target definition case.

    PubMed

    Lobefalo, Francesca; Bignardi, Mario; Reggiori, Giacomo; Tozzi, Angelo; Tomatis, Stefano; Alongi, Filippo; Fogliata, Antonella; Gaudino, Anna; Navarria, Piera; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta; Mancosu, Pietro

    2013-07-09

    To assess the dosimetric effect induced by inter-observer variability in target definition for 3D-conformal RT (3DCRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (RA) techniques for rectal cancer treatment. Ten patients with rectal cancer subjected to neo-adjuvant RT were randomly selected from the internal database. Four radiation oncologists independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV) in blind mode. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as CTV + 7 mm in the three directions. Afterwards, shared guidelines between radiation oncologists were introduced to give general criteria for the contouring of rectal target and the four radiation oncologists defined new CTV following the guidelines. For each patient, six intersections (I) and unions (U) volumes were calculated coupling the contours of the various oncologists. This was repeated for the contours drawn after the guidelines. Agreement Index (AI = I/U) was calculated pre and post guidelines. Two RT plans (one with 3DCRT technique using 3-4 fields and one with RA using a single modulated arc) were optimized on each radiation oncologist's PTV. For each plan the PTV volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95%) was calculated for both target and non-target PTVs. The inter-operator AI pre-guidelines was 0.57 and was increased up to 0.69 post-guidelines. The maximum volume difference between the various CTV couples, drawn for each patient, passed from 380 ± 147 cm³ to 137 ± 83 cm³ after the introduction of guidelines. The mean percentage for the non-target PTV V95% was 93.7 ± 9.2% before and 96.6 ± 4.9%after the introduction of guidelines for the 3DCRT, for RA the increase was more relevant, passing from 86.5 ± 13.8% (pre) to 94.5 ± 7.5% (post). The OARs were maximally spared with VMAT technique while the variability between pre and post guidelines was not relevant in both techniques. The contouring inter-observer variability has dosimetric

  11. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  12. Genetic variants in the TGFβ-signaling pathway influence expression of miRNAs in colon and rectal normal mucosa and tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Trivellas, Andromahi; Pellatt, Andrew J; Mullany, Lila E; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Herrick, Jennifer S

    2017-01-05

    The TGF-β signaling pathway is involved in regulation of cell growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We test the hypothesis that genetic variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway alters miRNA expression.We use data from 1188 colorectal cancer cases to evaluate associations between 80 SNPs in 21 genes.Seven variants eIF4E rs12498533, NFκB1 rs230510, TGFB1 rs4803455, TGFBR1 rs1571590 and rs6478974, SMAD3 rs3743343, and RUNX1 rs8134179 were associated with expression level of miRNAs in normal colorectal mucosa. RUNX2 rs12333172 and BMPR1B rs13134042 were associated with miRNAs in normal colon mucosa; eIF4EBP3 rs250425, SMAD3 rs12904944, SMAD7 rs3736242, and PTEN rs532678 were associated with miRNA expression in normal rectal mucosa. Evaluation of the differential expression between carcinoma and normal mucosa showed that SMAD3 rs12708491 and rs2414937, NFκB1 rs230510 and rs3821958, and RUNX3 rs6672420 were associated with several miRNAs for colorectal carcinoma. Evaluation of site-specific differential miRNA expression showed that BMPR1B rs2120834, BMPR2 rs2228545, and eIF4EBP3 rs250425 were associated with differential miRNA expression in colon tissue and SMAD3 rs12901071, rs1498506, and rs2414937, BMPR2 rs2228545, and RUNX2 rs2819854, altered differential miRNA expression in rectal tissue.These data support the importance of the TGF-β signaling pathway to the carcinogenic process, possibly through their influence on miRNA expression levels.

  13. Correlation in Rectal Cancer Between Clinical Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy and Sphincter or Organ Preservation: 10-Year Results of the Lyon R 96-02 Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ortholan, Cecile; Romestaing, Pascale; Chapet, Olivier; Gerard, Jean Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in rectal cancer, the benefit of a neoadjuvant radiation dose escalation with endocavitary contact radiotherapy (CXRT) in addition to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This article provides an update of the Lyon R96-02 Phase III trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with T2 to T3 carcinoma of the lower rectum were randomly assigned to neoadjuvant EBRT 39 Gy in 13 fractions (43 patients) vs. the same EBRT with CXRT boost, 85 Gy in three fractions (45 patients). Median follow-up was 132 months. Results: The 10-year cumulated rate of permanent colostomy (CRPC) was 63% in the EBRT group vs. 29% in the EBRT+CXRT group (p < 0.001). The 10-year rate of local recurrence was 15% vs. 10% (p = 0.69); 10-year disease-free survival was 54% vs. 53% (p = 0.99); and 10-year overall survival was 56% vs. 55% (p = 0.85). Data of clinical response (CR) were available for 78 patients (36 in the EBRT group and 42 in the EBRT+CXRT group): 12 patients were in complete CR (1 patient vs. 11 patients), 53 patients had a CR {>=}50% (24 patients vs. 29 patients), and 13 patients had a CR <50% (11 patients vs. 2 patients) (p < 0.001). Of the 65 patients with CR {>=}50%, 9 had an organ preservation procedure (meaning no rectal resection) taking advantage of major CR. The 10-year CRPC was 17% for patients with complete CR, 42% for patients with CR {>=}50%, and 77% for patients with CR <50% (p = 0.014). Conclusion: In cancer of the lower rectum, CXRT increases the complete CR, turning in a significantly higher rate of long-term permanent sphincter and organ preservation.

  14. Robotic rectal surgery: State of the art

    PubMed Central

    Staderini, Fabio; Foppa, Caterina; Minuzzo, Alessio; Badii, Benedetta; Qirici, Etleva; Trallori, Giacomo; Mallardi, Beatrice; Lami, Gabriele; Macrì, Giuseppe; Bonanomi, Andrea; Bagnoli, Siro; Perigli, Giuliano; Cianchi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery has demonstrated its superiority over the open approach, however it still has some technical limitations that lead to the development of robotic platforms. Nevertheless the literature on this topic is rapidly expanding there is still no consensus about benefits of robotic rectal cancer surgery over the laparoscopic one. For this reason a review of all the literature examining robotic surgery for rectal cancer was performed. Two reviewers independently conducted a search of electronic databases (PubMed and EMBASE) using the key words “rectum”, “rectal”, “cancer”, “laparoscopy”, “robot”. After the initial screen of 266 articles, 43 papers were selected for review. A total of 3013 patients were included in the review. The most commonly performed intervention was low anterior resection (1450 patients, 48.1%), followed by anterior resections (997 patients, 33%), ultra-low anterior resections (393 patients, 13%) and abdominoperineal resections (173 patients, 5.7%). Robotic rectal surgery seems to offer potential advantages especially in low anterior resections with lower conversions rates and better preservation of the autonomic function. Quality of mesorectum and status of and circumferential resection margins are similar to those obtained with conventional laparoscopy even if robotic rectal surgery is undoubtedly associated with longer operative times. This review demonstrated that robotic rectal surgery is both safe and feasible but there is no evidence of its superiority over laparoscopy in terms of postoperative, clinical outcomes and incidence of complications. In conclusion robotic rectal surgery seems to overcome some of technical limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery especially for tumors requiring low and ultra-low anterior resections but this technical improvement seems not to provide, until now, any significant clinical advantages to the patients. PMID:27895814

  15. [Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors and preneoplasic lesions].

    PubMed

    Rouquette Lassalle, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    In the recently published 2015 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the lungs, all neuroendocrine tumors of the lungs are presented for the first time in one single chapter. In this classification, high-grade small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) are differentiated from intermediate grade atypical carcinoids (AC) and low-grade typical carcinoids as well as from preinvasive lesion diffuse neuroendocrine hyperplasia DIPNECH. In the 2004 WHO classification, SCLC and carcinoids each had a separate chapter and LCNEC was listed in the chapter on large cell carcinoma of the lungs. The new WHO classification also gives some recommendations for the diagnosis on small biopsies. This review describes morphological, immunohistochemical, and genomic characteristic of these tumors according to the new classification.

  16. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for small submucosal tumors of the rectum compared with endoscopic submucosal resection with a ligation device

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Hideaki; Suehiro, Satoshi; Murakami, Daisuke; Nakahara, Ryotaro; Shimizu, Takanori; Katsuyama, Yasushi; Miyama, Yasunaga; Hayasaka, Kenji; Tounou, Shigetaka

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for small rectal submucosal tumors (SMTs). METHODS Between August 2008 and March 2016, 39 patients were treated with endoscopic submucosal resection with a ligation device (ESMR-L) (n = 21) or ESD (n = 18) for small rectal SMTs in this study. Twenty-five lesions were confirmed by histological evaluation of endoscopic biopsy prior to the procedure, and 14 lesions were not evaluated by endoscopic biopsy. The results for the ESMR-L group and the ESD group were retrospectively compared, including baseline characteristics and therapeutic outcomes. RESULTS The rate of en bloc resection was 100% in both groups. Although the rate of complete endoscopic resection was higher in the ESD group than in the ESMR-L group (100% vs 95.2%), there were no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.462). In one patient in the ESMR-L group with a previously biopsied tumor, histological complete resection with a vertical margin involvement of carcinoid tumor could not be achieved, whereas there was no incomplete resection in the ESD group. The mean length of the procedure was significantly greater in the ESD group than in the ESMR-L group (14.7 ± 6.4 min vs 5.4 ± 1.7 min, P < 0.05). The mean period of the hospitalization was also significantly longer in the ESD group than in the ESMR-L group (3.7 ± 0.9 d vs 2.8 ± 1.5 d, P < 0.05). Postoperative bleeding was occurred in one patient in the ESMR-L group. CONCLUSION Both ESMR-L and ESD were effective for treatment of small rectal SMTs. ESMR-L was simpler to perform than ESD and took less time. PMID:28250899

  17. Intussusception secondary to a carcinoid tumor in an adult patient☆

    PubMed Central

    Wiener-Carrillo, Isidoro; González-Alvarado, Carlos; Cervantes-Valladolid, Mario; Echaverry-Navarrete, Denis; Zubieta-O’Farrill, Gregorio; Gudiño-Chávez, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intussusception in adult patients represents 5% of all intussusceptions and 1–5% of bowel obstructions in adults. In contrast to pediatric patients, 90% of the time, in adults, it's caused by well-established pathologic mechanisms, such as carcinoma, polyps, diverticula, Meckel diverticula, stenosis, or benign neoplasms. Small intestine intussusceptions are more frequent, but colonic intussusceptions are caused 50% of the time by malignant neoplasms, especially adenocarcinoma. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a 70-year-old woman, with no relevant familial history, who presented with a 3-day symptomatology consisting of epigastric, colic, diffuse, abdominal pain of moderate intensity, which progressed till reaching a severe intensity, also referring abdominal distension, nausea, and gastrointestinal-content vomits. DISCUSSION In adult patients, the exact mechanism of intussusception is unknown in 8–20% of the cases, however, secondary intussusception can occur with any lesion of the intestinal wall or any irritant factor in its lumen that alters normal peristaltic activity and that could serve as a trigger to start an intussusception of one bowel segment over another the most common site is the small intestine. CONCLUSION Intussusception represents an unusual problem in adult patients; it requires a high clinical suspicion, mainly as a differential diagnosis in patients with intestinal obstruction, and it clinically presents as a subacute or chronic illness. CT represents the most useful diagnostic tool. An attempt to perform reduction procedures in small intestine intussusceptions can be done, however, in ileocolic or colonic intussusceptions, a formal resection of the segment is recommended. PMID:24727207

  18. What's New in Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... approach is still only available in the United States as a part of a clinical trial . Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is made up of doctors and master’s-prepared nurses with deep knowledge of cancer care as well as journalists, ...

  19. MRI in local staging of rectal cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Tapan, Ümit; Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative imaging for staging of rectal cancer has become an important aspect of current approach to rectal cancer management, because it helps to select suitable patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and determine the appropriate surgical technique. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in assessing the depth of tumor penetration, lymph node involvement, mesorectal fascia and anal sphincter invasion, and presence of distant metastatic diseases. Currently, there is no consensus on a preferred imaging technique for preoperative staging of rectal cancer. However, high-resolution phased-array MRI is recommended as a standard imaging modality for preoperative local staging of rectal cancer, with excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and absence of ionizing radiation. This review will mainly focus on the role of MRI in preoperative local staging of rectal cancer and discuss recent advancements in MRI technique such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:25010367

  20. Rectal prolapse as initial clinical manifestation of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-W; Hsiao, C-W; Wu, C-C; Jao, S-W

    2008-04-01

    Rectal prolapse as the initial clinical manifestation of colorectal cancer is uncommon. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon after presenting with complete rectal prolapse. The tumor caused rectosigmoid intussusception and then it prolapsed out through the anus. She underwent rectosigmoidectomy and rectopexy. The postoperative course was uneventful. The relationship between colorectal cancer and rectal prolapse has not been clearly established. This case report describes an unusual presentation of colorectal cancer. It suggests that rectal prolapse can present as the initial symptom of colorectal cancer and may also be a presenting feature of the occult intra-abdominal pathology. The importance of adequate investigation such as colonoscopy should be emphasized in patients who develop a new onset of rectal prolapse.

  1. [Local diagnostics for rectal cancer. What is realistic?].

    PubMed

    Ptok, H; Gastinger, I; Lippert, H

    2012-05-01

    Accurate pretherapeutic staging of rectal cancer is crucial for further therapeutic management and important for prognosis. The most accurate diagnostic tools in the assessment of T and N categories of rectal cancer are endorectal ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, MRI can accurately predict the distance of the tumor to the colorectal membrane (CRM) and computed tomography (CT) is more suitable for detecting distant metastases. In the routine care of rectal cancer EUS is the most frequently used diagnostic tool for local staging. The achieved accuracy for determining T category by EUS in routine clinical staging is lower than results reported in the literature. Furthermore, the accuracy of EUS depends on the experience of the examiner. Currently the frequency of using MRI for routine clinical staging of rectal cancer is low and in one out of five cases the local staging of rectal cancer is exclusively carried out by CT.

  2. A thymic carcinoid in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris).

    PubMed

    Powe, Joshua; Castleman, William; Fiorello, Christine

    2005-09-01

    An 18-yr-old Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) presented with acute onset hind limb paresis. Radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging revealed a caudal abdominal aortic thrombus and a cranial mediastinal mass. Necropsy confirmed aortic thrombosis. Necrotizing enteritis and multifocal renal thrombosis were also noted. The cranial mediastinum contained a bilobed mass that histologically and ultrastructurally was consistent with a carcinoid.

  3. Atypical carcinoid and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung: a proteomic dataset from formalin-fixed archival samples

    PubMed Central

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Abbondio, Marcello; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Eccher, Albino; Rindi, Guido; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Uzzau, Sergio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a dataset generated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples from two rare lung neuroendocrine tumor subtypes (namely, two atypical carcinoids, ACs, and two large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, LCNECs). Samples were subjected to a shotgun proteomics pipeline, comprising full-length protein extraction, SDS removal through spin columns, in solution trypsin digestion, long gradient liquid chromatography peptide separation and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1260 and 2436 proteins were identified in the AC and LCNEC samples, respectively, with FDR <1%. MS data are available in the PeptideAtlas repository at http://www.peptideatlas.org/PASS/PASS00375. PMID:27054153

  4. [A case of peritonitis carcinomatosa from goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix treated by intraperitoneal paclitaxel and systemic S-1 chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shingen; Kimura, Shigeaki; Kashima, Masahiro; Shichijo, Kana; Yoshida, Sumiko; Harada, Eiji; Matsushita, Takaya; Oshima, Yasushi; Tamaki, Yasutami; Horiuchi, Noriaki; Takeichi, Toshiaki; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Masuda, Kazuhiko; Iwasaka, Naohito; Shinomiya, Sadao

    2008-12-01

    Goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix is a rare neoplasm and clinically tends to take a malignant course. Most cases are young and early stage, and the surgical strategy is available. But appropriate chemotherapy for inoperable cases with peritoneal dissemination is not established. A 77-year-old woman with a past history of appendectomy was admitted to our hospital complaining of abdominal fullness. Abdominal computed tomography showed massive ascites and slight contrast enhancement of appendix. A tumor was found by colonoscopic examination at the orifice of vermiform and was diagnosed pathologically as goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix. Laparoscopy showed multiple peritoneal dissemination. We performed intraperitoneal paclitaxel(PTX)administration at 70 mg/m(2) week without any resection of the tumor. Ascites were reduced immediately, but drug-induced interstitial pneumonia occurred due to PTX. After steroid therapy, we switched to systemic S-1 therapy. For about one year, her tumor was controlled but became worse thirteen months after diagnosis and died. It is thought that intraabdominal paclitaxel administration and systemic S-1 therapy can be one of appropriate forms of chemotherapy for inoperable peritoneal carcinomatosis from goblet cell carcinoid of appendix.

  5. [Rectal cancer: diagnosis, screening and treatment].

    PubMed

    Decanini-Terán, César Oscar; González-Acosta, Jorge; Obregón-Méndez, Jorge; Vega-de Jesús, Martín

    2011-01-01

    Rectal cancer is one of the primary malignant neoplasms occurring in Mexican patients of reproductive age. Unfortunately, randomized studies in rectal cancer do not exist as they do with well-recognized colon cancer. We must individualize the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnostic approach, staging and treatment because management is different in rectal cancers affecting the mid- and lower third of the rectum than in the upper third and in colon cancers. Histological staging is the primary prognostic factor. TNM staging (tumor, node, and metastasis) is used internationally by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). Staging is done with the assistance of endorectal ultrasound, which is best used in early-stage cancer; however, there are certain disadvantages in detecting node involvement. Magnetic resonance, on the other hand, allows for the evaluation of stenotic tumors and node involvement. Once the correct diagnosis and staging have been made, the next step is correct treatment. Neoadjuvant treatment has demonstrated to be better than adjuvant treatment. Abdominoperineal resection is rarely practiced currently, with sphincter preservation being the preferred procedure. Laparoscopic approach has conferred the advantages of the approach itself when performed by experts in the procedure but there is insufficient evidence to make it the "gold standard." Rectal cancer is a complex pathology that must be considered totally different from colon cancer for diagnosis and treatment. The patient must be staged completely and appropriately for individualizing correct treatment. More long-term studies are needed for optimizing treatment modalities.

  6. Prognosis of patients with carcinoid heart disease after valvular surgery.

    PubMed

    Manoly, Imthiaz; McAnelly, Sarah-Louise; Sriskandarajah, Sanjeevan; McLaughlin, Kenneth Edward

    2014-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. We addressed the following question: in patients who are diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease (CHD), do valvular surgeries improve their prognosis? Fifty percent of the patients with clinically diagnosed carcinoid syndrome had cardiac involvement which was present either as valvular dysfunction or as cardiac metastases. These patients often require surgery due to their heightened risk of cardiac disease. Altogether 217 relevant papers were identified as a result of the below-mentioned search, of which 10 papers represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Of the patients who were identified to have carcinoid heart disease in different studies, 193 patients had valve procedure, mainly replacements at tricuspid, mitral and aortic valve positions and either valvuloplasty or replacement at pulmonary valve. Tricuspid and pulmonary valves represented the majority of the excised valves among patients undergoing valvular surgery for CHD. The pathology of carcinoid valve was attributed to the presence of plaque, causing thickening and retraction. Pure regurgitation was the most common finding in all the valves except pulmonary valve which had both stenosis and insufficiency. Thirty-day mortality was 17% (range 1-63%) and long-term survivors were reported to be alive at an average of 58 months (28-80 months) after the valve surgery. The evidence demonstrates that surgical intervention can lead to improved prognosis and reduce the symptoms of heart failure. Postoperative mortality was mainly due to the carcinoid disease itself and not as a complication of the surgery. Therefore, surgery could be considered for symptomatic palliation in carefully selected individuals.

  7. Rectal imaging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vining, D J

    1998-09-01

    Rectal imaging has evolved substantially during the past 25 years and now offers surgeons exquisite anatomic detail and physiologic information. Dynamic cystoproctography, helical computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging, and immunoscintigraphy have become standards for the diagnosis of rectal disease, staging of neoplasia, and survey of therapeutic results. The indications, limitations, and relative costs of current imaging methods are reviewed, and advances in imaging technology that promise future benefits to colorectal surgeons are introduced.

  8. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-10

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  9. Overexpression of PY1289-HER3 in sporadic pulmonary carcinoid from patients bearing MEN1 gene variants

    PubMed Central

    LATTANZIO, ROSSANO; VESCHI, SERENA; ACETO, GITANA MARIA; CURIA, MARIA CRISTINA; CAMA, ALESSANDRO; DE LELLIS, LAURA; FANTINI, FABIANA; ANGELUCCI, DOMENICO; IACOBELLI, STEFANO; PIANTELLI, MAURO; BATTISTA, PASQUALE

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptors (HERs) (HER1/HER2/HER3/HER4) and their phosphorylated forms (p-HER1/p-HER2/p-HER3/p-HER4) in pulmonary carcinoids (PCs). HER and p-HER protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays in 37 specimens of sporadic PCs, 29 typical carcinoids (TCs) and 8 atypical carcinoids (ACs). When compared with the ACs, the TCs did not exhibit any differences in terms of HER/p-HER expression. The tumors of this study have previously been characterized for the expression of menin and the mutational status of menin 1 (MEN1), a gene strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of PCs. In the present study, it was found that the cytoplasmic (‘disarrayed’), but not nuclear (‘arrayed’) expression of menin was positively correlated with HER3 (P=0.004), HER4 (P=0.015), p-HER1 (P=0.005), p-HER3 (P<0.001), and p-HER4 (P=0.001) expression. Moreover, HER3 and p-HER3 were found to be significantly more expressed in PCs with MEN1 variants, than in tumors with MEN1 wild-type (P=0.000 and P=0.025, respectively). These findings suggest the potential clinical use of HER inhibitors in the treatment of patients with PCs, particularly for individuals with p-HER3-positive PCs harboring MEN1 gene variants. PMID:27347164

  10. Rectal versus non-rectal primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colorectum: a retrospective survival analysis controlled for confounders.

    PubMed

    Ciarrocchi, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to compare the outcomes of rectal and non-rectal primary signet ring cell adenocarcinoma of the colorectum. A retrospective survival analysis was performed using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program database between 2004 and 2009 on subjects who were diagnosed as having a primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colorectum. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis controlled for confounders was used to assess overall survival comparing rectal and non-rectal cancers. Our population was composed of 1,484 patients: 200 affected by rectal cancer and 1,284 by non-rectal cancer. Unadjusted survival curves resulted to be almost superimposable (P = 0.916). After controlling for age, gender, race, tumor stage, grade, and size, tumor location demonstrated a statistically significant impact on overall survival (P = 0.032; 95% confidence interval 0.640-0.980; hazard ratio 0.792). On the basis of analysis of information from the SEER database, the signet ring cell carcinoma of the rectum was associated to a worse prognosis as compared to non-rectal cancer.

  11. Clinical validation of atlas-based auto-segmentation of pelvic volumes and normal tissue in rectal tumors using auto-segmentation computed system.

    PubMed

    Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Valentini, Chiara; Dinapoli, Nicola; Boldrini, Luca; Caria, Nicola; Barba, Maria Cristina; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Pasini, Danilo; Minsky, Bruce; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate in two different settings - clinical practice and education/training - the reliability, time efficiency and the ideal sequence of an atlas-based auto-segmentation system in pelvic delineation of locally advanced rectal cancer. Fourteen consecutive patients were selected between October and December 2011. The images of four were used as an atlas and 10 used for validation. Two independent operators participated: a Delineator to contour and a Reviewer to perform an independent check (IC). The CTV, pelvic subsites and organs at risk were contoured in four different sequences. These included A: manual; B: auto-segmentation; C: auto-segmentation + manual revision; and D: manual + auto-segmentation + manual revision. Contouring was performed by the Delineator using the same planning CT. All of them underwent an IC by a Reviewer. The time required for all the contours were recorded and overlapping evaluation was assessed using a Dice coefficient. In the clinical practice setting there have been 13 minutes time saved between sequences A versus sequences B (from 38 to 25 minutes, p = 0.002), a mean Dice coefficient in favor of sequences A for CTV and all subsites (p = 0.0195). In the educational/training setting there have been 35.2 minutes time saved between sequences C and D 8 (from 73.1 min to 37.9 min, p = 0.002). The preliminary data suggest that the use of an atlas-based auto-contouring system may help improve efficiencies in contouring in the clinical practice setting and could have a tutorial role in the educational/training setting.

  12. Carcinoid heart disease from ovarian primary presenting with acute pericarditis and biventricular failure

    PubMed Central

    Vergani, D; Massironi, L; Lombardi, F; Fiorentini, C

    1998-01-01

    A case is described of a 54 year old woman who had acute pericarditis with large exudative effusion accompanied by severe right and left ventricular failure. The patient was finally diagnosed with carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian carcinoid teratoma. She was treated with octreotide—a somatostatin analogue—followed by radical surgical resection of the neoplasm. At one year follow up only mild carcinoid tricuspid regurgitation remained. Only 16 cases of carcinoid heart disease from an ovarian primary have been described in literature. Moreover clinically manifest acute, non-metastatic pericarditis and left heart failure are not considered as possible presentations of carcinoid heart disease, whatever the origin. In a recent series a small pericardial effusion was considered an infrequent and unexpected echocardiographic finding in carcinoid heart patients. One case of "carcinoid pericarditis" has previously been described as a consequence of pericardial metastasis. Left sided heart involvement is usually caused by bronchial carcinoids or patency of foramen ovale; both were excluded in the case presented.

 Keywords: carcinoid heart disease;  ovarian tumour;  acute pericarditis;  heart failure PMID:10065036

  13. An Unusual Case of Synchronous Carcinoid of Ovary and Gall Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Rupali; Arora, Raksha; Bhasin, Sangeeta; Khurana, Nita

    2013-01-01

    Multifocal carcinoid is a known phenomenon. We present a rare combination of an ovarian carcinoid synchronous with gallbladder carcinoid. This rare combination has not been reported so far. An asymptomatic 45-years-old perimenopausal lady was diagnosed to have a metastatic ovarian cancer, but on laparotomy she was found to have a primary synchronous metastatic gall bladder as well. On histopathological evaluation she was found to have two separate primary carcinoids. Subsequently the patient received chemotherapy and is completely asymptomatic on follow up. Further research needs to be undertaken and guidelines need to be formulated for management of these cases. PMID:24371533

  14. [Bronchopulmonary ACTH-producing tumors].

    PubMed

    Pikunov, M Iu; Kuznetsov, N S; Latkina, N V; Dobreva, E A; Remizov, O V

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocr