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Sample records for rectal contrast medium

  1. Rectal contrast increases rectal dose during vaginal cuff brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Sebastia; Andres, Ignacio; Jimenez-Jimenez, Esther; Berenguer, Roberto; Sevillano, Marimar; Lopez-Honrubia, Veronica; Rovirosa, Angeles; Sanchez-Prieto, Ricardo; Arenas, Meritxell

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of rectal dose on rectal contrast use during vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB). A retrospective review of gynecology patients who received some brachytherapy fractions with and without rectal contrast was carried out. Rectal contrast was instilled at the clinician's discretion to increase rectal visibility. Thirty-six pairs of CT scans in preparation for brachytherapy were analyzed. Pairs of CTs were segmented and planned using the same parameters. The rectum was always defined from 1 cm above the cylinder tip up to 1.5 cm below the last activated dwell source position. An individual plan was computed at every VCB fraction. A set of values (Dmax, D(0.1cc), D(1cc), and D(2cc)) derived from dose-volume histograms were extracted and compared according to the rectal status. Rectal volume was 26.7% larger in the fractions with rectal contrast. Such an increase in volume represented a significant increase from 7.7% to 10.4% in all parameters analyzed except Dmax dose-volume histogram. Avoiding rectal contrast is a simple way of decreasing the rectal dose parameters of VCB, which would mean a better therapeutic ratio. Results also suggest that action directed at maintaining the rectum empty might have the same effect. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Incompatibility of Contrast Medium and Trisodium Citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Delcour, Christian Bruninx, Guy

    2013-02-15

    To test the compatibility of trisodium citrate, a catheter lock solution, with iodinated contrast medium. Iohexol, iobitridol, iodixanol, ioxaglate, ioxithalamate, iomeprol, and iopromide were tested. In all tests, 2 ml of contrast medium were mixed with 2 ml of trisodium citrate solution. Iodixanol and ioxaglate provoked a highly viscous gluelike precipitation when mixed with trisodium citrate. A brief transient precipitate was observed with iohexol, iomeprol, and ioxithalamate. Permanent precipitation occurred with iobitridol and iopromide. One must be aware of the potential for precipitation when contrast medium is mixed with trisodium citrate solution. Before trisodium citrate solution is injected, the catheter should be thoroughly flushed with saline if a contrast medium has previously been injected through it.

  3. Hytrast: A New Contrast Medium for Bronchography

    PubMed Central

    Misener, F. J.; Quinlan, J. J.; Hiltz, J. E.

    1965-01-01

    In 1962 Hytrast, an aqueous suspension containing 50% w/v of combined iodine as a mixture of N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-3,5-diiodopyridone-4 and 3,5-diiodopyridone-4, was introduced as a contrast medium for bronchography. Extensive clinical trials had suggested that this agent was superior to products usually employed for this purpose. At the Nova Scotia Sanatorium, Hytrast was used as a bronchographic contrast medium in 31 consecutive cases. For comparison purposes, the records of the first 50 patients in whom another contrast medium, Dionosil Oily, was used were reviewed. In all cases the contrast medium was introduced through a catheter passed into the bronchus with the aid of a laryngeal mirror, after local anesthesia was induced by pontocaine 2%. Experience in this limited number of cases was at variance with most published results. Hytrast was more irritating than Dionosil Oily, had a greater tendency to produce alveolarization, caused more frequent undesirable sequelae, and was retained in the lung for prolonged periods. PMID:14264971

  4. Contrast medium usage reduction in abdominal computed tomography by using high-iodinated concentration contrast medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannasri, A.; Kaewlai, R.; Asavaphatiboon, S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was to determine if administration of a low volume high-concentration iodinated contrast medium can preserve image quality in comparison with regular-concentration intravenous contrast medium in patient undergoing contrast-enhancement abdominal computed tomography (CT). Eighty-four patients were randomly divided into 3 groups of similar iodine delivery rate; A: 1.2 cc/kg of iomeprol-400, B: 1.0 cc/kg of iomeprol-400 and C: 1.5 cc/kg of ioversol-350. Contrast enhancement of the liver parenchyma, pancreas and aorta was quantitatively measured in Hounsfield units and qualitative assessed by a radiologist. T-test was used to evaluate contrast enhancement, and Chi-square test was used to evaluate qualitative image assessment, at significance level of 0.05 with 95% confidence intervals. There were no statistically significant differences in contrast enhancement of liver parenchyma and pancreas between group A and group C in both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Group C showed superior vascular enhancement to group A and B on quantitative analysis.

  5. Contrast medium enhanced susceptibility imaging signal mechanism; should we use contrast medium?

    PubMed

    Aydın, Ömer; Büyükkaya, Ramazan; Hakyemez, Bahattin

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial lesions exhibit clear contrast enhancement in T1-weighted imaging, but the mechanism whereby contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging (CE-SWI) generates signals remains unclear. Contrast enhancement patterns cannot be reliably predicted. To explore the mechanism of CE-SWI contrast enhancement. Fifty-five patients were retrospectively enrolled. All of the imaging employed a clinical 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system fitted with a 32-channel head coil. Minimum-intensity projection reformatted images were evaluated. Intracranial lesions and brain parenchymal intensities were explored using SWI and CE-SWI. signal intensity rates were calculated by dividing the lesional intensity by the white matter intensity, after which the SWI and CE-SWI signal intensity rate were compared. Two observers independently performed intralesional susceptibility signal analysis. After contrast medium administration, malignant and extra-axial tumors exhibited obvious contrast enhancement on CE-SWI (P < 0.001 and P = 0.013, respectively). The signal intensity of white matter was significantly reduced. The signal intensity rates rose significantly in the benign, malignant, and extra-axial groups (P < 0.001). Between-radiologist agreement in terms of intralesional susceptibility signal assessment was strong (kappa = 0.8, P < 0.001). Contrast media can either reduce or increase SWI signal intensities. The dual contrast feature of CE-SWI can be useful when exploring intracranial disorders. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2016.

  6. Autopsy case of delayed anaphylactic shock due to contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yayoi; Tanaka, Yuko; Nakazato, Yoichi; Sugawara, Nobuyuki; Arai, Miho; Okada, Etsuko; Koyama, Yoshinari; Hinohara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Koujirou; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2012-10-01

    We report an autopsy case of delayed anaphylactic shock due to contrast medium. A 17-year-old Japanese man underwent angiography using non-ionic contrast medium under the suspected diagnosis of Buerger's disease. Initial symptoms appeared 6 h after the administration of the contrast medium, and death was confirmed 11 h later. Considering the clinical course and the results of the autopsy, we concluded that the direct cause of the patient's death was severe acute circulatory failure due to a delayed allergic reaction to the contrast medium. The reported incidence of serious delayed reactions or biphasic reactions to non-ionic contrast medium is extremely low; however, we should be aware of such rare adverse reactions. © 2012 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  7. Modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter Medium for Direct Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Strains in Nasal and Rectal Swab Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacob; Kim, Taek-Kyung; Park, Min-Jeong; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Jae-Seok

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether CHROMagar Acinetobacter medium (CHROMagar, France) in combination with an antimicrobial supplement (modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter; CHROMagar, France) can be used for detecting and isolating multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter species (MRA) in nasal and rectal surveillance cultures. Nasal and rectal swab samples were collected from patients in an intensive care unit at a teaching hospital. The samples were used to inoculate modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter plates, which were examined after 24 and 48 hr of incubation at 37℃. Their susceptibility against the antimicrobial agents meropenem, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin was analyzed using the Etest (bioMerieux, France). A total of 406 paired samples (406 nasal swabs and 406 rectal swabs) were obtained from 226 patients, and 120 samples (28 nasal and 28 rectal cultures, 47 nasal cultures only, and 17 rectal cultures only) yielded MRA. Seventy-five MRA isolates (18.5%) were recovered from the 406 nasal samples, and 45 MRA isolates (11.1%) were recovered from the 406 rectal samples. Of the 120 MRA isolates, 3 (2.5%) were detected only after 48 hr of incubation. The use of modified CHROMagar Acinetobacter together with nasal and rectal swabs and 1-day incubation is an effective surveillance tool for detecting MRA colonization. PMID:23667846

  8. Can computed tomography scan be performed effectively in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis without the added morbidity of rectal contrast?

    PubMed

    Dearing, Daniel D; Recabaren, James A; Alexander, Magdi

    2008-10-01

    The highest degrees of accuracy have been demonstrated for CT scans using rectal contrast in diagnosing appendicitis. However, the administration of rectal contrast is associated with patient discomfort and rarely, rectosigmoid perforation (0.04%). Additionally, the commonly accepted negative appendectomy rate is around 16 per cent. We performed a retrospective review of radiology, operative, and pathology reports of consecutive patients undergoing appendectomy or CT examination for appendicitis during 2006. CT scans were performed without rectal contrast. The accuracy of each type of inpatient CT examination and negative appendectomy rates were determined. Two hundred and thirty-eight patients underwent appendectomy. One hundred and thirty-four appendectomy patients (56%) received a preoperative CT scan. The negative appendectomy rates were 6.3 per cent overall, 8.7 per cent without CT examination and 4.5 per cent with CT (P = 0.3). Two hundred and forty-five inpatient CT scans were performed for suspected appendicitis with a sensitivity of 90 per cent, specificity of 98 per cent, accuracy of 94 per cent, positive predictive value of 98 per cent, and negative predictive value of 91 per cent. CT scanning without rectal contrast is effective for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis making rectal contrast, with its attendant morbidity, unnecessary. The previously acceptable published negative appendectomy rate is higher than that found in current surgical practice likely due to preoperative CT scanning.

  9. Anaphylactic Shock Following Nonionic Contrast Medium during Caudal Epidural Injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Park, Jae Woo; Hwang, Byeong Mun

    2015-10-01

    Caudal epidural injection is a common intervention in patients with low back pain and sciatica. Even though the complications of fluoroscopically directed epidural injections are less frequent than in blind epidural injections, complications due to contrast media can occur. We report a case of anaphylactic shock immediately after injection of an intravenous nonionic contrast medium (iohexol) during the caudal epidural injection for low back pain and sciatica in a patient without a previous allergic history to ionic contrast media (ioxitalamate). Five minutes after the dye was injected, the patient began to experience dizziness, and the systolic blood pressure dropped to 60 mmHg. Subsequently, the patient exhibited a mild drowsy mental state. About 30 minutes after the subcutaneous injection of 0.2 mg epinephrine, the systolic blood pressure increased to 90 mmHg. The patient recovered without any sequela. Life-threatening complications after injection of intravenous contrast medium require immediate treatment.

  10. Contrast-Medium-Enhanced Digital Mammography: Contrast vs. Iodine Concentration Phantom Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado-Mendez, I.; Brandan, M. E.; Villasenor, Y.; Benitez-Bribiesca, L.

    2008-08-11

    This work deals with the application of the contrast-medium-enhanced digital subtraction mammography technique in order to calibrate the contrast level in subtracted phantom images as function of iodine concentration to perform dynamic studies of the contrast-medium uptake in the breast. Previously optimized dual-energy temporal subtraction modalities were used (a) to determine radiological parameters for a dynamic clinical study composed of 1 mask+3 post-contrast images limiting the total mean glandular dose to 2.5 mGy, and (b) to perform a contrast vs iodine concentration calibration using a custom-made phantom. Calculated exposure values were applied using a commercial full-field digital mammography unit. Contrast in subtracted phantom images (one mask and one post-CM) is linear as function of iodine concentration, although the sensitivity (contrast per iodine concentration) decreases beyond 8 mg/mL. This calibration seems to apply only to thin and normal thickness breasts.

  11. Comparison Between Perfusion Computed Tomography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kierkels, Roel G.J.; Backes, Walter H.; Janssen, Marco H.M.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare pretreatment scans with perfusion computed tomography (pCT) vs. dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent both pCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a dedicated 40-slice CT-positron emission tomography system and a 3-T MRI system. Dynamic contrast enhancement was measured in tumor tissue and the external iliac artery. Tumor perfusion was quantified in terms of pharmacokinetic parameters: transfer constant K{sup trans}, fractional extravascular-extracellular space v{sub e}, and fractional plasma volume v{sub p}. Pharmacokinetic parameter values and their heterogeneity (by 80% quantile value) were compared between pCT and DCE-MRI. Results: Tumor K{sup trans} values correlated significantly for the voxel-by-voxel-derived median (Kendall's tau correlation, tau = 0.81, p < 0.001) and 80% quantile (tau = 0.54, p = 0.04), as well as for the averaged uptake (tau = 0.58, p = 0.03). However, no significant correlations were found for v{sub e} and v{sub p} derived from the voxel-by-voxel-derived median and 80% quantile and derived from the averaged uptake curves. Conclusions: This study demonstrated for the first time that pCT provides K{sup trans} values comparable to those of DCE-MRI. However, no correlation was found for the v{sub e} and v{sub p} parameters between CT and MRI. Computed tomography can serve as an alternative modality to MRI for the in vivo evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in terms of the transfer constant K{sup trans}.

  12. Indirect lymph node lymphangiography using an iodine-based contrast medium and projection radiography following submucosal injection in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, A; Wuttke, M; Walter, F; De Leon, I; Kloeppel, R; Schoenfelder, M

    2002-11-01

    This study investigated the possibility of local lymph node detection and lymphatic mapping following submucosal injection of an iodine-based contrast medium. We established a contrast medium (oil/water emulsion on iodine basis) with a particle size of mainly 1.7+/-0.1 micro m. Ten rabbits received rectal submucosal injections of the contrast medium and underwent repeated projection radiography. Passage of the contrast medium into lymphatic vessels and storage in lymph nodes was seen in all ten animals. The best contrast was achieved within 24 and 48 h after injection. Lymph nodes were still seen in eight cases with the final radiograph on day 14. There were no clinical side effects observed. Injection sites showed mild signs of inflammation in histological examinations. Pathological signs were not detectable in lymph nodes containing the contrast media. This method appears useful when investigating local lymph nodes following submucosal injection due to its passage into lymphatic vessels and storage in lymph nodes.

  13. Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rectal cancer and its correlation with tumor differentiation

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, FU; LU, JIANPING; CHEN, LUGUANG; WANG, ZHEN; CHEN, YUKUN

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a novel imaging modality that can be used to reflect the microcirculation, although its value in diagnosing rectal cancer is unknown. The present study aimed to explore the clinical application of DCE-MRI in the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer, and its correlation with tumor differentiation. To achieve this, 40 pathologically confirmed patients with rectal cancer and 15 controls were scanned using DCE-MRI. The Tofts model was applied to obtain the perfusion parameters, including the plasma to extravascular volume transfer (Ktrans), the extravascular to plasma volume transfer (Kep), the extravascular fluid volume (Ve) and the initial area under the enhancement curve (iAUC). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to determine the diagnostic value. The results demonstrated that the time-signal intensity curve of the rectal cancer lesion exhibited an outflow pattern. The Ktrans, Kep, Ve, and iAUC values were higher in the cancer patients compared with controls (P<0.05). The intraclass correlation coefficients of Ktrans, Kep, Ve and iAUC, as measured by two independent radiologists, were 0.991, 0.988, 0.972 and 0.984, respectively (all P<0.001), indicating a good consistency. The areas under the ROC curves for Ktrans and iAUC were both >0.9, resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 93.3% for Ktrans, and of 92.5%, and 93.3% or 100%, for iAUC, respectively. In the 40 rectal cancer cases, there was a moderate correlation between Ktrans and iAUC, and pathological differentiation (0.3rectal cancer and differentiation, and therefore may provide novel insights into the preoperative diagnosis of rectal cancer. PMID:27073650

  14. Influence of the intravenous contrast media on treatment planning dose calculations of lower esophageal and rectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Nasrollah, Jabbari; Mikaeil, Molazadeh; Omid, Esnaashari; Mojtaba, Seyed Siahi; Ahad, Zeinali

    2014-01-01

    The impact of intravenous (IV) contrast media (CM) on radiation dose calculations must be taken into account in treatment planning. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of an intravenous contrast media on dose calculations in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for lower esophageal and rectal cancers. Seventeen patients with lower esophageal tumors and 12 patients with rectal cancers were analyzed. At the outset, all patients were planned for 3D-CRT based on the computed tomography (CT) scans with IV contrast media. Subsequently, all the plans were copied and replaced on the scans without intravenous CM. The radiation doses calculated from the two sets of CTs were compared. The dose differences between the planning image set using intravenous contrast and the image set without contrast showed an average increase in Monitor Units (MUs) in the lower esophageal region that was 1.28 and 0.75% for 6 and 15 MV photon beams, respectively. There was no statistical significant difference in the rectal region between the two sets of scans in the 3D-CRT plans. The results showed that the dose differences between the plans for the CT scans with and without CM were small and clinically tolerable. However, the differences in the lower esophageal region were significant in the statistical analysis.

  15. Reduction of iodinated contrast medium in CT: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Kopp, Felix K.; Penchev, Petar; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Fiebich, Martin; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-03-01

    In CT, the magnitude of enhancement is proportional to the amount of contrast medium (CM) injected. However, high doses of iodinated CM pose health risks, ranging from mild side effects to serious complications such as contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN). This work presents a method that enables the reduction of CM dosage, without affecting the diagnostic image quality. The technique proposed takes advantage of the additional spectral information provided by photon-counting CT systems. In the first step, we apply a material decomposition technique on the projection data to discriminate iodine from other materials. Then, we estimated the noise of the decomposed image by calculating the Cramér-Rao lower bound of the parameter estimator. Next, we iteratively reconstruct the iodine-only image by using the decomposed image and the estimation of noise as an input into a maximum-likelihood iterative reconstruction algorithm. Finally, we combine the iodine-only image with the original image to enhance the contrast of low iodine concentrations. The resulting reconstructions show a notably improved contrast in the final images. Quantitatively, the combined image has a significantly improved CNR, while the measured concentrations are closer to the actual concentrations of the iodine. The preliminary results from our technique show the possibility of reducing the clinical dosage of iodine, without affecting the diagnostic image quality.

  16. Does gadolinium-based contrast material improve diagnostic accuracy of local invasion in rectal cancer MRI? A multireader study.

    PubMed

    Gollub, Marc J; Lakhman, Yulia; McGinty, Katrina; Weiser, Martin R; Sohn, Michael; Zheng, Junting; Shia, Jinru

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to compare reader accuracy and agreement on rectal MRI with and without gadolinium administration in the detection of T4 rectal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS. In this study, two radiologists and one fellow independently interpreted all posttreatment MRI studies for patients with locally advanced or recurrent rectal cancer using unenhanced images alone or combined with contrast-enhanced images, with a minimum interval of 4 weeks. Readers evaluated involvement of surrounding structures on a 5-point scale and were blinded to pathology and disease stage. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and AUC were calculated and kappa statistics were used to describe interreader agreement. RESULTS. Seventy-two patients (38 men and 34 women) with a mean age of 61 years (range, 32-86 years) were evaluated. Fifteen patients had 32 organs invaded. Global AUCs without and with gadolinium administration were 0.79 and 0.77, 0.91 and 0.86, and 0.83 and 0.78 for readers 1, 2, and 3, respectively. AUCs before and after gadolinium administration were similar. Kappa values before and after gadolinium administration for pairs of readers ranged from 0.5 to 0.7. CONCLUSION. On the basis of pathology as a reference standard, the use of gadolinium during rectal MRI did not significantly improve radiologists' agreement or ability to detect T4 disease.

  17. Human pharmacokinetics of iohexol. A new nonionic contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, B.; Aulie, A.; Sveen, K.; Andrew, E.

    1983-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of iohexol, a new nonionic, water-soluble contrast medium, have been determined after intravenous injection in 20 healthy volunteers, at four different dose levels (125-500 mg I/kg). The apparent volume of distribution was 0.27 1/kg, indicating distribution in the extracellular water. The biologic half-life was 121 minutes, comparable with that of other intravascular contrast media. Iohexol was excreted completely unmetabolized in the urine, with a 100% recovery 24 hours after injection. A comparison of iohexol and chromium-51 (/sup 51/Cr)-EDTA clearances indicates that iohexol is mainly excreted by glomerular filtration. The /sup 51/Cr-EDTA clearance was the same when injected separately and concomitantly with iohexol, indicating that glomerular filtration rate is not affected by iohexol. No dose dependency was observed in the investigated parameters t1/2 alpha, t1/2 beta, Vd, ClT or ClR. Iohexol pharmacokinetics are in correspondence with previously reported data on intravascular contrast media.

  18. Magnetic resonance enema vs rectal water-contrast transvaginal sonography in diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Leone Roberti Maggiore, U; Biscaldi, E; Vellone, V G; Venturini, P L; Ferrero, S

    2017-04-01

    To compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance enema (MR-e) and rectal water-contrast transvaginal sonography (RWC-TVS) in the diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis. This prospective study included 286 patients of reproductive age with clinical suspicion of rectosigmoid endometriosis. Patients underwent MR-e and RWC-TVS before laparoscopic excision of endometriotic lesions. The findings of MR-e and RWC-TVS were compared with surgical and histological results. Of the 286 patients included in the study, 151 (52.8%) had rectosigmoid endometriosis. MR-e and RWC-TVS had similar accuracy in the diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis (P = 0.063). In the diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis with MR-e, the sensitivity was 95.4% (95% CI, 90.7-99.1%), specificity was 97.8% (95% CI, 93.6-99.5%), positive predictive value (PPV) was 98.0% (95% CI, 94.1-99.6%), negative predictive value (NPV) was 95.0% (95% CI, 89.9-97.9%), positive likelihood ratio (LR+) was 42.91 (95% CI, 14.01-131.46) and negative likelihood ratio (LR-) was 0.05 (95% CI, 0.02-0.10). For diagnosis with RWC-TVS, sensitivity was 92.7% (95% CI, 87.3-96.3%), specificity was 97.0% (95% CI, 92.6-99.2%), PPV was 97.2% (95% CI, 93.0-99.2%), NPV was 92.3% (95% CI, 86.6-96.1%), LR+ was 31.29 (95% CI, 11.90-82.25) and LR- was 0.08 (95% CI, 0.04-0.13). MR-e and RWC-TVS underestimated the size of the endometriotic nodules; for both imaging techniques the underestimation was greater for nodules with a diameter ≥ 30 mm. There was no significant difference in the mean intensity of pain experienced by the patients during the two examinations. RWC-TVS should be the first-line investigation in patients with clinical suspicion of rectosigmoid endometriosis and physicians should be trained in performing this examination. Considering that MR-e is more expensive than RWC-TVS, it should be used only when the findings of RWC-TVS are unclear. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of radiation therapy-induced microcirculation changes in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lussanet, Quido G. de . E-mail: qdlu@rdia.azm.nl; Backes, Walter H.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Padhani, Anwar R.; Baeten, Coen I.; Baardwijk, Angela van; Lambin, Philippe; Beets, Geerard L.; Engelshoven, Jos van; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) allows noninvasive evaluation of tumor microvasculature characteristics. This study evaluated radiation therapy related microvascular changes in locally advanced rectal cancer by DCE-MRI and histology. Methods and Materials: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI was performed in 17 patients with primary rectal cancer. Seven patients underwent 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy radiation therapy (RT) (long RT) before DCE-MRI and 10 did not. Of these 10, 3 patients underwent five fractions of 5 Gy RT (short RT) in the week before surgery. The RT treated and nontreated groups were compared in terms of endothelial transfer coefficient (K{sup PS}, measured by DCE-MRI), microvessel density (MVD) (scored by immunoreactivity to CD31 and CD34), and tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation (scored by immunoreactivity to Ki67). Results: Tumor K{sup PS} was 77% (p = 0.03) lower in the RT-treated group. Histogram analyses showed that RT reduced both magnitude and intratumor heterogeneity of K{sup PS} (p = 0.01). MVD was significantly lower (37%, p 0.03) in tumors treated with long RT than in nonirradiated tumors, but this was not the case with short RT. Endothelial cell proliferation was reduced with short RT (81%, p = 0.02) just before surgery, but not with long RT (p > 0.8). Tumor cell proliferation was reduced with both long (57%, p < 0.001) and short RT (52%, p = 0.002). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI-derived K{sup PS} values showed significant radiation therapy related reductions in microvessel blood flow in locally advanced rectal cancer. These findings may be useful in evaluating effects of radiation combination therapies (e.g., chemoradiation or RT combined with antiangiogenesis therapy), to account for effects of RT alone.

  20. Correlations of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Morphologic, Angiogenic, and Molecular Prognostic Factors in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hye-Suk; Kim, Se Hoon; Park, Hae-Jeong; Park, Mi-Suk; Kim, Won Ho; Kim, Nam Kyu; Lee, Jae Mun; Cho, Hyeon Je

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the correlations between parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and prognostic factors in rectal cancer. Materials and Methods We studied 29 patients with rectal cancer who underwent gadolinium contrast-enhanced, T1-weighted DCE-MRI with a three Tesla scanner prior to surgery. Signal intensity on DCE-MRI was independently measured by two observers to examine reproducibility. A time-signal intensity curve was generated, from which four semiquantitative parameters were calculated: steepest slope (SLP), time to peak (Tp), relative enhancement during a rapid rise (Erise), and maximal enhancement (Emax). Morphologic prognostic factors including T stage, N stage, and histologic grade were identified. Tumor angiogenesis was evaluated in terms of microvessel count (MVC) and microvessel area (MVA) by morphometric study. As molecular factors, the mutation status of the K-ras oncogene and microsatellite instability were assessed. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with each prognostic factor using bivariate correlation analysis. A p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results Erise was significantly correlated with N stage (r=-0.387 and -0.393, respectively, for two independent data), and Tp was significantly correlated with histologic grade (r=0.466 and 0.489, respectively). MVA was significantly correlated with SLP (r=-0.532 and -0.535, respectively) and Erise (r=-0.511 and -0.446, respectively). MVC was significantly correlated with Emax (r=-0.435 and -0.386, respectively). No significant correlations were found between DCE-MRI parameters and T stage, K-ras mutation, or microsatellite instability. Conclusion DCE-MRI may provide useful prognostic information in terms of histologic differentiation and angiogenesis in rectal cancer. PMID:23225808

  1. Pretreatment Evaluation of Microcirculation by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Survival in Primary Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Alexander Friedrich; Piringer, Gudrun; Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner; Saely, Christoph Hubert; Lukas, Peter; Öfner, Dietmar

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the perfusion index (PI), a microcirculatory parameter estimated from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability, to predict overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with primary rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients with stage cT3 rectal cancer requiring neoadjuvant chemoradiation were investigated with DCE-MRI before start of therapy. Contrast-enhanced dynamic T{sub 1} mapping was obtained, and a simple data analysis strategy based on the calculation of the maximum slope of the tissue concentration–time curve divided by the maximum of the arterial input function was used as a measure of tumor microcirculation (PI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability. Results: In 39 patients (47.0%), T downstaging (ypT0-2) was observed. During a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 71 ± 29 months, 58 patients (69.9%) survived, and disease-free survival was achieved in 45 patients (54.2%). The mean PI (PImean) averaged over the group of nonresponders was significantly higher than for responders. Additionally, higher PImean in age- and gender-adjusted analyses was strongly predictive of therapy nonresponse. Most importantly, PImean strongly and significantly predicted disease-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.85 [ 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.54; P<.001)]; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.81 [1.30-2.51]; P<.001) as well as overall survival (unadjusted HR 1.42 [1.02-1.99], P=.040; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.43 [1.03-1.98]; P=.034). Conclusions: This analysis identifies PImean as a novel biomarker that is predictive for therapy response, disease-free survival, and overall survival in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer.

  2. Speckle contrast diffuse correlation tomography of complex turbid medium flow

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; He, Lian; Kong, Weikai; Yu, Guoqiang; Luo, Jia

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Developed herein is a three-dimensional (3D) flow contrast imaging system leveraging advancements in the extension of laser speckle contrast imaging theories to deep tissues along with our recently developed finite-element diffuse correlation tomography (DCT) reconstruction scheme. This technique, termed speckle contrast diffuse correlation tomography (scDCT), enables incorporation of complex optical property heterogeneities and sample boundaries. When combined with a reflectance-based design, this system facilitates a rapid segue into flow contrast imaging of larger, in vivo applications such as humans. Methods: A highly sensitive CCD camera was integrated into a reflectance-based optical system. Four long-coherence laser source positions were coupled to an optical switch for sequencing of tomographic data acquisition providing multiple projections through the sample. This system was investigated through incorporation of liquid and solid tissue-like phantoms exhibiting optical properties and flow characteristics typical of human tissues. Computer simulations were also performed for comparisons. A uniquely encountered smear correction algorithm was employed to correct point-source illumination contributions during image capture with the frame-transfer CCD and reflectance setup. Results: Measurements with scDCT on a homogeneous liquid phantom showed that speckle contrast-based deep flow indices were within 12% of those from standard DCT. Inclusion of a solid phantom submerged below the liquid phantom surface allowed for heterogeneity detection and validation. The heterogeneity was identified successfully by reconstructed 3D flow contrast tomography with scDCT. The heterogeneity center and dimensions and averaged relative flow (within 3%) and localization were in agreement with actuality and computer simulations, respectively. Conclusions: A custom cost-effective CCD-based reflectance 3D flow imaging system demonstrated rapid acquisition of dense boundary

  3. Effects of contrast medium on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, S.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, H.; Kuwabara, Y.; Okano, T.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of contrast material (meglumine iothalamate) on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations were investigated in studies on the lymphocytes of patients who had undergone diagnostic radiography and in in vitro experiments with diagnostic x rays and /sup 60/Co gamma rays. Chromosome and chromatid aberrations were found to increase significantly with increasing concentrations of contrast material that were added at irradiation. However, the aberrations were not associated with elevation of the ratio of dicentric and ring chromosomes to the number of cells with unstable chromosome aberrations at the first mitosis. Lymphocytes irradiated in the absence of contrast material did not show an increase in chromosome-type aberrations when the agent was given in increasing concentrations during subsequent incubation, but there were greater numbers of chromatid gaps and breaks. When lymphocytes were exposed to 400 R (103.2 mC/kg) of /sup 60/Co gamma rays, the presence of contrast agent did not increase the yield of dicentric and ring chromosomes, but induced a marked delay in cell proliferation, especially in lymphocytes with more heavily damaged chromosomes. In additional examination, the contrast agent itself induced sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes.

  4. Oral administration of a medium containing both D-aspartate-producing live bacteria and D-aspartate reduces rectal temperature in chicks.

    PubMed

    Do, P H; Tran, P V; Bahry, M A; Yang, H; Han, G; Tsuchiya, A; Asami, Y; Furuse, M; Chowdhury, V S

    2017-10-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects on the rectal temperature of young chicks of the oral administration of a medium that contained both live bacteria that produce D-aspartate (D-Asp) and D-Asp. 2. In Experiment 1, chicks were subjected to chronic oral administration of either the medium (containing live bacteria and 2.46 μmol D-Asp) or water from 7 to 14 d of age. Plasma-free amino acids as well as mitochondrial biogenic gene expression in the breast muscle were analysed. In Experiment 2, 7-d-old chicks were subjected to acute oral administration of the above medium or of an equimolar amount of D-Asp to examine their effect on changes in rectal temperature. In Experiment 3, after 1 week of chronic oral administration of the medium, 14-d-old chicks were exposed to either high ambient temperature (HT; 40 ± 1°C, 3 h) or control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30 ± 1°C, 3 h) to monitor the changes in rectal temperature. 3. Chronic, but not acute, oral administration of the medium significantly reduced rectal temperature in chicks, and a chronic effect also appeared under HT conditions. 4. Chronic oral administration of the medium significantly reduced the mRNA abundance of the avian uncoupling protein (avUCP) in the breast muscle, but led to a significant increase in avian adenine nucleotide translocator (avANT) mRNA in the same muscle. 5. (a) These results indicate that the medium can reduce body temperature through the decline in avUCP mRNA expression in the breast muscle that may be involved in reduced mitochondrial proton leaks and heat production. (b) The increase in avANT further suggests a possible enhancement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with retrograde intralumen contrast enhancement of the rectum in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer. Experience of application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usova, A.; Frolova, I.; Afanasev, S.; Tarasova, A.; Molchanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    Experiment of use of MRI in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer is shown on clinical examples. We used retrograde contrasting of a rectum with 150ml ultrasonic gel to make MRI more informative in case of low diagnostic efficiency of ultrasound, colonoscopy and gynecological examination.

  6. Zero Contrast Coronary Intervention Using Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance in a Patient with Allergy to Contrast Medium.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Masakazu; Tsumuraya, Naoko; Nie, Masaki; Ikari, Yuji

    2016-09-20

    The occurrence of allergy to iodinated contrast in certain patients may prevent the use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in such cases. We present a 53-year-old male with a history of allergic reaction to iodinated contrast who successfully underwent intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guided PCI. Stent size was determined based on IVUS. After PCI, stent expansion and a lack of edge dissection or incomplete apposition were confirmed by IVUS. Thus, PCI without contrast injection under IVUS may be feasible in selected patients with allergy to iodinated contrast.

  7. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and gadolinium-based contrast media: updated ESUR Contrast Medium Safety Committee guidelines.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Morcos, Sameh K; Almén, Torsten; Bellin, Marie-France; Bertolotto, Michele; Bongartz, Georg; Clement, Olivier; Leander, Peter; Heinz-Peer, Gertraud; Reimer, Peter; Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart; Webb, Judith A W

    2013-02-01

    To update the guidelines of the Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) on nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and gadolinium-based contrast media. Topics reviewed include the history, clinical features and prevalence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and the current understanding of its pathophysiology. The risk factors for NSF are discussed and prophylactic measures are recommended. The stability of the different gadolinium-based contrast media and the potential long-term effects of gadolinium in the body have also been reviewed.

  8. In the eye of the storm: iodinated contrast medium induced thyroid storm presenting as cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Alkhuja, Samer; Pyram, Ronald; Odeyemi, Olutunde

    2013-01-01

    The administration of iodinated contrast medium may lead to excess free thyroid hormone release and cause thyroid storm. A woman presented to the emergency department with dyspnea, hemoptysis, and intermittent bilateral lower extremities edema. Physical examination revealed mildly enlarged thyroid. Patient underwent a computed tomography scan of the chest with intravenous iodinated contrast medium to rule out pulmonary embolism, the patient developed a thyroid storm second to iodinated contrast medium injection. Proper treatment was provided and the patient had a good outcome. We present this case of an unusual presentation of a thyroid storm with cardiac arrest. This case illustrates that evaluating thyroid function tests in patients with an enlarged thyroid prior to the administration of iodinated contrast medium could prevent the development of thyroid storm.

  9. Power port contrast medium flushing and trapping: impact of temperature, an in vitro experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Guiffant, Gérard; Durussel, Jean Jacques; Flaud, Patrice; Royon, Laurent; Marcy, Pierre Yves; Merckx, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The use of totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) certified as “high pressure resistant” or “power port” has begun to spread worldwide as a safe procedure for power contrast injection. Owing to the thermo-rheological properties of the contrast media, the primary aim of this work is to present an in vitro experimental impact study concerning the impact of the temperature level on flushing efficiency after contrast medium injection. Moreover, we report experimental data that confirms the role of needle bevel orientation. The secondary aim is to answer the following questions: Is there significant device contrast medium trapping after contrast medium injection? Is saline flushing efficient? And, finally, is it safe to inject contrast medium through an indwelled port catheter? Results The experimental results show that in addition to hydrodynamics, temperature is a key parameter for the efficiency of device flushing after contrast medium injection. It appears that this is the case when the cavity is incompletely rinsed after three calibrated flushing volumes of 10 mL saline solution, even by using the Huber needle bevel opposite to the port exit. This leads to a potentially important trapped volume of contrast medium in the port, and consequently to the possibility of subsequent salt precipitates and long term trisubstituted benzene nuclei delivery that might impair the solute properties, which may be further injected via the power port later on. Conclusion We thus suggest, in TIVADS patients, the use of a temporary supplementary intravenous line rather than the port to perform contrast medium injections in daily radiology routine practice. PMID:24043959

  10. Optical tracking of contrast medium bolus to optimize bolus shape and timing in dynamic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisa, Fabian; Brauweiler, Robert; Peetz, Alexander; Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-05-01

    One of the biggest challenges in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is the optimal synchronization of scan start and duration with contrast medium administration in order to optimize image contrast and to reduce the amount of contrast medium. We present a new optically based approach, which was developed to investigate and optimize bolus timing and shape. The time-concentration curve of an intravenously injected test bolus of a dye is measured in peripheral vessels with an optical sensor prior to the diagnostic CT scan. The curves can be used to assess bolus shapes as a function of injection protocols and to determine contrast medium arrival times. Preliminary results for phantom and animal experiments showed the expected linear behavior between dye concentration and absorption. The kinetics of the dye was compared to iodinated contrast medium and was found to be in good agreement. The contrast enhancement curves were reliably detected in three mice with individual bolus shapes and delay times of 2.1, 3.5 and 6.1 s, respectively. The optical sensor appears to be a promising approach to optimize injection protocols and contrast enhancement timing and is applicable to all modalities without implying any additional radiation dose. Clinical tests are still necessary.

  11. Is Contrast Medium Osmolality a Causal Factor for Contrast-Induced Nephropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Andreas M.; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Meinel, Felix G.; Krazinski, Aleksander W.; Spearman, James V.; McQuiston, Andrew D.; Wang, Rui; Bucher, Judith; Vogl, Thomas J.; Katzberg, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The exact pathophysiology of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is not fully clarified, yet the osmotic characteristics of contrast media (CM) have been a significant focus in many investigations of CIN. Osmotic effects of CM specific to the kidney include transient decreases in blood flow, filtration fraction, and glomerular filtration rate. Potentially significant secondary effects include an osmotically induced diuresis with a concomitant dehydrating effect. Clinical experiences that have compared the occurrence of CIN between the various classes of CM based on osmolality have suggested a much less than anticipated advantage, if any, with a lower osmolality. Recent animal experiments actually suggest that induction of a mild osmotic diuresis in association with iso-osmolar agents tends to offset potentially deleterious renal effects of high viscosity-mediated intratubular CM stagnation. PMID:24800254

  12. Contrast medium administration in the elderly patient: is advancing age an independent risk factor for contrast nephropathy after angiographic procedures?

    PubMed

    Detrenis, Simona; Meschi, Michele; Bertolini, Laura; Savazzi, Giorgio

    2007-02-01

    Contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CMIN) is the third leading cause of hospital-acquired acute renal dysfunction. Even if the number of patients over 75 years of age undergoing diagnostic and/or interventional procedures and requiring administration of contrast medium (CM) is growing constantly, at present there is no definitive consensus regarding the role of advancing age and related morphologic or functional renal changes as an independent risk factor for CMIN. The authors review the evidence from recent medical literature on the definition, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of CMIN as well as therapeutic approaches to its prophylaxis. Attention is focused on advancing age as a preexisting physiologic condition that is, per se, able to predispose the patient to CM-induced renal impairment, assuming that every elderly patient is potentially at risk for CMIN.

  13. Computed tomographic colonography vs rectal water- contrast transvaginal sonography in diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, S; Biscaldi, E; Vellone, V G; Venturini, P L; Leone Roberti Maggiore, U

    2017-04-01

    To compare the performance of computed tomographic colonography (CTC) and rectal water-contrast transvaginal sonography (RWC-TVS) in the diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis, and compare precision in estimating the length of the rectosigmoid nodules and the distance between the nodules and the anal verge. This prospective study included 70 patients of reproductive age with clinical suspicion of rectosigmoid endometriosis. Patients underwent RWC-TVS and CTC before laparoscopic excision of endometriotic nodules. The findings of RWC-TVS and CTC were compared with surgical and histological results. Of the 70 patients included in the study, 40 (57.1%) had rectosigmoid endometriosis. CTC and RWC-TVS had similar accuracy in the diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis (P = 0.508) and similar precision in estimating the length of the endometriotic nodules (P = 0.077). CTC was more precise than RWC-TVS in estimating the distance between the rectosigmoid nodule and the anal verge (P < 0.001). The intensity of pain experienced during CTC was higher than that perceived during RWC-TVS (P < 0.001); however, intestinal distension for CTC was well-tolerated in all patients without significant adverse effects. RWC-TVS and CTC have similar accuracy in the diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis and similar precision in estimating the size of the nodules; however, CTC is more precise than RWC-TVS in estimating the distance between the nodules and the anal verge, yet patients tolerate RWC-TVS better than CTC. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Carbon dioxide contrast medium for endovascular treatment of ilio-femoral occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Cynthia de Almeida; Martins, Alexandre de Arruda; Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Kuzniec, Sergio; Varella, Andrea Yasbek Monteiro; Fioranelli, Alexandre; Wolosker, Nelson

    2015-10-01

    Compare the use of carbon dioxide contrast medium with iodine contrast medium for the endovascular treatment of ilio-femoral occlusive disease in patients without contraindications to iodine. From August 2012 to August 2014, 21 consecutive patients with ilio-femoral occlusive disease who were eligible for endovascular treatment and lacked contraindications to either iodine contrast or carbon dioxide were randomized into the carbon dioxide or iodine groups and subjected to ilio-femoral angioplasty.We analyzed the feasibility of the procedures, the surgical and clinical outcomes, the procedure lengths, the endovascular material costs, the contrast costs and the quality of the angiographic images in each group. No conversions to open surgery and no contrast media related complications were noted in either group. A post-operative femoral pulse was present in 88.9% of the iodine group and 80% of the carbon dioxide group. No differences in procedure length, endovascular material cost or renal function variation were noted between the groups. Four patients in the carbon dioxide group required iodine supplementation to complete the procedure. Contrast media expenses were reduced in the carbon dioxide group. Regarding angiographic image quality, 82% of the carbon dioxide images were graded as either good or fair by observers. The use of carbon dioxide contrast medium is a good option for ilio-femoral angioplasty in patients without contraindications to iodine and is not characterized by differences in endovascular material costs, procedure duration and surgical outcomes. In addition, carbon dioxide has lower contrast expenses compared with iodine.

  15. The effect of oil and water-soluble contrast medium in hysterosalpingography on thyroid function.

    PubMed

    So, Shuhei; Yamaguchi, Wakasa; Tajima, Hiroko; Nakayama, Takeshi; Tamura, Naoaki; Kanayama, Naohiro; Tawara, Fumiko

    2017-09-01

    Hysterosalpingography (HSG) using iodinated contrast medium is X-ray diagnostic test that examines the inside of the uterus and fallopian tubes in infertile women. In this study, we compared thyroid function (thyroid stimulating hormone: TSH and free-T4: FT4 levels) after HSG with an oil-soluble contrast medium (OSCM) and a water-soluble contrast medium (WSCM). One hundred and sixty-four and 94 patients with normal thyroid function received HSG with OSCM and WSCM, respectively. Approximately 25% of the women in the OSCM group developed subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), whereas only less than 10% of the patients in the WSCM group developed SCH. Our data clearly indicate that WSCM is safe for thyroid function in women who plan to get pregnant.

  16. SU-E-T-427: Effect of Contrast in Radiadyne Alatus Balloon Packing System on Bladder and Rectal Doses in Gynecological Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Libby, B; Ding, K; Reardon, K; Crandley, E; Andrew, C; Schneider, B

    2012-06-01

    Vaginal packing for gynecological brachytherapy is used to immobilize the applicator and reduce doses to the bladder and rectum by increasing the separation from the applicator. With the introduction of theRadiadyne Alatus™ balloon packing system, we evaluate further reductions in dose to these structures by increasing the concentration of contrast in the balloon, increasing its attenuation. This evaluation has been performed using the Acuros™ dose calculation algorithm. A patient with cervical cancer was treated with HDR Ir-192 by insertion of a tandem and ovoid applicator, with the Alatus™ balloon system used for vaginal packing instead of wet gauze. The balloons were filled with distilled water containing 10% Omnipaque contrast. Retrospectively, the balloons were contoured in the BrachyVision™ planning system, and the CT number of the structure set was adjusted to determine the effect of the concentration of the contrast in the balloons on bladder and rectal doses after heterogeneity correction using the Acuros™ algorithm. Use of 10% Omnipaque solution reduced the bladder and rectal point doses by 6% and 9.5%, respectively, with similar reductions in the D2cc and D1cc for each structure. Overriding the density of the balloon showed that a 50% solution would reduce the doses by 8% and 30%, respectively, due to the positions of the balloons with respect to the applicator dwell positions. Use of the Alatus™ balloon packing system allows reduction of the bladder and rectal doses both by increasing the distance between the bladder and rectum and the applicators and by increased attenuation of the dose by the use of contrast solution. Optimal dilution of the contrast should take into account both the positive protective effect of the solution as well as any negative artifact that the solution causes in the CT scan, which might obscure the patient's anatomy patient. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Liver-specific magnetic resonance contrast medium in the evaluation of chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Marcio Augusto Correia Rodrigues; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatobiliary-specific contrast medium (gadoxetic acid – Primovist®) is primarily used to improve detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, such as in chronic liver disease patients with suspected hepatocellular carcinoma. Since the contrast medium is selectively taken up by functioning hepatocytes in the late hepatobiliary phase, it helps to detect typical hepatocellular carcinoma, which show low signal intensity on this phase. This imaging feature also assists in differentiating regenerative/dysplastic nodules from early hepatocellular carcinomas (with over 90% accuracy), as well as hypervascular hepatocellular carcinomas from arterial pseudo-enhancement foci. Future perspectives include its use in quantification of hepatic function and fibrosis. PMID:26154554

  18. Evaluation of a New Chromogenic Medium (StrepB Select) for Detection of Group B Streptococcus from Vaginal-Rectal Specimens ▿

    PubMed Central

    Louie, L.; Kotowich, L.; Meaney, H.; Vearncombe, M.; Simor, A. E.

    2010-01-01

    We compared StrepB Select medium (Select) after enrichment with conventional culture for the detection of Group B Streptococcus (GBS). Postenrichment sensitivities of Select and conventional culture were 98.8% and 92.2%, respectively (P < 0.05). Select was superior for detection of GBS from vaginal-rectal specimens. Growth of non-GBS colonies required additional work to exclude the presence of GBS, especially after 48 h of incubation. Incubation of Select beyond 24 h did not significantly increase the yield of GBS. PMID:20962144

  19. Carbon dioxide contrast medium for endovascular treatment of ilio-femoral occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Mendes, Cynthia; de Arruda Martins, Alexandre; Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Kuzniec, Sergio; Varella, Andrea Yasbek Monteiro; Fioranelli, Alexandre; Wolosker, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Compare the use of carbon dioxide contrast medium with iodine contrast medium for the endovascular treatment of ilio-femoral occlusive disease in patients without contraindications to iodine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From August 2012 to August 2014, 21 consecutive patients with ilio-femoral occlusive disease who were eligible for endovascular treatment and lacked contraindications to either iodine contrast or carbon dioxide were randomized into the carbon dioxide or iodine groups and subjected to ilio-femoral angioplasty. We analyzed the feasibility of the procedures, the surgical and clinical outcomes, the procedure lengths, the endovascular material costs, the contrast costs and the quality of the angiographic images in each group. RESULTS: No conversions to open surgery and no contrast media related complications were noted in either group. A post-operative femoral pulse was present in 88.9% of the iodine group and 80% of the carbon dioxide group. No differences in procedure length, endovascular material cost or renal function variation were noted between the groups. Four patients in the carbon dioxide group required iodine supplementation to complete the procedure. Contrast media expenses were reduced in the carbon dioxide group. Regarding angiographic image quality, 82% of the carbon dioxide images were graded as either good or fair by observers. CONCLUSIONS: The use of carbon dioxide contrast medium is a good option for ilio-femoral angioplasty in patients without contraindications to iodine and is not characterized by differences in endovascular material costs, procedure duration and surgical outcomes. In addition, carbon dioxide has lower contrast expenses compared with iodine. PMID:26598079

  20. A method to evaluate the dose increase in CT with iodinated contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, Ernesto; Lizio, Domenico; Settineri, Nicola; Di Pasquale, Andrea; Salamone, Ignazio; Pandolfo, Ignazio

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to develop a method to calculate the relative dose increase when a computerized tomography scan (CT) is carried out after administration of iodinated contrast medium, with respect to the same CT scan in absence of contrast medium. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 of anthropomorphic neck and abdomen phantoms exposed to a simplified model of CT scanner was set up in order to calculate the increase of dose to thyroid, liver, spleen, kidneys, and pancreas as a function of the quantity of iodine accumulated; a series of experimental measurements of Hounsfield unit (HU) increment for known concentrations of iodinated contrast medium was carried out on a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner in order to obtain a relationship between the increment in HU and the relative dose increase in the organs studied. The authors applied such a method to calculate the average dose increase in three patients who underwent standard CT protocols consisting of one native scan in absence of contrast, followed by a contrast-enhanced scan in venous phase. Results: The authors validated their GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation by comparing the resulting dose increases for iodine solutions in water with the ones presented in literature and with their experimental data obtained through a Roentgen therapy unit. The relative dose increases as a function of the iodine mass fraction accumulated and as a function of the Hounsfield unit increment between the contrast-enhanced scan and the native scan are presented. The data shown for the three patients exhibit an average relative dose increase between 22% for liver and 74% for kidneys; also, spleen (34%), pancreas (28%), and thyroid (48%) show a remarkable average increase. Conclusions: The method developed allows a simple evaluation of the dose increase when iodinated contrast medium is used in CT scans, basing on the increment in Hounsfield units observed on the patients' organs. Since many clinical protocols

  1. Thyroid function in very low birthweight infants after intravenous administration of the iodinated contrast medium iopromide

    PubMed Central

    Dembinski, J; Arpe, V; Kroll, M; Hieronimi, G; Bartmann, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Thyroid function disorders have often been observed in preterm infants after intravenous administration of iodinated contrast medium. The effect on thyroid function depends on the dosage, but the choice of the contrast medium may be equally important, as there are appreciable pharmacological differences between them.
METHOD—Thyroid function was analysed in 20 very low birthweight infants of gestational age less than 30 weeks after injection of iopromide, a monomeric non-ionic iodinated contrast medium. Levels of free thyroxine and thyroid stimulating hormone were compared with those in 26 control infants.
RESULTS—Free thyroxine levels in all study infants ranged from 9.0 to 25.7 pmol/l (days 14-21) and 9.0 to 23.2 pmol/l (days 35-49), and thyroid stimulating hormone levels ranged from 0.13 to 0.26mU/l (days 14-21) and 0.26 to 11.11 mU/l (days 35-49). These levels were not altered after injection of iopromide.
CONCLUSION—The risk of transient hypothyroidism or hyperthyrotropinaemia may be reduced with the use of iopromide compared with other contrast media.

 PMID:10794789

  2. [CT study of the cervical spine with intravenous administration of the contrast medium].

    PubMed

    Magnaldi, S; Pozzi-Mucelli, R S; Cova, M A; De Morpurgo, P

    1989-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) without contrast medium is largely applied to the study of intervertebral disk pathology in the lumbar spine, but has not been widely accepted in the cervical spine, due to technical and anatomical limitations. For these reasons many neuroradiologists still prefer myelography or myelo-CT. CT may yield better results if combined with iv contrast medium injection, which allows a better visualization of disk herniation. This technique is aimed at enhancing the density of the venous plexus which is located close to the intervertebral disk, the vertebral bodies and the neural foramina. A better contrast enhancement is thus obtained between the disk and the spinal cord. The authors' experience is based on 61 patients who underwent contrast enhanced CT; in 22 cases myelography and myelo-CT were also performed. The authors describe their technique and the most frequent CT findings of disk herniation: the typical finding includes a focal hypodensity surrounded by a linear blush, due to a posteriorly dislocated epidural vein. The posterior linear blush alone may be present in few cases. Contrast-enhanced CT is very useful in the study of disk pathology of the cervical spine, even when compared with myelography and myelo-CT, due the increase in the density of epidural plexus it allows. However, the technique must be very accurate if the same results as those of myelo-CT are to be obtained.

  3. Rectal melanoma presenting as a solitary complex cystic liver lesion: role of contrast-specific low-MI real-time ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Corvino, Antonio; Catalano, Orlando; Corvino, Fabio; Petrillo, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hepatic metastases arising from malignant melanoma are extremely rare, with the few such cases reported in the literature to date describing indeterminate imaging findings, being focused more on computed tomography. To the best of our knowledge, there is no prior report describing contrast-enhanced ultrasound findings of a solitary cystic liver metastasis from a primary rectal melanoma. We herein describe a case of a 41-year-old patient with a rectal melanoma, in whom the first manifestation of disease was a solitary complex cystic liver metastasis incidentally detected by ultrasound. On admission, our patient was free of specific symptoms and his laboratory test was normal. In this setting, contrast-enhanced ultrasound showed some distinctive features that helped us to make the correct diagnosis, confirmed subsequently by FNAC examination, thus allowing to provide the correct management for our patient. Although cystic metastases are rare, knowledge of CEUS imaging findings will be invaluable for radiologists and other medical subspecialties that may face such cases in the future in helping to provide adequate management for affected patients.

  4. Low contrast medium and radiation dose for hepatic computed tomography perfusion of rabbit VX2 tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cai-Yuan; Cui, Yan-Fen; Guo, Chen; Cai, Jing; Weng, Ya-Fang; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Deng-Bin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of low contrast medium and radiation dose for hepatic computed tomography (CT) perfusion of rabbit VX2 tumor. METHODS: Eleven rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumor underwent perfusion CT scanning with a 24-h interval between a conventional tube potential (120 kVp) protocol with 350 mgI/mL contrast medium and filtered back projection, and a low tube potential (80 kVp) protocol with 270 mgI/mL contrast medium with iterative reconstruction. Correlation and agreement among perfusion parameters acquired by the conventional and low dose protocols were assessed for the viable tumor component as well as whole tumor. Image noise and tumor-to-liver contrast to noise ratio during arterial and portal venous phases were evaluated. RESULTS: A 38% reduction in contrast medium dose (360.1 ± 13.3 mgI/kg vs 583.5 ± 21.5 mgI/kg, P < 0.001) and a 73% decrease in radiation dose (1898.5 mGy • cm vs 6951.8 mGy • cm) were observed. Interestingly, there was a strong positive correlation in hepatic arterial perfusion (r = 0.907, P < 0.001; r = 0.879, P < 0.001), hepatic portal perfusion (r = 0.819, P = 0.002; r = 0.831, P = 0.002), and hepatic blood flow (r = 0.945, P < 0.001; r = 0.930, P < 0.001) as well as a moderate correlation in hepatic perfusion index (r = 0.736, P = 0.01; r = 0.636, P = 0.035) between the low dose protocol with iterative reconstruction and the conventional protocol for the viable tumor component and the whole tumor. These two imaging protocols provided a moderate but acceptable agreement for perfusion parameters and similar tumor-to-liver CNR during arterial and portal venous phases (5.63 ± 2.38 vs 6.16 ± 2.60, P = 0.814; 4.60 ± 1.27 vs 5.11 ± 1.74, P = 0.587). CONCLUSION: Compared with the conventional protocol, low contrast medium and radiation dose with iterative reconstruction has no significant influence on hepatic perfusion parameters for rabbits VX2 tumor. PMID:25954099

  5. Relationship between ventral lumbar disc protrusion and contrast medium leakage during sympathetic nerve block.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Toshiharu; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Takamori, Mina; Ogawa, Ken-Ichi; Goto, Takahisa

    2015-02-01

    Ventral disc protrusions have been neglected because they are asymptomatic. Lumbar sympathetic nerve block (LSNB) is one of the clinical choices for refractory low back pain treatment. Leakage of the contrast medium may occur and lead to complications, especially when using a neurolytic agent. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of 52 consecutive patients with refractory low back pain due to lumbar spinal canal stenosis who underwent LSNB, and graded ventral disc protrusion at the L1/2 to L5/S1 vertebral discs on a three-point scale (grade 0 = no protrusion, grade 1 = protrusion without migration, grade 2 = protrusion with migration). We also determined if there was leakage of contrast medium in LSNB. Ventral disc protrusion was observed in all patients, and 75 % (39/52) had grade 2 protrusion in the L1/2-L3/4 vertebral discs. Moreover, the incidence of contrast medium leakage was significantly higher at the vertebrae that had grade 2 protrusion than at those with less protrusion. We revealed a higher incidence of ventral disc protrusion of the lumbar vertebrae than previously reported, and that the incidence of leakage in LSNB increased when ventral disc protrusion was present. To avoid complications, attention should be paid to ventral disc protrusions before performing LSNB.

  6. Object reconstruction in scattering medium using multiple elliptical polarized speckle contrast projections and optical clearing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshe, Tomer; Firer, Michael A.; Abookasis, David

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a hybrid method for improving the imaging quality of objects obscured within a scattering environment by combining multiple elliptical polarized speckle contrast projections with the use of optical clearing agents (OCAs). Elliptically polarized light enables the probing of subsurface volumes, where OCAs decrease light scattering while increasing photons' penetration depth through the medium. Experiments were conducted on object sample and prostate cancer cells embedded within ex vivo biological samples (chicken breasts) in reflection configuration. After immersion with OCAs, the medium was irradiated with an elliptically polarized laser beam and multiple polarized speckled images obtained from a lens array were first converted to speckled contrast images and then processed using a self-deconvolution shift-and-add algorithm. The conversion to contrast images and multiple perspectives acquisition was found to emphasize contrast. Analysis of image quality indicated improvement in object visualization by the combination of elliptical polarization and OCAs. This enhanced imaging strategy may advance the development of improved methods in biomedicine field, specifically biomedical tomography.

  7. Evaluation of two methods for topical application of contrast medium to the pharyngeal and laryngeal region of horses.

    PubMed

    Colbath, Aimée C; Valdés-Martínez, Alejandro; Leise, Britta S; Hackett, Eileen S

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharyngeal and laryngeal distribution of radiopaque contrast medium administered orally or via nasopharyngeal catheter to standing horses. ANIMALS 5 healthy adult horses. PROCEDURES A crossover study was conducted. Radiopaque contrast medium (12 mL) was administered orally and via nasopharyngeal catheter to each horse. Pharyngeal and laryngeal distribution of contrast medium was determined by examination of radiographs obtained immediately after administration of contrast medium, compared with those obtained before administration. Regional distribution of contrast medium was graded. Endoscopic examination of the nasopharynx, laryngopharynx, and larynx was performed to confirm radiographic results. RESULTS Examination of radiographs obtained after nasopharyngeal administration revealed contrast medium in the nasopharynx (n = 5), oropharynx (2), laryngopharynx (3), and larynx (5) of the 5 horses. Examination of radiographs obtained after oral administration revealed contrast medium in the oropharynx (n = 4) and larynx (1) of the 5 horses. Endoscopic examination confirmed radiographic findings and was found to be sensitive for detection of contrast medium in the laryngopharynx, whereby detection rates were higher for both administration methods. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that medication administered by use of a nasopharyngeal catheter will result in topical distribution within the nasopharynx, including the dorsal surface of the soft palate, and larynx, although distribution should be evaluated in horses with clinical airway disease to confirm these findings. Oral administration did not result in consistently detectable topical laryngeal distribution but could be used for selected conditions (eg, palatitis).

  8. Relative diffusion of paramagnetic metal complexes of MRI contrast agents in an isotropic hydrogel medium.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, Bimali Sanjeevani; Osuga, Toshiaki

    2017-03-01

    The observation of molecular diffusion by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is significant in the evaluation of the metabolic activity of living tissues. Series of MRI examinations were conducted on a diffusion model to study the behaviour of the diffusion process of different-molecular-weight (MW) paramagnetic MRI contrast agents in an isotropic agar hydrogel medium. The model consisted of a solidified 1 % agar gel with an initial concentration of 0.5 mmol/L contrast solution layered on top of the gel. The diffusion process was monitored at pre-determined time intervals of immediately, 1, 6, 9, 23, and 48 h after introduction of the contrast agents onto the agar gel with a T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) pulse sequence. Three types of paramagnetic contrast agents, Gd-DTPA with a MW of 547.57 g/mol, Prohance with a MW of 558.69 g/mol and MnCl2 with a MW of 125.84 g/mol, resulted in an approximate average diffusional displacement ratio of 1:1:2 per hour, respectively, within 48 h of the experiment. Therefore, the results of this study supported the hypothesis that the rate of the diffusion process of MRI contrast agents in the agar hydrogel medium is inversely related to their MWs. However, more repetitions are necessary under various types of experimental conditions and also with various types of contrast media of different MWs for further confirmation and validation of these results.

  9. Intraoperative ultrasound with contrast medium in resective pancreatic surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Antonino; Del Fabbro, Daniele; Sacchi, Matteo; Zerbi, Alessandro; Torzilli, Guido; Lutman, Fabio R; Laghi, Luigi; Malesci, Alberto; Montorsi, Marco

    2011-11-01

    The introduction of contrast-enhanced ultrasound has been a major innovation in liver and pancreatic imaging. Previous studies have validated its intraoperative use during liver surgery, while there is a lack of data regarding its use during pancreatic surgery. The purpose of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the possible role of contrast-enhanced intraoperative ultrasound (CEIOUS) during resective pancreatic surgery for primary lesion characterization and intraoperative staging. Thirty-four patients (70% males, mean age 67.9 years) were selected for pancreatic surgery between October 2006 and July 2009. All patients underwent intraoperative ultrasound with intravenous injection of 4.8 mL sulfur-hexafluoride microbubbles. Location of the primary tumor, relation to the main vessels, contrast medium uptake modalities, presence of liver metastases, and multifocal pancreatic involvement were evaluated. The majority of operations were pancreatoduodenectomies (70.6%) performed for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (64.7%). Additional lesions were detected by ultrasound in six patients (17.6%: liver metastases in four patients, a hemangioma in one patient, and a further pancreatic lesion in one patient). In five of these patients (5/34, 14.7%) surgical management was modified by these findings. All these new findings were diagnosed before injection of contrast medium, except for a metastasis from a neuroendocrine tumor; the characterization of the hemangioma was possible only after contrast injection. Intraoperative findings regarding location of primary tumor, relation to the main vessels, and lesion characterization did not differ from those obtained with preoperative imaging. In our experience intraoperative ultrasound is a valid technique for intraoperative staging prior to pancreatic resection; it is unclear whether, in pancreatic surgery, the addition of contrast enhancement adds any benefit to traditional intraoperative ultrasound.

  10. Efficacy of coronary fractional flow reserve using contrast medium compared to adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Tanboğa, Ibrahim Halil; Aksakal, Enbiya; Aksu, Uğur; Gulcu, Oktay; Birdal, Oğuzhan; Arısoy, Arif; Kalaycı, Arzu; Ulusoy, Fatih Rifat; Sevimli, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Coronary fractional flow reserve (FFR) is recommended as the gold standard method in evaluating intermediate coronary stenoses. However, there are significant debates concerning the agents and the timing of the measurement. Aim To compare the contrast medium induced Pd/Pa ratio (CMR) with the FFR. Material and methods We enrolled 28 consecutive patients with 34 intermediate lesions who underwent coronary FFR measurement by intracoronary (i.c.) adenosine. After baseline Pd/Pa was calculated, a single contrast medium (Iomeron) injection of 6 ml (3 ml/s) was performed manually. Within 10 s after the contrast medium injection, the CMR was calculated. Bolus injection of i.c. adenosine was performed to induce maximal hyperemia (from 60 µg to 600 µg), and when it was ≤ 0.80, the intermediate lesion was considered as significant. Results After bolus i.c. adenosine, 12 lesions of 34 (35.3%) were identified as significant. The CMR value was 0.86 ±0.06 (range: 0.71–0.97). There were no significant differences between FFR and CMR values (p = 0.108). A substantial positive correlation between adenosine and contrast values was detected (0.886 and p < 0.001). Good agreement in Bland-Altman analysis was revealed (mean bias was 0.027, 95% confidence interval 0.038–0.092). Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis showed 90.9% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity for a cut-off value of 0.85 for the CMR compared to FFR (≤ 0.80). Conclusions Our study showed that measuring the CMR is a feasible method compared to FFR. The CMR may be used in situations where adenosine cannot be administered. PMID:27625683

  11. Assessment of renal vasoconstriction in vivo after intra-arterial administration of the isosmotic contrast medium iodixanol compared to the low-osmotic contrast medium iopamidol.

    PubMed

    Treitl, Marcus; Rupprecht, Harald; Wirth, Stefan; Korner, Markus; Reiser, Maximilian; Rieger, Johannes

    2009-05-01

    Low-osmotic contrast media (LOCM) such as iopamidol are known to increase the renal resistance index (RRI). The aim of our study was to evaluate in vivo the different effects of intra-arterial administration of LOCM in comparison to isosmotic contrast medium (IOCM) such as iodixanol on the human RRI. Twenty patients (16 males, 4 females; 66 years on average) with normal renal function (mean creatinine 1.0 mg/dl) had digital subtraction angiography (DSA) of the abdominal and lower-limb arteries. Ten patients received LOCM, and 10 patients IOCM (150 ml on average, 20 ml/s). The RRI was assessed by an experienced nephrologist with duplex ultrasound from 15 min before until 30 min after the first injection with delays of 1-5 min. The basic value of the RRI and differential RRI were calculated. The basic value of the RRI was 0.69 in the LOCM group and 0.71 in the IOCM group. After LOCM a significant increase of the RRI to 0.73 on average (P < or = 0.001) 2 min after the first injection was found, whereas IOCM did not result in a significant change of the RRI (RRI remained 0.71 on average, P > or = 0.1). In the LOCM group, the RRI returned to the basic value after 30 min (+/-2.3 min). Intra-arterial administration of IOCM had no influence on renal vascular resistance as expressed by the RRI, unlike LOCM, which induced a highly significant increase of the RRI for up to 30 min.

  12. Automated contrast medium monitoring system for computed tomography--Intra-institutional audit.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Dario Luca; Neri, Emanuele; Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Caramella, Davide; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the usage and the data recorded by a RIS-PACS-connected contrast medium (CM) monitoring system (Certegra(®), Bayer Healthcare, Leverkusen, Germany) over 19 months of CT activity. The system used was connected to two dual syringe power injectors (each associated with a 16-row and a high definition 64-row multidetector CT scanner, respectively), allowing to manage contrast medium injection parameters and to send and retrieve CT study-related information via RIS/PACS for any scheduled contrast-enhanced CT examination. The system can handle up to 64 variables and can be accessed via touchscreen by CT operators as well as via a web interface by registered users with three different hierarchy levels. Data related to CM injection parameters (i.e. iodine concentration, volume and flow rate of CM, iodine delivery rate and iodine dose, CM injection pressure, and volume and flow rate of saline), patient weight and height, and type of CT study over a testing period spanning from 1 June 2013 to 10 January 2015 were retrieved from the system. Technical alerts occurred for each injection event (such as system disarm due to technical failure, disarm due to operator's stop, incomplete filling of patient data fields, or excessively high injection pressure), as well as interoperability issues related to data sending and receiving to/from the RIS/PACS were also recorded. During the testing period, the CM monitoring system generated a total of 8609 reports, of which 7629 relative to successful injection events (88.6%). 331 alerts were generated, of which 40 resulted in injection interruption and 291 in CM flow rate limitation due to excessively high injection pressure (>325 psi). Average CM volume and flow rate were 93.73 ± 17.58 mL and 3.53 ± 0.89 mL/s, and contrast injection pressure ranged between 5 and 167 psi. A statistically significant correlation was found between iodine concentration and peak IDR (rs=0.2744, p<0.0001), as well as between

  13. Iodinated contrast medium as an aid to gallstone dissolution with methyl tert-butyl ether: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Lee, S H; Rawat, B; Fache, J S; Maciejewska, U; Burhenne, H J

    1990-05-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) floats on bile, whereas gallstones sink. Therefore, stones and MTBE are separated by a layer of bile. This study investigates the effect of contrast medium on flotation of gallstones in bile and its role in stone and fragment dissolution with MTBE. Fresh human gallstones, both calcified and noncalcified, from different patients were tested in vitro for flotation in bile, with and without addition of contrast medium. All gallstones or fragments sank in bile before the introduction of contrast medium. Noncalcified stones floated when the contrast medium-bile volume ratio was 1:6 or more, while double this amount of contrast medium was required to float calcified stones. Fragments did dissolve somewhat in MTBE in the presence of bile alone, but when contrast medium was added, almost complete dissolution occurred. This is thought to be due to increased contact between the fragments and MTBE, both floating on the contrast medium-bile mixture. Contrast material may be a useful adjuvant in gallstone dissolution therapy with MTBE in vivo.

  14. Vascular extravasation of contrast medium in radiological examinations: University of California San Diego Health System Experience.

    PubMed

    Niv, Galia; Costa, Matthew; Kicak, Patricia; Richman, Katherine

    2014-06-01

    Extravasation is a well-recognized complication estimated to be between 0.1% and 0.9% of contrast medium administrations. According to the UC San Diego (UCSD) health system policy, all contrast medium extravasation (CME) reports are reviewed by the department of Risk Management, and the appropriate action is taken. Despite this strategy, a decrease in the incidence of CME could not be demonstrated. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency, management, and outcome of CME in UC San Diego patients and to assess the knowledge regarding CME among radiology technologists based on policy and guidelines. The secondary aim was to assess the manual ability of the radiology technologists in the performance of the procedure. The study has 2 parts; the first was retrospective, including data collection and interpretation of all radiology procedures using intravenous contrast medium injection between January 1, 2010, and September 30, 2011, and the second was prospective, including proactive observations and knowledge questionnaire. There were 83 (0.48%) cases of CME of 17,200 patients, 54 women (0.64%) and 29 men (0.33%), P = 0.005. The patients with CME were older, and their cannula was inserted in other departments than Radiology Department, P < 0.000. There was a gap between the high theoretical knowledge that was found in the knowledge questionnaire and its implementation that was demonstrated in the proactive observation. Our data demonstrate that sex, age, and where the cannula was inserted are predictive factors for CME. We believe that CME could be prevented by proper educational program and establishment of efficient strategy.

  15. Enhancement of temporal contrast of high-power laser pulses in an anisotropic medium with cubic nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuz'mina, M S; Khazanov, E A

    2015-05-31

    We consider the methods for enhancing the temporal contrast of super-high-power laser pulses, based on the conversion of radiation polarisation in a medium with cubic nonlinearity. For a medium with weak birefringence and isotropic nonlinearity, we propose a new scheme to enhance the temporal contrast. For a medium with anisotropic nonlinearity, the efficiency of the temporal contrast optimisation is shown to depend not only on the spatial orientation of the crystal and B-integral, but also on the type of the crystal lattice symmetry. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  16. Extensive exfoliative dermatitis induced by non-ionic contrast medium Iodixanol (Visipaque) used during percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Choi, Cheol Ung; Rha, Seung-Woon; Suh, Soon Yong; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eung Ju; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo

    2008-02-29

    We report a case of extensive exfoliative dermatitis in a patient appearing 3 days after intracoronary administration of non-ionic contrast medium Iodixanol (Visipaque) during the primary percutaneous coronary intervention. The patient presented with acute myocardial infarction and has never exposed to any X-ray contrast medium. The patient was successfully treated with corticosteroid, antihistamines and antibiotics for the prevention of secondary bacterial infection. The patient was recovered 8 days after the anti-allergic medical management. This case can be a rare example of late-onset allergic reaction to a non-ionic contrast medium Iodixanol presented with extensive exfoliative dermatitis.

  17. Multiple doses of contrast medium from a single container: bacteriological studies.

    PubMed

    Tress, B M; Hellyar, A G; Pennington, J; Thomson, K R; Desmond, P M; Martinkus, J; Lavan, J J

    1994-05-01

    Preparations of Iopromide (Ultravist 370; Schering Pty Ltd, Sydney, NSW, Australia), brain/heart infusion broth (BHI; positive growth control) and distilled water (negative control) were inoculated with 10(3) to 10(4) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus cells and incubated at 37 degrees C. Slow decreases (up to one log) were observed in each organism's count in Iopromide and distilled water at room temperature and in S. aureus and E. coli in Iopromide and distilled water at 35 degrees C until 6-8 h, when counts stabilized. BHI cultures showed logarithmic increases. P. aeruginosa counts increased (half log over 8 h) in Ultravist at 37 degrees C. Radiology laboratories were shown to have similar airborne bacterial loads to operating theatres. Samples from repeatedly entered Iopromide bottles showed no contamination. Multiple intravenous doses from a single bottle of non-ionic contrast medium can safely be used as a cost-saving measure provided scrupulous attention is paid to aseptic preparation. Unused decanted contrast medium should be discarded after 4 h.

  18. Potential harmful effect of iodinated intravenous contrast medium on the clinical course of mild acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Sánchez, R; Uscanga, L; Bezaury-Rivas, P; Robles-Díaz, G; Suazo-Barahona, J; Vargas-Vorácková, F

    2000-11-01

    A worse clinical outcome might be expected in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) who receive intravenous contrast medium for a nondynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CECT) study early during hospital admission. Cohort analytic study. Tertiary care center. Of 126 patients with mild AP, 52 patients underwent CECT to establish AP diagnosis (group 1), and the remaining 74 did not (group 2). Survival and development of local or systemic complications during the hospital stay. Potential confounders were demographic, clinical, and biochemical data, as well as therapeutic measures. The Atlanta classification was used to define local and systemic complications. Mean age, etiology of AP, prognostic score on admission, and pharmacologic treatment were similar between groups. Local and systemic complications were more frequently observed in patients who underwent CECT (odds ratio, 11.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.0-64.8; P =.008). Six patients, all in group 1, developed a pancreatic abscess (odds ratio, 20.8; P =.004). In 5 of them, a second CECT showed more severe AP changes. The association between CECT and abscess development was more apparent in patients with a body mass index of 25 or more and/or nasogastric suction. Six patients in group 1 and 1 in group 2 had systemic complications (odds ratio, 9. 5; P =.01). There were no deaths. The observed increased incidence of local and systemic complications in patients with mild AP who undergo CECT, particularly in those with a body mass index of 25 or more, suggests a potentially harmful effect of intravenous contrast medium. Until this issue is clarified, it seems reasonable to restrict the use of dynamic CECT to patients with severe AP, protracted clinical course, or suspected local septic complication.

  19. Analytical optimization of digital subtraction mammography with contrast medium using a commercial unit

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado-Mendez, I.; Palma, B. A.; Brandan, M. E.

    2008-12-15

    Contrast-medium-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) is an image subtraction technique which might help unmasking lesions embedded in very dense breasts. Previous works have stated the feasibility of CEDM and the imperative need of radiological optimization. This work presents an extension of a former analytical formalism to predict contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in subtracted mammograms. The goal is to optimize radiological parameters available in a clinical mammographic unit (x-ray tube anode/filter combination, voltage, and loading) by maximizing CNR and minimizing total mean glandular dose (D{sub gT}), simulating the experimental application of an iodine-based contrast medium and the image subtraction under dual-energy nontemporal, and single- or dual-energy temporal modalities. Total breast-entrance air kerma is limited to a fixed 8.76 mGy (1 R, similar to screening studies). Mathematical expressions obtained from the formalism are evaluated using computed mammographic x-ray spectra attenuated by an adipose/glandular breast containing an elongated structure filled with an iodinated solution in various concentrations. A systematic study of contrast, its associated variance, and CNR for different spectral combinations is performed, concluding in the proposal of optimum x-ray spectra. The linearity between contrast in subtracted images and iodine mass thickness is proven, including the determination of iodine visualization limits based on Rose's detection criterion. Finally, total breast-entrance air kerma is distributed between both images in various proportions in order to maximize the figure of merit CNR{sup 2}/D{sub gT}. Predicted results indicate the advantage of temporal subtraction (either single- or dual-energy modalities) with optimum parameters corresponding to high-voltage, strongly hardened Rh/Rh spectra. For temporal techniques, CNR was found to depend mostly on the energy of the iodinated image, and thus reduction in D{sub gT} could be achieved if the

  20. The association between use of metformin and change in serum CO2 level after administration of contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Kim, S K; Jung, J; Jung, J H; Kim, K Y; Baek, J-H; Hahm, J R

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the changes in serum creatinine and total CO2 levels in patients receiving metformin during administration of contrast medium. Patient records from January 2012 to December 2012 after the administration of contrast medium were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 924 patients were included for the final analysis. Of them, 105 received metformin during contrast medium administration, 112 were taking other oral hypoglycaemic agents, and 707 patients were not diabetic (controls). No significant change in total CO2 levels was detected (p=0.678). Metabolic acidosis was present in 33 (31.4%) metformin users, 31 (28.6%) other oral hypoglycaemic agent users, and 153 (21.6%) control patients. In the present logistic regression analysis, age, baseline levels of creatinine, and total CO2 levels were associated with metabolic acidosis after contrast medium exposure. These data indicate the presence of a coexisting risk factor, other than metformin use, associated with metabolic acidosis after contrast medium exposure. No relationship was found between the use of metformin and metabolic acidosis during contrast medium exposure. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of a Prototype Chromogenic Medium (ChromID CARBA) for Detecting Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Surveillance Rectal Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Vrioni, Georgia; Daniil, Ioannis; Voulgari, Evangelia; Ranellou, Kyriaki; Koumaki, Vasiliki; Ghirardi, Sandrine; Kimouli, Maria; Zambardi, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are an increasing problem worldwide, and rectal swab surveillance is recommended as a component of infection control programs. The performance of a prototype chromogenic medium (chromID CARBA) was evaluated and compared with media tested by four other screening methods: (i) overnight selective enrichment in 5 ml tryptic soy broth with a 10-μg ertapenem disk followed by plating onto MacConkey agar (CDC-TS), (ii) short selective enrichment in 9 ml brain heart infusion broth with a 10-μg ertapenem disk followed by plating onto chromID ESBL medium (ESBL-BH), (iii) direct plating onto chromID ESBL, and (iv) direct plating onto MacConkey agar supplemented with meropenem (1 μg/ml) (MCM). The screening methods were applied to detect CPE in 200 rectal swab specimens taken from different hospitalized patients. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility were performed by the Vitek 2 system. Carbapenem MICs were checked by Etest. Carbapenemase production was confirmed using the modified Hodge test, combined-disk tests, and PCR assays. In total, 133 presumptive CPE strains were detected. Phenotypic and genotypic assays confirmed 92 strains to be CPE (56 KPC-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae, 29 VIM-positive K. pneumoniae, and 7 KPC-positive Enterobacter aerogenes strains) recovered from 73 patients, while the remaining 41 strains were confirmed to be CPE negative (19 ESBL producers and 22 nonfermenters). chromID CARBA, ESBL-BH, and chromID ESBL exhibited the highest sensitivity (92.4%), followed by CDC-TS and MCM (89.1%) (P = 0.631). The specificity was greater for chromID CARBA (96.9%) and ESBL-BH (93.2%) than for CDC-TS (86.4%), MCM (85.2%), and chromID ESBL (84.7%) (P = 0.014). In conclusion, chromID CARBA was found to be a rapid and accurate culture screening method for active CPE surveillance. PMID:22461675

  2. Tools of the trade for CTA: MDCT scanners and contrast medium injection protocols.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Richard L; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2006-12-01

    The introduction of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanners in 1998 ushered in new advances in CT angiography (CTA). The subsequent expansion of MDCT scanner capabilities, coupled with advances in understanding of contrast medium (CM) dynamics, has further improved the clinical availability and consistency of CTA. We will review recent advances in CT scanner technology and discuss early CM dynamics. Specifically, we describe an approach tailored to the available scanner technology and to patient size aimed at providing consistently robust CTA studies across all vascular territories. A rational method to design combined CTA scan/injection protocols to facilitate this goal will be described. Our current experience with a simplified protocol for CTA with 64-MDCT will also be explained.

  3. Bilateral Renal Fornix Rupture Following Intraarterial Contrast Medium Application for Infrarenal Aortic Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Niggemann, Pascal Brehmer, Bernhard; Schuermann, Karl

    2006-02-15

    A 74-year-old male claudicant who had a significant abdominal aortic stenosis was hydrated before aortic stent placement because of an elevated creatinine level. During the intervention the patient experienced acute abdominal pain with vomiting. No vascular cause was detected. Due to persistant pain, plain radiography and an abdominal CT scan were performed a few hours after the procedure. Images revealed a bilateral renal fornix rupture with a large retroperitoneal fluid collection. The patient was treated conservatively with ureteral double-J placement and percutaneous nephrostomy. The further course was uneventful and the patient was discharged 2 weeks later free of symptoms. Renal fornix rupture is a very rare complication after contrast medium application that can be treated without surgery.

  4. Elimination of non-ionic contrast medium by hemodialysis in patients with impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, K; Yoshida, K; Tsuboi, N; Akimoto, M; Tajima, H; Kumazaki, T

    1999-10-01

    The elimination rate of iohexol, a non-ionic contrast medium, from the blood by hemodialysis, and the elimination rate of iohexol by a dialyzer were studied in 15 patients with chronic renal dysfunction who required angiography or enhanced CT. The elimination rate of iohexol was 19.8% at 15 min after the start of hemodialysis, 30.6% after 30 min, 44.2% after 1 hour, 62.1% after 2 hours and 72.9% after 3 hours. The dialyzer elimination rate was maintained at about 75% from 1 to 3 hours after the start of hemodialysis. If only about 70% of iohexol in the blood needs to be eliminated, hemodialysis for 3 hours with a blood flow rate of 120 ml/min and a dialysate flow of 500 ml/min using a 0.7 m2 cellulose triacetate membrane is sufficient.

  5. Coronary MR angiography: experimental results with a monomer-stabilized blood pool contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Taupitz, Matthias; Schnorr, Jörg; Wagner, Susanne; Abramjuk, Claudia; Pilgrimm, Herbert; Kivelitz, Dietmar; Schink, Tania; Hansel, Jörg; Laub, Gerhard; Hünigen, Hanna; Hamm, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the signal-enhancing characteristics of monomer-coated very small superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles used as a blood pool contrast medium for magnetic resonance (MR) angiography in the coronary arteries. The particles used in this study were coated with citrate as the monomer (VSOP-C91). The particles have a total diameter of 7 nm and show the following relaxivities at 0.47 T: T1, 19 L/mmol. sec(-1); T2, 29 L/mmol. sec(-1). Fifteen cardiac MR examinations were performed at 1.5 T in five pigs. Images were acquired from immediately to 35 minutes (equilibrium phase) after intravenous injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadobenate dimeglumine, and the very small SPIO particles (n = 5 for each substance). Immediately after administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadobenate dimeglumine, and the very small SPIO particles, respectively, increases in the signal-to-noise ratio in blood were 94%, 103%, and 102% and in myocardium were 83%, 83%, and 29% (P <.05, very small SPIO particles versus the low-molecular-weight gadolinium-based compounds). Differences in the blood-to-myocardium contrast-to-noise ratio and visualization of the coronary arteries and their branches were also significant. VSOP-C91 significantly improves visualization of the coronary arteries at MR angiography from immediately to 35 minutes after injection.

  6. Dosimetric effect of small bowel oral contrast on conventional radiation therapy, linear accelerator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy, and helical tomotherapy plans for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Kurian; Liu, Derek; Severin, Diane; Dickey, Mike; Polkosnik, Lee-Anne; Warkentin, Heather; Mihai, Alina; Ghosh, Sunita; Field, Colin

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the dosimetric effect of small bowel oral contrast on conventional radiation therapy, linear accelerator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) treatment plans. Thirteen patients with rectal cancer underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation with oral contrast (CCT) in preparation for chemoradiation therapy. The contrast in the small bowel was contoured, and a noncontrast CT scan (NCCT) was simulated by reassigning a CT number of 0 Hounsfield units to the contrast volume. Conventional, IMRT, and HT plans were generated with the CCT. The plan generated on the CCT was then recalculated on the NCCT, maintaining the same number of monitor units for each field, and the plans were not renormalized. Dosimetric parameters representing coverage of the planning target volume with 45 Gy (D98%, D95%, D50%, and D2%) and sparing of the bladder and peritoneal cavity (D50%, D30%, and D10%) were recorded. The ratio of dose calculated in the presence of contrast to dose with contrast edited out was recorded for each parameter. A paired Student t test was used for comparison of plans. For conventional plans, there was <0.1% variance in the dose ratio for all volumes of interest. For IMRT plans, there was a 1% decrease in the mean dose ratio, and the range of dose ratios for all volumes was greater than that for HT or conventional plans. For HT plans, for all volumes of interest, the mean dose ratio was <0.2%, and the range for all patients was <1%. For all IMRT dosimetric parameters, the difference was in the order of 1% of the mean dose (P < .05). The dose difference was not statistically significant for the conventional or HT plans. The use of CCT during CT simulation has no clinically significant effect on dose calculations for conventional, IMRT, and HT treatment plans and may not require replacement of the contrast with a CT number of 0 Hounsfield units. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology

  7. Diazepam Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Diazepam rectal gel is used in emergency situations to stop cluster seizures (episodes of increased seizure activity) in people who are ... Diazepam comes as a gel to instill rectally using a prefilled syringe with a special plastic tip. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, ...

  8. In vitro evaluation of contrast medium concentration and depth effects on the radiographic appearance of specific canine urolith mineral types.

    PubMed

    Weichselbaum, R C; Feeney, D A; Jessen, C R; Osborne, C A; Dunphy, E D; Bartges, J W

    1998-01-01

    Nine pure mineral types of canine uroliths (bladder or urethral origin only) identified in a chronologic sample from the Minnesota Urolith Center were compared to sequential dilutions of iodinated radiographic contrast medium in vitro. The uroliths studied were those composed of 100% magnesium ammonium phosphate, calcium oxalate monohydrate, calcium oxalate dihydrate, calcium phosphate appatite, calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (brushite), ammonium acid urate, sodium acid urate, cystine, and silica. The radiopacity of the uroliths was classified as radiolucent, isopaque, or radiopaque, as compared to the radiopacity of the contrast medium solutions in which they were placed, using 2.0 mm and 5.0 mm depths in petri dishes radiographed using a table-top technique. A statistically significant relationship was found between the effective atomic number of the uroliths and the effective atomic number of the contrast medium solutions to which they were compared for the endpoints of isopacity, first lucency (in increasing iodine concentration sequence), and optimal visualization of internal architecture. In general, uroliths isopaque or radiolucent in contrast medium solutions weaker than 23.5 mgI2/ml are most likely ammonium acid urate or sodium acid urate. Uroliths isopaque or radiolucent in contrast medium solutions between 23.5 mgI2/ml and 44.4 mgI2/ml are probably magnesium ammonium phosphate, cystine, or silica. Uroliths that remained radiopaque in solutions stronger than 44.4 mgI2/ml, and particularly those radiopaque in contrast medium solutions stronger than 80 mgI2/ml, almost always contained calcium. This relative opacity assessment is proposed for use in double contrast cystography as an aid in differentiating urolith mineral types clinically to facilitate appropriate use of medical protocols to dissolve uroliths or to prevent their growth or recurrence.

  9. Thyroid function after hysterosalpingography using an oil-soluble iodinated contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Mekaru, Keiko; Kamiyama, Shigeru; Masamoto, Hitoshi; Sakumoto, Kaoru; Aoki, Yoichi

    2008-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of an oil-soluble iodinated contrast medium (lipiodol) for hysterosalpingography (HSG) on thyroid function. In 214 of 528 women with infertility examined by HSG using lipiodol between 1996 and 2006 at our institution, serum free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin-stimulating hormone (TSH) were measured before and several months after HSG. The average age of the women was 34.5 +/- 4.6 years and their average infertility period was 2.9 +/- 2.5 years (mean+/-standard deviation). The 214 patients were divided into three groups based on the results of thyroid function before HSG: 180 in euthyroid, 28 in subclinical hypothyroidism and 13 in subclinical hyperthyroidism. The number of patients in the subclinical hypothyroidism group who developed hypothyroidism after HSG (ten of 28) was significantly higher than that of the euthyroid group (four of 180). Thyroid hormone replacement was required in three patients from the subclinical hypothyroidism group 1, 2 and 5 months after HSG. We conclude that thyroid function should be monitored closely after HSG using lipiodol to detect the development of hypothyroidism, particularly in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism, and TSH and FT4 measurements should be performed before HSG to identify patients at risk for hypothyroidism.

  10. Contrasting metabolic effects of medium- versus long-chain fatty acids in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Magdalene K; Osborne, Brenna; Brown, Simon H J; Small, Lewin; Mitchell, Todd W; Cooney, Gregory J; Turner, Nigel

    2013-12-01

    Dietary intake of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) plays a causative role in insulin resistance and risk of diabetes. Whereas LCFAs promote lipid accumulation and insulin resistance, diets rich in medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) have been associated with increased oxidative metabolism and reduced adiposity, with few deleterious effects on insulin action. The molecular mechanisms underlying these differences between dietary fat subtypes are poorly understood. To investigate this further, we treated C2C12 myotubes with various LCFAs (16:0, 18:1n9, and 18:2n6) and MCFAs (10:0 and 12:0), as well as fed mice diets rich in LCFAs or MCFAs, and investigated fatty acid-induced changes in mitochondrial metabolism and oxidative stress. MCFA-treated cells displayed less lipid accumulation, increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity, and less oxidative stress than LCFA-treated cells. These changes were associated with improved insulin action in MCFA-treated myotubes. MCFA-fed mice exhibited increased energy expenditure, reduced adiposity, and better glucose tolerance compared with LCFA-fed mice. Dietary MCFAs increased respiration in isolated mitochondria, with a simultaneous reduction in reactive oxygen species generation, and subsequently low oxidative damage. Collectively our findings indicate that in contrast to LCFAs, MCFAs increase the intrinsic respiratory capacity of mitochondria without increasing oxidative stress. These effects potentially contribute to the beneficial metabolic actions of dietary MCFAs.

  11. Contrasting metabolic effects of medium- versus long-chain fatty acids in skeletal muscle[S

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Magdalene K.; Osborne, Brenna; Brown, Simon H. J.; Small, Lewin; Mitchell, Todd W.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Turner, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Dietary intake of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) plays a causative role in insulin resistance and risk of diabetes. Whereas LCFAs promote lipid accumulation and insulin resistance, diets rich in medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) have been associated with increased oxidative metabolism and reduced adiposity, with few deleterious effects on insulin action. The molecular mechanisms underlying these differences between dietary fat subtypes are poorly understood. To investigate this further, we treated C2C12 myotubes with various LCFAs (16:0, 18:1n9, and 18:2n6) and MCFAs (10:0 and 12:0), as well as fed mice diets rich in LCFAs or MCFAs, and investigated fatty acid-induced changes in mitochondrial metabolism and oxidative stress. MCFA-treated cells displayed less lipid accumulation, increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity, and less oxidative stress than LCFA-treated cells. These changes were associated with improved insulin action in MCFA-treated myotubes. MCFA-fed mice exhibited increased energy expenditure, reduced adiposity, and better glucose tolerance compared with LCFA-fed mice. Dietary MCFAs increased respiration in isolated mitochondria, with a simultaneous reduction in reactive oxygen species generation, and subsequently low oxidative damage. Collectively our findings indicate that in contrast to LCFAs, MCFAs increase the intrinsic respiratory capacity of mitochondria without increasing oxidative stress. These effects potentially contribute to the beneficial metabolic actions of dietary MCFAs. PMID:24078708

  12. [Two cases of elderly patients with ruptured AVM with contrast medium extravasation during cerebral angiography].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Y; Urakawa, M; Kawakami, N

    2001-12-01

    Two cases are reported of elderly patients who experienced intracranial extravasation of contrast medium (CM) during carotid angiography (CAG) for ruptured cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). The first patient, an 87-year-old male with no history of hypertension, was admitted immediately following a loss of consciousness after swimming in a pool. CT scan revealed a large intracranial hematoma in the left frontal lobe. CAG performed 1 hour after his arrival revealed a small AVM, fed by the left anterior cerebral artery with concomitant extravasation of CM. The patient's condition subsequently deteriorated and he died the following day. The second patient, a 71-year-old female, was admitted to our hospital in a comatose state after complaining of a severe headache. CT scan revealed a right parietal lobe hemorrhage extending into the ventricles. CAG was performed and demonstrated a small AVM in the right parietal lobe with extravasation of CM. Following emergency removal of the hematoma and AVM, the patient regained consciousness although some motor deficits persisted. A literature review revealed that only 6 cases of CM extravasation with ruptured AVM have been previously reported. The 4 previous cases involved patients 9, 15, 33 and 66-year-old, the younger three of which had a good outcome. The patients reported here were much older, and had a much less favorable outcome. Thus, AVM with CM extravasation may have a better prognosis in younger individuals.

  13. Transformation of the X-ray contrast medium iopromide in soil and biological wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Manoj; Löffler, Dirk; Wagner, Manfred; Ternes, Thomas A

    2008-10-01

    In water/soil systems, the iodinated contrast medium iopromide was quantitatively biotransformed into several transformation products (TPs). Twelve TPs were identified via HPLC-UV and LC tandem MS. The chemical structures of the TPs were elucidated via fragmentation in MS2 and MS3 of LC tandem MS with a linear ion trap and 1H and 13C NMR analyses. All TPs exhibited transformations at the side chains containing either carboxylic moieties and/or primary and secondary amide moieties, while the triiodoisophthalic acid structure remained unaltered. A transformation pathway was proposed based on the sequence of TP formation in aerobic batch experiments. Additionally, the occurrence of iopromide TPs was investigated in native water samples. All TPs identified were found in municipal WWTP effluents because of their formation during biological wastewater treatment with maximum concentrations of up to 3.7 +/- 0.9 microg/L (TP 819). Predominantly, those TPs were present at higher concentrations in WWTP effluents which were formed at the beginning of the transformation pathway. Furthermore, four TPs formed at the end of the transformation pathway (TP 759, 701A/B, and 643) were also found in bank filtrate up to 0.050 microg/L and in groundwater of an wastewater irrigation area up to 4.6 microg/L.

  14. Aggravation of Pre-Existing Atrioventricular Block, Wenckebach Type, Provoked by Application of X-Ray Contrast Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Brodmann, Marianne Seinost, Gerald; Stark, Gerhard; Pilger, Ernst

    2006-12-15

    Background. Significant bradycardia followed by cardiac arrest related to single bolus administration of X-ray contrast medium into a peripheral artery has not, to our knowledge, been described in the literature. Methods and Results. While performing a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the left superficial femoral artery in a 68-year old patient with a pre-existing atrioventricular (AV) block, Wenckebach type, he developed an AV block III after a single bolus injection of intra-arterial X-ray contrast medium. Conclusion. We believe that application of contrast medium causes a transitory ischemia in the obstructed vessel and therefore elevation of endogenous adenosine. In the case of a previously damaged AV node this elevation of endogenous adenosine may be responsible for the development of a short period of third-degree AV block.

  15. Effects of contrast medium injection technique on attenuation values of adrenal glands in healthy dogs during contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Alexandra; Dennler, Matthias; Mosing, Martina; Gent, Thomas C; Santner, Guido; Imhasly, Sandro; Boretti, Felicitas S; Reusch, Claudia E; Kircher, Patrick; Sieber-Ruckstuhl, Nadja S

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effects of 3 contrast medium injection techniques on attenuation values for canine adrenal glands during contrast-enhanced CT. 9 healthy Beagles. 3 protocols were evaluated in a randomized cross-over design study: 700 mg of iodine/kg at a constant injection rate over 20 seconds (full-dose constant rate), the same dose at a rate following an exponential decay curve over 20 seconds (full-dose decelerated rate), and 350 mg of iodine/kg at a constant injection rate over 10 seconds (half-dose constant rate). Multislice CT images were obtained before and at predetermined time points after the start of contrast medium injection. Median peak attenuation values were 129, 133, and 87 Hounsfield units with the full-dose constant rate, full-dose decelerated rate, and half-dose constant rate injection protocols, respectively. Peak attenuation differed significantly between the full-dose constant rate and half-dose constant rate injection protocols and between the full-dose decelerated rate and half-dose constant rate injection protocols. Median time to peak attenuation did not differ significantly among injection methods and was 30, 23, and 15 seconds for the full-dose constant rate, full-dose decelerated rate, and half-dose constant rate injections, respectively. The dose of contrast medium and the timing of postinjection CT scanning were main determinants of peak attenuation for adrenal glands in healthy dogs; effects of the 3 injection protocols on attenuation were minor. The exponentially decelerated injection method was subjectively complex. A constant injection protocol delivering 700 mg of iodine/kg over 20 seconds, with scans obtained approximately 30 seconds after starting contrast medium injection, provided images with maximum adrenal gland attenuation values.

  16. [General pharmacological study of iodixanol, a new non-ionic isotonic contrast medium].

    PubMed

    Takasuna, K; Kasai, Y; Kitano, Y; Mori, K; Kobayashi, R; Makino, M; Hagiwara, T; Hirohashi, M; Nomura, M; Algate, D R

    1995-10-01

    The general pharmacological study of iodixanol, a non-ionic isotonic contrast medium, was conducted. 1) Iodixanol administered intravenously over a dose range of 320 to 3,200 mgI/kg had little or no effect on the general behavior, spontaneous locomotor activity, hexobarbital sleeping time, pain response, electroshock- or pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsion (mouse), EEG or body temperature (rabbit), gastrointestinal propulsion (mouse) or skeletal muscle contraction (rabbit). Iodixanol had no specific interaction with acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin, nicotin, BaCl2 (ileum), methacholine (trachea), isoprenaline (atrium) or oxytocin (pregnant uterus), nor had any effect on spontaneous contractility (atrium and uterus), or transmural electrostimulation-induced contractility (vas deferens) at concentrations of < or = 3.2 x 10(-3) gI/ml in vitro. Iodixanol had no effect on the cardiovascular system of dog, except that it increased femoral blood flow and respiratory rate at doses of > or = 1,000 mgI/kg. Iodixanol at 3,200 mgI/kg i.v. reduced urine output with a decrease in Na+ and Cl- excretion, whereas at 320 mgI/kg i.v., it slightly increased urine output (rat). 2) Injections of iodixanol into the cerebroventricular (0.96, 9.6 mgI/mouse and 3.2, 32 mgI/rat), left ventricular (1,920, 6,400 mgI/dog) or coronary artery (640, 1,920 mgI/dog) had no conspicuous effect on the central nervous system or the cardiovascular system, respectively. There was no marked difference among iodixanol, iohexol and iopamidol in this respect. Vascular pain during injection into the femoral artery (300-320 mgI/guinea pig) appeared to be less intense with iodixanol, compared with the other contrast media iohexol and iopamidol. These results suggest that intravenous injection of iodixanol is relatively free from pharmacological activity, and effects of iodixanol on the central nervous system (intracerebroventricular injection) and cardiovascular system (intra-left ventricular and -coronary

  17. Hepatic contrast medium enhancement at computed tomography and its correlation with various body size measures.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Anders; Nouhad, Jallo; Cederlund, Kerstin; Aspelin, Peter; Nyman, Ulf; Björk, Jonas; Torkel, Brismar B

    2012-07-01

    When the same dose of iodine is given to all patients when performing abdominal computed tomography (CT) there may be a wide inter-individual variation in contrast medium (CM) enhancement of the liver. To evaluate if any of the measures body height (BH), body mass index (BMI), lean body mass (LBM), ideal body weight (IBW), and body surface area (BSA) correlated better than body weight (BW) with hepatic enhancement, and to compare the enhancement when using iodixanol and iomeprol. One hundred patients referred for standard three-phase CT examination of abdomen were enrolled. Body weight and height were measured at the time of the CT examination. Forty grams of iodine (iodixanol 320 mg I/mL or iomeprol 400 mg I/mL) was injected at a rate of 1.6 g-I/s, followed by a 50 mL saline flush. The late arterial phase was determined by using a semi-automatic smart prep technique with a scan delay of 20 s. The hepatic parenchymal phase started automatically 25 s after the late arterial phase. CM concentration was estimated by placement of regions of interest in aorta (native and late arterial phase) and in liver (native and parenchymal phase). BW (r = -0.51 and -0.64), LBM (r = -0.54 and -0.59), and BSA (r = -0.54 and -0.65) showed the best correlation coefficients with aortic and hepatic parenchymal enhancement, respectively, without any significant differences between the measures. Comparing iodixanol and iomeprol there was no significant difference in aortic enhancement. The liver enhancement was significantly higher (P < 0.05) using iodixanol than iomeprol. To achieve a consistent hepatic enhancement, CM dose may simply be adjusted to body weight instead of using more complicated calculated parameters based on both weight and height.

  18. Establishment of the intracranial hemodynamic model based on contrast medium and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yaoer; He, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ischemic cerebrovascular diseases are one of the most common vascular diseases in aged people and CT perfusion (CTP) is a very popular tool to detect the ischemic changes in brain vascular. The present study aims to establish a novel intracranial hemodynamic model to simulate anterior cerebral artery blood flow, and compare the actual and simulated hemodynamic parameters of healthy people and patients with carotid stenosis or occlusion. A mathematical model of the intracranial hemodynamic was generated using MATLAB software, and data from patients with or without infarct disease (57 and 44 cases, respectively) were retrospectively collected to test the new model. The actual time-density curve (TDC) of anterior cerebral artery was obtained from the original intracranial CTP data, and simulated TDC was calculated from our intracranial hemodynamic model. All model parameters were adjusted according to patients’ sex, height, and weight. Time to peak enhancement (TTP), maximum enhancement (ME), and mean transit time (MTT) were selected to evaluate the status of hemodynamics. In healthy people, there were no significant differences of TTP and ME between actual and simulated curves. For patients with infarct symptoms, ME was significantly decreased in actual data compared with simulated curve, while there was no obvious difference of TTP between actual and simulated data. Moreover, MTT was delayed in infarct patients compared with healthy people. Our group generated a computer-based, physiologic model to simulate intracranial hemodynamics. The model successfully simulated anterior cerebral artery hemodynamics in normal healthy people and showed noncompliant ME and MTT in infarct patients, reflecting their abnormal cerebral hemodynamic status. The digital model is reliable and may help optimize the protocol of contrast medium enhancement in intracranial CT, and provide a solid tool to study intracranial hemodynamics. PMID:27930555

  19. Establishment of the intracranial hemodynamic model based on contrast medium and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yaoer; He, Wen

    2016-12-01

    Ischemic cerebrovascular diseases are one of the most common vascular diseases in aged people and CT perfusion (CTP) is a very popular tool to detect the ischemic changes in brain vascular. The present study aims to establish a novel intracranial hemodynamic model to simulate anterior cerebral artery blood flow, and compare the actual and simulated hemodynamic parameters of healthy people and patients with carotid stenosis or occlusion.A mathematical model of the intracranial hemodynamic was generated using MATLAB software, and data from patients with or without infarct disease (57 and 44 cases, respectively) were retrospectively collected to test the new model. The actual time-density curve (TDC) of anterior cerebral artery was obtained from the original intracranial CTP data, and simulated TDC was calculated from our intracranial hemodynamic model. All model parameters were adjusted according to patients' sex, height, and weight. Time to peak enhancement (TTP), maximum enhancement (ME), and mean transit time (MTT) were selected to evaluate the status of hemodynamics.In healthy people, there were no significant differences of TTP and ME between actual and simulated curves. For patients with infarct symptoms, ME was significantly decreased in actual data compared with simulated curve, while there was no obvious difference of TTP between actual and simulated data. Moreover, MTT was delayed in infarct patients compared with healthy people.Our group generated a computer-based, physiologic model to simulate intracranial hemodynamics. The model successfully simulated anterior cerebral artery hemodynamics in normal healthy people and showed noncompliant ME and MTT in infarct patients, reflecting their abnormal cerebral hemodynamic status. The digital model is reliable and may help optimize the protocol of contrast medium enhancement in intracranial CT, and provide a solid tool to study intracranial hemodynamics.

  20. Medium term water deficit elicits distinct transcriptome responses in Eucalyptus species of contrasting environmental origin.

    PubMed

    Spokevicius, Antanas V; Tibbits, Josquin; Rigault, Philippe; Nolin, Marc-Alexandre; Müller, Caroline; Merchant, Andrew

    2017-04-07

    Climatic and edaphic conditions over geological timescales have generated enormous diversity of adaptive traits and high speciation within the genus Eucalyptus (L. Hér.). Eucalypt species occur from high rainfall to semi-arid zones and from the tropics to latitudes as high as 43°S. Despite several morphological and metabolomic characterizations, little is known regarding gene expression differences that underpin differences in tolerance to environmental change. Using species of contrasting taxonomy, morphology and physiology (E. globulus and E. cladocalyx), this study combines physiological characterizations with 'second-generation' sequencing to identify key genes involved in eucalypt responses to medium-term water limitation. One hundred twenty Million high-quality HiSeq reads were created from 14 tissue samples in plants that had been successfully subjected to a water deficit treatment or a well-watered control. Alignment to the E. grandis genome saw 23,623 genes of which 468 exhibited differential expression (FDR < 0.01) in one or both ecotypes in response to the treatment. Further analysis identified 80 genes that demonstrated a significant species-specific response of which 74 were linked to the 'dry' species E. cladocalyx where 23 of these genes were uncharacterised. The majority (approximately 80%) of these differentially expressed genes, were expressed in stem tissue. Key genes that differentiated species responses were linked to photoprotection/redox balance, phytohormone/signalling, primary photosynthesis/cellular metabolism and secondary metabolism based on plant metabolic pathway network analysis. These results highlight a more definitive response to water deficit by a 'dry' climate eucalypt, particularly in stem tissue, identifying key pathways and associated genes that are responsible for the differences between 'wet' and 'dry' climate eucalypts. This knowledge provides the opportunity to further investigate and understand the mechanisms and

  1. Utility of contrast enema to assess anastomotic integrity and the natural history of radiological leaks after low rectal surgery: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Habib, K; Gupta, A; White, D; Mazari, Fayyaz A K; Wilson, T R

    2015-08-01

    There is no clear consensus on how to assess low rectal anastomotic integrity and patency prior to reversal of de-functioning stoma. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the utility of contrast enema (CE) in this context and to clarify the natural history of radiological leaks. Keyword search of electronic databases (Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar) and bibliographic cross-referencing were performed to identify appropriate studies. Data extraction and synthesis was performed with the primary outcomes being the sensitivity and specificity of CE for detecting clinically significant abnormalities. Statistical analysis was performed using Open Meta-Analyst software. Narrative review of outcomes including those of clinical and radiological leaks was also undertaken. A total of 1,142 CE from 11 articles were included in the final meta-analysis. CE had high specificity (95.4; 95 % confidence interval = 92.0-97.4) and negative predictive value (98.4; 97.4-99.1) and moderate sensitivity (79.9; 63.9-89.9) and positive predictive value (64.6; 55.5-72.9) for the detection of clinically significant anastomotic problems. There was a high degree of correlation between CE and clinical examination findings (96.7 %). Occult radiological leaks were seen in 5.7 % of CE, and all but one (97 %) eventually underwent successful reversal. Only three quarters of patients with clinical leak underwent successful reversal. CE is effective at excluding clinically significant anastomotic problems, especially after clinical anastomotic leaks. However, false positive results can be observed in asymptomatic patients, and it is unclear how much additional information CE provides over clinical assessment in the low uncomplicated anastomosis.

  2. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-13

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  3. Intense femtosecond laser driven collimated fast electron transport in a dielectric medium-role of intensity contrast.

    PubMed

    Dey, Indranuj; Adak, Amitava; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Shaikh, Moniruzzaman; Chatterjee, Gourab; Sarkar, Deep; Lad, Amit D; Kumar, G Ravindra

    2016-12-12

    Ultra-high intensity (> 1018 W/cm2), femtosecond (~30 fs) laser induced fast electron transport in a transparent dielectric has been studied for two laser systems having three orders of magnitude different peak to pedestal intensity contrast, using ultrafast time-resolved shadowgraphy. Use of a 400 nm femtosecond pulse as a probe enables the exclusive visualization of the dynamics of highest density electrons (> 7 × 1021 cm-3) observed so far. High picosecond contrast (~109) results in greater coupling of peak laser energy to the plasma electrons, enabling long (~1 mm), collimated (divergence angle ~2°) transport of fast electrons inside the dielectric medium at relativistic speeds (~0.66c). In comparison, the laser system with a contrast of ~106 has a large pre-plasma, limiting the coupling of laser energy to the solid and yielding limited fast electron injection into the dielectric. In the lower contrast case, bulk of the electrons expand as a cloud inside the medium with an order of magnitude lower speed than that of the fast electrons obtained with the high contrast laser. The expansion speed of the plasma towards vacuum is similar for the two contrasts.

  4. Contrast evaluation of the polarimetric images of different targets in turbid medium: possible sources of systematic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, T.; Bénière, A.; Goudail, F.; De Martino, A.

    2010-04-01

    Subsurface polarimetric (differential polarization, degree of polarization or Mueller matrix) imaging of various targets in turbid media shows image contrast enhancement compared with total intensity measurements. The image contrast depends on the target immersion depth and on both target and background medium optical properties, such as scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and anisotropy. The differential polarization image contrast is usually not the same for circularly and linearly polarized light. With linearly and circularly polarized light we acquired the orthogonal state contrast (OSC) images of reflecting, scattering and absorbing targets. The targets were positioned at various depths within the container filled with polystyrene particle suspension in water. We also performed numerical Monte Carlo modelling of backscattering Mueller matrix images of the experimental set-up. Quite often the dimensions of container, its shape and optical properties of container walls are not reported for similar experiments and numerical simulations. However, we found, that depending on the photon transport mean free path in the scattering medium, the above mentioned parameters, as well as multiple target design could all be sources of significant systematic errors in the evaluation of polarimetric image contrast. Thus, proper design of experiment geometry is of prime importance in order to remove the sources of possible artefacts in the image contrast evaluation and to make a correct choice between linear and circular polarization of the light for better target detection.

  5. Contrast medium administration and image acquisition parameters in renal CT angiography: what radiologists need to know

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Charbel; Deeb, Ibrahim Alsheikh; Mohamad, Maha; Al-Mohiy, Hussain; El-Merhi, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, exponential advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have resulted in improved spatial and temporal resolution. Faster image acquisition enabled renal CT angiography to become a viable and effective noninvasive alternative in diagnosing renal vascular pathologies. However, with these advances, new challenges in contrast media administration have emerged. Poor synchronization between scanner and contrast media administration have reduced the consistency in image quality with poor spatial and contrast resolution. Comprehensive understanding of contrast media dynamics is essential in the design and implementation of contrast administration and image acquisition protocols. This review includes an overview of the parameters affecting renal artery opacification and current protocol strategies to achieve optimal image quality during renal CT angiography with iodinated contrast media, with current safety issues highlighted. PMID:26728701

  6. Penetration of subarachnoid contrast medium into rabbit spinal cord. Comparison between metrizamide and iohexol

    SciTech Connect

    Holtas, S.; Morris, T.W.; Ekholm, S.E.; Isaac, L.; Fonte, D.

    1986-02-01

    The penetration into rabbit spinal cord of two nonionic contrast media, iohexol and metrizamide, and a reference tracer, technetium DTPA, were compared. The spinal subarachnoid space was perfused for 4 hours with a CSF solution to which technetium DTPA and either iohexol or metrizamide had been added. The contrast media and technetium DTPA concentrations reached a plateau level in CSF outflow within 80 minutes. The contrast media concentrations in CSF were higher than the technetium DTPA (P less than .001). In the cord tissue, technetium DTPA reached higher concentrations than the contrast media (P less than .001), and iohexol reached higher concentrations relative to technetium DTPA than metrizamide (P less than .001). The mean contrast media distribution volumes in the thoracic cord were 13% (iohexol) and 12% (metrizamide). The smaller distribution volume observed for metrizamide could be related to the larger effective size of associated metrizamide molecules or an interference with diffusion perhaps related to binding to glucose carriers.

  7. Improvement of the optical imaging of objects in a strongly scattering medium by means of contrast-enhancing dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai S; Smirnov, A V; Podgaetskii, Vitalii M; Tereshchenko, Sergei A; Tomilova, Larisa G

    1999-12-31

    The problem of enhancing the contrast of optical images in a strongly scattering medium by means of luminescent and absorbing dyes, topical in laser tomography, is examined. Preparations based on diphthalocyanine compounds were selected on the grounds of their tropism and resistance to the action of heat and light. Images with enhanced contrast in model scattering media (an aqueous solution of milk and margarine) were obtained in the IR region of the spectrum using the radiation of a picosecond neodymium laser. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Echocolor Power Doppler with contrast medium to evaluate vascularization in lesions of the soft tissues of the limbs.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, A; De Petro, P; Faletti, C; Brach del Prever, E M; Gino, G; Albertini, U; Piana, R; Marone, S; Mellano, D; Linari, A; Forni, M; Bertoldo, U; Comandone, A; Boglione, A; Brach del Prever, A

    2003-01-01

    Echocolor Power Doppler with contrast medium forms a non-invasive vascular image; the purpose of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness in differentiating benign and malignant tumors in the soft tissues of the limbs. Echocolor Power Doppler with contrast medium was used to study 80 patients with swelling in the soft tissues of the limbs: there were 54 benign lesions, 22 sarcomas, and 4 aggressive desmoid fibromatoses. Were identified 4 patterns of wash-in and wash-out curves that could be correlated to the histological diagnosis: type I was present in 85% of benign lesions, type III in 91% of malignant lesions and in 3.7% of the benign ones, type II in aggressive fibromatoses, anomalous type in 4 benign lesions and 2 sarcomas; the curve was absent in 2 benign lesions. Power Doppler Echocolor with contrast medium can become a useful method to be associated with traditional imaging methods in the differential diagnosis of swelling of the soft tissues of the limbs.

  9. Contrast medium injection optimisation in spiral CT for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Gattoni, Filippo; Tagliaferri, Beatrice; Scali, Paolo; Brioschi, Sonia; Boioli, Faustino

    2003-01-01

    Spiral CT, normally a highly accurate diagnostic method to diagnose pulmonary embolism, has its weak point in the synchronisation of contrast medium (CM) injection and the start of the acquisition, essential to obtain optimal vascular enhancement. The aim of this paper is to introduce a method to control the CM injection based on the enhancement of blood vessels in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. The CARE bolus software pilots an electronic trigger that first monitors the CM passage, then starts the acquisition procedure when the intensity of enhancement reaches a pre-set value. Our spiral CT has a 6-second scan delay between the trigger's "go-ahead" and the start of the acquisition. During this interval, the CM reaches the pulmonary venous system, enhancing it and making the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism more difficult. This problem was overcome by injecting a slow bolus (30 ml; 1.5 ml/s flow rate) before the CM that triggers the start of the scan when the CM is only present in the pulmonary arteries. We examined 80 patients (36 men, 44 women, mean age 66.9, age range 18 to 89 years). All patients were examined for clinically, radiographically or scintigraphically suspected pulmonary embolism. We evaluated the enhancement of pulmonary arteries on a scale from 0 (poor) to 10 (excellent), image quality (excellent, fair, poor), the examination time and patient tolerance. The results were compared with those obtained in a group of 80 patients studied with CARE bolus without a timing bolus. Monitor scans were performed with the ROI that triggers the sequence centred on the right heart (trigger value set at 30/35 HU). There were no diagnostic artefacts caused by the enhancement of pulmonary veins due the timing bolus. The average time per procedure was less than 30 min and the time needed to reach the trigger value was 15 sec (range: 10-24 sec). The average volume of CM injected was 130 ml (timing bolus: 30 ml, scan bolus: 100 ml). There were no adverse events to

  10. Effects of contrast medium on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. [X-ray; /sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, S.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, H.; Kuwabara, Y.; Okano, T.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of contrast material (meglumine iothalamate) on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations were investigated in studies on the lymphocytes of patients who had undergone diagnostic radiography and in vitro experiments with diagnostic x rays and /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays. Chromosome and chromatic aberrations were found to increase significantly with increasing concentrations of contrast material that were added at irradiation. However, the aberrations were not associated with elevation of the ratio of dicentric and ring chromosomes to the number of cells with unstable chromosome aberrations at the first mitosis. Lymphocytes irradiated in the absence of contrast material did not show an increase in chromosome-type aberrations when the agent was given in increasing concentrations during subsequent incubation, but there were greater numbers of chromatid gaps and breaks. When lymphocytes were exposed to 400 R (103.2 mC/kg) of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays, the presence of contrast agent did not increase the yield of dicentric and ring chromosomes, but induced a marked delay in cell proliferation, especially in lymphocytes with more heavily damaged chromosomes. In additional examination, the contrast agent itself induced sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes.

  11. Does iodinated contrast medium amplify DNA damage during exposure to radiation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There is a recognized increased risk of cancer following exposure of humans to ionizing radiation; this is felt to be most likely due to damage to DNA strands during exposure. Damage to DNA strands can be demonstrated microscopically following exposure to X-rays, and new evidence is emerging that this effect may be compounded by administration of iodinated contrast agents. PMID:26234959

  12. Misleading changes of the signal intensity on opposed-phase MRI after injection of contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Heywang-Koebrunner, S.H.; Hoefer, H.; Spielmann, R.P.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of opposed-phase imaging on the interpretation of MR contrast studies is highlighted. A model calculation is performed. It demonstrates the change of signal intensity of an average tumor before and after application of Gd-DTPA on an in-phase and an opposed-phase image, depending on the percentage of fat within the voxels. The effect is then demonstrated, using a small cotton stick soaked with water or a solution of contrast agent representing a tumor before and after i.v. application of Gd-DTPA. If an average enhancing tumor, which is surrounded by fat, occupies less than 50-60% of the slice thickness, it becomes undetectable on opposed-phase images. The reason is that due to signal cancellation on the the opposed image, no signal change or even signal decrease results, while signal increase is visible on the in-phase image. In those areas of the body where significant partial volume of a tumor with fat may occur (such as for breast tumors growing along ducts, which are surrounded by fat), severe errors can result. Therefore we explicitly warn from using opposed-image sequences for MR contrast studies. 14 ref.s, 4 figs.

  13. Thromboelastographic Changes Following Nonionic Contrast Medium Injection During Transfemoral Angiography in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, V.K. Handa, A.; Philips-Hughes, J.; Boardman, P.; Uberoi, R.; Hands, L.J.

    2006-12-15

    Background/Purpose. Patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) are known to be systemically hypercoagulable and there is concern that exposing them to contrast media during angiography may exacerbate that thrombotic tendency. Many in vitro studies in which blood is exposed to contrast media suggest that nonionic contrast medium (NICM) has a weaker anticoagulant effect than ionic contrast medium (ICM) and some studies suggest that NICM can lead to activation of coagulation thus increasing the risk of thrombotic events where it is employed. We have looked at the changes in coagulation adjacent to the site of contrast injection/potential angioplasty to determine the magnitude of change locally. Methods. We measured changes in the coagulability of aortic blood samples immediately before and within 2 min after injection of the last bolus of iohexol (NICM) prior to any intervention procedure in 30 patients with PAOD. Samples were analyzed using thromboelastography (TEG) to identify changes in the coagulability of the aortic blood samples. Results. TEG tracings of samples taken from the aorta after injection of NICM showed a significant increase in R time (time to fibrin formation) (p = 0.036) and in k time (dynamics of clot formation) (p = 0.028) and a reduction in Angle (decreased acceleration of fibrin build-up) (p = 0.013), Maximal amplitude (MA) (reduced ultimate clot strength) (p = 0.018) and Coagulation Index (CI) (p = 0.032). Conclusion. These changes in TEG parameters show that the local effect of NICM is a reduction in coagulation activity rather than the activation suggested by some previous studies.

  14. Premedication of patients for prior urticarial reaction to iodinated contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, Amy B; Hartman, Robert P; Hoskin, Tanya L; Carter, Rickey E; Maddox, Daniel E; Hunt, Christopher H; Hesley, Gina K

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether premedication of patients with a history of urticaria after low osmolality contrast media (LOCM) results in fewer subsequent reactions, and if a benefit is seen, to determine which premedication regimen results in the fewest reactions. The subsequent contrast enhanced studies of patients who experienced urticaria after intravenous LOCM between 2002 and 2009 were reviewed to determine whether an additional reaction occurred. Patients undergoing subsequent studies received either no premedication, or premedication with diphenhydramine alone, corticosteroid alone, or corticosteroid plus diphenhydramine. Reactions occurring without premedication were termed repeat reactions and reactions occurring after premedication were termed breakthrough reactions. Fifty patients with a history of urticaria after LOCM met the inclusion criteria and underwent 133 subsequent contrast enhanced studies. Repeat reactions occurred in 7.6% (5/66) of subsequent studies in patients receiving no premedication. Breakthrough reactions occurred in 8% (2/25), 46% (12/26), and 44% (7/16) of subsequent studies in patients receiving premedication with diphenhydramine, corticosteroid, and corticosteroid plus diphenhydramine, respectively. All subsequent reactions consisted of urticaria as the most severe manifestation; no hemodynamic instability or respiratory compromise occurred. In multivariate analysis, premedication with corticosteroid was significantly associated with higher rate of breakthrough reaction relative to no premedication (OR 14.3, 95% CI: 4.1-50.4), as was premedication with corticosteroid plus diphenhydramine (OR 8.3, 95% CI: 1.8-37.9). The results suggest that premedication of patients with a history of urticaria after LOCM may not be necessary.

  15. Effect and distribution of contrast medium after injection into the anterior suprachoroidal space in ex vivo eyes.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Gabriela S; Salmon, Jacklyn H; Mantuo, Rebecca; Feingold, Steven; Dayton, Paul A; Gilger, Brian C

    2011-07-29

    To determine the effects and posterior distribution of injections made into the anterior suprachoroidal space (SCS). The anterior SCS of adult porcine and canine ex vivo eyes was cannulated. Latex injections and high frequency ultrasound (50 MHz) was used to image the effect and distension of the SCS. Flow characteristics and percentage maximal distribution of microbubble contrast injection into the SCS were assessed by 2D and 3D ultrasound. Mean (SD) distension of the SCS with PBS increased from 1.57 (0.48) mm after injection of 250 μL to 3.28 (0.57) mm with 1000 μL PBS. Eyes injected at physiologic IOP had no significant difference in SCS distension. In real-time 2D ultrasound, the contrast agent flowed from the injection site to the opposite ventral anterior SCS and the posterior SCS. Contrast arrived at the opposite and posterior SCS 7.8 (4.6) and 7.7 (4.6) seconds after injection, respectively. In sagittal images, contrast was visible in 24.0%to 27.2% of the SCS; in 10 of 12 eyes, contrast reached the posterior pole of the eye. In 3D images, contrast medium occupied 39.0% to 52.1% of the entire SCS. These results suggest that the SCS can expand, in a dose-dependent manner, to accommodate various volumes of fluid and that it is possible to image the SCS with ultrasound contrast. The authors' hypothesis that a single anterior SCS injection can reach the ocular posterior segment was supported. Further development of SCS injections for treatment of the ocular posterior segment is warranted.

  16. Direct cardiac effects of an ionic and a non-ionic contrast medium in dogs.

    PubMed

    Palik, I; Szente, A; Köszeghy, G A; Koltai, M Z; Kiss, V; Pogátsa, G

    1986-11-01

    Direct cardiac effects of ionic diatrizoate (Uromiro) and non-ionic iopamidol (Iopamiro) were investigated in "in situ" heart-lung preparation of 19 vagotomized dogs. Diatrizoate was found to induce considerably greater alteration in plasma osmolality and subsequent dehydration of the myocardium compared with iopamidol. Myocardial dehydration resulted in a decrease of left ventricular compliance and in that of cardiac performance. Diatrizoate was shown to influence the myocardium not only by its hyperosmolarity but also by a direct action. Heart rate was reduced by both contrast media.

  17. Monomer-coated very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles as contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging: preclinical in vivo characterization.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Susanne; Schnorr, Jorg; Pilgrimm, Herbert; Hamm, Bernd; Taupitz, Matthias

    2002-04-01

    Preclinical in-vivo characterization of a newly developed MR contrast medium consisting of very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP) coated with citrate (VSOP-C184). VSOP-C184 (core diameter: 4 nm; total diameter: 8.6 nm; relaxivities in water at 0.94 T (T1) 20.1 and (T2) 37.1 l/[mmol*sec]) was investigated to determine its pharmacokinetics, efficacy, acute single dose toxicity, repeated dose toxicity, and genotoxicity. The plasma elimination half-life at 0.045 mmol Fe/kg was 21.3 +/- 5.5 minutes in rats and 36.1 +/- 4.2 minutes in pigs, resulting in a T1-relaxation time of plasma of < 100 milliseconds for 30 minutes in pigs. The particles are mainly cleared via the phagocytosing system of the liver. MR angiography at a dose of 0.045 mmol Fe/kg shows an excellent depiction of the thoracic and abdominal vasculature in rats and of the coronary arteries in pigs. The LD50 in mice is > 17.9 mmol Fe/kg. A good tolerance and safety profile was found. The experiments indicate, that VSOP-C184 may be a well tolerated and safe contrast medium for MR imaging that can be effectively used for MR angiography including visualization of the coronary arteries.

  18. Comparison of single- and dual-tracer pharmacokinetic modeling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data using low, medium, and high molecular weight contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Orth, Robert C; Bankson, James; Price, Roger; Jackson, Edward F

    2007-10-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters corresponding to perfused microvascular volume determined from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI data were compared to immunohistochemical measures of microvascular density (MVD) and perfused microvascular density. DCE MRI data from human mammary tumors (MDA-MB-435) implanted in nude mice using low (Gd-DTPA, MW approximately equal 0.6 kDa), medium (Gadomer-17, MW(eff) approximately equal 35 kDa), and high (PG-Gd-DTPA, MW approximately equal 220 kDa) molecular weight contrast agents were analyzed with single- and dual-tracer pharmacokinetic models. MVD values were determined by two manual counting methods, "hot spot" and summed region of interest (SROI). Pharmacokinetic parameters determined using the single-tracer model (Gd-DTPA [n = 15] and Gadomer-17 [n = 13]) did not correlate with MVD measures using either manual counting method. For dual-tracer studies (Gadomer-17/Gd-DTPA [n = 15] and PG-Gd-DTPA/Gd-DTPA [n = 13]), pharmacokinetic parameters demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with MVD determined by the SROI method, but not the "hot spot" method. Ten mice successfully underwent intravital FITC-labeled lectin perfusion with the hemisphere of highest lectin labeling correlating with pharmacokinetic parameter values in 9 of 10 tumors (single-tracer Gd-DTPA [n = 2], single-tracer Gadomer-17 [n = 3], and dual-tracer Gadomer-17/Gd-DTPA [n = 5]). This study demonstrates that dual-tracer DCE MRI studies yield pharmacokinetic parameters that correlate with immunohistochemical measures of MVD.

  19. Intravenous contrast ultrasound examination using contrast-tuned imaging (CnTI) and the contrast medium SonoVue for discrimination between benign and malignant adnexal masses with solid components.

    PubMed

    Testa, A C; Timmerman, D; Van Belle, V; Fruscella, E; Van Holsbeke, C; Savelli, L; Ferrazzi, E; Leone, F P G; Marret, H; Tranquart, F; Exacoustos, C; Nazzaro, G; Bokor, D; Magri, F; Van Huffel, S; Ferrandina, G; Valentin, L

    2009-12-01

    To determine whether intravenous contrast ultrasound examination is superior to gray-scale or power Doppler ultrasound for discrimination between benign and malignant adnexal masses with complex ultrasound morphology. In an international multicenter study, 134 patients with an ovarian mass with solid components or a multilocular cyst with more than 10 cyst locules, underwent a standardized transvaginal ultrasound examination followed by contrast examination using the contrast-tuned imaging technique and intravenous injection of the contrast medium SonoVue(R). Time intensity curves were constructed, and peak intensity, area under the intensity curve, time to peak, sharpness and half wash-out time were calculated. The sensitivity and specificity with regard to malignancy were calculated and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curves were drawn for gray-scale, power Doppler and contrast variables and for pattern recognition (subjective assignment of a certainly benign, probably benign, uncertain or malignant diagnosis, using gray-scale and power Doppler ultrasound findings). The gold standard was the histological diagnosis of the surgically removed tumors. After exclusions (surgical removal of the mass > 3 months after the ultrasound examination, technical problems), 72 adnexal masses with solid components were used in our statistical analyses. The values for peak contrast signal intensity and area under the contrast signal intensity curve in malignant tumors were significantly higher than those in borderline tumors and benign tumors, while those for the benign and borderline tumors were similar. The area under the ROC curve of the best contrast variable with regard to diagnosing borderline or invasive malignancy (0.84) was larger than that of the best gray-scale (0.75) and power Doppler ultrasound variable (0.79) but smaller than that of pattern recognition (0.93). Findings on ultrasound contrast examination differed between benign and malignant tumors but there

  20. Myocardial rupture associated with bolus injection of contrast medium during computed tomographic study in a patient with acute myocardial infarction: a rare but lethal complication.

    PubMed

    Lai, Vincent; Hau, K C; Lau, H Y; Chan, W C

    2009-08-01

    Well-documented potential cardiovascular complications associated with the use of contrast media include bradycardia, hypotension, arrhythmia, and conduction disturbances. Rupture of the myocardium after acute myocardial infarction is a known cause of death, but has yet to be recognised as a potential complication of the use of a bolus injection of contrast medium. On the contrary, contrast-enhanced computed tomographic studies have been performed widely for the diagnosis and evaluation of myocardial infarction. We report a case of complicated myocardial rupture after a single bolus injection of contrast medium during a computed tomographic study in an elderly woman with acute myocardial infarction, which led to cardiac tamponade and rapid death. Although rare, this should alert us to the need for cautious use of contrast medium in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  1. Quantitative analysis applied to contrast medium extravasation by using the computed-tomography number within the region of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kim, Moon-Jib; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kim, Sun-Ju; Kim, Kwang; Kwak, Byung-Joon

    2014-02-01

    The present study was carried out to present a method to analyze extravasation quantitatively by measuring the computed tomography (CT) number after determining the region of interest (ROI) in the CT images obtained from patients suspected of extravasation induced by contrast medium auto-injection. To achieve this, we divided the study subjects into a group of patients who incurred extravasation and a group of patients who underwent routine scans without incurring extravasation. The CT numbers at IV sites were obtained as reference values, and CT numbers at extravasation sites and hepatic portal veins, respectively, were obtained as relative values. Thereupon, the predicted time for extravasation ( T EP ) and the predicted ratio for extravasation ( R EP ) of an extravasation site were obtained and analyzed quantitatively. In the case of extravasation induced by a dual auto-injector, the values of the CT numbers were confirmed to be lower and the extravasation site to be enlarged when compared to the extravasation induced by a single autoinjector. This is because the physiological saline introduced after the injection of the contrast agent diluted the concentration of the extravasated contrast agent. Additionally, the T EP caused by the auto-injector was about 40 seconds, and we could perform a precise quantitative assessment of the site suspected of extravasation. In conclusion, the dual auto-injection method, despite its advantage of reducing the volume of contrast agent and improving the quality of images for patients with good vascular integrity, was judged to be likely to increase the risk of extravasation and aggravate outcomes for patients with poor vascular integrity by enlarging extravasation sites.

  2. Clinical analysis of contributors to the delayed gallbladder opacification following the use of water-soluble contrast medium

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ming-Chang; Kok, Victor C; Lee, Ming-Yung; Hsu, Soa-Min; Lee, Pei-Yu; Chang, Che-Wei; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Juan, Chi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Gallbladder opacification (GBO) on computed tomography (CT) imaging may obscure certain pathological or emergent conditions in the gallbladder, such as neoplasms, stones, and hemorrhagic cholecystitis. This study aimed to investigate the clinical contributing factors that could predict the presence of delayed GBO determined by CT. Methods This study retrospectively evaluated 243 consecutive patients who received enhanced CT or intravenous pyelography imaging and then underwent abdominal CT imaging within 5 days. According to the interval between imaging, the patients were divided into group A (1 day), group B (2 or 3 days), and group C (4 or 5 days). Three radiologists evaluated CT images to determine GBO. Fisher’s exact test and multivariate backward stepwise elimination logistic regression were performed. Results Positive GBO was significantly associated with the interval between imaging studies, contrast type, contrast volume, renal function, and hypertransaminasemia (P<0.05). Multivariate backward stepwise elimination logistic regression analysis of the three groups identified contrast type and hypertransaminasemia as independent predictors of GBO in group B patients (odds ratio [OR], 13.52, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.72–106.38 and OR, 3.43, 95% CI, 1.31–8.98, respectively; P<0.05). Hypertransaminasemia was the only independent predictor of GBO in group C patients with an OR of 7.2 (95% CI, 1.62–31.73). Hypertransaminasemia was noted in three patients (100%) who initially underwent imaging 5 days prior to GBO. Conclusion Delayed GBO on CT imaging may be associated with laboratory hypertransaminasemia, particularly in patients receiving contrast medium over a period of ≥4 days. A detailed clinical history, physical examination, and further workup are of paramount importance for investigating the underlying cause behind the hypertransaminasemia. PMID:27660453

  3. Continuum of Vasodilator Stress From Rest to Contrast Medium to Adenosine Hyperemia for Fractional Flow Reserve Assessment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nils P; Jeremias, Allen; Zimmermann, Frederik M; Adjedj, Julien; Witt, Nils; Hennigan, Barry; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Maehara, Akiko; Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Barbato, Emanuele; Esposito, Giovanni; Trimarco, Bruno; Rioufol, Gilles; Park, Seung-Jung; Yang, Hyoung-Mo; Baptista, Sérgio B; Chrysant, George S; Leone, Antonio M; Berry, Colin; De Bruyne, Bernard; Gould, K Lance; Kirkeeide, Richard L; Oldroyd, Keith G; Pijls, Nico H J; Fearon, William F

    2016-04-25

    This study compared the diagnostic performance with adenosine-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) ≤0.8 of contrast-based FFR (cFFR), resting distal pressure (Pd)/aortic pressure (Pa), and the instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR). FFR objectively identifies lesions that benefit from medical therapy versus revascularization. However, FFR requires maximal vasodilation, usually achieved with adenosine. Radiographic contrast injection causes submaximal coronary hyperemia. Therefore, intracoronary contrast could provide an easy and inexpensive tool for predicting FFR. We recruited patients undergoing routine FFR assessment and made paired, repeated measurements of all physiology metrics (Pd/Pa, iFR, cFFR, and FFR). Contrast medium and dose were per local practice, as was the dose of intracoronary adenosine. Operators were encouraged to perform both intracoronary and intravenous adenosine assessments and a final drift check to assess wire calibration. A central core lab analyzed blinded pressure tracings in a standardized fashion. A total of 763 subjects were enrolled from 12 international centers. Contrast volume was 8 ± 2 ml per measurement, and 8 different contrast media were used. Repeated measurements of each metric showed a bias <0.005, but a lower SD (less variability) for cFFR than resting indexes. Although Pd/Pa and iFR demonstrated equivalent performance against FFR ≤0.8 (78.5% vs. 79.9% accuracy; p = 0.78; area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve: 0.875 vs. 0.881; p = 0.35), cFFR improved both metrics (85.8% accuracy and 0.930 area; p < 0.001 for each) with an optimal binary threshold of 0.83. A hybrid decision-making strategy using cFFR required adenosine less often than when based on either Pd/Pa or iFR. cFFR provides diagnostic performance superior to that of Pd/Pa or iFR for predicting FFR. For clinical scenarios or health care systems in which adenosine is contraindicated or prohibitively expensive, cFFR offers a universal technique to

  4. Investigations into the environmental fate and effects of iopromide (ultravist), a widely used iodinated X-ray contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Länge, Reinhard; Schweinfurth, Hermann; Tschampel, Matthias; Rehmann, Irmgard

    2002-01-01

    lodinated X-ray contrast media are pharmaceuticals which are biologically inert and metabolically stable during their passage through the body and are excreted almost completely within a day into waste water. They are not readily biodegradable. However, in a test system simulating sewage treatment, we were able to show that the model compound iopromide (N,N'-bis(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-2,4,6-triiodo-5-methoxyacetylamino-N-methyliso-phthalamide) was amenable to primary degradation. The resulting degradation product (5-amino-N'N'-bis(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-2,4,6-triiodo-N-methyliso-phthalamide) showed a faster photolysis than the parent compound. Additionally this product was further degraded in a test system simulating surface water conditions. Short-term toxicity of the primary degradation product was low, i.e. no effects on any of various aquatic species could be found even at concentrations of 1 gl(-1). Additionally no chronic toxicity of the degradation product was observed in an early-life stage test with zebrafish at the highest tested concentration of 100mgl(-1). Based on the results from model systems a degradation pathway for iopromide is postulated. Though further work showing the transferability of the laboratory results to environmental conditions is necessary the presently available information on the environmental fate and effects of iopromide and its degradation products do not provide evidence of a risk for aquatic life caused by the introduction of this contrast medium into waste water.

  5. Dose perturbations due to contrast medium and air in MammoSite registered treatment: An experimental and Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.-W.; Mitra, R.; Allen Li, X.; Das, Indra J.

    2005-07-15

    In the management of early breast cancer, a partial breast irradiation technique called MammoSite registered (Proxima Therapeutic Inc., Alpharetta, GA) has been advocated in recent years. In MammoSite, a balloon implanted at the surgical cavity during tumor excision is filled with a radio-opaque solution, and radiation is delivered via a high dose rate brachytherapy source situated at the center of the balloon. Frequently air may be introduced during placement of the balloon and/or injection of the contrast solution into the balloon. The purpose of this work is to quantify as well as to understand dose perturbations due to the presence of a high-Z contrast medium and/or an air bubble with measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. In addition, the measured dose distribution is compared with that obtained from a commercial treatment planning system (Nucletron PLATO system). For a balloon diameter of 42 mm, the dose variation as a function of distance from the balloon surface is measured for various concentrations of a radio-opaque solution (in the range 5%-25% by volume) with a small volume parallel plate ion chamber and a micro-diode detector placed perpendicular to the balloon axis. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to provide a basic understanding of the interaction mechanism and the magnitude of dose perturbation at the interface near balloon surface. Our results show that the radio-opaque concentration produces dose perturbation up to 6%. The dose perturbation occurs mostly within the distances <1 mm from the balloon surface. The Plato system that does not include heterogeneity correction may be sufficient for dose planning at distances {>=}10 mm from the balloon surface for the iodine concentrations used in the MammoSite procedures. The dose enhancement effect near the balloon surface (<1 mm) due to the higher iodine concentration is not correctly predicted by the Plato system. The dose near the balloon surface may be increased by 0.5% per cm{sup 3} of air

  6. Assessment of errors caused by X-ray scatter and use of contrast medium when using CT-based attenuation correction in PET.

    PubMed

    Ay, Mohammad Reza; Zaidi, Habib

    2006-11-01

    Quantitative image reconstruction in positron emission tomography (PET) requires an accurate attenuation map of the object under study for the purpose of attenuation correction. Current dual-modality PET/CT systems offer significant advantages over stand-alone PET, including decreased overall scanning time and increased accuracy in lesion localisation and detectability. However, the contamination of CT data with scattered radiation and misclassification of contrast medium with high-density bone in CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) are known to generate artefacts in the attenuation map and thus the resulting PET images. The purpose of this work was to quantitatively measure the impact of scattered radiation and contrast medium on the accuracy of CTAC. Our recently developed MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo X-ray CT simulator for modelling both fan- and cone-beam CT scanners and the Eidolon dedicated 3D PET Monte Carlo simulator were used to generate realigned PET/CT data sets. The impact of X-ray scattered radiation on the accuracy of CTAC was investigated through simulation of a uniform cylindrical water phantom for both a commercial fan-beam multi-slice and a prototype cone-beam flat panel detector-based CT scanner. The influence of contrast medium was studied by simulation of a cylindrical phantom containing different concentrations of contrast medium. Moreover, an experimental study using an anthropomorphic striatal phantom was conducted for quantitative evaluation of errors arising from the presence of contrast medium by calculating the apparent recovery coefficient (ARC) in the presence of different concentrations of contrast medium. The analysis of attenuation correction factors (ACFs) for the simulated cylindrical water phantom in both fan- and cone-beam CT scanners showed that the contamination of CT data with scattered radiation in the absence of scatter removal causes underestimation of the true ACFs, namely by 7.3% and 28.2% in the centre for the two

  7. Potentials and limitations of low-concentration contrast medium (150 mg iodine/ml) in CT pulmonary angiography.

    PubMed

    Radon, M R; Kaduthodil, M J; Jagdish, J; Matthews, S; Hill, C; Bull, M J; Morcos, S K

    2011-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of producing diagnostic multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) pulmonary angiography with low iodine concentration contrast media (150 mg iodine/ml) in patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism. Ninety-five randomized patients underwent MDCT (64 row) pulmonary angiography with 100ml iopromide either at low concentration (LC) of 150 mg iodine/ml (n=45) or high concentration (HC) of 300 mg iodine/ml (n=50), delivered at the rate of 5 ml/s via a power injector. Two experienced radiologists, blinded to the concentration used, subjectively assessed the diagnostic quality and confidence using a four-point scale [1=poor (not diagnostic), 2=satisfactory, 3=good, 4=excellent]. Attenuation values (in HU) were measured in the main proximal branches of the pulmonary arteries. The median diagnostic quality score for both observers was 3.5 (interquartile range 3-4) in the HC group and 2.5 (interquartile range 1.5-3) in the LC group (p<0.01). The median diagnostic confidence score for both observers was 4 (interquartile range 3-4) in the HC group and 3 (interquartile range 1.5-4) in the LC group (p<0.01). Both observers rated examinations as diagnostic in 69% of cases in the LC group, compared with 96% of cases in the HC group. Good interobserver agreement was found in both groups (K value 0.72 in the LC group and 0.73 in the HC). Obesity, poor scan timing, and dilution by venous return of non-opacified blood were the main reasons for a reduction in diagnostic quality of examinations in the LC group. Despite a 50% reduction of contrast medium dose in comparison to the standard technique, 150 mg iodine/ml can produce diagnostic MDCT pulmonary angiogram studies in the absence of obesity or high cardiac output and hyper-dynamic pulmonary circulation. Reducing the dose of contrast media would minimize the risk of contrast nephropathy in patients at risk of this complication, particularly those suffering from congestive heart failure in whom

  8. Current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for external and internal rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    van Iersel, Jan J; Paulides, Tim J C; Verheijen, Paul M; Lumley, John W; Broeders, Ivo A M J; Consten, Esther C J

    2016-01-01

    External and internal rectal prolapse with their affiliated rectocele and enterocele, are associated with debilitating symptoms such as obstructed defecation, pelvic pain and faecal incontinence. Since perineal procedures are associated with a higher recurrence rate, an abdominal approach is commonly preferred. Despite the description of greater than three hundred different procedures, thus far no clear superiority of one surgical technique has been demonstrated. Ventral mesh rectopexy (VMR) is a relatively new and promising technique to correct rectal prolapse. In contrast to the abdominal procedures of past decades, VMR avoids posterolateral rectal mobilisation and thereby minimizes the risk of postoperative constipation. Because of a perceived acceptable recurrence rate, good functional results and low mesh-related morbidity in the short to medium term, VMR has been popularized in the past decade. Laparoscopic or robotic-assisted VMR is now being progressively performed internationally and several articles and guidelines propose the procedure as the treatment of choice for rectal prolapse. In this article, an outline of the current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for the treatment of internal and external rectal prolapse is presented. PMID:27275090

  9. Effect of the surface potential of the hemodialysis membrane and the electrical charge of the gadolinium contrast medium on dialyzability.

    PubMed

    Okada, Susumu; Inoue, Kohei; Kijima, Tetsuji; Katagiri, Kiwayo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    2003-02-01

    To search for methods of improving the excretion of injected gadolinium contrast medium (GdCM) in hemodialysis (HD) patients, we investigated the effect of the surface potential of HD membranes and the electrical charge of GdCM on the dialyzability of GdCM. Ionic (Gd-DTPA) or non-ionic (Gd-DO3A) GdCM solutions were dialyzed using a clinical HD unit. Two types of HD membranes, AN69 with a surface potential and PMMA without, were used. GdCM clearance was then calculated. Gd-DTPA clearance was significantly higher for PMMA membranes than for AN69 membranes. Gd-DO3A clearance was slightly higher for AN69 membranes than for PMMA membranes. The difference in Gd-DTPA and Gd-DO3A clearance values was not significant when PMMA membranes were used. These data indicate that non-ionic GdCM is preferable to ionic GdCM in patients receiving dialysis through an electrically positive membrane. Either ionic or non-ionic GdCM can be used when a normal dialysis membrane is being used.

  10. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  11. SU-C-12A-03: The Impact of Contrast Medium On Radiation Dose in CT: A Systematic Evaluation Across 58 Patient Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sahbaee, P; Samei, E; Segars, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of contrast medium on radiation dose as a function of time via Monte Carlo simulation from the liver CT scan across a library of 5D XCAT models Methods: A validated Monte Carlo simulation package (PENELOPE) was employed to model a CT system (LightSpeed 64 VCT, GE Healthcare). The radiation dose was estimated from a common abdomen CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on a library of adult extended cardiac-torso (5D XCAT) phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The 5D XCAT models were created based on patient-specific iodine concentration-time results from our computational contrast medium propagation model for different intravenous injection protocols. To enable a dynamic estimation of radiation dose, each organ in the model was assigned to its own time-concentration curve via the PENELOPE package, material.exe. Using the Monte Carlo, for each scan time point after the injection, 80 million photons were initiated and tracked through the phantoms. Finally, the dose to the liver was tallied from the deposited energy. Results: Monte Carlo simulation results of radiation dose delivered to the liver from the XCAT models indicated up to 30% increase in dose for different time after the administration of contrast medium. Conclusion: The contrast enhancement is employed in over 60% of imaging modalities, which not only remarkably affects the CT image quality, but also increases the radiation dose by as much as 70%. The postinjection multiple acquisition in several enhanced CT protocols, makes the radiation dose increment through the use of contrast medium, an inevitable factor in optimization of these protocols. The relationship between radiation dose and injected contrast medium as a function of time studied in this work allows optimization of contrast administration for vulnerable individuals.

  12. Evaluation of the Dark-Medium Objective Lens in Counting Asbestos Fibers by Phase-Contrast Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Nelson, John H.; Kashon, Michael L.; Harper, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A Japanese round-robin study revealed that analysts who used a dark-medium (DM) objective lens reported higher fiber counts from American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) Proficiency Analytical Testing (PAT) chrysotile samples than those using a standard objective lens, but the cause of this difference was not investigated at that time. The purpose of this study is to determine any major source of this difference by performing two sets of round-robin studies. For the first round-robin study, 15 AIHA PAT samples (five each of chrysotile and amosite generated by water-suspended method, and five chrysotile generated by aerosolization method) were prepared with relocatable cover slips and examined by nine laboratories. A second round-robin study was then performed with six chrysotile field sample slides by six out of nine laboratories who participated in the first round-robin study. In addition, two phase-shift test slides to check analysts’ visibility and an eight-form diatom test plate to compare resolution between the two objectives were examined. For the AIHA PAT chrysotile reference slides, use of the DM objective resulted in consistently higher fiber counts (1.45 times for all data) than the standard objective (P-value < 0.05), regardless of the filter generation (water-suspension or aerosol) method. For the AIHA PAT amosite reference and chrysotile field sample slides, the fiber counts between the two objectives were not significantly different. No statistically significant differences were observed in the visibility of blocks of the test slides between the two objectives. Also, the DM and standard objectives showed no pattern of differences in viewing the fine lines and/or dots of each species images on the eight-form diatom test plate. Among various potential factors that might affect the analysts’ performance of fiber counts, this study supports the greater contrast caused by the different phase plate absorptions as the main cause of high counts for

  13. Evaluation of the dark-medium objective lens in counting asbestos fibers by phase-contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Nelson, John H; Kashon, Michael L; Harper, Martin

    2015-06-01

    A Japanese round-robin study revealed that analysts who used a dark-medium (DM) objective lens reported higher fiber counts from American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) Proficiency Analytical Testing (PAT) chrysotile samples than those using a standard objective lens, but the cause of this difference was not investigated at that time. The purpose of this study is to determine any major source of this difference by performing two sets of round-robin studies. For the first round-robin study, 15 AIHA PAT samples (five each of chrysotile and amosite generated by water-suspended method, and five chrysotile generated by aerosolization method) were prepared with relocatable cover slips and examined by nine laboratories. A second round-robin study was then performed with six chrysotile field sample slides by six out of nine laboratories who participated in the first round-robin study. In addition, two phase-shift test slides to check analysts' visibility and an eight-form diatom test plate to compare resolution between the two objectives were examined. For the AIHA PAT chrysotile reference slides, use of the DM objective resulted in consistently higher fiber counts (1.45 times for all data) than the standard objective (P-value < 0.05), regardless of the filter generation (water-suspension or aerosol) method. For the AIHA PAT amosite reference and chrysotile field sample slides, the fiber counts between the two objectives were not significantly different. No statistically significant differences were observed in the visibility of blocks of the test slides between the two objectives. Also, the DM and standard objectives showed no pattern of differences in viewing the fine lines and/or dots of each species images on the eight-form diatom test plate. Among various potential factors that might affect the analysts' performance of fiber counts, this study supports the greater contrast caused by the different phase plate absorptions as the main cause of high counts for the

  14. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Improvement of the optical imaging of objects in a strongly scattering medium by means of contrast-enhancing dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai S.; Podgaetskii, Vitalii M.; Smirnov, A. V.; Tereshchenko, Sergei A.; Tomilova, Larisa G.

    1999-12-01

    The problem of enhancing the contrast of optical images in a strongly scattering medium by means of luminescent and absorbing dyes, topical in laser tomography, is examined. Preparations based on diphthalocyanine compounds were selected on the grounds of their tropism and resistance to the action of heat and light. Images with enhanced contrast in model scattering media (an aqueous solution of milk and margarine) were obtained in the IR region of the spectrum using the radiation of a picosecond neodymium laser.

  15. Intravenous injection of high and medium concentrations of computed tomography contrast media and related heat sensation, local pain, and adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Masui, Takayuki; Katayama, Motoyuki; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Sakahara, Harumi

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of acute adverse reactions and degrees of heat sensation and local pain after intravenous injection of high and medium concentrations of iodinated contrast medium for computed tomography (CT). A prospective study was performed involving 729 patients who underwent contrast CT scans. High-concentration (370 mgI/mL) and medium-concentration (300 mgI/mL) iodinated contrast medium was assigned to 342 patients (group H, aged 20-90 years, mean = 59.8 years) and to 387 patients (group M, aged 20-95 years, mean = 61.7 years), respectively. An injection rate of contrast medium (1, 2, or 4 mL/s) at a base volume of 2 mL/kg of body weight was selected according to the protocols for the evaluated diseases and regions. Each patient was assessed for heat sensation and local pain at the injection site using a visual analog scale (ranging from none for 0 to severe for 10). Acute adverse reactions were recorded when they occurred. There were no significant differences in patient background factors, including age, sex, history of prior adverse reactions, and allergies, between the 2 groups. The score for heat sensation was significantly higher in group H than in group M (4.46 +/- 2.44 vs. 3.44 +/- 2.45; P < 0.0001 for heat sensation). The data did not show a higher incidence of adverse reactions in group H than in group M (5 [1.46%] of 342 patients vs. 2 [0.52%] of 387 patients; P = 0.26) or a higher score for local pain in group H than in group M (0.98 +/- 1.70 vs. 0.88 +/- 1.49; P = 0.66), respectively. High and medium concentrations of iodinated contrast medium can be used for CT study with comparable safety profiles even though heat sensation produced by the high-concentration CM is greater than that produced by the medium-concentration CM.

  16. Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography and Risk of Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; How, Chorng-Kuang; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsuan-Jen; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term association between contrast medium exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We conducted a population-based cohort study using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7100 patients with nonadvanced CKD who underwent contrast medium-enhanced CT were identified and served as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used the propensity score to match 7100 nonadvanced CKD patients, who underwent noncontrast medium-enhanced CT to serve as the comparison cohort. The age, sex, index year, and frequency of undergoing CTs were also matched between the study and comparison cohorts. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of ESRD or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression. Contrast medium exposure was not identified as a risk factor for developing ESRD in nonadvanced CKD patients after confounders adjustment (adjusted HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66–1.26; P = 0.580). We further divided the patients who underwent CTs with contrast medium use into ≤1 exposure per year on average, >1 and <2 exposure per year on average, and ≥2 exposure per year on average. After adjusting for confounders, we identified a much higher risk for developing ESRD in the 2 groups of >1 and <2 exposure per year on average and ≥2 exposure per year on average (adjusted HR = 8.13; 95% CI, 5.57–11.87 and adjusted HR = 12.08; 95% CI, 7.39–19.75, respectively) compared with the patients who underwent CTs without contrast medium use. This long-term follow-up study demonstrated that contrast medium exposure was not associated with an increased risk of ESRD development in nonadvanced CKD patients. PMID:27100424

  17. MO-E-17A-02: Incorporation of Contrast Medium Dynamics in Anthropomorphic Phantoms: The Advent of 5D XCAT Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sahbaee, P; Samei, E; Segars, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a unique method to incorporate the dynamics of contrast-medium propagation into the anthropomorphic phantom, to generate a five-dimensional (5D) patient model for multimodality imaging studies. Methods: A compartmental model of blood circulation network within the body was embodied into an extended cardiac-torso (4D-XCAT) patient model. To do so, a computational physiologic model of the human cardiovascular system was developed which includes a series of compartments representing heart, vessels, and organs. Patient-specific cardiac output and blood volume were used as inputs influenced by the weight, height, age, and gender of the patient's model. For a given injection protocol and given XCAT model, the contrast-medium transmission within the body was described by a series of mass balance differential equations, the solutions to which provided the contrast enhancement-time curves for each organ; thereby defining the tissue materials including the contrastmedium within the XCAT model. A library of time-dependent organ materials was then defined. Each organ in each voxelized 4D-XCAT phantom was assigned to a corresponding time-varying material to create the 5D-XCAT phantom in which the fifth dimension is blood/contrast-medium within the temporal domain. Results: The model effectively predicts the time-varying concentration behavior of various contrast-medium administration in each organ for different patient models as function of patient size (weight/height) and different injection protocol factors (injection rate and pattern, iodine concentration or volume). The contrast enhanced XCAT patient models was developed based on the concentration of iodine as a function of time after injection. Conclusion: Majority of medical imaging systems take advantage of contrast-medium administration in terms of better image quality, the effect of which was ignored in previous optimization studies. The study enables a comprehensive optimization of contrast

  18. [CT evaluation of extravascular perfusion of contrast medium and its potential to a new method of diagnosis: an experimental study using macro, micro-molecular contrast media].

    PubMed

    Sako, M; Sugimoto, K; Matsumoto, S; Hirota, S; Fujita, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Kuwata, Y; Tomita, M; Murakami, T; Kono, M

    1994-03-25

    To evaluate the dynamics of extravascular perfusion, dynamic CT with two different molecular sized contrast media was performed on VX2 tumor of rabbit. The first dynamic CT was performed with a bolus injection of iopamidol (IP:120 mgI/ml, 5 ml). After ascertaining that the tumor attenuation had returned to the pre-contrast level, the second dynamic CT was performed on the same slice with bolus injection of iodoethylated starch (IES:120 mgI/ml). The time-density (T-D) curves of the same tumor area on the images obtained by two contrast media were compared. The T-D curve with IP showed definitely higher level than that with IES. This occurrence can be explained that IP, 13 A in size, has higher permeability distributing not only in the intravascular space, but also into the extravascular space. On the other hand, IES, 200 A in size, will stay mostly in the intravascular space. From this, we consider that the attenuation difference between the two curves will be an indicator for the dynamics of extravascular perfusion, suggesting to become a new method for CT diagnosis.

  19. [Significance of a nonionic renographic contrast medium (Iopamidol 300) in the roentgen diagnosis of the kidneys and urinary tract in children].

    PubMed

    Schneider, K; Fendel, H

    1984-10-01

    The ionic contrast media used so far have been associated with considerable risks in infants and children. The high osmolality of these media did not always permit a dosage sufficient for kidney imaging in the nephrographic and in the pyelographic phase. The new non-ionic contrast media have largely reduced these risks so that their general application in infants and young children should be recommended. Intravenous urographies using the non-ionic contrast medium Iopamidol 300 (Solutrast 300) were performed in 195 children aged one day to 12 years. Good to superior urograms were obtained in 85% of the investigations. No adverse reactions caused by the osmolality of the contrast media had been observed in spite of the relative high dosage. As a result of their low osmolality and non-ionic property a safe application of high doses was possible.

  20. Current concepts in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleshman, James W; Smallwood, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    The history of rectal cancer management informs current therapy and points us in the direction of future improvements. Multidisciplinary team management of rectal cancer will move us to personalized treatment for individuals with rectal cancer in all stages.

  1. Effects of Intra-Arterial and Intravenous Iso-Osmolar Contrast Medium (Iodixanol) on the Risk of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Peter A.; Brown, Jeremiah R.

    2011-01-01

    Background The iso-osmolar contrast agent iodixanol may be associated with a lower incidence of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) than low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM), but previous meta-analyses have yielded mixed results. Objectives: To compare the incidence of CI-AKI between iodixanol and LOCM. Methods Studies were identified from literature searches to December 2009, clinicaltrials.gov, and conference abstracts from the past 2 years including 2010. Only prospective, randomized comparisons between iodixanol and LOCM with CI-AKI [increase in serum creatinine (sCr) ≥0.5 mg/dl or ≥25% from baseline, as defined in the trial] as a primary and/or secondary endpoint and a Jadad score ≥2 were included. A random-effects model was used to obtain pooled relative risks (RRs) for CI-AKI in analyses based on route of administration [intra-arterial (IA) or intravenous (IV)], definition of CI-AKI, and timing of sCr measurements. Results 145 potential articles were identified, of which 25 were included in the meta-analysis. Following IA administration (n = 19), the RR for CI-AKI (≥0.5 mg/dl definition) with iodixanol, compared with LOCM, was 0.462 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.272–0.786, p = 0.004, 15 studies]. Using the ≥25% definition, there was a lower incidence of CI-AKI with iodixanol versus LOCM, but the difference was not statistically significant (RR: 0.577, 95% CI: 0.297–1.12, p = 0.104, 11 studies). In the IV trials, there was no significant difference in the incidence of CI-AKI using either definition (≥0.5 mg/dl definition: RR: 0.967, 95% CI: 0.188–4.972, p = 0.968, 3 trials; ≥25% definition: RR: 0.656, 95% CI: 0.316–1.360, p = 0.257, 4 trials). Conclusions IA but not IV administration of iodixanol is associated with a significantly lower risk of CI-AKI than LOCM. PMID:22164156

  2. Pedal angiography in peripheral arterial occlusive disease: first-pass i.v. contrast-enhanced MR angiography with blood pool contrast medium versus intraarterial digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Kos, Sebastian; Reisinger, Clemens; Aschwanden, Markus; Bongartz, Georg M; Jacob, Augustinus L; Bilecen, Deniz

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate first-pass i.v. gadofosveset-enhanced MR angiography in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease for visualization of the pedal arteries and stenosis or occlusion of those arteries with intraarterial digital subtraction angiography as the reference standard. Twenty patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (nine women, 11 men; age-range 58-83 years) were prospectively enrolled. Gadofosveset first-pass contrast-enhanced MR angiography was performed with a 1.5-T system, a dedicated foot coil, and cuff compression to the calf. Arterial segments were assessed for degree of arterial stenosis, arterial visibility, diagnostic utility, and venous contamination. Detection of vessel stenosis or occlusion was evaluated in comparison with findings at digital subtraction angiography. The unpaired Student's t test was used to test arterial visibility with the two techniques. First-pass MR angiography with gadofosveset had good diagnostic utility in 83.9% of all segments and no venous contamination in 96.8% of all segments. There was no difference between the performance of intraarterial digital subtraction angiography and that of i.v. contrast-enhanced MR angiography in arterial visibility overall (p = 0.245) or in subgroup analysis of surgical arterial bypass targets (p = 0.202). The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of i.v. gadofosveset-enhanced MR angiography for characterization of clinically significant stenosis and occlusion were 91.4%, 96.1%, and 93.9%. In the subgroup analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 85.5%, 96.5%, and 92.1%. Gadofosveset-enhanced MR angiography of the pedal arteries in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease has arterial visibility equal to that of digital subtraction angiography and facilitates depiction of clinically significant stenosis and occlusion.

  3. The influence of buoyancy contrasts on miscible source sink flows in a porous medium with thermal inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Mats S.; Woods, Andrew W.

    We investigate the displacement of one fluid through an inclined porous sheet by the injection of a second fluid of different density. Using numerical simulation we explore the role of the density contrast between the injected and the reservoir fluid on the displacement process, in the cases where the density contrast originates from either compositional contrasts and/or temperature contrasts between the fluids. In the case where the density contrast originates from compositional differences between the fluids, the density front moves with the fluid fluid front, and gravity may accelerate or decelerate the time for the injected liquid to reach the sink. In the case where the density contrast originates from a temperature contrast between the injected fluid and the reservoir fluid, then the density front follows the thermal front. Therefore, owing to thermal inertia, it lags behind the fluid fluid front. This has a quantitative impact on the time required for the injected liquid to reach the sink. If there are both thermal and compositional contrasts between the injected and reservoir fluid, then the thermal and compositional fronts become decoupled in space. The two fronts may lead to complementary or opposing density changes; the different cases lead to vastly different patterns of displacement and time at which the injected liquid reaches the sink, even if the net change in density between reservoir and the injected fluid is the same. We discuss the implications of these phenomena for water injection in sub-surface hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. In an Appendix, we note how a viscosity across both the thermal front and the fluid fluid front can also lead to a rich spectrum of flow patterns, especially if one front is stable and the other unstable to viscous instability.

  4. Risk of contrast-medium-induced nephropathy in high-risk patients undergoing MDCT--a pooled analysis of two randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Morcos, Sameh K

    2009-04-01

    The incidence of contrast-medium-induced nephropathy (CIN) following intravenous (IV) CM administration of contrast media to renally impaired patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is not well characterized. Our objective was to investigate the incidence of CIN in patients with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 ml/min undergoing contrast-enhanced MDCT examinations and to compare the rates of CIN following the IV administration of low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM, iopamidol and iomeprol) and an iso-osmolar contrast medium (IOCM, iodixanol). A total of 301 adult patients with moderate-to-severe renal failure received a similar IV contrast dose (40 gI). Serum creatinine (SCr) was measured at screening, baseline and 48-72 +/- 6 h after the MDCT examination. Primary CIN outcome was an increase in SCr >or=0.5 mg/dl (>or=44.2 micromol/l) from baseline. The CIN rates were 2.3% in the total population, 0.6% when GFR >40 ml/min, 4.6% when GFR <40 ml/min and 7.8% in patients with GFR <30 ml/min. The incidence of CIN was significantly higher after iodixanol than after LOCM (seven patients, 4.7% following IOCM, no CIN cases following the LOCM; p = 0.007). Significant differences in favor of the LOCM were also observed in patients with GFR <40 ml/min and GFR <30 ml/min. Following the IV administration of nonionic contrast agents in patients with moderate-to-severe renal insufficiency, the risk of significant CIN seems to be low. The IOCM iodixanol caused a higher rate of CIN than the LOCM iopamidol and iomeprol, especially in high-risk patients. Differences in osmolality between these LOCM and iodixanol do not play a role in the genesis of CIN.

  5. Effect of low-osmolar contrast medium iopromide and iso-osmolar iodixanol on DNA fragmentation in renal tubular cell culture.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ulla; Connemann, Julia; Keller, Frieder

    2013-12-01

    Intravascular administration of iodinated contrast media continues to be a common cause of hospital-acquired acute kidney injury. Accumulating evidence suggests that radiocontrast agent-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with increased oxidative stress, which leads to renal tissue damage with DNA fragmentation. We therefore tested whether an iso-osmolar contrast medium (iodixanol) causes less oxidative DNA damage to renal tubular cells than a low-osmolar contrast medium (iopromide). HK-2 cells (human proximal renal tubular cell line) were incubated at different time points (10 min-2 h) with increasing concentrations (20-120 mg/ml iodine) of iodixanol or of iopromide. Oxidative DNA damage to renal tubular cells was measured by alkaline comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis). Both iso- and low-osmolar contrast agents induced time- and concentration-dependent DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation was maximal at 2 h with 120 mg/ml iodine for iopromide (32 ± 27 tail moments) and iodixanol (46 ± 41 tail moments); both were significantly different from the control value with 3.15 ± 1.6 tail moments (Student's t test; p < 0.001). After 1 and 2 h and for all concentrations, iodixanol produced significantly higher DNA fragmentation than iopromide (ANOVA for 1 h p = 0.039 and 2 h p = 0.025, respectively). We were able to demonstrate for the first time that an iso-osmolar contrast medium induced even greater oxidative stress and DNA damage than a low-osmolar agent in HK-2 cells. This could provide an explanation for the nephrotoxicity that also is observed with iodixanol in clinical practice.

  6. Nonlinear image blending for dual-energy MDCT of the abdomen: can image quality be preserved if the contrast medium dose is reduced?

    PubMed

    Mileto, Achille; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Marin, Daniele; Alfaro-Cordoba, Marcela; Eusemann, Christian D; Scribano, Emanuele; Blandino, Alfredo; Mazziotti, Silvio; Ascenti, Giorgio

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the image quality of a dual-energy nonlinear image blending technique at reduced load of contrast medium with a simulated 120-kVp linear blending technique at a full dose during portal venous phase MDCT of the abdomen. Forty-five patients (25 men, 20 women; mean age, 65.6 ± 9.7 [SD] years; mean body weight, 74.9 ± 12.4 kg) underwent contrast-enhanced single-phase dual-energy CT of the abdomen by a random assignment to one of three different contrast medium (iomeprol 400) dose injection protocols: 1.3, 1.0, or 0.65 mL/kg of body weight. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and noise at the portal vein, liver, aorta, and kidney were compared among the different datasets using the ANOVA. Three readers qualitatively assessed all datasets in a blinded and independent fashion. Nonlinear blended images at a 25% reduced dose allowed a significant improvement in CNR (p < 0.05 for all comparisons), compared with simulated 120-kVp linear blended images at a full dose. No statistically significant difference existed in CNR and noise between the nonlinear blended images at a 50% reduced dose and the simulated 120-kVp linear blended images at a full dose. Nonlinear blended images at a 50% reduced dose were considered in all cases to have acceptable image quality. The dual-energy nonlinear image blending technique allows reducing the dose of contrast medium up to 50% during portal venous phase imaging of the abdomen while preserving image quality.

  7. Influence of osmolarity of contrast medium and saline flush on computed tomography angiography: comparison of monomeric and dimeric iodinated contrast media with different iodine concentrations at an identical iodine delivery rate.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Miori; Doi, Shoko; Shimizu, Junichiro; Lee, Ki-Ja; Iwasaki, Toshiroh; Miyake, Yoh-Ichi; Yamada, Kazutaka

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of osmolarity of iodinated contrast media and saline flush on the contrast effect in thoracic computed tomography angiography (CTA) at an identical iodine delivery rate (IDR). Seven beagles were used in a cross-over experiment. The contrast media used were iohexol 350 mgI/ml (IOH350; osmolarity 844 mmol/kg) and iodixanol 320 mgI/ml (IDX320; osmolarity 290 mmol/kg). Each contrast medium was administered to groups with and without saline flush at 40.0 mgI/kg/s for all experiments. Dynamic CT scanning was performed at the ninth thoracic vertebra level. The peak value, area under the curve (AUC), and time to peak (TTP) were calculated from the time attenuation curves of the pulmonary artery and aorta. There was no significant difference between IOH350 and IDX320 with or without saline flush in the peak values for the pulmonary artery and aorta. AUC was significantly higher in groups with saline flush for both contrast media and arteries (p<0.05) with no significant difference between contrast media. TTP was significantly longer in groups with saline flush than without saline flush for both contrast media and arteries (p<0.05), with no significant difference between contrast media. There were no significant differences in the contrast effects of monomeric IOH350 and dimeric IDX320 in thoracic CTA when used at an identical IDR. Moreover, saline flush prolonged the peak duration at 600 mgI/kg. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Advantages of T2 Weighted Three Dimensional and T1 Weighted Three Dimensional Contrast Medium Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Urography in Examination of the Child Population

    PubMed Central

    Sehic, Adnan; Julardzija, Fuad; Vegar-Zubovic, Sandra; Sefic-Pasic, Irmina

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to prove the advantages of combined use of T2 weighted three dimensional (T2 W 3D) and T1 weighted three dimensional contrast medium enhanced (T1 W 3D CE) magnetic resonance (MR) urography in displaying urinary tract in child population. Material and methods: Total of 120 patients were included in the study, 71 (59%) male patients and 49 (41%) female patients. The study was conducted on the Radiology clinic, University of Sarajevo Clinical Center, during the period from February to November 2016. Patients were examined on the 1.5T and 3T MRI, with standard protocol which includes T2 W 3D and T1 W 3D contrast medium enhanced MR urography. In the post procesing quantitative measurement of signal intensity and evaluation of the display quality in the area of renal pelvis, middle of ureter and the mouth of the ureter were done. Measurement was concluded on Syngo software B13. Results: Analyzing the acquired data and statistically processing them we got results which have shown higher signal intensity of measured structures on T1 W 3D contrast medium enhanced MR urography on the level p<0.01 and p<0.05 compared to T2 W 3D MR urography in patients that had normal dynamics of contrast medium secretion. However, in kidneys with decreased function, T2 W 3D MR urography provided higher signal intensity and better display compared to T1 W 3D contrast medium enhanced MR urography on the level p<0.05 and p<0.01. Conclusion: T2 W3D MR urography is useful in imaging nonfunctional kidney as well as in patients prone to allergic reactions, where as T1 W3D CE MR urography is at an advantage over T2 W 3D MR urography in imaging the kidney functionality, kidney dynamics measurement, it provides higher MRI signal intensity required for clear 3D reconstructions. PMID:28484293

  9. MRI in local staging of rectal cancer: an update

    PubMed Central

    Tapan, Ümit; Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative imaging for staging of rectal cancer has become an important aspect of current approach to rectal cancer management, because it helps to select suitable patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and determine the appropriate surgical technique. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in assessing the depth of tumor penetration, lymph node involvement, mesorectal fascia and anal sphincter invasion, and presence of distant metastatic diseases. Currently, there is no consensus on a preferred imaging technique for preoperative staging of rectal cancer. However, high-resolution phased-array MRI is recommended as a standard imaging modality for preoperative local staging of rectal cancer, with excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and absence of ionizing radiation. This review will mainly focus on the role of MRI in preoperative local staging of rectal cancer and discuss recent advancements in MRI technique such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:25010367

  10. Can low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of iodine contrast medium in a dynamic CT study of the liver?

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroto; Okada, Masahiro; Hyodo, Tomoko; Hidaka, Syojiro; Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuki, Mitsuru; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Murakami, Takamichi

    2014-04-01

    To investigate whether low-dose dynamic CT of the liver with iterative reconstruction can reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of contrast medium. This study was approved by our institutional review board. 113 patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group A/group B (fifty-eight/fifty-five patients) underwent liver dynamic CT at 120/100 kV, with 0/40% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), with a contrast dose of 600/480 mg I/kg, respectively. Radiation exposure was estimated based on the manufacturer's phantom data. The enhancement value of the hepatic parenchyma, vessels and the tumor-to-liver contrast of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) were compared between two groups. Two readers independently assessed the CT images of the hepatic parenchyma and HCCs. The mean CT dose indices: 6.38/4.04 mGy, the dose-length products: 194.54/124.57 mGy cm, for group A/group B. The mean enhancement value of the hepatic parenchyma and the tumor-to-liver contrast of HCCs with diameters greater than 1cm in the post-contrast all phases did not differ significantly between two groups (P>0.05). The enhancement values of vessels in group B were significantly higher than that in group A in the delayed phases (P<0.05). Two reader's confidence levels for the hepatic parenchyma in the delayed phases and HCCs did not differ significantly between the groups (P>0.05). Low-dose dynamic CT with ASIR can reduce both the radiation dose and the amount of contrast medium without image quality degradation, compared to conventional dynamic CT without ASIR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  12. Systematic Review of Pelvic Exenteration With En Bloc Sacrectomy for Recurrent Rectal Adenocarcinoma: R0 Resection Predicts Disease-free Survival.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Amarasingam; Bhan, Chetan; Jenkins, John T; Antoniou, Anthony; Murphy, Jamie

    2017-03-01

    The management of recurrent rectal cancer is challenging. At the present time, pelvic exenteration with en bloc sacrectomy offers the only hope of a lasting cure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcome measures and complication rates following sacrectomy for recurrent rectal cancer. A search was conducted on Pub Med for English language articles relevant to sacrectomy for recurrent rectal cancer with no time limitations. Studies reported sacrectomy with survival data for recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma. Disease-free survival following sacrectomy for recurrent rectal cancer was the main outcome measured. A total of 220 patients with recurrent rectal cancer were included from 7 studies, of which 160 were men and 60 were women. Overall median operative time was 717 (570-992) minutes and blood loss was 3.7 (1.7-6.2) L. An R0 (>1-mm resection margin) resection was achieved in 78% of patients. Disease-free survival associated with R0 resection was 55% at a median follow-up period of 33 (17-60) months; however, none of the patients with R1 (<1-mm resection margin) survived this period. Postoperative complication rates and median length of stay were found to decrease with more distal sacral transection levels. In contrast, R1 resection rates increased with more distal transection. The studies assessed by this review were retrospective case series and thus are subject to significant bias. Sacrectomy performed for patients with recurrent rectal cancer is associated with significant postoperative morbidity. Morbidity and postoperative length of stay increase with the level of sacral transection. Nevertheless, approximately half of patients eligible for rectal excision with en bloc sacrectomy may benefit from disease-free survival for up to 33 months, with R0 resection predicting disease-free survival in the medium term.

  13. Should the dose of contrast medium be determined solely on the basis of body weight regardless of the patient's sex?

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Junji; Kozawa, Eito; Inoue, Kaiji; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Toya, Masahito; Sato, Youichi

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively the difference in contrast enhancement of liver parenchyma between male and female subjects when the total amount of contrast material is determined by the total body weight (TBW). Computed tomography of the abdomen was performed with a total amount of iodine of 597 ± 3.9 mg I/kg (mean ± SD) over a mean ± SD total injection time of 30 ± 0.26 s. Postcontrast attenuation during the portal venous phase was measured in the liver parenchyma, portal vein, and aorta. These values were summed for each and compared to those obtained before contrast injection. A total of 565 consecutive patients without a history of underlying liver/heart disease, including 297 male and 268 female subjects (age 16-92 years, mean 67 years) were scanned and analyzed using a two-tailed t-test. The difference between precontrast and the portal venous phase in the male subjects was 315.4 ± 40.5 HU (mean ± SD), and that in female subjects was 358.6 ± 44.8 HU. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). The contrast enhancement in females was 13.7% higher than that in males when the amount of iodine administered was based on the TBW. The difference can presumably be attributed to the difference in fat and muscle components. This result suggests that the amount of contrast material used in females should be reduced according to this difference.

  14. Influence of the X-ray beam quality on the dose increment in CT with iodinated contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Amato, Ernesto; Asero, Grazia; Leotta, Salvatore; Auditore, Lucrezia; Salamone, Ignazio; Mannino, Giovanni; Privitera, Salvatore; Gueli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT), the image contrast is given by the difference in X-ray attenuation in the various tissues of the patient and contrast media are used to enhance image contrast in anatomic regions characterized by similar attenuation coefficients. Aim of the present work is to enlarge the range of applicability of the method previously introduced for organ dosimetry in contrast-enhanced CT, by studying the effects of X-ray beam quality on the parameters of the model. Furthermore, an experimental method for the evaluation of the attenuation properties of iodinated solutions is proposed. Monte Carlo simulations of anthropomorphic phantoms were carried out to determine a bi-parametrical (a and b) analytical relationship between iodine concentration and dose increase in organs of interest as a function of the tube kilo-voltage peak potential (kVp) and filtration. Experimental measurements of increments in Hounsfield Units (HU) were conducted in several CT scanners, at all the kVp available, in order to determine the parameter γ which relates the HU increment with the iodine mass fraction. A cylindrical phantom that can be filled with iodine solutions provided with an axial housing for a pencil ionization chamber was designed and assembled in order to measure the attenuation properties of iodine solutions under irradiation of a CT scanner and to obtain a further validation of Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation-derived parameters of the model, a and b, are only slightly dependent upon the tube kilo-voltage peak potential and filtration, while such scanner-dependent features influence mainly the experimentally-derived γ parameter. Relative dose variations registered by the ionization chamber inside the iodine-filled cylindrical phantom decrease when the X-ray mean energy increases, and reaches about 50% for 10 mg/ml of iodine. The dosimetric method for contrast-enhanced CT can be applied to all CT scanners by adopting average simulative parameters and

  15. Application of flash dual-source CT at low radiation dose and low contrast medium dose in triple-rule-out (tro) examination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Liang; Chen, Tian-Wu; Qiu, Li-Hua; Diao, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Li

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical imaging capacity of FLASH dual-source CT at low radiation dose and low contrast medium dose in thoracic aorta, pulmonary artery & vein and coronary artery. One hundred and eight patients of thoracalgia were randomly divided into two groups; 60 cases (group A) received dual-source CT scan in flash model at 100 KV and contrast medium dose of 74 ml combined with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) examination; 48 cases (group B) received retrospectively. ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition at 120 KV and contrast medium dose of 101 ml. Several image reconstruction techniques were adopted for coronary artery, pulmonary artery and aorta. The imaging quality and the diagnostic value of this technique were evaluated. Coronary artery stenosis of group A was compared against the results of DSA examination. The scan time in group A was obviously shorter than that of group B, i.e., t=0.7±0.1 s in group A and t=7.7±1.7 s in group A. The image reconstruction phase of coronary artery was 70.4±15.6% in group A, and the systolic phase accounted for 13.3% of the optimal reconstruction phase. Compared with group B, the radiation dose of group A decreased obviously, i.e. ED=2.7±0.7 mSv for group A and ED=21.6±6.0 mSv for group B. Moreover, less contrast agent was consumed in group A than in group B, which was 74 ml in group A and 101 ml in group B. The image quality of aorta and pulmonary artery & vein was grade 1 for all cases in group A, which was the same as with group B. The coronary artery images of group A had better quality, with score of 2.9±0.1. Of 780 segments, only 2 segments could be effectively diagnosed, showing no statistically significant differences from group B (P>0.05). The coronary artery stenosis revealed by dual-source CT for group A was not significantly different from that by DSA (P>0.05). FLASH dual-source CT scan at reduced radiation dose and reduced contrast medium dose used for triple-rule-out (TRO) examination

  16. Application of flash dual-source CT at low radiation dose and low contrast medium dose in triple-rule-out (tro) examination

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Liang; Chen, Tian-Wu; Qiu, Li-Hua; Diao, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical imaging capacity of FLASH dual-source CT at low radiation dose and low contrast medium dose in thoracic aorta, pulmonary artery & vein and coronary artery. Method: One hundred and eight patients of thoracalgia were randomly divided into two groups; 60 cases (group A) received dual-source CT scan in flash model at 100 KV and contrast medium dose of 74 ml combined with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) examination; 48 cases (group B) received retrospectively. ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition at 120 KV and contrast medium dose of 101 ml. Several image reconstruction techniques were adopted for coronary artery, pulmonary artery and aorta. The imaging quality and the diagnostic value of this technique were evaluated. Coronary artery stenosis of group A was compared against the results of DSA examination. Results: The scan time in group A was obviously shorter than that of group B, i.e., t=0.7±0.1 s in group A and t=7.7±1.7 s in group A. The image reconstruction phase of coronary artery was 70.4±15.6% in group A, and the systolic phase accounted for 13.3% of the optimal reconstruction phase. Compared with group B, the radiation dose of group A decreased obviously, i.e. ED=2.7±0.7 mSv for group A and ED=21.6±6.0 mSv for group B. Moreover, less contrast agent was consumed in group A than in group B, which was 74 ml in group A and 101 ml in group B. The image quality of aorta and pulmonary artery & vein was grade 1 for all cases in group A, which was the same as with group B. The coronary artery images of group A had better quality, with score of 2.9±0.1. Of 780 segments, only 2 segments could be effectively diagnosed, showing no statistically significant differences from group B (P>0.05). The coronary artery stenosis revealed by dual-source CT for group A was not significantly different from that by DSA (P>0.05). Conclusion: FLASH dual-source CT scan at reduced radiation dose and reduced contrast medium dose used for

  17. Barium sulfate aspiration: Severe chemical pneumonia induced by a massive reflux of contrast medium during small bowel barium enema.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Xiaowei; Dong, Hongmei; Zhou, Yiwu

    2015-08-01

    Barium contrast radiography is a conventional procedure aimed at revealing lesions of the alimentary tract using barium sulfate on X-ray irradiation. Although it is widely used in clinics, adverse effects and complications are observed, such as anaphylaxis, granuloma, fecalithes, abdomen-leaking, embolism, bacterial contamination, and aspiration. We report a case of death due to a massive barium sulfate aspiration resulted from an air-barium double contrast enema radiography. A 25-year-old female patient was hospitalized with symptoms of abdominal distention, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea for three days. A progressive respiratory distress presented only 1h after a small bowel air-barium double contrast enema. The patient died 11h later. The result of autopsy revealed the cause of death to be severe chemical pneumonitis induced by gastric fluid which was aspirated into her lungs. Barium sulfate is generally recognized to be chemically inert for the respiratory system, but a mixture of barium sulfate with gastric contents is fatal. Here we intend to suggest that, when determining the potential cause of death, medical examiners should consider a patient's status quo as well as the possible adverse effects and complications caused by the barium sulfate preparation during gastrointestinal radiography.

  18. Demonstration of liver metastases on postmortem whole body CT angiography following inadvertent systemic venous infusion of the contrast medium.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Chris; Hislop-Jambrich, Jacqueline; Woodford, Noel; Baker, Melissa

    2012-03-01

    An 86-year-old woman was hospitalized for breathlessness and a large right-sided pleural effusion. Approximately 1 h after thoracentesis, she developed a hemothorax resulting in hypotension and death. Routine postmortem CT scanning showed a large volume right hemothorax and a markedly enlarged liver. In an attempt to determine the origin of bleeding prior to autopsy, a postmortem CT angiogram was performed. Following inadvertent cannulation of the left long saphenous vein and infusion of ∼1,700 mL of a polyethylene glycol 200 and iodine-based radiographic contrast solution into systemic veins using a mechanical pump, CT scanning revealed a dense hepatic "parenchogram" containing multiple large, filling defects indicative of metastases. These were confirmed at autopsy. Microscopic evaluation of the liver using hematoxylin and eosin staining showed marked histological artifact characterized by centrilobular sinusoidal expansion although histology of the adenocarcinoma metastases was typical and apparently unaffected by the contrast solution. Postmortem CT angiography using an aqueous radiographic contrast agent in the so-called venous phase seems to be useful for the identification of hepatic parenchymal metastatic disease although it does cause histological artifact.

  19. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography using a 20% reduction in contrast medium dose delivered in a multiphasic injection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mitchell; Mattar, Gaith; Abdulkarim, Jamal A

    2017-03-28

    To evaluate the feasibility of reducing the dose of iodinated contrast agent in computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). One hundred and twenty-seven patients clinically suspected of having pulmonary embolism underwent spiral CTPA, out of whom fifty-seven received 75 mL and the remaining seventy a lower dose of 60 mL of contrast agent. Both doses were administered in a multiphasic injection. A minimum opacification threshold of 250 Hounsfield units (HU) in the main pulmonary artery is used for assessing the technical adequacy of the scans. Mean opacification was found to be positively correlated to patient age (Pearson's correlation 0.4255, P < 0.0001) and independent of gender (male:female, 425.6 vs 450.4, P = 0.34). When age is accounted for, the study and control groups did not differ significantly in their mean opacification in the main (436.8 vs 437.9, P = 0.48), left (416.6 vs 419.8, P = 0.45) or the right pulmonary arteries (417.3 vs 423.5, P = 0.40). The number of sub-optimally opacified scans (the mean opacification in the main pulmonary artery < 250 HU) did not differ significantly between the study and control groups (7 vs 10). A lower dose of iodine contrast at 60 mL can be feasibly used in CTPA without resulting in a higher number of sub-optimally opacified scans.

  20. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography using a 20% reduction in contrast medium dose delivered in a multiphasic injection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mitchell; Mattar, Gaith; Abdulkarim, Jamal A

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the feasibility of reducing the dose of iodinated contrast agent in computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). METHODS One hundred and twenty-seven patients clinically suspected of having pulmonary embolism underwent spiral CTPA, out of whom fifty-seven received 75 mL and the remaining seventy a lower dose of 60 mL of contrast agent. Both doses were administered in a multiphasic injection. A minimum opacification threshold of 250 Hounsfield units (HU) in the main pulmonary artery is used for assessing the technical adequacy of the scans. RESULTS Mean opacification was found to be positively correlated to patient age (Pearson’s correlation 0.4255, P < 0.0001) and independent of gender (male:female, 425.6 vs 450.4, P = 0.34). When age is accounted for, the study and control groups did not differ significantly in their mean opacification in the main (436.8 vs 437.9, P = 0.48), left (416.6 vs 419.8, P = 0.45) or the right pulmonary arteries (417.3 vs 423.5, P = 0.40). The number of sub-optimally opacified scans (the mean opacification in the main pulmonary artery < 250 HU) did not differ significantly between the study and control groups (7 vs 10). CONCLUSION A lower dose of iodine contrast at 60 mL can be feasibly used in CTPA without resulting in a higher number of sub-optimally opacified scans. PMID:28396728

  1. Low-dose triple-rule-out using 320-row-detector volume MDCT--less contrast medium and lower radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Tahir; Rogalla, Patrik; Lembcke, Alexander; Mühler, Matthias R; Hamm, Bernd; Hein, Patrick A

    2011-07-01

    To investigate image quality of triple-rule-out (TRO) computed tomography (CT) using a 320-row-detector CT system with substantially reduced contrast medium volume at 100 kV. Forty-six consecutive patients with noncritical, acute chest pain underwent 320-row-detector CT using a two-step TRO protocol consisting of a non-spiral, non-gated chest CT acquisition (150 mA) followed by a non-spiral, electrocardiography-gated cardiac acquisition (200-500 mA based on body mass index (BMI)). Data were acquired using a biphasic injection protocol with a total iodinated contrast medium volume of 60 ml (370 mg/ml). Vessel attenuation and effective doses were recorded. Image quality was scored independently by two readers. Mean attenuation was 584 ± 114 Hounsfield units (HU) in the ascending aorta, 335 ± 63HU in the aortic arch, 658 ± 136HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 521 ± 97HU and 549 ± 102HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. In all but one patient, attenuation and image quality allowed accurate visualization of the pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta, and coronary arteries in a single examination. Ninety-six percent of all coronary artery segments were rated diagnostic. Radiation exposure ranged between 2.0 and 3.3 mSv. Using 320-row-detector CT the investigated low-dose TRO protocol resulted in excellent opacification and image quality with substantial reduction of contrast medium volume compared to recently published TRO protocols.

  2. Myelography in achondroplasia: value of a lateral C1-2 puncture and non-ionic, water-soluble contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Suss, R.A.; Udvarhelyi, G.B.; Wang, H.; Kumar, A.J.; Zinreich, S.J.; Rosenbaum, A.E.

    1983-10-01

    Because of technical difficulties and diagnostic limitations encountered with other myelographic techniques in patients with achondroplasia, the authors employed a lateral C1-2 puncture and non-ionic, water-soluble contrast medium in 18 achondroplastic patients with spinal compression (21 procedures). This technique proved most appropriate for identifying the upper limit of degenerative osteophytes causing exacerbation of congenital spinal stenosis, which is crucial in planning decompressive surgery. A potentially important additional finding was the presence of degenerative lower cervical spine disease in the majority of patients. There were no serious complications. The authors recommend this technique as safe and effective in achondroplastic patients with severe congenital spinal stenosis.

  3. Computed tomography (CT) of the lungs of the dog using a helical CT scanner, intravenous iodine contrast medium and different CT windows.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, L; Gil, F; Ramírez, G; Teixeira, M A; Agut, A; Rivero, M A; Arencibia, A; Vázquez, J M

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of helical computed tomography (CT) for visualizing pulmonary parenchyma and associated formations in normal dogs. CT scan was performed by using intravenous contrast medium and by applying different types of CT windows: soft tissue and lung windows, and high-resolution computed tomography of the lung. This technique allowed, especially with lung window types, a good view of the parenchyma, bronchial tree, vascular structures and pleural cavity. The selected images, with high anatomical quality and tissue contrast, may be a reference for future clinical studies of this organ. Thus, helical CT is a promising non-invasive method of diagnosing a wide variety of pulmonary diseases in dogs.

  4. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  5. A rectal neuroendocrine neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Varas Lorenzo, Modesto J; Muñoz Agel, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    The incidence of gastric and rectal carcinoids is increasing. This is probably due to endoscopic screening. The prognosis is primarily dependent upon tumor size, aggressiveness (pathology, Ki-67), metastatic disease and stage. However, neuroendocrine carcinoma usually behaves as an adenocarcinoma.

  6. Low kV settings CT angiography (CTA) with low dose contrast medium volume protocol in the assessment of thoracic and abdominal aorta disease: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Talei Franzesi, C; Fior, D; Bonaffini, P A; Minutolo, O; Sironi, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic quality of low dose (100 kV) CT angiography (CTA), by using ultra-low contrast medium volume (30 ml), for thoracic and abdominal aorta evaluation. Methods: 67 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease underwent multidetector CT study using a 256 slice scanner, with low dose radiation protocol (automated tube current modulation, 100 kV) and low contrast medium volume (30 ml; 4 ml s−1). Density measurements were performed on ascending, arch, descending thoracic aorta, anonymous branch, abdominal aorta, and renal and common iliac arteries. Radiation dose exposure [dose–length product (DLP)] was calculated. A control group of 35 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease were evaluated with standard CTA protocol (automated tube current modulation, 120 kV; contrast medium, 80 ml). Results: In all patients, we correctly visualized and evaluated main branches of the thoracic and abdominal aorta. No difference in density measurements was achieved between low tube voltage protocol (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 304 HU; abdominal, 343 HU; renal arteries, 331 HU) and control group (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 320 HU; abdominal, 339; renal arteries, 303 HU). Radiation dose exposure in low tube voltage protocol was significantly different between thoracic and abdominal low tube voltage studies (490 and 324 DLP, respectively) and the control group (thoracic DLP, 1032; abdomen, DLP 1078). Conclusion: Low-tube-voltage protocol may provide a diagnostic performance comparable with that of the standard protocol, decreasing radiation dose exposure and contrast material volume amount. Advances in knowledge: Low-tube-voltage-setting protocol combined with ultra-low contrast agent volume (30 ml), by using new multidetector-row CT scanners, represents a feasible diagnostic tool to significantly reduce the radiation dose delivered to patients and to preserve renal function

  7. Rectal imaging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vining, D J

    1998-09-01

    Rectal imaging has evolved substantially during the past 25 years and now offers surgeons exquisite anatomic detail and physiologic information. Dynamic cystoproctography, helical computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging, and immunoscintigraphy have become standards for the diagnosis of rectal disease, staging of neoplasia, and survey of therapeutic results. The indications, limitations, and relative costs of current imaging methods are reviewed, and advances in imaging technology that promise future benefits to colorectal surgeons are introduced.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of liver metastases: experimental comparison of anionic and conventional superparamagnetic iron oxide particles with a hepatobiliary contrast medium during dynamic and uptake phases.

    PubMed

    Kaufels, Nicola; Korn, Ronny; Wagner, Susanne; Schink, Tania; Hamm, Bernd; Taupitz, Matthias; Schnorr, Jörg

    2008-07-01

    To assess the contrast-enhancing effects of citrate-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP-C184) in a rat liver tumor model using dynamic and delayed magnetic resonance imaging in comparison to carboxydextran-coated particles (ferucarbotran) and a hepatobiliary contrast medium (gadobenate dimeglumine). A total of 32 male rats with liver tumors (CC-531 colorectal carcinoma) were examined at 1.5 T with a T1-weighted dynamic series (3D gradient echo sequence) and T1-weighted and T2*-weighted images (2D gradient echo sequences) before and 15 and 90 minutes after injection. VSOP-C184 was investigated at doses of 0.015, 0.045, and 0.06 mmol Fe/kg, ferucarbotran at 0.015 mmol Fe/kg, and gadobenate dimeglumine at 0.025, 0.05, and 0.1 mmol Gd/kg. Liver-tumor contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated and statistically compared. T1-weighted dynamic images: VSOP-C184 has significantly higher CNR values at a dose of 0,015 mmol Fe/kg than ferucarbotran at the same dose (P = 0.001). VSOP-C184 produces a significantly higher CNR at a dose of 0.045 mmol Fe/kg than gadobenate dimeglumine at a dose of 0.05 mmol Gd/kg (P = 0.019). At a dose of 0.06 mmol Fe/kg, the CNR for VSOP-C184 is significantly lower than that of gadobenate dimeglumine (0.1 mmol Gd/kg) (P = 0.005).T2-weighted delayed images: CNR values of VSOP-C184 are similar to those of ferucarbotran and are significantly higher than those of gadobenate dimeglumine (P < 0.05). On T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of liver tumors VSOP-C184 produces a high contrast comparable to that of a hepatobiliary contrast medium in addition to its contrast-enhancing effect in T2-weighted imaging.

  9. Electromagnetic induction in a conductive strip in a medium of contrasting conductivity: application to VLF and MT above molten dykes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2014-11-01

    Very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic waves that penetrate conductive magma-filled dykes generate secondary fields on the surface that can be used to invert for dyke properties. The model used for the interpretation calculates currents induced in a conductive strip by an inducing field that decays exponentially with depth due to the conductivity of the surrounding medium. The differential equations are integrated to give an inhomogeneous Fredholm equation of the second kind with a kernel consisting of a modified Bessel function of the second kind. Numerical methods are typically used to solve for the induced currents in the strip. In this paper, we apply a modified Galerkin-Chebyshev method, which involves separating the kernel into source and field spectra and integrating the source terms to obtain a matrix equation for the unknown coefficients. The incident wave is expressed as a Chebyshev series. The modified Bessel function is separated into a logarithmic singularity and a non-singular remainder, both of which are expanded in complex Chebyshev polynomials. The Chebyshev coefficients for the remainder are evaluated using a fast Fourier transform, while the logarithmic term and incident field have analytic series. The deconvolution then involves a matrix inversion. The results depend on the ratio of strip-size to skin-depth. For infinite skin-depth and a singular conductivity distribution given by τ_0 a/√{a^2 - z^2 } (where τ0 is the conductance, a is the half-length and z the distance from the centre), Parker gives an analytic solution. We present a similar analytic series solution for the finite skin-depth case, where the size to skin depth ratio is small. Results are presented for different ratios of size to skin depth that can be compared with numerical solutions. We compare full-space and half-space solutions. A fit of the model to VLF data taken above a magma filled dykes in Hawaii and Mt Etna demonstrates that while properties such as depth to top

  10. [Study of low radiation exposure dose and low contrast medium dose in coronary CT angiography with High-pitch spiral acquisition mode of dual source CT].

    PubMed

    Dai, Yingyu; Guo, Liang; Dai, Qichun; Liu, Yonghao; Ma, Xinxing

    2014-08-05

    To evaluate the feasibility of low radiation exposure and low contrast medium volume for coronary CT angiography with High- pitch spiral acquisition mode of dual source CT. 135 patients whose BMI <23 kg/m² and heart rates <65 bpm selected from 291 patients diagnosed of suspected CHD at our institution from September 2013 to February 2014 were randomly divided into 3 groups before CCTA, and there were 45 patients in each group. 80 kV , Iodixanol (320 mgI/ml) and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) were used in A group. 80 kV , Iopamidol (370 mgI/ml) and SAFIRE were used in B group. 100 kV, Iodixanol and filtered back projection (FBP) were used in C group. Two radiologists assessed image quality with 5-piont scale subjectively and double-blind. Independent-Sample Test was used to analyze statistical significance of image quality including signal to noise ratio(SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) between A and B group or between A and C group. At the same time, Contrast medium dose statistical significance between A and B group and mean effective Radiation dose (ED)statistical significance between A and C were analyzed by the same way. There were no significant difference of image quality including SNR and CNR of aortic root (AO), left main coronary artery (LM), left anterior descending artery (LAD), circumflex coronary artery (CX) and right coronary artery (RCA) Between A and B group (P = non-significant for all comparison), whereas Iodine in taken of A group decreased 14% (17 600 mg vs 20 350 mg). There were no significant difference of image quality including SNR and CNR of AO, LM, LAD, CX and RCA Between A and C group (P = non-significant for all comparison), whereas mean ED of A group decreased 50% (0.41 ± 0.05 mSv vs 0.79 ± 0.15 mSv). The double low dose application which use High-pitch spiral mode, 80 kV, SAFIRE, and Iodixanol (320 mgI/ml) can be used in those patients whose BMI <23 kg/m² and heart rates <65 bpm to reduce the burden of

  11. How good is the turbid medium-based approach for accounting for light partitioning in contrasted grass--legume intercropping systems?

    PubMed

    Barillot, Romain; Louarn, Gaëtan; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Abraham J; Huynh, Pierre; Combes, Didier

    2011-10-01

    Most studies dealing with light partitioning in intercropping systems have used statistical models based on the turbid medium approach, thus assuming homogeneous canopies. However, these models could not be directly validated although spatial heterogeneities could arise in such canopies. The aim of the present study was to assess the ability of the turbid medium approach to accurately estimate light partitioning within grass-legume mixed canopies. Three contrasted mixtures of wheat-pea, tall fescue-alfalfa and tall fescue-clover were sown according to various patterns and densities. Three-dimensional plant mock-ups were derived from magnetic digitizations carried out at different stages of development. The benchmarks for light interception efficiency (LIE) estimates were provided by the combination of a light projective model and plant mock-ups, which also provided the inputs of a turbid medium model (SIRASCA), i.e. leaf area index and inclination. SIRASCA was set to gradually account for vertical heterogeneity of the foliage, i.e. the canopy was described as one, two or ten horizontal layers of leaves. Mixtures exhibited various and heterogeneous profiles of foliar distribution, leaf inclination and component species height. Nevertheless, most of the LIE was satisfactorily predicted by SIRASCA. Biased estimations were, however, observed for (1) grass species and (2) tall fescue-alfalfa mixtures grown at high density. Most of the discrepancies were due to vertical heterogeneities and were corrected by increasing the vertical description of canopies although, in practice, this would require time-consuming measurements. The turbid medium analogy could be successfully used in a wide range of canopies. However, a more detailed description of the canopy is required for mixtures exhibiting vertical stratifications and inter-/intra-species foliage overlapping. Architectural models remain a relevant tool for studying light partitioning in intercropping systems that exhibit

  12. How good is the turbid medium-based approach for accounting for light partitioning in contrasted grass–legume intercropping systems?

    PubMed Central

    Barillot, Romain; Louarn, Gaëtan; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Abraham J.; Huynh, Pierre; Combes, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Most studies dealing with light partitioning in intercropping systems have used statistical models based on the turbid medium approach, thus assuming homogeneous canopies. However, these models could not be directly validated although spatial heterogeneities could arise in such canopies. The aim of the present study was to assess the ability of the turbid medium approach to accurately estimate light partitioning within grass–legume mixed canopies. Methods Three contrasted mixtures of wheat–pea, tall fescue–alfalfa and tall fescue–clover were sown according to various patterns and densities. Three-dimensional plant mock-ups were derived from magnetic digitizations carried out at different stages of development. The benchmarks for light interception efficiency (LIE) estimates were provided by the combination of a light projective model and plant mock-ups, which also provided the inputs of a turbid medium model (SIRASCA), i.e. leaf area index and inclination. SIRASCA was set to gradually account for vertical heterogeneity of the foliage, i.e. the canopy was described as one, two or ten horizontal layers of leaves. Key Results Mixtures exhibited various and heterogeneous profiles of foliar distribution, leaf inclination and component species height. Nevertheless, most of the LIE was satisfactorily predicted by SIRASCA. Biased estimations were, however, observed for (1) grass species and (2) tall fescue–alfalfa mixtures grown at high density. Most of the discrepancies were due to vertical heterogeneities and were corrected by increasing the vertical description of canopies although, in practice, this would require time-consuming measurements. Conclusions The turbid medium analogy could be successfully used in a wide range of canopies. However, a more detailed description of the canopy is required for mixtures exhibiting vertical stratifications and inter-/intra-species foliage overlapping. Architectural models remain a relevant tool for

  13. Intra-arterial and intravenous applications of Iosimenol 340 injection, a new non-ionic, dimeric, iso-osmolar radiographic contrast medium: phase 2 experience

    PubMed Central

    Laniado, Michael; Hosten, Norbert; Kelsch, Bettina; Hogstrom, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background Iosimenol 340 injection is a new, dimeric, iso-osmolar, iodinated contrast medium for X-ray angiography. Purpose To compare the safety and efficacy of iosimenol injection to iodixanol injection in two randomized, controlled phase 2 trials. Material and Methods One hundred and forty-four adult patients were enrolled in the two trials, one for evaluation during arteriography and the other for evaluation during computed tomography. Safety was compared by assessing adverse events, vital signs, ECGs, and laboratory parameters. Efficacy was assessed as X-ray attenuation in the computed tomography (CT) trial and as the quality of contrast enhancement in the arteriography trial. Results There were no statistically significant differences in terms of safety or efficacy between the two contrast media. Both were well tolerated upon intravenous as well as intra-arterial injection. The most common adverse event was a feeling of warmth (observed in 35.1% of the patients with Iosimenol injection and 44.3% with iodixanol injection). Conclusion Iosimenol upon intravenous as well as upon intra-arterial injection exhibits a safety profile and shows an efficacy similar to that of iodixanol. PMID:24938661

  14. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic lesions with a newly developed Evans blue-DTPA-gadolinium contrast medium in apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Ikuta, Kenjiro; Uwatoku, Toyokazu; Oi, Keiji; Abe, Kohtaro; Hyodo, Fuminori; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Sugimura, Kohtaro; Utsumi, Hideo; Katayama, Yoshiki; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that specifically detect atherosclerotic plaque may be useful for the noninvasive detection of the plaque. We have recently developed a new contrast agent, Evans blue-DTPA-gadolinium (EB-DTPA-Gd), which selectively accumulates vascular lesions with endothelial removal. In this study, we examined whether EB-DTPA-Gd is also useful for in vivo imaging of atherosclerotic plaques. We used male apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice of different ages (3, 6 and 12 months old) and age-matched male wild-type mice. After a single intravenous administration of EB-DTPA-Gd (160 microM/kg body weight), MRI T(1) signal was obtained in vivo. Increased signal intensity in the aortic wall was noted within 10-20 min after intravenous injection of EB-DTPA-Gd and was maintained for 30 min. The MRI enhancement in the aorta of ApoE-/- mice was increased in accordance with age, whereas no such enhancement was noted in wild-type mice. Histological examination demonstrated that there was a topological correlation between the site of MRI enhancement and that of atherosclerotic plaque. These results indicate that EB-DTPA-Gd is a useful MRI contrast medium for the in vivo detection of atherosclerotic plaques. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. CT pulmonary angiography using a reduced volume of high-concentration iodinated contrast medium and multiphasic injection to achieve dose reduction.

    PubMed

    Goble, E W; Abdulkarim, J A

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether a reduced volume of a higher-concentration iodinated contrast medium delivered with a multiphasic injection could be used in computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) to achieve a reduction in dose without adversely affecting image quality. The CTPA images were retrospectively evaluated of 69 patients who received 100 ml of 300 mg iodine/ml ioversol, injected at constant rate of 5 ml/s and 70 patients who received 75 ml of 350 mg iodine/ml ioversol contrast medium delivered using a multiphasic injection protocol (starting at 5 ml/s and reducing exponentially). The degree of opacification in the proximal pulmonary arteries was measured in Hounsfield units. The groups did not differ in terms of age, sex distribution, or weight. The mean iodine dose was lower in the 75 ml of 350 mg iodine/ml group (26.25 versus 29.5 g, p < 0.0001). Mean opacification did not differ significantly between the 75 ml of 350 mg iodine/ml and 100 ml of 300 mg iodine/ml groups in the main pulmonary artery (365 versus 331, p = 0.055) although it was significantly higher in the 75 ml group in the right (352 versus 315, p = 0.024) and left pulmonary arteries (347 versus 312, p = 0.028). Opacification correlated positively with age and negatively with weight (p < 0.001) and when these effects had been accounted for, the differences in opacification were not statistically significant in the main (p = 0.23), right (p = 0.11), or left pulmonary arteries (p = 0.13). The number of suboptimally opacified studies (opacification of less than 250 HU in main pulmonary artery) did not differ between the groups (12 versus 13, p = 0.83). A reduction in iodine dose can be achieved without adversely affecting pulmonary arterial enhancement in CTPA by administering a smaller volume of high-concentration contrast medium using a multiphasic injection protocol. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Phase I clinical evaluation of citrate-coated monocrystalline very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles as a new contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Schnorr, Jörg; Kravec, Irina; Pilgrimm, Herbert; Bergmann-Fritsch, Henrike; Hamm, Bernd

    2004-07-01

    To evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of a newly developed MR contrast medium consisting of very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP) coated with citrate (VSOP-C184) in a clinical phase I trial. A total of 18 healthy subjects received either VSOP-C184 (core diameter: 4 nm; total diameter: 7 +/- 0.15 nm; relaxivities in water at 0.47 T (T1) 18.7 and (T2) 30 L/(mmol*seconds)) at doses of 0.015, 0.045, or 0.075 mmol Fe/kg (n = 5 per dose) or placebo (n = 1 per dose) as intravenous injections. Physical status and vital parameters were recorded, blood samples were collected for clinical chemistry and relaxometry (0.94 T), and urinalyses were performed before and for up to 2 weeks after administration. No serious adverse events occurred. The most pronounced adverse events occurred in 2 subjects of the highest dose group 45-50 minutes after injection. These were a drop in blood pressure and a drop in oxygen saturation, which were considered to be possibly drug-related and rapidly resolved without medication. Otherwise, no relevant changes in vital and laboratory parameters were observed. The parameters of iron metabolism exhibited short-term, dose-related changes. The injection of VSOP-C184 decreased T1 relaxation time of blood below 100 milliseconds for 18 minutes after a dose of 0.045 mmol [corrected] Fe/kg and for 60 minutes after 0.075 mmol [corrected] Fe/kg. The favorable data on the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of VSOP-C184 justify further clinical phase II and III trials as a contrast medium for MRI.

  17. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  18. Feasibility of low-concentration iodinated contrast medium with lower-tube-voltage dual-source CT aortography using iterative reconstruction: comparison with automatic exposure control CT aortography.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Jeong; Kim, Song Soo; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Jin, Seon Ah; Shin, Byung Seok; Shin, Kyung-Sook; Ahn, Moonsang

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of low-concentration contrast medium (CM) for vascular enhancement, image quality, and radiation dose on computed tomography aortography (CTA) using a combined low-tube-voltage and iterative reconstruction (IR) technique. Ninety subjects underwent dual-source CT (DSCT) operating in dual-source, high-pitch mode. DSCT scans were performed using both high-concentration CM (Group A, n = 50; Iomeprol 400) and low-concentration CM (Group B, n = 40; Iodixanol 270). Group A was scanned using a reference tube potential of 120 kVp and 120 reference mAs under automatic exposure control with IR. Group B was scanned using low-tube-voltage (80 or 100 kVp if body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)) at a fixed current of 150 mAs, along with IR. Images of the two groups were compared regarding attenuation, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), iodine load, and radiation dose in various locations of the CTA. In comparison between Group A and Group B, the average mean attenuation (454.73 ± 86.66 vs. 515.96 ± 101.55 HU), SNR (25.28 ± 4.34 vs. 31.29 ± 4.58), and CNR (21.83 ± 4.20 vs. 27.55 ± 4.81) on CTA in Group B showed significantly greater values and significantly lower image noise values (18.76 ± 2.19 vs. 17.48 ± 3.34) than those in Group A (all Ps < 0.05). Homogeneous contrast enhancement from the ascending thoracic aorta to the infrarenal abdominal aorta was significantly superior in Group B (P < 0.05). Low-concentration CM and a low-tube-voltage combination technique using IR is a feasible method, showing sufficient contrast enhancement and image quality.

  19. New generation of monomer-stabilized very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP) as contrast medium for MR angiography: preclinical results in rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Taupitz, M; Schnorr, J; Abramjuk, C; Wagner, S; Pilgrimm, H; Hünigen, H; Hamm, B

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the signal enhancement characteristics of very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP)-C63, a new monomer-coated, iron oxide-based magnetic resonance (MR) blood pool contrast medium with a very small particle size and optimized physical properties. Equilibrium MR angiography (MRA) of rats (thoracic and abdominal vessels) was performed at 1.5 T with a three-dimensional gradient-recalled echo (3D GRE) technique (TR/TE 6.6/2.3 msec, flip angle 25 degrees ) before and after (every 3-5 minutes up to 50 minutes) i.v. injection of VSOP-C63 [dosages: 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 micromol Fe/kg; diameter: 8 nm; relaxivities at 0.47 T: R1 = 30 l/(mmol * s); R2 = 39 l/(mmol * s)]. First-pass MRA images (3D-GRE, TR/TE 4.5/1.7 msec, flip angle 25 degrees ) were obtained with 45 micromol Fe/kg VSOP-C63 in comparison with 0.2 mmol Gd/kg of gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd DTPA; before and every 5 seconds p.i.). MRA (3D GRE, TR/TE 4.5/1.7 msec, flip angle 25 degrees) of coronary vessels in rabbits was performed after i.v. injection of 45 micromol Fe/kg of VSOP-C63. In rats maximal S/N ratio in thoracic and abdominal arteries directly after i.v. injection of VSOP-C63 was 25 +/- 1, 43 +/- 2, 49 +/- 4, 57 +/- 3, 64 +/- 3, and 63 +/- 3 for the different dosages. Blood half-life was dose dependent (15 +/- 2, 20 +/- 3, 29 +/- 6, 37 +/- 5, 61 +/- 16, and 86 +/- 21 minutes). At a dose of 30 micromol Fe/kg even small intrarenal arteries were sharply delineated. First-pass MRA showed no significant difference in the S/N ratio between Gd-DTPA (71.5 +/- 11.5) and VSOP-C63 (65.1 +/- 18. 3). The proximal segments of the coronary arteries in rabbits were clearly depicted at a dose of 45 micromol Fe/kg. The monomer-coated, iron oxide-based contrast medium VSOP-C63 exhibits favorable properties as a blood pool agent for both equilibrium and first-pass MRA. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2000;12:905-911. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. The Preinterventional Cystatin-Creatinine-Ratio: A Prognostic Marker for Contrast Medium-Induced Acute Kidney Injury and Long-Term All-Cause Mortality.

    PubMed

    Lüders, Florian; Meyborg, Matthias; Malyar, Nasser; Reinecke, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Contrast medium-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is an important iatrogenic complication following the injection of iodinated contrast media. The level of serum creatinine (SCr) is the currently accepted 'gold standard' to diagnose CI-AKI. Cystatin C (CyC) has been detected as a more sensitive marker for renal dysfunction. Both have their limitations. The role of the preinterventional CyC-SCr ratio for evaluating the risk for CI-AKI and long-term all-cause mortality was retrospectively analyzed in the prospective single-center 'Dialysis-versus-Diuresis trial'. CI-AKI was defined and staged according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network classification. Three hundred and seventy-three patients were included (average age 67.4 ± 10.2 years, 16.4% women, 29.2% with diabetes mellitus, mean baseline glomerular filtration rate 56.3 ± 20.2 ml/min/1.73 m(2) [as estimated by Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration Serum Creatinine Cystatin C equation], 5.1% ejection fraction <35%). A total of 79 patients (21.2%) developed CI-AKI after elective heart catheterization, and 65 patients (17.4%) died during follow-up. Multivariate analyses by logistic regression confirmed that the preinterventional CyC-SCr ratio is independently associated with CI-AKI (OR 9.423, 95% CI 1.494-59.436, p = 0.017). Also, the Cox regression model found a high significant association between preinterventional CyC-SCr ratio and long-term all-cause mortality (mean follow-up 649 days, hazards ratio 4.096, 95% CI 1.625-10.329, p = 0.003). The preinterventional CyC-SCr ratio is independently associated with CI-AKI and highly significant associated with long-term mortality after heart catheterization. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Improving optical transmission and image contrast in medium and high performance optical systems using weighted average angle of incidence techniques to optimize coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, James A.; Sprague, Michaelene

    2008-10-01

    Designers of medium and high performance optical systems often overlook a very simple technique that can improve the system transmission and image contrast, as well as reduce scattering within the system. The resulting improvement in the optical collection efficiency can be used to increase performance or be traded off to realize improvements in other areas (i.e. aperture size, weight, etc.). The technique is based on the observation that many (if not most) anti-reflection coatings specified for lens surfaces, are specified at a normal angle of incidence. Since most of the energy incident on a typical lens impinges at angles other than the normal, the efficiency of an anti-reflection coating at any surface might be improved by using an approach based on weighted average angles of the incident radiation. This paper describes one approach to calculate weighted average coating angles for a optical systems. The optical transmissions are estimated, when the respective coatings are specified at the normal angle of incidence and at an angle based on the incident ray geometry. The measured transmission of two (otherwise identical) aspheric lenses, one coated using a standard SLAR coating specified at a normal incidence angle and the other coated using a standard SLAR coating specified at optimized incidence angles are presented.

  2. Phase I Study of Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil for Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  3. New barium paste mixture for helical (slip-ring) CT evaluation of rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Noda, Y; Nishioka, A; Inomata, T; Yoshida, S; Toki, T; Ogoshi, S; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    We describe a new method for complete opacification of the rectum using helical CT and a newly developed anal contrast agent. Rectal cancers were easily identified in all of the 21 patients examined, and diagnostic accuracy in detecting local invasion was 94%. Our method of rectal CT is easy to perform and well tolerated.

  4. Clinical application of multimodality imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Yang; Zhe, Hong

    2013-12-11

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of rectal cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are mainstay techniques of radiotherapy for rectal cancer. However, the success of these techniques is heavily reliant on accurate target delineation and treatment planning. Computed tomography simulation is a cornerstone of rectal cancer radiotherapy, but there are limitations, such as poor soft-tissue contrast between pelvic structures and partial volume effects. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) can overcome these limitations and provide additional information for rectal cancer treatment planning. PET can also reduce the interobserver variation in the definition of rectal tumor volume. However, there is a long way to go before these image modalities are routinely used in the clinical setting. This review summarizes the most promising studies on clinical applications of multimodality imaging in target delineation and treatment planning for rectal cancer radiotherapy.

  5. Pre-operative Simulation of the Appropriate C-arm Position Using Computed Tomography Post-processing Software Reduces Radiation and Contrast Medium Exposure During EVAR Procedures.

    PubMed

    Stahlberg, E; Planert, M; Panagiotopoulos, N; Horn, M; Wiedner, M; Kleemann, M; Barkhausen, J; Goltz, J P

    2017-02-01

    The aim was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a new method for pre-operative calculation of an appropriate C-arm position for iliac bifurcation visualisation during endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) procedures by using three dimensional computed tomography angiography (CTA) post-processing software. Post-processing software was used to simulate C-arm angulations in two dimensions (oblique, cranial/caudal) for appropriate visualisation of distal landing zones at the iliac bifurcation during EVAR. Retrospectively, 27 consecutive EVAR patients (25 men, mean ± SD age 73 ± 7 years) were identified; one group of patients (NEW; n = 12 [23 iliac bifurcations]) was compared after implementation of the new method with a group of patients who received a historic method (OLD; n = 15 [23 iliac bifurcations]), treated with EVAR before the method was applied. In the OLD group, a median of 2.0 (interquartile range [IQR] 1-3) digital subtraction angiography runs were needed per iliac bifurcation versus 1.0 (IQR 1-1) runs in the NEW group (p = .007). The median dose area products per iliac bifurcation were 11951 mGy*cm(2) (IQR 7308-16663 mGy*cm(2)) for the NEW, and 39394 mGy*cm(2) (IQR 19066-53702 mGy*cm(2)) for the OLD group, respectively (p = .001). The median volume of contrast per iliac bifurcation was 13.0 mL (IQR: 13-13 mL) in the NEW and 26 mL (IQR 13-39 mL) in the OLD group (p = .007). Pre-operative simulation of the appropriate C-arm angulation in two dimensions using dedicated computed tomography angiography post-processing software is feasible and significantly reduces radiation and contrast medium exposure. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Contrast medium-induced nephrotoxicity risk assessment in adult inpatients: a comparison of serum creatinine level- and estimated glomerular filtration rate-based screening methods.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Matthew S; Khalatbari, Shokoufeh; Cohan, Richard H; Ellis, James H

    2013-10-01

    To compare serum creatinine (SCr) level- and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)-based screening methods for identifying adult inpatients at risk for contrast medium-induced nephrotoxicity (CIN). Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived for this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study. Computed tomographic examinations performed during 10 years in adult inpatients with stable renal function were identified (n = 28 390). The proportion of inpatients meeting various eGFR (≥60, <60, <45, <30, 30-44, 45-59 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and SCr (<1.5, ≥1.5, ≥1.6, ≥1.7, ≥1.8, ≥1.9, ≥2.0 mg/dL) thresholds were contrasted with each other and with published guidelines (≥2.0 mg/dL [SCr] and <45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [eGFR]) using McNemar and binomial tests. Most inpatients were considered low risk for CIN with commonly used thresholds: 92.6% (26 285 of 28 390) had SCr <1.5 mg/dL; 91.3% (25 922 of 28 390) had eGFR of ≥45 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Using SCr threshold of ≥1.5 mg/dL, identified inpatients had the following eGFRs: 19.6% (413 of 2105), 45-59 mL/min/1.73 m(2); 51.1% (1075 of 2105), 30-44 mL/min/1.73 m(2); 28.6% (603 of 2105), <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2); and 0.7% (14 of 2105), ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) . Using SCr threshold of ≥2.0 mg/dL, identified inpatients had the following eGFRs: 100% (658 of 658), <45 mL/min/1.73 m(2); 74.6% (491 of 658), <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Threshold of SCr ≥2.0 mg/dL could not be used to identify eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in 0.4% (112 of 28 390) and <45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in 6.4% (1810 of 28 390) of all inpatients. Using eGFR <45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) instead of SCr of ≥1.5 mg/dL would result in a significant but small increase in identified inpatients (8.7% [2468 of 28 390; 95% confidence interval: 8.4%, 9.0%] vs 7.4% [2105 of 28 390; 95% confidence interval: 7.1%, 7.7%]; P < .0001). Screening using eGFR <45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) instead of common SCr thresholds would significantly increase the number of inpatients

  7. A comparison of ionic versus nonionic contrast medium during primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction (GUSTO IIb). Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries in Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, W B; Granger, C B; Kleiman, N S; Phillips, H R; Ellis, S G; Betriu, A; Criger, D A; Stebbins, A L; Topol, E J; Califf, R M

    2000-03-15

    The clinical impact of contrast medium selection during primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been studied. We compared the clinical outcomes of patients who received ionic versus nonionic low osmolar contrast medium in the setting of primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty for AMI in the second Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries in Acute Coronary Syndromes (GUSTO IIb) trial. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to assess the relation between contrast medium selection and clinical outcome (death, reinfarction, or refractory ischemia) at 30 days. Although baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics were generally similar between the 2 groups, patients who received ionic, low osmolar contrast were less likely to have been enrolled at a US site (23% vs 43%, p = 0.001) and less likely to have occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (34% vs 47%, p = 0.03) or a history of prior AMI (8% vs 16%, p = 0.02). The triple composite end point of death, reinfarction, or refractory ischemia occurred less frequently in the ionic group, both in the hospital (4.4% vs 11%, p = 0.018) and at 30 days (5.5% vs 11%, p = 0.044). Although the trend favoring ionic contrast persisted, the differences were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for imbalances in baseline characteristics using a risk model developed from the study sample (n = 454, adjusted odds ratio for ionic contrast 0.48 [0.22 to 1.02], p = 0.055), and using a model developed from the entire GUSTO IIb study cohort (n = 12,142, adjusted odds ratio for ionic contrast 0.50 [0.23 to 1.06], p = 0.072). The results of this observational study warrant further elucidation by a randomized study design in this setting.

  8. Unique considerations in the patient with rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2011-08-01

    In the past two decades, substantial progress has been made in the adjuvant management of colorectal cancer. Chemotherapy has improved overall survival in patients with node-positive (N+) disease. In contrast with colon cancer, which has a low incidence of local recurrence, patients with rectal cancer have a higher incidence requiring the addition of pelvic radiation therapy (chemoradiation). Patients with rectal cancer have a number of unique management considerations: for example, the role of short-course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary for all patients, and if the type of surgery following chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? This review will address these and other controversies specific to patients with rectal cancer.

  9. Bladder and rectal complications following radiotherapy for cervix cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Bartholomew, M.; Velkley, D.E.; Cunningham, D.E.; Mortel, R.; Craycraft, G.; Shafer, J.

    1988-01-01

    One-hundred and thirty-two patients with cervix carcinoma who were treated with whole pelvis irradiation and two intracavitary applications had bladder and rectal dosimetry during brachytherapy with contrast agents placed into the bladder and rectum prior to orthogonal simulator radiographs. Doses were computer calculated at points A and B, F (bladder), R1 (rectum), and R2 (rectosigmoid). Late occurring bladder and rectal complications were graded on a severity scale of 1 to 3, and 14% had grade 2 or 3 injuries (9% developed fistulas). Statistical evaluation of the data showed that severe bladder and rectal injuries occur more commonly in stage IIIA and IIIB disease and in those receiving high external beam doses (5000 rad +). Analysis of variance tests revealed a significant correlation of brachytherapy dose to points R1 and R2 with severe rectal injuries but there was not a correlation of dose to F with bladder injuries. Nor was there correlation of injuries with dose to point A or the milligram-hour dose. We conclude that our technique for rectal dosimetry is adequate but that an improved technique of bladder dosimetry is needed. Also, when combining whole pelvis irradiation with two intracavitary applications (4000 rad to point A), the whole pelvis dose should probably not exceed 4000-4500 rad.

  10. Surface oxidation of gold nanoparticles supported on a glassy carbon electrode in sulphuric acid medium: contrasts with the behaviour of 'macro' gold.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Laborda, Eduardo; Crossley, Alison; Compton, Richard G

    2013-03-07

    Consecutive electro-oxidation and reduction cycling of gold macroelectrodes in sulphuric acid medium is a widely-used cleaning and calibration procedure. In this paper this method is applied to electrodeposited nanoparticles revealing significant differences in the electro-oxidation process and the cleaning effectiveness. This suggests a higher density of surface defects on the nanoparticles.

  11. Reproducibility with repeat CT in radiomics study for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Panpan; Wang, Jiazhou; Zhong, Haoyu; Zhou, Zhen; Shen, Lijun; Hu, Weigang; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the reproducibility of radiomics features by repeating computed tomographic (CT) scans in rectal cancer. To choose stable radiomics features for rectal cancer. Results Volume normalized features are much more reproducible than unnormalized features. The average value of all slices is the most reproducible feature type in rectal cancer. Different filters have little effect for the reproducibility of radiomics features. For the average type features, 496 out of 775 features showed high reproducibility (ICC ≥ 0.8), 225 out of 775 features showed medium reproducibility (0.8 > ICC ≥ 0.5) and 54 out of 775 features showed low reproducibility (ICC < 0.5). Methods 40 rectal cancer patients with stage II were enrolled in this study, each of whom underwent two CT scans within average 8.7 days. 775 radiomics features were defined in this study. For each features, five different values (value from the largest slice, maximum value, minimum value, average value of all slices and value from superposed intermediate matrix) were extracted. Meanwhile a LOG filter with different parameters was applied to these images to find stable filter value. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and inter-class correlation coefficients (ICC) of two CT scans were calculated to assess the reproducibility, based on original features and volume normalized features. Conclusions Features are recommended to be normalized to volume in radiomics analysis. The average type radiomics features are the most stable features in rectal cancer. Further analysis of these features of rectal cancer can be warranted for treatment monitoring and prognosis prediction. PMID:27669756

  12. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental.

  13. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Resources ASCRS Textbook, 3rd Edition CARSEP® CREST® Case Study Listserv International Colon and Rectal Societies and Organizations ... Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery CARSEP® Members Case Study Listserv CREST® Young Surgeons Listserv Quality Assessment and ...

  14. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. Warren; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-04-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007.

  15. [Quality radiotherapy in rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Capirci, C; Amichetti, M; De Renzis, C

    2001-01-01

    The quality of radiotherapy significantly impacts on the results of treatment, in patients with rectal carcinoma, especially in terms of acute and late toxicity. Based on this assumption, the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology (AIRO) formulated a document aimed to define the standards of radiation treatment for rectal carcinomas. Two different levels of standard were described: a first level, considered as "minimal requirement", and a second level, considered as "optimal treatment". A retrospective evaluation, based on a questionnaire, revealed that in 1996, in most Italian Centers, patients affected by rectal carcinoma received radiation treatment within the first level of proposed standards. A subsequent analysis concerned the evaluation of the level of treatments applied in 2000. In this paper the radiotherapy standards proposed by the AIRO are described in the different phases of the radiation treatment.

  16. Local management of rectal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Touzios, John; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2008-11-01

    The treatment of rectal neoplasia, whether benign or malignant, challenges the surgeon. The challenge in treating rectal cancer is selecting the proper approach for the appropriate patient. In a small number of rectal cancer patients local excision may be the best approach. In an attempt to achieve two goals-cure of disease with a low rate of local failure and maintenance of function and quality of life-multiple approaches can be utilized. The key to obtaining a good outcome for any one patient is balancing the competing factors that impact on these goals. Any effective treatment aimed at controlling rectal cancer in the pelvis must take into account the disease in the bowel wall itself and the disease, or potential disease, in the mesorectum. The major downside of local excision techniques is the potential of leaving untreated disease in the mesorectum. Local management techniques avoid the potential morbidity, mortality, and functional consequences of a major abdominal radical resection and are thus quite effective in achieving the maintenance of function and quality of life goal. The issue for the transanal techniques is how they fare in achieving the first goal-cure of the cancer while keeping local recurrence rates to an absolute minimum. Without removing both the rectum and the mesorectum there is no completely accurate way to determine whether a rectal cancer has moved outside the bowel wall, so any decision on local management of a rectal neoplasm is a calculated risk. For benign neoplasia, the challenge is removing the lesion without having to resort to a major abdominal procedure.

  17. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A rectal...

  18. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A rectal...

  19. Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  20. Dominance hierarchies, diversity and species richness of vascular plants in an alpine meadow: contrasting short and medium term responses to simulated global change

    PubMed Central

    Little, Chelsea J.; Jägerbrand, Annika K.; Molau, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    We studied the impact of simulated global change on a high alpine meadow plant community. Specifically, we examined whether short-term (5 years) responses are good predictors for medium-term (7 years) changes in the system by applying a factorial warming and nutrient manipulation to 20 plots in Latnjajaure, subarctic Sweden. Seven years of experimental warming and nutrient enhancement caused dramatic shifts in dominance hierarchies in response to the nutrient and the combined warming and nutrient enhancement treatments. Dominance hierarchies in the meadow moved from a community being dominated by cushion plants, deciduous, and evergreen shrubs to a community being dominated by grasses, sedges, and forbs. Short-term responses were shown to be inconsistent in their ability to predict medium-term responses for most functional groups, however, grasses showed a consistent and very substantial increase in response to nutrient addition over the seven years. The non-linear responses over time point out the importance of longer-term studies with repeated measurements to be able to better predict future changes. Forecasted changes to temperature and nutrient availability have implications for trophic interactions, and may ultimately influence the access to and palatability of the forage for grazers. Depending on what anthropogenic change will be most pronounced in the future (increase in nutrient deposits, warming, or a combination of them both), different shifts in community dominance hierarchies may occur. Generally, this study supports the productivity–diversity relationship found across arctic habitats, with community diversity peaking in mid-productivity systems and degrading as nutrient availability increases further. This is likely due the increasing competition in plant–plant interactions and the shifting dominance structure with grasses taking over the experimental plots, suggesting that global change could have high costs to biodiversity in the Arctic. PMID

  1. Dominance hierarchies, diversity and species richness of vascular plants in an alpine meadow: contrasting short and medium term responses to simulated global change.

    PubMed

    Alatalo, Juha M; Little, Chelsea J; Jägerbrand, Annika K; Molau, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    We studied the impact of simulated global change on a high alpine meadow plant community. Specifically, we examined whether short-term (5 years) responses are good predictors for medium-term (7 years) changes in the system by applying a factorial warming and nutrient manipulation to 20 plots in Latnjajaure, subarctic Sweden. Seven years of experimental warming and nutrient enhancement caused dramatic shifts in dominance hierarchies in response to the nutrient and the combined warming and nutrient enhancement treatments. Dominance hierarchies in the meadow moved from a community being dominated by cushion plants, deciduous, and evergreen shrubs to a community being dominated by grasses, sedges, and forbs. Short-term responses were shown to be inconsistent in their ability to predict medium-term responses for most functional groups, however, grasses showed a consistent and very substantial increase in response to nutrient addition over the seven years. The non-linear responses over time point out the importance of longer-term studies with repeated measurements to be able to better predict future changes. Forecasted changes to temperature and nutrient availability have implications for trophic interactions, and may ultimately influence the access to and palatability of the forage for grazers. Depending on what anthropogenic change will be most pronounced in the future (increase in nutrient deposits, warming, or a combination of them both), different shifts in community dominance hierarchies may occur. Generally, this study supports the productivity-diversity relationship found across arctic habitats, with community diversity peaking in mid-productivity systems and degrading as nutrient availability increases further. This is likely due the increasing competition in plant-plant interactions and the shifting dominance structure with grasses taking over the experimental plots, suggesting that global change could have high costs to biodiversity in the Arctic.

  2. [Comparative microangiographic and histological study of hepatic metastases. Possible implications in the phenomena of contrast medium uptake in x-ray computed tomography of the neoplastic liver].

    PubMed

    Tshibwabwa-Tumba, E; Marchal, G; Pylyser, K; Verbeken, E; Goddeeris, P; Baert, A L; Lauweryns, J

    1984-10-01

    A comparative study using microangiographic and histologic techniques was realized in 43 metastatic livers, totaling 109 lesions. Three different types of tumor vascularization could be recognized. In 30 lesions, residual vessels could be identified. They constitute the only vascular elements in most of the hypervascular lesions studied. On histology, these vessels corresponded to preserved hepatic arterial branches and portal radicles. 79 lesions appeared hypervascular. In 51 lesions, hypervascularity was due to tortuous irregular vessels, corresponding at microscopy to dysplastic capillaries clearly lined with endothelial cells. On the contrary, in 28 metastases, microangiographies showed amorphous contrast uptake. In these cases the contrast was found in large intercellular spaces without endothelial lining, suggesting free interstitial circulation. These observations suggest that the morphology and the dynamic of CT in liver metastases must be influenced by the arterial or portal venous nature of the different vessels. Furthermore, the extravascular diffusion should be function of the type of tumor circulation. If this circulation is confined to real vessels, diffusion will be function of the structure of the walls of these vessels. On the contrary, if the intratumoral circulation is of the free interstitial type, diffusion will be absent and mixing will occur because of the continuity of vascular and interstitial spaces.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Catherine E; Mortele, Koenraad J

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to discuss the anatomy of the anorectum, the MRI protocol parameters required to optimize diagnosis of rectal cancer, and the diagnostic MRI criteria essential to stage rectal cancer accurately, using the TNM staging classification. A brief review of more emerging important aspects of rectal cancer staging, such as the circumferential resection margin, extramural vascular invasion, and the staging of low rectal cancers, will also be provided. Finally, the authors will touch upon the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy in the setting of locally advanced rectal cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Rectosacropexy in rectal prolapse management].

    PubMed

    Titov, A Iu; Biriukov, O M; Fomenko, O Iu; Zarodniuk, I V; Voĭnov, M A

    2016-01-01

    To compare results of rectosacropexy and posterior-loop rectopexy in rectal prolapse management. Study included 122 patients operated for rectal prolapse for the period January 2007 to August 2014. Patients' age ranged from 19 to 85 years (mean 47.3±16.1). Main group consisted of 60 (49.2%) patients who underwent rectosacropexy (D'Hoore's procedure). Control group included 62 (50.8%) patients in whom posterior-loop rectopexy was applied (Wells's procedure). Long-term results were followed-up in 94 (77.0%) patients including 48 and 46 from main and control group respectively. Recurrent prolaple incidence after rectosacropexy and posterior-loop rectopexy was 2% and 8.7% respectively. Multivariant analysis statistically confirmed that postoperative impaired colon motility was independent risk factor of recurrence. Recurrent disease is observed 5.7 times more often in this case. Rectosacropexy does not significantly impair colon motility because of ileus occurs in 8.3% of operated patients. Impovement of anal continence does not depend on rectopexy method and occurs in all patients with degree 1-2 of anal sphincter failure. Rectosacropexy may be preferred in rectal prolapse. However, further highly significant studies are necessary to optimize rectal prolapse management.

  5. Renal cortical retention of contrast medium on delayed CT and nephropathy following transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation in patients with high serum creatinine level.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Oi, H; Matshushita, M; Inoue, T; Nakamura, H; Inoue, T

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of renal cortical retention (RCR) of contrast media seen on delayed CT, and nephropathy following transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) in high-risk patients. The findings of 18 patients with abnormally high serum creatinine levels who underwent TACE were reviewed. Nephropathy was defined as an increase in serum creatinine level of more than 44 micromol l(-1), or more than 25%, on day 1, 3, 7 or 14. RCR was defined as mild (CT value >50) or severe (CT value >100). RCR was seen in 16 cases (89%) and in seven cases (39%) of post-TACE nephropathy. Patients without severe RCR did not develop nephropathy post-TACE, whereas 50% of those with such retention did (p=0.19). Delayed CT appears to have the potential as an early detector of nephropathy post-TACE in high-risk patients.

  6. Induction of Upregulation and Downregulation of the T-Cell Activation Marker CD98 in Patients Undergoing Contrast-Enhanced CT with Iodinated Non-Ionic Dimeric Contrast Medium

    PubMed Central

    Schild, Hans H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to determine prospectively the expression of the multifunctional CD98 protein in peripheral white blood cells in patients receiving iodinated contrast media (CM) for a computed tomography (CT) examination. Materials and Methods In 12 adult patients that received non-ionic dimeric CM (iosimenol or iodixanol), the expression of CD98 was analyzed from samples of peripheral white blood cells obtained prior to, one hour, and 24 hours after CM injection by the use of flow cytometry analysis and the use of the direct immunofluorescence technique. Results Overall, expression of CD98 was significantly downregulated 24 hours after CM injection (51.9%±10.8% vs. 38.8%±16.9%; p < 0.04). Patients that received iosimenol exhibited a more pronounced but not significant decrease of CD98 expression both one hour and 24 hours after CM injection. In an analysis of specific patient responses, CD98 downregulation occurred in eight patients. In two patients, CD98 was upregulated, and in the remaining two patients, expression remained unchanged. No patient acquired an adverse CM reaction. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that CM may be a regulator of CD98 expression. To determine if upregulation is associated with an increased risk for the acquisition of an adverse CM-induced hypersensitivity reaction and if downregulation is associated without a risk for the acquisition of an adverse CM-induced hypersensitivity reaction, further studies with a larger population of patients are required. PMID:19182504

  7. Incidence and risk factors for rectal pain after laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Hee Cheol; Huh, Jung Wook; Lim, Hyun Young; Lee, Eun Kyung; Park, Hui Gyeong; Bang, Yu Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to investigate the incidence of and potential risk factors for rectal pain after laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data from 300 patients who underwent laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery. We assessed the presence of rectal pain and categorized patients into Group N (no rectal pain) or Group P (rectal pain). Results In total, 288 patients were included. Of these patients, 39 (13.5%) reported rectal pain and 14 (4.9%) had rectal pain that persisted for >3 months. Univariate analysis revealed that patients in Group P had more preoperative chemoradiotherapy, more ileostomies, longer operation times, more anastomotic margins of <2 cm from the anal verge, more anastomotic leakage, and longer hospital stays. Multivariate analysis identified an anastomotic margin of <2 cm from the anal verge and a long operation time as risk factors. The presence of diabetes mellitus was a negative predictor of rectal pain. Conclusions In this study, the incidence of rectal pain after laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery was 13.5%. An anastomotic margin of <2 cm from the anal verge and a long operation time were risk factors for rectal pain. The presence of diabetes mellitus was a negative predictor of rectal pain. Thus, the possibility of postoperative rectal pain should be discussed preoperatively with patients with these risk factors. PMID:28415928

  8. Feasibility of low-dose contrast medium high pitch CT angiography for the combined evaluation of coronary, head and neck arteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Chen, Yu; Wang, Yining; Xue, Huadan; Jin, Zhengyu; Kong, Lingyan; Cao, Jian; Li, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of combined heart, head, and neck CT angiography (CTA) using prospectively electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered high-pitch spiral scan protocol, compared with single coronary CTA. 151 consecutive patients were prospectively included and randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (n = 47) underwent combined heart, neck, and head CTA using prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch spiral (Flash) scan protocol with a single-phase intravenous injection of iodinated contrast and saline flush; Group 2 (n = 51) underwent single coronary CTA with Flash scan protocol; and Group 3 (n = 53) underwent single coronary CTA with prospective sequence scan protocol. All patients were examined on a dual source CT (Definition FLASH). The image quality was determined for each CT study. Patients of scanning protocol Group 1, 2, and 3 showed no significant differences in age, sex, heart rates, and BMI. Evaluation of coronary artery image quality showed comparable results in the three scanning protocol groups on a per patient-based analysis. In group 1, image quality was found to be sufficient to be diagnostic in all arterial segments of carotid arteries. The mean dose-length product (DLP) for group 1 was 256.3±24.5 mGy×cm and was significantly higher in comparison with group 2 (93.4±19.9 mGy×cm; p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference of DLP between group 1 and group 3 (254.1±69.9 mGy×cm). The combined heart, neck, and head arteries scan using prospectively electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered high-pitch spiral scan protocol in 1 single examination resulted in an excellent opacification of the aorta, the carotid arteries, and the coronary arteries and provided a good image quality with low radiation dose.

  9. Rectal dose to prostate cancer patients treated with proton therapy with or without rectal spacer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heeteak; Polf, Jerimy; Badiyan, Shahed; Biagioli, Matthew; Fernandez, Daniel; Latifi, Kujtim; Wilder, Richard; Mehta, Minesh; Chuong, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a spacer inserted in the prerectal space could reduce modeled rectal dose and toxicity rates for patients with prostate cancer treated in silico with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. A total of 20 patients were included in this study who received photon therapy (12 with rectal spacer (DuraSeal™ gel) and 8 without). Two PBS treatment plans were retrospectively created for each patient using the following beam arrangements: (1) lateral-opposed (LAT) fields and (2) left and right anterior oblique (LAO/RAO) fields. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were generated for the prostate, rectum, bladder, and right and left femoral heads. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model and compared between patients with and without the rectal spacer. A significantly lower mean rectal DVH was achieved in patients with rectal spacer compared to those without. For LAT plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 4.19 and 13.5%, respectively. For LAO/RAO plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 5.07 and 13.5%, respectively. No significant differences were found in any rectal dosimetric parameters between the LAT and the LAO/RAO plans generated with the rectal spacers. We found that ≥ 9 mm space resulted in a significant decrease in NTCP modeled for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity. Rectal spacers can significantly decrease modeled rectal dose and predicted ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated in silico with PBS. A minimum of 9 mm separation between the prostate and anterior rectal wall yields the largest benefit.

  10. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwangzoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Results Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Conclusion Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary. PMID:27592514

  11. [Surgical treatment of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Salinas-Aragón, L E; Camacho-Mauries, D; Medina-Franco, H

    2010-01-01

    Rectal affection accounts for 30% of colorectal cancer. The standard of treatment is surgical resection, which often is curative. For superior and middle-rectal involvement, low anterior resection (LAR) is the preferred procedure. For tumors involving the lower portion of the rectum, abdominoperineal resection (APR) or LAR are the options of treatment, depending on sphincter involvement. The main surgical objective is to achieve a R0 resection with an appropriated total mesorrectal excision, greater number of lymph nodes and negative distal and radial margins. These surgical parameters have been used as quality indicators and have prognostic implications in terms of overall and disease-free survival. Total mesorectal excision with preservation of hypogastric nerves has shown a reduction in rates of sexual and bladder dysfunction as well as lower local recurrence. At specialized centers such procedures are performed by minimal invasive surgery; however the number of meta-analysis is scarce.

  12. Clinical value of MRI-detected extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Pratik; Rao, Sheng Xiang; Zeng, Meng Su

    2017-01-01

    Extramural venous invasion (EMVI) is associated with a poor prognosis and a poor overall survival rate in rectal cancer. It can independently predict local and distant tumor recurrences. Preoperative EMVI detection in rectal cancer is useful for determining the treatment strategy. EMVI status is beneficial for the post-treatment evaluation and analysis of rectal cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic modality with no radiation effects. High-resolution MRI can detect EMVI with high accuracy. In addition, MRI results are equal to or even better than pathological results in the detection of medium to large EMVI in rectal cancer. MRI-detected EMVI (mrEMVI) can be used as a potential biomarker that facilitates treatment methods. This review highlights the importance of MRI before and after rectal cancer treatment. In addition, we analyze the prognostic correlation between mrEMVI and circulating tumor cells (CTC) in rectal cancer. This article may help shed light on the significance of mrEMVI.

  13. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-09-26

    Laparoscopic surgery has gained acceptance as a less invasive approach in the treatment of colon cancer. However, laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer, particularly cancer of the lower rectum, is still challenging because of limited accessibility. Robotic surgery overcomes the limitations of laparoscopy associated with anatomy and offers certain advantages, including 3-D imaging, dexterity and ambidextrous capability, lack of tremors, motion scaling, and a short learning curve. Robotic rectal surgery has been reported to reduce conversion rates, particularly in low anterior resection, but it is associated with longer operative times than the conventional laparoscopic approach. Postoperative morbidities are similar between the robotic and conventional laparoscopic approaches, and oncological outcomes such as the quality of the mesorectum and the status of resection margins are also equivalent. The possible superiority of robotic surgery in terms of the preservation of autonomic function has yet to be established in research based on larger numbers of patients. Although robotic rectal surgery is safe, feasible, and appears to overcome some of the technical limitations associated with conventional laparoscopic surgery, the advantages provided by this technical innovation are currently limited. To justify its expensive cost, robotic surgery is more suitable for select patients, such as obese patients, men, those with cancer of the lower rectum, and those receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy. © 2017 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Stubborn rectal prolapse in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Sven; Tobisch, Alexander; Puhl, Gero; Kötter, Ina; Wollina, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune connective tissue disorder. Anorectal involvement might typically cause fecal incontinence and rarely rectal prolapse. Here we report three female patients, who were admitted with a mean history of 10 years suffering from SSc. All patients presented with the initial symptom of anal incontinence, in all cases this was associated with rectal intussusception or rectal prolapse. The three women faced prolapse recurrence, independent of the initial procedure. After surgical removal of the prolapse, the incontinence remained. In SSc rectal prolapse syndrome might occur at an earlier age, and a primary prolapse of the ventral aspect of the rectal wall seems to be typical for this disease. If patients with prior diagnosis of SSc appear with third degree of fecal incontinence, it is suspected to be associated with rectal prolapse. The prolapse recurrence rate after surgery in SSc patients is high.

  15. Comparative evaluation of modified canal staining and clearing technique, cone-beam computed tomography, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, spiral computed tomography, and plain and contrast medium-enhanced digital radiography in studying root canal morphology.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, Prasanna; Subbarao, Chandana; Subbarao, Chandragiri V

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), spiral computed tomography (SCT), plain (plain digi), and contrast medium-enhanced digital radiographs (contrast digi) in studying root canal morphology. The root canal anatomy was analyzed in 95 teeth using CBCT, pQCT, SCT, plain digi, and contrast digi. After flushing out the radiopaque dye, access cavities were sealed, and the teeth were subject to the modified canal staining and clearing technique. The number of root canals (Vertucci classification and Gulabivala's additional classes) was calculated by three calibrated endodontists and two maxillofacial radiologists. Erroneous or unsuccessful identifications of root canals were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (p = 0.05). The modified canal staining and clearing technique identified an average of 1.8 root canals per mandibular central incisor, 2.3 per maxillary first premolar, 3.9 per maxillary first molar, 3.8 per maxillary and mandibular second molar, and 4.3 per mandibular first molar. CBCT and pQCT were erroneous in 0.29% and 2.05% cases, whereas SCT, contrast digi, and plain digi were unsuccessful in 15.58%, 14.7%, and 23.8%, respectively. There was a significant difference between all the methods (p < 0.05) in the unsuccessful identification of root canals except between CBCT and modified canal staining and clearing technique where there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). CBCT and pQCT were as accurate as the modified canal staining and tooth clearing technique in identifying root canal systems. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Penile metastases of rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Persec, Z; Persec, J; Sovic, T; Rako, D; Savic, I; Marinic, D K

    2014-02-01

    Penile metastases are very rare and arise most frequently from genitourinary cancers. Penile metastases from rectal adenocarcinoma are less common and only 50 or so cases have been reported. We present a 43-year-old man with penile metastases from a rectal adenocarcinoma. Two years before admittance to our department, abdomino-perineal resection of the rectum (Miles operation) was performed for a Dukes B (T3N0M0) rectal adenocarcinoma; the surgical resection margins wee negative. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment were administered. One year after initial management, excision of a local recurrence was performed followed by further chemotherapy. The patient subsequently noticed lesions of the penis measuring up to 1.2 cm in diameter. Biopsy revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma. Computed tomography showed normal structure of penis with subcutaneous nodular thickening. Soon thereafter, the entire shaft of the penis becomes indurated and the patient developed urinary obstruction. A suprapubic cystostomy was performed. The patient died within 6 months. Penile metastases arise most frequently from genitourinary cancers, primarily from the bladder and the prostate gland. Metastasis to the penis from a rectal adenocarcinoma occurs much less commonly. Other reported primary origins of penile metastases include malignancies of the lung, nasopharynx and melanoma. The major symptoms are penile nodular mass, malignant priapism, penile pain and tenderness, difficulty in micturition, and urinary retention. Possible routes of metastasis are arterial, retrograde venous spread, retrograde lymphatic spread, but direct tumor infiltration/extension is also possible. Penile metastases from rectal adenocarcinoma usually occur within 2 years after diagnosis of the primary tumor. The prognosis is very poor regardless of treatment modality. Treatment is more often palliative than curative. Survival usually varies from 7 months to 2 years. Long-term survival (9 years) has been

  17. Robotic rectal surgery: what are the benefits?

    PubMed

    Kim, C W; Baik, S H

    2013-10-01

    Robotic rectal surgery is not a rare event for colorectal surgeons any more. Even patients with colorectal diseases obtain information through the mass media and are asking surgeons about robotic surgery. Since laparoscopic rectal surgery has proved to have some benefits compared to open rectal surgery, many surgeons became interested in robotic rectal surgery. Some of them have reported the advantages and disadvantages of robotic rectal surgery over the last decade. This review will report on the outcomes of robotic rectal surgery. Robotic rectal surgery requires a longer operation time than laparoscopic or open surgery, but many authors reduced the gap as they were accustomed to the robotic system and used various additional techniques. The high cost for purchasing and maintaining the robotic system is still a problem, though. However, except for this reason, robotic rectal surgery shows comparable and even superior results in some parameters than laparoscopic or open surgery. They include pathologic and functional outcomes as well as short-term outcomes such as complication rates, length of hospital stay, time to recover normal bowel function or first flatus, time to start diet, and postoperative pain. Moreover, studies on oncologic outcomes show acceptable results. Robotic rectal surgery is safe and feasible and has a number of benefits. Therefore, it can be an alternative option to conventional laparoscopic and open surgery with strict indications.

  18. Rectal neuroendocrine neoplasms: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) are very rare, among which second most common type is the rectal NENs in China. Patients with rectal NENs may experience non-specific symptoms such as pain, perianal bulge, anemia, and bloody stools, and surgery is considered as the first treatment for rectal NENs. We report a case of rectal NENs in a 68-year-old male patient with bloody stools, who received surgery and postoperative pathology revealed an elevated well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:28138616

  19. Magnamosis: a novel technique for the management of rectal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Katie W; Rollins, Michael D; Feola, G Peter; Scaife, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of rectal atresia treated using magnets to create a rectal anastomosis. This minimally invasive technique is straightforward and effective for the treatment of rectal atresia in children. PMID:25096648

  20. Age and cellular context influence rectal prolapse formation in mice with caecal wall colorectal cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Tommelein, Joke; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; De Vlieghere, Elly; Wagemans, Glenn; Gespach, Christian; Boterberg, Tom; Demetter, Pieter; Ceelen, Wim; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In patients with rectal prolapse is the prevalence of colorectal cancer increased, suggesting that a colorectal tumor may induce rectal prolapse. Establishment of tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice after orthotopic inoculations of human colorectal cancer cells into the caecal wall is a widely used approach for the study of human colorectal cancer progression and preclinical evaluation of therapeutics. Remarkably, 70% of young mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor showed symptoms of intussusception of the large bowel associated with intestinal lumen obstruction and rectal prolapse. The quantity of the COLO320DM bioluminescent signal of the first three weeks post-inoculation predicts prolapse in young mice. Rectal prolapse was not observed in adult mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor or young mice carrying a HT29 caecal tumor. In contrast to HT29 tumors, which showed local invasion and metastasis, COLO320DM tumors demonstrated a non-invasive tumor with pushing borders without presence of metastasis. In conclusion, rectal prolapse can be linked to a non-invasive, space-occupying COLO320DM tumor in the gastrointestinal tract of young immunodeficient mice. These data reveal a model that can clarify the association of patients showing rectal prolapse with colorectal cancer. PMID:27689329

  1. Determining contrast medium dose and rate on basis of lean body weight: does this strategy improve patient-to-patient uniformity of hepatic enhancement during multi-detector row CT?

    PubMed

    Ho, Lisa M; Nelson, Rendon C; Delong, David M

    2007-05-01

    To prospectively evaluate the use of lean body weight (LBW) as the main determinant of the volume and rate of contrast material administration during multi-detector row computed tomography of the liver. This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval. All patients gave written informed consent. Four protocols were compared. Standard protocol involved 125 mL of iopamidol injected at 4 mL/sec. Total body weight (TBW) protocol involved 0.7 g iodine per kilogram of TBW. Calculated LBW and measured LBW protocols involved 0.86 g of iodine per kilogram and 0.92 g of iodine per kilogram calculated or measured LBW for men and women, respectively. Injection rate used for the three experimental protocols was determined proportionally on the basis of the calculated volume of contrast material. Postcontrast attenuation measurements during portal venous phase were obtained in liver, portal vein, and aorta for each group and were summed for each patient. Patient-to-patient enhancement variability in same group was measured with Levene test. Two-tailed t test was used to compare the three experimental protocols with the standard protocol. Data analysis was performed in 101 patients (25 or 26 patients per group), including 56 men and 45 women (mean age, 53 years). Average summed attenuation values for standard, TBW, calculated LBW, and measured LBW protocols were 419 HU +/- 50 (standard deviation), 443 HU +/- 51, 433 HU +/- 50, and 426 HU +/- 33, respectively (P = not significant for all). Levene test results for summed attenuation data for standard, TBW, calculated LBW, and measured LBW protocols were 40 +/- 29, 38 +/- 33 (P = .83), 35 +/- 35 (P = .56), and 26 +/- 19 (P = .05), respectively. By excluding highly variable but poorly perfused adipose tissue from calculation of contrast medium dose, the measured LBW protocol may lessen patient-to-patient enhancement variability while maintaining satisfactory hepatic and vascular enhancement.

  2. Multidisciplinary management in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hervás Morón, Asunción; García de Paredes, María Luisa; Lobo Martínez, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The treatment of rectal cancer has evolved over the last few decades from surgery alone to treatments with trimodal therapy for high-risk patients. The involvement of a multidisciplinary team of radiologists, pathologists, surgeons, radiotherapists and medical oncologists is now fundamental for decision-making and outcomes. The evolution of different diagnostic and therapeutic techniques has optimised the therapeutic rate. Future studies will determine the optimal regimen for inducing complete responses in locally advanced disease and whether the intensification of local treatments could enable the use of more conservative treatments, as for other tumour locations. The study of biomarkers will be essential in this respect.

  3. Multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Doi, Momoko; Ikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Kawamura, Takuji; Katsura, Kanade

    2016-08-01

    We report multiple rectal carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins who, respectively, had 42 and 36 carcinoid tumors in the lower rectum. This is the first report about carcinoid tumors in monozygotic twins. Both twins developed a similar number of rectal carcinoids with a similar distribution. Investigation of their genetic background may provide information about the origin of these tumors.

  4. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  5. Alcohol consumption and rectal tumor mutations and epigenetic changes.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Wolff, Roger K; Herrick, Jennifer S; Curtin, Karen; Caan, Bette J; Samowitz, Wade

    2010-08-01

    An association between alcohol and rectal cancer has been reported in the epidemiological literature. In this study we further explore the association by examining specific tumor markers with alcohol consumption as well as types of alcoholic beverages consumed. We assessed alcohol consumption with CpG Island Methylator Phenotype, TP53, and KRAS2 mutations in incident rectal cancer cases and compared them with population-based controls. We evaluated type, long-term, and recent alcohol consumption. We observed a trend toward increasing risk of CpG Island Methylator Phenotype positive tumors and long-term alcohol consumption. In contrast, after adjusting for total alcohol intake, recent high beer consumption significantly increased the odds of having a TP53 mutation compared with those who did not drink beer (odds ratio, 1.97; 95% CI 1.24, 3.12). We observed a nonstatistically significant reduced risk of a TP53 mutation among those who drank wine (in particular, red wine) vs nonconsumers of wine. The association between TP53 mutations and recent beer consumption was strongest for transversion mutations. These data suggest that both alcohol and specific constituents of alcoholic beverages contribute to rectal cancer risk among unique disease pathways.

  6. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Oxaliplatin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-11

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  7. Reduction of the rectal dose in gynecological brachytherapy: modification to the Fletcher-Suit applicator.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, E; Cederbaum, M; Yereslav, N; Kuten, A

    1996-01-01

    The dose to the anterior rectal wall is a known limiting factor for the delivery of radical doses of radiation to the uterine cervix with brachytherapy. We developed a modification to the Fletcher-Suit afterloading applicator, consisting of two small inflatable balloons attached to the posterior end of each colpostat. The balloons are connected to catheters that emerge from the vagina attached to the colpostat's handles. The balloons were affixed to the colpostats with a plastic adaptor and are inserted empty. After an anterior radiograph is taken, the balloons are filled with radiological contrast material and a lateral orthogonal film is made. This lateral film taken with the balloons filled with contrast typically shows a significant posterior displacement of the anterior rectal wall away from the vaginal sources. The International Commission on Radiation Units (ICRU) rectal point is then determined 5 mm beyond the posterior boundary of the opacified balloons. We have performed 90 applications using this device, including brachytherapy applications for cervical cancer, as well as vaginal applications for endometrial carcinoma following TAH-BSO. On average, the ICRU rectal point was displaced 14 mm away from the colpostats, thus reducing the dose rate by 60% and resulting in an average dose sparing of about 1000 cGy to the anterior rectal wall.

  8. [Rectal administration of anesthetic agents].

    PubMed

    Ceriana, P; Maurelli, M

    1995-05-01

    To collect data in the current literature dealing with the diffusion, the reliability and the effectiveness of the rectal administration of anaesthetic drugs. To evaluate differences with parenteral administration. Pharmacokinetics and clinical studies published in recent years in indexed journals. Based on the study methodology, drugs employed and pharmacokinetic parameters evaluated. Factors involved in absorption of drugs from the rectal mucosa, clinical effect and pharmacokinetic data of the following drugs: diazepam, flunitrazepam, midazolam, ketamin and methohexital, then a brief evaluation of other drugs: thiopental, etomidate, morphine and chloral hydrate. The most widely used drugs are benzodiazepines: they are safe, easy to manage and highly effective; among them midazolam has the best kinetic and dynamic pattern. Ketamin is useful during painful diagnostic procedures; with the use of barbiturates there is a greater risk of respiratory depression and more caution must be employed. Wide intervariability of rate of absorption, achievement of plasma levels and clinical effect is a relevant drawback of this technique, such to make it not preferable to the parenteral route, when both are feasible. It deserves, anyway, more consideration, and maintains its validity for the preparation of the paediatric patient to general anaesthesia.

  9. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  10. [Peri-operative treatments for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Doyen, Jerome; Bénézery, Karen; Borens, Bruno; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; François, Éric

    2015-06-01

    Depending on its location or stage, rectal cancer may differ significantly. Before any treatment decision a careful work up is mandatory relying mainly on endoscopy and imaging (MRI). Surgery according to the TME principle is the cornerstone of treatment. Most of the time surgery is associated with external beam radiotherapy often combined with concurrent chemotherapy (capecitabine) according to the neoadjuvant regimen CAP 50 (5 weeks long). It is sometimes possible to escalate safely the dose of irradiation using contact X-ray brachytherapy 50 Kv or Iridium 192 interstitial brachytherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be given in case of pejorative pathological findings but its benefit is not yet proven in contrast with colon cancer. Local recurrences are becoming unusual as is permanent APE surgery with permanent stoma. To reduce the risk of distant metastasis clinical trials are testing first line chemotherapy in T3-4 lesions. For early stage (T2-"small" T3) clinical trials try to achieve organ preservation. Intensification of CAP 50 either with more chemotherapy or radiation dose escalation using contact X-ray aim at achieving a clinical complete response followed by local excision or close surveillance.

  11. Rectal dosimetry following prostate brachytherapy with stranded seeds--comparison of transrectal ultrasound intra-operative planning (day 0) and computed tomography-postplanning (day 1 vs. day 30) with special focus on sources placed close to the rectal wall.

    PubMed

    Pinkawa, Michael; Asadpour, Branka; Piroth, Marc D; Gagel, Bernd; Klotz, Jens; Fischedick, Karin; Borchers, Holger; Jakse, Gerhard; Eble, Michael J

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare intra-operative and postplanning at different intervals with special focus on sources placed close to the rectal wall. In 61 consecutive patients, CT scans were performed on day 1 and day 30 after an I-125 implant with stranded seeds. The number of sources < or =7 mm to the rectal wall was determined, and displacements were analyzed. The angulation of strands relative to rectal wall was compared between intra-operative transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and both postplanning CT scans. Sources close to the rectum on day 1 (n=204) have been the most apical in a strand in 98.5% (n=201). By comparing day 1 and day 30 data, significant inferior source displacements (mean 3.6 mm; p=0.02) relative to pelvic bones and a decreasing distance to the rectal wall (mean 1.2 mm; p<0.01)--consequentially increasing rectal dose--were determined only for sources initially > or =3 mm to the rectum. In contrast to an almost parallel arrangement of the needle track and the rectal wall in TRUS, strands and rectal wall converged towards the apex in the postplanning CT scans (mean >30 degrees). Posterior preplanning margins around the prostate should be particularly limited at the level of the prostate apex.

  12. Transanal endoscopic surgery in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Mora-Lopez, Laura; Alcantara-Moral, Manel; Caro-Tarrago, Aleidis; Gomez-Diaz, Carlos Javier; Navarro-Soto, Salvador

    2014-09-07

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is the standard treatment for rectal cancer, but complications are frequent and rates of morbidity, mortality and genitourinary alterations are high. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) allows preservation of the anal sphincters and, via its vision system through a rectoscope, allows access to rectal tumors located as far as 20 cm from the anal verge. The capacity of local surgery to cure rectal cancer depends on the risk of lymph node invasion. This means that correct preoperative staging of the rectal tumor is necessary. Currently, local surgery is indicated for rectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas invading the submucosa, but not beyond (T1). Here we describe the standard technique for TEM, the different types of equipment used, and the technical limitations of this approach. TEM to remove rectal adenoma should be performed in the same way as if the lesion were an adenocarcinoma, due to the high percentage of infiltrating adenocarcinomas in these lesions. In spite of the generally good results with T1, some authors have published surprisingly high recurrence rates; this is due to the existence of two types of lesions, tumors with good and poor prognosis, divided according to histological and surgical factors. The standard treatment for rectal adenocarcinoma T2N0M0 is TME without adjuvant therapy. In this type of adenocarcinoma, local surgery obtains the best results when complete pathological response has been achieved with previous chemoradiotherapy. The results with chemoradiotherapy and TEM are encouraging, but the scientific evidence remains limited at present.

  13. Development of the American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) Rectal Cancer Surgery Checklist

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Sean C.; Morris, Arden M.; Baxter, Nancy N.; Fleshman, James W.; Alavi, Karim S.; Luchtefeld, Martin A.; Monson, John R. T.; Chang, George J.; Temple, Larissa K.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is excellent evidence that surgical safety checklists contribute to decreased morbidity and mortality. Objective To develop a surgical checklist comprising the key phases of care for rectal cancer patients. Design Consensus-oriented decision-making model involving iterative input from subject matter experts under the auspices of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Results The process generated a 25-item checklist covering the spectrum of care for rectal cancer patients undergoing surgery. Limitations Lack of prospective validation. Conclusions The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Rectal Cancer Surgery checklist comprises the essential elements of pre-, intra- and postoperative care that must be addressed during the surgical treatment of patients with rectal cancer. PMID:27270511

  14. Future of therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2013-06-01

    Since 2004, the standard of care for patients with cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer has been preoperative chemoradiation followed by surgery and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. A number of advances have occurred and are defining the future of rectal cancer therapy. Among these are short course radiation, the impact of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, selective radiation and selective surgery, and new chemoradiation regimens with novel agents. This review will examine these developments and assess their impact on the future therapy of rectal cancer.

  15. Genetic Mutations in Blood and Tissue Samples in Predicting Response to Treatment in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-08

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  16. Paediatric rectal prolapse in Rwanda.

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, E J; Duckett, J; Lewin, J

    1996-01-01

    During the 1994 crisis in Rwanda, a high incidence of full-thickness rectal prolapse was noted among the refugee children in the south-west of the country. The prolapses arose as a result of acute diarrhoeal illness superimposed on malnutrition and worm infestation. We used a modification of the Thiersch wire technique in 40 of these cases during two months working in a refugee camp. A catgut pursestring was tied around the anal margin under local, regional or general anaesthesia. This was effective in achieving short-term control of full-thickness prolapse until the underlying illness was corrected. Under the circumstances, no formal follow-up could be arranged; however, no complications were reported and only one patient presented with recurrence. Images Figure 1 PMID:9014879

  17. Mechanical suture in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheregi, Cornel Dragos; Simon, Ioan; Fabian, Ovidiu; Maghiar, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent digestive malignancies, being the third cause of death by cancer, despite early diagnosis and therapeutic progress made over the past years. Standard treatment in these patients is to preserve the anal sphincter with restoration of intestinal function by mechanical colorectal anastomosis or coloanal anastomosis, and to maintain genitourinary function by preservation of hypogastric nerves. In order to emphasize the importance of this surgical technique in the Fourth Surgical Clinic of the CF Clinical Hospital Cluj-Napoca, we conducted a prospective observational interventional study over a 3-year period (2013-2016) in 165 patients hospitalized for rectal and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in various disease stages, who underwent Dixon surgery using the two techniques of manual and mechanical end-to-end anastomosis. For mechanical anastomosis, we used Covidien and Panther circular staplers. The patients were assigned to two groups, group A in which Dixon surgery with manual end-to-end anastomosis was performed (116 patients), and group B in which Dixon surgery with mechanical end-to-end anastomosis was carried out (49 patients). Mechanical anastomosis allowed to restore intestinal continuity following low anterior resection in 21 patients with lower rectal adenocarcinoma compared to 2 patients in whom intestinal continuity was restored by manual anastomosis, with a statistically significant difference (p<0.000001). The double-row mechanical suture technique is associated with a reduced duration of surgery (121.67 minutes for Dixon surgery with mechanical anastomosis, compared to 165.931 minutes for Dixon surgery with manual anastomosis, p<0.0001). The use of circular transanal staplers facilitates end-to-end anastomosis by double-row mechanical suture, allowing to perform low anterior resection in situations when the restoration of intestinal continuity by manual anastomosis is technically not possible, with the aim to

  18. A rare cause of chronic rectal bleeding in children; solitary rectal ulcer: case report.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Abdulkerim; Tander, Burak; Temiz, Muhyittin; Barış, Sancar; Arıtürk, Ender

    2011-03-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer causing lower gastrointestinal bleeding is extremely rare in children. Rare presentation, non-specific symptoms, insufficient experience, and characteristics mimicking other rectal diseases may cause misdiagnosis or delay of diagnosis in some pediatric patients. Here, we report a 10-year-old boy with solitary rectal ulcer diagnosed two years after onset of the symptoms who responded well to the conservative therapy, including high-fiber diet, laxatives, defecation training, and sucralfate enema.

  19. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  20. Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor as an incidental finding in a patient with rectal polyps.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Xu-Dong; Fan, Ren-Gen; zha, Wen-Zhang; Xu, Yong-Hua; Qing, Cheng-Lin; Jia, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A patient who was diagnosed as rectal polyps in the local hospital went to our hospital for surgical treatment. Abdominal CT demonstrated a large irregular extra-luminal tumor of at least 5 cm cross-section on the ventral side of the lower rectal wall. Intraoperatively, a large irregular extra-luminal tumor (about 5×4.5×4 cm) was found. Anterior resection with end colostomy and rectal stump (Hartmann's procedure) was performed. Postoperative histological examination showed simultaneous development of rectal GIST and polyps.

  1. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  2. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  3. How to Use Rectal Suppositories Properly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lubricate the suppository tip with a water-soluble lubricant such as K-Y Jelly, not petroleum jelly (Vaseline). If you do not have this lubricant, moisten your rectal area with cool tap water. ...

  4. Unusual cause of 55 years of rectal bleeding: hemolymphangioma (a case report)

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sagar; Fan, Miao; Zhu, Junfeng; Lu, Xiaofang; Chang, Dandan; Li, Xiuhong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Hemolymphangioma is a rare developmental error of combined blood and lymphatic vasculature. To the best of our knowledge, there is only one case of rectal hemolymphangioma reported in Pubmed. Our case probably is the first reported rectal hemolymphangioma with computed tomography (CT) evaluation. Patient concerns and diagnosis: A 57-year-old male was presented to our hospital with 55 years of long history of episodic rectal bleeding. Past medical history showed numerous hospital visits for similar illness. Multiple diagnoses were made and different treatment modalities were applied for his benefit, but none of them relieved the symptoms permanently. He was then referred to our hospital. On admission, he was presented with intermediate rectal bleeding of fresh blood. CT examination showed isodense homogenous rectal wall thickening with heterogeneous enhancement on contrast examination. Multiple calcifications were seen in and around the lesion. Interventions and outcomes: He underwent open abdominal surgery with total surgical excision of the lesion. Post-surgical histopathological examination of excised specimen showed submucosal multiple thin-walled vessel of varying size, some consistent with blood vessel and other with lymph vessel, thus diagnosis of hemolymphangioma was made. Follow-up for 6 months showed no recurrence. Lessions: Hemolymphangioma is a benign developmental lesion. Radiological findings can be challenging and range from benign cystic lesion to aggressive lesion mimicking malignancy. Therefore, combined clinical history, radiological findings, and continuous follow-up can help make proper diagnosis and provide prompt and accurate treatment. PMID:28272235

  5. Robotic rectal surgery: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Staderini, Fabio; Foppa, Caterina; Minuzzo, Alessio; Badii, Benedetta; Qirici, Etleva; Trallori, Giacomo; Mallardi, Beatrice; Lami, Gabriele; Macrì, Giuseppe; Bonanomi, Andrea; Bagnoli, Siro; Perigli, Giuliano; Cianchi, Fabio

    2016-11-15

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery has demonstrated its superiority over the open approach, however it still has some technical limitations that lead to the development of robotic platforms. Nevertheless the literature on this topic is rapidly expanding there is still no consensus about benefits of robotic rectal cancer surgery over the laparoscopic one. For this reason a review of all the literature examining robotic surgery for rectal cancer was performed. Two reviewers independently conducted a search of electronic databases (PubMed and EMBASE) using the key words "rectum", "rectal", "cancer", "laparoscopy", "robot". After the initial screen of 266 articles, 43 papers were selected for review. A total of 3013 patients were included in the review. The most commonly performed intervention was low anterior resection (1450 patients, 48.1%), followed by anterior resections (997 patients, 33%), ultra-low anterior resections (393 patients, 13%) and abdominoperineal resections (173 patients, 5.7%). Robotic rectal surgery seems to offer potential advantages especially in low anterior resections with lower conversions rates and better preservation of the autonomic function. Quality of mesorectum and status of and circumferential resection margins are similar to those obtained with conventional laparoscopy even if robotic rectal surgery is undoubtedly associated with longer operative times. This review demonstrated that robotic rectal surgery is both safe and feasible but there is no evidence of its superiority over laparoscopy in terms of postoperative, clinical outcomes and incidence of complications. In conclusion robotic rectal surgery seems to overcome some of technical limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery especially for tumors requiring low and ultra-low anterior resections but this technical improvement seems not to provide, until now, any significant clinical advantages to the patients.

  6. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  7. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  8. Recovery of nosocomial fecal flora from frozen stool specimens and rectal swabs: comparison of preservatives for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Bonten, M J; Nathan, C; Weinstein, R A

    1997-04-01

    The recovery of antibiotic-susceptible and -resistant aerobic Gram-negative bacilli from stool specimens and from mock rectal swabs after freezing (-20 degrees C) for as long as 4 weeks was studied using three preservatives: Cary-Blair (CB) transport medium, buffered glycerol saline (BGS), and Para Pak C&S solution (CS). In addition, the recovery of enterococci from rectal swabs was investigated after storage of swabs in Stuart's transport media at 4 degrees C as long as 4 weeks. The log10 decreases in bacterial counts from seeded stool suspensions frozen in BGS were 0.64 (i.e., fourfold) and 1.16 after 1 and 4 weeks, respectively, which were significantly less (p < .05) than 1 and 4 week decreases following freezing in CB (1.57 and 2.85) or in CS (1.50 and 2.45). The recovery of Gram-negative bacilli from patients' rectal swabs preserved in BGS was consistent with the results of the experiments with seeded stool suspensions. There was no detectable decrease in recovery of enterococci from rectal swabs stored at 4 degrees C. BGS performed well as a preservative for freezing stool specimens or rectal swabs for later recovery of nosocomial Gram-negative bacilli; enterococci survived well in refrigerated rectal swab specimens.

  9. Surgical management of rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Madiba, Thandinkosi E; Baig, Mirza K; Wexner, Steven D

    2005-01-01

    The problem of complete rectal prolapse is formidable, with no clear predominant treatment of choice. Surgical management is aimed at restoring physiology by correcting the prolapse and improving continence and constipation with acceptable mortality and recurrence rates. Abdominal procedures are ideal for young fit patients, whereas perineal procedures are reserved for older frail patients with significant comorbidity. Laparoscopic procedures with their advantages of early recovery, less pain, and possibly lower morbidity are recently added options. Regardless of the therapy chosen, matching the surgical selection to the patient is essential. To review the present status of the surgical treatment of rectal prolapse. Literature review using MEDLINE. All articles reporting on rectopexy were included. Articles reporting on prospective and retrospective comparisons were included. Case reports were excluded, as were studies comparing data with historical controls. The results were tabulated to show outcomes of different studies and were compared. Studies that did not report some of the outcomes were noted as "not stated." Abdominal operations offer not only lower recurrence but also greater chance for functional improvements. Suture and mesh rectopexy produce equivalent results. However, the polyvinyl alcohol (Ivalon) sponge rectopexy is associated with an increased risk of infectious complications and has largely been abandoned. The advantage of adding a resection to the rectopexy seems to be related to less constipation. Laparoscopic rectopexy has similar results to open rectopexy but has all of the advantages related to laparoscopy. Perineal procedures are better suited to frail elderly patients with extensive comorbidity. Abdominal procedures are generally better for young fit patients; the results of all abdominal procedures are comparable. Suture and mesh rectopexy are still popular with many surgeons-the choice depends on the surgeon's experience and preference

  10. Differences in microbial signatures between rectal mucosal biopsies and rectal swabs.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Pérez, Félix; McCoy, Amber N; Okechukwu, Charles; Carroll, Ian M; Smith, Kevin M; Jeremiah, Kim; Sandler, Robert S; Asher, Gary N; Keku, Temitope O

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence the microbiota of the large bowel may influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer as well as other diseases including type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome. Current sampling methods to obtain microbial specimens, such as feces and mucosal biopsies, are inconvenient and unappealing to patients. Obtaining samples through rectal swabs could prove to be a quicker and relatively easier method, but it is unclear if swabs are an adequate substitute. We compared bacterial diversity and composition from rectal swabs and rectal mucosal biopsies in order to examine the viability of rectal swabs as an alternative to biopsies. Paired rectal swabs and mucosal biopsy samples were collected in un-prepped participants (n = 11) and microbial diversity was characterized by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of the 16S rRNA gene. Microbial community composition from swab samples was different from rectal mucosal biopsies (p = 0.001). Overall the bacterial diversity was higher in swab samples than in biopsies as assessed by diversity indexes such as: richness (p = 0.01), evenness (p = 0.06) and Shannon's diversity (p = 0.04). Analysis of specific bacterial groups by qPCR showed higher copy number of Lactobacillus (p < 0.0001) and Eubacteria (p = 0.0003) in swab samples compared with biopsies. Our findings suggest that rectal swabs and rectal mucosal samples provide different views of the microbiota in the large intestine.

  11. Laparoscopic versus robotic rectal resection for rectal cancer in a veteran population.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ramiro; Anaya, Daniel A; Li, Linda T; Orcutt, Sonia T; Balentine, Courtney J; Awad, Samir A; Berger, David H; Albo, Daniel A; Artinyan, Avo

    2013-10-01

    Robotic rectal cancer resection remains controversial. We compared the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic vs robotic rectal cancer resection in a high-risk Veterans Health Administration population. Patients who underwent minimally invasive rectal cancer resection were identified from an institutional colorectal cancer database. Baseline characteristics and outcomes were compared between robotic and laparoscopic groups. The robotic group (n = 13) did not differ significantly from the laparoscopic group (n = 59) with respect to baseline characteristics except for a higher rate of previous abdominal surgery. Robotic patients had significantly lower tumors, more advanced disease, a higher rate of preoperative chemoradiation, and were more likely to undergo abdominoperineal resection. Robotic rectal resection was associated with longer operative time. There were no differences in blood loss, conversion rates, postoperative morbidity, lymph nodes harvested, margin positivity, or specimen quality between groups. The robotic approach for rectal cancer resection is safe with similar postoperative and oncologic outcomes compared with laparoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The influence of hospital volume on long-term oncological outcome after rectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Frederik H W; Hagemans, Jan A W; Burger, Jacobus W A; Verhoef, Cornelis; Borstlap, Wernard A A; Tanis, Pieter J

    2017-09-07

    The association between hospital volume and outcome in rectal cancer surgery is still subject of debate. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of hospital volume on outcomes of rectal cancer surgery in the Netherlands in 2011. In this collaborative research with a cross-sectional study design, patients who underwent rectal cancer resection in 71 Dutch hospitals in 2011 were included. Annual hospital volume was stratified as low (< 20), medium (20-50), and high (≥ 50). Of 2095 patients, 258 patients (12.3%) were treated in 23 low-volume hospitals, 1329 (63.4%) in 40 medium-volume hospitals, and 508 (24.2%) in 8 high-volume hospitals. Median length of follow-up was 41 months. Clinical tumor stage, neoadjuvant therapy, extended resections, circumferential resection margin (CRM) positivity, and 30-day or in-hospital mortality did not differ significantly between volume groups. Significantly, more laparoscopic procedures were performed in low-volume hospitals, and more diverting stomas in high-volume hospitals. Three-year disease-free survival for low-, medium-, and high-volume hospitals was 75.0, 74.8, and 76.8% (p = 0.682). Corresponding 3-year overall survival rates were 75.9, 79.1, and 80.3% (p = 0.344). In multivariate analysis, hospital volume was not associated with long-term risk of mortality. No significant impact of hospital volume on rectal cancer surgery outcome could be observed among 71 Dutch hospitals after implementation of a national audit, with the majority of patients being treated at medium-volume hospitals.

  13. Robotic rectal surgery: State of the art

    PubMed Central

    Staderini, Fabio; Foppa, Caterina; Minuzzo, Alessio; Badii, Benedetta; Qirici, Etleva; Trallori, Giacomo; Mallardi, Beatrice; Lami, Gabriele; Macrì, Giuseppe; Bonanomi, Andrea; Bagnoli, Siro; Perigli, Giuliano; Cianchi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery has demonstrated its superiority over the open approach, however it still has some technical limitations that lead to the development of robotic platforms. Nevertheless the literature on this topic is rapidly expanding there is still no consensus about benefits of robotic rectal cancer surgery over the laparoscopic one. For this reason a review of all the literature examining robotic surgery for rectal cancer was performed. Two reviewers independently conducted a search of electronic databases (PubMed and EMBASE) using the key words “rectum”, “rectal”, “cancer”, “laparoscopy”, “robot”. After the initial screen of 266 articles, 43 papers were selected for review. A total of 3013 patients were included in the review. The most commonly performed intervention was low anterior resection (1450 patients, 48.1%), followed by anterior resections (997 patients, 33%), ultra-low anterior resections (393 patients, 13%) and abdominoperineal resections (173 patients, 5.7%). Robotic rectal surgery seems to offer potential advantages especially in low anterior resections with lower conversions rates and better preservation of the autonomic function. Quality of mesorectum and status of and circumferential resection margins are similar to those obtained with conventional laparoscopy even if robotic rectal surgery is undoubtedly associated with longer operative times. This review demonstrated that robotic rectal surgery is both safe and feasible but there is no evidence of its superiority over laparoscopy in terms of postoperative, clinical outcomes and incidence of complications. In conclusion robotic rectal surgery seems to overcome some of technical limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery especially for tumors requiring low and ultra-low anterior resections but this technical improvement seems not to provide, until now, any significant clinical advantages to the patients. PMID:27895814

  14. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... veins of the body, including vessels in the brain, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and legs soft tissues of the body, including the muscles, fat and skin brain breast Microbubble Contrast Materials Microbubble contrast materials are ...

  15. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... of page Side effects and adverse and allergic reactions Barium Sulfate Contrast Materials You should tell your ... You are at greater risk of an adverse reaction to barium-sulfate contrast materials if: you have ...

  16. Clinical impact of HLA class I expression in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Speetjens, Frank M.; de Bruin, Elza C.; Morreau, Hans; Zeestraten, Eliane C. M.; Putter, Hein; van Krieken, J. Han; van Buren, Maaike M.; van Velzen, Monique; Dekker-Ensink, N. Geeske; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To determine the clinical impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression in irradiated and non-irradiated rectal carcinomas. Experimental design Tumor samples in tissue micro array format were collected from 1,135 patients. HLA class I expression was assessed after immunohistochemical staining with two antibodies (HCA2 and HC10). Results Tumors were split into two groups: (1) tumors with >50% of tumor cells expressing HLA class I (high) and (2) tumors with ≤50% of tumor cells expressing HLA class I (low). No difference in distribution or prognosis of HLA class I expression was found between irradiated and non-irradiated patients. Patients with low expression of HLA class I (15% of all patients) showed an independent significantly worse prognosis with regard to overall survival and disease-free survival. HLA class I expression had no effect on cancer-specific survival or recurrence-free survival. Conclusions Down-regulation of HLA class I in rectal cancer is associated with poor prognosis. In contrast to our results, previous reports on HLA class I expression in colorectal cancer described a large population of patients with HLA class I negative tumors, having a good prognosis. This difference might be explained by the fact that a large proportion of HLA negative colon tumors are microsatellite instable (MSI). MSI tumors are associated with a better prognosis than microsatellite stable (MSS). As rectal tumors are mainly MSS, our results suggest that it is both, oncogenic pathway and HLA class I expression, that dictates patient’s prognosis in colorectal cancer. Therefore, to prevent confounding in future prognostic analysis on the impact of HLA expression in colorectal tumors, separate analysis of MSI and MSS tumors should be performed. PMID:17874100

  17. Defining the distal margin of rectal cancer for surgical planning

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Takashi; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the distal rectal tumor margin is essential in selecting the appropriate surgical procedure. However, there is no standard measurement method. The National Cancer Institute consensus group recommends use of the anal verge (AV) as a landmark, and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology recommends use of the anorectal ring (ARR). In addition, whether measurements should be made on double contrast barium enema (BE) radiographs or magnetic resonance (MR) images remains controversial. We measured the distal tumor margin on both BE and MR images obtained preoperatively from 52 patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. The distances from the distal end of the tumor to the AV and the ARR were measured on both types of images, and the variability was investigated by Bland-Altman analysis. The mean distance from the tumor to the AV was 8.9 cm on the BE radiographs and 7.7 cm on the MR images (P=0.013). The mean distances to the ARR were 6.8 and 5.6 cm, respectively (P=0.070). Significant proportional bias was shown as the measured distances increased, the difference between the BE- and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measurements increased. Use of one or the other landmark did not affect selection of the appropriate surgical procedure. We conclude that an approximate 1-cm underestimation should be taken into account when MRI-based measurement of the distal rectal tumor margin is used to choose between sphincter-saving resection and abdominoperineal resection. PMID:28280625

  18. Rectal Motion in Patients Receiving Preoperative Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, James D.; Dawson, Laura A.; Sampson, Elliott; Bayley, Andrew; Scott, Sandra; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Timothy; Cummings, Bernard; Dinniwell, Robert; Kim, John J.; Ringash, Jolie; Wong, Rebecca; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the movement of rectum, mesorectum, and rectal primary during a course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with Stage II or III rectal cancer had a planning CT scan with rectal contrast before commencement of preoperative chemoradiation. The scan was repeated during Weeks 1, 3, and 5 of chemoradiation. The rectal primary (gross tumor volume), rectum, mesorectum, and bladder were contoured on all four scans. An in-house biomechanical model-based deformable image registration technique, Morfeus, was used to measure the three-dimensional spatial change in these structures after bony alignment. The required planning target volume margin for this spatial change, after bone alignment, was also calculated. Results: Rectal contrast was found to introduce a systematic error in the position of all organs compared with the noncontrast state. The largest change in structures during radiotherapy was in the anterior and posterior directions for the mesorectum and rectum and in the superior and inferior directions for the gross tumor volume. The planning target volume margins required for internal movement for the mesorectum based on the three scans acquired during treatment are 4 mm right, 5 mm left, 7 mm anterior, and 6 mm posterior. For the rectum, values were 8 mm right, 8 mm left, 8 mm anterior, and 9 mm posterior. The greatest movement of the rectum occurred in the upper third. Conclusions: Contrast is no longer used in CT simulation. Assuming bony alignment, a nonuniform margin of 8 mm anteriorly, 9 mm posteriorly, and 8 mm left and right is recommended.

  19. Third-generation Dual-source CT for Head and Neck CT Angiography with 70 kV Tube Voltage and 20-25 ml Contrast Medium in Patients With Body Weight Lower than 75 kg.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Zhu, Yuanli; Xue, Huadan; Wang, Yun; Li, Yumei; Zhang, Zhuhua; Jin, Zhengyu

    2017-02-20

    Objective To investigate the image quality of head and neck CT angiography (CTA)using the third-generation dual-source CT combined with 70 kV tube voltage and 20-25 ml contrast medium (CM),and evaluate the effects of venous artifacts arising from the CM on the ipsilateral side of injection. Methods Totally 40 consecutive patients with suspected vascular diseases and body weight lower than 75 kg prospectively underwent head and neck CTA examination using the third-generation dual-source CT. CTA was performed with a third-generation dual-source CT system. Patients were randomly divived into 70 kV group (n=20)and 100 kV group (n=20). The 70 kV group used 20-25 ml CM and advanced modeled iterative reconstruction technique,and the 100 kV group used 40 ml CM and filtered back projection. Venous artifacts and CM residues were evaluated by a 3-point scale (1=excellent,3=poor),respectively. Results The effective dose of 70 kV group decreased 58% compared to 100 kV group (t=-18.14,P<0.001).In the 70 kV group,16 patients (80.0%)presented with venous artifacts and six of them (37.5%,6/16)affected the adjacent arteries. In the 100 kV group,19 patients (95.0%)presented with venous artifacts,and seven of them (36.8%,7/19)affected the adjacent arteries (Z=-0.878,P=0.380). In the 70 kV group,13 patients (65.0%)presented with obvious CM residues and two of them (15.3%,2/13)prolonged into the superior vena cava (SVC). In the 100 kV group,19 patients(95.0%)presented with obvious CM residues,and thirteen of them(68.4%,13/19)prolonged into the SVC (Z=-3.654,P<0.001). Conclusion Compared with the 100 kV,the third-generation dual-source CT for head and neck CTA,combined with 70 kV and 20-25 ml CM,can remarkably decrease the radiation dose,along with reduced CM residues and comparable venous artifacts.

  20. Short-Term High-Dose Vitamin E to Prevent Contrast Medium-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Elective Coronary Angiography: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Yousef; Khademvatani, Kamal; Rahimi, Behzad; Khoshfetrat, Mehran; Arjmand, Nasim; Seyyed-Mohammadzad, Mir-Hossein

    2016-03-15

    Contrast medium-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI) is a leading cause of acquired renal impairment. The effects of antioxidants have been conflicting regarding the prevention of CIAKI. We performed a study of vitamin E use to decrease CIAKI in patients undergoing elective coronary angiography. In a placebo-controlled randomized trial at 2 centers in Iran, 300 patients with chronic kidney disease-defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2)-were randomized 1:1 to receive 0.9% saline infusion 12 hours prior to and after intervention combined with 600 mg vitamin E 12 hours before plus 400 mg vitamin E 2 hours before coronary angiography or to receive placebo. The primary end point was the development of CIAKI, defined as an increase ≥0.5 mg/dL or ≥25% in serum creatinine that peaked within 72 hours. Based on an intention-to-treat analysis, CIAKI developed in 10 (6.7%) and 21 (14.1%) patients in the vitamin E and placebo groups, respectively (P=0.037). Change in white blood cell count from baseline to peak value was greater in the vitamin E group compared with the placebo group (-500 [-1500 to 200] versus 100 [-900 to 600]×10(3)/mL, P=0.001). In multivariate analysis, vitamin E (odds ratio 0.408, 95% CI 0.170-0.982, P=0.045) and baseline Mehran score (odds ratio 1.257, 95% CI 1.007-1.569; P=0.043) predicted CIAKI. Prophylactic short-term high-dose vitamin E combined with 0.9% saline infusion is superior to placebo for prevention of CIAKI in patients undergoing elective coronary angiography. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT02070679. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  1. Iodinated Contrast Medium Exposure During Computed Tomography Increase the Risk of Subsequent Development of Thyroid Disorders in Patients Without Known Thyroid Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based, Propensity Score-Matched, Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Shun; Chiu, Chien-Shan; Chen, Wen-Chi; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lin, Meng-Yu; Chang, Shih-Liang; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Hu, Sung-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the association between iodinated contrast medium (ICM) exposure during computed tomography (CT) and the subsequent development of thyroid disorders in patients without known thyroid disease in Taiwan, an iodine-sufficient area. We conducted a population-based cohort study by using data from 1996 to 2012 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 33,426 patients who underwent ICM-enhanced CT were included as the study cohort. To avoid selection bias, we used propensity score and matched for the index year (defined as the year of first ICM exposure) to retrieve 33,426 patients as the comparison cohort. No patients in the 2 cohorts had any known thyroid disease before the index year. Patients with a history of amiodarone treatment or coronary angiography and those with <1 year follow-up were excluded. Participants were followed until a new diagnosis of thyroid disorder or December 31, 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression. An association was identified between ICM exposure and the subsequent development of thyroid disorders after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted HR = 1.17; 95% CI: 1.07-1.29; P = 0.001). Male patients and patients' ages ≥40 years in the ICM-exposure cohort had a higher adjusted HR for developing thyroid disorders than did those in the non-ICM-exposure cohort. Hypothyroidism had the highest adjusted HR (HR = 1.37; 95% CI: 1.06-1.78; P < 0.05) among all thyroid disorders and had a higher risk of development or detection during >0.5-year post-ICM exposure compared with that during ≤0.5-year post-ICM exposure (HR = 1.26; 95% CI: 1.01-1.58; P < 0.05). Repeated ICM exposure increased the risk of thyroid disorders in patients who accepted >1 time of ICM per year on average compared with those who accepted ≤1 time per year on average (adjusted HR = 3.04; 95% CI: 2.47-3.73; P < 0

  2. Comparison of the iron oxide-based blood-pool contrast medium VSOP-C184 with gadopentetate dimeglumine for first-pass magnetic resonance angiography of the aorta and renal arteries in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, Jörg; Wagner, Susanne; Abramjuk, Claudia; Wojner, Ines; Schink, Tania; Kroencke, Thomas J; Schellenberger, Eyk; Hamm, Bernd; Pilgrimm, Herbert; Taupitz, Matthias

    2004-09-01

    VSOP-C184 at a dose of 0.045 mmol Fe/kg has been shown to be an efficient blood pool contrast medium for equilibrium magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) that can be administered as a bolus. The present study was performed to determine whether VSOP-C184 is also suitable for first-pass MRA. Fifteen MRA examinations at 1.5 T were performed in minipigs using a fast 3D fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence (repetition time = 4.5 ms, echo time = 1.7 ms, excitation angle = 25 degrees, matrix 256, body phased-array coil). The citrate-stabilized iron oxide preparation VSOP-C184 was investigated (total particle diameter: 7.0 +/- 0.15 nm; core size: 4 nm) and compared with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA). The following doses were tested: VSOP-C184: 0.015, 0.025, and 0.035 mmol Fe/kg; Gd-DTPA: 0.1 and 0.2 mmol Gd/kg; n = 3 examinations/dose. Data were analyzed quantitatively (signal enhancement (ENH) and vessel edge definition (VED)) and qualitatively. First-pass MRA using the 3 doses of VSOP-C184 yielded the following ENH: aorta: 9.4 +/- 2.6; 12.31 +/- 1.2; 16.53 +/- 1.7; renal arteries: 7.6 +/- 2.2; 9.9 +/- 1.0; 13.2 +/- 0.5. The values for the 2 doses of Gd-DTPA were aorta: 12.9 +/- 1.0; 16.8 +/- 2.2; renal arteries: 11.2 +/- 1.23; 11.3 +/- 1.7. VED for the 3 doses of VSOP-C184 was aorta: 106.3 +/- 31.0; 135.3 +/- 58.8; 141.3 +/- 71.0; renal arteries: 102.2 +/- 24.3; 146.8 +/- 63.0; 126.9 +/- 37.6 and for the 2 doses of Gd-DTPA, aorta: 157.2 +/- 47.8; 164.2 +/- 36.8; renal arteries: 165.9 +/- 30.4; 170.3 +/- 38.2 respectively. The differences between VSOP-C184 and Gd-DTPA are clinically not relevant and statistically not significant (p > or = .05). Qualitative evaluation of image quality, contrast, and delineation of vessels showed the results obtained with VSOP-C184 at doses of 0.025 and 0.035 mmol Fe/kg to be similar to those of Gd-DTPA at 0.1 and 0.2 mmol Gd/kg. VSOP-C184 is suitable for first-pass MRA at doses of 0.025 and 0.035 mmol Fe/kg and thus, in addition to

  3. Preoperative staging of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Neil; Brown, Gina

    2008-01-01

    Detailed preoperative staging using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the selection of patients that require preoperative therapy for tumour regression. This information can be used to instigate neoadjuvant therapy in those patients with poor prognostic features prior to disturbing the tumour bed and potentially disseminating disease. The design of trials incorporating MR assessment of prognostic factors prior to therapy has been found to be of value in assessing treatment modalities and outcomes that are targeted to these preoperative prognostic subgroups and in providing a quantifiable assessment of the efficacy of particular chemoradiation treatment protocols by comparing pre-treatment MR staging with post therapy histology assessment. At present, we are focused on achieving clear surgical margins of excision (CRM) to avoid local recurrence. We recommend that all patients with rectal cancer should undergo pre-operative MRI staging. Of these, about half will have good prognosis features (T1-T3b, N0, EMVI negative, CRM clear) and may safely undergo primary total mesorectal excision. Of the remainder, those with threatened or involved margins will certainly benefit from pre-operative chemoradiotherapy with the aim of downstaging to permit safe surgical excision. In the future, our ability to recognise features predicting distant failure, such as extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) may be used to stratify patients for neo-adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in an effort to prevent distant relapse. The optimal pre-operative treatment regimes for these patients (radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy alone or combination chemo-radiotherapy) is the subject of current and future trials.

  4. Predictive response biomarkers in rectal cancer neoadjuvant treatment.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Marco; Crotti, Sara; Bedin, Chiara; Cecchin, Erika; Maretto, Isacco; D'Angelo, Edoardo; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Nitti, Donato

    2014-01-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (RC) treatment is a challenge, because RC has a high rate of local recurrence. To date preoperative chemoradiotherapy (pCRT) is widely accepted as standard protocol of care for middle-low RC, but complete tumour response rate ranges from 4 to 44% and 5-year local recurrence rate is 6%. Better understanding of molecular biology and carcinogenesis pathways could be used both for pre-neoplastic lesions and locally recurrence diagnosis, and for tumour response prediction to therapy. Circulating molecules, gene expression and protein signature are promising sources to biomarker discovery. Several studies have evaluated potential predictors of response and recently, cell-free Nucleic Acid levels have been associated to tumour response to neoadjuvant therapies. Alternative method is the serum or plasma proteome and peptidome analysis. It may be ideally suited for its minimal invasiveness and it can be repeated at multiple time points throughout the treatment in contrast to tissue-based methods which still remain the most reliable and specific approach. Many studies have analyzed preoperative rectal tissue prognostic factor, but data are controversial or not confirmed.

  5. Novel radiation techniques for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The concepts for management of rectal cancer have changed drastically over the past few years. Through national bowel cancer screening programmes in the Western countries and the increasing use of endoscopic procedures as diagnostic tool, there is increase in detection of rectal cancer in early stages. There is increase in ageing population worldwide but more so in Western countries. In addition, there is realisation of harm from extirpative surgical procedures which are directed towards managing advanced rectal cancer in the past. Increase in cost of health care burden has also led the investigators to seek alternative treatment options which are effective, safe and cost effective. There are several modern radiation techniques which fits this bill and we need to be aware of newer novel radiation techniques to fulfil this gap. PMID:24982769

  6. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  7. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer operated for cure.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Sune Høirup; Harling, Henrik; Kirkeby, Lene Tschemerinsky; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Mocellin, Simone

    2012-03-14

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the Western world. Apart from surgery - which remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary tumours - postoperative (i.e., adjuvant) chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based regimens is now the standard treatment in Dukes' C (TNM stage III) colon tumours i.e. tumours with metastases in the regional lymph nodes but no distant metastases. In contrast, the evidence for recommendations of adjuvant therapy in rectal cancer is sparse. In Europe it is generally acknowledged that locally advanced rectal tumours receive preoperative (i.e., neoadjuvant) downstaging by radiotherapy (or chemoradiotion), whereas in the US postoperative chemoradiotion is considered the treatment of choice in all Dukes' C rectal cancers. Overall, no universal consensus exists on the adjuvant treatment of surgically resectable rectal carcinoma; moreover, no formal systematic review and meta-analysis has been so far performed on this subject. We undertook a systematic review of the scientific literature from 1975 until March 2011 in order to quantitatively summarize the available evidence regarding the impact of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy on the survival of patients with surgically resectable rectal cancer. The outcomes of interest were overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). CCCG standard search strategy in defined databases with the following supplementary search. 1. Rect* or colorect* - 2. Cancer or carcinom* or adenocarc* or neoplasm* or tumour - 3. Adjuv* - 4. Chemother* - 5. Postoper* Randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing patients undergoing surgery for rectal cancer who received no adjuvant chemotherapy with those receiving any postoperative chemotherapy regimen. Two authors extracted data and a third author performed an independent search for verification. The main outcome measure was the hazard ratio (HR) between the risk of event between the treatment arm (adjuvant chemotherapy

  8. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route. PMID:27123404

  9. Primary Transanal Management of Rectal Atresia in a Neonate.

    PubMed

    M, Braiek; A, Ksia; I, Krichen; S, Belhassen; K, Maazoun; S, Ben Youssef; N, Kechiche; M, Mekki; A, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Rectal atresia (RA) with a normal anus is a rare anomaly. We describe a case of rectal atresia in a newborn male presenting with an abdominal distension and failure of passing meconium. The rectal atresia was primarily operated by transanal route.

  10. Massive zosteriform cutaneous metastasis from rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damin, D C; Lazzaron, A R; Tarta, C; Cartel, A; Rosito, M A

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a large and rapidly growing skin lesion approximately six months after resection of a rectal carcinoma. The lesion measured 40 cm in size, extended from the suprapubic area to the proximal half of the left groin, and showed a particular zosteriform aspect. Biopsy confirmed a metastatic skin adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastases from rectal cancer are very uncommon. Their gross appearance is not distinctive, although the skin tumors are usually solid, small (less than 5 cm) and painless nodules or papules. Early biopsies for suspicious skin lesions are needed in patients with a history of colorectal cancer.

  11. Transanal Approach to Rectal Polyps and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Vinay; Mishra, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    A transanal approach to rectal polyp and cancer excision is often an appropriate alternative to conventional rectal resection, and has a lower associated morbidity. There has been a steady evolution in the techniques of transanal surgery over the past 30 years. It started with traditional transanal excision and was revolutionized by introduction of transanal endoscopic microsurgery in early 1980s. Introduction of transanal minimally invasive surgery made it more accessible to surgeons around the world. Now robotic platforms are being tried in certain institutions. Concerns have been raised about recurrence rates of cancers with transanal approach and success of subsequent salvage operations. PMID:26929754

  12. [Adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Qvortrup, Camilla; Mortensen, John Pløen; Pfeiffer, Per

    2013-09-09

    A new Cochrane meta-analysis evaluated adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil (5FU)-based, not modern combination chemotherapy) in almost 10,000 patients with rectal cancer and showed a 17% reduction in mortality corresponding well to the efficacy observed in recent studies, which reported a reduction in mortality just about 20%. The authors recommend adjuvant chemotherapy which is in accordance with the Danish national guidelines where 5-FU-based chemotherapy is recommended for stage III and high-risk stage II rectal cancer.

  13. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    PubMed Central

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  14. Contrastive Lexicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, R. R. K.

    This paper deals with the relation between etymologically related words in different languages. A survey is made of seven stages in the development of contrastive lexicology. These are: prelinguistic word studies, semantics, lexicography, translation, foreign language learning, bilingualism, and finally contrastive analysis. Concerning contrastive…

  15. Contrastive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Carl

    Contrastive analysis is viewed as an interlinguistic, bidirectional phenomenon which is concerned with both the form and function of language. As such, contrastive analysis must view language psycholinguistically and sociolinguistically as a system to be both described and acquired. Due to the need for a psychological component in the analysis,…

  16. Study between axillary and rectal temperature measurements in children.

    PubMed

    Haddadin, R B; Shamo'on, H I

    2007-01-01

    We compared axillary and rectal temperatures in 216 patients to assess the reliability of axillary temperature for determining fever in children under 14 years of age. Beyond the neonatal period, the mean rectal temperature was significantly higher than the axillary temperature. The sensitivity of axillary temperature in detecting fever was 87.5% among neonates but only 46% among older children. Axillary temperature correlated well with rectal temperature in neonates but not older children. There was no direct mathematical relationship between axillary and rectal temperature. Axillary temperature should be taken in neonates as it is less hazardous; rectal temperature should be used beyond this age.

  17. A new method of assessing the surgical margin in rectal carcinoma—using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lianhuang; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; Deng, Tongxin; Jiang, Liwei; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Xing; Jiang, Weizhong; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Guan, Guoxian; Chi, Pan; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, surgical resection is still the most effective treatment strategy for rectal carcinoma and one of the most important factors affecting whether the operation is successful or not is the surgical margin determination, especially in the distal rectal carcinoma which should take the sphincter-preserving issue into consideration. However, until recently no reliable evaluation method has been developed for this purpose. There are some shortcomings in intraoperative negative surgical margin assessment such as either lack of enough detailed information of biological tissues or the fact that it is time-consuming. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM)—nonlinear optical microscopy, which is based on the nonlinear optical process two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), has the ability to label freely and noninvasively visualize tissue micro-architecture at the sub-cellular level. The advantage of providing high contrast and high resolution biomedical image in real time makes MPM have a wide range of applications in life sciences. In this study, we introduced MPM to identify the boundary between normal and abnormal rectal tissues. MPM images clearly exhibit biological tissue microstructure and its morphological changes in the regions of our interest, which enable it to determine the surgical margin in rectal carcinoma. It can be foreseen that once MPM imaging system is used in clinical examination, it will greatly improve the accuracy of surgical resection.

  18. Distribution of fibronectin in the rectal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Scott, D L; Morris, C J; Blake, A E; Low-Beer, T S; Walton, K W

    1981-07-01

    Fibronectin is a glycoprotein of high molecular weight present in tissues, plasma, and tissue fluids. Its distribution in the rectal mucosa was studied by immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase techniques using a monospecific antiserum. Immunofluorescent reactivity for fibronectin was present in the normal rectal mucosa of control subjects in epithelial cells, on basement membranes, and as a loose cribriform network of extracellular reactivity in the lamina propria that codistributed with histochemically demonstrable reticulin. Fibronectin was demonstrated immunoelectromicroscopically on collagen fibres, on smooth muscle cells and within and between columnar epithelial cells. In the rectal mucosa of patients with colitis with marked inflammatory changes, fibronectin appeared thickened and more prominent when present on basement membranes and as sparse strands between inflammatory cells infiltrating the lamina propria. In patients with longstanding colitis and less inflammatory cell infiltration there was a diffuse increase in fibronectin which was densely and uniformly present throughout the lamina propria. Fibronectin is a structural component of the rectal mucosa and changes in its distribution may form an important part of the local reaction to inflammatory bowel disease.

  19. Rectal bezoars due to pumpkin seeds.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Mohammad Salman; Al-Wahibi, Khalifa; Baloch, Shafiq; Al-Qadhi, Hani

    2009-01-01

    Rectal bezoars commonly occur due to seeds, especially in children living in countries south of the Mediterranean and in the Middle-East. Dried seeds are considered a delicacy and consumed widely. Inadequate chewing or hastily eating without removing the hull may lead to their impaction as bezoars, which may require manual removal under general anaesthesia.

  20. Combined radical retropubic prostatectomy and rectal resection.

    PubMed

    Klee, L W; Grmoljez, P

    1999-10-01

    To present our experience with a small series of men who underwent simultaneous radical retropubic prostatectomy and rectal resection. Three men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer were found to have concurrent rectal tumors requiring resection. All three men underwent non-nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy and abdominoperineal resection (APR) or low anterior resection (LAR) of the rectum at the same operation. In the 2 patients undergoing APR, the levators were approximated posterior to the urethra, and the bladder was secured to the pubis. The patient undergoing LAR had urinary diversion stents placed and a diverting transverse loop colostomy. All 3 patients had excellent return of urinary continence. One patient required reoperation in the early postoperative period for small bowel adhesiolysis and stoma revision. Another patient had a mild rectal anastomotic stricture and a bladder neck stricture; both were successfully treated with a single dilation. No other significant complications occurred in these patients. Radical retropubic prostatectomy can safely be performed with partial or complete rectal resection in a single operation. A few minor modifications of the standard radical retropubic prostatectomy in this setting are suggested.

  1. [Rectal cancer: diagnosis, screening and treatment].

    PubMed

    Decanini-Terán, César Oscar; González-Acosta, Jorge; Obregón-Méndez, Jorge; Vega-de Jesús, Martín

    2011-01-01

    Rectal cancer is one of the primary malignant neoplasms occurring in Mexican patients of reproductive age. Unfortunately, randomized studies in rectal cancer do not exist as they do with well-recognized colon cancer. We must individualize the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnostic approach, staging and treatment because management is different in rectal cancers affecting the mid- and lower third of the rectum than in the upper third and in colon cancers. Histological staging is the primary prognostic factor. TNM staging (tumor, node, and metastasis) is used internationally by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). Staging is done with the assistance of endorectal ultrasound, which is best used in early-stage cancer; however, there are certain disadvantages in detecting node involvement. Magnetic resonance, on the other hand, allows for the evaluation of stenotic tumors and node involvement. Once the correct diagnosis and staging have been made, the next step is correct treatment. Neoadjuvant treatment has demonstrated to be better than adjuvant treatment. Abdominoperineal resection is rarely practiced currently, with sphincter preservation being the preferred procedure. Laparoscopic approach has conferred the advantages of the approach itself when performed by experts in the procedure but there is insufficient evidence to make it the "gold standard." Rectal cancer is a complex pathology that must be considered totally different from colon cancer for diagnosis and treatment. The patient must be staged completely and appropriately for individualizing correct treatment. More long-term studies are needed for optimizing treatment modalities.

  2. [Electronic rectal temperature measurement. A clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Ottesen, S; Nielsen, F T; Lund, H

    1993-05-24

    Rectal measurement of body temperature with an electronic device (Ivac) was compared to measurement with mercury thermometers in 157 adult patients on a medical ward. The electronic thermometers were less accurate, giving 3.6 times as many febrile patients. This was reduced to 1.6 after thermometer calibration. It is necessary to make regular calibrations of Ivac thermometers.

  3. Evaluation of ligase chain reaction for the non-cultural detection of rectal and pharyngeal gonorrhoea in men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Young, H; Manavi, K; McMillan, A

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To compare a nucleic acid amplification test (ligase chain reaction) with culture for detecting rectal and pharyngeal gonorrhoea in men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods: Duplicate rectal and throat swabs from MSM attending a genitourinary medicine clinic were collected for culture on modified New York City medium and detection of gonococcal nucleic acid by the Abbott ligase chain reaction (LCR) utilising probes based on opa 1 gene sequences. LCR positive culture negative specimens were tested by a second LCR utilising probes based on pilin gene sequences. Patients with rectal and/or pharyngeal cultures yielding Gram negative diplococci confirmed as Neisseria gonorrhoeae by biochemical and immunological methods were diagnosed with rectal and/or pharyngeal gonorrhoea. The criteria for diagnosing rectal and pharyngeal infection by LCR included a positive opa LCR with a positive culture from the same site or, in the case of a negative culture, a positive opa LCR and a positive pilin LCR. Results: Duplicate rectal samples were obtained from 227 MSM. The results of LCR and culture were concordant in 219 samples (96.5%). The prevalence of rectal gonorrhoea by LCR and culture was 7.0% (16/227) and 4.0% (9/227), respectively. Duplicate throat samples were obtained from 251 MSM. The results of LCR and culture were concordant in 230 (91.6%) cases. The prevalence of pharyngeal gonorrhoea by LCR and culture was 12.7% (32/251) and 6.0% (15/251), respectively. The specificity of LCR was 99.5% (210/211) for rectal and 98.2% (215/219) for pharyngeal specimens. Conclusions: The high prevalence and asymptomatic nature of pharyngeal and rectal gonococcal infection suggests that routine screening for infection at these sites by a nucleic acid amplification test method such as LCR should be considered as part of the overall strategy to control gonorrhoea in MSM. PMID:14663126

  4. Comparison of Adjuvant Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Stage II or Stage III Rectal Cancer Who Are Receiving Radiation Therapy and Fluorouracil Before or After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  5. Bladder urothelial carcinoma extending to rectal mucosa and presenting with rectal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Aneese, Andrew M; Manuballa, Vinayata; Amin, Mitual; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2017-01-01

    An 87-year-old-man with prostate-cancer-stage-T1c-Gleason-6 treated with radiotherapy in 1996, recurrent prostate cancer treated with leuprolide hormonal therapy in 2009, and bladder-urothelial-carcinoma in situ treated with Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin and adriamycin in 2010, presented in 2015 with painless, bright red blood per rectum coating stools daily for 5 mo. Rectal examination revealed bright red blood per rectum; and a hard, fixed, 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm mass at the normal prostate location. The hemoglobin was 7.6 g/dL (iron saturation = 8.4%, indicating iron-deficiency-anemia). Abdominopelvic-CT-angiography revealed focal wall thickening at the bladder neck; a mass containing an air cavity replacing the normal prostate; and adjacent rectal invasion. Colonoscopy demonstrated an ulcerated, oozing, multinodular, friable, 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm mass in anterior rectal wall, at the usual prostate location. Histologic and immunohistochemical analysis of colonoscopic biopsies of the mass revealed poorly-differentiated-carcinoma of urothelial origin. At visceral angiography, the right-superior-rectal-artery was embolized to achieve hemostasis. The patient subsequently developed multiple new metastases and expired 13 mo post-embolization. Comprehensive literature review revealed 16 previously reported cases of rectal involvement from bladder urothelial carcinoma, including 11 cases from direct extension and 5 cases from metastases. Patient age averaged 63.7 ± 9.6 years (all patients male). Rectal involvement was diagnosed on average 13.5 ± 11.8 mo after initial diagnosis of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Symptoms included constipation/gastrointestinal obstruction-6, weight loss-5, diarrhea-3, anorexia-3, pencil thin stools-3, tenesmus-2, anorectal pain-2, and other-5. Rectal examination in 9 patients revealed annular rectal constriction-6, and rectal mass-3. The current patient had the novel presentation of daily bright red blood per rectum coating the stools simulating

  6. Complications and outcomes following rectal pull-through surgery in dogs with rectal masses: 74 cases (2000-2013).

    PubMed

    Nucci, Daniel J; Liptak, Julius M; Selmic, Laura E; Culp, William T N; Durant, April M; Worley, Deanna; Maritato, Karl C; Thomson, Maurine; Annoni, Maurizio; Singh, Ameet; Matz, Brad; Benson, John; Buracco, Paolo

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the incidence of and factors associated with complications following rectal pull-through (RPT) surgery and the outcome for dogs with rectal tumors. Retrospective case series. 74 dogs with rectal masses. Information regarding signalment, history, diagnostic testing, type of rectal disease, surgical details, and postoperative complications, treatments, and outcomes was obtained from medical records and follow-up communications. Survival times were calculated. Descriptive statistics were generated. Regression analyses were used to evaluate the effect of various variables on the development of postsurgical complications and survival time. 58 (78.4%) dogs developed postsurgical complications, the most common of which was fecal incontinence with 42 (56.8%) dogs affected, of which 23 (54.8%) developed permanent incontinence. Other complications included diarrhea (n = 32), tenesmus (23), stricture formation (16), rectal bleeding (8), constipation (7), dehiscence (6), and infection (4). The rectal tumor recurred in 10 dogs. The median survival time was 1,150 days for all dogs and 726 days for dogs with malignant tumors. The 2 most common rectal masses were rectal carcinoma and rectal carcinoma in situ, and the dogs with these tumors had median survival times of 696 and 1,006 days, respectively. Dogs with rectal diseases that underwent RPT surgery had a high incidence of complications; however, those dogs had good local tumor control and survival times. The risk and impact of postsurgical complications on the quality of life and oncological outcomes should be discussed with owners before RPT surgery is performed in dogs with rectal masses.

  7. CT pelvimetry and clinicopathological parameters in evaluation of the technical difficulties in performing open rectal surgery for mid-low rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Cong; Su, Meng; Hu, Ke-Qiong; Su, Yin-Fa; Ye, Ying-Hai; Huang, Chong-Quan; Yu, Zhen-Lei; Li, Xiao-Yang; Zhou, Hong; Ni, Yao-Zhong; Jiang, Y I; Lou, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    time was associated with tumor height and tumor staging (RC(2)=0.312; P<0.001). By contrast, the pelvic anatomical parameters appeared to be more valuable predictors of variation in APR, in which intraoperative blood loss was associated with the anteroposterior diameter of the mid-pelvis, the anteroposterior diameter of the pelvic outlet, the interspinous diameter, the depth of the sacral curvature and the sacropubic distance (RC(2)=0.608; P=0.002). BMI, tumor height and the maximum diameter of the tumor may be used to predict the operative difficulty in performing open rectal surgery for mid-low rectal cancer. In addition to the associated clinicopathological parameters, wider, shallower and less curved pelvises may make the greatest contribution to reducing operative time and intraoperative blood loss. Operative difficulty is likely to be increased in deeper and narrower pelvises, or in those with greater sacrococcygeal curvature.

  8. Contrast lipocryolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Hernán; Melamed, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Alternative crystal structures are possible for all lipids and each different crystal structure is called a polymorphic form. Inter-conversion between polymorphisms would imply the possibility of leaning crystal formation toward the most effective polymorphism for adipocyte destruction. Food industry has been tempering lipids for decades. Tempering technology applied to lipocryolysis gave birth to “contrast lipocryolysis”, which involves pre- and post-lipocryolysis fat layer heating as part of a specific tempering protocol. In this study, we evaluated the skinfold thickness of 10 subjects after a single contrast lipocryolysis session and witnessed important and fast reductions. PMID:25068088

  9. [A short infusion or a bolus injection of contrast medium in i.v. urography. Comparative density measurements in the kidney pelvic-caliceal system using sequential computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, H; Klose, P; Klose, K; Schmiedel, E

    1993-06-01

    The rate of contrast injection during i.v. urography may vary considerably (bolus injection or drip infusion). The effect of 5 rates of injection (6, 12, 18, 36 and 72 ml/min) on the contrast density in the renal collecting system was examined over a period of 30 minutes. Measurements showed an inter-individual difference of more than 200% in each group. The intra-individual variations for different rates of injection were very slight; individual concentration in the kidney for a given dose depends only slightly on the rate of injection. There is no statistically significant improvement in contrast values as a result of a bolus injection. The reduced incidence of side effects justifies the use of bolus injections but pressure injections are unnecessary from a diagnostic point view.

  10. Transanal local excision of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, D R; Sokil, S; Ruiz-Salas, G

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with invasive rectal cancer treated by transanal excision between 1978-1989 are presented. Two patients had poorly differentiated tumours and were converted to abdominoperineal resection and one patient had extensive liver metastases documented preoperatively. The remaining twenty-two, mean age 64 years, fulfilled the criteria for local treatment. Eighty-two percent of tumours were T1 or T2 stage. There was no operative mortality. Six complications in five patients occurred, none requiring surgical intervention. Five patients died of unrelated causes without evidence of recurrence at 4, 4, 14, 26 and 58 months. The length of follow-up for the surviving group (17 patients) was 16 to 115 months (mean 63 months). Two patients developed local recurrence at 32 and 60 months. Transanal excision can be curative for selected rectal cancers.

  11. [Fatal intoxication following rectal instillation of alcohol].

    PubMed

    Nadjem, H; Ropohl, D; Werp, J

    1990-01-01

    A 62-year old man who had been living on a remote farm was found dead in his bed. Inserted in his rectum was a synthetic flexible tube filled with brandy (43 vol. %) and connected to a bicycle pump. Samples taken during autopsy from 3 different parts of the body showed ethanol concentrations from 4.87% to 5.35% in the blood and 6.73% in the urine. The ethanol concentrations in the small and large intestine were considerably higher (more than 29%) than in the stomach (9%). The decreased had a tumor as large as a tennis ball on the base of his tongue, almost completely filling the oropharynx, making swallowing very difficult, which probably was the reason of the rectal instillation of alcohol. The report deals with this unusual case of rectal alcohol instillation, and with the different ethanol and congener alcohol concentrations in the body fluids.

  12. Management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laterza, Liboria; Cecinato, Paolo; Guido, Alessandra; Mussetto, Alessandro; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic radiation disease is one of the major complication after radiotherapy for pelvic cancers. The most commonly reported symptom is rectal bleeding which affects patients' quality of life. Therapeutic strategies for rectal bleeding are generally ignored and include medical, endoscopic, and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. Most cases of radiation-induced bleeding are mild and self-limiting, and treatment is normally not indicated. In cases of clinically significant bleeding (i.e. anaemia), medical therapies, including stool softeners, sucralfate enemas, and metronidazole, should be considered as first-line treatment options. In cases of failure, endoscopic therapy, mainly represented by argon plasma coagulation and hyperbaric oxygen treatments, are valid and complementary second-line treatment strategies. Although current treatment options are not always supported by high-quality studies, patients should be reassured that treatment options exist and success is achieved in most cases if the patient is referred to a dedicated centre.

  13. Comparison of contrast media for visualization of the colon of healthy dogs during computed tomography and ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Byunggyu; Moon, Sohyeon; Park, Seungjo; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Hong, Sunghwa; Cho, Hyun; Choi, Jihye

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate contrast agents for their ability to improve visualization of the colon wall and lumen during CT and ultrasonography. ANIMALS 10 healthy adult Beagles. PROCEDURES Food was withheld from dogs for 36 hours, after which dogs consumed 250 mL of polyethylene glycol solution. Dogs were then anesthetized, a contrast agent (tap water, diluted barium, or air; order randomly assigned) was administered rectally, iodine contrast medium (880 mg of I/kg) was administered IV, and CT and ultrasonography of the colon were performed. After a 1-week washout period, this process was repeated with a different contrast agent until all agents had been evaluated. Two investigators reviewed the CT and ultrasonographic images for colon wall thickness, conspicuity, artifacts, wall layering, and degree of lumen dilation at 4 sites. RESULTS Thickness of the colon wall was greatest in CT and ultrasonographic images with water used as contrast agent, followed by barium and then air. The CT images obtained after water administration had a smooth appearance that outlined the colonic mucosa and had the highest score of the 3 contrast agents for wall conspicuity. Although no substantial artifacts related to any of the contrast agents were identified on CT images, barium- and gas-induced shadowing and reverberation artifacts hindered wall evaluation during ultrasonography. For ultrasonography, the degree of conspicuity was highest with barium in the near-field wall and with water in the far-field wall. In contrast to CT, ultrasonography could be used to distinguish wall layering, and the mucosal and muscular layers were distinct with all contrast agents. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Use of water as a contrast agent for both CT and ultrasonography of the colon in dogs compensated for each imaging modality's disadvantages and could be beneficial in the diagnosis of colon disease.

  14. Altemeier operation for gangrenous rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Abdelhedi, Cherif; Frikha, F; Bardaa, S; Kchaw, A; Mzali, R

    2014-08-08

    A stranguled rectal prolapse is a rare cause of intestinal occlusion. It requires emergency surgery. A patient who underwent emergency perineal proctectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy is described. The postoperative course was uneventful, with an excellent final result after colostomy closure. The successful treatment of this patient illustrates the value of the Altemeier procedure in the difficult and unusual scenario of bowel incarceration.

  15. Rectal balloon use limits vaginal displacement, rectal dose, and rectal toxicity in patients receiving IMRT for postoperative gynecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Chia; Wuu, Yen-Ruh; Yanagihara, Theodore; Jani, Ashish; Xanthopoulos, Eric P; Tiwari, Akhil; Wright, Jason D; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel

    2017-09-01

    Pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies traditionally used a 4-field box technique. Later trials have shown the feasibility of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) instead. But vaginal movement between fractions is concerning when using IMRT due to greater conformality of the isodose curves to the target and the resulting possibility of missing the target while the vagina is displaced. In this study, we showed that the use of a rectal balloon during treatment can decrease vaginal displacement, limit rectal dose, and limit acute and late toxicities. Little is known regarding the use of a rectal balloon (RB) in treating patients with IMRT in the posthysterectomy setting. We hypothesize that the use of an RB during treatment can limit rectal dose and acute and long-term toxicities, as well as decrease vaginal cuff displacement between fractions. We performed a retrospective review of patients with gynecological malignancies who received postoperative IMRT with the use of an RB from January 1, 2012 to January 1, 2015. Rectal dose constraint was examined as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1203 and 0418. Daily cone beam computed tomography (CT) was performed, and the average (avg) displacement, avg magnitude, and avg magnitude of vector were calculated. Toxicity was reported according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Acute toxicity was defined as less than 90 days from the end of radiation treatment. Late toxicity was defined as at least 90 days after completing radiation. Twenty-eight patients with postoperative IMRT with the use of an RB were examined and 23 treatment plans were reviewed. The avg rectal V40 was 39.3% ± 9.0%. V30 was65.1% ± 10.0%. V50 was 0%. Separate cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images (n = 663) were reviewed. The avg displacement was as follows: superior 0.4 + 2.99 mm, left 0.23 ± 4.97 mm, and anterior 0.16 ± 5.18 mm. The avg magnitude of displacement was superior

  16. Increasing trend in retained rectal foreign bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ayantunde, Abraham A; Unluer, Zynep

    2016-01-01

    AIM To highlight the rising trend in hospital presentation of foreign bodies retained in the rectum over a 5-year period. METHODS Retrospective review of the cases of retained rectal foreign bodies between 2008 and 2012 was performed. Patients’ clinical data and yearly case presentation with data relating to hospital episodes were collected. Data analysis was by SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL, United States. RESULTS Twenty-five patients presented over a 5-year period with a mean age of 39 (17-62) years and M: F ratio of 2:1. A progressive rise in cases was noted from 2008 to 2012 with 3, 4, 4, 6, 8 recorded patients per year respectively. The majority of the impacted rectal objects were used for self-/partner-eroticism. The commonest retained foreign bodies were sex vibrators and dildos. Ninty-six percent of the patients required extraction while one passed spontaneously. Two and three patients had retrieval in the Emergency Department and on the ward respectively while 19 patients needed examination under anaesthesia for extraction. The mean hospital stay was 19 (2-38) h. Associated psychosocial issues included depression, deliberate self-harm, illicit drug abuse, anxiety and alcoholism. There were no psychosocial problems identified in 15 patients. CONCLUSION There is a progressive rise in hospital presentation of impacted rectal foreign bodies with increasing use of different objects for sexual arousal. PMID:27830039

  17. Spontaneous rupture of the renal pelvis presenting as an urinoma in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Mohanty, Debajyoti; Rathi, Vinita; Jain, Bhupendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A 29-year-old gentleman underwent a transverse colostomy for intestinal obstruction caused by advanced rectal carcinoma. On the 5th postoperative day, the patient developed a painful swelling on the right side of the abdomen. The contrast enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a right sided hydronephrosis, a large rent in the renal pelvis, and a large retroperitoneal fluid collection on the right side. Percutaneous nephrostomy and pigtail catheter drainage of the urinoma led to resolution of abdominal swelling. Development of a urinoma as a consequence of rectal carcinoma is highly unusual. Prompt imaging for confirmation of diagnosis, decompression of the renal pelvicalyceal system, and drainage of the urinoma limits morbidity. PMID:24749123

  18. Ferrimagnetic susceptibility contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bach-Gansmo, T

    1993-01-01

    Contrast agents based on superparamagnetic particles have been in clinical development for more than 5 years, and the complexity of their effects is still not elucidated. The relaxivities are frequently used to give an idea of their efficacy, but these parameters can only be used if they are concentration independent. For large superparamagnetic systems, the evolution of the transverse magnetization is biexponential, after an initial loss of magnetization. Both these characteristics of large superparamagnetic systems should lead to prudence in using the relaxivities as indicators of contrast medium efficacy. Susceptibility induced artefacts have been associated with the use of superparamagnetic contrast agents since the first imaging evaluation took place. The range of concentrations where good contrast effect was achieved without inducing artefacts, as well as blurring and metal artefacts were evaluated. The influence of motion on the induction of artefacts was studied, and compared to the artefacts induced by a paramagnetic agent subject to motion. With a suitable concentration of a negative contrast agent, a signal void could be achieved in the region prone to motion, and no artefacts were induced. If the concentration was too high, a displacement of the region close to the contrast agent was observed. The artefacts occurred in a volume surrounding the contrast agent, i.e., also outside the imaging plane. In comparison a positive, paramagnetic contrast agent induced heavy artefacts in the phase encoding direction, appearing as both high intensity regions and black holes, in a mosaic pattern. Clinical trials of the oral contrast agent OMP for abdominal MR imaging showed this agent to be safe and efficacious. OMP increased the diagnostic efficacy of abdominal MR imaging in 2 of 3 cases examined, with a significant decrease in motion artefacts. Susceptibility contrast agents may also be of use in the evaluation of small lesions in the liver. Particulate material

  19. Giant rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Alder, L.S.; Elver, G.; Foo, F.J.; Dobson, M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST are the most common mesenchymal tumours; however, rectal GISTs account for <5%. In the pelvis they represent a diagnostic challenge with giant GISTs likely to be malignant. They may present with urological, gynaecological or rectal symptoms. Sphincter-preserving surgery can be aided by neoadjuvant therapy. We present an uncommon case of giant rectal GIST masquerading as acute urinary retention. PMID:24968434

  20. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Management of Bleeding Rectal Varices.

    PubMed

    Philips, Cyriac Abby; Augustine, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Rectal variceal bleeding, though rare, can pose significant morbidity and mortality in the wake of treatment failure. Conventional treatment utilizing endoscopic glue injection might not be feasible in all cases due to poor visualization and inadvertent missing of variceal source of bleed. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided rectal variceal management is a promising and effective modality. We provide real-time images and a video of EUS-guided precision management of rectal variceal bleed using coiling and glue in a cirrhotic.

  1. SU-D-207B-01: Radiomics Feature Reproducibility From Repeat CT Scans of Patients with Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, P; Wang, J; Zhong, H; Zhou, Z; Shen, L; Hu, W; Zhang, Z

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the reproducibility of radiomics features by repeating computed tomographic (CT) scans in rectal cancer. To choose stable radiomics features for rectal cancer. Methods: 40 rectal cancer patients were enrolled in this study, each of whom underwent two CT scans within average 8.7 days (5 days to 17 days), before any treatment was delivered. The rectal gross tumor volume (GTV) was distinguished and segmented by an experienced oncologist in both CTs. Totally, more than 2000 radiomics features were defined in this study, which were divided into four groups (I: GLCM, II: GLRLM III: Wavelet GLCM and IV: Wavelet GLRLM). For each group, five types of features were extracted (Max slice: features from the largest slice of target images, Max value: features from all slices of target images and choose the maximum value, Min value: minimum value of features for all slices, Average value: average value of features for all slices, Matrix sum: all slices of target images translate into GLCM and GLRLM matrices and superpose all matrices, then extract features from the superposed matrix). Meanwhile a LOG (Laplace of Gauss) filter with different parameters was applied to these images. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and inter-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to assess the reproducibility. Results: 403 radiomics features were extracted from each type of patients’ medical images. Features of average type are the most reproducible. Different filters have little effect for radiomics features. For the average type features, 253 out of 403 features (62.8%) showed high reproducibility (ICC≥0.8), 133 out of 403 features (33.0%) showed medium reproducibility (0.8≥ICC≥0.5) and 17 out of 403 features (4.2%) showed low reproducibility (ICC≥0.5). Conclusion: The average type radiomics features are the most stable features in rectal cancer. Further analysis of these features of rectal cancer can be warranted for treatment monitoring and

  2. Effect of pelvic floor muscle contraction on vesical and rectal function with identification of puborectalis-rectovesical inhibitory reflex and levator-rectovesical excitatory reflex.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A; El-Sibai, O

    2001-08-01

    changes. Repetition of the test using saline instead of xylocaine resulted in rectal and vesical pressure responses similar to those without the use of saline. In conclusion, the decline in rectal and vesical responses upon PR muscle contraction indicates a reflex relationship which we term 'puborectalis rectovesical inhibitory reflex'. This reflex is suggested to abort the urge to defecate or urinate. In contrast, LA muscle contraction produced rectal and vesical pressure elevation which is suggested to be mediated through the 'levator rectovesical excitatory reflex'. 'This reflex is probably evoked to promote rectal and vesical evacuation.

  3. Rectal Diclofenac Versus Rectal Paracetamol: Comparison of Antipyretic Effectiveness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Aalinezhad, Marzieh; Sarami, Golbahareh; Rangraz, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever is the most common complaint in pediatric medicine and its treatment is recommended in some situations. Paracetamol is the most common antipyretic drug, which has serious side effects such as toxicity along with its positive effects. Diclofenac is one of the strongest non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs, which has received little attention as an antipyretic drug. Objectives This study was designed to compare the antipyretic effectiveness of the rectal form of Paracetamol and Diclofenac. Patients and Methods This double-blind controlled clinical trial was conducted on 80 children aged six months to six years old. One group was treated with rectal Paracetamol suppositories at 15 mg/kg dose and the other group received Diclofenac at 1 mg/kg by rectal administration (n = 40). Rectal temperature was measured before and one hour after the intervention. Temperature changes in the two groups were compared. Results The average rectal temperature in the Paracetamol group was 39.6 ± 1.13°C, and 39.82 ± 1.07°C in the Diclofenac group (P = 0.37). The average rectal temperature, one hour after the intervention, in the Paracetamol and the Diclofenac group was 38.39 ± 0.89°C and 38.95 ± 1.09°C, respectively (P = 0.02). Average temperature changes were 0.65 ± 0.17°C in the Paracetamol group and 1.73 ± 0.69°C in the Diclofenac group (P < 0.001). Conclusions In the first one hour, Diclofenac suppository is able to control the fever more efficient than Paracetamol suppositories. PMID:26889398

  4. [Ventral rectal sacropexy (colpo-perineal) in the treatment of rectal and rectogenital prolapse].

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Elósegui, José L; Apeztegui, Francisco J; Placer, Carlos; Borda, Nerea; Irazusta, Martín; Múgica, José A; Murgoitio, Javier

    2009-11-01

    Ventral sacral-rectopexy with mesh corrects rectal prolapse and minimises rectal dissection. Subsequent colpopexy corrects apical and posterior prolapses of the vagina. The combination of both procedures can lead to the simultaneous correction of pelvic organ prolapses (POP). To present the results of a patient series with several types of POP treated using the same approach and operation. A total of 57 patients diagnosed with any type of POP were operated on between January 2005 and August 2008 using ventral rectal-colpo-sacropexy, who were grouped into three types: A, total rectal prolapse isolated or combined with a hysterocele or colpocele (11 patients); B, rectoenterocele with internal rectal invagination and/or descending perineum (4 patients); and C, middle and posterior genital compartment prolapse (42 patients). The laparoscopic approach was used in the 15 patients of groups A and B and 11 from group C. A biological mesh was used in 41 patients and a macroporous synthetic one in the rest. The mean age of the patients in the series was 66 (19-81) years, with 55 females and 2 males. The median follow up was 25 (4-48) months. There were no major post-surgical complications. A recurrence of prolapse was recorded in one patient in group A (1/11); the 7 patients who suffered from incontinence improved after the surgery, no case of de novo constipation being recorded and an improvement in 8 of the 9 patients from groups A and B with obstructive defaecation. There were 9 (21%) recurrences detected in group C, but only 4 (9%) required reintervention. In all the recurrences a biological mesh had been used. Laparoscopic ventral rectal-colpo-pexy is an effective technique to correct POP. Although safe and innocuous, the results with biological meshes did not last as long.

  5. Comparison of the preventive analgesic effect of rectal ketamine and rectal acetaminophen after pediatric tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Heidari, S Morteza; Mirlohi, S Zahra; Hashemi, S Jalal

    2012-03-01

    There is a little data about rectal administration of Ketamine as a postoperative analgesic, so we compared the efficacy of rectal ketamine with rectal acetaminophen, which is applied routinely for analgesia after painful surgeries like tonsillectomy. In this single-blinded comparative trial, we enrolled 70 children undergoing elective tonsillectomy, and divided them randomly in two groups. Patients received rectal ketamine (2 mg / kg) or rectal acetaminophen (20 mg / kg) at the end of surgery. The children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain scale was used to estimate pain in children. Also the vital signs, Wilson sedation scale, and side effects in each group were noted and compared for 24 hours. The ketamine group had a lower pain score at 15 minutes and 60 minutes after surgery in Recovery (6.4 ± 0.8, 7.4 ± 1 vs. 7.1 ± 1.2, 7.8 ± 1.2 in the acetaminophen group, P < 0.05) and one hour and two hours in the ward (7.2 ± 0.7, 7 ± 0.5 vs. 7.9 ± 1.2, 7.5 ± 1.2 in the acetaminophen group, P < 0.05), with no significant differences till 24 hours. Dreams and hallucinations were not reported in the ketamine group. Systolic blood pressure was seen to be higher in the ketamine group (104.4 ± 7.9 vs. 99.8 ± 7.7 in the acetaminophen group) and nystagmus was reported only in the ketamine group (14.2%). Other side effects were equivalent in both the groups. With low complications, rectal ketamine has analgesic effects, especially in the first hours after surgery in comparison with acetaminophen, and it can be an alternative analgesic with easy administration in children after tonsillectomy.

  6. Laparoscopic intersphincteric resection for low rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sang Woo; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hyeong Rok

    2011-12-01

    Laparoscopic intersphincteric resection (ISR) after neoadjuvant chemoradiation is helpful in the management of patients with low rectal cancer. With the advent of this technique, the need for performance of abdominoperineal resection seems to have decreased in patients with very low rectal tumors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility, the functional outcome, and the short-term oncologic outcomes of laparoscopic ISR for low rectal adenocarcinoma at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 111 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic ISR for low rectal adenocarcinoma between July 2005 and December 2009. Demographic status, surgical outcomes, functional outcome data, and oncologic outcome data were collected. The mean distance of the tumor from the anal verge was 3.4 cm (range: 1-5 cm). The mean operative time was 214.7 min (range, 150-450 min). The mean distal resection margin was 1.3 ± 1.1 cm. Morbidity occurred in 24 patients (21.6%), including anastomotic leakage in 2 patients (1.8%). The mean Wexner continence score after stoma repair was 7.5 ± 2.7 (range: 2 ~ 19), and 9.8 in total ISR, 7.3 in partial ISR (P = 0.071). The 3-year overall survival rate was 92.8%, and the 3-year disease-free survival rate was 73.0%. Local recurrence was noted in 6 of the 111 patients with TNM stage I to III (5.4%). The patients with lesions at 2 cm to the dentate line had a 7.07-fold greater risk of local recurrence, including a 13.42-fold greater risk of lateral pelvic wall recurrence and perineal recurrence (95% Confidence interval [CI], 1.141-158.006; P = 0.009) than in those who had lesions more than 2 cm from the anal verge (95% CI, 1.290-38.832; P = 0.011). Laparoscopic ISR after neoadjuvant chemoradiation can be recommended as a technically feasible, minimally invasive, and a sphincter-saving procedure with acceptable functional and short-term oncologic outcomes in patients with very low rectal cancer.

  7. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Łuczak, Jacek; Kosicka, Katarzyna; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra; Sopata, Maciej; Główka, Franciszek

    2014-01-01

    Background Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III “pain ladder” drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient’s refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures), and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal) on the bupivacaine plasma concentration. Cases We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours). The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 mL every 4.5–11 hours). Methods Total bupivacaine plasma concentrations were determined using the high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet method. Results Effective pain control was achieved with intrathecal bupivacaine (0.077–0.154 mg·kg−1) and bupivacaine in enema (1.820 mg·kg−1). Intrathecal bupivacaine (0.5%, 2 mL) caused a drop in blood pressure; other side effects were absent in both cases. Total plasma bupivacaine concentrations following intrathecal and rectal bupivacaine application did not exceed 317.2 ng·mL−1 and 235.7 ng·mL−1, respectively. Bupivacaine elimination was

  8. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery for the treatment of uncommon rectal lesions.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Márquez, Manuel; Rubio-Gil, Francisco; Ortega-Ruiz, Sofía; Blesa-Sierra, Isabel; Álvarez-García, Antonio; Jorge-Cerrudo, Jaime; Vidaña-Márquez, Elisabet; Belda-Lozano, Ricardo; Reina-Duarte, Ángel

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) was developed as a less aggressive alternative treatment for rectal lesions (mainly adenomas and adenocarcinomas). However, its use for other rectal lesions has become more frequent, trying to reduce the morbidity associated with more invasive techniques. The aim of this study is to describe our experience in the use of TEM in other rectal lesions. Retrospective and descriptive study including patients operated with TEM (from June 2008 to December 2016) for the treatment of rectal lesions different from adenomas or adenocarcinomas. Among the 138 patients treated by TEM in our department, 10 patients were operated on for rectal lesions other than adenomas or adenocarcinomas. Rectal lesions were 3neuroendocrine tumours, a neuroendocrine tumour metastasis, a rectal stenosis, a cloacogenic polyp, an endometrioma, a retrorrectal tumour, a presacral abscess and a lesion in the rectovaginal septum. Mean operative time was 72min and postoperative stay was 4.2 days. Only one patient needed a reoperation, due to rectal bleeding. TEM could be a useful tool for the treatment of rectal lesions different from adenomas or adenocarcinomas, potentially decreasing the morbidity associated with more aggressive surgical techniques. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Rectal transmission of bovine leukemia virus in cattle and sheep.

    PubMed

    Henry, E T; Levine, J F; Coggins, L

    1987-04-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was transmitted by rectal inoculation of BLV-infective whole blood into cattle and sheep. Two cows and 2 sheep each were given 500 ml and 50 ml of blood, respectively, by rectal infusion. Two sheep which served as positive controls each were given 1 ml of the same blood, IV. All animals became seropositive to BLV by postinoculation week 5. Although relatively large volumes of blood were used for rectal inoculation, a base line for infectivity was established for the rectal route.

  10. Case report: Sigmoid strangulation from evisceration through a perforated rectal prolapse ulcer – An unusual complication of rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer Z.; Kittmer, Tiffaney; Forbes, Shawn; Ruo, Leyo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rectal prolapse occurs particularly in elder females and presentation can sometimes lead to complications such as strangulation and evisceration of other organs through the necrotic mucosa. Presentation of case This is a case of a 61 year-old female with rectal prolapse complicated by rectal perforation through which a segment of sigmoid colon eviscerated and became strangulated. This patient initially presented with sepsis requiring ICU admission, but fully recovered following a Hartmann’s procedure with a sacral rectopexy. Discussion Complications of rectal prolapse include incarceration, strangulation, and rarely, perforation with evisceration of other viscera requiring urgent operation. This report provides a brief overview of complications associated with rectal prolapse, reviews similar cases of transrectal evisceration, and discusses the management of chronic rectal prolapse. Conclusion Prompt surgical consult is warranted if any signs or symptoms suggestive of complications from prolapse are present. PMID:25680532

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound for the characterization and staging of rectal cancer. Current state of the method. Technological advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gersak, Mariana M; Badea, Radu; Graur, Florin; Hajja, Nadim Al; Furcea, Luminita; Dudea, Sorin M

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate type of examination for the assessment of rectal tumors. Over the years, the method has advanced from gray-scale examination to intravenous contrast media administration and to different types of elastography. The multimodal approach of tumors (transrectal, transvaginal) is adapted to each case. 3D ultrasound is useful for spatial representation and precise measurement of tumor formations, using CT/MR image reconstruction; color elastography is useful for tumor characterization and staging; endoscopic ultrasound using intravenous contrast agents can help study the amount of contrast agent targeted at the level of the tumor formations and contrast wash-in/wash-out time, based on the curves displayed on the device. The transvaginal approach often allows better visualization of the tumor than the transrectal approach. Performing the procedure with the rectal ampulla distended with contrast agent may be seen as an optimization of the examination methodology. All these aspects are additional methods for gray-scale endoscopic ultrasound, capable of increasing diagnostic accuracy. This paper aims at reviewing the progress of transrectal and transvaginal ultrasound, generically called endoscopic ultrasound, for rectal tumor diagnosis and staging, with emphasis on the current state of the method and its development trends.

  12. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-13

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  13. Contrast cystography.

    PubMed

    Essman, Stephanie C

    2005-02-01

    Cystography is a radiographic study performed to aid in evaluation of the urinary bladder for extramural, mural, or intraluminal lesions. These lesions may primarily involve the urinary bladder or may be an extension of disease from adjacent organs. Cystography is easy to perform with relatively few complications. Different types of cystography (positive versus negative contrast) may be used depending on the type of information that the clinician hopes to obtain. Although a valuable technique, it is important to correlate the findings on cystography with other clinical information to arrive at the final diagnosis.

  14. Comparison of broth enhancement to direct plating for screening of rectal cultures for ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liss, Michael A; Nakamura, Kristen K; Peterson, Ellena M

    2013-01-01

    A transrectal prostate biopsy is the most common procedure used to establish the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Prior to biopsy, patients are commonly given ciprofloxacin for prophylaxis. However, a complication of the procedure is infection with ciprofloxacin-resistant organisms, in particular resistant Escherichia coli. In order to identify patients carrying ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli, so as to tailor their antibiotic prophylaxis, rectal swabs are screened using selective broth and/or solid medium. In our evaluation, we compared broth enrichment and direct plating techniques by using brain heart infusion broth and MacConkey agar containing 1 μg/ml or 10 μg/ml of ciprofloxacin. Of the 100 patients included in the study, 20 were colonized with ciprofloxacin-resistant organisms, 19 of which were E. coli. There was no significant difference (P > 0.1) between the culture methods or the ciprofloxacin concentrations in the medium when identifying patients with ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli; however, broth enrichment using 1 μg/ml ciprofloxacin was the most sensitive at 100%, but it was the least specific. Direct plating of rectal swabs onto MacConkey agar containing 10 μg/ml of ciprofloxacin was 100% specific and missed only 1 positive specimen, with a sensitivity of 94.7%; this method was the most cost-effective. Therefore, direct plating of rectal swabs onto selective medium proved to be a sensitive and cost-effective approach in identifying patients colonized with ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli.

  15. Rectal sensation test helps avoid pain of apical prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jones, J Stephen; Zippe, Craig D

    2003-12-01

    Apical cores obtained during transrectal prostate biopsy are associated with greater pain than cores obtained from the remainder of the gland. We present a method to minimize this pain. During 30 consecutive apical biopsies the needle was purposefully placed above all rectal pain fibers, which are anatomically present only below the dentate line. All patients received a periprostatic nerve block prior to biopsy. The patient was asked if he felt the sharp sensation of the needle as it was placed lightly against the rectal mucosa when the needle was aimed at apex (the rectal sensation test). If so, the needle was advanced cranially 2 to 3 mm or until he could no longer detect its light touch. The probe handle was then rotated dorsally, pulling the rectal mucosa downward until the needle was again aimed at the apex. Patients were asked to report a visual analog pain score for each biopsy. These results were compared to those obtained when doing 30 consecutive apical biopsies without the rectal sensation test. The average visual analog pain score for apical biopsy was 1.25 (range 0 to 2.2) for patients in whom the rectal sensation test was used to bypass rectal pain sensory fibers. The average score in control patients in whom the rectal sensation test was not used was higher at 2.28 (range 0.3-6.2). These results were statistically significant (p > 0.0005). Increased sensitivity to apical prostate biopsy is due to rectal pain fibers located below the dentate line. These fibers and the associated pain may be safely avoided by passing through the rectal wall above the dentate line. The rectal sensation test easily identifies the sensate area below the dentate line. Painless apical biopsy can then be achieved by rotating the ultrasound probe to aim the biopsy needle in the desired path.

  16. Lubricant Provides Poor Rectal Mucosal HIV Coverage.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Eugenie C; Weld, Ethel D; Fuchs, Edward J; Hiruy, Hiwot; Buckheit, Karen W; Buckheit, Robert W; Breakey, Jennifer; Hendrix, Craig W

    2017-08-01

    Given the rising HIV incidence in men who have sex with men (MSM) despite repeatedly proven effectiveness of oral HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis, behaviorally congruent periodic dosing strategies, such as dosing microbicides as lubricants, are now in demand. Rectal microbicide gel studies largely administer gels using vaginal applicators, which have not been well received and do not mimic lubricant use. We compared rectal gel manually dosed as lubricant with applicator dosing in five healthy, HIV-negative MSM who received 10 or 3.5 ml of (99m)Tc-DTPA-radiolabeled hydroxyethyl cellulose universal placebo gel intrarectally. After washout, participants received 10 ml of radiolabeled Wet(®) Original(®) lubricant to apply to the anus with fingers and/or a phallus in a manner typical of sexual lubricant use with a partner, followed by simulated receptive anal intercourse. Single-photon emission computed tomography with transmission computed tomography was performed 4 h after each gel administration. Manual dosing was associated with more variable rectosigmoid distribution, 4.4-15.3 cm from the anorectal junction, compared with more uniform distribution, 5.9-7.4 and 5.3-7.6 cm after 10 and 3.5 ml applicator dosing, respectively. A significantly smaller fraction of the initial 10 ml dose was retained within the colon after manual dosing, 3.4%, compared with 94.9% and 88.4% after 10 and 3.5 ml applicator dosing, respectively (both p < .001). Manual dosing of a sexual lubricant delivered a small, variable fraction of the dose with variable rectosigmoid distribution compared with applicator dosing. These results raise concern that dosing a rectal microbicide gel as a sexual lubricant may not provide adequate or predictable mucosal coverage for HIV protection.

  17. Abdominosacral resection for locally recurring rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Filiberto; Gronchi, Alessandro; Corbellini, Carlo; Milione, Massimo; Leo, Ermanno

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate feasibility and outcome of abdominal-sacral resection for treatment of locally recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS A population of patients who underwent an abdominal-sacral resection for posterior recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum at the National Cancer Institute of Milano, between 2005 and 2013, is considered. Retrospectively collected data includes patient characteristics, treatment and pathology details regarding the primary and the recurrent rectal tumor surgical resection. A clinical and instrumental follow-up was performed. Surgical and oncological outcome were investigated. Furthermore an analytical review of literature was conducted in order to compare our case series with other reported experiences. RESULTS At the time of abdomino-sacral resection, the mean age of patients was 55 (range, 38-64). The median operating time was 380 min (range, 270-480). Sacral resection was performed at S2/S3 level in 3 patients, S3/S4 in 3 patients and S4/S5 in 4 patients. The median operating time was 380 ± 58 min. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 1750 mL (range, 200-680). The median hospital stay was 22 d. Overall morbidity was 80%, mainly type II complication according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Microscopically negative margins (R0) is obtained in all patients. Overall 5-year survival after first surgical procedure is 60%, with a median survival from the first surgery of 88 ± 56 mo. The most common site of re-recurrence was intrapelvic. CONCLUSION Sacral resection represents a feasible approach to posterior rectal cancer recurrence without evidence of distant spreading. An accurate staging is essential for planning the best therapy. PMID:28070232

  18. [Robotic total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Rossi, Gustavo; Alvarez, Fernando A; Mentz, Ricardo; Vaccaro, Carlos A; Im, Víctor; Quintana, Guillermo Ojea

    2013-06-01

    Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) has proven to be feasible and safe. However, it represents a major technical challenge, since it involves the dissection of the rectum in a confined space such as the bony pelvis using un-ergonomic surgical devices. This difficulty is accentuated in patients with distal tumors and high body mass index (BMI), in which the surgical margins and the hypogastric nerves may be affected. Therefore, robotic surgery aims to overcome these limitations that conspire against the mininvasive surgical approach of rectal cancer. We present an obese (BMI = 32 kg/m2) 82-year-old man with a history of smoking and prostate cancer that was recently diagnosed with a middle rectal adenocarcinoma at 9 cm from the anal verge. Rectal examination evidenced a mobile lesion. Computed tomography scan ruled out metastases and at the local staging by MRI, the tumor was considered as T3-N0 with free circumferential margins. Surgical treatment was decided and a hybrid technique was used combining an initial laparoscopic approach followed by the robotic TME. The patient had a full recovery and was discharged three days after surgery without complications. Pathological examination revealed a low-grade adenocarcinoma with mesorectal invasion, free circumferential and distal margins, and 24 negative lymph nodes (pT3-pN0-pM0/Stage II). Robotic TME was performed safely in an obese patient. It facilitated dissection maneuvers in a confined space with proper identification and preservation of the hypogastric nerves, allowing retrieving an intact mesorectum. Prospective randomized trials will define the role of this new technology.

  19. A new 'enterocompressor' to facilitate rectal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Barraza, R P

    1990-02-01

    A newly devised enterocompressor facilitates low rectal anastomosis in children with Hirschsprung's disease. This simple surgical instrument, composed of two semicylindrical valves, a hinge, and a regulating screw, maintains intestinal anastomoses properly placed and produces spur crushing. In addition, it is inexpensive and reusable. The enterocompressor, used in 33 primary and 15 secondary Duhamel operations, and applied to normalize intestinal transit in 10 colectomies, provided adequate anastomosis and prevented leakage of intestinal contents. This enterocompressor can be used safely in children as young as six months of age.

  20. Combined modality therapy for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D; Röedel, Claus; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The standard adjuvant treatment for cT3 and/or N+ rectal cancer is preoperative chemoradiation. However, there are many controversies regarding this approach. These include the role of short course radiation, whether postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for all patients and whether the type of surgery after chemoradiation should be based on the response rate. More accurate imaging techniques and/or molecular markers may help identify patients with positive pelvic nodes to reduce the chance of overtreatment with preoperative therapy. Will more effective systemic agents both improve the results of radiation as well as modify the need for pelvic radiation? These questions and others remain active areas of clinical investigation.

  1. Adjuvant therapy of resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-08-01

    The two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer are surgery followed by postoperative combined modality therapy and preoperative combined modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. Preoperative therapy (most commonly combined modality therapy) has gained acceptance as a standard adjuvant therapy. The potential advantages of the preoperative approach include decreased tumor seeding, less acute toxicity, increased radiosensitivity due to more oxygenated cells, and enhanced sphincter preservation. There are a number of new chemotherapeutic agents that have been developed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Phase I/II trials examining the use of new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with pelvic radiation therapy are in progress.

  2. Rectal and appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors.

    PubMed

    Khoddami, Maliheh; Sanae, Shahram; Nikkhoo, Bahram

    2006-07-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are neoplasms characterized by spindle cell proliferation and a fiboinflammatory vascular stroma. Herein, we presented the successful treatment of a rectal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in an 11-year-old boy who presented with diarrhea and abdominal pain of 1(1/2) months duration and an appendiceal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in a 29-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain of two months duration with associated tenderness and rebound tenderness in the right lower abdomen. Histologically, our cases had inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors very similar to that of other sites; the spindle cells were positive for vimentin and muscle-specific actin.

  3. A tertiary care hospital's 10 years' experience with rectal ultrasound in early rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Ahmed; Walker, Andrew; Heise, Charles P; Kennedy, Gregory D; Benson, Mark E; Pfau, Patrick R; Johnson, Eric A; Frick, Terrence J; Gopal, Deepak V

    2017-08-24

    Rectal endoscopic ultrasound (RUS) has become an essential tool in the management of rectal adenocarcinoma because of the ability to accurately stage lesions. The aim of this study was to identify the staging agreement of early RUS-staged rectal adenocarcinoma with surgical resected pathology and ultimately determine how this impacts the management of early rectal cancer (T1-T2). Retrospective chart review was performed from November 2002 to November 2013 to identify procedure indication, RUS staging data, surgical management, and postoperative surgical pathology data. There were a total of 693 RUS examinations available for review and 282 of these were performed for a new diagnosis of rectal adenocarcinoma. There was staging agreement between RUS and surgical pathology in 19 out of 20 (95%) RUS-staged T1 cases. There was staging agreement between RUS and surgical pathology in 3 out of 9 (33%) RUS-staged T2 cases. There was significantly better staging agreement for RUS-staged T1 lesions compared to RUS staged T2 lesions (P = 0.002). Nearly 60% of T1N0 cancers were referred for transanal excisions (TAEs), and 78% of T2N0 cancers underwent low anterior resection. This study identified only a small number of T1-T2 adenocarcinomas. There was good staging agreement between RUS and surgical pathology among RUS-staged T1 lesions whereas poor staging agreement among RUS-staged T2 lesions. Although TAE is largely indicated by the staging of a T1 lesion, this approach may be less appropriate for T2 lesions due to high reported local recurrence.

  4. Locally advanced rectal cancer: Preliminary results of rectal preservation after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Carlos Alberto; Yazyi, Federico Julio; Ojra Quintana, Guillermo; Santino, Juan Pablo; Sardi, Mabel Edith; Beder, Damián; Tognelli, Joaquin; Bonadeo, Fernando; Lastiri, José María; Rossi, Gustavo Leandro

    2016-05-01

    The standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision. However, organ preservation has been proposed for tumors with good response to neoadjuvant treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oncologic results of this strategy. This is a retrospective cohort study (2005-2014) including a consecutive series of patients with rectal adenocarcinoma with complete or almost complete clinical response after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, that were treated according to a strategy of preservation of the rectum. A total of 204 patients with rectal cancer received neoadjuvant therapy. Thirty (14.7%) had a good response and were treated with rectal preservation (23 «Watch and Wait» and 7 local resections). Median follow-up was 46 months (interquartile range: 30-68). In the group of «Watch & Wait», 4 patients had local recurrence before 12 months (actuarial local recurrence rate=18.5%). All of them underwent salvage surgery (2 with radical surgery and 2 local resections) without any further recurrence. Disease-free survival actuarial rate at 3 years follow-up was 94.1% (95% CI 82.9-100). None of the 7 patients that were treated by local excision had local recurrence. The organ preservation rate for the whole group was 93%. The strategy of organ preservation in locally advanced rectal cancer is feasible in cases with good response to neoadjuvant therapy. When implemented in a highly selected group of patients this strategy is associated with satisfactory oncologic results. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Is rectal MRI beneficial for determining the location of rectal cancer with respect to the peritoneal reflection?

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun Joo; Ryu, Chun Geun; Kim, Gangmi; Kim, Su Ran; Nam, Sang Eun; Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Young Jun; Hwang, Dae-Yong

    2012-12-01

    An objective method for determining the location of the cancer with respect to peritoneal reflection would be helpful to decide the treatment modality for rectal cancer. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of rectal MRI to determine spatial relations between the peritoneal reflection and rectal cancer and to compare these with operative findings. Patients that underwent a rectal cancer operation after a rectal MRI check between November 2008 and June 2010 were considered for the study. The patients that received preoperative concurrent chemoradiation or trans-anal local excision were excluded. Fifty-four patients constituted the study cohort. By comparing surgical and radiologic findings, the accuracy for predicting tumour location in relation to the peritoneal reflection by rectal MRI in all patients was 90.7%. In terms of tumour location in relation to peritoneal reflection, the accuracy of rectal MRI was 93.5% in patients with a tumour located above the peritoneal reflection, 90.0% in patients with a tumour located on the peritoneal reflection, and 84.6% in patients with a tumour located below the peritoneal reflection (p=0.061). When the cohort was subdivided by gender, body mass index (BMI), operative findings, or tumour size, no significant difference was observed among subgroups. Rectal MRI could be a useful tool for evaluating the relation between rectal cancer and peritoneal reflection especially when tumour size is less than 8cm. Rectal MRI can provide information regarding the location of rectal cancer in relation to the peritoneal reflection for treatment planning purposes.

  6. Rectal gonorrhoea in male homosexuals. Presentation and therapy.

    PubMed

    Fluker, J L; Deherogoda, P; Platt, D J; Gerken, A

    1980-12-01

    In a review of rectal gonorrhoea 73 episodes were studied in 65 homosexual men. The presenting signs and symptoms were carefully noted. Treatment with a single injection of spectinomycin hydrochloride 2 g resulted in a cure rate of 94.5%. The relatively high treatment failure rate associated with rectal gonorrhoea may possibly be due to microbial mechanisms.

  7. Rectal chlamydia - should screening be recommended in women?

    PubMed

    Andersson, Nirina; Boman, Jens; Nylander, Elisabet

    2017-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection in Europe and has large impacts on patients' physical and emotional health. Unidentified asymptomatic rectal Chlamydia trachomatis could be a partial explanation for the high Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence. In this study, we evaluated rectal Chlamydia trachomatis testing in relation to symptoms and sexual habits in women and men who have sex with men. Rectal Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence was 9.1% in women and 0.9% in men who have sex with men. None of the patients reported any rectal symptoms; 59.0% of the women with a rectal Chlamydia trachomatis infection denied anal intercourse and 18.8% did not have a urogenital infection; 9.4% did neither have a urogenital infection nor reported anal sex. We suggest that rectal sampling should be considered in women visiting sexually transmitted infection clinics regardless of rectal symptoms and irrespective of anal intercourse, since our data suggest that several cases of rectal Chlamydia trachomatis otherwise would be missed, thus enabling further disease transmission.

  8. Clinical significance of radiation-induced CD133 expression in residual rectal cancer cells after chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Aya; Tanaka, Koji; Saigusa, Susumu; Toiyama, Yuji; Morimoto, Yuhki; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Takashi; Matsushita, Kohei; Yokoe, Takeshi; Yasuda, Hiromi; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-03-01

    CD133 and CD44 have been considered as markers for colorectal cancer stem cells (CSCs). The association of CD133 and CD44 expression with radiation has not been fully examined in rectal cancer. Both CD133 (PROM) and CD44 mRNA levels were measured in post-chemoradiotherapy (CRT) specimens of 52 rectal cancer patients using real-time RT-PCR and compared to clinicopathological variables and clinical outcome. Their protein levels were examined in the radiation-treated HT29 human colon cancer cell line. Post-CRT CD133 in residual cancer cells was significantly higher than matched pre-CRT CD133 in biopsy specimens (n=30). By contrast, CD44 was significantly lower in post-CRT specimens (P<0.01). CD133 was associated with distant recurrence after CRT followed by surgery (P<0.05). Patients with elevated CD133 in residual cancer cells showed poor disease-free survival (P<0.05). No significant association between post-CRT CD44 and clinical outcome was found. The in vitro study showed that CD133 protein was increased in a radiation dose-dependent manner, despite of the decreased number of clonogenic radiation-surviving cells. CD44 protein was decreased after irradiation. CD133, but not CD44, was increased in radiation-resistant surviving colon cancer cells. Post-CRT CD133 in residual cancer cells may predict metachronous distant recurrence and poor survival of rectal cancer patients after CRT.

  9. Rectal biopsy for Hirschsprung's disease: a review of techniques, pathology, and complications.

    PubMed

    Muise, Eleanor Dorothy; Cowles, Robert Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HD) is one of the most common congenital anomalies of colorectal function, affecting approximately 1 in 5000 live births, with a 4:1 male predominance. HD is characterized by aganglionosis that is most often limited to the rectosigmoid, but can extend proximally along the colon and, in rare instances, reach into the small intestine. A clinical history of delayed passage of meconium beyond 48 hours after birth, physical exam findings of abdominal distention and vomiting, and a contrast enema demonstrating a transition zone are highly suggestive of HD. We searched databases including PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scopus for the following key words: Hirschsprung's disease, rectal biopsy, pathology, ganglion cell, nerve trunk hypertrophy, pediatric constipation, and selected publications written in English that were relevant to the scope of this review. Based on the data presented in the literature, we reviewed 1) biopsy techniques for the diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease, addressed inadequate biopsies, and complications from rectal biopsy, and 2) pathologic and histologic interpretation of biopsy specimens for the diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease. A well-executed rectal biopsy with expert pathologic evaluation of the specimen remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease and is the subject of this review.

  10. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  11. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  12. Immunological Landscape and Clinical Management of Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ruiz, Elísabeth; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of rectal cancer and colon cancer differs due to increased local relapses in rectal cancer. However, the current molecular classification does not differentiate rectal cancer and colon cancer as two different entities. In recent years, the impact of the specific immune microenvironment in cancer has attracted renewed interest and is currently recognized as one of the major determinants of clinical progression in a wide range of tumors. In colorectal cancer, the density of lymphocytic infiltration is associated with better overall survival. Due to the need for biomarkers of response to conventional treatment with chemoradiotherapy in rectal tumors, the immune status of rectal cancer emerges as a useful tool to improve the management of patients. PMID:26941741

  13. Rectal prolapse as initial clinical manifestation of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-W; Hsiao, C-W; Wu, C-C; Jao, S-W

    2008-04-01

    Rectal prolapse as the initial clinical manifestation of colorectal cancer is uncommon. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon after presenting with complete rectal prolapse. The tumor caused rectosigmoid intussusception and then it prolapsed out through the anus. She underwent rectosigmoidectomy and rectopexy. The postoperative course was uneventful. The relationship between colorectal cancer and rectal prolapse has not been clearly established. This case report describes an unusual presentation of colorectal cancer. It suggests that rectal prolapse can present as the initial symptom of colorectal cancer and may also be a presenting feature of the occult intra-abdominal pathology. The importance of adequate investigation such as colonoscopy should be emphasized in patients who develop a new onset of rectal prolapse.

  14. [Local diagnostics for rectal cancer. What is realistic?].

    PubMed

    Ptok, H; Gastinger, I; Lippert, H

    2012-05-01

    Accurate pretherapeutic staging of rectal cancer is crucial for further therapeutic management and important for prognosis. The most accurate diagnostic tools in the assessment of T and N categories of rectal cancer are endorectal ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, MRI can accurately predict the distance of the tumor to the colorectal membrane (CRM) and computed tomography (CT) is more suitable for detecting distant metastases. In the routine care of rectal cancer EUS is the most frequently used diagnostic tool for local staging. The achieved accuracy for determining T category by EUS in routine clinical staging is lower than results reported in the literature. Furthermore, the accuracy of EUS depends on the experience of the examiner. Currently the frequency of using MRI for routine clinical staging of rectal cancer is low and in one out of five cases the local staging of rectal cancer is exclusively carried out by CT.

  15. Comparison of rectal and axillary temperatures in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Goic, Joana B; Reineke, Erica L; Drobatz, Kenneth J

    2014-05-15

    To compare rectal versus axillary temperatures in dogs and cats. Prospective observational study. 94 dogs and 31 cats. Paired axillary and rectal temperatures were measured in random order with a standardized method. Animal signalment, initial complaint, blood pressure, blood lactate concentration, and variables associated with vascular perfusion and coat were evaluated for associations with axillary and rectal temperatures. Axillary temperature was positively correlated with rectal temperature (ρ = 0.75 in both species). Median axillary temperature (38.4°C [101.1°F] in dogs, and 38.4°C [101.2°F] in cats) was significantly different from median rectal temperature in dogs (38.9°C [102.0°F]) but not in cats (38.6°C [101.5°F]). Median rectal-axillary gradient (difference) was 0.4°C (0.7°F; range, -1.3° to 2.3°C [-2.4° to 4.1°F]) in dogs and 0.17°C (0.3°F; range -1.1° to 1.6°C [-1.9° to 3°F]) in cats. Sensitivity and specificity for detection of hyperthermia with axillary temperature were 57% and 100%, respectively, in dogs and 33% and 100%, respectively, in cats; sensitivity and specificity for detection of hypothermia were 86% and 87%, respectively, in dogs and 80% and 96%, respectively, in cats. Body weight (ρ = 0.514) and body condition score (ρ = 0.431) were correlated with rectal-axillary gradient in cats. Although axillary and rectal temperatures were correlated in dogs and cats, a large gradient was present between rectal temperature and axillary temperature, suggesting that axillary temperature should not be used as a substitute for rectal temperature.

  16. Imaging in rectal cancer with emphasis on local staging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Supreeta; Das, Deepak; Engineer, Reena; Saklani, Avanish

    2015-01-01

    Imaging in rectal cancer has a vital role in staging disease, and in selecting and optimizing treatment planning. High-resolution MRI (HR-MRI) is the recommended method of first choice for local staging of rectal cancer for both primary staging and for restaging after preoperative chemoradiation (CT-RT). HR-MRI helps decide between upfront surgery and preoperative CT-RT. It provides high accuracy for prediction of circumferential resection margin at surgery, T category, and nodal status in that order. MRI also helps assess resectability after preoperative CT-RT and decide between sphincter saving or more radical surgery. Accurate technique is crucial for obtaining high-resolution images in the appropriate planes for correct staging. The phased array external coil has replaced the endorectal coil that is no longer recommended. Non-fat suppressed 2D T2-weighted (T2W) sequences in orthogonal planes to the tumor are sufficient for primary staging. Contrast-enhanced MRI is considered inappropriate for both primary staging and restaging. Diffusion-weighted sequence may be of value in restaging. Multidetector CT cannot replace MRI in local staging, but has an important role for evaluating distant metastases. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) has a limited role in the initial staging of rectal cancer and is reserved for cases with resectable metastatic disease before contemplating surgery. This article briefly reviews the comprehensive role of imaging in rectal cancer, describes the role of MRI in local staging in detail, discusses the optimal MRI technique, and provides a synoptic report for both primary staging and restaging after CT-RT in routine practice. PMID:25969638

  17. Teaching bovine rectal palpation with live cows in the slaughterhouse: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Lopes, G; Rocha, A

    2006-12-01

    Bovine rectal palpation, a procedure that requires considerable practice to develop the necessary skills, is often taught during extramural activities, or even learnt in practice after graduation. However, student access to cows in extramural activities may be limited because of student numbers, animal welfare considerations and concerns over induction of embryo mortality because of inexperience of the student. To overcome some of these limitations, in our school practical classes of bovine rectal palpation are taught in a slaughterhouse, with small groups of approximately 10 students per class, over a period of 30 weeks. Number of cows palpated, type of cases found and the success rate of students in the final practical exam were recorded and analysed for 3 years, and contrasted with the pre-established goals for the course. Additionally, a questionnaire was sent to former students to assess their opinion on the usefulness of the palpation course, as well as to identify main learning difficulties and collect suggestions to improve teaching methods. Overall, the information obtained indicated that the course is useful to teach palpation skills, even if the original goals may have been very optimistic. Most (96%) of the respondents had the opinion that the course was very useful or useful. Several suggestions were offered to improve teaching methods, but there was no consensus on a single recommendation. Despite the fact that a considerable number of respondents to the questionnaire did not use bovine rectal palpation in their practice, only one considered the classes 'not useful'. It is concluded that this method of teaching rectal palpation should be continued and the teaching methods improved with the adoption of some modifications.

  18. An isolated vaginal metastasis from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sadatomo, Ai; Koinuma, Koji; Horie, Hisanaga; Lefor, Alan K; Sata, Naohiro

    2016-02-01

    Isolated vaginal metastases from colorectal cancer are extremely rare. There are only a few reported cases in the English literature, and the characteristics of such cases of metastasis remain relatively unknown. We present a case of isolated vaginal metastasis from rectal cancer in a 78-year-old female patient. The patient had no symptoms related to vaginal tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed thickening of the middle rectum and a vaginal tumor. Biopsy from the vaginal tumor showed adenocarcinoma, similar to the rectal lesion. Low anterior resection with ileostomy, hystero-oophorectomy, and transvaginal tumor resection was performed. After nineteen months, computed tomography scan revealed multiple lung metastases and recurrent tumor in the pelvis. The patient refused chemotherapy and is alive three months after developing recurrent disease. Most cases of primary vaginal carcinoma are squamous cell carcinoma. Other histologic types such as adenocarcinoma are usually metastatic lesions. Primary lesions associated with metastatic vaginal adenocarcinoma are most often the uterus, and are very rarely from the colon or rectum. We review previous case reports of isolated vaginal metastases from colorectal cancer and discuss their symptoms, treatments, and outcomes. We should keep the vagina within the field of view of pelvic MRI, which is one of the preoperative diagnostic tools for colorectal cancer. If female patients show gynecological symptoms, gynecological examination should be recommended. Isolated vaginal metastases are an indication for surgical resection, and adjuvant chemotherapy is also recommended.

  19. [Radiotherapy in pelvic recurrences of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Morganti, A G; Santoni, R; Osti, M F

    2001-01-01

    Patients with locally recurrent rectal carcinoma have an unfavourable prognosis for the high incidence of distant metastases, the infrequent feasibility of radical surgical resection, and, in these last cases, the high incidence of re-recurrences. Based on the low resectability rate of pelvic recurrences, the clear impact of tumor diameter on resectability and outcome, and the documented possibility to achieve a significant tumor downstaging and downsizing with the use of concurrent chemoradiation, it is evident that the most promising treatment several authors have considered concurrent chemoradiation followed, if feasible, by radical resection. Furthermore, based on the high local and distant failure rate after surgery, the utilization of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) and adjuvant chemotherapy seems justified. Some published comparisons between patients treated with and without IORT seems to suggest the possible improvement in both local control and survival in these patients. Particularly interesting issues in this field are: 1) the definition of the most effective treatment modality (both in terms of radiation dose, fractionation and techniques, and drugs to be used concurrently to radiotherapy); 2) the analysis of the prognostic impact of several factors, with the aim of designing and validating staging systems of local rectal recurrences; 3) the possibility to treat with relatively high doses also patients previously irradiated on the pelvis.

  20. Focusing the management of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dbeis, Rachel; Smart, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer treatment has undergone major changes over the last 15 years with a focus on individualized care based around MRI assessment of the relationship of the tumour to the mesorectal fascia, improved surgical techniques and targeted use of pre-operative oncological therapies in patients with locally advanced disease. The recognition that some tumours responded completely to pre-operative chemoradiotherapy, and the selective use of a non-operative policy has led to a quest to further identify those patients and their tumour in whom this approach could be used, irrespective of MRI stage. With no clear patient factors identified, the tumour and its gene expression has become a target for research to identify individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms, which may indicate a response to specific treatment, or not. To date some agents have been identified and trialed, such as cetuximab, with individual tumours being assessed for response allowing directed treatment. The reviewed paper by Sebio and colleagues report a study that links polymorphisms in the DNA repair gene XRCC1 with response to neoadjuvant 5-Fluorouracil treatment in rectal cancer patients. However, genetic heterogeneity alone may not explain the variations of drug response and environmental factors may lead to epigenetic effects and therefore alter responses. Therefore whilst this study demonstrates the impact of different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it is only one step forward, but perhaps a step in the right direction. PMID:28149883

  1. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-02-20

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  2. Laparoscopic rectopexy for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome without overt rectal prolapse. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Menekse, Ebru; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Karateke, Faruk; Ozyazici, Sefa; Demirturk, Pelin; Kuvvetli, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare clinical entity. Several treatment options has been described. However, there is no consensus yet on treatment algorithm and standard surgical procedure. Rectopexy is one of the surgical options and it is generally performed in patients with solitary rectal ulcer accompanied with overt prolapse. Various outcomes have been reported for rectopexy in the patients with occult prolapse or rectal intussusception. In the literature; outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure have been reported in the limited number of case or case series. No study has emphasized the outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection rectopexy procedure in the patients with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse. In this report we aimed to present clinical outcomes of laparoscopic non-resection posterior suture rectopexy procedure in a 21-year-old female patient with solitary rectal ulcer without overt prolapse.

  3. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Aravantinou, Meropi; Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Truong, Rosaline; Derby, Nina; Blanchard, James; Grasperge, Brooke; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa; Martinelli, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef) vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt) infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques), while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings.

  4. Gastric inhibitory peptide, serotonin, and glucagon are unexpected chloride secretagogues in the rectal gland of the skate (Leucoraja erinacea)

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Catherine A.; Decker, Sarah E.; Silva, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the rectal gland of the dogfish shark 50 years ago, experiments with this tissue have greatly aided our understanding of secondary active chloride secretion and the secretagogues responsible for this function. In contrast, very little is known about the rectal gland of skates. In the present experiments, we performed the first studies in the perfused rectal gland of the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), an organ weighing less than one-tenth of the shark rectal gland. Our results indicate that the skate gland can be studied by modified perfusion techniques and in primary culture monolayers, and that secretion is blocked by the inhibitors of membrane proteins required for secondary active chloride secretion. Our major finding is that three G protein-coupled receptor agonists, the incretin gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), also known as glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, as well as glucagon and serotonin, are unexpected potent chloride secretagogues in the skate but not the shark. Glucagon stimulated chloride secretion to a mean value of 1,661 ± 587 μeq·h−1·g−1 and serotonin stimulated to 2,893 ± 699 μeq·h−1·g−1. GIP stimulated chloride secretion to 3,733 ± 679 μeq·h−1·g−1 and significantly increased tissue cAMP content compared with basal conditions. This is the first report of GIP functioning as a chloride secretagogue in any species or tissue. PMID:24553297

  5. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    PubMed

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs.

  6. Microscopy detection of rectal gonorrhoea in asymptomatic men.

    PubMed

    Forni, J; Miles, K; Hamill, M

    2009-11-01

    This audit aimed to determine the usefulness of microscopy to detect presumptive rectal gonorrhoea (GC) infection in asymptomatic men. We retrospectively audited more than 400 male patients attending a London genitourinary medicine clinic from January 2005 to March 2007 who tested rectal culture positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and compared this with the microscopy detection rate. In total, 123/423 (29%) of culture positive samples were microscopy positive. Of those that tested microscopy negative (300/423), 64 (21%) were symptomatic and 236 (79%) asymptomatic. In addition, a time and motion study examined 81 rectal slides over a two-week period to identify microscopy reading time required to make a presumptive diagnosis of GC. Three slides were positive, resulting in six hours and 45 minutes to detect one positive sample. Given the low sensitivity for rectal microscopy coupled with the length of time required to obtain a presumptive positive rectal GC result, we believe rectal microscopy is no longer a cost-effective tool screening for asymptomatic men, and this report supports the BASHH guideline that it is not recommended in the management of asymptomatic rectal infection.

  7. Postembryonic development of rectal pads in bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    PubMed

    Santos, Carolina Gonçalves; Neves, Clóvis Andrade; Zanuncio, José Cola; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2009-10-01

    The morphology and development of the digestive tract of insects has been extensively studied, but little attention has been given to the development of the rectal pads. These organs are responsible for absorption of water and salts. In insects where they occur, there are usually six ovoid rectal pads located in the medial-anterior portion of the rectum. The rectal pad has three types of cells: principal, basal, and junctional. The arrangement of these three cell types delimits an intrapapillary lumen. The aim of the current study is to describe the development of the rectal pads during postembryonic development of Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides and Melipona scutellaris. Specimens were analyzed at the following developmental stages: white-, pink-, brown-, and black-eyed pupae, and adult workers. The development of the rectal pad begins as a thickening of the epithelium in white-eyed pupae at 54 hr. At this stage, there is neither a basal cell layer nor intrapapillary lumen. The basal layers begin to form in the pink-eyed pupa and are completely formed at the end of the development of the brown-eyed pupa. In the brown-eyed pupal stage, the intrapapillary lumen is formed and the junctional cells are positioned and completely differentiated. Necrotic and apoptotic cell death were detected along with cell proliferation in the whole rectum during pupal development, suggesting that the development of the rectal pads involves cell proliferation, death, and differentiation. The rectal pads originate only from the ectoderm.

  8. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Increases Rectal Activity in Children.

    PubMed

    Moeller Joensson, Iben; Hagstroem, Soren; Siggaard, Charlotte; Bower, Wendy; Djurhuus, Jens Christian; Krogh, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    Neurostimulation is increasingly used in treating bladder and bowel dysfunction, but its effect on rectal motility is obscure. The aim of the study was to evaluate the acute effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on rectal motility in children with overactive bladder (OAB). In this double-blind placebo-controlled study in 20 children with OAB (mean age 8.6 ± 1.8 years; 7 girls), 48-hour urodynamic monitoring including rectal manometry was performed. After 24-hours of baseline investigation without stimulation the children were randomised to either active TENS (n = 10) or placebo (n = 10). Surface electrodes were placed over the sacral bone. The exterior of active and placebo stimulators was identical. Starting in the morning, the children received either continuous TENS stimulation or placebo until bedtime. Rectal contractions were defined as pressure runs exceeding 5 cm H2O and lasting ≥3 minutes. At baseline there was no significant difference in proportion of time with rectal contractions in the 2 groups (TENS group median 31% [range 12%-66%] vs placebo group median 31% [range 10%-66%]; P = 0.75); however, on the day of stimulation there was more time with rectal contractions in the group receiving TENS (median 51% [range 25%-78%]) compared with placebo (median 32% [range 4%-68%]; P = 0.02). Also, there was an increase in time with rectal contractions in the TENS group (P = 0.007) but not in the placebo group (P = 0.39). The night after the TENS was disabled, rectal activity in both groups returned to baseline level. TENS acutely increases time with rectal contractions in children undergoing urodynamic investigation. The effect disappears when the stimulator is turned off.

  9. Delayed endoluminal vacuum therapy for rectal anastomotic leaks after rectal resection in a swine model: a new treatment option.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Shada, Amber; Ritter, Lane A; Mauro, David M; Mentrikoski, Mark J; Feldman, Sanford H; Kleiner, Daniel E

    2014-04-01

    Anastomotic leaks are a dreaded surgical complication following colorectal operations. Creation of a temporary proximal diverting ileostomy is used in high-risk anastomoses, however, additional surgical risk is accumulated with its creation and reversal. Endoluminal vacuum therapy has been shown to seal anastomotic defects in the prophylactic setting in a pig model and we hypothesized it could be utilized in a delayed fashion to rescue subjects with an active anastomotic leak. Yorkshire pigs underwent rectal resection, intentional leak confirmed by fluoroscopy, and endoluminal vacuum therapy device placement to low continuous suction. Following treatment, a contrast enema and necropsy was performed for gross and histopathology. Pigs underwent 2 (or 5) days of free intraperitoneal leak prior to device placement and 5 (or 7) subsequent days of endoluminal vacuum therapy. Six of seven early-treated pigs sealed their anastomotic defect, while two of the four treated pigs in this extended group sealed the defect. Endoluminal vacuum therapy is feasible and well tolerated in a pig model, and it has been shown to seal a significant number of freely leaking anastomoses in the early period (86%). This technology warrants further study as it may provide a noninvasive means to treatment of anastomotic leaks. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Delayed Endoluminal Vacuum Therapy for Rectal Anastomotic Leaks after Rectal Resection in a Swine Model: A New Treatment Option

    PubMed Central

    Shada, Amber; Ritter, Lane A.; Mauro, David M.; Mentrikoski, Mark J.; Feldman, Sanford H.; Kleiner, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Anastomotic leaks are a dreaded surgical complication following colorectal operations. Creation of a temporary proximal diverting ileostomy is used in high‐risk anastomoses, however, additional surgical risk is accumulated with its creation and reversal. Endoluminal vacuum therapy has been shown to seal anastomotic defects in the prophylactic setting in a pig model and we hypothesized it could be utilized in a delayed fashion to rescue subjects with an active anastomotic leak. Yorkshire pigs underwent rectal resection, intentional leak confirmed by fluoroscopy, and endoluminal vacuum therapy device placement to low continuous suction. Following treatment, a contrast enema and necropsy was performed for gross and histopathology. Pigs underwent 2 (or 5) days of free intraperitoneal leak prior to device placement and 5 (or 7) subsequent days of endoluminal vacuum therapy. Six of seven early‐treated pigs sealed their anastomotic defect, while two of the four treated pigs in this extended group sealed the defect. Endoluminal vacuum therapy is feasible and well tolerated in a pig model, and it has been shown to seal a significant number of freely leaking anastomoses in the early period (86%). This technology warrants further study as it may provide a noninvasive means to treatment of anastomotic leaks. PMID:24456480

  11. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  12. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  13. Death by Disimpaction: A Bradycardic Arrest Secondary to Rectal Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Cory M.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal examination and fecal disimpaction are common procedures performed in the Emergency Department on a daily basis. Here, we report a rare case of a patient suffering a cardiac arrest and ultimately death likely due to rectal manipulation. A 66-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with a complaint of abdominal distention and constipation. A rectal exam was performed. During the examination the patient became apneic. On the cardiac monitor the patient was found to be in pulseless electrical activity with a bradycardic rate. Our recommendation would be to provide adequate analgesia and close patient monitoring of those undergoing this procedure especially patients with significant stool burdens. PMID:28116179

  14. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Management of Bleeding Rectal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Rectal variceal bleeding, though rare, can pose significant morbidity and mortality in the wake of treatment failure. Conventional treatment utilizing endoscopic glue injection might not be feasible in all cases due to poor visualization and inadvertent missing of variceal source of bleed. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided rectal variceal management is a promising and effective modality. We provide real-time images and a video of EUS-guided precision management of rectal variceal bleed using coiling and glue in a cirrhotic. PMID:28879206

  15. Perineal Rectosigmoidectomy (Altemeier Procedure) as Treatment of Strangulated Rectal Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Cernuda, Ricardo Baldonedo; Ángel, Janet Pagnozzi; Fernández, Nuria Truan; Sánchez-Farpón, José Herminio; Pérez, Jose Antonio Álvarez

    2016-12-01

    Incarceration of a rectal prolapse is an unusual entity that represents a surgical emergency. Even more rarely, it becomes strangulated, requiring emergency surgery. When surgery becomes inevitable, the choice of procedure varies. A 57-year-old man who presented with strangulated rectal prolapse is described. The patient underwent emergency perineal proctosigmoidectomy, the Altemeier operation, combined with diverting loop sigmoid colostomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. After a 6-month follow-up, there was no recurrence, but the patient continued with fecal incontinence. This case underlines the importance of the Altemeier procedure as treatment in the patient with a strangulated prolapsed rectal segment.

  16. Fournier gangrene: first manifestation of occult rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Tovar, J; Córdoba, L; Devesa, J M

    2011-01-01

    Fournier gangrene is a necrotizing fasciitis of the genital and perineal region. Diverse factors predispose to Fournier gangrene, such as diabetes mellitus, ethylism, liver dysfunction, haematological disorders, obesity or recent regional instrumentation. Rectal tumours can also predispose to Fournier gangrene; most of the reported cases are perforated or unresectable colorectal tumours, but some cases of anorectal cancer diagnosed after recovery from Fournier gangrene have also been reported. In these cases, the presence of a rectal tumour at the time of, or prior to, diagnosis of Fournier gangrene could not be ruled out. We present three cases of rectal cancer whose first manifestation was as Fournier gangrene.

  17. Proforma-based reporting in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, F; Mangat, N; Swift, I R; Brown, G

    2010-10-04

    The improvements in outcomes associate with the use of preoperative therapy rather than postoperative treatment means that clinical teams are increasingly reliant on imaging to identify high-risk features of disease to determine treatment plans. For many solid tumours, including rectal cancer, validated techniques have emerged in identifying prognostic factors pre-operatively. In the MERCURY study, a standardised scanning technique and the use of reporting proformas enabled consistently accurate assessment and documentation of the prognostic factors. This is now an essential tool to enable our clinical colleagues to make treatment decisions. In this review, we describe the proforma-based reporting tool that enables a systematic approach to the interpretation of the magnetic resonance images, thereby enabling all the clinically relevant features to be adequately assessed.

  18. Rectal versus non-rectal primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colorectum: a retrospective survival analysis controlled for confounders.

    PubMed

    Ciarrocchi, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to compare the outcomes of rectal and non-rectal primary signet ring cell adenocarcinoma of the colorectum. A retrospective survival analysis was performed using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program database between 2004 and 2009 on subjects who were diagnosed as having a primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colorectum. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis controlled for confounders was used to assess overall survival comparing rectal and non-rectal cancers. Our population was composed of 1,484 patients: 200 affected by rectal cancer and 1,284 by non-rectal cancer. Unadjusted survival curves resulted to be almost superimposable (P = 0.916). After controlling for age, gender, race, tumor stage, grade, and size, tumor location demonstrated a statistically significant impact on overall survival (P = 0.032; 95% confidence interval 0.640-0.980; hazard ratio 0.792). On the basis of analysis of information from the SEER database, the signet ring cell carcinoma of the rectum was associated to a worse prognosis as compared to non-rectal cancer.

  19. Radiotherapy and local control in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Valentini, V; Rosetto, M E; Fares, C; Mantini, G; Salvi, G; Turriziani, A

    1998-01-01

    Recurrence is a stage in the natural history of rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy or postoperative radiochemotherapy lower the rate of recurrence, improving local control. From 1980 to 1997, at the "Divisione di Radioterapia" of the "Università Cattolica del S. Cuore" of Rome 380 patients with rectal cancer of early clinical stage T2-3, candidates for surgery for cure, underwent radiation therapy. 119 patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (45-50 Gy); 45 patients underwent "sandwich" radiotherapy (45 Gy:27 Gy before and 28 Gy after surgery), of whom 7 were treated with preoperative radiotherapy alone; 145 patients underwent preoperative concomitant radiochemotherapy according to 3 different protocols, radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with mitomycin C and 5-FU; radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) combined with cisplatin and 5-FU; radiotherapy (45 Gy) combined with 5-FU and folinic acid. 71 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with IORT (10 Gy). Median follow-up was 6 years. Overall local control was 85% at 3 years, 83% at 5 years, 81% at 10 years. The rate of local control at 5 years was: 76% for postoperative radiotherapy, 83% for "sandwich" radiotherapy, 84% for preoperative radiochemotherapy and 93% for preoperative radiotherapy combined with IORT. Local control was shown to be significantly better with preoperative treatment as compared to postoperative treatment (p = 0.02). The incidence of metastases was 35% in the patients with local recurrence and 16% in those with local control. The difference in survival was highly significant in patients with local control as compared to those with local recurrence: at 5 years 87% and 32% respectively. Patients with local control showed a lower incidence of metastasis and a better survival.

  20. [Strangled rectal prolapse in young adults: about a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bayar, Rached; Djebbi, Achref; Mzoughi, Zeineb; Talbi, Ghofrane; Gharbi, Lassaad; Arfa, Nafaa; Mestiri, Hafedh; Khalfallah, Mohamed Taher

    2016-01-01

    Rectal prolapse is a rectal static disorder which involves rectal wall intussusception inducing its externalization through the anus. It usually affects children and the elderly. Its occurrence in young adults is rare. Strangulated rectal prolapse is also a rare complication. We report the case of a 30-year old patient who underwent emergency surgery for strangulated rectal prolapse. Emergency perineal rectosigmoidectomy (Altemeier repair) was performed with simple outcome.

  1. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to preoperative chemoradiation or radiation in rectal cancer: should we be more cautious?

    PubMed Central

    Glynne-Jones, R; Grainger, J; Harrison, M; Ostler, P; Makris, A

    2006-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is a term originally used to describe the administration of chemotherapy preoperatively before surgery. The original rationale for administering NACT or so-called induction chemotherapy to shrink or downstage a locally advanced tumour, and thereby facilitate more effective local treatment with surgery or radiotherapy, has been extended with the introduction of more effective combinations of chemotherapy to include reducing the risks of metastatic disease. It seems logical that survival could be lengthened, or organ preservation rates increased in resectable tumours by NACT. In rectal cancer NACT is being increasingly used in locally advanced and nonmetastatic unresectable tumours. Randomised studies in advanced colorectal cancer show high response rates to combination cytotoxic therapy. This evidence of efficacy coupled with the introduction of novel molecular targeted therapies (such as Bevacizumab and Cetuximab), and long waiting times for radiotherapy have rekindled an interest in delivering NACT in locally advanced rectal cancer. In contrast, this enthusiasm is currently waning in other sites such as head and neck and nasopharynx cancer where traditionally NACT has been used. So, is NACT in rectal cancer a real advance or just history repeating itself? In this review, we aimed to explore the advantages and disadvantages of the separate approaches of neoadjuvant, concurrent and consolidation chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer, drawing on theoretical principles, preclinical studies and clinical experience both in rectal cancer and other disease sites. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may improve outcome in terms of disease-free or overall survival in selected groups in some disease sites, but this strategy has not been shown to be associated with better outcomes than postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. In particular, there is insufficient data in rectal cancer. The evidence for benefit is strongest when NACT is administered

  2. Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography and Angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado-Mendez, I.; Palma, B. A.; Villasenor, Y.; Benitez-Bribiesca, L.; Brandan, M. E.

    2007-11-26

    Angiogenesis could be a means for pouring contrast media around tumors. In this work, optimization of radiological parameters for contrast-enhanced subtraction techniques in mammography has been performed. A modification of Lemacks' analytical formalism was implemented to model the X-ray absorption in the breast with contrast medium and detection by a digital image receptor. Preliminary results of signal-to-noise ratio analysis show the advantage of subtracting two images taken at different energies, one prior and one posterior to the injection of contrast medium. Preliminary experimental results using a custom-made phantom have shown good agreement with calculations. A proposal is presented for the clinical application of the optimized technique, which aims at finding correlations between angiogenesis indicators and dynamic variables of contrast medium uptake.

  3. Rectal Douching and Implications for Rectal Microbicides among Populations Vulnerable to HIV in South America: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Jerome T.; Kinsler, Janni J.; Imrie, John; Nureña, César R.; Sánchez, Jorge; Cunningham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective While gel-formulated Rectal Microbicides (RM) are the first to enter clinical trials, rectal douching in preparation for anal intercourse is a common practise, thus RMs formulated as douches may be a convenient alternative to gels. Nonetheless, little is known about potential users’ thoughts regarding douche-formulated RMs or rectal douching practises, data needed to inform the advancement of douche-based RMs. This qualitative study examined thoughts regarding douches, their use as a RM and current douching practises among men who have sex with men and transgender women. Methods Ten focus groups and 36 in-depth interviews were conducted (N=140) to examine the overall acceptability of RM, of which one component focused on rectal douching. Focus groups and interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded; text relating to rectal douching was extracted and analysed. Sociodemographic information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Results Support for a douche-formulated RM centred on the possibility of combined pre-coital hygiene and HIV protection, and it was believed that a deeply-penetrating liquid douche would confer greater HIV protection than a gel. Drawbacks included rectal dryness; impracticality and portability issues; and, potential side effects. Non-commercial douching apparatus use was common and liquids used included detergents, vinegar, bleach, lemon juice and alcohol. Conclusions A douche-formulated RM while desirable and perceived as more effective than a gel-formulated RM also generated questions regarding practicality and side-effects. Of immediate concern were the non-commercial liquids already being used which likely damage rectal epithelia, potentially increasing HIV infection risk. Pre-coital rectal douching is common and a RM formulated as such is desirable, but education on rectal douching practices is needed now. PMID:23966338

  4. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-05-28

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images, as compared to the

  5. Fermentation RS3 derived from sago and rice starch with Clostridium butyricum BCC B2571 or Eubacterium rectale DSM 17629.

    PubMed

    Purwani, Endang Yuli; Purwadaria, Tresnawati; Suhartono, Maggy Thenawidjaja

    2012-02-01

    Resistant starch type 3 (RS3) is retrograded starch which is not digested by human starch degrading enzyme, and will thus undergo bacterial degradation in the colon. The main fermentation products are the Short Chain Fatty Acid (SCFA): acetate, propionate and butyrate. SCFA has significant benefit impact on the metabolism of the host. The objectives of this research were to study the SCFA profile produced by colonic butyrate producing bacteria grown in medium containing RS3. RS3 was made from sago or rice starch treated with amylase, pullulanase and the combination of amylase and pullulanase. Fermentation study was performed by using Clostridium butyricum BCC B2571 or Eubacterium rectale DSM 17629, which has been identified as capable of degradation of starch residue and also regarded as beneficial bacteria. Experimental result revealed that enzyme hydrolysis of retrograded sago or rice starch was beneficial to RS formation. RS3 derived from sago contained higher RS (31-38%) than those derived from rice starch (21-26%). This study indicated that C. butyricum BCC B2571 produced acetate, propionate and butyrate at molar ratio of 1.8 : 1 : 1, when the medium was supplemented with RSSA at concentration 1%. In the medium containing similar substrate, E. rectale DSM 17629 produced acetate, propionate and butyrate at molar ratio of 1.7 : 1 : 1.2. High levels of acetate, propionate and butyrate at molar ratio of 1.8 : 1 : 1.1 was also produced by E. rectale DSM 17629 in medium supplemented with RSSP at concentration 1%. The results showed that both bacteria responded differently to the RS3 supplementation. Such result provided insight into the possibility of designing RS3 as prebiotic with featured regarding SCFA released in the human colon with potential health implication.

  6. A monte carlo comparison of three different media for contrast enhanced radiotherapy of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Garnica-Garza, H M

    2010-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy makes use of a kilovoltage X-ray beam, either from a diagnostic X-ray tube or modified megavoltage linear accelerator, in conjunction with a high-Z contrast medium deposited into the target volume to enhance the absorption of radiation. In this work, using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and the voxelized Zubal phantom to model a prostate radiotherapy treatment, a comparison between the physical absorbed dose distributions rendered by three different enhancing agents namely bismuth, gadolinium, and iodine is performed. It is assumed that there exists a concentration of 10 mg of enhancing agent per 1 g of tissue in the target volume while in the background a concentration of 1.5 mg per 1 g of tissue is present. The X-ray beam energy spectrum was obtained by means of Monte Carlo simulation of a tungsten target upon which a 220 keV mono-energetic electron pencil beam is made to impinge, and the resultant photon beam is heavily filtrated by 0.2 cm of copper. The treatment delivery is simulated as a 3608 arc collimated to conform to the target from every direction. Cumulative dose-volume histograms and isodose curves are presented for the target as well as five organs-at-risk, namely rectal wall, bladder, femoral heads, skin, and bone marrow. It is shown that under these conditions clinically acceptable treatment plans are obtained for all three contrast agents. A 72 Gy dose to 100% of the target volume results in maximum absorbed doses to the above mentioned organs-at-risk of 65, 56, 44, 32 and 65 Gy respectively when bismuth is used as the contrast agent, but the results obtained with gadolinium follow closely.

  7. Endoluminal negative-pressure therapy for preventing rectal anastomotic leaks: a pilot study in a pig model.

    PubMed

    Shada, Amber L; Rosenberger, Laura H; Mentrikoski, Mark J; Silva, Michael A; Feldman, Sanford H; Kleiner, Daniel E

    2014-04-01

    Anastomotic leak after rectal resection carries substantial morbidity and mortality. A diverting ileostomy is beneficial for high-risk anastomoses, but its creation and reversal carry a surgical risk in addition to that of resection itself. We sought an alternative method for managing complications of rectal anastomosis. We developed an endoluminal negative-pressure technology with a diverting proximal sump, and hypothesized that it would close anastomotic disruptions in pigs. We performed rectal resections on pigs, with primary anastomoses and the creation of an anastomotic defect. In animals in the treatment group we inserted an endoluminal negative-pressure device and kept it at a low level of continuous suction for 5 d. No device was inserted in a control group of animals. After the 5-d period of treatment we evaluated the anastomoses in both the treatment and control groups of animals for leakage, using contrast enemas. Specimens of anastomosed rectum were evaluated histologically for mucosal integrity and for the location and density of inflammatory responses. Fourteen pigs were assigned to either the treatment (n=10) or control (n=4) group. Of the pigs in the treatment group, 90% had complete closure of their rectal defect, as compared with 25% of the animals in the control group (χ(2) test, p=0.04). The animals in the treatment group had only minimal mucosal and serosal inflammation, whereas those in the control group had extensive mucosal damage with associated serositis. Endoluminal negative-pressure therapy was well-tolerated and led to successful closure of 90% of the anastomic rectal defects in the treatment group of animals in the present study. Additional evaluation of this therapy is warranted.

  8. Rectal tuberculosis in an HIV-infected patient: case report

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Marcos dos Santos Vieira; Christiano, Celso Guilherme; Lovisolo, Silvana Maria; Rosa, Vladimir Mulele Pinto Santa

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract has been increasingly affected by tuberculosis, especially in immunocompromised patients. Although strict rectal involvement is rare, the GI site mostly affected is the ileocecal region. Thus, tuberculosis should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of perianal and rectal lesions, and more so in patients infected by the HIV virus. The authors report the case of a 32-year-old man presenting a long-term history of fever, night sweats, weight loss, bloody diarrhea, fecal incontinence, tenesmus, and rectal pain. HIV serology was positive. The patient underwent anoscopy and biopsy, which disclosed the diagnosis of rectal tuberculosis. Thus the patient was referred to an outpatient clinic to follow the standard treatment. PMID:28573121

  9. Tailoring treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma: immunohistochemistry for predictive biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Payal

    2011-04-01

    Over the past couple of decades, multimodality treatment for the management of resectable rectal cancer has substantially improved the outcome of affected patients. However, the broad and unpredictable response to tumor of patients with rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapeutic interventions shows that our understanding of the molecular events leading to radioresistance in patients affected with this malignancy remains sparse. Multiple attempts by individual molecular markers in gene array and tissue microarray studies have emerged with the goal of identifying predictors of a response to chemoradiation in patients with rectal cancer. In this report, we discuss the status of the markers currently available in an attempt to tailor specific targeted therapies for rectal cancer in the neoadjuvant setting.

  10. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  11. Adult rectosigmoid junction intussusception presenting with rectal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing Zeng; Teo, Li Tserng; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2015-05-01

    Most cases of intussusception in adults present with chronic and nonspecific symptoms, and can sometimes be challenging to diagnose. We herein report on a patient with the rare symptom of colonic intussusceptions presenting with rectal prolapse and review the existing literature of similar case reports to discuss how to reach an accurate diagnosis. A 75-year-old woman with dementia presented with per rectal bleeding, rectal prolapse and lower abdominal pain. An operation was scheduled and a large sigmoid intussusception with a polyp as a leading point was found intraoperatively. She subsequently recovered well and was discharged. As large sigmoid intussusceptions may present as rectal prolapse, intussusception should be considered as a differential diagnosis for immobile patients, especially when the leading point is a lesion.

  12. Adult rectosigmoid junction intussusception presenting with rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing Zeng; Teo, Li Tserng; Chiu, Ming Terk

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of intussusception in adults present with chronic and nonspecifi c symptoms, and can sometimes be challenging to diagnose. We herein report on a patient w ith the rare symptom of colonic intussusceptions presenting with rectal prolapse and review the existing literature of similar case reports to discuss how to reach an accurate diagnosis. A 75-year-old woman with dementia presented with per rectal bleeding, rectal prolapse and lower abdominal pain. An operation was scheduled and a large sigmoid intussusception with a polyp as a leading point was found intraoperatively. She subsequently recovered well and was discharged. As large sigmoid intussusceptions may present as rectal prolapse, intussusception should be considered as a differential diagnosis for immobile patients, especially when the leading point is a lesion. PMID:26034324

  13. Intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema.

    PubMed

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Kang Moon; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2011-11-01

    Rectal burns caused by hot water enema have been reported only occasionally and the majority of them were treated in a conservative manner. Although intractable rectal stricture caused by rectal burn is rare, it may be treated by endoscopic intervention or surgery. A 52-year-old woman who had used various methods of enema to treat her chronic constipation eventually undertook a hot water enema herself. After that, anal pain and constipation became aggravated prompting her to visit our clinic. Although various nonoperative treatments including endoscopic stenting were performed, her obstructive symptom did not improve and endoscopic findings had not changed. Hence, we performed a laparoscopic proctosigmoidectomy and transanal coloanal anastomosis with ileal diversion to treat the disease, and as a result, her obstructive symptom improved well. Corrective surgery such as resection of involved segment with anastomosis may be beneficial in relieving obstructive symptoms of an intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema.

  14. Intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Lee, Kang Moon

    2011-01-01

    Rectal burns caused by hot water enema have been reported only occasionally and the majority of them were treated in a conservative manner. Although intractable rectal stricture caused by rectal burn is rare, it may be treated by endoscopic intervention or surgery. A 52-year-old woman who had used various methods of enema to treat her chronic constipation eventually undertook a hot water enema herself. After that, anal pain and constipation became aggravated prompting her to visit our clinic. Although various nonoperative treatments including endoscopic stenting were performed, her obstructive symptom did not improve and endoscopic findings had not changed. Hence, we performed a laparoscopic proctosigmoidectomy and transanal coloanal anastomosis with ileal diversion to treat the disease, and as a result, her obstructive symptom improved well. Corrective surgery such as resection of involved segment with anastomosis may be beneficial in relieving obstructive symptoms of an intractable rectal stricture caused by hot water enema. PMID:22148129

  15. A crunching colon: rectal bezoar caused by pumpkin seed consumption.

    PubMed

    Manne, Janaki R; Rangu, Venu M; Motapothula, Uma Maheswara R; Hall, Matthew C

    2012-05-01

    Rectal seed bezoars are an uncommon cause of fecal impaction, particularly in the United States. Although the literature has reported several cases of phytobezoars composed of various types of seeds, bezoars formed of pumpkin seeds have rarely been reported. We report a case of a man, aged 62 years, with a rectal bezoar composed of pumpkin seeds with complications necessitating extensive treatment, including manual disimpaction and colonoscopy.

  16. Bioavailabilities of rectal and oral methadone in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Ola; Sheffels, Pamela; Kharasch, Evan D

    2004-01-01

    Aims Rectal administration of methadone may be an alternative to intravenous and oral dosing in cancer pain, but the bioavailability of the rectal route is not known. The aim of this study was to compare the absolute rectal bioavailability of methadone with its oral bioavailability in healthy humans. Methods Seven healthy subjects (six males, one female, aged 20–39 years) received 10 mg d5-methadone-HCl rectally (5 ml in 20% glycofurol) together with either d0-methadone intravenously (5 mg) or orally (10 mg) on two separate occasions. Blood samples for the LC-MS analyses of methadone and it's metabolite EDDP were drawn for up to 96 h. Noninvasive infrared pupillometry was peformed at the same time as blood sampling. Results The mean absolute rectal bioavalability of methadone was 0.76 (0.7, 0.81), compared to 0.86 (0.75, 0.97) for oral administration (mean (95% CI)). Rectal absorption of methadone was more rapid than after oral dosing with Tmax values of 1.4 (0.9, 1.8) vs. 2.8 (1.6, 4.0) h. The extent of formation of the metabolite EDDP did not differ between routes of administration. Single doses of methadone had a duration of action of at least 10 h and were well tolerated. Conclusions Rectal administration of methadone results in rapid absorption, a high bioavailability and long duration of action. No evidence of presystemic elimination was seen. Rectal methadone has characteristics that make it a potential alternative to intravenous and oral administration, particularly in cancer pain and palliative care. PMID:15255797

  17. Combined-modality therapy for rectal cancer using irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-05-01

    Preoperative or postoperative pelvic radiation plus concurrent fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is standard adjuvant treatment for patients with T3 and/or N1/2 rectal cancer. Newer chemotherapeutic regimens have been developed for the treatment of patients with metastatic disease. Irinotecan (CPT-11, Camptosar)-based regimens have improved survival in patients with metastatic disease and are being actively investigated in combination with pelvic radiation therapy for patients with rectal cancer.

  18. Therapeutic Evaluation of Biofeedback Therapy in the Treatment of Anterior Resection Syndrome After Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhonglin; Ding, Wenjun; Chen, Wei; Wang, Zhongchuan; Du, Peng; Cui, Long

    2016-09-01

    Anterior resection syndrome (ARS) is common after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. It includes changes in the frequency and urgency of bowel movements and fecal incontinence. The therapeutic efficacy of biofeedback on ARS is unclear. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of biofeedback therapy in patients with ARS after anterior resection for rectal cancer and to investigate the associated factors for therapeutic success. The study was designed as a retrospective review of the data from 61 patients with ARS collected from a prospectively maintained institutional cancer database. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated using anorectal manometry, the number of bowel movements daily, and fecal incontinence scoring systems (Vaizey and/or Wexner scores). Changes of > 15% in the Vaizey and/or Wexner scores were considered to indicate effectiveness. Stepwise logistic regression models were performed to evaluate whether the associated factors influenced therapeutic efficacy. The parameters of anorectal manometry in patients with rectal cancer were significantly lower than those in control group (P < .01). After biofeedback therapy, significant improvements were observed in the incontinence scale scores (P < .001), number of bowel movements (P < .001), and anorectal manometry data (maximum resting pressure, P < .001; maximum squeeze pressure, P = .001; and rectal capacity, P = .015). In contrast, no significant difference in the rectal initial sensation threshold was observed (P = .089). Patients with fecal incontinence as the primary symptom experienced significant improvements in all variables (P < .01), except for the rectal initial sensation threshold (P = .125). Age at surgery, current smoking status, diabetes, treatment cycles, laparoscopic surgery, interval from surgery to biofeedback therapy, and the use of radiation therapy were closely associated with therapeutic success. On multivariate analysis, current smoking status (odds ratio [OR], 0.09; 95

  19. When to Order a Contrast-Enhanced CT.

    PubMed

    Rawson, James V; Pelletier, Allen L

    2013-09-01

    Family physicians often must determine the most appropriate diagnostic tests to order for their patients. It is essential to know the types of contrast agents, their risks, contraindications, and common clinical scenarios in which contrast-enhanced computed tomography is appropriate. Many types of contrast agents can be used in computed tomography: oral, intravenous, rectal, and intrathecal. The choice of contrast agent depends on route of administration, desired tissue differentiation, and suspected diagnosis. Possible contraindications for using intravenous contrast agents during computed tomography include a history of reactions to contrast agents, pregnancy, radioactive iodine treatment for thyroid disease, metformin use, and chronic or acutely worsening renal disease. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria is a useful online resource. Clear communication between the physician and radiologist is essential for obtaining the most appropriate study at the lowest cost and risk to the patient.

  20. Rectal arterio-venous malformation (AVM) with bleeding of an internal hemorrhoid.

    PubMed

    Komekami, Yusuke; Konishi, Fumio; Makita, Kohzoh; Mijin, Toma; Onogawa, Atsushi; Chochi, Takeshi; Lee, Chunyong; Yoshida, Takayoshi; Maeda, Tooru; Mitsusada, Makoto; Hasegawa, Shunji

    2016-02-01

    A 38-year-old male with no past history of illnesses visited the out-patient clinic of Nerima Hikarigaoka Hospital complaining of dizziness and persistent anal bleeding. There was a significant anemia on a blood test and colonoscopy showed a thrombus in a markedly swollen internal hemorrhoid. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) showed a poorly demarcated area with early face enhancement on the right side of the rectum and anal canal. Based on these findings, an arterio-venous malformation (AVM) of the rectum was suspected. Abdominal angiography showed abnormal vessels receiving a blood supply from the bilateral superior rectal arteries. We suspected that the AVM in the rectum was the cause of the hemorrhage from the internal hemorrhoid, and therefore performed embolization of the AVM. Thereafter, the hemorrhage from the internal hemorrhoid stopped completely and the anemia improved to the normal level, without the need for treatment for the internal hemorrhoid. Colonoscopy performed 6 months after embolization showed shrinkage of the internal hemorrhoid. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reports stating a relationship between rectal AVM and internal hemorrhoids. However, we consider that contrast-enhanced CT can be used to detect vessel abnormalities related to severe bleeding of the internal hermorrhoids in patients with internal hemorrhoids and severe anemia.

  1. Excretory transport of xenobiotics by dogfish shark rectal gland tubules.

    PubMed

    Miller, D S; Masereeuw, R; Henson, J; Karnaky, K J

    1998-09-01

    Marine elasmobranch rectal gland is a specialized, osmoregulatory organ composed of numerous blind-ended, branched tubules emptying into a central duct. To date, NaCl excretion has been its only described function. Here we use isolated rectal gland tubule fragments from dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias), fluorescent xenobiotics, and confocal microscopy to describe a second function, xenobiotic excretion. Isolated rectal gland tubules rapidly transported the fluorescent organic anion sulforhodamine 101 from bath to lumen. Luminal accumulation was concentrative, saturable, and inhibited by cyclosporin A (CSA), chlorodinitrobenzene, leukotriene C4, and KCN. Inhibitors of renal organic anion transport (probenecid, p-aminohippurate), organic cation transport (tetraethylammonium and verapamil), and P-glycoprotein (verapamil) were without effect. Cellular accumulation of sulforhodamine 101 was not concentrative, saturable, or inhibitable. Rectal gland tubules did not secrete fluorescein, daunomycin, or a fluorescent CSA derivative. Finally, frozen rectal gland sections stained with an antibody to a hepatic canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT or MRP2) showed heavy and specific staining on the luminal membrane of the epithelial cells. We conclude that rectal gland is capable of active and specific excretion of xenobiotics and that such transport is mediated by a shark analog of MRP2, an ATP-driven xenobiotic transporter, but not by P-glycoprotein.

  2. Management and outcome of rectal injury during gynecologic laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Jo, Eun Ju; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Tae-Joong; Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2013-01-01

    To assess the incidence and management of accidental rectal injury during gynecologic laparoscopic surgery. A retrospective study with review of outcomes (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). A tertiary care/research/university hospital. Patients with colon injury during laparoscopy for gynecologic diseases at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea, from January 2000 to April 2012. Use of absorbable suture or staples in primary repair of injured colon. From January 2000 to April 2012, 12 354 patients underwent laparoscopic surgery. Rectal injury occurred in 15 women (0.12%). Their median age was 42.5 years (30-49), and the median length of injury was 3 cm (0.7-7). Among 13 patients with rectal injuries recognized during surgery, 10 patient injuries were repaired primarily with interrupted absorbable sutures without converting laparotomy, 1 patient underwent laparoscopic low anterior resection with Endo-GIA, 1 underwent open primary repair, and 1 underwent open low anterior resection. Two rectal injuries were detected after surgery. One of these patients underwent primary repair under laparotomy at day 4 after surgery. The other patient had development of a rectovaginal fistula requiring open segmental resection 30 days after primary laparoscopy despite conservative management, including percutaneous drainage and prophylactic antibiotics. Rectal injury during laparoscopy in the gynecologic field can be repaired successfully without the need for a colostomy regardless of mechanism of injury and the size of injury if adequate rectal tissue is available and recognized during surgery. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Contrast Adaptation Contributes to Contrast-Invariance of Orientation Tuning of Primate V1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Lionel G.; Barone, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies in rodents and carnivores have shown that orientation tuning width of single neurons does not change when stimulus contrast is modified. However, in these studies, stimuli were presented for a relatively long duration (e. g., 4 seconds), making it possible that contrast adaptation contributed to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning. Our first purpose was to determine, in marmoset area V1, whether orientation tuning is still contrast-invariant with the stimulation duration is comparable to that of a visual fixation. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed extracellular recordings and examined orientation tuning of single-units using static sine-wave gratings that were flashed for 200 msec. Sixteen orientations and three contrast levels, representing low, medium and high values in the range of effective contrasts for each neuron, were randomly intermixed. Contrast adaptation being a slow phenomenon, cells did not have enough time to adapt to each contrast individually. With this stimulation protocol, we found that the tuning width obtained at intermediate contrast was reduced to 89% (median), and that at low contrast to 76%, of that obtained at high contrast. Therefore, when probed with briefly flashed stimuli, orientation tuning is not contrast-invariant in marmoset V1. Our second purpose was to determine whether contrast adaptation contributes to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning. Stationary gratings were presented, as previously, for 200 msec with randomly varying orientations, but the contrast was kept constant within stimulation blocks lasting >20 sec, allowing for adaptation to the single contrast in use. In these conditions, tuning widths obtained at low contrast were still significantly less than at high contrast (median 85%). However, tuning widths obtained with medium and high contrast stimuli no longer differed significantly. Conclusions/Significance Orientation tuning does not appear to be contrast-invariant when

  4. Surgery for constipation: systematic review and practice recommendations: Results III: Rectal wall excisional procedures (Rectal Excision).

    PubMed

    Mercer-Jones, M; Grossi, U; Pares, D; Vollebregt, P F; Mason, J; Knowles, C H

    2017-09-01

    To assess the outcomes of rectal excisional procedures in adults with chronic constipation. Standardised methods and reporting of benefits and harms were used for all CapaCiTY reviews that closely adhered to PRISMA 2016 guidance. Main conclusions were presented as summary evidence statements with a summative Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (2009) level. Forty-seven studies were identified, providing data on outcomes in 8340 patients. Average length of procedures was 44 min and length of stay (LOS) was 3 days. There was inadequate evidence to determine variations in procedural duration or LOS by type of procedure. Overall morbidity rate was 16.9% (0-61%), with lower rates observed after Contour Transtar procedure (8.9%). No mortality was reported after any procedures in a total of 5896 patients. Although inconsistently reported, good or satisfactory outcome occurred in 73-80% of patients; a reduction of 53-91% in Longo scoring system for obstructive defecation syndrome (ODS) occurred in about 68-76% of patients. The most common long-term adverse outcome is faecal urgency, typically occurring in up to 10% of patients. Recurrent prolapse occurred in 4.3% of patients. Patients with at least 3 ODS symptoms together with a rectocoele with or without an intussusception, who have failed conservative management, may benefit from a rectal excisional procedure. Rectal excisional procedures are safe with little major morbidity. It is not possible to advise which excisional technique is superior from the point of view of efficacy, peri-operative variables, or harms. Future study is required. © 2017 The Authors. Colorectal Disease published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. TEM and conventional rectal surgery for T1 rectal cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Yong-You; Li, Shan; Zhu, Bao-Song; Zhao, Kui; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun Gen

    2011-01-01

    To compare transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) with conventional radical surgery (CRS) for T1 rectal cancer focusing on safety, feasibility and efficacy of both procedures. An online search of Ovid, Medline, Embase, Pubmed and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register was undertaken to identify studies comparing TEM with CRS published in English between 1984 and March 2010. Only studies comparing TEM with CRS for T1 rectal cancer treatment and with a minimum of 20 cases were included. The parameters compared were postoperative complications, hospital mortality, recurrence rate and 5-year survival. Five studies met screening criteria and 397 patients were enrolled in the meta-analysis; 216 were treated with TEM and the rest received CRS. Complications were observed in 16/196 in the TEM group and 77/163 in the CRS group. The difference was significant (p=0.01). The rate of mortality was 3.68% in CRS group, and 0 in TEM group (p=0.01). The 5-year survival was similar (p=0.84), the TEM group was 80.1% and the CRS group was 81.0%. However, there was more recurrence in the TEM group compared to CRS group (p=0.0004). TEM group was 12.0%, while CRS group was 0.5%. Compared with CRS, TEM had significant shorter hospital stay and fewer postoperative complications. TEM is a safe, feasible and effective option for T1 rectal cancer. Though TEM had a slightly higher rate of recurrence than CRS, no significant difference on 5-year survival was observed.

  6. Rectal microbicides: clinically relevant approach to the design of rectal specific placebo formulations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to identify the critical formulation parameters controlling distribution and function for the rectal administration of microbicides in humans. Four placebo formulations were designed with a wide range of hydrophilic characteristics (aqueous to lipid) and rheological properties (Newtonian, shear thinning, thermal sensitive and thixotropic). Aqueous formulations using typical polymers to control viscosity were iso-osmotic and buffered to pH 7. Lipid formulations were developed from lipid solvent/lipid gelling agent binary mixtures. Testing included pharmaceutical function and stability as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity. Results The aqueous fluid placebo, based on poloxamer, was fluid at room temperature, thickened and became shear thinning at 37°C. The aqueous gel placebo used carbopol as the gelling agent, was shear thinning at room temperature and showed a typical decrease in viscosity with an increase in temperature. The lipid fluid placebo, myristyl myristate in isopropyl myristate, was relatively thin and temperature independent. The lipid gel placebo, glyceryl stearate and PEG-75 stearate in caprylic/capric triglycerides, was also shear thinning at both room temperature and 37°C but with significant time dependency or thixotropy. All formulations showed no rectal irritation in rabbits and were non-toxic using an ex vivo rectal explant model. Conclusions Four placebo formulations ranging from fluid to gel in aqueous and lipid formats with a range of rheological properties were developed, tested, scaled-up, manufactured under cGMP conditions and enrolled in a formal stability program. Clinical testing of these formulations as placebos will serve as the basis for further microbicide formulation development with drug-containing products. PMID:21385339

  7. Study protocol: multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging for therapeutic response prediction in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trang Thanh; Liney, Gary; Wong, Karen; Rai, Robba; Lee, Mark; Moses, Daniel; Henderson, Christopher; Lin, Michael; Shin, Joo-Shik; Barton, Michael Bernard

    2017-07-04

    Response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) of rectal cancer is variable. Accurate imaging for prediction and early assessment of response would enable appropriate stratification of management to reduce treatment morbidity and improve therapeutic outcomes. Use of either diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) or dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging alone currently lacks sufficient sensitivity and specificity for clinical use to guide individualized treatment in rectal cancer. Multi-parametric MRI and analysis combining DWI and DCE may have potential to improve the accuracy of therapeutic response prediction and assessment. This protocol describes a prospective non-interventional single-arm clinical study. Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing preoperative CRT will prospectively undergo multi-parametric MRI pre-CRT, week 3 CRT, and post-CRT. The protocol consists of DWI using a read-out segmented sequence (RESOLVE), and DCE with pre-contrast T1-weighted (VIBE) scans for T1 calculation, followed by 60 phases at high temporal resolution (TWIST) after gadoversetamide injection. A 3-dimensional voxel-by-voxel technique will be used to produce colour-coded ADC and K(trans) histograms, and data evaluated in combination using scatter plots. MRI parameters will be correlated with surgical histopathology. Histopathology analysis will be standardized, with chemoradiotherapy response defined according to AJCC 7th Edition Tumour Regression Grade (TRG) criteria. Good response will be defined as TRG 0-1, and poor response will be defined as TRG 2-3. The combination of DWI and DCE can provide information on physiological tumour factors such as cellularity and perfusion that may affect radiotherapy response. If validated, multi-parametric MRI combining DWI and DCE can be used to stratify management in rectal cancer patients. Accurate imaging prediction of patients with a complete response to CRT would enable a 'watch and wait' approach, avoiding surgical morbidity

  8. Gastroduodenal adenocarcinomas and rectal adenoma in a cougar (Felis concolor) infected with Helicobacter-like organisms and spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshikazu; Aono, Itsushi; Ohya, Tatsuo; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Kadota, Koichi

    2002-02-01

    A 14-year-old female cougar died from gastroduodenal adenocarcinomas and rectal adenoma. At necropsy, polypoid tumor masses of various sizes were scattered on the mucosal surfaces of the stomach, duodenum, and rectum. Histologically, the gastric tumor was diagnosed as an intestinal type adenocarcinoma and the tumor cells metastasized to the mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and lung. Helicobacter-like organisms were detected in the lumina lined by foveolar epithelium. In the duodenum, the carcinoma cells were localized in the limina propria and many of them were intensely positive for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In contrast, the rectal adenoma had a lower number of PCNA-positive cells. In the rectum, chronic inflammation with numerous spirochetes was also noted. These results indicated that the occurrence of the gastrointestinal tumors might be associated with the bacterial infection described above.

  9. The accuracy of endorectal ultrasonography in rectal cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    COTE, ADRIAN; GRAUR, FLORIN; LEBOVICI, ANDREI; MOIS, EMIL; AL HAJJAR, NADIM; MARE, CODRUTA; BADEA, RADU; IANCU, CORNEL

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The incidence of rectal cancer in the European Union is about 35% of the total colorectal cancer incidence. Staging rectal cancer is important for planning treatment. It is essential for the management of rectal cancer to have adequate preoperative imaging, because accurate staging can influence the therapeutic strategy, type of resection, and candidacy for neoadjuvant therapy. The aim of this work is to evaluate the accuracy of endorectal ultrasound (ERUS) in rectal cancer staging. Methods A retrospective study was performed to assess the accuracy of ERUS by analyzing patients discharged from Regional Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (IRGH) Cluj-Napoca, Romania, diagnosed with rectal cancer between 01 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. Patients who were preoperatively staged by other imaging methods and those who had ERUS performed in another service were excluded from the analysis. As inclusion criteria remained ERUS performed for patients with rectal cancer in IRGH Cluj-Napoca where they were also operated. We analyzed preoperative T stage obtained by ERUS and it was compared with the histopathology findings. Results The number of patients discharged with a diagnosis of rectal cancer were 200 (operated – 157) in 2011, 193 (operated – 151) in 2012, and 198 (operated – 142) in 2013. We analyzed a total of 51 cases diagnosed with rectal cancer who performed ERUS in IRGH Cluj-Napoca. The results according to the T stage obtained by ERUS and histopathology test were: Under-stage T2= 25.0%, T3=7.9% of cases; Over-stage T2=25.0%, T3=31.6% and T4=60.0% of cases. Less than 20% of patients underwent preoperative radio-chemotherapy. Conclusions ERUS is a method of staging rectal cancer which is human dependent. ERUS is less accurate for T staging of stenotic tumours, but the accuracy may still be within acceptable limits. Surgeons use ERUS to adopt a treatment protocol, knowing the risk of under-staging and over-staging of this method

  10. Trans-rectal interventional MRI: initial prostate biopsy experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Bernadette M.; Behluli, Meliha R.; Feller, John F.; May, Stuart T.; Princenthal, Robert; Winkel, Alex; Kaminsky, David B.

    2010-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland when evaluated along with T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and their corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps can yield valuable information in patients with rising or elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels1. In some cases, patients present with multiple negative trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies, often placing the patient into a cycle of active surveillance. Recently, more patients are undergoing TRIM for targeted biopsy of suspicious findings with a cancer yield of ~59% compared to 15% for second TRUS biopsy2 to solve this diagnostic dilemma and plan treatment. Patients were imaged in two separate sessions on a 1.5T magnet using a cardiac phased array parallel imaging coil. Automated CAD software was used to identify areas of wash-out. If a suspicious finding was identified on all sequences it was followed by a second imaging session. Under MRI-guidance, cores were acquired from each target region3. In one case the microscopic diagnosis was prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), in the other it was invasive adenocarcinoma. Patient 1 had two negative TRUS biopsies and a PSA level of 9ng/mL. Patient 2 had a PSA of 7.2ng/mL. He underwent TRUS biopsy which was negative for malignancy. He was able to go on to treatment for his prostate carcinoma (PCa)4. MRI may have an important role in a subset of patients with multiple negative TRUS biopsies and elevated or rising PSA.

  11. [Quality standards in rectal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Pera, M; Pascual, M

    2005-01-01

    The results of surgery for rectal cancer have classically been measured through indicators such as morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay. In the last few years other parameters have been included that evaluate healthcare quality such as the functional results of the surgical technique employed and quality of life. Total resection of the mesorectum, performed by experienced surgeons, is the surgical technique of choice. Currently, the sphincter can be preserved in 70% of patients. Anastomotic dehiscence after anterior resection of the rectum is the most serious complication and the most important risk factor is the height of the anastomosis. The overall dehiscence rate should be less than 15% and operative mortality should be between 2% and 3%. The colonic reservoir improves functional outcome and consequently it is the procedure of choice to reconstruct transit after low anterior resection. Local recurrence should be less than 10% and 5-year survival should be between 70% and 80%. In general, quality of life is better after anterior resection of the rectum than after abdominoperineal amputation, despite the functional deterioration presented by some patients.

  12. What is being researched in rectal cancer?

    PubMed

    Reina Duarte, Angel; Ferrer Márquez, Manuel; Rubio Gil, Francisco A; Belda Lozano, Ricardo; Alvarez García, Antonio; Blesa Sierra, Isabel; Fuentes Porcel, Orlando; Vidaña Márquez, Elisa; Rosado Cobian, Rafael

    2014-11-25

    Clinical evidence has a more significant role in medical specialties than in surgery. Rectal cancer (CR) is no exception. This paper explores what CR-related subjects are being investigated at the present time in a quantitative and qualitative way and analyzes this information to know what possible answers clinical research could give us in the future. The data collection was carried out in April 2014 and was based on 3 sources: 2 institutional clinical trials registries -American (clinicaltrials.gov) and European (EU Clinical Trials Register)- and a survey given to members of the Asociación Española de Coloproctología (AECP). The obtained studies were exported to a database designed especially for this review, which included a number of descriptive elements that would allow the cataloging of the different studies. The AECP survey results were analyzed separately. There are currently 216 clinical trials ongoing related to CR. Two-thirds are primarily conducted by oncologists. Nearly a third are surgical. The research focuses on improving preoperative treatment: new drugs, new schemes of chemo-radiotherapy (usually induction or consolidation schemes) or optimization of radiotherapy and its effects. Surgical clinical trials are related to robotics, laparoscopy, stoma, low colorectal anastomosis, distal CR and local treatment. Most of the current clinical trials ongoing on CR are analyzing aspects of chemo-radiotherapy and its effects. A third focus on purely surgical issues. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Outcome of young patients with rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo-Hernández, Rosa A.; Ruiz-García, Erika B.; León-Takahashi, Alberto M.; García-Pérez, Leticia

    2017-01-01

    Background There is an increase in the incidence of rectal carcinoma (RC) in young patients. Methods We analyzed 175 patients with sporadic RC which were divided in two groups according their age: 24 patients ≤40 years and 151 patients >40 years and the two groups were compared in order to determine if the outcomes (especially overall 5-year survival) were different. Results Overall 5-year survival was similar between groups (67.1% for patients over 40 years and 70.4% for those under 40 years, P=0.803). The only differences found were in some clinicopathologic features: patients <40 years showed more dissected lymph nodes (LNs) (21 vs. 15, P=0.035) and more LN metastasis (54.2% vs. 39.1%, P=0.048). In multivariate analysis factors associated with worse survival were incomplete resection and no use of neoadjuvant therapy. Age did not demonstrate prognostic value (P=0.077). Conclusions RC in people ≤40 years demonstrated greater number of LN harvested and LN metastases but oncologic outcomes, especially 5-year overall survival, were similar between groups. PMID:28280614

  14. Rectal suppository: commonsense and mode of insertion.

    PubMed

    Abd-el-Maeboud, K H; el-Naggar, T; el-Hawi, E M; Mahmoud, S A; Abd-el-Hay, S

    1991-09-28

    Rectal suppository is a well-known form of medication and its use is increasing. The commonest shape is one with an apex (pointed end) tapering to a base (blunt end). Because of a general lack of information about mode of insertion, we asked 360 lay subjects (Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and 260 medical personnel (physicians, pharmacists, and nurses) by questionnaire which end they inserted foremost. Apart from 2 individuals, all subjects suggested insertion with the apex foremost. Commonsense was the most frequent basis for this practice (86.9% of lay subjects and 84.6% of medical personnel) followed by information from a relative, a friend, or medical personnel, or from study at medical school. Suppository insertion with the base or apex foremost was compared in 100 subjects (60 adults, 40 infants and children). Retention with the former method was more easily achieved in 98% of the cases, with no need to introduce a finger in the anal canal (1% vs 83%), and lower expulsion rate (0% vs 3%). The designer of the "torpedo-shaped" suppository suggested its insertion with apex foremost. Our data suggest that a suppository is better inserted with the base foremost. Reversed vermicular contractions or pressure gradient of the anal canal might press it inwards.

  15. [A Case of Rectal Syphilis Incidentally Found at Regular Medical Check-up].

    PubMed

    You, Ji Hong; Cho, Ki Won; Cha, Yoon Jin; Park, Hyo Jin

    2016-10-25

    Syphilis is a rare disease in the rectum. It is difficult to diagnose because the characteristics of the rectal syphilis rectal lesion are highly varied. The endoscopic findings of rectal syphilis are proctitis, ulcers, and masses. If rectal syphilis is suspected to be the cause for rectal lesions, it is important for physicians to consider the sexual history and sexual orientation of the patient. We report a case of incidental rectal syphilis in a 41-year-old man diagnosed during a regular medical check-up.

  16. Evaluation of the robotic approach concerning pitfalls in rectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Baukloh, J K; Reeh, M; Spinoglio, G; Corratti, A; Bartolini, I; Mirasolo, V M; Priora, F; Izbicki, J R; Gomez Fleitas, M; Gomez Ruiz, M; Perez, D R

    2017-07-01

    The feasibility and advantages of robotic rectal surgery (RRS) in comparison to conventional open or laparoscopic rectal resections have been postulated in several reports. But well-known challenges and pitfalls of minimal invasive rectal surgery have not been evaluated by a prospective, multicenter setting so far. Aim of this study was to analyze the perioperative outcome of patients following RRS especially in regard to the pitfalls such as obesity, male patients and low tumors by a European multicenter setting. This prospective study included 348 patients undergoing robotic surgery due to rectal cancer in six major European centers. Clinicopathological parameters, morbidity, perioperative recovery and short-term outcome were analyzed. A total of 283 restorative surgeries and 65 abdominoperineal resections were carried out. The conversion rate was 4.3%, mean blood loss was 191 ml, and mean operative time was 315 min. Postoperative complications with a Clavien-Dindo score >2 were observed in 13.5%. Obesity and low rectal tumors showed no significant higher rates of major complications or impaired oncological parameters. Male patients had significant higher rates of major complications and anastomotic leakage (p = 0.048 and p = 0.007, respectively). RRS is a promising tool for improvement of rectal resections. The well-known pitfalls of minimal-invasive rectal surgery like obesity and low tumors were sufficiently managed by RRS. However, RRS showed significantly higher rates of major complications and anastomotic leakage in male patients, which has to be evaluated by future randomized trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  17. Digital rectal examination in the evaluation of rectovaginal septal defects.

    PubMed

    Rachaneni, Suneetha; Atan, Ixora Kamisan; Shek, Ka Lai; Dietz, Hans Peter

    2017-02-17

    The objective was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of digital rectal examination in the identification of a true rectocele. This is a retrospective observational study utilising 187 archived data sets of women presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms and/or pelvic organ prolapse between August 2012 and November 2013. Evaluation included a standardised interview, ICS-POPQ, rectal examination and 4D translabial ultrasound. The main outcome measure was the diagnosis of rectocele by digital rectal palpation on Valsalva manoeuvre. This diagnosis correlated with the sonographic diagnosis of rectocele to determine agreement between digital examination and ultrasound findings. Complete data sets were available for 180 participants. On imaging, the mean position of the rectal ampulla was 11.07 (-36.3 to 44.3) mm below the symphysis pubis; 42.8% (77) had a rectocele of a depth of ≥10 mm. On palpation, a rectocele was detected in 60 women (33%). Agreement between palpation and imaging was observed in 77%; the kappa was 0.52 (CI 0.39-0.65). On receiver operator characteristic analysis, the area under the curve was 0.854 for the relationship between rectocele pocket depth and the detection of rectocele on palpation. Moderate agreement was found between digital rectal examination for rectocele and translabial ultrasound findings of a "true rectocele". Digital rectal examination may be used to identify these defects in clinical practice. Extending the clinical examination of prolapse to include rectal examination to palpate defects in the rectovaginal septum may reduce the need for defecatory proctograms for the assessment of obstructive defecation and may help triage patients in the management of posterior compartment prolapse.

  18. 'Objective' assessment of rectal sensation: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Shafik, Ahmed; El-Sibai, Olfat; Shafik, Ali A; Ahmed, Ismail

    2004-01-01

    Rectal sensation is used as an investigative tool in the diagnosis of anorectal pathology. However, the data obtained are subjective depending on the patient's perception of the sensation. We investigated the hypothesis that sympathetic skin response (SSR) can be used as a tool for objective assessment of the rectal sensation. The SSR was recorded in 24 healthy volunteers (age 37.2 years, 14 men) using a surface electrode applied to the skin of the palmar surface of the subject's hand and a reference electrode to the dorsum of the same hand. The EMG activity of the pelvic floor muscles was registered by a surface electrode fixed to the perineal skin. The subject was asked before and after individual anesthetization of the rectum and palm to report the first rectal and urge sensations during balloon filling of the rectum in increments of 10 ml of saline. Low volume rectal distension effected no sympathetic skin or pelvic floor responses, while larger volumes produced the response. The skin and pelvic floor responses occurred with every rectal sensation and corresponded with the volunteers' subjective perception. Urge suppression was associated with synchronous decrease of skin and pelvic floor responses which disappeared on balloon expulsion. Rectal balloon distension, 20 minutes after individual anesthetization of the rectum or palm produced no palm skin response, which returned however 3 hours later. A novel approach which can objectively define subjective perceptions arising from the rectum has been identified. Rectal sensations produce coordinated sympathetic skin response and pelvic floor activity which seem to be mediated through a reflex which we term the "recto-palmar reflex". Further studies are required to investigate the role of this reflex in defection and sympathetic disorders.

  19. Population-based use of sphincter-preserving surgery in patients with rectal cancer: is there room for improvement?

    PubMed

    Richardson, Devon P; Porter, Geoff A; Johnson, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    Treatment of rectal cancer in North America has been associated with lower rates of sphincter-preserving surgery in comparison with other regions. It is unclear if these lower rates are due to patient, tumor, or treatment factors; thus, the potential to increase the use of sphincter-preserving surgery is unknown. The aim of this study is to identify the factors associated with the use of sphincter-preserving surgery and to quantify the potential for an increase in sphincter preservation. This population-based retrospective cohort study used patient-level data collected through a comprehensive, standardized review of hospital inpatient and outpatient medical records and cancer center charts. This study was conducted in all hospitals providing rectal cancer surgery in a Canadian province. All patients with a new diagnosis of rectal cancer from July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2006 who underwent potentially curative radical surgery were included. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with receiving a permanent colostomy. Patients were categorized as having received an appropriate or potentially inappropriate colostomy based on a priori determined patient, tumor, operative, and pathologic criteria. Of 466 patients who underwent radical surgery, 48% received a permanent colostomy. There was significant variation in the rate of sphincter-preserving surgery among the 10 hospitals that provided rectal cancer care (12%-73%, p = 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, male sex, low tumor height, and increasing tumor stage were associated with the receipt of a permanent colostomy. Among patients who received a permanent stoma, 65 of 224 (29%) patients received a potentially inappropriate stoma. On multivariate analysis, male sex and treatment in a medium- or low-volume hospital was associated with the receipt of a potentially inappropriate colostomy. This study was limited by its retrospective design. These data suggest that the receipt of a permanent colostomy by

  20. Apex technique in the treatment of obstructed defecation syndrome associated with rectal intussusception and full rectal mucosa prolapse.

    PubMed

    Regadas, F Sergio P; Abedrapo, Mario; Cruz, Jose Vinicius; Murad Regadas, Sthela M; Regadas Filho, F Sergio P

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to demonstrate the use of a modified stapling technique, called the apex technique, to treat rectal intussusception and full rectal mucosal prolapse. It was conducted as a retrospective study at 3 centers (2 in Brazil and 1 in Chile). The apex technique is performed by using a HEM/EEA-33 stapler. A pursestring suture is placed at the apex of the prolapse, on the 4 quadrants, independent of the distance to the dentate line. A second pursestring is then placed to define the band of rectal mucosa to be symmetrically resected. Outcome measures included width of the resected full-thickness rectal wall; the intensity of postoperative pain on a visual analog scale from 1 to 10; full mucosal prolapse and rectal intussusception assessed by physical examination, cinedefecography, or echodefecography; and change in the constipation scale. Forty-five patients (30 women/15 men; mean age, 59.5 years) with rectal intussusception and full mucosal prolapse were included. The median operative time was 17 (range, 15-30) minutes. Bleeding after stapler fire requiring manual suture occurred in 3 patients (6.7%); 25 (55.6%) patients reported having no postoperative pain. Hospital stay was 24 hours. The mean width of the resected rectal wall was 5.9 (range, 5.0-7.5) cm. Stricture at the staple line was seen in 4 patients, of whom 1 required dilation under anesthesia. The median follow-up time was 120 (range, 90-120) days. A small residual prolapse was identified in 6 (13.3%) patients. Imaging demonstrated complete disappearance of rectal intussusception in all patients, and the mean postoperative constipation score decreased from 13 (range, 8-15) to 5 (range, 3-7). The apex technique appears to be a safe, quickly performed, and low-cost method for the treatment of rectal intussusception. In this series, imaging examinations showed the disappearance of rectal intussusception, and a significant decrease in constipation score suggested improvement in

  1. Rectal Adenocarcinoma: Proposal for a Model Based on Pretreatment Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, Fernando; Freire, Viviana; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Quevedo, Gerardo; Echenique, Ignacio A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Currently the choice of chemotherapy regimen in rectal cancer is made prior to surgery in contrast to colon cancer where it is made postoperatively after the pathological stage has been determined. If we could identify which are the important pretreatment prognostic factors in rectal cancer, we could then target those patients with unfavorable features to investigate potentially more effective preoperative chemotherapy regimens aimed at those with unfavorable features. The present study aims to determine pre-treatment prognostic factors that are associated with an unfavorable outcome. Methods A retrospective review of 99 rectal cancer patients operated at the Hospital Auxilio Mutuo and Hospital San Pablo was done. Sociodemographic characteristics, clinical and treatment data was collected. Results 54% were males. The mean ± sd age was 62.2 ± 10.4. In age-adjusted Cox model, male gender [HR (95%CI): 3.32 (1.09–10.13)], mucinous carcinoma [HR (95%CI): 3.67 (1.25–10.77)], and clinical stages II & III [HR (95%CI): 8.19 (1.08–62.08)] were predictors of poor prognosis. In multivariate age-adjusted analysis, a tendency towards a poorer prognosis was observed for male patients [HR: 2.60] CEA level ≥ 5ng/ml [HR: 2.55], mucinous carcinoma [HR:2.96], and clinical stages II & III [HR:4.96], although results were not statistically significant (p>0.05), Conclusion Although current therapeutic results are relatively favorable with preoperative 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) and radiotherapy, future clinical trials should address the management of those cases with adverse pretreatment prognostic factors so that they can be treated with potentially more effective albeit more toxic chemotherapy regimens. PMID:22783696

  2. Transanal Endoscopic Operation for Benign Rectal Lesions and T1 Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Emi; Dedrye, Lieven; Vindevoghel, Koen; Nuytens, Frederiek; Pottel, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Transanal endoscopic operation (TEO) is a minimally invasive technique used for local excision of benign and selected malignant rectal lesions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility, safety, and oncological outcomes of the procedure and to report the experience in 3 centers. Methods: Retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was performed of all patients with benign lesions or ≤cT1N0 rectal cancer who underwent TEO with curative intent at 3 Belgian centers (2012 through 2014). Results: Eighty-three patients underwent 84 TEOs for 89 rectal lesions (37 adenomas, 43 adenocarcinomas, 1 gastrointestinal stromal tumor, 1 lipoma, 2 neuroendocrine tumors, and 5 scar tissues). Operative time was associated with lesion size (P < .001). Postoperative complications occurred in 13 patients: 7 hemorrhages, 1 urinary tract infection, 1 urinary retention, 2 abscesses, 1 anastomotic stenosis, and 1 entrance into the peritoneal cavity. Median hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1–8). During a median follow-up of 13 months (range, 2–27), there was 1 recurrence. Conclusion: Although longer follow-up is still necessary, TEO appears to be an effective method of excising benign tumors and low-risk T1 carcinomas of the rectum. However, TEO should be considered as part of the diagnostic work-up. Furthermore, the resected specimen of a TEO procedure allows adequate local staging in contrast to an endoscopic piecemeal excision. Nevertheless, definitive histology must be appreciated, and in case of unfavorable histology, radical salvage resection still has to be performed. PMID:28144126

  3. Effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Baeten, Coen . E-mail: C.Baeten@surgery.azm.nl; Castermans, Karolien; Lammering, Guido; Hillen, Femke; Wouters, Bradly G.; Hillen, Harry; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Baeten, Cornelius G.M.I.

    2006-11-15

    Background: We and others have shown that angiogenesis and leukocyte infiltration are important prognostic factors in rectal cancer. However, little is known about its possible changes in response to radiotherapy (RTX), which is frequently given to rectal tumors as a neoadjuvant treatment to improve the prognosis. We therefore investigated the biologic effects of RTX on these parameters using fresh-frozen biopsy samples of tumor and normal mucosa tissue before and after RTX. Methods: Biopsy samples were taken from a total of 34 patients before and after either a short course or long course of RTX combined with chemotherapy. The following parameters were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction: Microvessel density, leukocyte infiltration, proliferating epithelial and tumor cells, proliferating endothelial cells, adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells, and the angiogenic mRNA profile. Results: The tumor biopsy samples taken after RTX treatment demonstrated a significant decrease in microvessel density and the number of proliferating tumor cells and proliferating endothelial cells (p < 0.001). In contrast, the leukocyte infiltration, the levels of basic fibroblast growth factor in carcinoma tissue, and the adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells in normal as well as carcinoma tissue increased significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data show that together with an overall decrease in tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation, RTX results in an increase in the expression of adhesion molecules that stimulate leukocyte infiltration. This suggests the possibility that, in addition to its direct cytotoxic effect, radiation may also stimulate an immunologic tumor response that could contribute to the documented improvement in local tumor control and distal failure rate of rectal cancers.

  4. Nomogram to predict rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Delobel, Jean-Bernard; Ospina, Juan David; Beckendorf, Véronique; Chira, Ciprian; Zhu, Jian; Bossi, Alberto; Messai, Taha; Acosta, Oscar; Castelli, Joël; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    Background To identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT), while integrating the potential impact of RT technique, dose escalation, and moderate hypofractionation, thus enabling us to generate a nomogram for individual prediction. Methods In total, 972 patients underwent RT for localized prostate cancer, to a total dose of 70 Gy or 80 Gy, using two different fractionations (2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/day), by means of several RT techniques (3D conformal RT [3DCRT], intensity-modulated RT [IMRT], or image-guided RT [IGRT]). Multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity. A nomogram was generated based on the logistic regression model used to predict the 3-year rectal toxicity risk, with its accuracy assessed by dividing the cohort into training and validation subgroups. Results Mean follow-up for the entire cohort was 62 months, ranging from 6 to 235. The rate of acute Grade ≥2 rectal toxicity was 22.2%, decreasing when combining IMRT and IGRT, compared to 3DCRT (RR = 0.4, 95%CI: 0.3–0.6, p<0.01). The 5-year Grade ≥2 risks for rectal bleeding, urgency/tenesmus, diarrhea, and fecal incontinence were 9.9%, 4.5%, 2.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. The 3-year Grade ≥2 risk for overall rectal toxicity increased with total dose (p<0.01, RR = 1.1, 95%CI: 1.0–1.1) and dose per fraction (2Gy vs. 2.5Gy) (p = 0.03, RR = 3.3, 95%CI: 1.1–10.0), and decreased when combining IMRT and IGRT (RR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.3–0.8, p<0.01). Based on these three parameters, a nomogram was generated. Conclusions Dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation increase late rectal toxicity. IMRT combined with IGRT markedly decreases acute and late rectal toxicity. Performing combined IMRT and IGRT can thus be envisaged for dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation. Our nomogram predicts the 3-year rectal toxicity risk by integrating total dose, fraction dose, and RT technique. PMID:28640871

  5. [Repeatability of measurements of the rectal temperature and comparison of vaginal and rectal temperature in puerperal sows].

    PubMed

    Stiehler, T; Heuwieser, W; Pfützner, A; Voigtsberger, R; Burfeind, O

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum diseases of sows are economically important in the pig industry. They affect animal health and welfare of sows and piglets. Measuring rectal temperature in sows post partum is a commonly used diagnostic method to early detection of infectious diseases. The study consisted of five parts. The objective of the first four parts was to evaluate the influence of different factors on the measurements of rectal temperature (e.g. investigator, thermometer, penetration depth of the thermometer). The secondary objective of this study was to validate the application of a temperature logger to continuously measure vaginal temperature. Thirty sows on the first day postpartum were used in the first four parts of the study. Rectal temperature was measured repeatedly by one investigator, by different investigators, with different thermometers and at different penetration depths. For the fifth part of the study 21 sows on the first day postpartum were used. A temperature logger was inserted in the vagina for a duration of 6 hours. Additionally, rectal temperature was measured. The data showed that rectal temperature can be measured repeatably (mean ± standard deviation = 38.7 ± 0.1 °C, coefficient of variation = 0.2%). Different investigators or thermometers resulted in low differences (0.0 °C and 0.1 °C). The penetration depth of the thermometer influenced the result (difference of 0.4 °C between 5 and 10 cm). Rectal and vaginal temperatures, measured in 21 sows, were highly correlated (r = 0.80, p < 0.01) with a mean difference of 0.3 °C. Rectal temperature measurement can be regarded as a repeatable diagnostic method. The measurement should be standardized (type of thermometer, penetration depth). The measurement of vaginal temperature with a data logger in early puerperal sows is a possible means for a continuous and non-invasive monitoring of body temperature.

  6. The sexual health of female rectal and anal cancer survivors: results of a pilot randomized psycho-educational intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, Tammy; Nelson, Christian; Philip, Errol; Temple, Larissa; Schover, Leslie; Baser, Raymond E.; Starr, Tatiana D.; Cannon, Kathleen; Jennings, Sabrina; Jandorf, Lina; Carter, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexual dysfunction is a frequently reported consequence of rectal/anal cancer treatment for female patients. Purpose The purpose of this study was to conduct a small randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a telephone-based, four-session Cancer Survivorship Intervention-Sexual Health (CSI-SH). Methods Participants (N = 70) were stratified by chemotherapy, stoma, and menopause statuses before randomization to CSI-SH or assessment only (AO). Participants were assessed at baseline, 4 months (follow-up 1), and 8 months (follow-up 2). Results The intervention had medium effect sizes from baseline to follow-up 1, which decreased by follow-up 2. Effect sizes were larger among the 41 sexually active women. Unadjusted means at the follow-ups were not significantly different between the treatment arms. Adjusting for baseline scores, demographics, and medical variables, the intervention arm had significantly better emotional functioning at follow-ups 1 and 2 and less cancer-specific stress at follow-up 1 compared to the AO arm. Conclusion The data supported the hypothesized effects on improved sexual and psychological functioning and quality of life in CSI-SH female rectal/anal cancer survivors compared to the AO condition. Condensed Abstract This pilot study (N = 70) of CSI-SH supported the impact of this intervention on sexual and psychological functioning and quality of life on rectal and anal cancer survivors compared with an AO condition. However, intervention effects were stronger at follow-up 1 as compared to follow-up 2 and were stronger for sexually active women. Implications for Cancer Survivors Women may benefit from a brief, four-session, sexual health intervention after treatment from rectal and anal cancer. PMID:26667358

  7. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  8. Toward Restored Bowel Health in Rectal Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Steineck, Gunnar; Schmidt, Heike; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Sjöberg, Fei; Bull, Cecilia Magdalena; Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    As technology gets better and better, and as clinical research provides more and more knowledge, we can extend our ambition to cure patients from cancer with restored physical health among the survivors. This increased ambition requires attention to grade 1 toxicity that decreases quality of life. It forces us to document the details of grade 1 toxicity and improve our understanding of the mechanisms. Long-term toxicity scores, or adverse events as documented during clinical trials, may be regarded as symptoms or signs of underlying survivorship diseases. However, we lack a survivorship nosology for rectal cancer survivors. Primarily focusing on radiation-induced side effects, we highlight some important observations concerning late toxicity among rectal cancer survivors. With that and other data, we searched for a preliminary survivorship-disease nosology for rectal cancer survivors. We disentangled the following survivorship diseases among rectal cancer survivors: low anterior resection syndrome, radiation-induced anal sphincter dysfunction, gut wall inflammation and fibrosis, blood discharge, excessive gas discharge, excessive mucus discharge, constipation, bacterial overgrowth, and aberrant anatomical structures. The suggested survivorship nosology may form the basis for new instruments capturing long-term symptoms (patient-reported outcomes) and professional-reported signs. For some of the diseases, we can search for animal models. As an end result, the suggested survivorship nosology may accelerate our understanding on how to prevent, ameliorate, or eliminate manifestations of treatment-induced diseases among rectal cancer survivors.

  9. [Rectal ozone therapy for patients with pulmonary emphysema].

    PubMed

    Calunga, José Luis; Paz, Yuleidys; Menéndez, Silvia; Martínez, Alfredo; Hernández, Aparicio

    2011-04-01

    Ozone therapy may stimulate antioxidant systems and protect against free radicals. It has not been used formerly in patients with pulmonary emphysema. To assess the effects of rectal ozone therapy in patients with pulmonary emphysema. Sixty four patients with pulmonary emphysema, aged between 40 and 69 years, were randomly assigned to receive rectal ozone in 20 daily sessions, rectal medicinal oxygen or no treatment. Treatments were repeated three months later in the first two groups. At baseline and at the end of the study, spirometry and a clinical assessment were performed. fifty patients completed the protocol, 20 receiving ozone therapy, 20 receiving rectal oxygen and 10 not receiving any therapy. At baseline, patients on ozone therapy had significantly lower values of forced expiratory volume in the first second (fEV1) and fEV1/forced vital capacity. At the end of the treatment period, these parameters were similar in the three treatment groups, therefore they only improved significantly in the group on ozone therapy. No differences were observed in other spirometric parameters. Rectal ozone therapy may be useful in patients with pulmonary emphysema.

  10. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  11. Patient surveillance after curative-intent surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Frank E; Longo, Walter E; Ode, Kenichi; Shariff, Umar S; Papettas, Trifonas; McGarry, Alaine E; Gammon, Steven R; Lee, Paul A; Audisio, Riccardo A; Grossmann, Erik M; Virgo, Katherine S

    2005-09-01

    The follow-up of patients with rectal cancer after potentially curative resection has significant financial and clinical implications for patients and society. The ideal regimen for monitoring patients is unknown. We evaluated the self-reported practice patterns of a large, diverse group of experts. There is little information available describing the actual practice of clinicians who perform potentially curative surgery on rectal cancer patients and follow them after recovery. The 1795 members of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons were asked, via a detailed questionnaire, how often they request 14 discrete follow-up modalities in their patients treated for cure with TNM stage I, II, or III rectal cancer over the first five post-treatment years. 566/1782 (32%) responded and 347 of the respondents (61%) provided evaluable data. Members of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons typically follow their own patients postoperatively rather than sending them back to their referral source. Office visit and serum CEA level are the most frequently requested items for each of the first five postoperative years. Endoscopy and imaging tests are also used regularly. Considerable variation exists among these highly experienced, highly credentialed experts. The surveillance strategies reported here rely most heavily on relatively simple and inexpensive tests. Endoscopy is employed frequently; imaging tests are employed less often. The observed variation in the intensity of postoperative monitoring is of concern.

  12. Lamellipodin-Deficient Mice: A Model of Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Shen, Zeli; Drees, Frauke; Ge, Zhongming; Feng, Yan; Chen, Xiaowei; Gong, Guanyu; Nagar, Karan K.; Wang, Timothy C.; Gertler, Frank B.; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    During a survey of clinical rectal prolapse (RP) cases in the mouse population at MIT animal research facilities, a high incidence of RP in the lamellipodin knock-out strain, C57BL/6-Raph1tm1Fbg (Lpd-/-) was documented. Upon further investigation, the Lpd-/- colony was found to be infected with multiple endemic enterohepatic Helicobacter species (EHS). Lpd-/- mice, a transgenic mouse strain produced at MIT, have not previously shown a distinct immune phenotype and are not highly susceptible to other opportunistic infections. Predominantly male Lpd-/- mice with RP exhibited lesions consistent with invasive rectal carcinoma concomitant to clinically evident RP. Multiple inflammatory cytokines, CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) populations, and epithelial cells positive for a DNA damage biomarker, H2AX, were elevated in affected tissue, supporting their role in the neoplastic process. An evaluation of Lpd-/- mice with RP compared to EHS-infected, but clinically normal (CN) Lpd-/- animals indicated that all of these mice exhibit some degree of lower bowel inflammation; however, mice with prolapses had significantly higher degree of focal lesions at the colo-rectal junction. When Helicobacter spp. infections were eliminated in Lpd-/- mice by embryo transfer rederivation, the disease phenotype was abrogated, implicating EHS as a contributing factor in the development of rectal carcinoma. Here we describe lesions in Lpd-/- male mice consistent with a focal inflammation-induced neoplastic transformation and propose this strain as a mouse model of rectal carcinoma. PMID:27045955

  13. Multiple differential expression networks identify key genes in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ri-Heng; Zhang, Ai-Min; Li, Shuang; Li, Tian-Yang; Wang, Lian-Jing; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Li, Ping; Jia, Xiong-Jie; Zhang, Tao; Peng, Xin-Yu; Liu, Min-Di; Wang, Xu; Lang, Yan; Xue, Wei-Lan; Liu, Jing; Wang, Yan-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is an important contributor to cancer mortality. The objective of this paper is to identify key genes across three phenotypes (fungating, polypoid and polypoid & small-ulcer) of rectal cancer based on multiple differential expression networks (DENs). Differential interactions and non-differential interactions were evaluated according to Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC) algorithm, and were selected to construct DENs. Topological analysis was performed for exploring hub genes in largest components of DENs. Key genes were denoted as intersections between nodes of DENs and rectal cancer associated genes from Genecards. Finally, we utilized hub genes to classify phenotypes of rectal cancer on the basis of support vector machines (SVM) methodology. We obtained 19 hub genes and total 12 common key genes of three largest components of DENs, and EGFR was the common element. The SVM results revealed that hub genes could classify phenotypes, and validated feasibility of DEN methods. We have successfully identified significant genes (such as EGFR and UBC) across fungating, polypoid and polypoid & small-ulcer phenotype of rectal cancer. They might be potential biomarkers for classification, detection and therapy of this cancer.

  14. Recent advances in robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Soichiro; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Robotic technology, which has recently been introduced to the field of surgery, is expected to be useful, particularly in treating rectal cancer where precise manipulation is necessary in the confined pelvic cavity. Robotic surgery overcomes the technical drawbacks inherent to laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer through the use of multi-articulated flexible tools, three-dimensional stable camera platforms, tremor filtering and motion scaling functions, and greater ergonomic and intuitive device manipulation. Assessments of the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have reported similar operation times, blood loss during surgery, rates of postoperative morbidity, and circumferential resection margin involvement when compared with laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, rates of conversion to open surgery are reportedly lower with increased urinary and male sexual functions in the early postoperative period compared with laparoscopic surgery, demonstrating the technical advantages of robotic surgery for rectal cancer. However, long-term outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have not been fully evaluated yet; therefore, large-scale clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of this new technology.

  15. Voiding Dysfunction after Total Mesorectal Excision in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Noh, Tae Il; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Gu; Um, Jun Won; Min, Byung Wook

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the voiding dysfunction after rectal cancer surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Methods This was part of a prospective study done in the rectal cancer patients who underwent surgery with TME between November 2006 and June 2008. Consecutive uroflowmetry, post-voided residual volume, and a voiding questionnaire were performed at preoperatively and postoperatively. Results A total of 50 patients were recruited in this study, including 28 male and 22 female. In the comparison of the preoperative data with the postoperative 3-month data, a significant decrease in mean maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume were found. In the comparison with the postoperative 6-month data, however only the maximal flow rate was decreased with statistical significance (P=0.02). In the comparison between surgical methods, abdominoperineal resection patients showed delayed recovery of maximal flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided residual volume. There was no significant difference in uroflowmetry parameters with advances in rectal cancer stage. Conclusions Voiding dysfunction is common after rectal cancer surgery but can be recovered in 6 months after surgery or earlier. Abdominoperineal resection was shown to be an unfavorable factor for postoperative voiding. Larger prospective study is needed to determine the long-term effect of rectal cancer surgery in relation to male and female baseline voiding condition. PMID:22087426

  16. [Current MRI staging of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wietek, B M; Kratt, T

    2012-11-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the second most prevalent cause for cancer, and has very variable outcomes. Advancements in surgery, the change from adjuvant to neo-adjuvant radio-chemo-therapies as well as in clinical diagnostics have improved the prognosis for patients in a multi-modal therapy concept. An accurate primary staging including a reliable prediction of the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has established MR Imaging (MRI) beside intraluminal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). MRI facilitates the selection of patients likely to benefit from a preoperative therapy, especially in cases of unfavorable factors. Currently the relationship of the tumor to the mesorectal fascia has become a more important prognostic factor than the T-staging, particularly for surgical therapy. In addition further prognostic factors like the depth of infiltration into the perirectal fat and the extramural venous infiltration (EMVI) have important impact on therapy and prognosis. High resolution MRI has proved useful in clarifying the relationship between the tumor and the mesorectal fascia, which represents the CRM at the total mesorectal excision (TME) especially in the upper and middle third. Preoperative evaluation of the other prognostic factors as well as the nodal status is still difficult. It is used increasingly not only for primary staging but also progressively for the monitoring of neoadjuvant therapy. The addition of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is an interesting option for the improvement of response evaluation. The following overview provides an introduction of MRI diagnosis as well as its importance for the evaluation of the clinically relevant prognostic factors leading to an improvement of therapy and prognosis of patients with rectal carcinoma. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Electrophysiological characterization of human rectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kheng-Seong; Brookes, Simon J.; Montes-Adrian, Noemi A.; Mahns, David A.

    2016-01-01

    It is presumed that extrinsic afferent nerves link the rectum to the central nervous system. However, the anatomical/functional existence of such nerves has never previously been demonstrated in humans. Therefore, we aimed to identify and make electrophysiological recordings in vitro from extrinsic afferents, comparing human rectum to colon. Sections of normal rectum and colon were procured from anterior resection and right hemicolectomy specimens, respectively. Sections were pinned and extrinsic nerves dissected. Extracellular visceral afferent nerve activity was recorded. Neuronal responses to chemical [capsaicin and “inflammatory soup” (IS)] and mechanical (Von Frey probing) stimuli were recorded and quantified as peak firing rate (range) in 1-s intervals. Twenty-eight separate nerve trunks from eight rectums were studied. Of these, spontaneous multiunit afferent activity was recorded in 24 nerves. Peak firing rates increased significantly following capsaicin [median 6 (range 3–25) spikes/s vs. 2 (1–4), P < 0.001] and IS [median 5 (range 2–18) spikes/s vs. 2 (1–4), P < 0.001]. Mechanosensitive “hot spots” were identified in 16 nerves [median threshold 2.0 g (range 1.4–6.0 g)]. In eight of these, the threshold decreased after IS [1.0 g (0.4–1.4 g)]. By comparison, spontaneous activity was recorded in only 3/30 nerves studied from 10 colons, and only one hot spot (threshold 60 g) was identified. This study confirms the anatomical/functional existence of extrinsic rectal afferent nerves and characterizes their chemo- and mechanosensitivity for the first time in humans. They have different electrophysiological properties to colonic afferents and warrant further investigation in disease states. PMID:27789454

  18. Electrophysiological characterization of human rectal afferents.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kheng-Seong; Brookes, Simon J; Montes-Adrian, Noemi A; Mahns, David A; Gladman, Marc A

    2016-12-01

    It is presumed that extrinsic afferent nerves link the rectum to the central nervous system. However, the anatomical/functional existence of such nerves has never previously been demonstrated in humans. Therefore, we aimed to identify and make electrophysiological recordings in vitro from extrinsic afferents, comparing human rectum to colon. Sections of normal rectum and colon were procured from anterior resection and right hemicolectomy specimens, respectively. Sections were pinned and extrinsic nerves dissected. Extracellular visceral afferent nerve activity was recorded. Neuronal responses to chemical [capsaicin and "inflammatory soup" (IS)] and mechanical (Von Frey probing) stimuli were recorded and quantified as peak firing rate (range) in 1-s intervals. Twenty-eight separate nerve trunks from eight rectums were studied. Of these, spontaneous multiunit afferent activity was recorded in 24 nerves. Peak firing rates increased significantly following capsaicin [median 6 (range 3-25) spikes/s vs. 2 (1-4), P < 0.001] and IS [median 5 (range 2-18) spikes/s vs. 2 (1-4), P < 0.001]. Mechanosensitive "hot spots" were identified in 16 nerves [median threshold 2.0 g (range 1.4-6.0 g)]. In eight of these, the threshold decreased after IS [1.0 g (0.4-1.4 g)]. By comparison, spontaneous activity was recorded in only 3/30 nerves studied from 10 colons, and only one hot spot (threshold 60 g) was identified. This study confirms the anatomical/functional existence of extrinsic rectal afferent nerves and characterizes their chemo- and mechanosensitivity for the first time in humans. They have different electrophysiological properties to colonic afferents and warrant further investigation in disease states. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Results of radical surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Heald, R J; Karanjia, N D

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the hypothesis that a reduction in the distal mural margin during anterior resection for sphincter conservation in rectal cancer excision is safe, provided total mesorectal excision is undertaken with wash-out of the clamped rectum. One hundred ninety-two patients underwent anterior resection and 21 (less than 10%) patients underwent abdomino-perineal excision (APE) by one surgeon (RJH). Anterior resections were classified as "curative" (79%) and "non-curative" (21%); in the "curative" sub-group less than 4% of patients developed local recurrence. The series was retrospectively analyzed for the effect of mural margins on local recurrence with 152 patients undergoing "curative" anterior resections and 40 patients undergoing "non-curative" resections. In the 152 specimens from curative resections, 110 had a resection margin greater than 1 cm and 42 had a resection margin less than 1 cm. Four patients developed local recurrence in the greater than 1 cm margin group (95% confidence interval: 0.8%-7.8%) and no patients developed local recurrence in the less than or equal to 1 cm margin group (95% confidence interval: 0%-5.9%). In each patient with local recurrence a cause for failure was apparent. There was no statistically significant difference in local recurrence rate between the less than or equal to 1 cm margin group and the greater than 1 cm margin group. A reduction in resection margin therefore did not compromise survival after anterior resection. The significance of lateral resection margins is discussed. The role of deep radiotherapy and cytotoxics are considered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Neo-adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glimelius, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    In rectal cancer treatment, attention has focused on the local primary tumour and the regional tumour cell deposits to diminish the risk of a loco-regional recurrence. Several large randomized trials have also shown that combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have markedly reduced the risk of a loco-regional recurrence, but this has not yet had any major influence on overall survival. The best results have been achieved when the radiotherapy has been given preoperatively. Preoperative radiotherapy improves loco-regional control even when surgery has been optimized to improve lateral clearance, i.e., when a total mesorectal excision has been performed. The relative reduction is then 50%-70%. The value of radiotherapy has not been tested in combination with more extensive surgery including lateral lymph node clearance, as practised in some Asian countries. Many details about how the radiotherapy is performed are still open for discussion, and practice varies between countries. A highly fractionated radiation schedule (5 Gy × 5), proven efficacious in many trials, has gained much popularity in some countries, whereas a conventionally fractionated regimen (1.8-2.0 Gy × 25-28), often combined with chemotherapy, is used in other countries. The additional therapy adds morbidity to the morbidity that surgery causes, and should therefore be administered only when the risk of loco-regional recurrence is sufficiently high. The best integration of the weakest modality, to date the drugs (conventional cytotoxics and biologicals) is not known. A new generation of trials exploring the best sequence of treatments is required. Furthermore, there is a great need to develop predictors of response, so that treatment can be further individualized and not solely based upon clinical factors and anatomic imaging. PMID:24379566

  1. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  2. Same admission colostomy closure (SACC). A new approach to rectal wounds: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Renz, B M; Feliciano, D V; Sherman, R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purposes of this project were to study the healing of protected rectal wounds (RWs) using contrast enemas (CEs) and to establish the safety of same admission colostomy closure (SACC) in terms of colostomy closure (CC) and rectal wound-related outcomes, for selected patients with radiologically healed RWs. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Traditional treatment of RWs has included a diverting colostomy that is closed 2 or more months later during a readmission. METHODS: All patients admitted with a rectal injury were entered into this prospective study, treated with a diverting colostomy and presacral drainage, and managed according to a postoperative protocol that included a CE per anus to detect healing of the RW. Patients with no leaking on their first CE, no infection, and anal continence underwent SACC. RESULTS: From 1990 to 1993, 30 consecutive patients had rectal injuries, 90% of which resulted from gunshot wounds. The first CE was performed in 29 patients 5 to 10 days after injury. In this group, 21 patients did not and 8 did have leakage from their RWs. The proportions of RWs radiologically healed at 7 and 10 days after injury were 55.2% and 75%, respectively. Sixteen patients with a normal CE underwent SACC 9 to 19 days after injury (mean, 12.4 days). There were two fecal fistulas (2 of 7; 28.6%) after simple suture closure, none (0 of 9) after resection of the stoma with end-to-end anastomosis, and no RW-related complications after SACC. The mean hospitalization time was 17.4 days. CONCLUSIONS: The following conclusions were drawn: (1) CE confirmed healing of RWs in 75% of patients by 10 days after injury; (2) 60% of patients with RWs were candidates for SACC, and 53% were discharged with their colostomies closed; (3) SACC was performed without complications in 87.5% of patients with radiologically healed RWs; and (4) there were no RW-related complications after SACC. Images Figure 6. Figure 7. Figure 8. Figure 9. PMID:8373271

  3. Using dose-surface maps to predict radiation-induced rectal bleeding: a neural network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buettner, Florian; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Webb, Steve; Partridge, Mike

    2009-09-01

    The incidence of late-toxicities after radiotherapy can be modelled based on the dose delivered to the organ under consideration. Most predictive models reduce the dose distribution to a set of dose-volume parameters and do not take the spatial distribution of the dose into account. The aim of this study was to develop a classifier predicting radiation-induced rectal bleeding using all available information on the dose to the rectal wall. The dose was projected on a two-dimensional dose-surface map (DSM) by virtual rectum-unfolding. These DSMs were used as inputs for a classification method based on locally connected neural networks. In contrast to fully connected conventional neural nets, locally connected nets take the topology of the input into account. In order to train the nets, data from 329 patients from the RT01 trial (ISRCTN 47772397) were split into ten roughly equal parts. By using nine of these parts as a training set and the remaining part as an independent test set, a ten-fold cross-validation was performed. Ensemble learning was used and 250 nets were built from randomly selected patients from the training set. Out of these 250 nets, an ensemble of expert nets was chosen. The performances of the full ensemble and of the expert ensemble were quantified by using receiver-operator-characteristic (ROC) curves. In order to quantify the predictive power of the shape, ensembles of fully connected conventional neural nets based on dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were generated and their performances were quantified. The expert ensembles performed better than or equally as well as the full ensembles. The area under the ROC curve for the DSM-based expert ensemble was 0.64. The area under the ROC curve for the DSH-based expert ensemble equalled 0.59. This difference in performance indicates that not only volumetric, but also morphological aspects of the dose distribution are correlated to rectal bleeding after radiotherapy. Thus, the shape of the dose

  4. [Role of neoadjuvant radiotherapy for rectal cancer : Is MRI-based selection a future model?].

    PubMed

    Kulu, Y; Hackert, T; Debus, J; Weber, M-A; Büchler, M W; Ulrich, A

    2016-07-01

    Following the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) in the curative treatment of rectal cancer, the role of neoadjuvant therapy has evolved. By improving the surgical technique the local recurrence rate could be reduced by TME surgery alone to below 8 %. Even if local control was further improved by additional preoperative irradiation this did not lead to a general survival benefit. Guidelines advocate that all patients in UICC stage II and III should be pretreated; however, the stage-based indications for neoadjuvant therapy have limitations. This is mainly attributable to the facts that patients with T3 tumors comprise a very heterogeneous prognostic group and preoperative lymph node diagnostics lack accuracy. In contrast, in recent years the circumferential resection margin (CRM) has become an important prognostic parameter. Patients with tumors that are very close to or infiltrate the pelvic fascia (positive CRM) have a higher rate of local recurrence and poorer survival. With high-resolution pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination in patients with rectal cancer, the preoperative CRM can be determined with a high sensitivity and specificity. Improved T staging and better prediction of the resection margins by pelvic MRI potentially facilitate the selection of patients for study-based treatment strategies omitting neoadjuvant radiotherapy.

  5. Anastomotic leak rate after low anterior resection for rectal cancer after chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Benjamin R; Harris, Lisa J; Maxwell, Pinckney J; Isenberg, Gerald A; Goldstein, Scott D

    2010-08-01

    Anastomotic leak may be the most concerning complication after colorectal anastomosis. To compare open with laparoscopic rectal resection, we must have accurate leak rates in patients who have received neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy to serve as a benchmark for comparison. All patients who had preoperative chemoradiation therapy with rectal resection and low pelvic anastomosis for cancer in a single colorectal practice over a 7-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had proximal diversion and a contrast enema study before stoma reversal. Eighty-seven consecutive patients were included in the study. Average age was 58 years. Fifty-nine per cent of patients were male. Sixty-six per cent were smokers. Pathologic T stage was 5 per cent T0, 16 per cent T1, 28 per cent T2, 47 per cent T3, and 5 per cent T4. Seventy-five per cent of patients were pathologically lymph node-negative. Average time to stoma reversal was 122 days. Total anastomotic leak rate was 10.3 per cent (8% clinical leaks). Five (56%) patients with leak successfully underwent reversal of their diverting stoma (average time to reversal, 290 days). Patients who had the complication of anastomotic leakage had less likelihood of stoma reversal and a significantly prolonged time to stoma reversal.

  6. [Recto-sacral fixation in the treatment of rectal prolapse refractory to conservative treatment].

    PubMed

    Alaminos Mingorance, M; Sánchez López-Tello, C; Valladares Mendías, J C; Fernández Valadés, R

    2000-04-01

    The clinical cases of 20 patients submitted to Reifferscheid intervention (fixation of rectum to promontorium) between 1967 and 1997 are presented. Twenty patients have been treated by means of the operation of Reifferscheid. They were divided in two groups: from 1967 to 1972, ten patients were submitted to this technique (group A). From 1974 to 1997, other ten patients (group B). In each case, the following items were registered: sex, eventual secondary diagnosis, incision, complications, middle-term evolution. Group A: Middle age: 2.15 years old. Sex: 7 girls (5 of them presented mielomeningocele) and 3 males; pararectal incision for babies, Pfannenstiel incision for children over 1 year-old. 2 years without recidives. Group B: Middle age: 2.5 years-old, 9 males (2 of them were diagnosed of mielomeningocele) and 1 girl. No recidives were detected. These excellent results obtained with Reifferscheid operation contrast with the poor results referred by other authors for other therapeutical approaches. That is why, in patients affected of serious rectal prolapse, especially when associated to other pathologies, rectal fixation to promontorium is an useful and long-term sure approach.

  7. Assessment of T staging and mesorectal fascia status using high-resolution MRI in rectal cancer with rectal distention

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Zeng, Meng-Su; Xu, Jian-Ming; Qin, Xin-Yu; Chen, Cai-Zhong; Li, Ren-Chen; Hou, Ying-Yong

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the accuracy of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using phased-array coil for preoperative assessment of T staging and mesorectal fascia infiltration in rectal cancer with rectal distention. METHODS: In a prospective study of 67 patients with primary rectal cancer, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (in-plane resolution, 0.66 × 0.56) with phased-array coil were performed for T-staging and measurement of distance between the tumor and the mesorectal fascia. The assessment of MRI was compared with postoperative histopathologic findings. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were evaluated. RESULTS: The overall magnetic resonance accuracy was 85.1% for T staging and 88% for predicting mesorectal fascia involvement. Magnetic resonance sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value was 70%, 97.9%, 89.6%, 93.3% and 88.5% for ≤ T2 tumors, 90.5%, 76%, 85.1%, 86.4% and 82.6% for T3 tumors, 100%, 95.2%, 95.5%, 62.5% and 100% for T4 tumors, and 80%, 90.4%, 88%, 70.6% and 94% for predicting mesorectal fascia involvement, respectively. CONCLUSION: High-resolution MRI enables accurate preoperative assessment for T staging and mesorectal fascia infiltration in rectal cancer with rectal distention. PMID:17696238

  8. Metachronous penile metastasis from rectal cancer after total pelvic exenteration.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuta; Shida, Dai; Nasu, Keiichi; Matsunaga, Hiroki; Warabi, Masahiro; Inoue, Satoru

    2012-10-14

    Despite its abundant vascularization and extensive circulatory communication with neighboring organs, metastases to the penis are a rare event. A 57-year-old male, who had undergone total pelvic exenteration for rectal cancer sixteen months earlier, demonstrated an abnormal uptake within his penis by positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A single elastic nodule of the middle penis shaft was noted deep within Bucks fascia. No other obvious recurrent site was noted except the penile lesion. Total penectomy was performed as a curative resection based on a diagnosis of isolated penile metastasis from rectal cancer. A histopathological examination revealed an increase of well differentiated adenocarcinoma in the corpus spongiosum consistent with his primary rectal tumor. The immunohistochemistry of the tumor cells demonstrated positive staining for cytokeratin 20 and negative staining for cytokeratin 7, which strongly supported a diagnosis of penile metastasis from the rectum. The patient is alive more than two years without any recurrence.

  9. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  10. ["The three-lies disease": solitary rectal ulcer syndrome].

    PubMed

    Crespo Pérez, L; Moreira Vicente, V; Redondo Verge, C; López San Román, A; Milicua Salamero, J M

    2007-11-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is an uncommon benign condition characterized by rectal bleeding, passage of mucus, and pain. Histological features are well established as obliteration of the lamina propria by fibrosis and smooth-muscle fibers extending from a thickened muscularis mucosa to the lumen. Diagnosis can usually be made on sigmoidoscopy, and biopsies should always be taken. Ulceration is not universally present, and polypoid, non-ulcerated lesions and erythematous areas are also seen. The lesion or lesions are most often found on the anterior or anterolateral wall of the rectum, although they can also be located in the left colon and be more extensive or even circumferential. Lesions are multiple in 30 percent of cases. These are the reasons why this entity is also known as "the disease of three lies". We report a case of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome presenting at endoscopy with an erythematous area on the left side wall of the rectum.

  11. Smooth muscle pseudotumours: a potentially confusing artefact of rectal biopsy.

    PubMed Central

    Dankwa, E K; Davies, J D

    1988-01-01

    An artefactual smooth muscle lesion was found in seven of 500 consecutive rectal biopsy specimens. The lesions had the deceptive appearance of a genuine tumour although none of the patients with the lesion had presented with a rectal mucosal swelling. The morphology of the lesion and its poor reproducibility under experimental conditions suggested that it was an artefact of the biopsy procedure: it was easily reproduced in resected specimens of large bowel using punch or basket forceps but not when using flat forceps. The presence of the lesion seems to depend on the type of forceps used rather than on differences in deployment and seems to be caused by avulsion of the superficial part of the muscularis propria and its incorporation into the tissues included in rectal biopsy specimens. Images Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 1 Fig 4 PMID:3045159

  12. Human Collagen Injections to Reduce Rectal Dose During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, William R.; Hosford, Charles C.; Schultz, Steven E.

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: The continuing search for interventions, which address the incidence and grade of rectal toxicities associated with radiation treatment of prostate cancer, is a major concern. We are reporting an investigational trial using human collagen to increase the distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall, thereby decreasing the radiation dose to the rectum. Methods: This is a pilot study evaluating the use of human collagen as a displacing agent for the rectal wall injected before starting a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Using a transperineal approach, 20 mL of human collagen was injected into the perirectal space in an outpatient setting. Computerized IMRT plans were performed pre- and postcollagen injection, and after a patient completed their radiotherapy, to determine radiation dose reduction to the rectum associated with the collagen injection. Computed tomography scans were performed 6 months and 12 months after completing their radiotherapy to evaluate absorption rate of the collagen. All patients were treated with IMRT to a dose of 75.6 Gy to the prostate. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled into the study. The injection of human collagen in the outpatient setting was well tolerated. The mean separation between the prostate and anterior rectum was 12.7 mm. The mean reduction in dose to the anterior rectal wall was 50%. All men denied any rectal symptoms during the study. Conclusions: The transperineal injection of human collagen for the purpose of tissue displacement is well tolerated in the outpatient setting. The increased separation between the prostate and rectum resulted in a significant decrease in radiation dose to the rectum while receiving IMRT and was associated with no rectal toxicities.

  13. Human collagen injections to reduce rectal dose during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noyes, William R; Hosford, Charles C; Schultz, Steven E

    2012-04-01

    The continuing search for interventions, which address the incidence and grade of rectal toxicities associated with radiation treatment of prostate cancer, is a major concern. We are reporting an investigational trial using human collagen to increase the distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall, thereby decreasing the radiation dose to the rectum. This is a pilot study evaluating the use of human collagen as a displacing agent for the rectal wall injected before starting a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Using a transperineal approach, 20 mL of human collagen was injected into the perirectal space in an outpatient setting. Computerized IMRT plans were performed pre- and postcollagen injection, and after a patient completed their radiotherapy, to determine radiation dose reduction to the rectum associated with the collagen injection. Computed tomography scans were performed 6 months and 12 months after completing their radiotherapy to evaluate absorption rate of the collagen. All patients were treated with IMRT to a dose of 75.6 Gy to the prostate. Eleven patients were enrolled into the study. The injection of human collagen in the outpatient setting was well tolerated. The mean separation between the prostate and anterior rectum was 12.7 mm. The mean reduction in dose to the anterior rectal wall was 50%. All men denied any rectal symptoms during the study. The transperineal injection of human collagen for the purpose of tissue displacement is well tolerated in the outpatient setting. The increased separation between the prostate and rectum resulted in a significant decrease in radiation dose to the rectum while receiving IMRT and was associated with no rectal toxicities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  15. Rectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases: Do we have a clear direction?

    PubMed

    Pathak, S; Nunes, Q M; Daniels, I R; Smart, N J; Poston, G J; Påhlman, L

    2015-12-01

    Rectal cancer is a common entity and often presents with synchronous liver metastases. There are discrepancies in management guidelines throughout the world regarding the treatment of advanced rectal cancer, which are further compounded when it presents with synchronous liver metastases. The following article examines the evidence regarding treatment options for patients with synchronous rectal liver metastases and suggests potential treatment algorithms.

  16. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Zheng, L. Q.; Jiang, X. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  17. Rectal inflammatory stenosis secondary to Chlamydia trachomatis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pérez Sánchez, Luis Eduardo; Hernández Barroso, Moisés; Hernández Hernández, Guillermo

    2017-09-01

    The rectal inflammatory originated strictures constitute a rare cause of intestinal obstruction. We present a 30-year-old male patient with a history of HIV and protctitis caused by Chalmydia trachomatis and HSV-2, in which develops a low intestinal obstruction refractory to medical treatment. Surgery was performed with good clinical evolution. The medical treatment constitutes the fundamental basis of the therapy in these patients. Despite that, when fibrotic stenoses are not treatable medical or endoscopically, they often require surgical treatment. We must pay attention to the proctitis infectious diseases as a cause of rectal stenosis, especially by Chlamydia trachomatis, and assess surgical option in refractory cases.

  18. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy for incarcerated rectal prolapse (Altemeier’s procedure)

    PubMed Central

    Sipahi, Mesut; Arslan, Ergin; Börekçi, Hasan; Aytekin, Faruk Önder; Külah, Bahadır; Banlı, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Perineal procedures have higher recurrence and lower mortality rates than abdominal alternatives for the treatment of rectal prolapse. Presence of incarceration and strangulation also influences treatment choice. Perineal rectosigmoidectomy is one of the treatment options in patients with incarceration and strangulation, with low mortality and acceptable recurrence rates. This operation can be performed especially to avoid general anesthesia in old patients with co-morbidities. We aimed to present perineal rectosigmoidectomy and diverting loop colostomy in a patient with neurological disability due to spinal trauma and incarcerated rectal prolapse. PMID:27528816

  19. Fatal cerebral air embolism following endoscopic evaluation of rectal stump

    PubMed Central

    Baban, Chwanrow Karim; Murphy, Michael; Hennessy, Tony; O'Hanlon, Deirdre

    2013-01-01

    A 63-year-old man underwent endoscopic evaluation of the rectal stump for rectal bleeding and suffered a massive cerebral air embolism with severe neurological impairment and subsequent death. The patient underwent a Hartmann's procedure 9 month previously for ischaemic bowel and was noted to have portal hypertension at laparotomy. We hypothesise that air entered the venous plexus around rectum and entered the azygos vein via a porto-systemic shunt and travelled retrogradely via the superior vena cava to the venous sinuses of the brain. PMID:23704447

  20. Perirectal fascia: morphology and use in staging of rectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Grabbe, E.; Lierse, W.; Winkler, R.

    1983-10-01

    A revised anatomy of the perirectal fascia is proposed based on more than 2000 CT examinations of the lower pelvis. CT examination showed that the perirectal fascia completely encloses the capsula adipose rectalis within the subperitoneal space and separates the perirectal compartment from the pararectal connective tissue. The accuracy of CT in preoperative staging of rectal carcinoma was also demonstrated. It is concluded on the basis of 155 preopertive CT examinations of rectal carcinoma that CT staging is superior to Mason's clinical staging scheme, although routine staging by CT is not justified because slight perirectal tumor spread and lymph node metastasis cannot be predicted accurately.

  1. Rectal fist insertion. An unusual form of sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Shook, L L; Whittle, R; Rose, E F

    1985-12-01

    Rectal fist insertion (fist fucking) is an uncommon and potentially dangerous sexual practice. This is usually a homosexual activity, but can also be a heterosexual or an autoerotic practice. One known death has been reported associated with rectal fist insertion, in which the complications of anal and colonic tears and bleeding had occurred (see Editor's note). The possibility of drug overdose is also probable, as drugs and alcohol are commonly introduced into the rectum to promote sphincter relaxation and to ease the discomfort of anal dilatation.

  2. Total mesorectal excision and management of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Ilia; Phang, P Terry

    2007-10-01

    Treatment of rectal cancer over the last two decades has evolved with changes in techniques of surgery and radiation based on national and international trials. Preoperative adjuvant radiation is now preferred over postoperative adjuvant radiation, and total mesorectal excision with preservation of pelvic nerves is the gold standard for surgical treatment of rectal cancer. Preservation of the anal sphincter without compromising oncological outcome is an additional benefit for patients with carcinoma in the distal rectum. Further progress in imaging and a multidisciplinary team approach will facilitate individualization of treatment strategy with more focus on quality of life.

  3. Rectal foreign bodies: imaging assessment and medicolegal aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Antonio; Miele, Vittorio; Pinto, Fabio; Mizio, Veronica Di; Panico, Maria Rita; Muzj, Carlo; Romano, Luigia

    2015-02-01

    The amount of patients presenting at the emergency hospitals with retained rectal foreign bodies appears recently to have increased. Foreign objects retained in the rectum may result from direct introduction through the anus (more common) or from ingestion. Affected individuals often make ineffective attempts to extract the object themselves, resulting in additional delay of medical care and potentially increasing the risk of complications. The goals of radiological patient assessment are to identify the type of object retained, its location, and the presence of associated complications. Plain film radiographs still play an important role in the assessment of retained rectal foreign bodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of group B streptococci colonization in vaginal and rectal specimens by culture method and polymerase chain reaction technique.

    PubMed

    Bidgani, Shahrokh; Navidifar, Tahereh; Najafian, Mahin; Amin, Mansour

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS) is a colonizing microorganism in pregnant women and without causing symptoms. Colonization of GBS in the rectovaginal region in late of pregnancy is a risk factor for newborn diseases. GBS infection in newborn babies is acquired by the aspiration of infected amniotic fluid or vertical transmission during delivery through the birth canal. The aim of this study was determination of GBS prevalence among vaginal and anorectal specimens at gestation females by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture-based methods. In this study, 137 rectal and vaginal swabs were separately collected from women with gestational age 35-37 weeks from July 2013 to March 2014 at the teaching hospital of Razi, Ahvaz, Iran. All samples were enrichment in selective culture media Todd-Hewitt broth for 24 hours and recognized by standard culture using blood agar, phenotypic tests, and amplification of the CFB gene. Age range was 16-45 years (mean, 28.34 ± 0.7 years). Of rectal samples, 42 (30.7%) were positive based on culture method and 57 (41.6%) samples were positive by PCR. Of 137 vaginal samples, 38 (27.7%) were positive by culture and 60 (43.8%) samples were positive by PCR. The chance of colonization with GBS was increased in women with a history of urinary tract infection. The frequency of GBS culture from rectal samples was higher than vaginal samples. However, the detection percentage of GBS using PCR from vaginal samples was higher than rectal samples. By contrast, the culture is a time-consuming method requiring at least 48 hours for GBS fully identification but PCR is a sensitive and rapid technique in detection of GBS, with the result was acquired during 3 hours. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  5. Small bowel hydro-MR imaging for optimized ileocecal distension in Crohn's disease: should an additional rectal enema filling be performed?

    PubMed

    Ajaj, Waleed; Lauenstein, Thomas C; Langhorst, Jost; Kuehle, Christiane; Goyen, Mathias; Zoepf, Thomas; Ruehm, Stefan G; Gerken, Guido; Debatin, Jorg F; Goehde, Susanne C

    2005-07-01

    To assess the impact of an additional rectal enema filling in small bowel hydro-MRI in patients with Crohn's disease. A total of 40 patients with known Crohn's disease were analyzed retrospectively: 20 patients only ingested an oral contrast agent (group A), the other 20 subjects obtained an additional rectal water enema (group B). For small bowel distension, a solution containing 0.2% locust bean gum (LBG) and 2.5% mannitol was used. In all patients, a breathhold contrast-enhanced T1w three-dimensional volumetric interpolated breathhold examination (VIBE) sequence was acquired. Comparative analysis was based on image quality and bowel distension as well as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements. MR findings were compared with those of conventional colonoscopy, as available (N = 25). The terminal ileum and rectum showed a significantly higher distension following the rectal administration of water. Furthermore, fewer artifacts were seen within group B. This resulted in a higher reader confidence for the diagnosis of bowel disease, not only in the colon, but also in the ileocecal region. Diagnostic accuracy in diagnosing inflammation of the terminal ileum was 100% in group B; in the nonenema group there were three false-negative diagnoses of terminal ileitis. Our data show that the additional administration of a rectal enema is useful in small bowel MRI for the visualization of the terminal ileum. The additional time needed for the enema administration was minimal, and small and large bowel pathologies could be diagnosed with high accuracy. Thus, we suggest that a rectal enema in small bowel MR imaging be considered.

  6. Accumulation of phenylpropanoid and sesquiterpenoid volatiles in male rectal pheromonal glands of the guava fruit fly, Bactrocera correcta.

    PubMed

    Tokushima, Isao; Orankanok, Watchreeporn; Tan, Keng Hong; Ono, Hajime; Nishida, Ritsuo

    2010-12-01

    The guava fruit fly, Bactrocera correcta, is widely distributed in Thailand and other surrounding Southeast Asian countries, and, like the closely related sympatric species, the oriental fruit fly, B. dorsalis, infests various fruits, including guava, peach, and mango. Males of both B. correcta and B. dorsalis are strongly attracted to, and compulsively feed on, methyl eugenol (ME). Bactrocera dorsalis males fed on ME sequester its metabolite phenylpropanoids, (E)-coniferyl alcohol and 2-allyl-4,5-dimethoxyphenol, in the rectal pheromone gland. In contrast, B. correcta males fed on ME sequester two different metabolites, (Z)-coniferyl alcohol (ZCF) and (Z)-3,4-dimethoxycinnamyl alcohol (DMC), in the rectal gland. Examination of the temporal changes of ME metabolites in B. correcta male rectal glands revealed that the total of ZCF and DMC was as high as 100 μg/male at 24 hr after ME feeding. ZCF and DMC were detected in a large proportion of wild B. correcta males captured at various sites in Thailand. Since B. correcta and B. dorsalis are sympatric species in Thailand, these two different subsets of rectal phenylpropanoids could play a role to avoid interbreeding between the species. Further survey of wild flies in Thailand revealed that a large proportion of males of B. correcta store large quantities (over 250 μg/gland) of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, including β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, and alloaromadendrene in the rectal gland in addition to, or instead of, ZCF and DMC. Laboratory-reared males also sequestered β-caryophyllene and α-humulene, along with ZCF and DMC, when the sesquiterpenes were artificially supplied together with ME. A field test demonstrated that a mixture (1:1) of β-caryophyllene and α-humulene attracted male B. correcta, albeit in smaller numbers than in traps baited with ME. The sequestration of sesquiterpenes, in addition to the different ME metabolites in the pheromone gland in B. correcta males, contrasts with the situation in

  7. Hypersensitivity to contrast media and dyes.

    PubMed

    Brockow, Knut; Sánchez-Borges, Mario

    2014-08-01

    This article updates current knowledge on hypersensitivity reactions to diagnostic contrast media and dyes. After application of a single iodinated radiocontrast medium (RCM), gadolinium-based contrast medium, fluorescein, or a blue dye, a hypersensitivity reaction is not a common finding; however, because of the high and still increasing frequency of those procedures, patients who have experienced severe reactions are nevertheless frequently encountered in allergy departments. Evidence on allergologic testing and management is best for iodinated RCM, limited for blue dyes, and insufficient for fluorescein. Skin tests can be helpful in the diagnosis of patients with hypersensitivity reactions to these compounds.

  8. Pre-referral rectal artesunate for severe malaria

    PubMed Central

    Okebe, Joseph; Eisenhut, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe or complicated malaria is a medical emergency and people die as a result of delays in starting treatment. Most patients need parenteral treatment, and in primary healthcare facilities, where intravenous therapy is not available but intramuscular injections can be given, intramuscular quinine, artesunate, and artemether have been used before transporting patients to hospital. However, in rural settings with limited access to health care, intramuscular injections may also be unavailable. In these situations, rectal artesunate given prior to transfer to hospital by volunteers with little medical training, may be a feasible option. Objectives To evaluate the effects of pre-referral treatment with rectal artesunate on mortality and morbidity in people with severe malaria. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE and LILACS up to 21 May 2014. We also searched the WHO clinical trial registry platform and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) for ongoing trials. Selection criteria Individual or cluster-randomized controlled trials comparing pre-referral rectal artesunate with placebo or injectable antimalarials in children and children with severe malaria. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts for potentially eligible trials, and extracted data from the included trials. Dichotomous outcomes were summarized using risk ratios (RR) and presented with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Where data allowed, we conducted subgroup analyses by age, trial region and whether participants were included in the trial analysis. We assessed the quality of evidence for the most important outcomes using the GRADE approach. Main results One trial met the inclusion criteria; a placebo-controlled trial of 17,826 children and adults living in rural villages in Ghana and Tanzania (Africa) and Bangladesh (Asia). Villagers with no

  9. SU-E-T-407: Evaluation of the Stopping Power and Imaging Visibility for Iodine Based Contrast in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, H; Zhao, L; Rana, S; Chacko, M; Zheng, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between calculated and measured relative linear stopping power (RLSP) for contrast medium in proton therapy. Furthermore, the visibility for different concentrations in prostate phantom on orthogonal X-ray system was evaluated Methods and Materials: In prostate cancer patient, rectal balloon along with the contrast media was used to visualize the balloon position, thus facilitating the patient setup during each fraction of the uniform scanning proton treatment. There were no fiducial markers implanted in the prostate for this patient. A blue wax phantom with outer dimensions 10cm(H) x 14.5cm(L) x 10cm(W) was made in house. To hold iodine based contrast solution, a rectangular shaped hole with dimensions 7cm(H) x 8cm(L) x 4cm(W) was made inside the phantom. Organically bound 8.5% iodine based Cystografin Dilute contrast agent with molecular formula C11H9I3N2O4.C7H17NO5 was used in this study. Six solutions were prepared; each mixture of water and iodine based contrast agent at different concentrations as 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 50%. During computed tomographic(CT) simulation, solutions were placed together at the isocenter of CT and scanned at 120kVp using the same protocol as for prostate cancer patients. The treatment planning was done in CMS-XiO system. Multi-layer-ion-chamber (MLIC) was used to measure residual proton range. Results: The 50% concentration contrast solution was used during treatment for better visualization on orthogonal X-ray image. The measured RLSP for 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% & 50% solutions were 1.005, 1.010, 1.018, 1.023 & 1.033; and similarly calculated RLSP from XiO were 1.090, 1.135, 1.222, 1.299 & 1.448 respectively. Conclusion: The treatment planning system could overestimates the relative stopping power of contrast solution with high concentrations. It is recommended to override the contrast with measured RLSP for high atomic number based contrast solution in treatment

  10. Iatrogenic direct rectal injury: an unusual complication during suprapubic cystostomy (SPC) insertion and its laparoscopic management.

    PubMed

    Rajmohan, Rakesh; Aguilar-Davidov, Bernardo; Tokas, Theodoros; Rassweiler, Jens; Gözen, Ali Serdar

    2013-06-24

    Suprapubic cystostomy (SPC) is commonly used, instead of indwelling urethral catheter- ization, as indicated in many pathological conditions. Although considered to be a safe procedure that can be easily performed in an outpatient basis several complications have been reported in international literature. Bowel injury can be a serious complication with the small intestine affected in the majority of cases. We present a case of an acci- dental rectal injury by a suprapubic catheter misplacement, in a 76 year old demented patient with prostatic hyperplasia and chronic urinary retention. The injury was confirmed by cystogra- phy and injection of contrast meterial through the suprapubic catheter, and successfully treated laparoscopically by an extraperitoneal approach. The patient was discharged after 10 days with- out any complications. The above method, in experienced hands, can be an effective primary treatment option for such rare but devastating complications. The case and management is unique as, to our knowledge, as no similar cases have been presented.

  11. Predictors of mesorectal fascia invasion after gadolinium injection in rectal carcinoma after neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Gennari, Antonio Giulio; De Paoli, Luca; Angileri, Roberta; Ukmar, Maja; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2014-01-01

    To assess spectral presaturation inversion-recovery MRI sequence with gadolinium to identify predictors of mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma after neoadjuvant therapy. Sixty-five patients underwent neoadjuvant concomitant radiation and chemotherapy and surgery. Magnetic resonance images were assessed by two radiologists. Linear (odds ratio, 95% confidence intervals: 19.33, 1.98-188.6) and reticular strands (odds ratio, 95% confidence intervals: 9.75, 1.45-67.77) reaching the MRF are predictors of MRF invasion. Linear or reticular mesorectal strands reaching the MRF detected at contrast-enhanced MRI represent a predictor of MRF invasion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory [Los Alamos, NM; Ward, Michael D [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-12-27

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  13. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2014-10-21

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  14. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2016-05-17

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  15. Surgical Correction of Rectal Prolapse in Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, Mayu; Wilding, Laura A; Nowland, Megan H

    2015-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is a common clinical problem in laboratory mice. This condition may occur spontaneously, develop after genetic manipulations, result from infections with pathogens such as Citrobacter species, or arise secondary to experimental design such as colitis models. The current standard of care at our institution is limited to monitoring mice until tissue becomes ulcerated or necrotic; this strategy often leads to premature euthanasia of valuable animals prior to the study endpoint. Surgical correction of rectal prolapse is performed routinely and with minimal complications in larger species by using manual reduction with placement of a pursestring suture. In this report, we investigated whether the use of a pursestring suture was an effective treatment for mice with rectal prolapse. The procedure includes anesthetizing mice with isoflurane, manually reducing prolapsed tissue, and placing a pursestring suture of 4-0 polydioxanone. We have performed this procedure successfully in 12 mice. Complications included self-trauma, fecal impaction due to lack of defecation, and mutilation of the surgical site by cage mates. Singly housing mice for 7 d postoperatively, applying multimodal analgesia, and releasing the pursestring when indicated eliminated these complications. The surgical repair of rectal prolapses in mice is a minimally invasive procedure that resolves the clinical symptoms of affected animals and reduces the number of mice that are euthanized prematurely prior to the study endpoint.

  16. Transvaginal resection of a rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Hara, Masayasu; Takayama, Satoru; Arakawa, Atsushi; Sato, Mikinori; Nagasaki, Takaya; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2012-09-01

    We herein report a case in which a rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was resected transvaginally. The patient, a 45-year-old female, had a rectal GIST on the anterior wall of the lower rectum. The tumor was within 6 cm of the anal verge, a location which would normally require performing an ultra-low anterior resection using the Double Staple Technique, and a diverting stoma. To minimize the invasiveness of treatment and to reduce the postoperative morbidity, a transvaginal resection was performed. Under general anesthesia, the posterior vaginal mucosa was incised vertically. The tumor was then excised en bloc with the overlying rectovaginal septum and rectal mesenchymal tissue. The defect was repaired primarily, and a diverting stoma was not required. The procedure was uncomplicated, and the patient was discharged home with an intact anal sphincter function and no abdominal incisions. In female patients, transvaginal resection of low anterior rectal lesions may provide a minimally invasive alternative to the traditional ultra-low anterior resection.

  17. Prototype of a rectal wall ultrasound image analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Ng, Wan S.; Abeyratne, Udantha R.; Tsang, Charles B.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a software system prototype for rectal wall ultrasound image processing, image display and 3D reconstruction and visualization of the rectal wall structure, which is aimed to help surgeons cope with large quantities of rectal wall ultrasound images. On the core image processing algorithm part, a novel multigradient field active contour model proposed by authors is used to complete the multi-layer boundary detection of the rectal wall. A novel unifying active contour model, which combines region information, gradient information and contour's internal constraint, is developed for tumor boundary detection. The region statistical information is described accurately by Gaussian Mixture Model, whose parameter solution is computed by Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The whole system is set up on Java platform. Java JAI technology is used for 2D image display, Java3D technology is employed for 3D reconstruction and visualization. The system prototype is currently composed of three main modules: image processing, image display and 3D visualization.

  18. Effects of oral phosphocysteamine and rectal cysteamine in cystinosis.

    PubMed Central

    van't Hoff, W G; Baker, T; Dalton, R N; Duke, L C; Smith, S P; Chantler, C; Haycock, G B

    1991-01-01

    Diurnal variation in leucocyte cystine and the effects of equimolar single doses of oral phosphocysteamine and rectal cysteamine were studied in eight patients with cystinosis, aged 1.8-16.5 years. No significant diurnal variation in leucocyte cystine was found. Absorption of cysteamine was reduced after rectal administration compared with the oral dose: mean (SD) peak concentration 17.2 (6.3) mumol/l v 36.4 (5.5) mumol/l at 40 min and mean (SD) area under the curve 22.3 (14.3) v 59.4 (33.1) mumol/h/l. Oral phosphocysteamine significantly reduced the mean (SD) leucocyte cystine from 8.09 (0.47) to 3.26 (1.48) nmol 1/2 cystine/mg protein at three hours. At 12 hours the mean leucocyte cystine was significantly lower than the pretreatment concentration. Rectal cysteamine did not significantly reduce the mean leucocyte cystine concentration. In conclusion, phosphocysteamine suspension may be administered every 12 hours. Rectal cysteamine administration is feasible but higher doses are required before efficacy can be judged. PMID:1776892

  19. Comparative clinicopathological characteristics of colon and rectal T1 carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ichimasa, Katsuro; Kudo, Shin-Ei; Miyachi, Hideyuki; Kouyama, Yuta; Hayashi, Takemasa; Wakamura, Kunihiko; Hisayuki, Tomokazu; Kudo, Toyoki; Misawa, Masashi; Mori, Yuichi; Matsudaira, Shingo; Hidaka, Eiji; Hamatani, Shigeharu; Ishida, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis significantly influences the management of patients with colorectal carcinoma. It has been observed that the biology of colorectal carcinoma differs by location. The aim of the current study was to retrospectively compare the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with colon and rectal T1 carcinomas, particularly their rates of lymph node metastasis. Of the 19,864 patients who underwent endoscopic or surgical resection of colorectal neoplasms at Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, 557 had T1 surgically resected carcinomas, including 457 patients with colon T1 carcinomas and 100 patients with rectal T1 carcinomas. Analysed clinicopathological features included patient age, gender, tumor size, morphology, tumor budding, invasion depth, vascular invasion, histological grade, lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis. Rectal T1 carcinomas were significantly larger than colon T1 carcinomas (mean ± standard deviation: 23.7±13.1 mm vs. 19.9±11.0 mm, P<0.01) and were accompanied by significantly higher rates of vascular invasion (48.0% vs. 30.2%, P<0.01). Significant differences were not observed among any other clinicopathological factors. In conclusion, tumor location itself was not a risk factor for lymph node metastasis in colorectal T1 carcinomas, even though on average, rectal T1 carcinomas were larger and accompanied by a significantly higher rate of vascular invasion than colon T1 carcinomas. PMID:28356962

  20. Acute rectal ischaemia following emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Frances R.; Akhtar, Sobia; George, Rina; Pillay, Woolagasen R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of isolated rectal ischaemia, a rare complication after emergency surgery for a ruptured abdominal aneurysm. We discuss the possible aetiology of this condition and how this rare condition may be missed unless care is taken at the time of reoperation. PMID:28344761

  1. [Preoperative intra-arterial chemotherapy for progressive lower rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yun-qiang; Tan, Zhi-ming; Wang, Jia-kang; Tang, Ri-jie; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Hong-yu; Mai, Cong; Zhang, Xiang-liang; Cui, Shu-zhong

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effect of preoperative regional intra-arterial chemotherapy (PRAC) on progressive lower rectal cancer. Forty-five patients with progressive lower rectal cancer were divided into groups A (23 cases) and B (22 cases) for treatment with PRAC 1 to 2 weeks prior to surgical tumor resection or with surgical resection only, respectively. PRAC caused obvious tissue degeneration and necrosis of rectal cancer with a total effective rate of 95.65%. The rates of radical resection in groups A and B were 91.3% and 72.27%, respectively. The 1-year postoperative survival rates of the two groups were 95.65% and 86.36%, with 3-year survival of 89.96% and 68.18%, and 3-year postoperative recurrence rates of 8.69% and 27.27%, respectively. The anal preservation rates of the two groups were 78.26% and 59.09%. PRAC can increase radical resection rates, promote the postoperative survival and anal preservation rate, and lower the recurrence rate in patients with lower rectal cancer.

  2. Comparison between rectal and infrared skin temperature in the newborn.

    PubMed

    De Curtis, Mario; Calzolari, Flaminia; Marciano, Alessandra; Cardilli, Viviana; Barba, Gianvincenzo

    2008-01-01

    The reliability of measurement of body temperature using a new infrared skin thermometer was evaluated in 107 newborns. The use of the device was associated with low operator-related variability and acceptable limits of agreement with the temperature measured with a rectal mercury thermometer. Use of the infrared skin thermometer is a comfortable and reliable way of measurement of body temperature in newborns.

  3. Multidisciplinary management of resectable rectal cancer. New developments and controversies.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D; Guillem, Jose G

    2008-11-15

    Until 2004, initial surgery and, in cases of pT3 and/or node-positive disease, postoperative chemoradiotherapy (radiation plus concurrent chemotherapy) was the conventional approach for patients with clinical T3 and/or node-positive rectal cancer. The German CAO/ARO/AIO 94 trial confirmed that, compared with preoperative chemoradiotherapy, postoperative chemoradiotherapy is associated with significantly higher local failure and toxicity rates as well as a decrease in the incidence of sphincter preservation. These data resulted in a change from postoperative to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. This shift to preoperative therapy has prompted a series of new questions regarding the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, including: What is the ideal neoadjuvant approach (short-course vs. combined-modality therapy)? Is postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for all patients following preoperative chemoradiotherapy? Do patients with node-negative rectal cancer require pelvic radiation? What is the ideal combined-modality regimen? Does an increase in response rate translate into improved local control and survival? And lastly, what is the benefit of novel radiation sensitization and delivery techniques? This review will address these and other questions surrounding the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer.

  4. Genomic evaluation of rectal temperature in Holstein cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat stress negatively impacts the production, fertility, and health of dairy cattle. Rectal temperature (RT) has unfavorable genetic correlations with production, longevity, economic merit, and somatic cell score in Holstein cows. The objectives of the current study were to perform a genome-wide as...

  5. Rectal Blue Nevus: Distinguishing Features of a Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Neena; McCue, Peter; Quirk, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A 26-year-old African American man with a history of depression and tuberculosis presented to the gastroenterology department after several months of rectal pain with bowel movements. Colonoscopy revealed hyperpigmentation in the distal rectum and internal hemorrhoids, which resulted in a diagnosis of blue nevi. This is only the third known description of a blue nevus involving the gastrointestinal mucosa. PMID:28008401

  6. Lifetime costs of colon and rectal cancer management in Canada.

    PubMed

    Maroun, Jean; Ng, Edward; Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Le Petit, Christel; Dahrouge, Simone; Flanagan, William M; Walker, Hugh; Evans, William K

    2003-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality among Canadians. We derived the direct health care costs associated with the lifetime management of an estimated 16,856 patients with a diagnosis of colon and rectal cancer in Canada in 2000. Information on diagnostic approaches, treatment algorithms, follow-up and care at disease progression was obtained from various databases and was integrated into Statistics Canada's Population Health Model (POHEM) to estimate lifetime costs. The average lifetime cost (in Canadian dollars) of managing patients with colorectal cancer ranged from $20,319 per case for TNM stage I colon cancer to $39,182 per case for stage III rectal cancer. The total lifetime treatment cost for the cohort of patients in 2000 was estimated to be over $333 million for colon and $187 million for rectal cancer. Hospitalization represented 65% and 61% of the lifetime costs of colon and rectal cancer respectively. Disease costing models can be important policy- relevant tools to assist in resource allocation. Our results highlight the importance of performing preoperative tests and staging in an ambulatory care setting, where possible, to achieve optimal cost efficiencies. Similarly, terminal care might be delivered more efficiently in the home environment or in palliative care units.

  7. Retrospective review of rectal cancer surgery in northern Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; DeGara, Christopher; Porter, Geoff; Ghosh, Sunita; Schiller, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies, including research published more than 10 years ago in Northern Alberta, have demonstrated improved outcomes with increased surgical volume and subspecialisation in the treatment of rectal cancer. We sought to examine contemporary rectal cancer care in the same region to determine whether practice patterns have changed and whether outcomes have improved. Methods We reviewed the charts of all patients with rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed between 1998 and 2003 who had a potentially curative resection. The main outcomes examined were 5-year local recurrence (LR) and disease-specific survival (DSS). Surgeons were classified into 3 groups according to training and volume, and we compared outcome measures among them. We also compared our results to those of the previous study from our region. Results We included 433 cases in the study. Subspecialty-trained colorectal surgeons performed 35% of all surgeries in our study compared to 16% in the previous study. The overall 5-year LR rate and DSS in our study were improved compared to the previous study. On multivariate analysis, the only factor associated with increased 5-year LR was presence of obstruction, and the factors associated with decreased 5-year DSS were high-volume noncolorectal surgeons, presence of obstruction and increased stage. Conclusion Over the past 10 years, the long-term outcomes of treatment for rectal cancer have improved. We found that surgical subspecialization was associated with improved DSS but not LR. Increased surgical volume was not associated with LR or DSS. PMID:23883504

  8. Retrospective review of rectal cancer surgery in northern Alberta.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Degara, Christopher; Porter, Geoff; Ghosh, Sunita; Schiller, Dan

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies, including research published more than 10 years ago in Northern Alberta, have demonstrated improved outcomes with increased surgical volume and subspecialisation in the treatment of rectal cancer. We sought to examine contemporary rectal cancer care in the same region to determine whether practice patterns have changed and whether outcomes have improved. We reviewed the charts of all patients with rectal adenocarcinoma diagnosed between 1998 and 2003 who had a potentially curative resection. The main outcomes examined were 5-year local recurrence (LR) and disease-specific survival (DSS). Surgeons were classified into 3 groups according to training and volume, and we compared outcome measures among them. We also compared our results to those of the previous study from our region. We included 433 cases in the study. Subspecialty-trained colorectal surgeons performed 35% of all surgeries in our study compared to 16% in the previous study. The overall 5-year LR rate and DSS in our study were improved compared to the previous study. On multivariate analysis, the only factor associated with increased 5-year LR was presence of obstruction, and the factors associated with decreased 5-year DSS were high-volume noncolorectal surgeons, presence of obstruction and increased stage. Over the past 10 years, the long-term outcomes of treatment for rectal cancer have improved. We found that surgical subspecialization was associated with improved DSS but not LR. Increased surgical volume was not associated with LR or DSS.

  9. [Fecal incontinence and rectal prolapse. Clinico-functional assessment].

    PubMed

    Santini, L; Pezzullo, L; Caracò, C; Candela, G; Esposito, B

    1995-09-01

    Rectal Prolapse is a rare and distressing condition, with a multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Often, this pathology is associated with fecal incontinence. The recommended approach to the patient with rectal prolapse and fecal incontinence is to repair the prolapse first, then deal particularly with fecal incontinence at a second operation. A retrospective, clinical and manometric study has varying degrees of fecal incontinence. Clinically five of their operation, and a further three patients improved, in two patients the degree of fecal incontinence remained invariable. One patient was worsened after surgery. Manometrically resting and pressure (RAP) was significantly higher in continent patients than in voluntary contraction pressure (MVCP) (p < 0.05) in preoperative testing. Postoperatively, there was a significant increase in the resting anal pressure as well as in maximum voluntary contraction pressure. Patients who remained incontinent had a significantly lower RAP and MVCP than patients who improved our regained continence. In conclusion this study shows an alteration of internal and external sphincteric function in patients with rectal prolapse. The surgical treatment of this disease improves sphincteric function. Incontinent patients with RAP < 10 mmHg and MCVP < 20 mmHg, probably they would be better treated simultaneously either for rectal prolapsus and incontinence. In this kind of patients the perianal proctectomy with total sphincteroplasty could be the elective treatment.

  10. Surgeon-related factors and outcome in rectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, G A; Soskolne, C L; Yakimets, W W; Newman, S C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether surgical subspecialty training in colorectal surgery or frequency of rectal cancer resection by the surgeon are independent prognostic factors for local recurrence (LR) and survival. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Variation in patient outcome in rectal cancer has been shown among centers and among individual surgeons. However, the prognostic importance of surgeon-related factors is largely unknown. METHODS: All patients undergoing potentially curative low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection for primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum between 1983 and 1990 at the five Edmonton general hospitals were reviewed in a historic-prospective study design. Preoperative, intraoperative, pathologic, adjuvant therapy, and outcome variables were obtained. Outcomes of interest included LR and disease-specific survival (DSS). To determine survival rates and to control both confounding and interaction, multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: The study included 683 patients involving 52 surgeons, with > 5-year follow-up obtained on 663 (97%) patients. There were five colorectal-trained surgeons who performed 109 (16%) of the operations. Independent of surgeon training, 323 operations (47%) were done by surgeons performing < 21 rectal cancer resections over the study period. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of LR was increased in patients of both noncolorectal trained surgeons (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.5, p = 0.001) and those of surgeons performing < 21 resections (HR = 1.8, p < 0.001). Stage (p < 0.001), use of adjuvant therapy (p = 0.002), rectal perforation or tumor spill (p < 0.001), and vascular/neural invasion (p = 0.002) also were significant prognostic factors for LR. Similarly, decreased disease-specific survival was found to be independently associated with noncolorectal-trained surgeons (HR = 1.5, p = 0.03) and surgeons performing < 21 resections (HR = 1.4, p = 0.005). Stage (p < 0

  11. Gastric heterotopia of rectum in a child: a mimicker of solitary rectal ulcer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; Lone, Khurram; Al-Sofyani, Medhat; El Bagir, Asim

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding per rectum is an uncommon presentation in pediatric patients. Heterotopic gastric mucosa in the rectum is a rare cause of rectal bleeding. Here, we report a 3-year-old child with a bleeding rectal ulcer that was initially diagnosed and managed as a solitary rectal ulcer syndrome. After 1 month, the patient persisted to have intermittent rectal bleed and severe anal pain. Repeat colonoscopy showed the worsening of the rectal ulcer in size. Pediatric surgeon excised the ulcer, and histopathological examination revealed a gastric fundic-type mucosa consistent with the diagnosis of gastric heterotopia of the rectum. Over the following 18 months, our patient had experienced no rectal bleeding and remained entirely asymptomatic. In conclusion, heterotopic gastric mucosa of the rectum should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a bleeding rectal ulcer.

  12. Pre-slaughter rectal temperature as an indicator of pork meat quality.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, L; Van de Perre, V; Permentier, L; De Bie, S; Geers, R

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates whether rectal temperature of pigs, prior to slaughter, can give an indication of the risk of developing pork with PSE characteristics. A total of 1203 pigs were examined, measuring the rectal temperature just before stunning, of which 794 rectal temperatures were measured immediately after stunning. pH30LT (M. Longissimus thoracis) and temperature of the ham (Temp30Ham) were collected from about 530 carcasses, 30 min after sticking. The results present a significant positive linear correlation between rectal temperature just before and after slaughter, and Temp30Ham. Moreover, pH30LT is negatively correlated with rectal temperature and Temp30Ham. Finally, a linear mixed model for pH30LT was established with the rectal temperature of the pigs just before stunning and the lairage time. This model defines that measuring rectal temperature of pigs just before slaughter allows discovery of pork with PSE traits, taking into account pre-slaughter conditions.

  13. Factors affecting rectal temperature measurement using commonly available digital thermometers.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Jonathan M; Streeter, Renee M; Torgerson, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Rectal temperature measurement is an essential part of physical examination of cattle and some physiological experiments. Modern digital thermometers are often used to measure rectal temperatures by students; this study describes their reliability and appropriate use. Students measured rectal temperature on 53 occasions using their personal digital thermometer and techniques gained from previous instruction, rectal temperature was also measured by an experienced person using a Cornell mercury thermometer completely inserted in the rectum. Cornell mercury thermometers values were 38.95±0.05°C (mean±1 SE, n=53). Student rectal temperature measurements using their initial technique were nearly 0.5°C lower, 38.46±0.07°C. After receiving instruction to insert the digital thermometer to the window, student obtained values were 38.77±0.06°C; these are significantly higher than with the student's initial technique and closer to those obtained with a Cornell thermometer. In a series of 53 water bath tests, student owned thermometers recorded similar mean values to those of a traceable (reference) digital thermometer, Cornell mercury thermometer readings were 0.2°C higher. 10 individual digital thermometers were repeatedly tested against a traceable thermometer in a water bath, one was inaccurate. In a separate experiment a trained clinician tested the effect of angle of insertion of a digital thermometer on temperature readings and the affect was <0.1°C. We conclude that accurate temperature measurements using digital thermometers are only likely if the thermometer is inserted to the beginning of the window and the thermometer's accuracy is checked periodically.

  14. Can endobronchial or endotracheal metastases appear from rectal adenocarcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Serbanescu, GL; Anghel, RM

    2017-01-01

    Background: Endobronchial and endotracheal metastases from extra-pulmonary solid tumors are rare. Patients and methods: We reported the case of a patient diagnosed with endobronchial and endotracheal metastases from rectal adenocarcinoma. Case report: Patient P.G., 62 years old, was diagnosed with a rectal tumor in 2011, for which, a surgical intervention was performed (pT3 pN2a M0, stage IIIB). Afterwards, she underwent adjuvant chemotherapy and concomitant radiochemotherapy. In September 2013, the chest CT showed 2 nodules for which, an incomplete surgical resection was done and which were histopathologically diagnosed as metastases from rectal cancer. The patient continued the treatment with chemotherapy associated with Bevacizumab and after 6 months only Bevacizumab for maintenance. In June 2015, the chest CT pointed out a nodule in the right upper lobe and the bronchoscopy highlighted a 4-5 mm lesion at the level of the right primary bronchus, whose biopsy proved the rectal origin. Afterwards, another surgical intervention was performed. Unfortunately, the postoperative chest CT revealed an intratracheal tissue mass (11/ 7mm) and multiple metastases in the right lung. The bronchoscopy showed 2 endotracheal lesions, out of which one was biopsied (histopathological result of metastasis from rectal cancer). Despite the fact that chemotherapy was continued, other endobronchial lesions appeared. All of them were removed and the patient started radiotherapy on the tracheal area. Afterwards, she refused to continue chemotherapy. The last bronchoscopy highlighted one endobronchial and two endotracheal secondary malignant lesions. Conclusion: Endobronchial and endotracheal metastases must be taken into consideration in all the patients with a history of extra-pulmonary cancer. Abbreviations: CT = computed tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, IMRT = intensity-modulated radiotherapy, ESMO = European Society for Medical Oncology, NCCN = National Comprehensive

  15. Real-time in vivo rectal wall dosimetry using MOSkin detectors during linac based stereotactic radiotherapy with rectal displacement.

    PubMed

    Legge, Kimberley; Greer, Peter B; O'Connor, Daryl J; Wilton, Lee; Richardson, Matthew; Hunter, Perry; Wilfert, Alex; Martin, Jarad; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Cutajar, Dean

    2017-02-27

    MOSFET dosimetry is a method that has been used to measure in-vivo doses during brachytherapy treatments and during linac based radiotherapy treatment. Rectal displacement devices (RDDs) allow for safe dose escalation for prostate cancer treatment. This study used dual MOSkin detectors to assess real-time in vivo rectal wall dose in patients with an RDD in place during a high dose prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost trial. The PROMETHEUS study commenced in 2014 and provides a prostate SBRT boost dose with a RDD in place. Twelve patients received two boost fractions of 9.5-10 Gy each delivered to the prostate with a dual arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique. Two MOSkins in a face-to-face arrangement (dual MOSkin) were used to decrease angular dependence. A dual MOSkin was attached to the anterior surface of the Rectafix and read out at 1 Hz during each treatment. The planned dose at each measurement point was exported from the planning system and compared with the measured dose. The root mean square error normalised to the total planned dose was calculated for each measurement point and treatment arc for the entire course of treatment. The average difference between the measured and planned doses over the whole course of treatment for all arcs measured was 9.7% with a standard deviation of 3.6%. The cumulative MOSkin reading was lower than the total planned dose for 64% of the arcs measured. The average difference between the final measured and final planned doses for all arcs measured was 3.4% of the final planned dose, with a standard deviation of 10.3%. MOSkin detectors were an effective tool for measuring dose delivered to the anterior rectal wall in real time during prostate SBRT boost treatments for the purpose of both ensuring the rectal doses remain within acceptable limits during the treatment and for the verification of final rectal doses.

  16. Rectal Dose and Source Strength of the High-Dose-Rate Iridium-192 Both Affect Late Rectal Bleeding After Intracavitary Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Koizumi, Masahiko

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to reconfirm our previous findings that the rectal dose and source strength both affect late rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT), by using a rectal dose calculated in accordance with the definitions of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 (ICRU{sub RP}) or of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two patients who underwent HDR-ICBT and were followed up for 1 year or more were studied. The rectal dose for ICBT was calculated by using the ICRP{sub RP} based on orthogonal radiographs or the DVH parameters based on computed tomography (CT). The total dose was calculated as the biologically equivalent dose expressed in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). The relationship between averaged source strength or the EQD{sub 2} and late rectal bleeding was then analyzed. Results: When patients were divided into four groups according to rectal EQD{sub 2} ({>=} or =} or <2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}), the group with both a high EQD{sub 2} and a high source strength showed a significantly greater probability of rectal bleeding for ICRU{sub RP}, D{sub 2cc}, and D{sub 1cc}. The patients with a median rectal dose above the threshold level did not show a greater frequency of rectal bleeding unless the source strength exceeded 2.4 cGy.m{sup 2}.h{sup -1}. Conclusions: Our results obtained with data based on ICRU{sub RP} and CT-based DVH parameters indicate that rectal dose and source strength both affect rectal bleeding after HDR-ICBT.

  17. Rectal dose and source strength of the high-dose-rate iridium-192 both affect late rectal bleeding after intracavitary radiation therapy for uterine cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Koizumi, Masahiko; Suzuki, Osamu; Konishi, Koji; Sumida, Iori; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Inoue, Takehiro

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to reconfirm our previous findings that the rectal dose and source strength both affect late rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT), by using a rectal dose calculated in accordance with the definitions of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 38 (ICRU(RP)) or of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by the Groupe Européen de Curietherapie of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Sixty-two patients who underwent HDR-ICBT and were followed up for 1 year or more were studied. The rectal dose for ICBT was calculated by using the ICRP(RP) based on orthogonal radiographs or the DVH parameters based on computed tomography (CT). The total dose was calculated as the biologically equivalent dose expressed in 2-Gy fractions (EQD(2)). The relationship between averaged source strength or the EQD(2) and late rectal bleeding was then analyzed. When patients were divided into four groups according to rectal EQD(2) (>or= or or= or <2.4 cGy.m(2).h(-1)), the group with both a high EQD(2) and a high source strength showed a significantly greater probability of rectal bleeding for ICRU(RP), D(2cc), and D(1cc). The patients with a median rectal dose above the threshold level did not show a greater frequency of rectal bleeding unless the source strength exceeded 2.4 cGy.m(2).h(-1). Our results obtained with data based on ICRU(RP) and CT-based DVH parameters indicate that rectal dose and source strength both affect rectal bleeding after HDR-ICBT. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Local recurrence after curative resection for rectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jung-A; Huh, Jung Wook; Kim, Hee Cheol; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Local recurrence of rectal cancer is difficult to treat, may cause severe and disabling symptoms, and usually has a fatal outcome. The aim of this study was to document the clinical nature of locally recurrent rectal cancer and to determine the effect of surgical resection on long-term survival. A retrospective review was conducted of the prospectively collected medical records of 2485 patients with primary rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent radical resection between September 1994 and December 2008. In total, 147 (5.9%) patients exhibited local recurrence. The most common type of local recurrence was lateral recurrence, whereas anastomotic recurrence was the most common type in patients without preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Tumor location with respect to the anal verge significantly affected the local recurrence rate (P < 0.001), whereas preoperative CCRT did not affect the local recurrence rate (P = 0.433). Predictive factors for surgical resection of recurrent rectal cancer included less advanced tumor stage (P = 0.017, RR = 3.840, 95% CI = 1.271–11.597), axial recurrence (P < 0.001, RR = 5.772, 95% CI = 2.281–14.609), and isolated local recurrence (P = 0.006, RR = 8.679, 95% CI = 1.846–40.815). Overall survival after diagnosis of local recurrence was negatively influenced by advanced pathologic tumor stage (P = 0.040, RR = 1.867, 95% CI = 1.028–3.389), positive CRM (P = 0.001, RR = 12.939, 95% CI = 2.906–57.604), combined distant metastases (P = 0.001, RR = 2.086, 95% CI = 1.352–3.218), and nonsurgical resection of recurrent tumor (P < 0.001, RR = 4.865, 95% CI = 2.586–9.153). In conclusion, the clinical outcomes of local recurrence after curative resection of rectal cancer are diverse. Surgical resection of locally recurrent rectal cancer should be considered as an initial treatment, especially in patients with less advanced tumors and axial recurrence. PMID:27399067

  19. The curative management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Dara O; Martin, Joseph; Small, Cormac; Joyce, Myles R; Faul, Clare M; Kelly, Paul J; O'Riordain, Michael; Gillham, Charles M; Armstrong, John G; Salib, Osama; McNamara, Deborah A; McVey, Gerard; O'Neill, Brian D P

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neoadjuvant “long-course” chemoradiation is considered a standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition to prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy with or without androgen suppression (AS) are well established in prostate cancer management. A retrospective review of ten cases was completed to explore the feasibility and safety of applying these standards in patients with dual pathology. To our knowledge, this is the largest case series of synchronous rectal and prostate cancers treated with curative intent. Methods: Eligible patients had synchronous histologically proven locally advanced rectal cancer (defined as cT3-4Nx; cTxN1-2) and non-metastatic prostate cancer (pelvic nodal disease permissible). Curative treatment was delivered to both sites simultaneously. Follow-up was as per institutional guidelines. Acute and late toxicities were reviewed, and a literature search performed. Results: Pelvic external beam radiotherapy (RT) 45–50.4 Gy was delivered concurrent with 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Prostate total dose ranged from 70.0 to 79.2 Gy. No acute toxicities occurred, excluding AS-induced erectile dysfunction. Nine patients proceeded to surgery, and one was managed expectantly. Three relapsed with metastatic colorectal cancer, two with metastatic prostate cancer. Five patients have no evidence of recurrence, and four remain alive with metastatic disease. With a median follow-up of 2.2 years (range 1.2–6.3 years), two significant late toxicities occurred; G3 proctitis in a patient receiving palliative bevacizumab and a G3 anastomotic stricture precluding stoma reversal. Conclusion: Patients proceeding to synchronous radical treatment of both primary sites should receive 45–50.4 Gy pelvic RT with infusional 5FU. Prostate dose escalation should be given with due consideration to the potential impact of prostate cancer on patient survival, as increasing dose may result in significant late morbidity

  20. Anatomy of the middle rectal artery: a review of the historical literature.

    PubMed

    Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Ishihara, Soichiro; Murono, Koji; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    The middle rectal artery is a very important anatomical structure in rectal cancer surgery. It is the only vessel that penetrates through the proper rectal fascia into the pelvic cavity, and therefore threatens the integrity of total mesorectal excision. Moreover, it is very closely related to the lateral lymphatic drainage root. The definition of the middle rectal artery is ambiguous, and different frequencies, origins, and trajectories have been reported in various papers. The frequency of the middle rectal artery is reported to range from 12 to 97 %. Traditionally, the middle rectal artery is described as an artery that penetrates the pelvic plexus from the lateral side along with the lateral ligament; the frequency of this lateral type of middle rectal artery ranges from 20 to 30 %. However, the reports that describe higher frequency values also consider another type of middle rectal artery, which penetrates the neuro-vascular bundle from the antero-lateral direction; this antero-lateral type of middle rectal artery tends to be a small vessel, and frequently forms a common trunk with the prostatic artery. With advancements in endoscopic surgery, the knowledge of the precise anatomy of this structure is becoming more crucial for optimal rectal cancer surgery.

  1. [Influence of clinical and pathomorphological parameters on prognosis in colon carcinoma and rectal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang-ying; Di, Mei-juan; Dong, Jian-kang; Wang, Feng-juan; Jin, Yi-sen; Zhu, Yi-min; Lai, Mao-de

    2006-05-01

    To investigate the effects of clinical and pathomorphological parameters on the prognosis of colon carcinoma and rectal carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate COX proportional hazard models were used to study the effects of the clinical and pathomorphological factors on the prognosis in 101 cases of colon carcinoma, 219 of rectal carcinoma and 137 of rectal carcinoma under curative resections. By using univariate analysis, we identified that lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis were the common prognostic factors for both colon carcinoma and rectal carcinoma. Smoking, deep infiltration, chemotherapy and serum albumin concentration were the uncertain prognostic factors for colon carcinoma. Signet-ring cell carcinoma, larger tumor size (>6 cm), deep infiltration, lack of radical surgery, and advanced TNM stage were the exclusive adverse prognostic factors for rectal carcinoma. Further studies showed that the adverse prognostic factors for the rectal carcinoma under curative resection included deep infiltration, lymph node metastasis, vessel invasion, less of peritumoral lymphocyte infiltration, lack of Crohn's like reactivity, high level of tumor budding, advanced TNM stage and positive urine glucose. By using multivariate analysis based on a COX proportional hazard model, it was identified that smoking, lymph node metastasis and serum albumin concentration were independent prognostic factors for colon carcinoma; advanced TNM stage, distant metastasis and palliative surgery for rectal carcinoma; and vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis and urine glucose for rectal carcinoma under curative resections. The various clinical and pathomorphological parameters show different prognostic value for colon carcinoma, rectal carcinoma and rectal carcinoma under curative resections.

  2. The Contrastive Analysis Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardhaugh, Ronald

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the strong contrastive analysis hypothesis, which claims predictive powers for contrastive analysis, and the weak hypothesis, which claims only that contrastive analysis can help account for observed difficulties in second language learning. The strong hypothesis is found untenable, and difficulties with the weak hypothesis are discussed…

  3. CBI: Systems or Medium?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higginbotham-Wheat, Nancy L.

    This paper addresses one area of conflict in decisionmaking in computer-based instruction (CBI) research: the relationship between the researcher's definition of CBI either as a medium or as an integrated system and the design of meaningful research questions. (A medium is defined here as a device for the delivery of instruction, while an…

  4. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  5. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, Stanley E.

    1989-01-01

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chormium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  6. Balloon-Occluded Antegrade Transvenous Sclerotherapy to Treat Rectal Varices: A Direct Puncture Approach to the Superior Rectal Vein Through the Greater Sciatic Foramen Under CT Fluoroscopy Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yasuyuki Kariya, Shuji Nakatani, Miyuki Yoshida, Rie Kono, Yumiko Kan, Naoki Ueno, Yutaka Komemushi, Atsushi Tanigawa, Noboru

    2015-10-15

    Rectal varices occur in 44.5 % of patients with ectopic varices caused by portal hypertension, and 48.6 % of these patients are untreated and followed by observation. However, bleeding occurs in 38 % and shock leading to death in 5 % of such patients. Two patients, an 80-year-old woman undergoing treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A) and a 63-year-old man with class C hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A), in whom balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous sclerotherapy was performed to treat rectal varices are reported. A catheter was inserted by directly puncturing the rectal vein percutaneously through the greater sciatic foramen under computed tomographic fluoroscopy guidance. In both cases, the rectal varices were successfully treated without any significant complications, with no bleeding from rectal varices after embolization.

  7. [Contrasting study of erythritol and xylitol on Streptococcus mutans].

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Zhang, Jia-Li; Wu, Yu-Qiong; Lu, Zhao-Jie

    2009-12-01

    To study the inhibitory effect of erythritol by contrast to xylitol on growth and acid production of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). S. mutans were incubated respectively in 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 4%, 8%, 12%, 16% erythritol or xylitol culture medium under anaerobic conditions. The A and pH value of the mediums were measured at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 18, 24 hours, following the profile plots by SPSS. The data of A were higher in 0.5%, 1%, 2% erythritol culture medium than in xylitol culture medium at the same concentration, while lower in 8%, 12%, 16% erythritol culture medium than in xylitol culture medium at the same concentration. The data of pH were lower in 0.5%, 1%, 2% erythritol culture medium than in xylitol culture medium at the same concentration, while higer in 8%, 12%, 16% erythritol culture medium than in xylitol culture medium at the same concentration. It indicated that the growth and acid production of S. mutans were higer in 0.5%, 1%, 2% erythritol culture medium than in xylitol culture medium at the same concentration, while lower in 8%, 12%, 16% erythritol culture medium than in xylitol culture medium at the same concentration. Compared with xylitol, erythritol in low concentration has weaker effort on the growth and acid production of S. mutans, while having stronger effort in high concentration.

  8. Evaluation of the Granada agar plate for detection of vaginal and rectal group B streptococci in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Gil, E G; Rodríguez, M C; Bartolomé, R; Berjano, B; Cabero, L; Andreu, A

    1999-08-01

    Granada medium was evaluated for the detection of group B streptococci (GBS) in vaginal and rectal swabs compared with selective Columbia blood agar and selective Lim broth. From May 1996 to March 1998, 702 pregnant women (35 to 37 weeks of gestation) participated in this three-phase study; 103 (14.7%) of these women carried GBS. In the first phase of the experiment (n = 273 women), vaginorectal specimens were collected on the same swab; the sensitivities of Granada tube, selective Columbia blood agar, and Lim broth were 31.4, 94.3, and 74.3%, respectively. In the second and third phases (n = 429 women), vaginal and rectal specimens were collected separately; the sensitivities of Granada plate, selective Columbia blood agar, and Lim broth (subcultured at 4 h on selective Columbia agar in the second phase and at 18 to 24 h in Granada plate in the third phase) were 91.1, 83.9, and 75%, respectively, in the second phase and 88.5, 90.4, and 63.5%, respectively, in the third phase. There were no statistically significant differences in GBS recovery between the Granada agar plate and selective Columbia blood agar, but the Granada plate provided a clear advantage; the characteristic red-orange colonies produced overnight by GBS can be identified by the naked eye and is so specific that further identification is unnecessary. The use of the Granada tube and Lim broth did not result in increased isolation of GBS. In conclusion, the Granada agar plate is highly sensitive for detecting GBS in vaginal and rectal swabs from pregnant women and can provide results in 18 to 24 h.

  9. Evaluation of the Granada Agar Plate for Detection of Vaginal and Rectal Group B Streptococci in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Gil, E. García; Rodríguez, M. C.; Bartolomé, R.; Berjano, B.; Cabero, L.; Andreu, A.

    1999-01-01

    Granada medium was evaluated for the detection of group B streptococci (GBS) in vaginal and rectal swabs compared with selective Columbia blood agar and selective Lim broth. From May 1996 to March 1998, 702 pregnant women (35 to 37 weeks of gestation) participated in this three-phase study; 103 (14.7%) of these women carried GBS. In the first phase of the experiment (n = 273 women), vaginorectal specimens were collected on the same swab; the sensitivities of Granada tube, selective Columbia blood agar, and Lim broth were 31.4, 94.3, and 74.3%, respectively. In the second and third phases (n = 429 women), vaginal and rectal specimens were collected separately; the sensitivities of Granada plate, selective Columbia blood agar, and Lim broth (subcultured at 4 h on selective Columbia agar in the second phase and at 18 to 24 h in Granada plate in the third phase) were 91.1, 83.9, and 75%, respectively, in the second phase and 88.5, 90.4, and 63.5%, respectively, in the third phase. There were no statistically significant differences in GBS recovery between the Granada agar plate and selective Columbia blood agar, but the Granada plate provided a clear advantage; the characteristic red-orange colonies produced overnight by GBS can be identified by the naked eye and is so specific that further identification is unnecessary. The use of the Granada tube and Lim broth did not result in increased isolation of GBS. In conclusion, the Gran