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Sample records for rectal gastrointestinal stromal

  1. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach.

  2. Giant rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Alder, L.S.; Elver, G.; Foo, F.J.; Dobson, M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST are the most common mesenchymal tumours; however, rectal GISTs account for <5%. In the pelvis they represent a diagnostic challenge with giant GISTs likely to be malignant. They may present with urological, gynaecological or rectal symptoms. Sphincter-preserving surgery can be aided by neoadjuvant therapy. We present an uncommon case of giant rectal GIST masquerading as acute urinary retention. PMID:24968434

  3. Transvaginal resection of a rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Hara, Masayasu; Takayama, Satoru; Arakawa, Atsushi; Sato, Mikinori; Nagasaki, Takaya; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2012-09-01

    We herein report a case in which a rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was resected transvaginally. The patient, a 45-year-old female, had a rectal GIST on the anterior wall of the lower rectum. The tumor was within 6 cm of the anal verge, a location which would normally require performing an ultra-low anterior resection using the Double Staple Technique, and a diverting stoma. To minimize the invasiveness of treatment and to reduce the postoperative morbidity, a transvaginal resection was performed. Under general anesthesia, the posterior vaginal mucosa was incised vertically. The tumor was then excised en bloc with the overlying rectovaginal septum and rectal mesenchymal tissue. The defect was repaired primarily, and a diverting stoma was not required. The procedure was uncomplicated, and the patient was discharged home with an intact anal sphincter function and no abdominal incisions. In female patients, transvaginal resection of low anterior rectal lesions may provide a minimally invasive alternative to the traditional ultra-low anterior resection.

  4. Rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumor as an incidental finding in a patient with rectal polyps.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Xu-Dong; Fan, Ren-Gen; zha, Wen-Zhang; Xu, Yong-Hua; Qing, Cheng-Lin; Jia, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A patient who was diagnosed as rectal polyps in the local hospital went to our hospital for surgical treatment. Abdominal CT demonstrated a large irregular extra-luminal tumor of at least 5 cm cross-section on the ventral side of the lower rectal wall. Intraoperatively, a large irregular extra-luminal tumor (about 5×4.5×4 cm) was found. Anterior resection with end colostomy and rectal stump (Hartmann's procedure) was performed. Postoperative histological examination showed simultaneous development of rectal GIST and polyps.

  5. Collision tumour involving a rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumour with invasion of the prostate and a prostatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are the most common primary mesenchymal neoplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, although they represent only a small fraction of total gastrointestinal malignancies in adults (<2%). GISTs can be located at any level of the gastrointestinal tract; the stomach is the most common location (60-70%), in contrast to the rectum, which is most rare (4%). When a GIST invades into the adjacent prostate tissue, it can simulate prostate cancer. In this study, we report on a case comprising the unexpected collision between a rectal GIST tumour and a prostatic adenocarcinoma. Findings We describe the complexity of the clinical, endoscopic and radiological diagnosis, of the differential diagnosis based on tumour biopsy, and of the role of neoadjuvant therapy using imatinib prior to surgical treatment. Conclusions Although isolated cases of coexisting GISTs and prostatic adenocarcinomas have previously been described, this is the first reported case in the medical literature of a collision tumour involving a rectal GIST and prostatic adenocarcinoma components. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1238437468776331. PMID:23111239

  6. Collision tumour involving a rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumour with invasion of the prostate and a prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Macías-García, Laura; De la Hoz-Herazo, Haydee; Robles-Frías, Antonio; Pareja-Megía, María J; López-Garrido, Juan; López, José I

    2012-10-30

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are the most common primary mesenchymal neoplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, although they represent only a small fraction of total gastrointestinal malignancies in adults (<2%). GISTs can be located at any level of the gastrointestinal tract; the stomach is the most common location (60-70%), in contrast to the rectum, which is most rare (4%). When a GIST invades into the adjacent prostate tissue, it can simulate prostate cancer. In this study, we report on a case comprising the unexpected collision between a rectal GIST tumour and a prostatic adenocarcinoma. We describe the complexity of the clinical, endoscopic and radiological diagnosis, of the differential diagnosis based on tumour biopsy, and of the role of neoadjuvant therapy using imatinib prior to surgical treatment. Although isolated cases of coexisting GISTs and prostatic adenocarcinomas have previously been described, this is the first reported case in the medical literature of a collision tumour involving a rectal GIST and prostatic adenocarcinoma components. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1238437468776331.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (Review of NICE Technology Appraisal Guidance 196) (National Institute for Health and ... Society: Treating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Cancer.Net: Gastrointestinal ...

  8. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Changjun

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor has received a lot of attention over the last 10 years due to its unique biologic behavior, clinicopathological features, molecular mechanisms, and treatment implications. GIST is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm in the gastrointestinal tract and has emerged from a poorly understood and treatment resistant neoplasm to a well-defined tumor entity since the discovery of particular molecular abnormalities, KIT and PDGFRA gene mutations. The understanding of GIST biology at the molecular level promised the development of novel treatment modalities. Diagnosis of GIST depends on the integrity of histology, immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis. The risk assessment of the tumor behavior relies heavily on pathological evaluation and significantly impacts clinical management. In this review, historic review, epidemiology, pathogenesis and genetics, diagnosis, role of molecular analysis, prognostic factor and treatment strategies have been discussed. PMID:22943011

  9. What's New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stromal Tumor (GIST) About Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor What’s New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research? Important research on ... Tumors? Key Statistics for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors What’s New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research? More In Gastrointestinal ...

  10. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 227.2345 Phone Search Search Category Cancer A-Z Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Be Found Early? Signs and Symptoms of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Tests for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Stages ...

  11. Treatment for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) Based on Tumor Spread

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stromal Tumor Chemotherapy for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Radiation Therapy for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Treatment Choices for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Based on Tumor ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  12. What Are the Key Statistics about Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stromal Tumor (GIST) About Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Key Statistics for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) ... can occur in people at any age. Survival statistics for GIST are discussed in Survival Rates for ...

  13. Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    von Mehren, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors had the reputation for poor outcomes because of their lack of response to nonsurgical interventions. The discovery of gain-of-function mutations involving receptor tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors altered the biological understanding and management. Beginning in 2000, management of these tumors has changed dramatically because of the availability of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The role of surgery continues to be refined. This article reviews how surgery and systemic therapy are being used, incorporating definitions of risk. Decisions on how to treat a patient is based on the risk of progression, pathologic characteristics, and tumor location. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs. PMID:28348480

  15. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-03-14

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs.

  16. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Somerhausen, Nicolas De Saint Aubain

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To study the evolution of concepts concerning gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) over 30 years. Discussion. GISTs have been, for more than 30 years, the subject of considerable controversy regarding their line of differentiation as well as the prediction of their behaviour. Furthermore, once they spread within the peritoneal cavity, they are extremely hard to control. The recent findings of c-Kit mutations and the immunohistochemical detection of the product of this gene, KIT or CD117, in the mainly non-myogenic subset of this family of tumours, has led to a reappraisal of this group of lesions, which, with some exceptions, is now thought to be derived from the interstitial cells of Cajal, and this has facilitated a clearer definition of their pathological spectrum. In this article, we review chronologically the evolution of the concept of GIST with the gradual application of electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, DNA ploidy analysis. We discuss the impact of these techniques on the pathological assessment and clinical management of GISTs. PMID:18521245

  17. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: May Mimic Adnexal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Nilay; Akpak, Yaşam Kemal; Tatar, Zeynep; Batmaz, Gonca; Erken, Aslihan

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs occur in the entire gastrointestinal tract and may also arise from the retroperitoneum, omentum and mesenteries. They are originated from gastrointestinal pacemaker cells (Cajal’s interstitial cells) and range from benign tumors to sarcomas at all sites of occurrence. Diagnosis of GIST could be deceptive because of their similarity in appearance to gynecological neoplasms. We would like to present a case of a woman with GIST in the small intestine giving a imprint of an adnexal mass was diagnosed correctly during surgery. The diagnosis and treatment of GIST has been reformed over the past years. It is crucial to separate GISTs from possible misdiagnosis because their prognosis and treatment could be unlike clearly. The purpose of this case is to evaluate this rarely seen clinical entity, and thus, make some contribution to the literature. PMID:26383211

  18. Tumeur stromale rectale: à propos d'une observation

    PubMed Central

    Rejab, Haitham; Kridis, Wala Ben; Ben Ameur, Hazem; Feki, Jihene; Frikha, Mounir; Beyrouti, Mohamed Issam

    2014-01-01

    Les tumeurs stromales gastro-intestinales sont des tumeurs mésenchymateuses peu fréquentes. Elles sont localisées préférentiellement eu niveau de l'estomac. La localisation rectale reste rare. A un nouveau cas de tumeur stromale du rectum ainsi qu'une bref revue de la littérature, on se propose d’étudier les particularités cliniques, radiologiques et thérapeutiques de cette entité rare. PMID:25120863

  19. [Surgical treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumours].

    PubMed

    Erko, I P; Moloshok, A A; Zotov, V N

    2013-10-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) have formed a certain nosologic group in 2000 yr. Precise diagnosis may be established basing only on the results of immunohistochemical investigation and the CD 117 revealing. The results of treatment of 32 patients, suffering GIST in 2007 - 2012 yrs were adduced. Clinical signs of GIST are nonspecific. Examination must include the upper endoscopy conduction, as well as abdominal ultrasonography and computeric tomography. Gastric GIST was diagnosed in 65.6% patients, the small intestinal--in 9.4%, colonic--in 9.4%, pancreatic-- in 3.1%. The operation volume depends on localization, dimensions and spread of the tumor.

  20. Laparoscopic resection of duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Zioni, Tammy; Dizengof, Vitaliy; Kirshtein, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Only a few studies have revealed using laparoscopic technique with limited resection of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) of the duodenum. A 68-year-old man was admitted to the hospital due to upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Evaluation revealed an ulcerated, bleeding GI tumour in the second part of the duodenum. After control of bleeding during gastroduodenoscopy, he underwent a laparoscopic wedge resection of the area. During 1.5 years of follow-up, the patient is disease free, eats drinks well, and has regained weight. Surgical resection of duodenal GIST with free margins is the main treatment of this tumour. Various surgical treatment options have been reported. Laparoscopic resection of duodenal GIST is an advanced and challenging procedure requiring experience and good surgical technique. The laparoscopic limited resection of duodenal GIST is feasible and safe, reducing postoperative morbidity without compromising oncologic results. PMID:28281485

  1. Characteristics of Emergency Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST).

    PubMed

    Uçar, Ahmet Deniz; Oymaci, Erkan; Carti, Erdem Bariş; Yakan, Savaş; Vardar, Enver; Erkan, Nazif; Mehmet, Yildirim

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Importance of GISTs is increasing while surgeons are facing with more frequent either in emergency setting of elective cases. Delineating the presentation and management of emergency GIST is important. From 2005 to 2014, emergency cases with final diagnosis of GIST were examined retrospectively. Total of 13 operated cases were evaluated by patients characteristics, clinical presentation, operational findings and postoperative prognosis. There were 9 male and 4 female with the mean age of 48.15 years. The most frequent presentations are ileus and GIT hemorrhage both covering the 84% of patients. Small bowel was the dominating site with ileus. Stomach was the second frequent site of the disease with the finding of hemorrhage. Emergency patients are more likely to come with small bowel GIST and obstruction symptoms. Hemorrhage is the most frequent symptom for emergency GIST of stomach and duodenum.

  2. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Dei Tos, Angelo P; Laurino, Licia; Bearzi, Italo; Messerini, Luca; Farinati, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent a mesenchymal neoplasm occurring primarily in the gastrointestinal tract, and showing differentiation toward the interstitial cell of Cajal. Its incidence is approximately 15 case/100,000/year. Stomach and small bowel are the most frequently affected anatomic sites. GIST represents a morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular distinct entity, the recognition of which has profound therapeutic implications. In fact, they have shown an exquisite sensitivity to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. Diagnosis relies upon morphology along with immunodetection of KIT and/or DOG1. When dealing with KIT negative cases, molecular analysis of KIT/PDGFRA genes may help in confirming diagnosis. Molecular evaluation of both genes are in any case recommended as mutational status provides key predictive information. Pathologists also play a key role in providing an estimation of the risk of biological aggressiveness, which is currently based on anatomic location of the tumor, size, and mitotic activity.

  3. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumor and renal transplant].

    PubMed

    Seculini Patiño, Carina E; Tabares, Aldo H; Laborie, Maria V; Diller, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) accounts for nearly 1% of all gastrointestinal tumors. Its association with renal transplantation is not frequent. Approximately 95% of GIST show staining for CD177. DOG1 is a recently described monoclonal antibody that shows positivity even in the absence of CD177 staining. The diagnosis of GIST should be pursued because of the availability of very effective treatments with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. Herein, we describe the case of a woman with renal transplant who presented a small bowel GIST and weak positivity for CD177, treated initially with surgery. Tumor recurrence was documented 3 years later and histopatology showed loss of CD177 staining and positivity for DOG1. She was treated with imatimib without further recurrence after five years of follow up.

  4. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor – An Evolving Concept

    PubMed Central

    Tornillo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with RTK inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan) the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other “entities,” have been discovered (e.g., succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, and mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway). The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data. PMID:25593916

  5. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are usually found on the stomach or small intestine, but they can be found anywhere in or near the GI tract. Find out about risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, staging, and treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  6. Diagnosis of a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Presenting as a Prostatic Mass: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung-Sik; Park, Kyung Kgi; Kim, Young Joo

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are an unusual and heterogeneous group of spindle cell tumors that can also appear on the exterior of the gastrointestinal tract (extra-GISTs). Despite the fact that extra-GISTs or large rectal GISTs can lead to the clinical impression of a prostatic mass, these tumors are, in general, excluded in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell tumors observed on prostate needle biopsy. Here, we present, in detail, a case of an extra-GIST identified on prostatic biopsy; the tumor was previously believed to be a primary prostatic stromal sarcoma in the differential diagnosis. Every investigator should check for KIT (CD117) in immunohistochemical staining to rule out an extra-GIST prior to diagnosing a solitary prostatic tumor, specialized prostatic stromal tumor, or leiomyosarcoma on prostate needle biopsy. PMID:25606568

  7. [Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Romero-Espinosa, Larry; Souza-Gallardo, Luis Manuel; Martínez-Ordaz, José Luis; Romero-Hernández, Teodoro; de la Fuente-Lira, Mauricio; Arellano-Sotelo, Jorge

    The gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common soft tissue sarcomas of the digestive tract. They are usually found in the stomach (60-70%) and small intestine (25-30%) and, less commonly, in the oesophagus, mesentery, colon, or rectum. The symptoms present at diagnosis are, gastrointestinal bleeding, abdominal pain, abdominal mass, or intestinal obstruction. The type of symptomatology will depend on the location and size of the tumour. The definitive diagnosis is histopathological, with 95% of the tumours being positive for CD117. This is an observational and descriptive study of 5cases of small intestinal GIST that presented with gastrointestinal bleeding as the main symptom. The period from the initial symptom to the diagnosis varied from 1 to 84 months. The endoscopy was inconclusive in all of the patients, and the diagnosis was made using computed tomography and angiography. Treatment included resection in all patients. The histopathological results are also described. GIST can have multiple clinical pictures and unusual symptoms, such as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The use of computed tomography and angiography has shown to be an important tool in the diagnosis with patients with small intestine GISTs. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  8. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins. PMID:19968734

  9. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins.

  10. Latest advances in adult gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Florou, Vaia; Wilky, Breelyn A; Trent, Jonathan C

    2017-10-06

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common GI tract mesenchymal tumors. GIST patients are optimally managed by a precision medicine approach. Herein, we discuss the latest advances in precision medicine and ongoing clinical trials relevant to GIST. Circulating tumor DNA for detection of mutational changes could replace tissue biopsies and radiographic imaging once validated. Most GISTs are KIT/PDGFRα mutated, and despite the good clinical response to imatinib, treatment is generally not curative, more often due to secondary mutations. New mechanisms to bypass this resistance by inhibiting KIT downstream pathways and by targeting multiple KIT or PDGFRα mutations are being investigated. Immunotherapy for GIST patients is in its infancy. These approaches may lead to more effective, less toxic therapies.

  11. Pediatric/"Wildtype" gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Mullassery, Dhanya; Weldon, Christopher B

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric/"Wildtype" gastrointestinal stromal tumor (P/WT-GIST) is a rare cancer, distinct and markedly different from the phenotype found predominantly in older patients (adult, non-wildtype GIST). Having a different molecular signature, it is not responsive to standard adjuvant therapies utilized in adult GIST, and surgery remains the only effective cure. However, even with presumed complete resections in patients with localized disease at presentation, recurrence rates are high. Furthermore, it is an indolent cancer that can persist for decades, and treatment strategies must balance the possible morbid risks of intervention with the reality of preserving quality of life in the interim. Effective adjuvant therapies remain elusive, and research is critically needed to identify both targets and drugs for treatment consideration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Update on Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors for Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Baheti, Akshay D.; Tirumani, Harika; O'Neill, Ailbhe; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.

    2017-01-01

    The management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) has evolved significantly in the last two decades due to better understanding of their biologic behavior as well as development of molecular targeted therapies. GISTs with exon 11 mutation respond to imatinib whereas GISTs with exon 9 or succinate dehydrogenase subunit mutations do not. Risk stratification models have enabled stratifying GISTs according to risk of recurrence and choosing patients who may benefit from adjuvant therapy. Assessing response to targeted therapies in GIST using conventional response criteria has several potential pitfalls leading to search for alternate response criteria based on changes in tumor attenuation, volume, metabolic and functional parameters. Surveillance of patients with GIST in the adjuvant setting is important for timely detection of recurrences. PMID:28096720

  13. Laparoscopic-Assisted Resection of a Bleeding Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Frias, J. A.; Castañeda-Leeder, P.; Baquera-Heredia, J.; Weber-Sánchez, A.

    1999-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 29-year-old male patient with a severe lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in whom a successful laparoscopic diagnosis and resection (assisted) of an ileal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was performed. Laparoscopy can be very useful in the diagnosis and treatment of selected cases of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:10527336

  14. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  15. Nuclear morphometric analysis in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ozdamar, Sükrü Oğuz; Bektaş, Sibel; Erdem Ozdamar, Sevim; Gedikoğlu, Gökhan; Doğan Gün, Banu; Bahadir, Burak

    2007-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are considered a specialized group of mesenchymal neoplasms. In this study, the histomorphologic and immunohistochemical features of gastrointestinal stromal tumors are compared with nuclear morphometric results. Morphometric nuclear parameters such as mean area, mean roundness factor, mean form ellipse, mean length and mean perimeter were evaluated in hematoxylin and eosin stained slides of 22 gastrointestinal stromal tumors (9 benign and 13 malignant) by using a computer-assisted image analysis system. Morphometric results were compared with tumor behavior and tumor size, the presence of necrosis, mitotic index, and immunohistochemical expressions of p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. We found that tumor necrosis was correlated with mean nuclear roundness factor, mean nuclear form ellipse, mean nuclear length and mean nuclear perimeter (p<0.05). Mitotic index was also correlated with mean nuclear roundness factor and mean nuclear form ellipse (p<0.05). However, no correlation was found between morphometric features and gastrointestinal stromal tumor behavior, tumor size, or index of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and p53 expressions (p>0.05). In this preliminary study, the relative concordance of the morphometric results and general histomorphologic data exhibited the importance of nuclear morphometric analysis in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Studies including larger series of cases investigating detailed nuclear morphometric analysis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors are needed.

  16. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and second malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rodriquenz, Maria Grazia; Rossi, Sabrina; Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Larocca, Mario; Dipasquale, Angelo; Quirino, Michela; Schinzari, Giovanni; Basso, Michele; D’Argento, Ettore; Strippoli, Antonia; Barone, Carlo; Cassano, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several evidences showed that patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) develop additional malignancies. However, thorough incidence of second tumors remains uncertain as the possibility of a common molecular pathogenesis. A retrospective series of 128 patients with histologically proven GIST treated at our institution was evaluated. Molecular analysis of KIT and PDGFR-α genes was performed in all patients. Following the involvement of KRAS mutation in many tumors’ pathogenesis, analysis of KRAS was performed in patients with also second neoplasms. Forty-six out of 128 GIST patients (35.9%) had a second neoplasm. Most second tumors (52%) raised from gastrointestinal tract and 19.6% from genitourinary tract. Benign neoplasms were also included (21.7%). Molecular analysis was available for 29/46 patients with a second tumor: wild-type GISTs (n. 5), exon 11 (n. 16), exon 13 (n. 1), exon 9 (n. 1) KIT mutations, exon 14 PDGFR-α mutation (n. 2) and exon 18 PDGFR-α mutation (n. 4). KIT exon 11 mutations were more frequent between patients who developed a second tumor (P = 0.0003). Mutational analysis of KRAS showed a wild-type sequence in all cases. In metachronous cases, the median time interval between GIST and second tumor was 21.5 months. The high frequency of second tumors suggests that an unknown common molecular mechanism might play a role, but it is not likely that KRAS is involved in this common pathogenesis. The short interval between GIST diagnosis and the onset of second neoplasms asks for a careful follow-up, particularly in the first 3 years after diagnosis. PMID:27661019

  17. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the rectum: Report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Nello; Cipolla, Calogero; Torcivia, Adriana; Mandalà, Stefano; Graceffa, Giuseppa; Bottino, Alessandro; Latteri, Federica

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is a rare tumour of the gastrointestinal tract which does not generally originate in the rectum. The authors describe a case of a 70-year-old man who underwent an anterior resection of the rectum for a low-risk GIST. The patient was not given adjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib and is still disease-free 30 mo after surgery. The authors conclude that although rectal GIST is extremely uncommon, it should be included in differential diagnosis when a tumour in the rectum is detected. Biopsy of the tumour is essential, since this makes it possible to reach a sure preoperative diagnosis based on the immunohistological features of the CD117 and CD34. Although complete surgical resection with negative tumour margins is the principal curative procedure for primary and non-metastatic tumours, further studies are still needed for the determination of the most effective treatment strategy for patients with rectal GIST. PMID:18300363

  18. Intestinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a cat

    PubMed Central

    SUWA, Akihisa; SHIMODA, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.6-kg, spayed female domestic shorthaired cat had a 2-month history of anorexia and weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed an exophytic mass originating from the jejunum with very poor central and poor peripheral contrast enhancement. On day 14, surgical resection of the jejunum and mass with 5-cm margins and an end-to-end anastomosis were performed. Histopathological examination revealed the mass was a transmural, invasive cancer showing exophytic growth and originating from the small intestinal muscle layer. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor cells revealed diffuse positivity for KIT protein and negativity for desmin and S-100. The mass was diagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Ultrasonographic findings indicated the tumor probably metastasized to the liver and omentum, as seen in humans and dogs. The owner rejected further treatment at the last visit on day 192. To our knowledge, this is the first report of intestinal tumor and metastasis in feline GIST and its imaging features. PMID:28163271

  19. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Sever; Barbu, Emil; Ionescu, Călin; Costache, Adrian; Bălăşoiu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal malignancies of the digestive tract. Gastric localization is the most frequent. The aim of this study is to evaluate the importance of immunohistochemical factors (CD117, CD34, α-SMA, vimentin, p53, Ki67) in diagnostic and size tumor and mitotic activity as prognostic factors for these tumors. We present the case of a 66-year-old male patient with a giant gastric GIST. Like in the vast majority, the symptomatology in this patient has long been faint, despite the large tumor size, and when it became manifest, it was nonspecific. Imagery wise, the computer tomography (CT) scan was the most efficient, showing the origin of the tumor from the greater curvature of the stomach, its dimensions, as well as the relations with the other abdominal viscera. Surgery in this patient was en-bloc, according to the principles of GIST. The histological aspect is characterized by a proliferation of spindle cells positive for CD117 and CD34. Despite complete microscopic resection, the size of the tumor (25×20×27 cm) and the mitotic activity (21÷5 mm2) remains important relapse factor.

  20. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    LOUREIRO, Marcelo de Paula; de ALMEIDA, Rômulo Augusto Andrade; CLAUS, Christiano Marlo Paggi; BONIN, Eduardo Aimoré; CURY-FILHO,, Antônio Moris; DIMBARRE, Daniellson; da COSTA, Marco Aurélio Raeder; VITAL, Marcílio Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal mesenchymal or stromal tumors (GIST) are lesions originated on digestive tract walls, which are treated by surgical resection. Several laparoscopic techniques, from gastrectomies to segmental resections, have been used successfully. Aim Describe a single center experience on laparoscopic GIST resection. Method Charts of 15 operated patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen had gastric lesions, of which ten were sub epithelial, ranging from 2-8 cm; and three were pure exofitic growing lesions. The remaining two patients had small bowel lesions. Surgical laparoscopic treatment consisted of two distal gastrectomies, 11 wedge gastric resections and two segmental enterectomies. Mechanical suture was used in the majority of patients except on six, which underwent resection and closure using manual absorbable sutures. There were no conversions to open technique. Results Mean operative time was 1h 29 min±92 (40-420 min). Average lenght of hospital stay was three days (2-6 days). There were no leaks, postoperative bleeding or need for reintervention. Mean postoperative follow-up was 38±17 months (6-60 months). Three patients underwent adjuvant Imatinib treatment, one for recurrence five months postoperatively and two for tumors with moderate risk for recurrence . Conclusion Laparoscopic GIST resection, not only for small lesions but also for tumors above 5 cm, is safe and acceptable technique. PMID:27120729

  1. Neoadjuvant imatinib treatment and laparoscopic anus-preserving surgery for a large gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the rectum.

    PubMed

    Kyo, Kennoki; Azuma, Masaki; Okamoto, Kazuya; Nishiyama, Motohiro; Shimamura, Takahiro; Maema, Atsushi; Kanamaru, Hitoshi; Shirakawa, Motoaki; Nakamura, Toshio; Shinmura, Kazuya; Koda, Kenji; Yokoyama, Hidetaro

    2016-03-08

    Resection of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the rectum can be difficult because of the particular location in the pelvis, and a large rectal GIST often requires abdominoperineal resection. Recent reports demonstrate that neoadjuvant imatinib treatment improves surgical outcomes in patients with a rectal GIST, and there are only a few reports of the effectiveness of laparoscopic surgery for a rectal GIST. A 46-year-old man was found to have a rectal GIST that measured 80 mm and was located on the anterior wall of the lower rectum. After 6 months treatment with imatinib, the tumor decreased in size to 37 mm, and laparoscopic low anterior resection was performed. The patient is currently alive without any evidence of recurrence 37 months after surgery. Neoadjuvant imatinib should be a treatment of choice for a large rectal GIST. When marked tumor shrinkage is achieved, laparoscopic surgery may be the preferred procedure.

  2. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) masquerading as an ovarian mass

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, Giorgio; Beneduce, Pasquale

    2004-01-01

    Background Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are rare mesenchymal tumors originating in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Myogenic gastrointestinal stromal tumor, a distinctive morphologic variant is characterized by an unusually prominent myxoid stromal background. Case presentation We report a case of myxoid variant of GIST in a 42 years old woman presenting as an epigastric mass associated to an ovarian cyst and elevated CA-125. Histologically, the lesions was composed of a proliferation of spindle cells in an abundant myxoid stroma, without evidence of atypia or anaplasia. Immunohistochemical stains showed strong positive staining with muscle actin, positive staining with CD34 and weak positive staining with CD117, while showed negative for S-100. Conclusion At surgery every effort should be made to identify the origin of the tumor. A complete surgical removal of the tumor should be obtained, as this is the only established treatment that offers long term survival. PMID:15142276

  3. Atypical presentation of gastrointestinal stromal tumours-a case report.

    PubMed

    Raja, Kalpana; Dev, Bhawna; Santosham, Roy; Santhosh, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are benign mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Their clinical presentations are variable. We report a case of a 31-year-old man who presented with pain in the abdomen and vomiting. CT abdomen revealed a large exophytic mass in the epigastrium with enhancement pattern similar to hemangioma. No relationship of the mass could be made out with the adjacent structures on CT, histopathology proved it to be a GIST.

  4. Molecular diagnostics in soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen M; Coleman, Joshua; Bridge, Julia A; Iwenofu, O Hans

    2015-04-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare malignant heterogenous tumors of mesenchymal origin with over fifty subtypes. The use of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections (and immunohistochemistry) in the morphologic assessment of these tumors has been the bane of clinical diagnosis until recently. The last decade has witnessed considerable progress in the understanding and application of molecular techniques in refining the current understanding of soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors beyond the limits of traditional approaches. Indeed, the identification of reciprocal chromosomal translocations and fusion genes in some subsets of sarcomas with potential implications in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment has been revolutionary. The era of molecular targeted therapy presents a platform that continues to drive biomarker discovery and personalized medicine in soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In this review, we highlight how the different molecular techniques have enhanced the diagnosis of these tumors with prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor extending to prostate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huan; Liu, Chong; Chen, Yanbo; Gu, Meng; Cai, Zhikang; Chen, Qi; Wang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the neoplasm of gastrointestinal tract. Patient concerns: The patient complained about the retention of urinary. Diagnoses: GIST. Interventions: radical prostatectomy and the imatinib therapy. Outcomes: No recurrence and metastasis have been found during a 14-month follow-up. Lessons: comprehensive treatment is necessary for the GIST treatment. Furthermore, we summarize a review of the literature of GIST occurring in the prostate gland treated by different methods and 4 kinds of rare diseases in prostate. PMID:27861390

  6. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: case reports and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bronzino, P; Colombini, M; Ferro, A; Gambetta, G; Gennaro, M; Ivaldi, L; Revetria, P

    2008-01-01

    The Authors describe four cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) two of them were localized in the stomach, the others in the ileum. GIST are neoplasms of mesenchymal origin which develop inside the wall of the digestive tract. The most frequent site is the stomach, followed by the small bowel; less commonly these tumors can affect the oesophagus, the colon and the rectum. GIST originate from precursors of the interstitial cells of Cajal, which are localized in the gastro-intestinal wall and are involved in the regulation of the peristalsis. The treatment is surgical resection. For advanced disease there is a new interesting treatment based on the imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

  7. Meckel Diverticulum Harboring a Rare Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Andrew C.; Nakshabendi, Rahman; Kanar, Ozdemir; Hamer, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tumors within a Meckel diverticulum are a rare complication observed in only 0.5%-3.2% of symptomatic cases. The majority of tumors are benign, but some malignant tumors, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) can occur. Case Report: We report the case of a 48-year-old female who presented with severe abdominal pain and nausea and was found to have a GIST arising from a Meckel diverticulum. Conclusion: The differential diagnosis of a pelvic mass in a middle-aged female presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms must remain broad. With an atypical presentation site, distinguishing benign tumors from malignant tumors such as GISTs is of paramount importance. PMID:28331460

  8. Collection of Biospecimen & Clinical Information in Patients w/ Gastrointestinal Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-24

    Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Gynecologic Cancers; Gynecologic Cancers Cervical Cancer; Gastric (Stomach) Cancer; Gastro-Esophageal(GE) Junction Cancer; Gastrointenstinal Stromal Tumor (GIST); Colon/Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Colon Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Anal Cancer; Anal Cancer; Hepatobiliary Cancers; Hepatobiliary Cancers Liver; Pancreatic Cancer

  9. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Small Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mami; Yamamoto, Kentaroh; Taketomi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Fumio; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The source of most cases of gastrointestinal bleeding is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Since bleeding from the small intestine is very rare and difficult to diagnose, time is required to identify the source. Among small intestine bleeds, vascular abnormalities account for 70–80%, followed by small intestine tumors that account for 5–10%. The reported peak age of the onset of small intestinal tumors is about 50 years. Furthermore, rare small bowel tumors account for only 1–2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We describe a 29-year-old man who presented with obscure anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent laparotomy. Surgical findings revealed a well-circumscribed lesion measuring 45 × 40 mm in the jejunum that initially appeared similar to diverticulosis with an abscess. However, the postoperative pathological diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with extramural growth. PMID:27920659

  10. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Arising From a Gastric Duplication Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Machicado, Jorge; Davogustto, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts (GDC) are rarely diagnosed in adults, but previous cases have been associated with malignancy. We present a case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) arising from a GDC in a 71-year-old woman who presented with 3 years of early satiety, anorexia, abdominal distention, and weight loss. Abdominal CT showed a 9.3 x 5.2 x 9.5-cm well-circumscribed cystic mass arising 3 cm above the gastroduodenal junction. The cyst was resected, and histopathology was consistent with GDC. Future studies are needed to clarify the malignant potential of GDC and the molecular pathways for its development. PMID:27144196

  11. Heterotopic Pancreatic Pseudocyst Radiologically Mimicking Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sarsenov, Dauren; Tırnaksız, Mehmet Bülent; Doğrul, Ahmet Bülent; Tanas, Özlem; Gedikoglu, Gökhan; Abbasoğlu, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic pancreas is a relatively common variant of foregut embryologic dystopia that can be described as pancreatic tissue found outside the normal anatomic location, being independent from vascular supply of normal pancreas. Having all features of pancreatic tissue except for the major duct structures, this ectopic tissue may be clinically recognized when pathologic changes take place. Inflammation, hemorrhagic or obstructive states, and eventually malignancy-related problems may become a diagnostic challenge for clinician and finally lead to consequences of misdiagnosis. In this article we will discuss a case of heterotopic pancreatic tissue located in gastric cardia, which was diagnosed preoperatively as gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PMID:25785332

  12. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Li; Liu, Dan; Yang, Jian-Jun; Zheng, Min-Wen; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the liver. A 17-year-old man with a solid mass in the anterior segment of the right liver was asymptomatic with negative laboratory examinations with the exception of positive HBV. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) revealed a hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase and hypoechoic features during the portal and late phases. However, enhanced spiral computed tomography (CT) showed hypoattenuation in all three phases. Following biopsy, immunohistochemical evaluation demonstrated positive CD117. Different imaging features of primary GISTs of the liver are due to pathological properties and different working systems between CEUS and enhanced spiral CT. PMID:19653356

  13. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour and second tumours: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Martín, Rafael; Cubedo Cervera, Ricardo; Provencio Pulla, Mariano

    2017-07-20

    There are several tumours associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST), most of them without an apparent family relationship; only 5% of them occur within the context of a family syndrome. In this article the corresponding literature about the former has been reviewed. A search in Pubmed was carried out, the methodology of which is described in detail in the body of the article. A total of 88 articles have been chosen for the review, next to the application of limits as well as a manual review. GIST patients have a twofold risk of developing a second tumour than the general population (4-33% of them develop a second neoplasm, either synchronic or metachronic). Most incident tumours associated with GIST are gastrointestinal and genitourinary tumours. In addition, patients with second tumours have a worse survival rate than those without second tumours. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Management of metastatic disease and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Vadakara, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Prior to the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors like imatinib, there were few treatment options available to patients with metastatic GIST. Surgery was the mainstay of treatment and the prognosis for patients with metastatic GIST was dismal. With the advent of imatinib the prognosis of metastatic GIST has improved dramatically. Second line tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as sunitinib and regorafenib have further bettered prognosis, however there is still a need for therapies for patients with disease refractory to TKI therapy. Newer agents such as the Hsp90 inhibitors, PI3K-AKT-mTOR inhibitors and IGF1-R inhibitors are currently under investigation and may have promise. This review discusses the current standard of care in terms of pharmacotherapy, both standard and investigational (summarized in Box 1), in the management of metastatic GIST. PMID:24093167

  15. Mesenteric gastrointestinal stromal tumour presenting as intracranial space occupying lesion

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Tarun; Gunabushanam, Gowthaman; Malik, Monica; Goyal, Shikha; Das, Anup K; Julka, Pramod K; Rath, Goura K

    2006-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) usually present with non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal mass, pain, anorexia and bowel obstruction. Methods We report a case of a 42 year old male who presented with a solitary intracranial space occupying lesion which was established as a metastasis from a mesenteric tumour. Results The patient was initially treated as a metastatic sarcoma, but a lack of response to chemotherapy prompted testing for CD117 which returned positive. A diagnosis of mesenteric GIST presenting as solitary brain metastasis was made, and the patient was treated with imatinib. Conclusion We recommend that all sarcomas with either an intraabdominal or unknown origin be routinely tested for CD117 to rule out GIST. PMID:17105654

  16. Gastrointestinal pacemaker cell tumor (GIPACT): gastrointestinal stromal tumors show phenotypic characteristics of the interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed Central

    Kindblom, L. G.; Remotti, H. E.; Aldenborg, F.; Meis-Kindblom, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) form a complex cell network within the gastrointestinal tract wall where they function as a pacemaker system. Expression of the kit proto-oncogene is essential for the development of this system. The aim of our study was to examine the hypothesis that gastrointestinal stromal tumors differentiate toward cells with an ICC phenotype. Ultrastructurally, 58 stromal tumors were characterized and found to share many features with ICC. Seventy-eight stromal tumors were immunophenotyped, particularly with regard to the kit receptor. All 78 tumors revealed strong, homogeneous immunoreactivity for the kit receptor as did ICC of adjacent and control gastrointestinal walls. Focal hyperplasia and hypertrophy of kit receptor positive cells were also observed in the gastrointestinal wall adjacent to the tumors. CD34 immunoreactivity observed in interstitial cells surrounding Auerbach's ganglia suggests that a subpopulation of ICC is CD34 positive and may explain why 56 of 78 stromal tumors were CD34 positive. Thirty control tumors, including gastrointestinal leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, were all negative for the kit receptor. We conclude that gastrointestinal stromal tumors show striking morphological and immunophenotypic similarities with ICC and that they may originate from stem cells that differentiate toward a pacemaker cell phenotype. We propose that the noncommittal name "gastrointestinal stromal tumor" be replaced by gastrointestinal pacemaker cell tumor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:9588894

  17. A gist of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: A review

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, Ashwin; Sathyanesan, Jeswanth; Rajendran, Kamalakannan; Pitchaimuthu, Anbalagan; Perumal, Senthil-Kumar; Srinivasan, UP; Ramasamy, Ravi; Palaniappan, Ravichandran; Govindan, Manoharan

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have been recognized as a biologically distinctive tumor type, different from smooth muscle and neural tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). They constitute the majority of gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors of the GIT and are known to be refractory to conventional chemotherapy or radiation. They are defined and diagnosed by the expression of a proto-oncogene protein detected by immunohistochemistry which serves as a crucial diagnostic and therapeutic target. The identification of these mutations has resulted in a better understanding of their oncogenic mechanisms. The remarkable antitumor effects of the molecular inhibitor imatinib have necessitated accurate diagnosis of GIST and their distinction from other gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. Both traditional and minimally invasive surgery are used to remove these tumors with minimal morbidity and excellent perioperative outcomes. The revolutionary use of specific, molecularly-targeted therapies, such as imatinib mesylate, reduces the frequency of disease recurrence when used as an adjuvant following complete resection. Neoadjuvant treatment with these agents appears to stabilize disease in the majority of patients and may reduce the extent of surgical resection required for subsequent complete tumor removal. The important interplay between the molecular genetics of GIST and responses to targeted therapeutics serves as a model for the study of targeted therapies in other solid tumors. This review summarizes our current knowledge and recent advances regarding the histogenesis, pathology, molecular biology, the basis for the novel targeted cancer therapy and current evidence based management of these unique tumors. PMID:23847717

  18. Characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumours, diagnostic procedure and therapeutic management and main directions of nursing practice in gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Głuszek, Stanisław; Kozieł, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) constitute a separate group of mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. They have been commonly recognized for a few years, they have created a new problem in medical practice. GIST are more often centred in the stomach. They equally affect female and male patients and occur mainly in patients older than 50 years of age. The clinical picture of the tumour is non-specific. Radical surgical treatment and molecularly targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors are used in GIST treatment. Nursing practice with reference to GIST danger is connected with biopsychosocial interventions of perioperative, oncological and palliative procedures and involves the area of health education mainly oriented towards shaping preventive procedures which favour early disease detection and support therapy and recovery. PMID:25784835

  19. [A rare case of bone metastasis from gastro-intestinal stromal tumour: place of radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Heymann, S; Imperiale, A; Schlund-Schoettel, E; Sauer, B; Dourthe, L-M

    2014-01-01

    Gastro-intestinal stromal tumours are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Their usual metastatic sites are the liver and the peritoneum, but gastro-intestinal stromal tumours rarely metastasize to the bones. We report the case of a 56-year-old male presenting with bone lesions six years after initial surgical resection. We discuss through this paper the possibilities of management of these lesions and the place of radiotherapy.

  20. Ectopic Pancreas Imitating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) In The Stomach.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Bandurski, Roman; Pryczynicz, Anna; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Kemona, Andrzej; Kędra, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic pancreas is a rare congenital disorder defined as pancreatic tissue lacking vascular or anatomic communication with the normal body of the pancreas. Most cases of ectopic pancreas are asymptomatic, but it may become clinically evident depending on the size, location and the pathological changes similar to those observed in case of the normal pancreas. It is often an incidental finding and can be located at different sites in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common locations are: the stomach, duodenum or the proximal part of small intestine. The risk of malignancy, bleeding and occlusion are the most serious complications. Despite the development in diagnostics, it still remains a challenge for the clinician to differentiate it from neoplasm. In this report, we described a case of 28-years old woman who presented recurrent epigastric pain. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastrointestinal stromal tumor on the border of the body and antrum of the back wall of great curvature of the stomach. The histopathological examination after surgery showed heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric mass lesions.

  1. Management of early asymptomatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Faiss, Siegbert; Knoefel, Wolfram-Trudo; Wardelmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Approximately two thirds of clinically manifest tumors occur in the stomach, nearly one third in the small bowel, and the rest in the colorectal region with a few cases in the esophagus. GIST originate within the smooth muscle layer in the wall of the tubular gastrointestinal tract and grow mostly toward the serosa, far less often toward the mucosa. In the latter case, ulceration may develop and can cause gastrointestinal bleeding as the cardinal symptom. However, most GIST of the stomach are asymptomatic. They are increasingly detected incidentally as small intramural or submucosal tumors during endoscopy and particularly during endoscopic ultrasound. Epidemiological and molecular genetic findings suggest that early asymptomatic GIST of the stomach (< 1 cm) show self-limiting tumorigenesis. Thus, early (< 1 cm) asymptomatic gastric GIST (synonym: micro-GIST) are found in 20%-30% of the elderly. The mostly elderly people with early gastric GIST have an excellent GIST-specific prognosis. Patients with early GIST of the stomach can therefore be managed by endoscopic surveillance. PMID:25031785

  2. Familial multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumours with associated abnormalities of the myenteric plexus layer and skeinoid fibres.

    PubMed

    Handra-Luca, A; Fléjou, J F; Molas, G; Sauvanet, A; Belghiti, J; Degott, C; Terris, B

    2001-10-01

    Multiple familial gastrointestinal stromal tumours are rare. We report the third family with two cases of multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumours showing skeinoid fibres. Associated abnormalities of the myenteric plexus layer are described and new hypotheses for the histogenesis of gastrointestinal stromal tumours are formulated. Multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumours developed in the duodenum and proximal jejunum were removed from mother and son. No history of a specific syndrome or of mastocytosis was known. Light microscopy revealed typical gastrointestinal stromal tumours with skeinoid fibres. An unusual abnormality of the myenteric plexus layer, showing a diffuse spindle cell hyperplasia, was noted in the macroscopically normal digestive wall. No abnormalities of the ganglion cells were associated. Tumours and the spindle cell hyperplasia showed similar morphological and immunohistochemical features with expression of CD34 and CD117 antigens. Follow-up revealed recurrences in the mother. The morphological characteristics of these two cases of familial gastrointestinal stromal tumours and of the associated abnormalities of the myenteric plexus layer, help to better explain the histogenesis of multiple familial gastrointestinal stromal tumours. The hyperplasia of the myenteric plexus could be considered a risk factor for recurrent tumours.

  3. The neo-adjuvant treatment in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Catania, V; Consoli, A; Cavallaro, A; Liardo, R L E; Malaguarnera, M

    2010-08-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) is a rare intra-abdominal tumor, characterized by a specific histological and immunohistochemical pattern. These tumors affect with higher frequency stomach and small bowel and occur at a median age of 60 years with a slight male predominance. An early stage of GIST often don't cause any symptoms, so most GISTs are diagnosed in later stages of the disease. We report a case of GIST diagnosed only with clinical data and positron emission tomography (PET). We demonstrate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment with Imatinib mesylate, a newly developed tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor. The neoadjuvant treatment with Imatinib reduced the mass size and vascularization, making possible a surgical approach.

  4. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor in an XYY/XY male.

    PubMed

    Limacher, Jean-Marc; Girard-Lemaire, Françoise; Jeandidier, Eric; Chenard-Neu, Marie-Pierre; Kassem, Maysoun; Flori, Elisabeth; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre

    2002-03-01

    A 32-year-old patient was diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small bowel. The pathologic diagnosis was confirmed by positive immunochemistry against CD34, and against CD117, the tyrosine-kinase c-kit. We performed a karyotypic analysis on the basis of the patient's tall stature and speech difficulties. One hundred thirty-two metaphases were obtained on PHA-stimulated peripheral blood; 123 of them presented an extra chromosome Y. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using a Y satellite III probe showed the presence of a sole copy of chromosome Y in the tumor cells precluding a direct relationship between the extra chromosome Y and the initiation of the tumor. This is, to our knowledge, the second occurrence of a nonhematologic malignancy reported in this genetic disorder. A review of the malignancies observed in men with the XYY constitution is presented.

  5. Paraneoplastic Hypoglycaemia: A Rare Manifestation of Pelvic Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Rahat; Mehrotra, Kiranpreet; Rastogi, Shivani; Masood, Shakeel

    2017-01-01

    Non-Islet Cell Tumour Induced Hypoglycaemia (NICTH), presenting with recurrent fasting hypoglycaemia is a very rare paraneoplastic syndrome. It usually presents with large metastatic mesenchymal tumours. NICTH secondary to Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) is even rarer. Diagnosis of NICTH is based on the low serum insulin level, low serum concentrations of Insulin Like Growth Factor (IGF-I) and IGF binding protein- III (IGFBP-III) in combination with elevated concentrations of pro-IGF-II. Various Immunohistochemical (IHC) markers are integral to diagnosis of GIST namely 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase -1(DOG-1), Cluster Differentiation 34 (CD 34), Cluster Differentiation 117 (CD117). The management requires prompt intravenous hydration and glucose infusions followed by surgical resection. We hereby, report a rare case of a 65-year-old female with intractable fasting hypoglycaemia due to overproduction of "big" insulin-like growth factor II diagnosed to have pelvic GIST and managed by Steroids and Imatinib.

  6. Outcome after resection of one hundred gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Krajinovic, K; Germer, C T; Agaimy, A; Wünsch, P H; Isbert, C

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome after surgical resection in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors and to determine the factors influencing local tumor recurrence or distant metastatic disease after locally complete tumor resection (R0). Outcomes of 100 patients with primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) surgically managed between 1997 and 2006 at a single institution were reviewed. Univariate and bivariate analyses were used to determine factors affecting recurrence-free and tumor-free survival. All patients (n = 100) had c-kit-positive GIST. There were 17% (n = 17) very low risk, 41% (n = 41) low risk, 19% (n = 19) intermediate risk and 23% (n = 23) high risk GIST originating from the stomach, small bowel, colon and rectum. The median patient age was 68 years (range 39-92). Seventy-three percent of the patients had symptomatic local disease. Most (94%; n = 94) of them underwent R0 resections of their primary tumor. R0 resection was significantly associated with a lower tumor-related mortality rate (p = 0.0001). The patients with recurrence/metastases had significantly larger tumors (p = 0.0017) and a mitotic index higher than 5/50 HPF (p = 0.0001). Seven of 20 patients from the high-risk group and 2 of 7 patients with metastatic disease developed local recurrence or further metastatatic tumor spread following R0 resection. Surgical removal continues to be the mainstay of GIST treatment. R0 resection, tumor size and mitotic index are significant prognostic factors. Overall, more than 30% of the patients with high-risk GIST develop local recurrences and distant metastases despite R0 resection. Additional molecular pathological markers are needed to yield a more accurate tumor profile and to thus achieve a better predictability of the biological behavior of GIST. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Gastric and small intestine gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Do outcomes differ?

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Katherine; Nagarajan, Neeraja; Canner, Joseph; Najafian, Alireza; Wolfgang, Christopher; Schneider, Eric; Meyer, Christian; Lennon, Anne Marie; Johnston, Fabian M; Ahuja, Nita

    2017-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Previous literature has suggested that small intestine GISTs are more aggressive than gastric GISTs. Our primary objective was to compare the outcomes of gastric and small intestine GISTs in the decade after approval of imatinib for treatment. The SEER database was queried for cases of gastric and small intestine GIST between the years 2002 and 2012, using the ICD-O-3 histology code 8936. Survival analysis was performed using generalized gamma models for time to cause-specific mortality (CSM). CSM was 14.0% for the 3,759 gastric GIST patients and 14.3% for the 1,848 small intestine GIST patients. Five-year survival was 82.2% and 83.3% for gastric and small intestine patients, respectively. The number of diagnosed cases of GIST increased over the course of this study, especially for tumors <5 cm in size and in patients over age 50 years. In this large nation-wide study, we found that patients with gastric and small intestine GISTs had similar outcomes, in contrast to previous reports. The diagnosis of GIST has significantly increased in the last decade, which may reflect the increased recognition of this entity and frequent use of imaging. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:351-357. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A clinical and immunohistochemical study of gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Joon Joon; Gunn, Andrew

    2005-06-01

    To study the clinical features, histology and immunohistochemical properties of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs); and establish any parameters that can help prognosticate the malignant potential. Twenty-six patients with GISTs who were seen in Sultanah Aminah Hospital Johor, Malaysia from 1999 to 2003 were selected for study. Patient, clinical characteristics and outcome based on surgical records were analysed. Tumour variables (tumour size, cellularity, mitotic count, necrosis and haemorrhage) were compared between very low to low risk groups and intermediate to high risk groups. The immunohistochemical properties of GISTs were also studied. Patients with GISTs presented mainly with pain, palpable mass or gastrointestinal tract bleeding. The tumours were seen in stomach (50%) followed by small intestine (38.5%) and rectum (11.5%). In the period of study, six patients had metastasis, mainly in the liver or peritoneum. Immunoreactivity for CD117, CD34, vimentin, S100, neuron specific enolase, alpha-smooth-muscle-actin and desmin were observed in 100%, 76.9%, 61.5%, 46.1%, 80.8%, 11.5% and 0% of tumours respectively. The behaviour of GISTs was largely dependent on tumour size and number of mitosis. Necrosis and haemorrhage were seen in tumours with high risk potential.

  9. Molecularly targeted therapy and radiotherapy in the management of localized gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the rectum: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ciresa, Marzia; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Ramella, Sara; Cellini, Francesco; Gaudino, Diego; Stimato, Gerardina; Fiore, Michele; Greco, Carlo; Nudo, Raffaele; Trodella, Lucio

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. The main treatment for localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors is surgical resection. These tumors respond poorly to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy agents and to radiotherapy. Imatinib mesylate, a small-molecule kinase inhibitor, has proved useful in the treatment of recurrent or metastatic GISTs and is now being tested in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant setting. The role of radiotherapy in the management of patients with GIST is currently restricted to symptomatic palliation. We present the case of a 54-year-old man affected by rectal GIST extending to the anal canal, with constipation, hematochezia, and anal pain. He received imatinib, 400 mg orally per day, for a week before and during radiation therapy. Irradiation was delivered to the gross tumor volume by 3D conformal therapy. The planned total dose was 50.4 Gy in fractions of 1.8 Gy daily. We observed a partial clinical response 3 weeks after the end of combination treatment. The patient then underwent a sphincter-saving surgical procedure. There was no perioperative morbidity and a complete pathological response was obtained. At the present time, the role of radiotherapy in the management of patients with GIST is restricted to symptomatic palliation. The introduction of molecularly targeted therapy combined with radiation therapy could improve the outcomes for patients diagnosed with GIST.

  10. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma or Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  11. C-kit mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Morey, Adrienne L; Wanigesekera, G David; Hawkins, Nicholas J; Ward, Robyn L

    2002-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), once assumed to be of smooth muscle origin, generally express CD117 and CD34, similar to the interstitial cells of Cajal. Assessment of malignant potential in GISTs is problematic, especially on small biopsies. Some recent data indicate that mutations in the juxtamembrane domain (exon 11) of the c-kit (CD117) proto-oncogene may be associated with a worse prognosis. In this study, the frequency of c-kit exon 11 mutations has been determined in a series of 18 gut stromal tumours. Immunophenotype was assessed by immunoperoxidase stains for smooth muscle actin, desmin, S100, CD34 and CD117, and each tumour classified as being of low, uncertain (intermediate) or high malignant potential based on standard histological criteria. DNA from each tumour was extracted from fresh (n = 5) or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (n= 13) tissues using the direct lysis method. Exon 11 was amplified by PCR and sequencing of both sense and antisense strands was performed on two occasions using an ABI 377 sequencer. Mutations in exon 11 were detected in three of 14 confirmed GISTs, two being point mutations at codon 560 and one a 3-bp deletion resulting in the in-frame deletion of glutamine at codon 561. All three tumours were of high or intermediate malignant potential histologically. Three other 'high risk' primary GISTs and a metastatic GIST deposit were negative for exon 11 mutations. Data on this relatively small cohort of Australian patients indicate that c-kit exon 11 mutation analysis does not correlate well with histological assessment of malignant potential, and cannot be regarded as a reliable objective marker for poor prognosis in GISTs.

  12. The Occurrence of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors and Second Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Bonetti, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs may coexist with different types of cancer, either synchronous or metachronous. The frequency of this association and the spectrum of neoplasms involved have not been sufficiently analyzed; most of publications describe a single case report and rare case series. In the absence of definitive data, it could be interesting to compare the frequency of the occurrence of GIST and second malignancies in literature. A review of all case series that reported the frequency of the occurrence of GIST and synchronous second malignancies were considered. Six retrospective case series were considered, including 440 GIST patients; of these, there were 64 (14.5 %) patients with other synchronous second malignancies. Median age was 67 years, median GIST size was 3.91 cm (range 3.0-4.79 cm), and all cases (100.0 %) were CD117 and CD34 positive. According to the risk categories, 35.2 % of patients had a very low risk, 24.0 % a low risk, 27.6 % an intermediate risk, and 13.2 % a high risk. Regarding the occurrence of GISTs and synchronous second malignancies, we can consider it as more common than it has been considered. Differently, concerning the topic of the incidence of second primary malignancies (SPMs) and metachronous second malignancies in pre-imatinib and after-imatinib era, we can consider it as a clinically relevant topic; according to the present knowledge, the main cause for the increased incidence of SPMs in the imatinib era is explained by the increased survival of patients with metastatic GISTs and therefore more time available to develop SPMs.

  13. Endosonographic features predictive of benign and malignant gastrointestinal stromal cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, L; Landi, B; Cellier, C; Cuillerier, E; Roseau, G; Barbier, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM—Some endoscopic ultrasonographic (EUS) features have been reported to be suggestive of malignancy in gastrointestinal stromal cell tumours (SCTs). The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of these features for malignancy.
METHODS—A total of 56 histologically proven cases of SCT studied by EUS between 1989 and 1996 were reviewed. There were 42 gastric tumours, 12 oesophageal tumours, and two rectal tumours. The tumours were divided into two groups: (a) benign SCT, comprising benign leiomyoma (n = 34); (b) malignant or borderline SCT (n = 22), comprising leiomyosarcoma (n = 9), leiomyoblastoma (n = 9), and leiomyoma of uncertain malignant potential (n = 4). The main EUS features recorded were tumour size, ulceration, echo pattern, cystic spaces, extraluminal margins, and lymph nodes with a malignant pattern. The two groups were compared by univariate and multivariate analysis.
RESULTS—Irregular extraluminal margins, cystic spaces, and lymph nodes with a malignant pattern were most predictive of malignant or borderline SCT. Pairwise combinations of the three features had a specificity and positive predictive value of 100% for malignant or borderline SCT, but a sensitivity of only 23%. The presence of at least one of these three criteria had 91% sensitivity, 88% specificity, and 83% predictive positive value. In multivariate analysis, cystic spaces and irregular margins were the only two features independently predictive of malignant potential. The features most predictive of benign SCTs were regular margins, tumour size ⩽30 mm, and a homogeneous echo pattern. When the three features were combined, histology confirmed a benign SCT in all cases.
CONCLUSIONS—The combined presence of two out of three EUS features (irregular extraluminal margins, cystic spaces, and lymph nodes with a malignant pattern) had a positive predictive value of 100% for malignant or borderline gastrointestinal SCT. Tumours less than 30

  14. Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) approach for large juxta-anal gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Nicolas; Wörns, Marcus-Alexander; Dos Santos, Daniel Pinto; Lang, Hauke; Huber, Tobias; Kneist, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rarely found in the rectum. Large rectal GISTs in the narrow pelvis sometimes require extended abdominal surgery to obtain free resection margins, and it is a challenge to preserve sufficient anal sphincter and urogenital function. Here we present a 56-year-old male with a locally advanced juxta-anal non-metastatic GIST of approximately 10 cm in diameter. Therapy with imatinib reduced the tumour size and allowed partial intersphincteric resection (pISR). The patient underwent an electrophysiology-controlled nerve-sparing hybrid of laparoscopic and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) in a multimodal setting. The down-to-up approach provided sufficient dissection plane visualisation and allowed the confirmed nerve-sparing. Lateroterminal coloanal anastomosis was performed. Follow-up showed preserved urogenital function and good anorectal function, and the patient remains disease-free under adjuvant chemotherapy as of 12 months after surgery. This report suggests that the TAMIS approach enables extraluminal high-quality oncological and function-preserving excision of high-risk GISTs.

  15. Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) approach for large juxta-anal gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Nicolas; Wörns, Marcus-Alexander; dos Santos, Daniel Pinto; Lang, Hauke; Huber, Tobias; Kneist, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rarely found in the rectum. Large rectal GISTs in the narrow pelvis sometimes require extended abdominal surgery to obtain free resection margins, and it is a challenge to preserve sufficient anal sphincter and urogenital function. Here we present a 56-year-old male with a locally advanced juxta-anal non-metastatic GIST of approximately 10 cm in diameter. Therapy with imatinib reduced the tumour size and allowed partial intersphincteric resection (pISR). The patient underwent an electrophysiology-controlled nerve-sparing hybrid of laparoscopic and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) in a multimodal setting. The down-to-up approach provided sufficient dissection plane visualisation and allowed the confirmed nerve-sparing. Lateroterminal coloanal anastomosis was performed. Follow-up showed preserved urogenital function and good anorectal function, and the patient remains disease-free under adjuvant chemotherapy as of 12 months after surgery. This report suggests that the TAMIS approach enables extraluminal high-quality oncological and function-preserving excision of high-risk GISTs. PMID:27279406

  16. Retrospective analysis of extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jun Ho; Park, Byeong-Bae; Kang, Jung Hun; Hwang, In Gyu; Shin, Dong Bok; Sym, Sun Jin; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Lee, Soon Il; Lim, Do Hyoung; Park, Keon Woo; Won, Young-Woong; Lim, Sung Hee; Park, Se Hoon

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinicopathologic features of patients with extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs) in South Korea. METHODS: A total of 51 patients with an EGIST were identified. The clinicopathologic features, including sex, age, location, tumor size, histology, mitotic rate, immunohistochemical features, genetic status and survival data, were analyzed. RESULTS: The median age was 55 years (range: 29-80 years), and male:female ratio was 1:1.04. The most common site was in the mesentery (n = 15) followed by the retroperitoneum (n = 13) and omentum (n = 8). The median tumor size was 9.0 cm (range: 2.6-30.0 cm) and the median mitotic rate was 5.0/50HPF. (1/50 - 185/50). KIT was analyzed in 16, which revealed 10 cases with wild-type KIT and 6 cases with an exon 11 mutation. Among 51 patients, 31 patients had undergone surgery, and 10 had unresectable disease and had taken palliative imatinib, which resulted in 22.7 mo of progression-free survival. Of the patients who had undergone surgery, 18 did not take adjuvant imatinib, and 8 of these were categorized as “high risk” according to the risk criteria. However, the relapse-free survival was not different (P = 0.157) between two groups. CONCLUSION: Because the biologic behaviors of GISTs differ according to the location of the tumor, a more stratified strategy is required for managing EGISTs including incorporation of molecular features. PMID:25684950

  17. Pancreas preserving surgery for duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumor removal.

    PubMed

    Crocetti, Daniele; Sapienza, Paolo; Cisano, Claudio; Tarallo, Mariarita; Polistena, Andrea; Venturini, Luigi; Pedullà, Giuseppe; De Toma, Giorgio

    2016-10-01

    We reported our experience with high-risk, non-metastatic second portion duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)s in patients who underwent 1-month neoadjuvant cycles with imatinib therapy followed by pancreas-preserving surgery and 12-month of adjuvant chemotherapic regimen including imatinib. This study was conducted to evaluate the short and long-term results. The study was conducted between January 2010 and May 2015. Medical charts and operative logbooks of patients were retrospectively reviewed. Nine patients form the basis of the current analysis. All patients underwent curative resection with pancreas preservation, and all specimens had histologically negative margins. The median follow-up was 35 months. Eight patients were alive, 1 patient died for myocardial infarction at a mean follow-up of 10 months, 1 patient had a recurrence at a mean follow-up of 32 months and no patients developed distant metastases. We are confident to suggest the use of neoadjuvant and adjuvant Imatinib therapy to those patients affected with D2, high-risk, duodenal GISTs to allow a limited resection.

  18. Gastric bronchogenic cyst presenting as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Longhao; Lu, Li; Fu, Weihua; Li, Weidong; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Bronchogenic cyst (BC) is congenital abnormality of the tracheobronchial bud derived from the primitive foregut which is predominantly found in the mediastinum. Surgery remains the most common treatment when malignancy is suspected, or when there are presenting. Only infrequently, is BC located at an extrathoracic site. Although rarely located in the stomach, BC should be considered as a differential diagnosis of gastric neoplasm. For these cases, surgery remains a common choice. Minimally invasive procedures such as endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle biopsy aspiration (EUS-FNA) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) should also be considered when the diagnosis of BC is suspected. They are valuable diagnostic methods that can assess and identify the location of the lesion, and facilitate histological examination of the cyst. In some cases of more superficial lesions ESD can take the place of surgery as it avoids unnecessary complications of a more invasive procedure. Here we present a case of gastric BC located in the fundus of the stomach that resembled a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). We discuss its embryology, pathogenesis, radiological, clinical and treatment modalities. We also provide a thorough review of 14 cases (including our own case), which completely meet pathological criteria has been undertaken focusing on symptom, location, treatment, and histological features. PMID:26722583

  19. Coexistence of gastrointestinal stromal tumor, esophageal and gastric cardia carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Xu-Dong; Shi, Quan; Jia, Jing

    2013-03-28

    Gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma are distinct neoplasms originating from different cell layers; therefore, simultaneous development of such carcinomas is relatively rare. Auxiliary examinations revealed coexistence of esophageal and gastric cardia carcinoma with lymph node metastasis in a 77-year-old man. Intraoperatively, an extraluminal tumor (about 6.0 cm × 5.0 cm × 6.0 cm) at the posterior wall of the gastric body, a tumor (about 2.5 cm × 2.0 cm) in the lower esophagus, and an infiltrative and stenosing tumor (about 1.0 cm × 2.0 cm) in the gastric cardia were detected. Wedge resection for extraluminal gastric tumor, radical esophagectomy for lower esophageal tumor, and cardiac resection with gastroesophageal (supra-aortic arch anastomoses) were performed. Postoperative histological examination showed synchronous occurrence of gastric GIST, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry indicated strong staining for c-Kit/CD117, Dog-1, Ki-67 and smooth muscle, while expression of S-100 and CD34 was negative.

  20. Liquid biopsy in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Nannini, Margherita; Astolfi, Annalisa; Urbini, Milena; Biasco, Guido; Pantaleo, Maria A

    2014-08-14

    The role of molecular analysis in the management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) remains indisputable. To date, tumor tissue extracted from specimens obtained by surgical or biopsy procedures has been the only source of the tumor DNA required for the molecular and genomic assessment of cancer. However, tumor tissue sampling has several clinical limitations: for example, the invasiveness of these procedures precludes repeated sampling. Thus, it is possible to obtain only a static molecular picture of the disease, a picture that lacks the inter- and intra-metastatic molecular heterogeneity that characterizes most GIST. In contrast, circulating tumor DNA obtained from a patient's bloodstream, known as liquid biopsy, can theoretically overcome the limitations of tissue biopsies and provide the same molecular and genomic information. GIST are recognized as a paradigm of molecular biology among solid tumors. Although few but promising data on liquid biopsy in GIST have been accumulated to date, these tumors may provide the optimal field for application of this challenging approach.

  1. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Thirty years experience of an Institution

    PubMed Central

    Arolfo, Simone; Teggia, Paolo Mello; Nano, Mario

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) during the last 29 years. METHODS: Thirty two cases of GIST referred to our Institution from the 1st January 1981 to the 10th June 2010 were reviewed. Metastases, recurrence and survival data were collected in relation to age, history, clinical presentation, location, size, resection margins and cellular features. RESULTS: Mean age was 63.7 years (range, 40-90) and incidence was slightly higher in males (56%). R0 resection was performed in 90.7% of cases, R1 in 6.2% (2 cases) and R2 in 3.1% (one case). Using Fletcher’s classification 8/32 (25%) had high risk, 9/32 (28%) intermediate and 15/32 (47%) low risk tumors. Follow-up varied from 1 mo to 29 years, with a median of 8 years; overall survival was 75% (24/32), disease-free survival was 72% and tumor-related mortality was 9.3%. Three patients with high risk GIST were treated with imatinib mesylate: one developed a recurrence after 36 mo, and 2 are free from disease at 41 mo. CONCLUSION: Surgical treatment remains the gold standard therapy for resectable GISTs. Pathological and biological features of the neoplasm represent the most important factors predicting the prognosis. PMID:21528056

  2. Herpes zoster complicating imatinib mesylate for gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Durosinmi, M A; Ogbe, P O; Salawu, L; Oyekunle, A A

    2007-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection is uncommon in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) and who have not been exposed to extensive radiotherapy and/or high-dose chemotherapy. We report a 56-year-old Nigerian man with GIST who developed VZV infection while on imatinib mesylate therapy. From August 2003 to November 2005, 64 patients (GIST/CML = 6/58) were enrolled into an ongoing Glivec (imatinib mesylate) international patient-assistance programme therapy for Philadelphia/bcr-abl-positive chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and CD117-positive GIST patients at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The patient developed herpes zoster (HZ) infection 23 months into therapy with Glivec. With his absolute lymphocyte count at 2,774 cells per microlitre and CD4 count at 950 cells per microlitre, no obvious immunological defect was observed. Prompt resolution of symptoms without sequelae was achieved by treating with acyclovir, analgesic and dressing of lesions with desiccant. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of HZ infection in a patient with GIST on Glivec therapy, and the response is similar to that of CML patients who developed VZV while on similar therapy.

  3. CT Features of Colorectal Schwannomas: Differentiation from Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji Hee; Kim, Se Hyung; Kim, Young Hoon; Rha, Sung Eun; Hur, Bo Yun; Han, Joon Koo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To find differential CT features of colorectal schwannomas from gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Materials and Methods CT features of 13 pathologically proven colorectal schwannomas and 21 GISTs were retrospectively reviewed. The following CT items were analyzed: size, longitudinal and transverse location, shape, margin, homogeneity, necrosis, surface ulceration, calcification, degree of attenuation, the presence of enlarged lymph node (LN), and metastasis. Among the features, significant variables were evaluated using univariate statistical tests. The optimal cut-off point of tumor size was obtained by ROC analysis. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to find the most independent CT variables. Results Small size, non-rectum location, smooth margin, homogeneous high attenuation without necrosis, and the presence of enlarged LNs were found to be significant variables to differentiate schwannomas from GISTs (P<0.05). The optimized cut-off point for tumor size in distinguishing GISTs from schwannomas was 3.9 cm (AUC = 0.808, sensitivity = 66.7%, specificity = 92.3%, P<0.0001). Binary regression analysis revealed that only non-rectum location remained independent predictor for schwannomas differentiated from GISTs (odds ratio = 31.667, P = 0.001). Conclusion Colorectal schwannomas usually located in non-rectum and appear as small subepithelial nodules showing homogeneous high attenuation and smooth margin. Schwannomas exclusively accompany with enlarged LNs. PMID:28005903

  4. Optimizing Adherence to Adjuvant Imatinib in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tetzlaff, Eric D.; Davey, Monica P.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of patient-administered oral anticancer drugs is paralleled by new challenges in maintaining treatment adherence. These challenges are particularly significant with adjuvant therapies for prevention of disease recurrence, where the benefits of ongoing treatment are not readily apparent to patients. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants (collectively referred to as advanced practitioners) play integral roles in providing education on disease and treatment to patients that can increase adherence to oral therapies and ideally improve outcomes. For patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), the oral targeted therapy imatinib has become the mainstay of treatment for advanced and recurrent disease and as adjuvant therapy following surgical resection. Recent data indicate significantly improved overall survival with 3 years vs. 1 year of adjuvant imatinib therapy. Continuous dosing with imatinib is needed for optimal efficacy and to limit additional health-care costs associated with management of disease progression in GIST. However, longer duration of therapy increases the risk of nonadherence. Imatinib adherence rates, as well as factors contributing to nonadherence to adjuvant therapy in routine clinical practice, are discussed in this review. Also explored are practical approaches for improving adherence to adjuvant imatinib therapy through greater patient education, in light of the increased duration of therapy in select patients. PMID:25032004

  5. Carbonic anhydrase II. A novel biomarker for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Parkkila, Seppo; Lasota, Jerzy; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Ou, Wen-Bin; Kivelä, Antti J; Nuorva, Kyösti; Parkkila, Anna-Kaisa; Ollikainen, Jyrki; Sly, William S; Waheed, Abdul; Pastorekova, Silvia; Pastorek, Jaromir; Isola, Jorma; Miettinen, Markku

    2010-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are clinically distinct mesenchymal tumors, which generally result from expression of mutant KIT or PDGFRA receptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes. Most GISTs feature strong expression of KIT that serves as a crucial diagnostic adjunct. However, a subset of tumors lacks KIT expression and otherwise may also be difficult to distinguish from other sarcomas, including leiomyosarcoma. Because various carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes have been identified as potential treatment targets against different cancers, we evaluated CA II expression in 175 GISTs. Western blotting experiments indicated that CA II is highly expressed in GIST cell lines. Immunohistochemically, 95% of GISTs showed positive signal. The CA II expression in GISTs did not correlate with particular KIT or PDGFRA mutation types. CA II immunoreactivity was absent or low in other mesenchymal tumor categories analyzed. High CA II expression was associated with a better disease-specific survival rate than low or no expression (Mantel-Cox test, P<0.0001). The present results indicate that CA II is overexpressed in most GISTs, is quite selective to this tumor type among mesenchymal tumors, and therefore might be a useful biomarker in diagnostics.

  6. Current status of immunotherapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Y; Trent, J C; Wilky, B A; Kerr, D A; Rosenberg, A E

    2017-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) contain tumor-infiltrating immune cells and their presence provides an opportunity and rationale for developing effective forms of immunotherapy. The types of tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells and relevant immune checkpoint inhibitors are the focus of active investigation. The most numerous tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells are tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and CD3+ T cells. Studies have shown that patients with GISTs that harbor increased numbers of CD3+ T cells have better outcomes. However, the clinical behavior of GIST has not been shown to correlate with the number of TAMs. The biological significance of other less frequent tumor-infiltrating immune cells including tumor-infiltrating neurtrophils (TINs), natural killer cells (NKs), B cells, dendritic cells (DCs) remains unclear. The immune checkpoint inhibitors CTLA-4, PD1/PDL1 and TIM3/galectin-9 are molecules that can be targeted by synthesized antibodies. Clinical and pre-clinical trials using this approach against immune checkpoint inhibitors, anti-KIT antibody and the generation of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells have shown promising results. The treatment of GIST with immunotherapy is complex and evolving; this article reviews its current status for patients with GISTs.

  7. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST): at the forefront of targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Emile, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Although gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most frequent sarcomas, they were usually not diagnosed before 1998. GIST derive from interstitial cells of Cajal, and may develop along the digestive tract, mainly from stomach and small intestine. GIST are characterized by the expression of KIT (CD117), and mutations KIT or PDGFRA are present in 85 % of cases. More than 150 different types of mutations have been reported. They are responsible for a constitutive activation of these tyrosine kinase receptors, in absence of their specific ligand. Detection of these mutations may help to confirm the diagnosis or to evaluate the prognosis. The mutations also have a predictive value. Indeed patients with metastatic GIST and duplication within exon 9 of KIT deserve to receive twice the dose of imatinib, while GIST with PDGFRA p.D842 V mutation are resistant to this drug. This review presents the main characteristics of GIST, and focus on the important insights of studies on GIST and their cell models in the field of oncology.

  8. Differentiation between gastrointestinal schwannomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors by computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming-Yan; Zhang, Rong; Peng, Zhenpeng; Li, Yin; Xu, Ling; Jiang, Mengjie; Li, Zi-Ping; Feng, Shi-Ting

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify computed tomography (CT) features to assist in differentiating gastrointestinal schwannomas from gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). CT images of gastrointestinal schwannomas (n=15) and GISTs (n=50) were analyzed. The absolute CT values of tumor/aorta during plain scan/arterial phase/venous phase were recorded as tumor plain scan (Tp)/aorta plain scan (Ap), tumor arterial phase (Ta)/aorta arterial phase (Aa) and tumor venous phase (Tv)/aorta venous phase (Av), respectively, and normalized CT values of the three phases were calculated as Sp=Tp/Ap, Sa=Ta/Aa and Sv=Tv/Av, respectively. The difference in tumor CT value between arterial and venous phases was calculated and recorded as Tv-a. CT data including tumor size, contour, margin, growth pattern, presence of calcification, cystic change, hemorrhage, ulceration, perilesional lymph nodes (PLNs), local invasion to surrounding structures, metastasis, ascites, vasculatures, enhancement pattern/degree, Tp/Ta/Tv and Sp/Sa/Sv were evaluated for each patient. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the ability of the CT data to differentiate gastrointestinal schwannomas from GISTs. Compared with GISTs, gastrointestinal schwannomas more frequently demonstrated round contouring, relatively smaller tumor size, a homogeneous enhancement pattern, with the presence of PLNs and a higher level of vasculature (P<0.05), whilst the presence of cystic changes were more common in GISTs compared with gastrointestinal schwannomas (P<0.05). The Sa, Ta and Tv-a of gastrointestinal schwannomas were less compared with those of GISTs (P<0.05). The difference in margin, growth pattern, intra-tumoral calcifications and hemorrhage were insignificant (P>0.05). ROC analysis indicated that tumor size, cystic change, the presence of PLNs, tumor enhancement pattern and Sa demonstrated improved diagnostic potential compared with others [area under the curve (AUC) >0

  9. Incidental detection of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor on Tc-99m red blood cell scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Gupta, Vikas; Singh, Rajinder; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2012-10-01

    The role of 99m-technetium labeled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy in acute gastro-intestinal bleed is well-established. The authors report a case of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) incidentally discovered on Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy.

  10. Discovered on gastrointestinal stromal tumours 1 (DOG1) expression in non-gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hemminger, Jessica; Iwenofu, O Hans

    2012-08-01

    To further characterize discovered on GIST1 (DOG1) antibody clone K9 expression in a broad range of mesenchymal and epithelial tumours. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of various tumours were stained with the anti-DOG1 monoclonal antibody clone K9. The tumours (n = 187) included: gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) (n = 20); malignant melanoma (n = 19); schwannoma (n = 10); neurofibroma (n = 10); leiomyosarcoma (n = 10); low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (n = 5); angiosarcoma, (n = 10); epithelioid sarcoma (n = 5); clear cell sarcoma (n = 3); synovial sarcoma (n = 10); malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) (n = 12); alveolar soft part sarcoma (n = 3); chordoma (n = 5); pleomorphic undifferentiated sarcoma (n = 5); perineurioma (n = 4); granular cell tumour (n = 6); acinic cell carcinoma (n = 5); adenocarcinoma, lung (n = 5), colon (n = 10), endometrioid (n = 10), prostate (n = 10) and renal cell (n = 10). Nineteen of 20 GISTs expressed DOG-1 and 12 of 20 were diffusely positive (≥95%) with moderate to strong intensity. There was focal, predominantly luminal staining of colorectal (three of 10), endometrioid (four of 10) and acinic cell carcinomas (four of five). One case each of spindle cell/desmoplastic melanoma (2+), schwannoma (trace) and MPNST (2+) showed DOG-1 expression. Our study supports that DOG-1 is a highly sensitive and specific marker for GISTs and also highlights hitherto unrecognized and unusual patterns of expression in non-mesenchymal neoplasms. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Preoperative imatinib mesylate (IM) for huge gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST).

    PubMed

    Tang, Sumin; Yin, Yuan; Shen, Chaoyong; Chen, Jiaju; Yin, Xiaonan; Zhang, Bo; Yao, Yuqin; Yang, Jinliang; Chen, Zhixin

    2017-04-11

    Preoperative imatinib mesylate (IM) treatment has not yet been standardized. Here, we aim to further explore such therapy on patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) retrospectively. Patients experiencing preoperative IM were identified from January 2009 to February 2015. A total of 28 GIST patients were identified. The patients received preoperative IM treatment for a median length of 13.5 months, ranging from 5 to 37 months. PR and SD were observed in 24 (85.7%) and 4 (15.3%) patients, respectively. The tumor shrinkage occurred predominantly within 6 to 12 months, and slight tumor shrinkage could be observed after 12 months in certain patients. Nineteen patients (67.9%) received surgery, and R0 resection was acquired in 18 (94.7%) patients. The initial mean maximum diameter was 10.5 (5.2 to 19.0) cm and decreased to 5.9 (2.7 to 19.0) cm after preoperative treatment with a median length of 12 (ranging from 5 to 36) months (P < 0.001) in patients receiving operations. Three in 7 cases of rectum GIST underwent abdominoperineal resection, and four others adopted sphincter-sparing resection. Partial gastrectomy was performed in four patients. IM prior to surgery can effectively prevent tumor rupture and facilitate surgery with low surgical morbidity for GIST patients. Tumor shrinkage following IM occurred predominantly within 6 to 12 months, and slight tumor shrinkage could be observed after 12 months in certain patients. In selected patients, prolonged exposure to IM is seemingly advisable under close radiological surveillance.

  12. P16 overexpression in BRAF-mutated gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shan-Shan; Wang, Xuan; Xia, Qiu-Yuan; Rao, Qiu; Shen, Qin; Ye, Sheng-Bin; Li, Rui; Shi, Qun-Li; Lu, Zhen-Feng; Ma, Heng-Hui; Zhou, Xiao-Jun

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the histopathology, immunophenotype, molecular features, and prognosis in cases of BRAF-mutated gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and to examine the p16 expression in these tumors, and further discuss its effects on tumor formation and progression. In all, 283 GIST cases (201 KIT mutants, 12 PDGFRA mutants and 70 wild-type) from the 2010 to 2014 surgical pathology files of the Department of Pathology at Nanjing Jinling Hospital were analyzed for mutations in BRAF exon 15. Patient follow-up and clinical data were collected if available in the medical records. To determine the clinicopathological features and potential molecular mechanism, the authors examined 10 BRAF-mutated GIST cases for KIT, DOG1, SMA, desmin, S-100, Ki-67 and p16 expression. The authors identified 10 cases (3.5%) of BRAF (V600E) mutations in a series of 283 primary GISTs, without KIT (exons 9, 11, 13, 17) or PDGFRA (exons 12, 18) gene mutations. All 10 cases exhibited spindle-cell features, and the morphology and immunophenotype of these cases were no different from those in cases of KIT-mutated GISTs. The clinical results indicated that BRAF-mutated GISTs tended to occur more frequently in females (7/10), older individuals (mean age, 54.9 years) and the stomach (7/10), and that these tumors were low risk and exhibited low recurrence and mortality rates. Two different forms of p16 were identified, which presented with simultaneously strong and diffuse nuclear and cytoplasmic expression patterns. GISTs with the BRAF V600E mutation are relatively benign tumors with a distinctive molecular mechanism. The expression of the nuclear and cytoplasmic forms of p16 represent two independent mechanisms, and both seemed to control proliferation in response to oncogenic stimuli, protecting the cell from malignant transformation in BRAF-mutated GISTs.

  13. Large gastrointestinal stromal tumours of the stomach: Is laparoscopy reasonable?

    PubMed Central

    Severino, Beatrice Ulloa; Fuks, David; Lainas, Panagiotis; Blain, Antoine; Validire, Pierre; Ferraz, Jean-Marc; Perniceni, Thierry; Gayet, Brice

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic resection (LR) offers significant advantages compared to open resections for gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). We aimed to evaluate whether LR outcomes jeopardised short and long-term outcomes of patients with large GISTs. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Among 50 patients undergoing surgery for gastric GISTs, 12 underwent LR for large GISTs (>5 cm). Their characteristics, perioperative results and survival were retrospectively compared to those of 22 patients who underwent LR for ‘small GIST’. RESULTS: The two groups were similar regarding demographics, rate of wedge resection and mean blood loss. No patient required transfusion or conversion. Operative time was significantly increased in the ‘large GIST’ group (160 min vs 112 min, P = 0.001). Mean tumour size was significantly lower in the ‘small GIST’ group (8.4 cm vs 2.4 cm, P = 0.0001). Resection margins were negative. The mortality rate was nil and the overall morbidity rates was similar in both groups. Median length of hospital stay was significantly increased in the ‘large GIST’ group (7 days vs 5 days, P = 0.004). Median follow-up was 47 months and one patient in the ‘small GIST’ group developed recurrence and died during follow-up 11 years after surgery. No patient died during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: LR for large GISTs is safe and technically feasible and does not negatively influence the oncologic course. Prospective randomised trials should be performed before using this approach in routine surgical care. PMID:27073308

  14. Clinicopathologic Features and Clinical Outcomes of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Liu, Shushang; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in esophagus are limited, because of the relatively rare incidence of esophageal GISTs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of esophageal GISTs, and to investigate the potential factors that may predict prognosis. Esophageal GIST cases were obtained from our center and from case reports and clinical studies extracted from MEDLINE. Clinicopathologic features and survivals were analyzed and compared with gastric GISTs from our center. The most common location was lower esophagus (86.84%), followed by middle and upper esophagus (11.40% and 1.76%). The majority of esophageal GISTs were classified as high-risk category (70.83%). Mitotic index was correlated with histologic type, mutational status, and tumor size. The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival were 65.1% and 65.9%, respectively. Tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were associated with prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Only tumor size, however, was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. In comparison to gastric GISTs, the distribution of tumor size, histologic type, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were significantly different between esophageal GISTs and gastric GISTs. The disease-free survival and disease-specific survival of esophageal GISTs were significantly lower than that of gastric GISTs. The most common location for esophageal GISTs was lower esophagus, and most of the esophageal GISTs are high-risk category. Tumor size was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Esophageal GISTs differ significantly from gastric GISTs in respect to clinicopathologic features. The prognosis of esophageal GISTs was worse than that of gastric GISTs. PMID:26765432

  15. Recurrent epimutation of SDHC in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Killian, J Keith; Miettinen, Markku; Walker, Robert L; Wang, Yonghong; Zhu, Yuelin Jack; Waterfall, Joshua J; Noyes, Natalia; Retnakumar, Parvathy; Yang, Zhiming; Smith, William I; Killian, M Scott; Lau, C Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Walling, Jennifer; Stevenson, Holly; Smith, Carly; Wang, Zengfeng; Lasota, Jerzy; Kim, Su Young; Boikos, Sosipatros A; Helman, Lee J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2014-12-24

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a conserved effector of cellular metabolism and energy production, and loss of SDH function is a driver mechanism in several cancers. SDH-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors (dSDH GISTs) collectively manifest similar phenotypes, including hypermethylated epigenomic signatures, tendency to occur in pediatric patients, and lack of KIT/PDGFRA mutations. dSDH GISTs often harbor deleterious mutations in SDH subunit genes (SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD, termed SDHx), but some are SDHx wild type (WT). To further elucidate mechanisms of SDH deactivation in SDHx-WT GIST, we performed targeted exome sequencing on 59 dSDH GISTs to identify 43 SDHx-mutant and 16 SDHx-WT cases. Genome-wide DNA methylation and expression profiling exposed SDHC promoter-specific CpG island hypermethylation and gene silencing in SDHx-WT dSDH GISTs [15 of 16 cases (94%)]. Six of 15 SDHC-epimutant GISTs occurred in the setting of the multitumor syndrome Carney triad. We observed neither SDHB promoter hypermethylation nor large deletions on chromosome 1q in any SDHx-WT cases. Deep genome sequencing of a 130-kbp (kilo-base pair) window around SDHC revealed no recognizable sequence anomalies in SDHC-epimutant tumors. More than 2000 benign and tumor reference tissues, including stem cells and malignancies with a hypermethylator epigenotype, exhibit solely a non-epimutant SDHC promoter. Mosaic constitutional SDHC promoter hypermethylation in blood and saliva from patients with SDHC-epimutant GIST implicates a postzygotic mechanism in the establishment and maintenance of SDHC epimutation. The discovery of SDHC epimutation provides a unifying explanation for the pathogenesis of dSDH GIST, whereby loss of SDH function stems from either SDHx mutation or SDHC epimutation.

  16. Towards global consensus in the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Reichardt, Peter; Blay, Jean-Yves; von Mehren, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary clinical landscape of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) has evolved rapidly over the past several years. Widely used treatment guidelines – from the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network – have recently been updated and represent the most up-to-date, comprehensive tools guiding the optimal management of GIST. In these, and in other published guidelines, close alignment among recommendations now exists for many of the clinical issues relevant to GIST management – surgery, use of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors imatinib and sunitinib and the role of pre- and post-operative imatinib, among others. This trend towards a global consensus in the treatment of GIST is the result of a relatively large amount of new data across the spectrum of its management. However, for some clinical considerations, recommendations still partially deviate. This review examines clinical recommendations and opinions on the management of GIST in the context of the latest data in the field and with an eye towards a multidisciplinary approach including surgical oncology, medical oncology, pathology and diagnostic radiology. Points of consensus are highlighted. Expert opinion is presented on management areas where no scientific evidence or firm recommendations currently exist; lingering and unresolved questions or issues are included. Within this framework, we present an evaluation of current global guidelines on the following areas in GIST management: surgery in the metastatic setting; neoadjuvant therapy; adjuvant therapy; mutational analysis; maintenance tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy; and radiological imaging in GIST. A summary of consensus across these guidelines based on clinical trial data is juxtaposed with expert opinion where gaps in data still remain. PMID:20131998

  17. Coexistence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors and gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Li, Ziyu; Liu, Yiqiang; Zhang, Lianhai; Li, Jiyou; Ji, Jiafu

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to detect the clinicopathology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) occurring synchronously with gastric adenocarcinomas and to unveil the potential underlying relationship between the synchronous GIST and gastric adenocarcinoma. This study included 15 patients with incidental GISTs found during operations for gastric adenocarcinoma and 30 patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer without discovering GIST between January 2005 and December 2010 at the Beijing Cancer Institute. We collected the clinicopathological data and analyzed the KIT/PDGFRA mutational status of GISTs, corresponding gastric adenocarcinoma specimens, and the normal tissue around the cancer lesions. Additionally, as a control group, the mutational status of the patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and no other tumors was assayed. Overall, 18 GISTs were found in 15 gastric adenocarcinoma patients. Multiple GIST lesions were found in three cases (20 %). The patients' age ranged from 46 to 85 years, with an average of 67.6 years. The average size of the GISTs was 0.85 cm. All mesenchymal lesions showed low proliferative activity, were of low or very low risk, and were identified as CD117-positive by immunostaining. In GIST lesions, mutations in KIT were detected in 7 out of 13 cases, and of these mutations, 6 were found in exon 11 (46.2 %), and 1 was found in exon 9 (7.7 %). A total of five deletions and one point mutation were in exon 11, and one insertion was in exon 9. Mutations were not detected in exon 17 or 13 of KIT. There was no remarkable mutation analyzed in the gastric adenocarcinoma lesions or normal tissues from either the test or control groups. Clinicopathological profiles and molecular analysis of KIT/PDGFRA showed no obvious relationship between gastric cancer and GISTs in tumor genesis, such as similar oncogene mutations.

  18. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Somatic Mutations and Candidate Genetic Risk Variants

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Katie M.; Orlow, Irene; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Ballman, Karla; McCall, Linda; DeMatteo, Ronald; Engel, Lawrence S.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or “signatures” in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836) and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836). CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively). Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic origins

  19. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Katie M; Orlow, Irene; Antonescu, Cristina R; Ballman, Karla; McCall, Linda; DeMatteo, Ronald; Engel, Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836) and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836). CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively). Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic origins and

  20. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST).

    PubMed

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites.

  1. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites. PMID:25120735

  2. Friend leukemia virus integration-1 (FLI-1) expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaygusuz, Gülşah; Kuzu, Işinsu

    2009-06-01

    Friend leukemia virus integration-1 expression has been shown in a variety of tumors, including vascular tumors, desmoplastic small round cell tumor, Merkel cell carcinoma, and lymphoblastic lymphoma, in addition to Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor. The aim of the current study was to examine Friend leukemia virus integration-1 protein expression in a series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors and also to assess if Friend leukemia virus integration-1 has any role in the disease process. It is the first study analyzing Friend leukemia virus integration-1 expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the English literature. A tissue microarray block containing 52 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors was done. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for Friend leukemia virus integration-1 polyclonal antibody. Immunohistochemically, Friend leukemia virus integration-1 was negative in all cases. Friend leukemia virus integration-1 can be expressed in a variety of tumors, and is helpful in making the diagnosis of Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor. We think that this protein is not expressed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors and it is not a part of the pathogenesis of this disease.

  3. Extracorporeal hepatic resection and autotransplantation for primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver.

    PubMed

    Mao, L; Chen, J; Liu, Z; Liu, C-J; Tang, M; Qiu, Y-D

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver. A 60-year-old woman with a large mass in the liver was asymptomatic with no hepatic virus infection and negative tumor markers. Because the tumor was unresectable by conventional means, we used extracorporeal hepatic resection and autotransplantation (ECHRA) for operation. The pathology showed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor that was diagnosed based on positive immunostaining for c-kit and CD34. Mutation analysis revealed an acquired mutation in exon 11 of c-kit. As we know, this is the eighth case of a primary hepatic extragastrointestinal stromal tumor reported previously in English, and the first case of which that was treated with ECHRA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Low stromal Foxp3+ regulatory T-cell density is associated with complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, M J; Hemmings, C; Miller, T J; Austin, S J; Bulsara, M K; Zeps, N; Nowak, A K; Lake, R A; Platell, C F

    2015-01-01

    Background: Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a vital role in preventing autoimmunity, but also suppress antitumour immune responses. Tumour infiltration by Tregs has strong prognostic significance in colorectal cancer, and accumulating evidence suggests that chemotherapy and radiotherapy efficacy has an immune-mediated component. Whether Tregs play an inhibitory role in chemoradiotherapy (CRT) response in rectal cancer remains unknown. Methods: Foxp3+, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and IL-17+ cell density in post-CRT surgical samples from 128 patients with rectal cancer was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between T-cell subset densities and clinical outcome (tumour regression and survival) was evaluated. Results: Stromal Foxp3+ cell density was strongly associated with tumour regression grade (P=0.0006). A low stromal Foxp3+ cell density was observed in 84% of patients who had a pathologic complete response (pCR) compared with 41% of patients who did not (OR: 7.56, P=0.0005; OR: 5.27, P=0.006 after adjustment for presurgery clinical factors). Low stromal Foxp3+ cell density was also associated with improved recurrence-free survival (HR: 0.46, P=0.03), although not independent of tumour regression grade. Conclusions: Regulatory T cells in the tumour microenvironment may inhibit response to neoadjuvant CRT and may represent a therapeutic target in rectal cancer. PMID:26645238

  5. A rare case of primary mesenteric gastrointestinal stromal tumor with metastasis to the cervix uteri

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nupur; Mittal, Suneeta; Lal, Neena; Misra, Renu; Kumar, Lalit; Bhalla, Sunita

    2007-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are CD117 (C Kit) positive mesenchymal neoplasms, that may arise anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract. Their current therapy is imatinib mesylate before or after surgery. Case presentation We describe a case of 17-year-old female with metastasis to the cervix uteri of a primary mesenteric gastrointestinal tumor. Conclusion Surgery remains the mainstay of known curative treatment. The manifestations of GIST are not restricted to the typical locations within the bowel; may have very unusual metastatic sites or infiltrations per continuitatem. PMID:18045506

  6. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to a rectal leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Giovanni D De; Rega, Maria; Masone, Stefania; Siciliano, Saverio; Persico, Marcello; Salvatori, Francesca; Maione, Francesco; Esposito, Dario; Bellino, Antonio; Persico, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of leiomyoma of the rectum is uncommon. Most of these lesions are clinically silent and are found incidentally during laparotomy or endoscopic procedures for unrelated conditions. Symptomatic leiomyomas of the rectum are encountered less frequently, with only sporadic reports in the literature. We describe a case of a leiomyoma of the rectum presenting as recurrent lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage and secondary anemia. PMID:19360922

  7. Transsacral excision with pre-operative imatinib mesylate treatment and approach for gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the rectum: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    SUN, LI-FENG; HE, JIN-JIE; YU, SHAO-JUN; XU, JING-HONG; WANG, JIAN-WEI; LI, JUN; SONG, YONG-MAO; DING, KE-FENG; ZHENG, SHU

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare in the rectum. Radical surgery, such as an abdominoperineal resection, is necessary for large rectal GISTs, which can result in the loss of function of involved organs. Imatinib mesylate can be used as perioperative therapy and may reduce tumor size, and it is now approved for use in the adjuvant therapy of locally resected anorectal GISTs. The present study describes two cases of large rectal GISTs, for which abdominoperineal resections were initially planned. The two patients received pre-operative imatinib mesylate treatment, and the therapeutic response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Finally, transsacral local resection was successfully performed for these two GISTs. A macroscopically complete resection was achieved, and microscopically, the resection margin was negative. One patient experienced the complication of rectal leakage, which was successfully managed by drainage. No recurrence occurred in the two patients after more than two years. Pre-operative imatinib mesylate therapy with subsequent transsacral local resection for selected rectal GISTs is a feasible treatment modality and can prevent extended surgery. PMID:25202349

  8. Multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the ileum and neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Marcelo A; Cruces, Karina S; Barría, Carlos; Verdugo, Gustavo

    2006-02-01

    Type 1 neurofibromatosis, also known as von Recklinghausen disease, is one of the most common genetic disorders. Gastrointestinal associations have been well described in these patients, but the true incidence of gastrointestinal tumors and the proportion of these becoming clinically significant are not known. The most common gastrointestinal tumors are stromal tumors, most of which are located in the stomach and jejunum. We discuss the case of a female patient with neurofibromatosis whose initial diagnosis was an ovarian mass. During surgery the diagnosis of an intestinal stromal tumor was made. Operative findings were a multilobulated tumor arising from the ileal wall 50 cm from the ileocecal valve. The tumor did not originate from the nervous myenteric plexus or muscular layer of the small bowel wall; it originated from within the stromal cells of the intestinal wall. Mitotic count showed 3 mitoses per 10 high-power fields. Immunohistochemical stains of the tumor showed positive staining for CD117 and CD34 and negative staining for S100, alpha-smooth muscle actin, and desmin. The intestinal myenteric plexus showed positive staining for chromegranin A and S100. The histologic characteristics of this patient's tumor are compatible with an undifferentiated stromal tumor of nonneural or nonmuscular origin.

  9. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated with solitary rectal ulcer in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Bes, C; Dağlı, Ü; Yılmaz, F; Soy, M

    2015-09-16

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare benign disorder that has a wide range of clinical presentations and variable endoscopic findings which makes it difficult to diagnose and treat. The clinical and endoscopic picture in this condition can also mimic malign ulceration, malignancy or Crohn's disease. Behçet's disease can affect the gastrointestinal tract. However to the best of our knowledge, no case with solitary rectal ulceration has been reported so far in literature. We herein present a patient diagnosed with Behçet's disease admitted to our clinic with rectal bleeding due to solitary rectal ulceration.

  10. Lichenoid drug eruption caused by imatinib mesylate in a Chinese patient with gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing-Ru; Xiang, Xiao-Jun; Xiong, Jian-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Imatinib mesylate, the first agent approved for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor, is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting (KIT) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α and -β. However, imatinib administration can be accompanied by various adverse events. Here we report a case of Lichenoid drug eruption (LDE) that appeared 24 weeks after commencement of imatinib in a 73-year-old man with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The skin lesions were distributed over his face, trunk and limbs, which improved only after discontinuation of imatinib therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of imatinib-induced LDE in the Chinese population.

  11. Synchronous Appearance of Adenocarcinoma and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Pushparaj, Magesh; Masih, Dipti; Pulimood, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of gastric tumour, accounting for approximately 95% of all gastric carcinomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) occurring in the stomach is rare and very few cases have been reported in literature. Synchronous tumours in the stomach are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. A 63-year-old gentleman was diagnosed with a gastric adenocarcinoma on endoscopic biopsy and underwent surgery. Postoperative histopathologic examination revealed 2 synchronous tumours with both adenocarcinoma and GIST. The adenocarcinoma was determined to be the aggressive tumour based on histologic features. GIST was categorized as a very low risk of malignancy, based on its size and mitosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma. He is under follow up and is currently disease free. Careful histopathologic evaluation is required to detect co-existing rare synchronous tumours. Presence of the second tumour may require additional procedures or protocols.

  12. Synchronous Appearance of Adenocarcinoma and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pushparaj, Magesh; Masih, Dipti; Pulimood, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of gastric tumour, accounting for approximately 95% of all gastric carcinomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) occurring in the stomach is rare and very few cases have been reported in literature. Synchronous tumours in the stomach are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. A 63-year-old gentleman was diagnosed with a gastric adenocarcinoma on endoscopic biopsy and underwent surgery. Postoperative histopathologic examination revealed 2 synchronous tumours with both adenocarcinoma and GIST. The adenocarcinoma was determined to be the aggressive tumour based on histologic features. GIST was categorized as a very low risk of malignancy, based on its size and mitosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma. He is under follow up and is currently disease free. Careful histopathologic evaluation is required to detect co-existing rare synchronous tumours. Presence of the second tumour may require additional procedures or protocols. PMID:27042477

  13. Incidental detection of gastrointestinal stromal tumor by Tc-99m MDP bone scan.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Timothy M; Idakoji, Ibrahim A; Pampaloni, Miguel H

    2012-02-01

    This case demonstrates extraosseous 99m-technetium methylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m MDP) accumulation from a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. A 75-year-old woman underwent a temporal bone CT for conductive hearing loss that showed sclerosis in the right occipital condyle. Follow-up Tc-99m MDP bone scan for osseous metastases instead showed a mass-like extraosseous accumulation of Tc-99m MDP in the anterior left upper quadrant. Differential diagnoses included gastric cancer, lymphoma, metastatic melanoma, systemic hypercalcemia, or heterotopic mesenteric ossification. Contrast CT showed a well-circumscribed mass arising from the stomach, and subsequent pathology confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumor. These tumors rarely can contain osteoclast-like giant cells and should be considered for extraosseous Tc-99m MDP accumulation.

  14. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: report of a clinical case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bronzino, P; Cassinelli, G; Arena, E; Rassu, P C; Partipilo, F; Rusca, I; Cuneo, A E; Casaccia, M

    2002-01-01

    In this case report, the Authors describe a case of stromal gastric tumour, in a male 65 years old, who presented gastrointestinal bleeding. Gastro-Intestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are neoplasm with an incidence of 1-3 per cent of the digestive tract malignant neoplasms. The rarity of this disease, its visceral wall localization, the histopathological characteristics make the diagnosis difficult. Moreover there is no correlation between the behaviour of these neoplasms and the histologic features. Surgery represents the main treatment for GISTs based on complete resection, followed by a long-term follow-up. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy don't seem to play a crucial role in the treatment of these neoplasms. A new treatment with inhibitors of the tyrosinekinase is under discussion. Follow-up represents the only way to evaluate the effective behaviour of the disease, due to the lack of classic prognostic factors impact.

  15. Intestinal Kaposi's sarcoma may mimic gastrointestinal stromal tumor in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zoufaly, A; Schmiedel, S; Lohse, A W; van Lunzen, J

    2007-09-07

    Diffuse intestinal Kaposi's sarcoma shares macroscopic and histopathologic features with gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Correct diagnosis may pose a clinical challenge. We describe the case of a young HIV-1-infected African lady without advanced immunodeficiency, who presented with a diffuse spindle cell tumor of the gut. Initial diagnosis was of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor, based on endoscopy and histopathology. Further evaluation revealed evidence for human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) and the diagnosis had to be changed to diffuse intestinal Kaposi's sarcoma. Antiretroviral triple therapy together with chemotherapy was commenced, and has led to the rapid remission of intestinal lesions. With a background of HIV infection, the presence of HHV8 as the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma should be determined, as distinct treatment is indicated.

  16. Surgical treatment of giant mesenteric fibromatosis presenting as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stoidis, Christos N; Spyropoulos, Basileios G; Misiakos, Evangelos P; Fountzilas, Christos K; Paraskeva, Panorea P; Fotiadis, Constantine I

    2010-09-23

    Intra-abdominal fibromatosis, usually located at the mesenteric level, is a locally invasive tumor of fibrous origin, with no ability to metastasize, but a tendency to recur. Certain non-typical cases of intra-abdominal fibromatosis with involvement of the bowel wall can be misdiagnosed because of their different biological behavior. We describe the case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man presenting with mesenteric fibromatosis and involvement of the bowel wall, who was treated surgically. The macroscopic and microscopic appearance of the lesion mimicked a gastrointestinal stromal tumor, a tumor with potential malignant behavior. It is essential to make an early and correct diagnosis in such equivocal cases, so that the appropriate treatment can be chosen and suitable patients admitted to clinical trials if appropriate. New and reliable criteria for discriminating between intra-abdominal fibromatosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumor should be proposed and established because novel sophisticated therapeutic strategies have been introduced in the international literature.

  17. Small gastrointestinal stromal tumor in the stomach: identification of precursor for clinical gastrointestinal stromal tumor using c-kit and α-smooth muscle actin expression.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Tetuo; Nemoto, Yuta; Numata, Yoshiko; Hana, Kiyomi; Nakada, Norihiro; Ichinoe, Masaaki; Murakumo, Yoshiki; Okayasu, Isao

    2013-12-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. To find precursors for clinical GISTs of the stomach, small gastric stromal tumors of less than 3 cm were collected and examined immunohistochemically with analysis of the KIT mutation. Sixty-eight of 74 lesions were classified into 4 representative groups according to the expression of c-kit and α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA): group A, c-kit diffusely positive and αSMA negative (18 cases); group B, c-kit diffusely positive and αSMA focally positive (13); group C, c-kit focally positive and αSMA diffusely positive (27); and group D, c-kit negative and αSMA diffusely positive (10). Of the 4 groups, groups A and B of c-kit diffuse expression showed higher cellularity and labeling indices of p27(Kip1) and Ki-67 than did groups C and D of diffuse αSMA expression. Incidence of KIT exon 11 mutation in groups A and B was 86% (25/29), whereas that in groups C and D was 0% (0/20). Small gastric stromal tumors with c-kit diffuse expression were considered precursors for clinical GIST because they were significantly different from c-kit focally positive or negative tumors. The mutation of KIT is considered as an early event in tumorigenesis of GIST.

  18. Clinical activity of regorafenib in PDGFRA-mutated gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Grellety, Thomas; Kind, Michèle; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Italiano, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most frequent mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract and one of the most frequent sarcoma. Mutually exclusive KIT and PDGFRA mutations are central events in GIST pathogenesis, and their understanding is crucial because specific treatment targeting oncogenic KIT and PDGFRA activation (especially imatinib) has become available. The most frequent PDGFRA mutation (D842V) is associated with primary resistance to imatinib. Data related to regorafenib efficacy in PDGFRA-mutated GIST are lacking. We report here a case report of a prolonged response with regorafenib in a patient with a PDGFRA-mutated GIST. PMID:28031906

  19. Clinical activity of regorafenib in PDGFRA-mutated gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Grellety, Thomas; Kind, Michèle; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Italiano, Antoine

    2015-11-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most frequent mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract and one of the most frequent sarcoma. Mutually exclusive KIT and PDGFRA mutations are central events in GIST pathogenesis, and their understanding is crucial because specific treatment targeting oncogenic KIT and PDGFRA activation (especially imatinib) has become available. The most frequent PDGFRA mutation (D842V) is associated with primary resistance to imatinib. Data related to regorafenib efficacy in PDGFRA-mutated GIST are lacking. We report here a case report of a prolonged response with regorafenib in a patient with a PDGFRA-mutated GIST.

  20. KIT-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumours in two Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica).

    PubMed

    Velarde, Roser; Mentaberre, Gregorio; Sánchez, Joaquín; Marco, Ignasi; Lavín, Santiago

    2008-09-01

    Gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumours from two Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica) were examined grossly, histologically and immunohistochemically. One neoplasm was a 1.5 kg tan multinodular cavitated mass in the forestomach. The other tumour was a firm mural mass 1.2 cm in diameter in the colon. Microscopically, both tumours were formed mainly by spindle shaped cells arranged in closely packed interlacing fascicles. Neoplastic cells in both tumours labelled positively for KIT (CD117), vimentin and alpha-smooth muscle actin. These findings suggest that both neoplasms were gastrointestinal stromal tumours and most likely to be derived from the interstitial cells of Cajal or their progenitor cells.

  1. Pancreatic extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a bleeding duodenal mass

    PubMed Central

    Wegge, Jacqueline; Bartholomew, David M; Burke, Leandra H; Miller, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 55-year-old man presenting to our institution with a gastrointestinal bleed. He was found to have a 5 cm pancreatic extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumours (EGISTs) eroding into the duodenum and ampulla of Vater. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed and the tumour was noted to be positive for CD117 and CD34 with six mitotic figures per 50/high-powered field. At 5 months postoperatively he is receiving treatment with imatinib and doing well. To the best of our knowledge, our patient is only the 18th case reported in the literature to date. PMID:23087281

  2. Skull Metastasis of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Successfully Managed by Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Inkeun; Chung, Dong Hae; Yoo, Chan Jong; Shin, Dong Bok

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare, but are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. The most common sites of metastasis are liver and peritoneum, while bone metastasis is rare. We report on a patient with skull metastasis after seven years of treatment with imatinib for metastatic GIST. She underwent metastasectomy consisting of craniectomy with excision of the mass, and cranioplasty and continued treatment with imatinib and sunitinib, without evidence of cranial recurrence. She died of pneumonia sepsis one year after metastasectomy. Skull metastasis of GIST is a very rare presentation, and an aggressive multidisciplinary approach should be considered whenever possible. PMID:28061498

  3. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Showing Intense Tracer Uptake on PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Noto, Benjamin; Weckesser, Matthias; Buerke, Boris; Pixberg, Michaela; Avramovic, Nemanja

    2017-03-01

    A 70-year-old man with suspected prostate cancer was referred for Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT (short PSMA PET/CT) for staging of tumor extent. Apart from vivid tracer uptake in the prostate gland and osseous metastasis, PSMA PET/CT revealed a large soft tissue mass with calcifications in the left upper abdomen showing intense tracer uptake. Histologic examination revealed the mass to be a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  4. Positron emission tomography image on evaluating intraperitoneal dissemination of malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Nakao, Makoto; Konishi, Masayshi; Urawa, Naohito; Iwasa, Motoh; Kaito, Masahiko; Adachi, Yukihiko

    2008-01-01

    Herein is a report of a patient with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) possibly arising from greater omentum accompanying diffuse peritoneal disseminatation. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) revealed that 18F-FDG uptake was widely spreading in the abdomen. In this case, the PET image was more useful than computed tomography (CT) for understanding tumor distribution rather. PET provides important information on tumor distribution and has an impact on evaluating clinical stage in GIST patients.

  5. Targeting ETV1 in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: tripping the circuit breaker in GIST?

    PubMed

    Duensing, Anette

    2015-03-01

    Activating mutations in the KIT or PDGFRA receptor tyrosine kinase genes are the key oncogenic drivers in the majority of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), but novel results now show that aberrant kinase signaling is potentiated by a positive feedback circuit that involves the ETS transcription factor ETV1. Targeting ETV1 can disrupt this circuit and represents a promising new therapeutic approach for the treatment of GISTs. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Gastric carcinoid tumor in a patient with a past history of gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chien-Yuan; Chen, Ming-Jen; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Liu, Tsang-Pai; Chan, Yu-Jan; Wang, Tsang-En; Chang, Wen-Hsiung

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract. It may coexist with other type of cancers, and if so, the tumors usually involve the stomach. The most common associated cancers are gastrointestinal carcinomas. We report a 65-year-old woman with a history of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor who had undergone subtotal segmental gastrectomy. New polypoid lesions were detected on a follow-up gastroscopy one year later. The lesions were biopsied and found to be carcinoid tumors. There was serum hypergastrinemia, and type 1 gastric carcinoid tumor was diagnosed. A total gastrectomy was performed. Pathologic examination revealed both carcinoid tumors and a recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PMID:19058321

  7. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaobin; Chen, Dong; Chen, Wenbin; Sheng, Qinsong

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors located in the alimentary tract. A small portion of GISTs are observed in extra-gastrointestinal regions, primarily in the omentum, mesentery and retroperioneum, and these types of GISTs are referred to as extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The present study reports of a patient with unique primary liver GIST. The patient underwent en bloc resection and post-operative administration of imatinib, and subsequently experienced a good prognosis. The present case is followed by a brief review of reported cases of liver GISTs identified in the literature. The literature revealed that primary liver GISTs are usually large in size and possess a high mitotic index, which contributes to malignant characterization, thus classifying these tumors as high-risk. En bloc resection remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary liver GISTs. However, the prognosis of these patients is not favorable. Perioperative administration of imatinib may be useful to a certain extent, and interventional therapy, including radiofrequency ablation, should be considered. PMID:27698856

  8. A rare case of jejuno-ileal intussusception secondary to a gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Stout, Annabel; Santharam, Lakshmi; Mirza, Nazzia

    2015-01-08

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare tumours, making up 0.2-1% of gastrointestinal malignancies [Zakaria and Daradkeh (Jejunojejunal intussusception induced by a gastrointestinal stromal tumour. Case Rep Surg 2012; 2022: :173680)]. Their relative rarity combined with non-specific presentation results in tumours often remaining undiagnosed until surgery or histological examination [Martis et al. (A rare case of jejunojejunal intussusception in an adult. Indian J Surg 2013; 75: (Suppl 1):18-20)]. Presentation as a lead point for intussusception is particularly rare. We present the first case of GIST leading to intussusception at the jejuno-ileal junction in an otherwise well patient prior to presentation. Provisional diagnosis was made during emergency laparotomy, and confirmed through histological analysis. A typical immunohistochemical profile was identified, after which the patient was commenced on adjuvant imatinib therapy. We discuss classical presentation of intussusception and GIST. Further considerations of the investigation and treatment options of GISTs are also presented. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015.

  9. A rare case of jejuno-ileal intussusception secondary to a gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Annabel; Santharam, Lakshmi; Mirza, Nazzia

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare tumours, making up 0.2–1% of gastrointestinal malignancies [Zakaria and Daradkeh (Jejunojejunal intussusception induced by a gastrointestinal stromal tumour. Case Rep Surg 2012;2022:173680)]. Their relative rarity combined with non-specific presentation results in tumours often remaining undiagnosed until surgery or histological examination [Martis et al. (A rare case of jejunojejunal intussusception in an adult. Indian J Surg 2013;75(Suppl 1):18–20)]. Presentation as a lead point for intussusception is particularly rare. We present the first case of GIST leading to intussusception at the jejuno-ileal junction in an otherwise well patient prior to presentation. Provisional diagnosis was made during emergency laparotomy, and confirmed through histological analysis. A typical immunohistochemical profile was identified, after which the patient was commenced on adjuvant imatinib therapy. We discuss classical presentation of intussusception and GIST. Further considerations of the investigation and treatment options of GISTs are also presented. PMID:25576166

  10. Current Concepts in Non-Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Soft Tissue Sarcomas: A Primer for Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; O'Neill, Ailbhe; Tirumani, Harika; Tirumani, Sree Harsha

    2017-01-01

    Non-gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms whose classification and management continues to evolve with better understanding of their biologic behavior. The 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) has revised their classification based on new immunohistochemical and cytogenetic data. In this article, we will provide a brief overview of the revised WHO classification of soft tissue tumors, discuss in detail the radiology and management of the two most common adult non-GIST STS, namely liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma, and review some of the emerging histology-driven targeted therapies in non-GIST STS, focusing on the role of the radiologist. PMID:28096721

  11. Gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) incidentally found and resected during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Marcelo A; Pujado, Blazenko; Méndez, Pedro E; Gonzáles, Francisco J; Margulis, David I; Contreras, Mario A; Cruces, Karina S

    2010-03-01

    The incidence of incidental pathology found during laparoscopic bariatric surgery has been estimated to be around 2%, and gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have been found in 0.8% of patients, constituting a rather uncommon finding. Safe laparoscopic resection of gastric GISTs is an established procedure and has been described associated to gastric Roux-en-Y bypass for morbid obesity. We discuss one case of a gastric GIST incidentally discovered during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity. The procedure was performed via laparoscopy, and the patient recovered without any complication. Currently, the patient has lost weight according to what was expected, is asymptomatic, and free of disease.

  12. Chinese consensus guidelines for diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Ye, Yingjiang; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Bo; Qin, Shukui; Shi, Yingqiang; He, Yulong; Liang, Xiaobo; Liu, Xiufeng; Zhou, Ye; Wu, Xin; Zhang, Xinhua; Wang, Ming; Gao, Zhidong; Lin, Tianlong; Cao, Hui; Shen, Lin; Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) Expert Committee on Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    2017-01-01

    In order to further promote the standardization of diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in China, the members of Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) Expert Committee on GIST thoroughly discussed the key contents of the consensus guidelines, and voted on the controversial issue. In final, the Chinese consensus guidelines for the diagnosis and management of GIST (2017 edition) was formed on the basis of 2013 edition consensus guidelines, which is hereby announced. The consensus included the pathological diagnosis, recurrence risk classification evaluation, targeted agent therapy, surgery and principles of surveillance of GIST.

  13. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour with Synchronous Bone Metastases: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rochigneux, Philippe; Mescam-Mancini, Lénaig; Perrot, Delphine; Bories, Erwan; Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Sarran, Anthony; Guiramand, Jérôme; Bertucci, François

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal tumours of the digestive tract, derived from Cajal interstitial cells. Bone metastases are very rare, and there is no consensus regarding their treatment. Here, we present the unusual case of a 66-year-old man with a gastric GIST with synchronous bone and liver metastases, fully documented at the pathological and molecular levels with a KIT exon 11 mutation. After 9 months of imatinib, the scanner showed a 33% partial response of target lesions. We also review the literature and describe the characteristics, treatment, and outcome of all cases previously reported. PMID:28203166

  14. Imatinib-induced Ototoxicity in a Patient with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Wasif, Komal; Wasif, Nawal

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib (Gleevec) is a biological agent that is approved for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) as well as gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The most frequently seen adverse effects in patients treated with imatinib include superficial edema, muscle cramps, musculoskeletal pain, rash, fatigue, headache, abdominal pain, and joint pain. Ototoxicity has rarely been reported except in two cases. We report a case of bilateral irreversible sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) caused by imatinib in a patient receiving this agent in the adjuvant setting. This case underlines the importance of early recognition of this potential toxicity that can impact the quality of life. PMID:27909636

  15. Metachronous Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung During Adjuvant Imatinib Mesylate Therapy for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Meng-jie; Weng, Shan-Shan; Cao, Ying; Li, Xiao-Fen; Wang, Liu-Hong; Xu, Jing-Hong; Yuan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in gastrointestinal tracts; however, the synchronous or metachronous coexistence of GIST with additional primary malignancy is not common. Here, we present an unusual case of gastric GIST with metachronous primary lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed during his adjuvant treatment with oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (400 mg daily). After 6-month use of imatinib, the patient suffered from dry cough and dyspnea. Subsequent lung biopsy demonstrated adenocarcinoma with diffuse interstitial changes. Our research emphasizes the possibility of an additional primary tumor with GIST, and reminds the clinicians to strengthen the surveillance of the additional cancer during the follow-up of GIST patients. PMID:26356712

  16. Epigenetics in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: clinical implications and potential therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sioulas, Athanasios D; Vasilatou, Diamantina; Pappa, Vasiliki; Dimitriadis, George; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2013-11-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) represent the most common mesenchymal neoplasms affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Activating mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRa gene are the principal oncogenic triggers with the former accounting for more than 80 % of cases. In the small subset of GIST that are wild type for both the aforementioned changes, other germline or somatic mutations have been identified. GIST exhibit a highly variable clinical behavior and the main prognostic determinants are tumor size, mitotic rate, and location. It is, however, strongly believed that, beyond classic genetics, additional epigenetic phenomena such as DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation, microRNA alterations, and chromatin modifications underlie GIST tumorigenesis and influence the clinical course and response to standard treatment. This review aims to illuminate current advances in terms of epigenetics in GIST, as well as possible implications in prognosis and therapeutics.

  17. Case report of pneumatosis intestinalis secondary to sunitinib treatment for refractory gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Jarkowski, Anthony; Hare, Ryan; Francescutti, Valerie; Wilkinson, Neal; Khushalani, Nikhil

    2011-10-01

    Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) occurs when inter-luminal air enters the bowel wall of the gastrointestinal tract via a mucosal defect. The condition is caused by numerous disease states, direct trauma, and various drugs. When PI is secondary to drug therapy, discontinuation of the offending agent results in the resolution of PI. We report on the case of a 73-year-old male with a history of refractory gastrointestinal stromal tumor experiencing PI while on sunitinib treatment. PI was noted via computed tomography (CT) scans 68 days after starting sunitinib therapy and showed near complete resolution on a follow up CT performed one month after discontinuing sunitinib. Given that a CT scan performed five months prior to the initiation of sunitinib did not show PI, lack of abdominal symptoms in our patient, and resolution of PI after discontinuing sunitinib, the cause of PI in our patient was likely due to sunitinib treatment.

  18. Familial and multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors with fair response to a half-dose of imatinib.

    PubMed

    Bamba, Shigeki; Hirota, Seiichi; Inatomi, Osamu; Ban, Hiromitsu; Nishimura, Takashi; Shioya, Makoto; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Nishida, Atsushi; Sasaki, Masaya; Murata, Satoshi; Andoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Since our first report in 1998, approximately 30 families with multiple GISTs due to a germline gain-of-function mutation of c-kit have been reported. We herein present a case of a family with multiple GISTs that have a germline c-kit mutation in exon 11 (Del-Val560) in two siblings. One of the patients showed a fair response to treatment with a half-dose of imatinib (200 mg/day). There are few reports describing the response to imatinib in familial GISTs and this drug appears to be a promising therapeutic option.

  19. [Current status and progress of medical imaging in diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingjie; Zhang, Ruiping; Li, Jianding

    2015-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are derived from non-directed differentiation of gastrointestinal mesenchymal tissue, which lack of typical clinical symptoms, and many asymptomatic GISTs are often found on physical examination. The tumor is primarily through implantation metastasis and blood metastasis. Currently, conventional medical imaging methods, such as X-ray barium meal, US, CT, MRI, PET/CT and ES, are still the main means of diagnosis of GISTs. Early diagnosis and early treatment are key factors of the prognosis in GISTs. Therefore, we need to be proficient in various medical imaging methods, then apply them to the diagnosis of GISTs, and to provide comprehensive and valuable information for clinical practice. Through retrieving and consulting literature of medical imaging associated with GISTs, this paper reviews the current status and progress of medical imaging in diagnosis of GISTs.

  20. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of colon: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Azfar Khan; Kaley, Kristin; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs originate from cells of Cajal and related stem cells. Surgery and imatinib therapy are the main lines of treatment. We report on a case with GIST in the colon treated with surgical resection followed by adjuvant imatinib therapy. This treatment showed no side-effects, and subsequent colonoscopy was unremarkable. The diagnosis was delayed for 12 months after initial presentation of vague abdominal pain, thus highlighting the need to improve clinical suspicion in order to detect GISTs in earlier stages when resection may be curative. Colonic GIST, in particular, may mimic presentation similar to ovarian cyst, as seen in the present case. This case report corroborates that patients with high-grade GISTs can be effectively treated with imatinib therapy. However, duration of treatment may vary depending on the grade of the tumor and side-effects.

  1. Spontaneous Perforation as a First Presentation of Ileal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) with Synchronous Breast Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma M, Bir Kumar; Barad, Arun Kumar; Padu, Kemba; Singh K, Sridartha; Singh Th, Sudhir Chandra

    2014-05-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (GIST's) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Majority of the GISTs are asymptomatic and often diagnosis is incidental. Synchronous second malignancies have been reported in patients with GIST. We report a case of 50-year-old female presenting with features of hollow viscous perforation, found to have ileal GIST with perforations along with a synchronous breast sarcoma. GIST with spontaneous perforation as its first clinical manifestation is rare. Synchronous occurrence of an ileal GIST with a breast sarcoma is unique and deserves reporting. This case report highlights the varied nature of clinical presentation of the GIST and also stresses on the importance of extensive search for the synchronous second malignancies in the extra abdominal sites as well.

  2. Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF) system and gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST): present and future.

    PubMed

    Nannini, Margherita; Biasco, Guido; Astolfi, Annalisa; Urbini, Milena; Pantaleo, Maria A

    2014-02-01

    In the last decades, the concept that Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF) axis plays a key role in several steps of tumorigenesis, cancer growth and metastasis has been widely documented. The aberration of the IGF system has been described in many kinds of tumours, providing several lines of evidence in support of IGF receptor type 1 (IGF1R) as molecular target in cancer treatment. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract, commonly characterized in most cases by KIT and PDGFRA gain mutations. Beyond to the well recognized KIT and PDGFRA gain mutations, in the last years other molecular aberrations have been investigated. Recently, several lines of evidence about the involvement of the IGF system in GIST have been accumulated. The aim of this review is to report all current data about the IGF system involvement in GIST, focusing on the current clinical implication and future perspectives.

  3. Gastrointestinal and Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulos, Petros; Leonardou, Polytimi; Barbagiannis, Nikolaos; Alexiou, Konstantinos; Demonakou, Maria; Economou, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    We present two cases, one of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the stomach and one of an extragastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGIST) in the hepatogastric ligament, which were discovered as incidental findings during computed tomography (CT) scans performed for other reasons. In both cases the diagnosis of the tumor was confirmed histologically and immunohistochemically. During the follow-up CT examinations these tumors proved to have a completely different natural course. The first case refers to an 82-year-old male patient with GIST of the stomach who refused to be operated and was followed by CT scans for a 4-year period. This patient did not show any significant changes in the morphology, size and density of the lesion. The second case refers to a 58-year-old female patient with EGIST of the hepatogastric ligament who presented with simultaneous liver metastases and remained healthy for 2 years after surgical resection, but developed local recurrence later. As a conclusion, both GISTs/EGISTs can be revealed as incidental findings in a CT scan performed for other purposes. Moreover, an untreated GIST located in the stomach can remain unchanged and without metastatic lesions for a long period of time, as in our case for a 4-year period. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature in whom a GIST was proved to remain almost unchanged for many years without any treatment, and we therefore attempt a further review of the current literature on stromal tumors. PMID:24707244

  4. Synchronous gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and other primary neoplasms of gastrointestinal tract: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ramneet; Bhalla, Sunita; Nundy, Samiran; Jain, Sunila

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract with a malignant potential. However, uncommonly they can be associated with synchronous tumors of different histogenesis. We herein report two cases of gastric GIST with synchronous tumors. The first case is of a 50-year-old male patient who was suspected with GIST of stomach and was incidentally found to have an associated duodenal neuroendo-crine neoplasm. The second case is of a 62-year-old male who, while undergoing surgery for a primary colon adenocarcinoma, was incidentally detected to have a coexistent gastric GIST initially suspected to be a metastatic nodule. Coexistence of gastric GIST with neuroendocrine tumor is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge this is the second case of gastric GIST coexisting with duodenal neuroendocrine tumor to be reported in the literature. Similarly, association of GIST with adenocarcinoma is uncommon. We herein analyze the pathological findings of two such cases, and we review the malignant potential of these synchronous tumors.

  5. Development of enterohepatic fistula after embolization in ileal gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Ho; Koo, Ja Seol; Jung, Chang Ho; Chung, Sang Yoon; Lee, Jae Joong; Kim, Seung Young; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Choung, Rok Seon; Lee, Sang Woo; Choi, Jai Hyun

    2013-11-21

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract that has been associated with the formation of fistulas to adjacent organs in few case reports. However, GIST with enterohepatic fistula has not been reported. Here we report the case of an enterohepatic fistula that occurred after embolization of a liver mass originating in the distal ileum. An 87-year-old woman was hospitalized for melena. On initial conventional endoscopy, a bleeding focus in the gastrointestinal tract was not found. Because of massive hematochezia, enteroscopy was performed through the anus. A protruding, ulcerative mass was found in the distal ileum that was suspected to be the source of the bleeding; a biopsy sample was taken. Electrocoagulation was not successful in controlling the bleeding; therefore, embolization was performed. After embolization, the patient developed a high fever and severe abdominal tenderness with rebound tenderness. Follow-up abdominopelvic computed tomography revealed an enterohepatic fistula between the liver and distal ileum. The fistula was treated surgically by segmental resection of the distal ileum and unlooping of the liver mass.

  6. Preoperative needle biopsy and immunohistochemical analysis for gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the rectum mimicking vaginal leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Takano, M; Saito, K; Kita, T; Furuya, K; Aida, S; Kikuchi, Y

    2006-01-01

    Accurate preoperative diagnosis for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was obtained using the endoscopic approach in about 50% of the cases. Preoperative assessment is quite important in reproductive women for the treatment of pelvic tumor. We report the first case of GIST of the rectum that was accurately diagnosed with preoperative needle biopsy from the vaginal wall. The case was a 38-year-old woman who presented with a history of genital bleeding. Internal examination revealed a round and elastic mass (7 x 7 cm) in the left pelvic cavity. The biopsy specimen from the left sidewall of the vagina using a manually manipulated biopsy needle showed strong reaction for CD34 and CD117 (c-KIT). The patient underwent low anterior resection of the rectum, tumor resection, and partial resection of the posterior vagina. Preoperative biopsy with vaginal approach might be helpful to make a diagnosis for pelvic tumor of unknown origin and unknown malignant potential.

  7. Imatinib mesylate treatment in a dog with gastrointestinal stromal tumors with a c-kit mutation.

    PubMed

    Irie, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Ohtake, Yuzo; Suzuki, Hitomi; Nagata, Nao; Miyoshi, Takuma; Kagawa, Yumiko; Yamagami, Tetsushi

    2015-11-01

    A 13-year-old spayed mixed-breed dog was diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) after histopathological examination of an abdominal mass. Five months after surgical resection of the tumor, we detected the recurrence of GIST with multiple disseminated abdominal lesions. A sequence analysis of cDNA obtained from a biopsy of the recurrent tumors revealed a mutation within exon 9 of the c-kit gene (1523A>T, Asn(508)Ile), which has been shown to cause ligand-independent phosphorylation of the KIT protein in GISTs and canine mast cell tumors (MCTs). Upon detection of the recurrent tumors, we initiated treatment with imatinib mesylate (10 mg/kg, q 24 hr). After 2 months, the dog achieved complete remission. Our findings indicate that canine GIST, and possibly MCT, may be responsive to molecular-targeted therapy.

  8. Intervention in gastrointestinal stromal tumour with a high risk of malignancy and associated with thalassaemia minor.

    PubMed

    Pericay Pijaume, Carles; Saigi Grau, Eugeni

    2012-06-01

    This study reports on a 65-year-old female patient with controlled comorbidity, who was diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumours following regular monitoring of renal cysts. After the surgical treatment, coadjuvant treatment with imatinib was initiated. After a few months, the patient complained of angor and asthenia and the diagnosis of anaemic syndrome was made on the basis of blood test results. We studied the causes of the anaemia (maturation factors and other causes of secondary anaemia) and it led to the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency. Treatment with vitamin B12 supplementation was initiated. With the correction of the vitamin levels with supplementation, the symptoms improved. Thalassaemia led to the misdiagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency because of the lower mean corpuscular volume levels.

  9. The management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a model for targeted and multidisciplinary therapy of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Heikki; DeMatteo, Ronald P

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) has become a model for targeted therapy in cancer. The vast majority of GISTs contain an activating mutation in either the KIT or platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGFRA) gene. GIST is highly responsive to several selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In fact, this cancer has been converted to a chronic disease in some patients. Considerable progress has been made recently in our understanding of the natural history and molecular biology of GIST, risk stratification, and drug resistance. Despite the efficacy of targeted therapy, though, surgery remains the only curative primary treatment and cures >50% of GIST patients who present with localized disease. Adjuvant therapy with imatinib prolongs recurrence-free survival and may improve overall survival. Combined or sequential use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors with other agents following tumor molecular subtyping is an attractive next step in the management of GIST.

  10. Management of gastrointestinal stromal tumours of limited size: proposals from a French panel of physicians.

    PubMed

    Landi, Bruno; Bouché, Olivier; Guimbaud, Rosine; Aparicio, Thomas; Berger, Anne; Bonvalot, Sylvie; Buecher, Bruno; Blay, Jean-Yves; Boustière, Christian; Coindre, Jean-Marie; Emile, Jean-François; Giovannini, Marc; Lecomte, Thierry; Le Cesne, Axel; Monges, Geneviève; Napoléon, Bertrand; Palazzo, Laurent; Chayvialle, Jean-Alain

    2011-12-01

    A number of guidelines on the management of gastro-intestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) have been published, mostly based on expert consensus. However, these guidelines have generally failed to address the specific problem of GISTs of limited size (i.e. those measuring a few centimetres in diameter) with which gastroenterologists are increasingly confronted. The aim of the present work was to draw up proposals for the diagnosis and treatment of GISTs measuring less than 5 cm in diameter. For this purpose, a number of practical questions were put to a panel of French experts. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ménétrier disease and gastrointestinal stromal tumors: hyperproliferative disorders of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Robert J.; Washington, Mary Kay; Corless, Christopher L.; Heinrich, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Ménétrier disease and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are hyperproliferative disorders of the stomach caused by dysregulated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In Ménétrier disease, overexpression of TGF-α, a ligand for the RTK EGFR, results in selective expansion of surface mucous cells in the body and fundus of the stomach. In GISTs, somatic mutations of the genes encoding the RTK KIT (or PDGFRA in a minority of cases) result in constitutive kinase activity and neoplastic transformation of gut pacemaker cells (interstitial cells of Cajal). On the basis of the involvement of these RTKs in the pathogenesis of these disorders, Ménétrier disease patients have been effectively treated with a blocking monoclonal antibody specific for EGFR and GIST patients with KIT and PDGFRA tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:17200708

  12. [Resection of a Huge Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Stomach Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy with Imatinib].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Karasawa, Hideaki; Aoki, Takeshi; Imoto, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Naoki; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Abe, Tomoya; Nagao, Munenori; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Musha, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Masanobu; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Naitoh, Takeshi; Ishioka, Chikashi; Unno, Michiaki

    2016-11-01

    We report a case of a huge gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor(GIST)that was safely resected followingpreoperative imatinib therapy. A 72-year-old woman was hospitalized with severe abdominal distension. Computed tomography revealed a 27×17 cm tumor in the left upper abdominal cavity. The patient was diagnosed with high risk GIST by EUS-FNA. We initiated preoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib to achieve a reduction of operative risks and functional preservation. After 6 months of chemotherapy, CT showed a reduction in the tumor size and the patient underwent partial gastrectomy and partial resection of the diaphragm. Histologically, most of the tumor cells were replaced by hyalinized collagen and viable cells were scattered only around the blood vessels. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib has the potential to become an important therapeutic option for the treatment of huge GISTs.

  13. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: evolving role of the multidisciplinary team approach in management.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Peter; Morosi, Carlo; Wardelmann, Eva; Gronchi, Alessandro

    2012-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumors of the GI tract arising from mesenchymal cells. Treatment options include surgical resection and medical therapy with imatinib. A summary of National Comprehensive Cancer Network and European Society of Medical Oncology clinical practice guidelines relating to GIST management are presented here. A multidisciplinary team of physicians is essential to the successful treatment of GIST. Evidence supports multidisciplinary team management with a gastroenterologist, surgeon, medical oncologist, pathologist and radiologist. Consultations between them are recommended to ensure optimal care of patients with GIST. The role for individual core team workers is highlighted. The benefits of multidisciplinary disease management of patients include reducing recurrent disease, optimizing timing of surgery and organ preservation, prolonging survival for the patient and enhancing response to targeted therapies.

  14. [Additional primary malignancies in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Proposal for a new classification].

    PubMed

    Fernández Hernández, Juan Ángel; Olivares Ripoll, Vicente; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2016-11-04

    Additional primary malignancies in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is not only common but of growing interest in the scientific literature. This association is of great importance in terms of clinical challenge, diagnosis and therapy as well as for the prognosis impact it implies. In the published series there is a tendency to group these patients to determine the specific and distinguishable characteristics of GIST associated with other malignancies. On the other hand, there is no general consensus or unified classification. This classification would be of great interest, as it would unify criteria, agree groups to compare different series and demonstrate whether the aetiology underlying both tumours and the GIST's own characteristics really vary according to the type in question. We undertook a medical literature review and proposed a new classification for patients with GIST associated with other tumours. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Pitfalls in mutational testing and reporting of common KIT and PDGFRA mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Dietmaier, Wolfgang; Füzesi, Laszlo; Gaumann, Andreas; Haller, Florian; Kitz, Julia; Krohn, Antje; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Penzel, Roland; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Simon, Ronald; Wardelmann, Eva

    2010-07-04

    Mutation analysis of KIT and PDGFRA genes in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is gaining increasing importance for prognosis of GISTs and for prediction of treatment response. Several groups have identified specific mutational subtypes in KIT exon 11 associated with an increased risk of metastatic disease whereas GISTs with PDGFRA mutations often behave less aggressive. Furthermore, in advanced GIST disease with proven KIT exon 9 mutation the doubled daily dose of 800 mg imatinib increases the progression free survival and is now recommended both in the European and the American Guidelines. In Germany, there are still no general rules how to perform mutational analysis. When comparing results from six different molecular laboratories we recognized the need of standardisation. Six German university laboratories with experience in mutation analysis in GISTs joined together to develop recommendations for the mutation analysis of the most common and clinically relevant hot spots, i. e. KIT exons 9 and 11 and PDGFRA exon 18. We performed a three-phased interlaboratory trial to identify pitfalls in performing molecular analysis in GISTs. We developed a design for a continuous external laboratory trial. In 2009 this external trial was conducted by 19 laboratories via the initiative for quality assurance in pathology (QuiP) of the German Society of Pathology and the Professional Association of German Pathologists. By performing a three-phased internal interlaboratory trial and conducting an external trial in Germany we were able to identify potential pitfalls when performing KIT and PDGFRA mutational analysis in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We developed standard operation procedures which are provided with the manuscript to allow other laboratories to prevent these pitfalls.

  16. Anti-tumor effects of the Notch pathway in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Amaury G; Yang, Yanwen; Reynoso, David; Katz, Daniela; Trent, Jonathan C; Hughes, Dennis P

    2012-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are driven by gain-of-function mutations of KIT or PDGFRa. The introduction of imatinib has significantly extended survival for patients. However, most patients develop resistances. Notch signaling is a conserved developmental pathway known to play a critical role in the development of several cancers, functioning as a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor. Given that the normal progenitor cell for GIST, the interstitial cell of Cajal, has characteristics similar to those of cells of neuroendocrine origin, we hypothesized that Notch pathway impacts the biology of GIST cells. In this study, we retrovirally and pharmacologically manipulated the Notch pathway in human GIST cells. We also performed a retrospective analysis of a cohort on 15 primary tumors to determine the role of Hes1, a major target gene of Notch, as a prognostic marker for GIST. Constitutively, active intracellular domain of Notch1 (ICN1) expression potently induced growth arrest and downregulated KIT expression in vitro. Additionally, treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid caused dose-dependent upregulation of Notch1 expression and a parallel decrease in viability in these cells. Retroviral silencing of downstream targets of Notch (dominant-negative Hes1) and pharmacological inhibition of Notch activation (γ-secretase inhibition) partially rescued GIST cells from suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid treatment. GIST patients with high Hes1 mRNA levels have a significantly longer relapse-free survival. These results identify a novel anti-tumor effect of Notch1 and cross talk between the Notch and KIT pathways. Thus, activation of this pathway by treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors is an appealing potential therapeutic strategy for GISTs. Précis: This study is the first report of the tumor suppressor effects of Notch pathway in gastrointestinal stromal tumors via a negative feedback with the oncogene KIT and may

  17. Heavily calcified gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Pathophysiology and implications of a rare clinicopathologic entity

    PubMed Central

    Salati, Massimiliano; Orsi, Giulia; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Longo, Giuseppe; Cascinu, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, and are characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical, histological and molecular features at presentation. Although focal and scattered calcifications are not uncommon within the primary tumor mass, heavy calcification within a GIST is rarely described in the literature and the clinical-biological meaning of this feature remains unclear. Cases with such an atypical presentation are challenging and may be associated with diagnostic pitfalls. Herein, we report a gastric GIST with the unusual presentation of prominent calcifications that was identified incidentally on imaging during a post-trauma diagnostic work-up. The patient underwent laparoscopic surgery with a radical resection of the mass, which was subsequently characterized by histological analysis as spindle-shaped tumor cells, positive for CD117/c-KIT, CD34 and DOG1, and with calcified areas. Given the intermediate risk of recurrence, no adjuvant therapy was recommended and the patient underwent regular follow-up for 22 mo, with no evidence of relapse. Our case can be considered of interest because of the rarity of clinical presentation and the uniquely large size of the GIST at diagnosis (longest diameter exceeding 9 cm). In closing, we discuss the pathophysiology and clinical implications of calcifications in GISTs by reviewing the most up-to-date relevant literature. PMID:28344749

  18. The standard diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of gastrointestinal stromal tumors based on guidelines.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Toshirou; Blay, Jean-Yves; Hirota, Seiichi; Kitagawa, Yuko; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2016-01-01

    Although gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are a rare type of cancer, they are the commonest sarcoma in the gastrointestinal tract. Molecularly targeted therapy, such as imatinib therapy, has revolutionized the treatment of advanced GIST and facilitates scientific research on GIST. Nevertheless, surgery remains a mainstay of treatment to obtain a permanent cure for GIST even in the era of targeted therapy. Many GIST guidelines have been published to guide the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. We review current versions of GIST guidelines published by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, by the European Society for Medical Oncology, and in Japan. All clinical practice guidelines for GIST include recommendations based on evidence as well as on expert consensus. Most of the content is very similar, as represented by the following examples: GIST is a heterogeneous disease that may have mutations in KIT, PDGFRA, HRAS, NRAS, BRAF, NF1, or the succinate dehydrogenase complex, and these subsets of tumors have several distinctive features. Although there are some minor differences among the guidelines--for example, in the dose of imatinib recommended for exon 9-mutated GIST or the efficacy of antigen retrieval via immunohistochemistry--their common objectives regarding diagnosis and treatment are not only to improve the diagnosis of GIST and the prognosis of patients but also to control medical costs. This review describes the current standard diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of GISTs based on the recommendations of several guidelines and expert consensus.

  19. Spectrum of mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients - a population-based study from Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Minárik, Gabriel; Plank, Lukáš; Lasabová, Zora; Szemes, Tomáš; Burjanivová, Tatiana; Szépe, Peter; Buzalková, Veronika; Porubský, David; Sufliarsky, Jozef

    2013-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of gastrointestinal tract and are characterized by presence of mutations in tyrosine kinases cKIT (KIT) and PDGFRα (PDGFRA). Mutations identified are highly heterogeneous, but some mutations are associated with specific clinical features of the tumor. Samples from 278 GIST patients collected during the period 2004-2011 were screened for mutations in exons 9, 11, 13, and 17 of KIT and 12, 14 and 18 of PDGFRA. Results of mutation screening were summarized and tested for possible association with clinical parameters of tumors. Mutations were identified in 83.81% of patients. Most frequent mutations were found in KIT exon 11 reaching frequency of 62.95%. Other exons contributed to the mutation pool with frequencies 8.27%, 7.55%, 2.52%, 1.44%, 1.08%, and 0.00%, in decreasing order KIT exon 9, PDGRFA exons 18 and 12, KIT exon 13, PDGFRA exon 14, and KIT exon 17. General linear model analysis showed no effect of any individual analyzed mutation on the phenotypic variables, but we confirmed association between mutations KIT exon 9 p. 503-504_dup2, and PDGFRA exon 18 p. D842V and intestinal and gastric localization of tumors. © 2012 APMIS Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Sunitinib in the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mulet-Margalef, Nuria; Garcia-del-Muro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. In advanced setting and after progression to imatinib, the multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib has clearly demonstrated a clinical benefit in terms of response rate and progression-free survival with an acceptable toxicity profile. The recommended schedule for sunitinib administration is 50 mg per day 4 weeks ON and 2 weeks OFF; however, potential alternative schedules are also reviewed in the present article. Several biomarkers have been explored to better select candidates for sunitinib therapy, such as the value of early changes in standardized uptake value assessed by positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, circulating biomarkers, clinical biomarkers such as the appearance of arterial hypertension during treatment that correlates with better outcomes, and the GIST genotype. GISTs with KIT mutations at exon 9 and the so-called wild-type GISTs seem to better respond to sunitinib. Nonetheless, further investigation is required to confirm these findings as well as to understand the mechanisms of sunitinib resistance such as the development of new KIT mutations or conformational changes in KIT receptor. PMID:28008275

  1. Differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumors from gastric adenocarcinomas and normal mucosae using confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, and gastric adenocarcinomas are a common cancer worldwide. To differentiate GISTs from adenocarcinomas is important because the surgical processes for both are different; the former excises the tumor with negative margins, while the latter requires radical gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. Endoscopy with biopsy is used to distinguish GISTs from adenocarcinomas; however, it may cause tumor bleeding in GISTs. We reported here the confocal Raman microspectroscopy as an effective tool to differentiate GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal mucosae. Of 119 patients enrolled in this study, 102 patients underwent gastrectomy (40 GISTs and 62 adenocarcinomas), and 17 patients with benign lesions were obtained as normal mucosae. Raman signals were integrated for 100 s for each spot on the specimen, and 5 to 10 spots, depending on the sample size, were chosen for each specimen. There were significant differences among those tissues as evidenced by different Raman signal responding to phospholipids and protein structures. The spectral data were further processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis. A two-dimensional plot demonstrated that GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal gastric mucosae could be effectively differentiated from each other.

  2. Targeted therapies of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST)--the next frontiers.

    PubMed

    Duensing, Stefan; Duensing, Anette

    2010-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and are caused by activating KIT or PDGFRA mutations. GISTs can be successfully treated with the small molecule kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, Novartis) with response rates of up to 85%. However, complete responses are rare, and most patients will develop imatinib resistance over time. Recent results have shown that although imatinib effectively stimulates apoptotic cell death in sensitive GIST cells, a considerable proportion of cells does not undergo apoptosis, but instead enters a state of quiescence. Quiescence is characterized by a reversible withdrawal from the cell division cycle, during which the cells remain alive and metabolically active. It is conceivable that quiescence not only plays a pivotal role in the emergence of residual disease but also in creating a pool of tumor cells that survive continuous small molecule therapy and may hence represent the "seeds" for the outgrowth of resistant clones. This review will summarize the current knowledge about GIST biology and treatment response to imatinib including the induction of cellular quiescence in GIST. In addition, we will highlight future strategies to design more effective treatment options to overcome these problems with an aim towards cure of this hitherto untreatable tumor entity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach with axillary lymph node metastasis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Naoki; Takeuchi, Nobumichi

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common type of gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors, although metastasis to the perigastric lymph nodes is relatively rare, compared with liver or peritoneal metastasis. In this report, we describe a case of stomach GIST with a solitary simultaneous metastasis in the left axillary lymph node. A 68-year-old man was diagnosed with a large upper-stomach GIST, and computed tomography and positron emission tomography revealed masses in the left axilla and right mediastinum. We did not detect evidence of metastases to the liver, or other sites including the perigastric lymph nodes, although findings from the surgically resected axillary lymph nodes were compatible with GIST metastasis. Treatment using imatinib markedly reduced the gastric and mediastinal lesions, and this response persisted for 3 years. The patient subsequently experienced rapid growth of the gastric lesion without mediastinal or axilla recurrence, which required palliative surgery. Despite continuing medical treatment (sunitinib and regorafenib), the patient died of liver metastases 23 mo after the surgery. Based on our findings, it appears that the axillary lymph nodes can be a potential metastatic site for GIST metastasis. PMID:28321172

  4. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor's dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection.

  5. Integrated genomic analyses identify frequent gene fusion events and VHL inactivation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Choong-Hyun; Park, Inho; Lee, Seungmook; Kwon, Jekeun; Do, Ingu; Hong, Min Eui; Van Vrancken, Michael; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Joon Oh; Cho, Jeonghee; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Sohn, Tae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. We sequenced nine exomes and transcriptomes, and two genomes of GISTs for integrated analyses. We detected 306 somatic variants in nine GISTs and recurrent protein-altering mutations in 29 genes. Transcriptome sequencing revealed 328 gene fusions, and the most frequently involved fusion events were associated with IGF2 fused to several partner genes including CCND1, FUS, and LASP1. We additionally identified three recurrent read-through fusion transcripts: POLA2-CDC42EP2, C8orf42-FBXO25, and STX16-NPEPL1. Notably, we found intragenic deletions in one of three exons of the VHL gene and increased mRNAs of VEGF, PDGF-β, and IGF-1/2 in 56% of GISTs, suggesting a mechanistic link between VHL inactivation and overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor target genes in the absence of hypoxia. We also identified copy number gain and increased mRNA expression of AMACR, CRIM1, SKP2, and CACNA1E. Mapping of copy number and gene expression results to the KEGG pathways revealed activation of the JAK-STAT pathway in small intestinal GISTs and the MAPK pathway in wild-type GISTs. These observations will allow us to determine the genetic basis of GISTs and will facilitate further investigation to develop new therapeutic options. PMID:25987131

  6. Integrated genomic analyses identify frequent gene fusion events and VHL inactivation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guhyun; Yun, Hongseok; Sun, Choong-Hyun; Park, Inho; Lee, Seungmook; Kwon, Jekeun; Do, Ingu; Hong, Min Eui; Van Vrancken, Michael; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Joon Oh; Cho, Jeonghee; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Sohn, Tae Sung

    2016-02-09

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. We sequenced nine exomes and transcriptomes, and two genomes of GISTs for integrated analyses. We detected 306 somatic variants in nine GISTs and recurrent protein-altering mutations in 29 genes. Transcriptome sequencing revealed 328 gene fusions, and the most frequently involved fusion events were associated with IGF2 fused to several partner genes including CCND1, FUS, and LASP1. We additionally identified three recurrent read-through fusion transcripts: POLA2-CDC42EP2, C8orf42-FBXO25, and STX16-NPEPL1. Notably, we found intragenic deletions in one of three exons of the VHL gene and increased mRNAs of VEGF, PDGF-β, and IGF-1/2 in 56% of GISTs, suggesting a mechanistic link between VHL inactivation and overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor target genes in the absence of hypoxia. We also identified copy number gain and increased mRNA expression of AMACR, CRIM1, SKP2, and CACNA1E. Mapping of copy number and gene expression results to the KEGG pathways revealed activation of the JAK-STAT pathway in small intestinal GISTs and the MAPK pathway in wild-type GISTs. These observations will allow us to determine the genetic basis of GISTs and will facilitate further investigation to develop new therapeutic options.

  7. Treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor with imatinib mesylate: a retrospective single-center experience in Heidelberg.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Bernd; Kallinowski, Birgit; Herrmann, Thomas; Lehnert, Thomas; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Geer, Thomas; Ho, Anthony D; Egerer, Gerlinde

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Surgery has been the only effective therapy. However, many patients still eventually die of disease recurrence. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy have been of limited value. Imatinib mesylate (Glivec) is an orally administered competitive inhibitor of tyrosine kinases associated with the KIT, ABL protein, licensed for the treatment of metastatic GIST since 2002 in Germany. We summarized the data of 16 patients with advanced or metastatic GIST treated with imatinib mesylate in palliative and neoadjuvant settings. Overall response was 81%, with no evidence of disease (NED) in 3/16 (19%), partial response (PR) in 9/16 (56%) and stable disease (SD) in 1/16 (6%), whereas 3/16 patients (19%) suffered from progressive disease (PD). Mean follow-up was 18.6 months [range: 4-30]. Mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 17.6 months [range: 0-30], mean overall survival (OS) from initial diagnosis was 32.3 months [range: 5-122]. Most common side effects were periorbital edema and skin rash. Imatinib mesylate is well tolerated in a dose of up to 800 mg/day and has significant activity during long- term treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic GIST. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a cyst in the lesser sac

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Ahmed Mahmoud; Ayyash, Emad Helmi; Alzafiri, Raed; Francis, Issam; Asfar, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are solid tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, mostly found in the stomach and intestine. They rarely present as cystic lesions. A 74-year-old woman referred to the hepatopancreaticobiliary unit, with 3 months history of upper abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound scan showed a large cystic lesion in the epigastric region suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. The CT-scan showed a 6.6×6×6.3 cm size cyst related to the pancreas and extending to the hepatogastric omentum. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) scan was suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Aspirated Cyst fluid via EUS showed benign cytology with normal amylase, lipase and tumour markers (CEA, CA-19.9 and CA-125). She was referred as a case of pancreatic pseudocyst. After surgical excision, the histopathology confirmed the presence GIST in the wall of the cystic lesion. The possibility of GIST should be kept in mind in the presence of unusual features of a cyst on abdominal imaging. PMID:27469382

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: clinical significance of p53 expression, MDM2 amplification, and KIT mutation status.

    PubMed

    Wallander, Michelle L; Layfield, Lester J; Tripp, Sheryl R; Schmidt, Robert L

    2013-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. Clinical behavior is best predicted by size and mitotic count (risk index). KIT and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) mutations have therapeutic and prognostic value but few other prognostically significant molecular markers have been identified. We investigated the prognostic value of p53 protein expression and MDM2 gene amplification in a series of GISTs. Thirty-five GISTs were tested for KIT and PDGFRA mutations, p53 protein expression (high >10% positive by immunohistochemistry) and MDM2 gene amplification (ratio >1.8). Mitotic index (>5/50 HPF), MDM2 amplification status, p53 protein expression, tumor size, and KIT/PDGFRA mutational status were correlated with clinical outcome. Only a single (3%) GIST was amplified for MDM2. p53 protein expression, mitotic index, and KIT/PDGFRA mutations did not correlate with recurrence or metastasis (P=0.20, 0.50, and 0.08, respectively) but tumor size did (P=0.04). Risk assessment (size and mitotic index) showed a weak association with clinical behavior (P=0.19). MDM2 amplification is uncommon in GISTs. Although high p53 expression occurred in 35% of cases, it did not correlate with clinical behavior. Only GIST size predicted clinical outcome.

  10. Asian Consensus Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Dong-Hoe; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Yang, Han-Kwang; Sawaki, Akira; Hirota, Seiichi; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Tzen, Chin-Yuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Nishida, Toshirou; Shen, Lin; Chen, Li-Tzong; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors originating in the gastrointestinal tract. With the introduction of molecular-targeted therapy for GISTs which has yielded remarkable outcomes, these tumors have become a model of multidisciplinary oncological treatment. Although Western clinical guidelines are available for GISTs, such as those published by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), the clinical situations in Asian countries are different from those in Western countries in terms of diagnostic methods, surgical approach, and availability of new targeted agents. Accordingly, we have reviewed current versions of several GIST guidelines published by Asian countries (Japan, Korea, China, and Taiwan) and the NCCN and ESMO and discussed the areas of dissensus. We here present the first version of the Asian GIST consensus guidelines that were prepared through a series of meetings involving multidisciplinary experts in the four countries. These guidelines provide an optimal approach to the diagnosis and management of GIST patients in Asian countries. PMID:27384163

  11. Status of the gastric mucosa with endoscopically diagnosed gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Kouichi; Ban, Shinichi; Hiejima, Yoshimitsu; Narita, Rei; Shimizu, Michio; Aikawa, Masayasu; Ohata, Ken; Matsuhashi, Nobuyuki; Arai, Shin; Kita, Hiroto

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal submucosal tumor, the endosonographic, CT, and MRI features of gastric GISTs have been widely investigated. However, the GIST-bearing gastric mucosa status has not been reported. Objective. To characterize the GIST-bearing gastric mucosa status in terms of the degree of inflammation and atrophy, assessed endoscopically. Subjects and Methods. The subjects were 46 patients with submucosal tumors (histologically proven gastric GISTs) who had undergone upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in our hospital between April 2007 and September 2012. They were retrospectively evaluated regarding clinicopathological features, the endoscopically determined status of the entire gastric mucosa (presence or absence and degree of atrophy), presence or absence and severity of endoscopic gastritis/atrophy (A-B classification) at the GIST site, and presence or absence of H. pylori infection. Results. Twenty-three patients had no mucosal atrophy, but 17 and 6 had closed- and open-type atrophy, respectively. Twenty-six, 5, 12, 1, 1, and 1 patients had grades B0, B1, B2, B3, A0, and A1 gastritis/atrophy at the lesion site, respectively, with no grade A2 gastritis/atrophy. Conclusion. The results suggest that gastric GISTs tend to arise in the stomach wall with H. pylori-negative, nonatrophic mucosa or H. pylori-positive, mildly atrophic mucosa.

  12. Antitumor effects in gastrointestinal stromal tumors using photodynamic therapy with a novel glucose-conjugated chlorin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mamoru; Kataoka, Hiromi; Yano, Shigenobu; Ohi, Hiromi; Moriwaki, Kazuhiro; Akashi, Haruo; Taguchi, Takahiro; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Hamano, Shingo; Mori, Yoshinori; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Joh, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Except for surgical resection, no effective treatment strategies have been established. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) consists of intravenous administration of a photosensitizer, activated by a specific wavelength of light, which produces reactive oxygen species that directly kill tumor cells. We analyzed the efficacy of PDT using a newly developed photosensitizer, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis [4-[β-d-glucopyranosylthio-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl]-2,3,[methano[N-methyl] iminomethano] chlorin (H(2)TFPC-SGlc), for the GIST treatment. Various photosensitizers were administered in vitro to GIST (GIST-T1) and fibroblast (WI-38) cells, followed by irradiation, after which cell death was compared. We additionally established xenograft mouse models with GIST-T1 tumors and examined the accumulation and antitumor effects of these photosensitizers in vivo. In vitro, the expression of the glucose transporters GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4, the cellular uptake of H(2)TFPC-SGlc, and apoptosis mediated by PDT with H(2)TFPC-SGlc were significantly higher in GIST-T1 than in WI-38 cells. In vivo, H(2)TFPC-SGlc accumulation was higher in xenograft tumors of GIST-T1 cells than in the adjacent normal tissue, and tumor growth was significantly suppressed following PDT. PDT with novel H(2)TFPC-SGlc is potentially useful for clinical applications about the treatment of GIST.

  13. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors in kidney transplant recipients: Report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chi Yuen; Lo, Stanley Hok King; Chan, Ching Kit; Li, Fu Keung; Cheng, Ignatius Kum Po; Chau, Ka Foon

    2017-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common primary mesenchymal gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, GISTs occurring in kidney transplant recipients, including their treatment and outcome, are rarely described in literature. We hereby report two kidney transplant recipients with GISTs. Our first patient was diagnosed with high-risk epithelioid gastric GIST 2 years after kidney transplant. He received everolimus after resection and remained disease-free for 2 years before liver metastasis was confirmed. Imatinib therapy was planned but he died of fulminant pneumonia shortly. Our second patient was diagnosed with spindle cell GISTs in the mesentery 1 year after kidney transplant. Only partial response was obtained with imatinib as new lesions continued to develop. Withdrawal of cyclosporine and introduction of sirolimus resulted in complete shrinkage of existing tumors and no new lesions. He remained disease-free for more than 10 years. Combination therapy consisting of imatinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORi) seems to be safe and effective in kidney transplant recipients. However, therapeutic drug monitoring of mTORi is essential to avoid nephrotoxicity. Further trials addressing the optimal dosage of imatinib and mTORi in kidney transplant recipients are recommended.

  14. Clinicopathological features and outcome of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in an Afro-Caribbean population.

    PubMed

    Brady-West, Doreen; Blake, Garfield

    2012-01-01

    A retrospective observational study was done to describe the clinical and pathological profile of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in Afro-Caribbean patients at a tertiary care referral center over a 5-year period. Eighteen cases of GIST were identified over the period under review. Male to female ratio was 1.25:1, the mean age was 54.7 years, and abdominal pain (44%) and gastrointestinal bleeding (50%) were the predominant presenting symptoms. The majority of tumors were of gastric location (83%) and spindle cell morphology (66%). C-kit (CD117) positivity was found in 13 of 14 (93%) cases tested. Using current guidelines for assigning risk of aggressive behavior, 44% of tumors were considered high risk. Of the 10 patients with high-risk or intermediate-risk tumors, 4 died, 1 of which had developed resistance to imatinib therapy. In this group of patients, GISTs demonstrated predominantly gastric location and spindle cell morphology and a guarded outlook for more aggressive tumors, which is moderated in the long-term by imatinib resistance.

  15. Personalized Medicine in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST): Clinical Implications of the Somatic and Germline DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ravegnini, Gloria; Nannini, Margherita; Sammarini, Giulia; Astolfi, Annalisa; Biasco, Guido; Pantaleo, Maria A.; Hrelia, Patrizia; Angelini, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. They are characterized by gain of function mutations in KIT or PDGFRA tyrosine kinase receptors, with their consequent constitutive activation. The gold standard therapy is imatinib that offers a good and stable response for approximately 18–36 months. However, resistance is very common and it is vital to identify new biomarkers. Up until now, there have been two main approaches with focus to characterize novel targets. On the one hand, the focus is on the tumor genome, as the final clinical outcome depends mainly from the cancer specific mutations/alterations patterns. However, the germline DNA is important as well, and it is inconceivable to think the patients response to the drug is not related to it. Therefore the aim of this review is to outline the state of the art of the personalized medicine in GIST taking into account both the tumor DNA (somatic) and the patient DNA (germline). PMID:26184165

  16. Personalized Medicine in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST): Clinical Implications of the Somatic and Germline DNA Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ravegnini, Gloria; Nannini, Margherita; Sammarini, Giulia; Astolfi, Annalisa; Biasco, Guido; Pantaleo, Maria A; Hrelia, Patrizia; Angelini, Sabrina

    2015-07-09

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. They are characterized by gain of function mutations in KIT or PDGFRA tyrosine kinase receptors, with their consequent constitutive activation. The gold standard therapy is imatinib that offers a good and stable response for approximately 18-36 months. However, resistance is very common and it is vital to identify new biomarkers. Up until now, there have been two main approaches with focus to characterize novel targets. On the one hand, the focus is on the tumor genome, as the final clinical outcome depends mainly from the cancer specific mutations/alterations patterns. However, the germline DNA is important as well, and it is inconceivable to think the patients response to the drug is not related to it. Therefore the aim of this review is to outline the state of the art of the personalized medicine in GIST taking into account both the tumor DNA (somatic) and the patient DNA (germline).

  17. Evidence for Ca2+-Regulated ATP Release in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Erik; Berglund, David; Akcakaya, Pinar; Ghaderi, Mehran; Daré, Elisabetta; Berggren, Per-Olof; Köhler, Martin; Aspinwall, Craig A.; Lui, Weng-Onn; Zedenius, Jan; Larsson, Catharina; Bränström, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are thought to originate from the electrically active pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite the presence of synaptic-like vesicles and proteins involved in cell secretion it remains unclear whether GIST cells possess regulated release mechanisms. The GIST tumor cell line GIST882 was used as a model cell system, and stimulus-release coupling was investigated by confocal microscopy of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), flow cytometry, and luminometric measurements of extracellular ATP. We demonstrate that GIST cells have an intact intracellular Ca2+-signaling pathway that regulates ATP release. Cell viability and cell membrane integrity was preserved, excluding ATP leakage due to cell death and suggesting active ATP release. The stimulus-secretion signal transduction is at least partly dependent on Ca2+ influx since exclusion of extracellular Ca2+ diminishes the ATP release. We conclude that measurements of ATP release in GISTs may be a useful tool for dissecting the signal transduction pathway, mapping exocytotic components, and possibly for the development and evaluation of drugs. Additionally, release of ATP from GISTs may have importance for tumor tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance escape. PMID:23499741

  18. Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors associated with dysphagia and novel type germline mutation of KIT gene.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Seiichi; Nishida, Toshirou; Isozaki, Koji; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Akiko; Takabayashi, Arimichi; Obayashi, Tadashi; Okuno, Tomoko; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Chen, Hui; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Kitamura, Yukihiko

    2002-05-01

    A family with multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), a new type of germline mutation of KIT gene, and dysphagia is reported. The mutation was observed at Asp-820 in tyrosine kinase (TK) II domain. Mutations in TK II domain have been found in mast cell and germ cell tumors but not in GISTs, and the present family members are the first reported cases of GISTs with TK II domain mutations, including sporadic GISTs. Because interleukin 3-dependent Ba/F3 murine lymphoid cells transfected with the mutant KIT complementary DNA grew autonomously without any growth factors and formed tumors in nude mice, the mutation was considered to be gain-of-function type. Family members with the germline KIT mutation reported dysphagia, but those without the mutation did not. The mechanism of dysphagia was examined with gastrointestinal fiberscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography, and esophageal manometry. No mechanical obstruction was found, and the esophagus was not remarkably dilated. In the family members with dysphagia, endoscopic ultrasonography at the esophagocardiac junction showed a thickened hyperechoic layer between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers, suggesting hyperplasia of interstitial cells of Cajal at the myenteric plexus layer. Manometry showed low resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure and abnormal simultaneous contractions of the esophagus without normal peristalsis. These findings indicate that the dysphagia of the present family is different from typical achalasia. This is the first report of familial dysphagia caused by germline gain-of-function mutation of the KIT gene at the TK II domain.

  19. KIT exon 11 deletion-inversions represent complex mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Lasota, Jerzy; Miettinen, Markku

    2007-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. KIT expression and mutational KIT activation have been documented in a majority of GISTs. Most mutations have been found in KIT juxtamembrane domain encoded by exon 11. Recently, we have identified three, complex KIT exon 11 mutations previously unreported in GISTs. These mutations consisted of several nucleotide deletions accompanied by insertions of inverted complementary DNA strand sequences. All three mutations were found in the 5' part of KIT exon 11. At the protein level, these mutations lead to the same end result: in-frame loss and insertion of a number of amino acids and could be considered examples of deletion-insertion. Although proper description of these mutations at the genomic level is a complex task and requires an individual approach, the uniform name deletion-inversion is suggested for this type of mutation, based on the present study. The frequency of deletion-inversions among KIT exon 11 mutant GISTs was estimated to be <0.5%, based on evaluation of 700 KIT exon 11 mutants. Molecular events leading to formation of deletion-inversions remain elusive and should be studied further.

  20. Changes in the Structure and Function of ICC Networks in ICC Hyperplasia and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    KWON, JOONG GOO; HWANG, SUNG JIN; HENNIG, GRANT W.; BAYGUINOV, YULIA; MCCANN, CONOR; CHEN, HUI; ROSSI, FERDINAND; BESMER, PETER; SANDERS, KENTON M.; WARD, SEAN M.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) express the receptor tyrosine kinase c-kit. Approximately 90% of GISTs have gain-of-function mutations in the Kit gene, which leads to its constitutive activation and drives malignant behavior of GISTs. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) express c-kit; however, it is unknown whether uncontrolled hyperplasia of ICC is responsible for GISTs. Here, we sought to determine whether gain-of-function mutations in Kit lead to hyperplasia of all classes of ICC, whether ICC hyperplasia begins before birth, and whether functional defects occur in ICC hyperplasia or the development of GISTs. Methods Heterozygous mutant KitV558Δ/+ mice that develop symptoms of human familial GISTs and prematurely die from pathology of the gastrointestinal tract were utilized and compared with wild-type controls. C-kit-immunohistochemistry and intracellular electrical recording of spontaneous and nerve-evoked activity were applied to examine the density and functionality of ICC in these mutants. Results There was considerable hyperplasia in all classes of ICC throughout the GI tract of KitV558Δ/+ mice, except for ICC in the deep muscular plexus of the intestine. Spontaneous electrical activity and postjunctional neural responses in hyperplastic ICC tissues appeared normal but were up-regulated in the cecum, where GISTs were commonly found. Conclusions Kit gain-of-function leads to hyperplasia of most classes of ICC throughout the GI tract. ICC retain normal pacemaker function and enteric neural responses well after development of hyperplasia. PMID:19032955

  1. Strongyloidiasis in a diabetic patient accompanied by gastrointestinal stromal tumor: cause of eosinophilia unresponsive to steroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun Jeong; Jeon, Jin; Koh, Young-Il; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2015-04-01

    We report here a case of strongyloidiasis in a 72-year-old diabetic patient (woman) accompanied by gastrointestinal stromal tumor receiving imatinib therapy, first diagnosed as hypereosinophilic syndrome and treated with steroids for uncontrolled eosinophilia. She suffered from lower back pain and intermittent abdominal discomfort with nausea and diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumor. After post-operative imatinib treatment eosinophilia persisted, so that steroid therapy was started under an impression of hypereosinophilic syndrome. In spite of 6 months steroid therapy, eosinophilia persisted. Stool examination was performed to rule out intestinal helminth infections. Rhabditoid larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis were detected and the patient was diagnosed as strongyloidiasis. This diagnosis was confirmed again by PCR. The patient was treated with albendazole for 14 days and her abdominal pain and diarrhea improved. This case highlights the need for thorough investigation, including molecular approaches, to test for strongyloidiasis before and during steroid therapies.

  2. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of gastrointestinal stromal tumor presenting as an umbilical mass (Sister Mary Joseph's Nodule).

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Donizete; Wakely, Paul E

    2006-04-01

    The Sister Mary Joseph (SMJ) nodule is a clinical sign of metastatic cancer involving the umbilicus. The vast majority of these instances represent adenocarcinomas arising from ovarian or colorectal primaries. We present a patient who presented with ascites and the SMJ lesion that turned out to be a metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor after fine needle aspiration biopsy was performed. The lesion was subsequently histologically confirmed. Gastrointestinal stroma tumor involving the umbilicus is exceedingly uncommon and only rarely presents in this fashion. The cytomorphological features, differential diagnosis, and comparison with the tissue specimen are made.

  3. Gastric fundal heterotopic pancreas mimicking a gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST): a case report and a brief review.

    PubMed

    Subasinghe, Duminda; Sivaganesh, Sivasuriya; Perera, Niranthi; Samarasekera, Dharmabandhu N

    2016-03-22

    Heterotopic pancreas is a rare congenital condition characterised by pancreatic tissue lacking vascular or anatomic communication with the normal pancreas. Most cases of ectopic pancreas are asymptomatic. The preoperative diagnosis of this condition is difficult. A 50-year-old woman presented with dyspeptic symptoms of 4 years duration. Contrast enhanced CT (computed tomography) scan of abdomen suggested a gastrointestinal stromal tumour in the fundus of the stomach. The patient underwent laparoscopy assisted resection and subsequent histology revealed ectopic pancreatic tissue. Although heterotopic pancreas is a rare lesion diagnosed on histology, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric mass lesions and in patients presenting with vague upper gastrointestinal symptoms.

  4. State of the Art in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Garlipp, Benjamin; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequently diagnosed mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite their biological and clinical heterogeneity, the majority of these tumors are positive for the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT and are driven by KIT- or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA)-activating mutations. There are still uncertainties regarding their clinical and molecular characterization and the optimal treatment regimens, making it difficult to establish a universal treatment algorithm for these tumors. Summary From a clinical perspective, the main difference between GISTs and other gastrointestinal neoplasms is that the benign or malignant behavior of GISTs cannot be predicted from histopathology, but instead relies on empirically established scoring systems. Clinical data suggest that malignant potential may be an inherent quality of some GISTs rather than a feature acquired by the tumor during disease progression. Thus, some patients may require prolonged anti-tumor treatment even after complete surgical removal of the tumor. Key Message Although GISTs are the most frequently occurring mesenchymal neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract, no universal treatment algorithms exist. This paper reviews the current evidence that guides the management of GISTs. Practical Implications The management of localized GISTs involves the use of surgical resection, with the inclusion of preoperative tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment for locally advanced, primarily unresectable tumors and for resectable cases requiring extensive surgery. Imatinib is also indicated as adjuvant therapy after complete surgical removal of GISTs with a high estimated risk of recurrence unless specific mutations conferring imatinib resistance are present. The optimal duration of adjuvant treatment is still controversial. For patients with metastatic imatinib-sensitive GISTs, imatinib constitutes the first-line standard treatment

  5. Comparison between air and carbon dioxide insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Bin; Wang, Zi-Hao; Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Han; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ying; Xu, Lei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CO2 insufflation compared with air insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. METHODS: Sixty patients were randomized to undergo endoscopic submucosal excavation, with the CO2 group (n = 30) and the air group (n = 30) undergoing CO2 insufflation and air insufflation in the ESE, respectively. The end-tidal CO2 level (pETCO2) was observed at 4 time points: at the beginning of ESE, at total removal of the tumors, at completed wound management, and 10 min after ESE. Additionally, the patients’ experience of pain at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after the examination was registered using a visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: Both the CO2 group and air group were similar in mean age, sex, body mass index (all P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in PetCO2 values before and after the procedure (P > 0.05). However, the pain scores after the ESE at different time points in the CO2 group decreased significantly compared with the air group (1 h: 21.2 ± 3.4 vs 61.5 ± 1.7; 3 h: 8.5 ± 0.7 vs 42.9 ± 1.3; 6 h: 4.4 ± 1.6 vs 27.6 ± 1.2; 24 h: 2.3 ± 0.4 vs 21.4 ± 0.7, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the percentage of VAS scores of 0 in the CO2 group after 1, 3, 6 and 24 h was significantly higher than that in the air group (60.7 ± 1.4 vs 18.9 ± 1.5, 81.5 ± 2.3 vs 20.6 ± 1.2, 89.2 ± 0.7 vs 36.8 ± 0.9, 91.3 ± 0.8 vs 63.8 ± 1.3, respectively, P < 0.05). Moreover, the condition of the CO2 group was better than that of the air group with respect to anal exsufflation. CONCLUSION: Insufflation of CO2 in the ESE of gastrointestinal stromal tumors will not cause CO2 retention and it may significantly reduce the level of pain, thus it is safe and effective. PMID:23326136

  6. Comparison between air and carbon dioxide insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-Bin; Wang, Zi-Hao; Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Han; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ying; Xu, Lei-Ming

    2012-12-28

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CO(2) insufflation compared with air insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Sixty patients were randomized to undergo endoscopic submucosal excavation, with the CO(2) group (n = 30) and the air group (n = 30) undergoing CO(2) insufflation and air insufflation in the ESE, respectively. The end-tidal CO(2) level (pETCO(2)) was observed at 4 time points: at the beginning of ESE, at total removal of the tumors, at completed wound management, and 10 min after ESE. Additionally, the patients' experience of pain at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after the examination was registered using a visual analog scale (VAS). Both the CO(2) group and air group were similar in mean age, sex, body mass index (all P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in PetCO(2) values before and after the procedure (P > 0.05). However, the pain scores after the ESE at different time points in the CO(2) group decreased significantly compared with the air group (1 h: 21.2 ± 3.4 vs 61.5 ± 1.7; 3 h: 8.5 ± 0.7 vs 42.9 ± 1.3; 6 h: 4.4 ± 1.6 vs 27.6 ± 1.2; 24 h: 2.3 ± 0.4 vs 21.4 ± 0.7, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the percentage of VAS scores of 0 in the CO(2) group after 1, 3, 6 and 24 h was significantly higher than that in the air group (60.7 ± 1.4 vs 18.9 ± 1.5, 81.5 ± 2.3 vs 20.6 ± 1.2, 89.2 ± 0.7 vs 36.8 ± 0.9, 91.3 ± 0.8 vs 63.8 ± 1.3, respectively, P < 0.05). Moreover, the condition of the CO(2) group was better than that of the air group with respect to anal exsufflation. Insufflation of CO(2) in the ESE of gastrointestinal stromal tumors will not cause CO(2) retention and it may significantly reduce the level of pain, thus it is safe and effective.

  7. Supraclavicular lymph node metastases from malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the jejunum: A case report with review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chi; Hao, Shao-Long; Liu, Xin-Cheng; Nin, Jin-Yao; Wu, Guo-Chang; Jiang, Li-Xin; Fancellu, Alessandro; Porcu, Alberto; Zheng, Hai-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent the most common mesenchymal tumors of the alimentary tract. These tumors may have different clinical and biological behaviors. Malignant forms usually spread via a hematogenous route, and lymph node metastases rarely occur. Herein, we report a patient with a jejunal GIST who developed supraclavicular lymph node metastasis. We conclude that lymphatic diffusion via the mediastinal lymphatic station to the supraclavicular lymph nodes can be a potential metastatic route for GISTs. PMID:28348499

  8. Supraclavicular lymph node metastases from malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the jejunum: A case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi; Hao, Shao-Long; Liu, Xin-Cheng; Nin, Jin-Yao; Wu, Guo-Chang; Jiang, Li-Xin; Fancellu, Alessandro; Porcu, Alberto; Zheng, Hai-Tao

    2017-03-14

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent the most common mesenchymal tumors of the alimentary tract. These tumors may have different clinical and biological behaviors. Malignant forms usually spread via a hematogenous route, and lymph node metastases rarely occur. Herein, we report a patient with a jejunal GIST who developed supraclavicular lymph node metastasis. We conclude that lymphatic diffusion via the mediastinal lymphatic station to the supraclavicular lymph nodes can be a potential metastatic route for GISTs.

  9. Severe paraneoplastic hypoglycemia in a patient with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with an exon 9 mutation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Guillermo A; Robinson, William A; Nydam, Trevor L; Heiple, Drew C; Weiss, Glen J; Buckley, Linda; Gonzalez, Rene; McCarter, Martin D

    2007-01-01

    Background Non-islet cell tumor induced hypoglycemia (NICTH) is a very rare phenomenon, but even more so in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. It tends to present in large or metastatic tumors, and can appear at any time in the progression of the disease. We present herein a case of NICTH in a GIST tumor and report an exon 9 mutation associated to it. Case presentation A thirty nine year-old man with a recurrent, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor presented to the hospital with nausea, dizziness, loss of consciousness, and profound hypoglycemia (20 mg/dL). There was no evidence of factitious hypoglycemia. He was stabilized with a continuous glucose infusion and following selective vascular embolization, the patient underwent debulking of a multicentric 40 cm × 25 cm × 10 cm gastrointestinal stromal tumor. After resection, the patient became euglycemic and returned to his normal activities. Tumor analysis confirmed excessive production of insulin-like growth factor II m-RNA and the precursor protein, "big" insulin-like growth factor II. Mutational analysis also identified a rare, 6 bp tandem repeat insert (gcctat) at position 1530 in exon 9 of KIT. Conclusion Optimal management of gastrointestinal stromal tumor-induced hypoglycemia requires a multidisciplinary approach, and surgical debulking is the treatment of choice to obtain immediate symptom relief. Imatinib or combinations of glucocorticoids and growth hormone are alternative palliative strategies for symptomatic hypoglycemia. In addition, mutations in exon 9 of the tyrosine kinase receptor KIT occur in 11–20% of GIST and are often associated with poor patient outcomes. The association of this KIT mutation with non-islet cell tumor induced hypoglycemia has yet to be established. PMID:17229322

  10. Gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor with incomplete duplication cyst - a case with possibility of neoplasia in fetal-period malformed tissues.

    PubMed

    Lewitowicz, Piotr; Matykiewicz, Jaroslaw; Koziel, Dorota; Gluszek, Stanislaw Z; Sosnowski, Zbigniew; Horecka-Lewitowicz, Agata; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna

    2015-03-01

    The coincidence of GIST and other gastric malignancies are documented well but arising GIST from congenital anomalies is still rarity in literature. To date, only a few papers have been concerned on the possibility of arising neoplasms from duplication cyst of gastrointestinal tract. There, are dominating usual cancers, neuroendocrine cancers or lymphomas but GIST has been noted only once. Here, we report a case of 73 years old female-patient with typical gastric stromal tumor comprised centrally locked an incomplete duplication cyst.

  11. 68Ga-PSMA Uptake in an Incidentally Detected Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Case of Suspected Carcinoma Prostate.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, Mra; S, Bindu; Sr, Sudin

    2017-10-01

    A 74-year-old man with suspected prostate cancer and a previously negative transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT. Scan showed no abnormal tracer concentration in enlarged prostate gland to suggest prostate cancer. Note was made of an incidentally detected well defined soft tissue lesion in the greater curvature of the stomach with moderate tracer concentration in its intraluminal portion. Biopsy of the lesion revealed gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  12. Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumor syndrome: report of 2 cases with KIT exon 11 mutation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek H; Caracciolo, Jamie T; Hodul, Pamela J; Strosberg, Jonathan R; Coppola, Domenico; Bui, Marilyn M

    2015-01-01

    As with cases of sporadic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), familial GIST syndrome arises from mutations in KIT or PDGFRA. Only a few dozen such families have been described in the literature. Cases of 2 individuals from 2 different newly described kindreds with familial GIST syndrome were retrospectively reviewed. Pertinent immunohistochemical stains, including CD117, CD34, DOG1, desmin, and S100, were performed. Samples from each case were sent to outside facilities for molecular analysis. A review of the relevant literature was performed and the number of familial GIST syndrome cases reported was updated through July 2014. In case 1, a woman 40 years of age with a family history of GIST presented with abdominal pain and gastrointestinal bleeding. Biopsy of a gastric mass revealed spindle-cell type GIST. Molecular analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation of p.Asp579del in exon 11 of KIT. The patient was placed on imatinib therapy and an initial positive response was demonstrated by imaging. Disease regression was seen on computed tomography, and several GIST tumors were surgically resected. The patient has had stable disease since surgery. In case 2, an asymptomatic woman 29 years of age presented for screening due to a family history of GIST. One small nodule was noted in her stomach and another was noted in the duodenum; both were surgically resected. The patient recovered well following surgery. The GIST in this patient was noted to have similar histological, immunohistochemical, and molecular findings as case 1. Imatinib has often been shown to be an effective therapy in both the familial and sporadic forms of GIST. There is no standard protocol for addressing the surveillance of patients with spindle-cell type GIST seen in the setting of familial GIST syndrome and with a p.Asp579del mutation of exon 11 on KIT.

  13. Contrast-enhanced (endoscopic) ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound elastography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ignee, Andre; Jenssen, Christian; Hocke, Michael; Dong, Yi; Wang, Wen-Ping; Cui, Xin-Wu; Woenckhaus, Matthias; Iordache, Sevastita; Saftoiu, Adrian; Schuessler, Gudrun; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent the largest group of subepithelial tumors (SET) of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. They may show malignant behavior, in contrast to other SET. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is frequently used to characterize SET. With the introduction of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) into EUS (CE-EUS), distinct enhancement patterns can be detected. In the presented study, the characteristic features of CE-EUS in GIST are analyzed and compared with those of other SET. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients from four centers with SET of the upper and middle GI tract were included and received endoscopic or transcutaneous CEUS. The results were compared with EUS-guided tissue acquisition, forceps biopsy, or surgical resection. Results: Forty-two out of 62 (68%) patients had SET of the stomach, 17/62 (27%) of the small intestine, 2/62 (3%) of the esophagus, and 1/62 (2%) extraintestinal. Eighty-one percent underwent surgery. Leiomyoma was found in 5/62 (8%) and GIST in 57/62 patients (92%). Thirty-nine out of 57 (68%) patients had GIST lesions in the stomach, 17/57 (30%) had GIST of the small intestine, and 1/57 (2%) patients had extraintestinal GISTs. GIST size was 62.6 ± 42.1 (16–200) mm. Hyperenhancement had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of 98%, 100%, 100%, 93%, and 98% for the diagnosis of GIST. Fifty out of 57 patients with GIST (88%) showed avascular areas in the center of the lesions. Conclusion: CE-EUS and CEUS show hyperenhancement and avascular areas in a high percentage of GIST but not in leiomyoma. Thus, GIST and leiomyoma can be discriminated accurately. PMID:28218202

  14. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for silent gastric Dieulafoy lesions mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Cao, Hailong; Wang, Sinan; Wang, Dan; Xu, Mengque; Piao, Meiyu; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Dieulafoy lesion is a rare but serious cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. However, some cases can be occasionally found without bleeding during the endoscopic screening, and the management remains unclear. The aim of this article was to report the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for silent gastric Dieulafoy lesions, which presented as protrusion lesions mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Methods: Data from the patients with gastric protrusion lesions who underwent ESD from September 2008 to April 2016 in General Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, China were recorded. Seven cases with pathological diagnosis of Dieulafoy lesion without bleeding were enrolled for further analysis. Results: A total of 7 patients (2 males and 5 females) with mean age of 57.7 ± 4.15 years were pathologically diagnosed as Dieulafoy lesion. Four of the lesions were located in gastric antrum, 2 in the fundus, and 1 in the body of stomach, respectively. The mean sizes of the Dieulafoy lesions under white light endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) were 1.06 ± 0.28 and 0.84 ± 0.29 cm. The origins of these lesions were submucosa (6/7, 85.7%) and muscularis propria (1/7, 14.3%). Three of them appeared with mixed echo under EUS, 3 with hypoechogenicity, and 1 with hyperechogenicity. En bloc complete resection was achieved in all the lesions by ESD with average time of 76.00 ± 16.86 minutes, and no intraoperative bleeding happened. In addition, all patients were followed up for 1 to 53 months, and no recurrence or long-term complications was observed. Conclusion: Therefore, ESD can be an effective and safe treatment for silent gastric Dieulafoy lesions with clinical presentations of submucosal protrusion lesions mimicking GISTs. PMID:27603399

  15. DOG1 for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST): Comparison between 2 different antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; West, Robert B; Bacchi, Livia M; van de Rijn, Matt; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Discovered on GIST-1 (DOG1) is a recently described protein expressed in GISTs irrespective of mutation status. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of DOG1 using 2 different monoclonal antibodies (DOG1.1 and the commercially available K9 antibody) in 668 GIST cases and to compare the results with the expression of KIT. DOG1 and KIT expression also were studied in most human normal tissues and several nonmesenchymal and mesenchymal tumors other than GIST. KIT was expressed in 643 (96.3%) GISTs. DOG1.1 and K9 were positive in 538 (80.5%) and 642 (96.1%) GIST cases, respectively. In 25 (3.7%) KIT-negative GIST cases, DOG1 was expressed in 5 (20.0%) and 19 (76.0%) using DOG1.1 and K9 antibodies, respectively. Only 0.9% of GISTs were negative for KIT, DOG1.1, and K9. Most normal human tissues did not reveal KIT and DOG1 expression. DOG1.1 was positive in only 2 of 57 synovial sarcomas and 1 of 61 soft tissue leiomyosarcomas. K9 was positive in 5 of 57 synovial sarcomas, 1 of 14 angiosarcomas, 1 of 61 soft tissue leiomyosarcomas, 3 of 4 adenoid cystic carcinomas of the head and neck, and in myoepithelial cells of 9 of 11 fibroadenomas of the breast. In conclusion, the commercially available K9 is of great utility for the diagnosis of most KIT-negative GISTs, and the combination of both KIT and K9 antibody in a panel of immunohistochemistry can define the diagnosis of GIST in more than 99% of cases.

  16. Pharmacological inhibition of KIT activates MET signaling in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Noah A.; Zeng, Shan; Seifert, Adrian M.; Kim, Teresa S.; Sorenson, Eric C.; Greer, Jonathan B.; Beckman, Michael J.; Santamaria-Barria, Juan A.; Crawley, Megan H.; Green, Benjamin L.; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common adult sarcomas and the oncogenic driver is usually a KIT or PDGFRA mutation. While GIST are often initially sensitive to imatinib or other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, resistance generally develops necessitating backup strategies for therapy. In this study, we determined that a subset of human GIST specimens that acquired imatinib resistance acquired expression of activated forms of the MET oncogene. MET activation also developed after imatinib therapy in a mouse model of GIST (KitV558del/+ mice), where it was associated with increased tumor hypoxia. MET activation also occurred in imatinib-sensitive human GIST cell lines after imatinib treatment in vitro. MET inhibition by crizotinib or RNA interference was cytotoxic to an imatinib-resistant human GIST cell population. Moreover, combining crizotinib and imatinib was more effective than imatinib alone in imatinib-sensitive GIST models. Lastly, cabozantinib, a dual MET and KIT small molecule inhibitor, was markedly more effective than imatinib in multiple preclinical models of imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant GIST. Collectively, our findings showed that activation of compensatory MET signaling by KIT inhibition may contribute to tumor resistance. Furthermore, our work offered a preclinical proof of concept for MET inhibition by cabozantinib as an effective strategy for GIST treatment. PMID:25836719

  17. Neoadjuvant imatinib in locally advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Seon; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Kim, Mi-Jung; Ryu, Min-Hee; Chang, Heung Moon; Kim, Tae Won; Jang, Se Jin; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Oh, Sung Tae; Kim, Byung Sik; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2006-01-01

    Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy used to treat locally advanced or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GI ST) remains under active investigation. We studied three cases of locally advanced gastric GISTs treated with imatinib on a neoadjuvant basis, followed by a complete surgical resection. Three patients were diagnosed with locally advanced unresectable GIST of the stomach and were started on imatinib 400 mg/day. After the imatinib treatment, partial responses were achieved in all patients and the tumors were considered resectable. Surgical resection was done after 7, 11, and 8 months of imatinib therapy, respectively. In one case, a metastatic liver lesion was detected during the imatinib treatment using computed tomography scans, so the imatinib therapy was maintained for 11 months postoperatively. In the other two patients without distant metastasis, imatinib treatment was not restarted after surgery. Mutational analysis revealed a mutation in exon 11 of the c-kit gene in two patients, and wild-type c-kit and PDGFRA in one patient. During pathology review of all three cases, we noted several features common to imatinib treatment. There was no evidence of tumor recurrence in all three patients at respective follow-up visits of 22, 15, and 7 months. These results suggest that the neoadjuvant imatinib therapy is a potentially curative approach for selected patients with locally advanced GIST.

  18. Genomic and transcriptomic analysis of imatinib resistance in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Elzawahry, Asmaa; Mimaki, Sachiyo; Furukawa, Eisaku; Nakatsuka, Rie; Nakamura, Hiromi; Nishigaki, Takahiko; Serada, Satoshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Hirota, Seiichi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors represent the most common mesenchymal tumor of the digestive tract, driven by gain‐of‐function mutations in KIT. Despite its proven benefits, half of the patients treated with imatinib show disease progression within 2 years due to secondary resistance mutations in KIT. It remains unclear how the genomic and transcriptomic features change during the acquisition of imatinib resistance. Here, we performed exome sequencing and microarray transcription analysis for four imatinib‐resistant cell lines and one cell line briefly exposed to imatinib. We also performed exome sequencing of clinical tumor samples. The cell line briefly exposed to imatinib exhibited few single‐nucleotide variants and copy‐number alterations, but showed marked upregulation of genes related to detoxification and downregulation of genes involved in cell cycle progression. Meanwhile, resistant cell lines harbored numerous genomic changes: amplified genes related to detoxification and deleted genes with cyclin‐dependent kinase activity. Some variants in the resistant samples were traced back to the drug‐sensitive samples, indicating the presence of ancestral subpopulations. The subpopulations carried variants associated with cell death. Pre‐existing cancer cells with genetic alterations promoting apoptosis resistance may serve as a basis whereby cancer cells with critical mutations, such as secondary KIT mutations, can establish full imatinib resistance. © 2017 The Authors Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27997714

  19. Promoter methylation of PCDH10 by HOTAIR regulates the progression of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Kim, Won Kyu; Yun, Seongju; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Chan Hyuk; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Hogeun; Lee, Sang Kil

    2016-01-01

    HOTAIR, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), plays a crucial role in tumor initiation and metastasis by interacting with the PRC2 complex and the modulation of its target genes. The role of HOTAIR in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) is remains unclear. Herein we investigate the mechanism of HOTAIR in the genesis and promotion of GISTs. The expression of HOTAIR was found to be higher in surgically resected high-risk GISTs than that in low- and intermediate-risk GISTs. Using GIST-T1 and GIST882 cells, we demonstrated that HOTAIR repressed apoptosis, was associated with cell cycle progression, and controlled the invasion and migration of GIST cells. Using a gene expression microarray and lists of HOTAIR-associated candidate genes, we suggested that protocadherin 10 (PCDH10) is a key molecule. PCDH10 expression was significantly decreased in GIST-T1 and GIST882 cells, possibly as a consequence of hypermethylation. We observed that HOTAIR induced PCDH10 methylation in a SUZ12-dependent manner. In this study, we found that the malignant character of GISTs was initiated and amplified by PCDH10 in a process regulated by HOTAIR. In summary, our findings imply that PCDH10 and HOTAIR may be useful markers of disease progression and therapeutic targets. PMID:27659532

  20. KIT and PDGFRalpha mutational analyses of mixed cell-type gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Wong, N A C S; Mangwana, S

    2007-12-01

    To determine whether the epithelioid and spindle components of a mixed cell-type gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) show the same receptor tyrosine kinase mutation and, by inference, the same sensitivity to imatinib. Six mixed cell-type GISTs were identified from 108 gastric GISTs. Clinicopathological and immunohistochemical data of the six neoplasms were collated. For each neoplasm, DNA was extracted separately from the laser-microdissected epithelioid and spindle components and non-neoplastic tissue and sequenced for KIT and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)alpha mutations. The epithelioid component often showed less CD117 and/or CD34 immunoreactivity than the spindle component of the same mixed cell-type GIST. Four mixed cell-type GISTs showed somatic KIT mutations (deletions in exon 11 in three tumours and an insertion in exon 9 in one tumour) and one showed a somatic PDGFRalpha mutation (point mutation in exon 18); in each of the five cases, both epithelioid and spindle components showed identical mutations. The presence of the same receptor tyrosine kinase mutation in both components of a mixed cell-type GIST suggests that both components should be equally responsive to imatinib treatment, and that such mutation is an early key event in the pathogenesis of these neoplasms.

  1. Targeting Human Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour Cells with a Quadruplex-binding Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Gunaratnam, Mekala; Beltran, Monica; Galesa, Katja; Haider, Shozeb M.; Reszka, Anthony P.; Cuenca, Francisco; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Neidle, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The majority of human gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are driven by activating mutations in the proto-oncogene KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Clinical treatment with imatinib targets the kinase domain of KIT, but tumour regrowth occurs as a result of the development of resistant mutations in the kinase active site. An alternative small-molecule approach to GIST therapy is described, in which the KIT gene is directly targeted, and thus kinase resistance may be circumvented. A naphthalene dimiide derivative has been used to demonstrate the concept of dual quadruplex targeting. This compound strongly stabilises both telomeric quadruplex DNA and quadruplex sites in the KIT promoter in vitro. It is shown here that the compound is a potent inducer of growth arrest in a patient-derived GIST cell line at a concentration (ca 1μM) that also results in effective inhibition of telomerase activity and almost complete suppression of KIT mRNA and KIT protein expression. Molecular modelling studies with a telomeric quadruplex have been used to rationalise aspects of the experimental quadruplex melting data. PMID:19469547

  2. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors as an incidental finding in patients with a presumptive diagnosis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Mario; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Echeverri, Carolina; Álvarez, Luis Guillermo; Palomino, Maria Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical presentation and oncologic outcomes of a series of patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass and were diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Methods Data were obtained on all patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass between September 2007 and June 2010 and who were ultimately diagnosed with a GIST. The patients' medical records were reviewed. A literature review was also conducted. Results Six patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria. All six patients had a tumor in the intestinal tract arising from the small bowel. The mean tumor size was 12 cm (range, 6 to 22 cm). A complete resection was achieved in five of the six patients. There were no intraoperative complications; one patient had a postoperative complication. Two patients were treated with imatinib after surgery. The mean follow-up time was 32 months (range, 0.3 to 40 months). At the last follow-up, five of the six patients were without any evidence of disease. One patient died of an unrelated hepatic encephalopathy. The incidence in our institution is 3%. Conclusion GISTs are uncommon; however, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with an abdominal or pelvic mass. PMID:22355467

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors as an incidental finding in patients with a presumptive diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Mario; Ramirez, Pedro T; Echeverri, Carolina; Alvarez, Luis Guillermo; Palomino, Maria Alejandra; Pareja, Luis René

    2012-01-01

    To report the clinical presentation and oncologic outcomes of a series of patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass and were diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Data were obtained on all patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass between September 2007 and June 2010 and who were ultimately diagnosed with a GIST. The patients' medical records were reviewed. A literature review was also conducted. Six patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria. All six patients had a tumor in the intestinal tract arising from the small bowel. The mean tumor size was 12 cm (range, 6 to 22 cm). A complete resection was achieved in five of the six patients. There were no intraoperative complications; one patient had a postoperative complication. Two patients were treated with imatinib after surgery. The mean follow-up time was 32 months (range, 0.3 to 40 months). At the last follow-up, five of the six patients were without any evidence of disease. One patient died of an unrelated hepatic encephalopathy. The incidence in our institution is 3%. GISTs are uncommon; however, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with an abdominal or pelvic mass.

  4. Beyond Standard Therapy: Drugs Under Investigation for The Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Alturkmani, Hani J; Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Godwin, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common non-epithelial malignancy of the GI tract. With the discovery of KIT and later PDGFRA gain-of-function mutations as factors in the pathogenesis of the disease, GIST was the quintessential model for targeted therapy. Despite the successful clinical use of imatinib mesylate, a selective receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor that targets KIT, PDGFRA and BCR-ABL, we still do not have treatment for the long-term control of advanced GIST. Areas covered This review summarizes the drugs that are under investigation or have been assessed in trials for GIST treatment. The article focuses on their mechanisms of actions, the preclinical evidence of efficacy, and the clinical trials concerning safety and efficacy in humans. Expert opinion It is known that KIT and PDGFRA mutations in GIST patients influence the response to treatment. This observation should be taken into consideration when investigating new drugs. RECIST was developed to help uniformly report efficacy trials in oncology. Despite the usefulness of this system, many questions are being addressed about its validity in evaluating the true efficacy of drugs knowing that new targeted therapies do not affect the tumor size as much as they halt progression and prolong survival. PMID:26098203

  5. Primary omental gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) presenting with a large abdominal mass and spontaneous haemoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Seow-En, Isaac; Seow-Choen, Francis; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon; Leow, Wei Qiang

    2014-11-03

    A 60-year-old Indonesian woman presented with a 9-day history of increasing abdominal distension, pain and tiredness. Physical examination revealed significant pallor with a palpable mass in the abdomen. CT of the abdomen reported a 22 cm complex mass in the peritoneal cavity with free intra-abdominal fluid. Laboratory results showed anaemia with a raised serum CA 125 level. At laparotomy a large haemorrhagic tumour with blood filled cystic cavities was found attached to both greater omentum and the transverse mesocolon with 2.2 L of blood in the peritoneal cavity. There was no invasion of any part of the stomach or intestines and there were no metastases seen. Histopathology of the resected specimen was consistent with that of a gastrointestinal stromal tumour arising from the omentum. Immunohistochemical studies revealed the tumour to be strongly positive for discovered on GIST-1 (DOG1) but negative for both CD117 and CD34. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) exon 18 mutation D842V was detected.

  6. Duration of adjuvant treatment following radical resection of metastases from gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    NANNINI, MARGHERITA; PANTALEO, MARIA ABBONDANZA; MALEDDU, ALESSANDRA; SAPONARA, MARISTELLA; MANDRIOLI, ANNA; LOLLI, CRISTIAN; PALLOTTI, MARIA CATERINA; GATTO, LIDIA; SANTINI, DONATELLA; PATERINI, PAOLA; DI SCIOSCIO, VALERIO; CATENA, FAUSTO; FUSAROLI, PIETRO; PINNA, ANTONIO DANIELE; DEI TOS, ANGELO PAOLO; BIASCO, GUIDO

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale studies have demonstrated that continuative treatment in advanced and adjuvant settings results in a gain-of-survival. However, the discontinuation, and the duration of treatment in disease-free patients who have undergone radical surgical resection of metastases from gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) have yet to be evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed 40 patients with advanced and recurrent GIST, included in our GIST database, focusing on patients (5 males and 2 females; median age 56 years) who continued medical treatment following radical surgical resection of metastatic lesions. Seven out of 40 patients underwent surgery and continued medical treatment following radical surgical resection of metastatic lesions. The duration of adjuvant therapy was 3, 12, 16, 24, 35, 37 and 52 months, respectively, with a median of 26 months. No patients discontinued therapy and all were disease-free at the final CT-scan evaluation. Considering that the discontinuation of imatinib in responding patients with advanced GIST (even in complete remission) results in a rapid high risk of progression, and a short adjuvant therapy results in a shorter disease-free and overall survival in high-risk GIST patients, it is also likely that treatment should not be discontinued in this setting. However, large-scale studies are required to better assess the optimal duration of treatment, particularly after 5 years, by focusing on the identification of predictive factors for the selection of patients who may benefit from a prolonged or lifelong imatinib treatment. PMID:22740975

  7. Succinate dehydrogenase mutation underlies global epigenomic divergence in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Killian, J Keith; Kim, Su Young; Miettinen, Markku; Smith, Carly; Merino, Maria; Tsokos, Maria; Quezado, Martha; Smith, William I; Jahromi, Mona S; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Walker, Robert L; Lasota, Jerzy; Raffeld, Mark; Klotzle, Brandy; Wang, Zengfeng; Jones, Laura; Zhu, Yuelin; Wang, Yonghong; Waterfall, Joshua J; O'Sullivan, Maureen J; Bibikova, Marina; Pacak, Karel; Stratakis, Constantine; Janeway, Katherine A; Schiffman, Joshua D; Fan, Jian-Bing; Helman, Lee; Meltzer, Paul S

    2013-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) harbor driver mutations of signal transduction kinases such as KIT, or, alternatively, manifest loss-of-function defects in the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex, a component of the Krebs cycle and electron transport chain. We have uncovered a striking divergence between the DNA methylation profiles of SDH-deficient GIST (n = 24) versus KIT tyrosine kinase pathway-mutated GIST (n = 39). Infinium 450K methylation array analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues disclosed an order of magnitude greater genomic hypermethylation relative to SDH-deficient GIST versus the KIT-mutant group (84.9 K vs. 8.4 K targets). Epigenomic divergence was further found among SDH-mutant paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma (n = 29), a developmentally distinct SDH-deficient tumor system. Comparison of SDH-mutant GIST with isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutant glioma, another Krebs cycle-defective tumor type, revealed comparable measures of global hypo- and hypermethylation. These data expose a vital connection between succinate metabolism and genomic DNA methylation during tumorigenesis, and generally implicate the mitochondrial Krebs cycle in nuclear epigenomic maintenance.

  8. Mutational analysis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs): procedural approach for diagnostic purposes.

    PubMed

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Ludovici, Giorgia; Leone, Barbara; Covello, Renato; Conti, Salvatore; Costarelli, Leopoldo; Della-Morte, David; Ferroni, Patrizia; Roselli, Mario; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors in the digestive tract characterized, in the majority of cases, by activating mutations in the KIT (v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) or PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide) genes. Mutations affecting these tyrosine kinase receptors are also responsible for the mechanisms of primary and secondary drug resistance during the treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We performed mutational analysis to evaluate the pharmacotherapy susceptibility of GISTs, adopting a comprehensive procedural approach, in order to optimize the identification of mutations that may result in cellular resistance to conventional therapy. DNA from paraffin-embedded tumor sections from 40 GISTs were analyzed using microdissection, direct sequencing analysis and allelic separation by cloning. KIT mutations were found in 55.0% of the tumor samples. PDGFRA mutations were present in 5.0% of cases. Allelic cloning assay allowed for better definition of the extent of the mutations and clarification of the exact nucleotidic position of complex mutations. Our experience suggests that sequential microdissection, direct sequencing and allelic separation by PCR cloning of large variants may improve the approach to mutational analysis and interpretation of sequence data of KIT and PDGFRA in patients with GIST.

  9. Drug Repurposing Identifies a Synergistic Combination Therapy with Imatinib Mesylate for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Pessetto, Ziyan Y.; Ma, Yan; Hirst, Jeff J.; von Mehren, Margaret; Weir, Scott J.; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) is a rare and therefore often neglected disease. Introduction of the kinase inhibitor, imatinib mesylate (IM) radically improved the clinical response of patients with GIST; however, its effects are often short-lived, with GISTs demonstrating a median time to progression of approximately two years. Although many investigational drugs, approved first for other cancers, have been subsequently evaluated for the management of GIST, few have greatly impacted the overall survival of patients with advanced disease. We employed a novel, focused, drug repurposing effort for GIST including IM-resistant GIST evaluating a large library of FDA-approved drugs regardless of current indication. As a result of the drug repurposing screen, we identified eight FDA-approved drugs including fludarabine phosphate (F-AMP) that showed synergy with and/or overcame resistance to IM. F-AMP induces DNA damage, annexin V and caspase 3/7 activities as the cytotoxic effects on GIST cells, including IM-resistant GIST cells. F-AMP and IM combination treatment showed greater inhibition of GIST cell proliferation when compared to IM alone and F-AMP alone. Successful in vivo experiments confirmed the combination of IM with F-AMP enhanced the antitumor effects compared to IM alone. Our results identified F-AMP as a promising, repurposed drug therapy for the treatment of GISTs, with potential to be administered in combination with IM or for treatment of IM-refractory tumors. PMID:25122069

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs): SEAP-SEOM consensus on pathologic and molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Martin-Broto, J; Martinez-Marín, V; Serrano, C; Hindi, N; López-Guerrero, J A; Ramos-Asensio, R; Vallejo-Benítez, A; Marcilla-Plaza, D; González-Cámpora, R

    2016-12-09

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract, with an incidence of 1.1 cases/100,000 inhabitants/year. A group of experts from the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Oncology met to discuss a brief update on GISTs and agree on aspects relating to the pathological and molecular diagnosis of these tumors. GISTs are generally solitary, well-circumscribed lesions of variable size (<10 mm-35 cm) that may present with intra- or extra-luminal parietal growth or a mixed-type (hourglass) growth pattern. Histologically, they are unencapsulated neoplasms displaying expansive growth and spindle-shaped (70%), epithelioid (20%), or mixed cellularity (10%). Mitotic activity is generally moderate or low and should be evaluated only in areas with high cellularity or higher mitotic frequency. The great majority of GISTs harbour mutually exclusive activating mutations in genes coding for the type III receptor tyrosine kinases KIT and PDGFRA; less commonly, GISTs have also been reported to display mutations elsewhere, including BRAF and NF1 and SDH-complex genes. The method most widely used to detect KIT and PDGFRA mutations is amplification of the exons involved by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing (Sanger method) of these amplification products. Molecular analyses should always specify the type of analysis performed, the region or mutations evaluated, and the sensitivity of the detection method employed.

  11. ZNF-Mediated Resistance to Imatinib Mesylate in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; von Mehren, Margaret; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Although imatinib mesylate (IM) has transformed the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), many patients experience primary/secondary drug resistance. In a previous study, we identified a gene signature, consisting mainly of Kruppel-associated box (KRAB) domain containing zinc finger (ZNF) transcriptional repressors that predict short-term response to IM. To determine if these genes have functional significance, a siRNA library targeting these genes was constructed and applied to GIST cells in vitro. These screens identified seventeen “IM sensitizing genes” in GIST cells (sensitization index (SI) <0.85 ratio of drug/vehicle) with a false discovery rate (FDR) <15%, including twelve ZNF genes, the majority of which are located within the HSA19p12–13.1 locus. These genes were shown to be highly specific to IM and another tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), sunitinib, in GIST cells. In order to determine mechanistically how these ZNFs might be modulating response to IM, RNAi approaches were used to individually silence genes within the predictive signature in GIST cells and expression profiling was performed. Knockdown of the 14 IM-sensitizing genes (10 ZNFs) universally led to downregulation of six genes, including TGFb3, periostin, and NEDD9. These studies implicate a role of KRAB-ZNFs in modulating response to TKIs in GIST. PMID:23372733

  12. Low frequency of TERT promoter mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs).

    PubMed

    Campanella, Nathália C; Celestino, Ricardo; Pestana, Ana; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; de Oliveira, Antonio Talvane; Brito, Maria José; Gouveia, António; Lopes, José Manuel; Guimarães, Denise Peixoto; Soares, Paula; Reis, Rui M

    2015-06-01

    Somatic mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, mainly at positions c.-124 and c.-146 bp, are frequent in several human cancers; yet its presence in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) has not been reported to date. Herein, we searched for the presence and clinicopathological association of TERT promoter mutations in genomic DNA from 130 bona fide GISTs. We found TERT promoter mutations in 3.8% (5/130) of GISTs. The c.-124C>T mutation was the most common event, present in 2.3% (3/130), and the c.-146C>T mutation in 1.5% (2/130) of GISTs. No significant association was observed between TERT promoter mutation and patient's clinicopathological features. The present study establishes the low frequency (4%) of TERT promoter mutations in GISTs. Further studies are required to confirm our findings and to elucidate the hypothetical biological and clinical impact of TERT promoter mutation in GIST pathogenesis.

  13. Hepatitis B viral reactivation secondary to imatinib treatment in a patient with gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Walker, Evan J; Simko, Jeffry P; Ko, Andrew H

    2014-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation is a known risk in cancer patients receiving cytotoxic or immunosuppressive therapy; however, the risk associated with newer molecularly-targeted agents has not been well-quantified. Imatinib, a small molecule inhibitor directed against BCR-ABL, CKIT, and other tyrosine kinases, has been associated with HBV reactivation primarily in patients treated for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Herein we present the first reported case of a patient who developed HBV reactivation while receiving imatinib therapy for a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the adjuvant setting. This eventually resulted in fulminant liver failure and was effectively treated with living-related donor liver transplant and anti-viral medication. Currently, no guidelines exist for HBV screening prior to imatinib therapy. This report emphasizes the need for such guidelines and supports the idea that viral reactivation is a risk in all imatinib-treated patients, regardless of the underlying disease. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. A Case of a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Diagnosed at the Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Canda, Aras Emre; Karadeniz, Emre; Yavuzsen, Tugba; Sagol, Ozgul; Obuz, Funda; Canda, Mehmet Serefettin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We discuss a rare gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) case detected at the 10th postpartum week and we want to pay attention to the challenges and improvements in the diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, and follow-up of this rare tumor accompanied with the review of the current literature. Case Presentation. A 32-year-old multiparous woman presented with abdominal swelling 10 weeks after her second vaginal birth. Abdominal examination revealed a mass starting from the pelvic level and extending to the right upper quadrant. Radiological examinations showed a solid, multiloculated, and hypervascular mass starting from the pelvis and extending to the transverse colon. En bloc mass with a 20 cm jejunal segment resection and a left pelvic side wall peritonectomy with omentectomy was performed. The pathologic examination revealed a high-risk GIST which originated from the jejunum and disseminated to the peritoneum. The patient has been given imatinib 400 mg/day since then. She did not reveal any progression during the 15-month follow-up postoperatively. Conclusion. GIST tumors are rare and there is not sufficient information in the literature regarding its management. In this patient having high risk GIST and GIST sarcomatosis we successfully treated the patient by surgery and adjuvant imatinib chemotherapy. PMID:27957364

  15. Integrative Genomic Characterization and a Genomic Staging System for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ylipää, Antti; Hunt, Kelly K.; Yang, Jilong; Lazar, Alexander J. F.; Torres, Keila E.; Lev, Dina Chelouche; Nykter, Matti; Pollock, Raphael E.; Trent, Jonathan; Zhang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) were historically grouped with leiomyosarcomas (LMSs) based on their morphological similarities, but recently they have been unequivocally established as a distinct type of sarcoma based on the molecular features and response to imatinib treatment. To gain further insight into the genomic differences between GISTs and LMSs, we mapped gene copy number aberrations (CNAs) in 42 GISTs and 30 LMSs and integrated them with gene expression profiles. Our studies revealed distinct patterns of CNAs between GISTs and LMSs. Losses in chromosomes 1p, 14q, 15q, and 22q were significantly more frequent in GISTs than in LMSs (P < 0.001), whereas losses in chromosomes 10 and 16 as well as gains in 1q, 14q, and 15q (P < 0.001) were more common in LMSs. By integrating CNAs with gene expression data and clinical information, we found several clinically relevant CNAs that were prognostic of survival in patients with GIST. Furthermore, GISTs were categorized into four groups according to an accumulating pattern of genetic alterations. Many key cellular pathways were differently expressed in the four groups and the patients had increasingly worse prognosis as the extent of genomic alterations increased. These findings lead us to propose a new tumor-progression genetic staging system termed Genomic Instability Stage (GIS) to complement the current prognostic predictive system based on tumor size, mitotic index (MI), and KIT mutation. PMID:20818650

  16. The roles of serum CXCL16 in circulating Tregs and gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common sarcomas of the digestive system. Abnormal expression of CXCL16 and its sole receptor, CXCR6, has been demonstrated in many cancers. However, no studies have shown the relationship between CXCL16 or CXCR6 expression and GIST. In this study, we detected CXCL16 and CXCR6 expression in GIST patient samples by using immunohistochemistry analysis and Western blot analysis. Serum CXCL16 level was determined by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Circulating Tregs were isolated by using flow cytometry. MTT assay, cell cycle assay, and transwell assay were used to test the effects of recombinant CXCL16 on Tregs and GIST cells in vitro. The levels of CXCL16 and CXCR6 protein were higher in cancer tissues than in normal tissues. Serum CXCL16 level and circulating Tregs were higher in GIST patients than that in the healthy volunteers. CXCL16, CXCR6, serum CXCL16, and circulating Tregs were significantly associated with a decreased survival time of patients. Relative to control cells, high concentration recombinant CXCL16 treated Tregs and GIST cells exhibited lower proliferation and mobility rates as assessed by MTT assay and transwell assay, respectively. Taken together, CXCL16 was observed to mediate the inhibitory effects in Tregs and GIST cells, and these involved suppression of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27418838

  17. The DREAM complex in anti-tumor activity of imatinib mesylate in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs)

    PubMed Central

    DeCaprio, James A.; Duensing, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Although most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) respond well to treatment with the small molecule kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (Gleevec), the majority of patients achieve disease stabilization and complete remissions are rare. Furthermore, discontinuation of treatment in the presence of residual tumor mass almost inevitably leads to tumor progression. These observations suggest that a subset of tumor cells not only persists under imatinib treatment, but remains viable. The current article reviews the molecular basis for these findings and explores strategies to exploit them therapeutically. Recent findings Although imatinib can induce apoptosis in a subset of GIST cells, it can induce a reversible exit from the cell division cycle and entry into G0, a cell cycle state called quiescence, in the remaining cells. Mechanistically, this process involves the DREAM complex, a newly identified key regulator of quiescence. Interfering with DREAM complex formation either by siRNA-mediated knockdown or by pharmacological inhibition of the regulatory kinase DYRK1A was shown to enhance imatinib-induced GIST cell death. Summary Targeting the DREAM complex and imatinib-induced quiescence could provide opportunities for future therapeutic interventions toward more efficient imatinib responses. PMID:24840522

  18. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the ileum pre-operatively diagnosed as an abdominal abscess

    PubMed Central

    Rubini, Patrizia; Tartamella, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The present case report described the acute presentation, diagnosis and management of a primary gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) of the ileum. A male patient (age, 51 years) was admitted to Maggiore Hospital (Parma, Italy) due to presenting with fever, dysuria and lower abdominal pain. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a 7,5×5,5-cm pelvic mass containing air and purulent fluid indicative of an intraperitoneal abscess. The patient was subjected to diagnostic laparoscopy, which revealed a huge, soft cystic mass arising from the small bowel. The procedure was then converted to an open exploration through a midline incision. Ileal resection including a Meckel's diverticulum was performed. Macroscopic examination revealed that the cystic mass was filled with a large amount of pus, probably due to communication between the tumour mass and the small bowel lumen. In fact, the surgical specimen showed enteric leakage from the ileal mucosal ulcer into the tumour mass. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the abscess wall identified a spindle-cell mesenchymal-type, c-KIT-positive neoplasm. The post-operative course was uneventful and adjuvant imatinib mesylate was administered for 1 year. Follow-up by computed tomography demonstrated no tumour recurrence at 72 months after surgery. PMID:27900093

  19. Kinase genotype analysis of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor cytology samples using targeted next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Ferga C; Kipp, Benjamin R; Kerr, Sarah E; Voss, Jesse S; Graham, Rondell P; Campion, Michael B; Minot, Douglas M; Tu, Zheng J; Klee, Eric W; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Henry, Michael R; Levy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) usually contain the mast/stem cell growth factor receptor Kit gene (KIT) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) mutations that can be targeted by, or mediate resistance to, imatinib. Diagnostic material often is obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, which often is unsuitable for molecular analysis. We investigated whether targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) can be used in multiplex genotype analysis of cytology samples collected by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration. We used the Ion AmpliSeq V2 Cancer Hotspot NGS Panel (Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA) to identify mutations in more than 2800 exons from 50 cancer-associated genes in GIST samples from 20 patients. We identified KIT mutations in 58% of samples (91% in exon 11 and 9% in exon 17) and PDGFRA mutations in 26% (60% in exon 18 and 40% in exon 12); 16% of samples had no mutations in KIT or PDGFRA. No pathogenic alterations were found in PIK3CA, BRAF, KRAS, NRAS, or FGFR3. We predicted that 32% of patients would have primary resistance to imatinib, based on mutations in exon 17 of KIT, exon 18 of PDGFRA (D842V), or no mutation in either gene. Targeted NGS of cytology samples from GISTs is feasible and provides clinically relevant data about kinase genotypes that can help guide individualized therapy.

  20. GLP-2 receptors in human disease: high expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumors and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Körner, Meike; Rehmann, Ruth; Reubi, Jean Claude

    2012-11-25

    Peptide hormones of the glucagon-like peptide (GLP) family play an increasing clinical role, as reported for GLP-1 in diabetes therapy and insulinoma diagnostics. GLP-2, despite its known trophic and anti-inflammatory intestinal actions translated into preliminary clinical studies using the GLP-2 analogue teduglutide for treatment of short bowel syndrome and Crohn's disease, remains poorly characterized in terms of expression of its receptor in tissues of interest. Therefore, the GLP-2 receptor expression was assessed in 237 tumor and 148 non-neoplastic tissue samples with in vitro receptor autoradiography. A GLP-2 receptor expression was present in 68% of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Furthermore, GLP-2 receptors were identified in the intestinal myenteric plexus, with significant up-regulation in active Crohn's disease. The GLP-2 receptors in GIST may be used for clinical applications like in vivo targeting with radiolabelled GLP-2 analogues for imaging and therapy. Moreover, the over-expressed GLP-2 receptor in the myenteric plexus may represent the morphological correlate of the clinical target of teduglutide in Crohn's disease.

  1. Adherence to imatinib therapy in gastrointestinal stromal tumors and chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Al-Barrak, Jasem; Cheung, Winson Y

    2013-08-01

    The number of anticancer drugs available in oral formulation has risen sharply in the past few years and this is expected to continue to increase over the next several decades. For patients, the convenience of self-administration constitutes a major benefit associated with oral therapy. For clinicians, however, the transition from parenteral to oral therapy has resulted in concerns about adherence to therapy, its monitoring, and its effects on clinical outcomes. Several studies have demonstrated that imatinib is effective at improving overall survival and/or recurrence-free survival in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors and chronic myeloid leukemia (primary and metastatic disease). Despite the survival benefit and the favorable toxicity profile of imatinib, however, adherence to imatinib remains poor. Herein, we review the evidence showing the effects of nonadherence on patient outcomes as well as data indicating that adherence to imatinib (and oral anticancer therapy in general) is suboptimal. We also highlight factors that may contribute to nonadherence and suggest key steps that can be implemented by the multidisciplinary medical team to overcome the daily challenges of adherence. Improving adherence to imatinib depends on open communication and comprehensive patient education. All of this is essential to maximize benefits from therapy and improve clinical outcomes for our patients.

  2. KIT and PDGFRA mutations and PDGFRA immunostaining in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Antonella; Fornari, Alessandro; Bonello, Lisa; Tondat, Fabrizio; Chiusa, Luigi; Lista, Patrizia; Pich, Achille

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the association of PDGFRA and KIT mutations as well as PDGFRA immunohistochemical expression with clinicopathologic features and prognosis in a series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Tumor DNA from 40 GISTs was sequenced for the presence of mutations in KIT exons 9, 11, 13 and 17, and in PDGFRA exons 12 and 18. Tissue sections were stained with polyclonal anti-PDGFRA antibody. KIT mutations occurred in 26 cases. There were 13 deletions, 6 substitutions, 3 deletion-substitutions, 3 duplications and 1 insertion. Tumors with KIT deletions/insertion were large with a high mitotic index (MI), and were associated with a high rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs, distant metastasis, relapse and a short disease-free survival (DFS). PDGFRA mutations occurred in 6 gastric GISTs. There were 4 deletions and 2 substitutions. Tumors with PDGFRA mutations were small, with a low MI and Ki67 score, and were associated with a very low rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs and distant metastasis. PDGFRA immunopositivity was found in 23 cases: a peculiar 'dotlike' staining was found in 5 out of 6 PDGFRA mutated cases. Patients with positive PDGFRA immunostaining had a longer DFS than those with negative staining. Our data confirm that the type of KIT mutation is associated with various clinicopathologic features of GISTs, and indicate that PDGFRA mutations are associated with rather indolent tumors. PDGFRA immunopositivity reflects PDGFRA mutational status and is associated with a favorable outcome.

  3. Oncogenic Kit signaling and therapeutic intervention in a mouse model of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ferdinand; Ehlers, Imke; Agosti, Valter; Socci, Nicholas D.; Viale, Agnes; Sommer, Gunhild; Yozgat, Yasemin; Manova, Katia; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Besmer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Kit receptor-activating mutations are critical in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). We investigated mechanisms of oncogenic Kit signaling and the consequences of therapeutic intervention in a mouse model of human GIST. Treatment of GIST mice with imatinib decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in the tumor. Analysis of tumor tissue from imatinib-treated mice showed diminished phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling suggesting that oncogenic Kit signaling critically contributes to the translational response in GIST. Treatment with RAD001 (everolimus), an mTOR inhibitor, diminished the translational response and cell proliferation in tumor lesions, pointing to mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic approach for imatinib-resistant GIST. Analysis of RNA expression profiles in GIST lesions with and without imatinib treatment showed changes in expression of IFN-inducible genes and cell cycle regulators. These results convincingly show that KitV558Δ/+ mice represent a unique faithful mouse model of human familial GIST, and they demonstrate the utility of these mice for preclinical investigations and to elucidate oncogenic signaling mechanisms by using genetic approaches and targeted pharmacological intervention. PMID:16908864

  4. A meta-analysis of prognostic value of KIT mutation status in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jian; Li, Zhi; Liu, Yingjun; Wang, Daohai; Han, Guangsen

    2016-01-01

    Numerous types of KIT mutations have been reported in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs); however, controversy still exists regarding their clinicopathological significance. In this study, we reviewed the publicly available literature to assess the data by a meta-analysis to characterize KIT mutations and different types of KIT mutations in prognostic prediction in patients with GISTs. Twenty-eight studies that included 4,449 patients were identified and analyzed. We found that KIT mutation status was closely correlated with size of tumors and different mitosis indexes, but not with tumor location. KIT mutation was also observed to be significantly correlated with tumor recurrence, metastasis, as well as the overall survival of patients. Interestingly, there was higher risk of progression in KIT exon 9-mutated patients than in exon 11-mutated patients. Five-year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate was significantly higher in KIT exon 11-deleted patients than in those with other types of KIT exon 11 mutations. In addition, RFS for 5 years was significantly worse in patients bearing KIT codon 557–558 deletions than in those bearing other KIT exon 11 deletions. Our results strongly support the hypothesis that KIT mutation status is another evaluable factor for prognosis prediction in GISTs. PMID:27350754

  5. [Current research status and progress of primary esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumors in China].

    PubMed

    Li, Guoren; Dai, Jianhua

    2017-09-25

    Primary esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) is a rare independent disease with clinicopathological and molecular features different from other mesenchymal tumors. Authors searched and reviewed associated reports and summarized the morbidity trends, characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of esophageal GIST in China. Data show that the incidence and detection rate of esophageal GIST presents the rising trend. Imaging has some characteristics. Ultrasonography and CT are main methods and effective examinations to detect and prompt diagnosis of esophageal GIST. Pathology and immunohistochemistry are the evidence for a definite diagnosis. Risk classification is the important basis for selecting surgical methods and predicting prognosis. Surgery is the mainstay treatment. Very low and low risk patients with tumors less than 3 cm can choose endoscopic resection. For tumors of 3 to 5 cm, tumor resection must be considered. Thoracoscopy appears to be the first choice for surgery. Medium and high risk patients with tumors >5 cm should be treated with partial resection of esophagus. Surgery combined with targeted therapy and neoadjuvant therapy is the main treatment pattern and research direction.

  6. Synchronous occurrence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors and other digestive tract malignancies in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuan; Chen, Jiaju; Han, Luyin; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhixin; Chen, Jiaping

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Elderly patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) synchronous with other digestive tract malignancies have been rarely reported. In this study, clinicopathological characteristics were evaluated among elderly patients with GISTs with or without coexisting digestive tract malignancies. Methods A total of 161 patients (≥65 years) were retrospectively reviewed at the West China Hospital, Sichuan University from January 2009 to June 2014. Results Sixty-one patients were diagnosed with synchronous digestive tract malignancies (synchronous group), whereas 100 patients were diagnosed with no synchronous condition (no-synchronous group). The synchronous group exhibited a higher percentage of males (70.49% vs. 53.00%, P = 0.028) and poorer Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status than the no-synchronous group (P = 0.029). The three-year overall survival (OS) rate was significantly lower among patients with synchronous digestive tract malignancies than that among patients without synchronous condition (64.5% vs. 84.0%, P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of synchronous digestive tract malignancies (P = 0.002), co-morbidity (P = 0.004), and mitotic count ≥10 mitoses/50 high power fields (P = 0.012) were associated with poor OS. Conclusions A synchronous condition with other digestive tract malignancies is common in elderly patients with GISTs. OS primarily depends on synchronous digestive tract malignancies, mitotic count, and co-morbidity. PMID:25826075

  7. Clinico-pathological characteristics and prognostic factors of gastrointestinal stromal tumors among a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiehua; Zhang, Haitian; Chen, Zhibai; Su, Ka

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common primary mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. GISTs include a group of heterogeneous tumors with different morphology, biologic behavior, and genetic characteristics, so their epidemiology, clinico-pathological features and prognosis is distinct in different countries. The objective of this study is to analyze clinico-pathological characteristics and prognostic factors of GISTs among Chinese population. We investigated 112 GIST patients were diagnosed between July 2008 and January 2013 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University. Histologic evaluation and immunohistochemistry analysis was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue from the 112 GISTs. Overall survival analysis was carried out using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed according to Cox’s proportional hazards model. Three and 5-year OS rates were 71.4 and 58.6% respectively. Univariate analysis showed that the following factors were significant in predicting OS: tumor site, tumor size, metastasis, resection margin status, cell type, invasion of adjacent organ, invasion of smooth muscle, mitotic rate, P53 and adjuvant therapy with imatinib (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size, metastasis, resection margin status, mitotic rate, P53 and adjuvant therapy with imatinib were independent prognostic factors associated with OS. This may aid in the prediction of clinical evolution and guide treatments in patients with GIST in China. PMID:26884871

  8. A meta-analysis of prognostic value of KIT mutation status in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jian; Li, Zhi; Liu, Yingjun; Wang, Daohai; Han, Guangsen

    2016-01-01

    Numerous types of KIT mutations have been reported in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs); however, controversy still exists regarding their clinicopathological significance. In this study, we reviewed the publicly available literature to assess the data by a meta-analysis to characterize KIT mutations and different types of KIT mutations in prognostic prediction in patients with GISTs. Twenty-eight studies that included 4,449 patients were identified and analyzed. We found that KIT mutation status was closely correlated with size of tumors and different mitosis indexes, but not with tumor location. KIT mutation was also observed to be significantly correlated with tumor recurrence, metastasis, as well as the overall survival of patients. Interestingly, there was higher risk of progression in KIT exon 9-mutated patients than in exon 11-mutated patients. Five-year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate was significantly higher in KIT exon 11-deleted patients than in those with other types of KIT exon 11 mutations. In addition, RFS for 5 years was significantly worse in patients bearing KIT codon 557-558 deletions than in those bearing other KIT exon 11 deletions. Our results strongly support the hypothesis that KIT mutation status is another evaluable factor for prognosis prediction in GISTs.

  9. Pharmacogenetics of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in gastrointestinal stromal tumor and chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ravegnini, Gloria; Sammarini, Giulia; Angelini, Sabrina; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are two tumor types deeply different from each other. Despite the differences, these disorders share treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. Despite the success of imatinib, the response rates vary among different individuals and pharmacogenetics may play an important role in the final clinical outcome. In this review, the authors provide an overview of the pharmacogenetic literature analyzing the role of polymorphisms in both GIST and CML treatment efficacy and toxicity. So far, several polymorphisms influencing the pharmacokinetic determinants of imatinib have been identified. However, the data are not yet conclusive enough to translate pharmacogenetic tests in clinical practice. In this context, the major obstacles to pharmacogenetic test validation are represented by the small sample size of most studies, ethnicity and population admixture as confounding source, and uncertainty related to genetic variants analyzed. In conclusion, a combination of different theoretical approaches, experimental model systems and statistical methods is clearly needed, in order to appreciate pharmacogenetics applied to clinical practice in the near future.

  10. Safety of Regular-Dose Imatinib Therapy in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Undergoing Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Ryota; Serizawa, Takako; Yamada, Atsuo; Yoshida, Shuntaro; Tanaka, Mariko; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The number of cancer patients undergoing dialysis has been increasing, and the number of these patients on chemotherapy is also increasing. Imatinib is an effective and safe therapy for KIT-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), but the efficacy and safety of imatinib in dialysis patients remain unclear. Because clinical trials have not been conducted in this population, more investigations are required. We report on a 75-year-old Japanese man undergoing dialysis who presented with massive tarry stool from a duodenal GIST. The duodenal GIST was 14 cm in diameter with multiple liver and bone metastases. The patient underwent an urgent pancreaticoduodenectomy to achieve hemostasis. After surgery, he was administered imatinib 400 mg/day. No severe adverse event including myelosuppression, congestive heart failure, liver functional impairment, intestinal pneumonia, or Steven-Johnson syndrome occurred, and the liver metastasis remained stable for 4 months. During chemotherapy, hemodialysis continued three times per week without adverse events. We suggest that regular-dose imatinib is an effective and safe treatment in patients with GIST undergoing dialysis. In addition, we present a literature review of the effectiveness and safety of imatinib treatment in dialysis patients.

  11. NCCN Task Force Report: Update on the Management of Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Demetri, George D.; von Mehren, Margaret; Antonescu, Cristina R.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Ganjoo, Kristen N.; Maki, Robert G.; Pisters, Peter W.T.; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Riedel, Richard F.; Schuetze, Scott; Sundar, Hema M.; Trent, Jonathan C.; Wayne, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The standard of care for managing patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) rapidly changed after the introduction of effective molecularly targeted therapies involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib mesylate and sunitinib malate. A better understanding of the molecular characteristics of GISTs have improved the diagnostic accuracy and led to the discovery of novel immunomarkers and new mechanisms of resistance to TKI therapy, which in turn have resulted in the development of novel treatment strategies. To address these issues, the NCCN organized a task force consisting of a multidisciplinary panel of experts in the fields of medical oncology, surgical oncology, molecular diagnostics, and pathology to discuss the recent advances, identify areas of future research, and recommend an optimal approach to care for patients with GIST at all stages of disease. The task force met for the first time in October 2003 and again in December 2006 and October 2009. This supplement describes the recent developments in the field of GIST as discussed at the October 2009 meeting. PMID:20457867

  12. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors presenting as omental masses--a clinicopathologic analysis of 95 cases.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Markku; Sobin, Leslie H; Lasota, Jerzy

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), generally KIT-positive and KIT/PDGFRA mutation-driven mesenchymal neoplasms, most commonly originate from the stomach or small intestine, but in rare examples they involve the omentum. In this study, we analyzed 95 GISTs surgically designated as the omental masses. These tumors occurred in 49 males and 46 females with a median age of 60 years (range: 27 to 88 y). They formed single (n=51) or multiple masses (n=39); 5 cases were equivocal in this respect. Of the single tumors, 21 had no evidence of gastrointestinal tract involvement, 25 were attached to stomach, and 3 were attached to small intestine. Clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis of the 2 former groups were similar. Single tumor cases showed a median mitotic count of 2/50 HPFs and median tumor size was 14 cm. Their histologic features were similar to gastric GISTs in 22 cases, and to small intestinal GISTs in 6 cases. These tumors were KIT positive 38/41, CD34 positive 20/33, 8 had PDGFRA mutations, and 6 had KIT exon 11 mutations. The median survival was 129 months (range: 0 to 397 mo) and 14 patients were alive at the end of follow-up. Multiple tumor cases showed median mitotic count of 14/50 HPFs and the main tumor median size was 16 cm. The histologic features were similar to small intestinal GISTs in 21 cases and to gastric GISTs in 7 cases; small intestinal attachment or history of a previous small intestinal GIST were noted in 5 cases, whereas no tumor was attached to stomach. The multiple GISTs were KIT positive 23/24, CD34 positive 7/21, and 5 had KIT exon 11 mutations, 3 had KIT exon 9 mutations, and 2 had PDGFRA mutations. The median survival was for 8 months and all patients died. Omental GISTs are clinicopathologically heterogenous. Patients with solitary tumors usually have gastric GIST-like morphology and a better prognosis than those with multiple tumors, whose tumor usually has small intestinal GIST-like histology. Omental GISTs unattached to

  13. Comparison of Gastrointestinal and Rectal Temperatures During Recovery After a Warm-Weather Road Race

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Yuri; Adams, William M.; Stearns, Rebecca L.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  It has been well established that gastrointestinal temperature (TGI) tracks closely with rectal temperature (TREC) during exercise. However, the field use of TGI pills is still being examined, and little is known about how measurements obtained using these devices compare during recovery after exercise in warm weather. Objective:  To compare TGI and TREC in runners who completed an 11.3-km warm-weather road race and determine if runners with higher TGI and TREC present with greater passive cooling rates during recovery. Design:  Cross-sectional study. Setting:  Field. Patients or Other Participants:  Thirty recreationally active runners (15 men, 15 women; age = 39 ± 11 years, weight = 68.3 ± 11.7 kg, body fat = 19.2% ± 5.0%). Main Outcome Measure(s):  The TGI and TREC were obtained immediately after the race and during a 20-minute passive rest at the 2014 Falmouth Road Race (heat index = 26.2°C ± 0.9°C). Temperatures were taken every 2 minutes during passive rest. The main dependent variables were mean bias and limits of agreement for TGI and TREC, using Bland-Altman analysis, and the 20-minute passive cooling rates for TGI and TREC. Results:  No differences were evident between TGI and TREC throughout passive rest (P = .542). The passive cooling rates for TGI and TREC were 0.046 ± 0.031°C·min−1 and 0.060 ± 0.036°C·min−1, respectively. Runners with higher TGI and TREC at the start of cooling had higher cooling rates (R = 0.682, P < .001 and R = 0.54, P = .001, respectively). The mean bias of TGI during the 20-minute passive rest was −0.06°C ± 0.56°C with 95% limits of agreement of ±1.09°C. Conclusions:  After participants completed a warm-weather road race, TGI provided a valid measure of body temperature compared with the criterion measure of TREC. Therefore, TGI may be a viable option for monitoring postexercise-induced hyperthermia, if the pill is administered prophylactically. PMID:27186918

  14. Comparison of Gastrointestinal and Rectal Temperatures During Recovery After a Warm-Weather Road Race.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Yuri; Adams, William M; Stearns, Rebecca L; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    It has been well established that gastrointestinal temperature (TGI) tracks closely with rectal temperature (TREC) during exercise. However, the field use of TGI pills is still being examined, and little is known about how measurements obtained using these devices compare during recovery after exercise in warm weather. To compare TGI and TREC in runners who completed an 11.3-km warm-weather road race and determine if runners with higher TGI and TREC present with greater passive cooling rates during recovery. Cross-sectional study. Field. Thirty recreationally active runners (15 men, 15 women; age = 39 ± 11 years, weight = 68.3 ± 11.7 kg, body fat = 19.2% ± 5.0%). The TGI and TREC were obtained immediately after the race and during a 20-minute passive rest at the 2014 Falmouth Road Race (heat index = 26.2°C ± 0.9°C). Temperatures were taken every 2 minutes during passive rest. The main dependent variables were mean bias and limits of agreement for TGI and TREC, using Bland-Altman analysis, and the 20-minute passive cooling rates for TGI and TREC. No differences were evident between TGI and TREC throughout passive rest (P = .542). The passive cooling rates for TGI and TREC were 0.046 ± 0.031°C·min(-1) and 0.060 ± 0.036°C·min(-1), respectively. Runners with higher TGI and TREC at the start of cooling had higher cooling rates (R = 0.682, P < .001 and R = 0.54, P = .001, respectively). The mean bias of TGI during the 20-minute passive rest was -0.06°C ± 0.56°C with 95% limits of agreement of ±1.09°C. After participants completed a warm-weather road race, TGI provided a valid measure of body temperature compared with the criterion measure of TREC. Therefore, TGI may be a viable option for monitoring postexercise-induced hyperthermia, if the pill is administered prophylactically.

  15. Limited resection for duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Surgical management and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Jens; Kulemann, Birte; Marjanovic, Goran; Bronsert, Peter; Hopt, Ulrich Theodor

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To analyze our experience in patients with duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) and review the appropriate surgical approach. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients with duodenal GIST surgically treated at our medical institution between 2002 and 2011. Patient files, operative reports, radiological charts and pathology were analyzed. For surgical therapy open and laparoscopic wedge resections and segmental resections were performed for limited resection (LR). For extended resection pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. Age, gender, clinical symptoms of the tumor, anatomical localization, tumor size, mitotic count, type of resection resectional status, neoadjuvant therapy, adjuvant therapy, risk classification and follow-up details were investigated in this retrospective study. RESULTS: Nine patients (5 males/4 females) with a median age of 58 years were surgically treated. The median follow-up period was 45 mo (range 6-111 mo). The initial symptom in 6 of 9 patients was gastrointestinal bleeding (67%). Tumors were found in all four parts of the duodenum, but were predominantly located in the first and second part of the duodenum with each 3 of 9 patients (33%). Two patients received neoadjuvant medical treatment with 400 mg imatinib per day for 12 wk before resection. In one patient, the GIST resection was done by pancreatoduodenectomy. The 8 LRs included a segmental resection of pars 4 of the duodenum, 5 wedge resections with primary closure and a wedge resection with luminal closure by Roux-Y duodeno-jejunostomy. One of these LRs was done minimally invasive; seven were done in open fashion. The median diameter of the tumors was 54 mm (14-110 mm). Using the Fletcher classification scheme, 3/9 (33%) tumors had high risk, 1/9 (11%) had intermediate risk, 4/9 (44%) had low risk, and 1/9 (11%) had very low risk for aggressive behaviour. Seven resections showed microscopically negative transsection margins (R0), two

  16. Canine and human gastrointestinal stromal tumors display similar mutations in c-KIT exon 11

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are common mesenchymal neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and dogs. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these tumors. This study evaluated the role of c-KIT in canine GISTs; specifically, we investigated activating mutations in exons 8, 9, 11, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide (PDGFRA), all of which have been implicated in human GISTs. Methods Seventeen canine GISTs all confirmed to be positive for KIT immunostaining were studied. Exons 8, 9, 11, 13 and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA, were amplified from DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. Results Of these seventeen cases, six amplicons of exon 11 of c-KIT showed aberrant bands on gel electrophoresis. Sequencing of these amplicons revealed heterozygous in-frame deletions in six cases. The mutations include two different but overlapping six base pair deletions. Exons 8, 9, 13, and 17 of c-KIT and exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA had no abnormalities detected by electrophoresis and sequencing did not reveal any mutations, other than synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in exon 11 of c-KIT and exons 12 and 14 of PDGFRA. Conclusions The deletion mutations detected in canine GISTs are similar to those previously found in the juxtamembrane domain of c-KIT in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors in our laboratory as well as to those reported in human GISTs. Interestingly, none of the other c-KIT or PDGFRA exons showed any abnormalities in our cases. This finding underlines the critical importance of c-KIT in the pathophysiology of canine GISTs. The expression of KIT and the identification of these activating mutations in c-KIT implicate KIT in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Our results indicate that mutations in c-KIT may be of prognostic significance and that targeting KIT may be a rational approach to treatment of these

  17. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Nerich, Virginie; Fleck, Camille; Chaigneau, Loïc; Isambert, Nicolas; Borg, Christophe; Kalbacher, Elsa; Jary, Marine; Simon, Pauline; Pivot, Xavier; Blay, Jean-Yves; Limat, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    The management of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) has been modified considerably by the availability of costly tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs); however, the best therapeutic sequence in terms of cost and effectiveness remains unknown. The aim of this study was to compare four potential strategies (reflecting the potential daily practice), each including imatinib 400 mg/day, as first-line treatment: S1 (imatinib400/best supportive care [BSC]); S2 (imatinib400/imatinib800/BSC); S3 (imatinib400/sunitinib/BSC); and S4 (imatinib400/imatinib800/sunitinib/BSC). A Markov model was developed with a hypothetical cohort of patients and a lifetime horizon. Transition probabilities were estimated from the results of clinical trials. The analysis was performed from the French payer perspective, and only direct medical costs were included. Clinical and economic parameters were discounted, and the robustness of results was assessed. The least costly and effective strategy was S1, at a cost of €65,744 for 32.9 life months (reference). S3 was the most cost-effective strategy, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €48,277/life-year saved (LYS). S2 was dominated, and S4 yielded an ICER of €363,320/LYS compared with S3. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these results; however, when taking into account a price reduction of 80 % for imatinib, S2 and S4 become the most cost-effective strategies. Our approach is innovative to the extent that our analysis takes into account the sequential application of TKIs. The results suggest that the S1 strategy is the best cost-effective strategy, but a price reduction of imatinib impacts on the results. This approach must continue, including new drugs and their impact on the quality of life of patients with advanced GISTs.

  18. Patterns of Deregulation of Insulin Growth Factor Signaling Pathway in Pediatric and Adult Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, Antoine; Chen, Junwei; Zhang, Lei; Hajdu, Mihai; Singer, Samuel; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Antonescu, Cristina R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Data regarding the patterns and the mechanisms of deregulation of the insulin growth factor (IGF) pathway in adult and pediatric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are limited. Methods We investigated the expression profiling of the genes encoding the main components of the IGF signaling pathway in 131 GISTs (106 adult, 21 pediatric and 4 young adult) and 25 other soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) using an Affymetrix U133A platform. IGF2 was investigated for loss of imprinting (LOI) whereas IGF1R was analyzed for copy number aberration and mutation. Results IGF2 was the most highly overexpressed gene of the IGF pathway in GIST. IGF2 expression was also significantly higher than in other STS. IGF2 expression was correlated to the age onset and mutational status of GIST. Indeed, IGF2 expression was significantly higher in the “adult” group than in the “pediatric” and “young adult” groups. Among adult GIST, IGF2 expression was higher in tumors lacking KIT or PDGFRA mutations in comparison with mutated cases. A trend for a higher expression of IGF2 in resistant GIST in comparison to responsive GIST was also found. Overexpression of IGF2 was not related to LOI. Conversely, the expression of the IGF1R gene was significantly higher in the pediatric group than in the adult group. No copy number gains or mutations of IGF1R were observed. Conclusion The IGF pathway is deregulated in GIST with distinct patterns according to age onset and mutational status. The IGF pathway may represent a therapeutic target in patients with primary or secondary resistance to imatinib. PMID:22770876

  19. Patterns of deregulation of insulin growth factor signalling pathway in paediatric and adult gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine; Chen, Junwei; Zhang, Lei; Hajdu, Mihai; Singer, Samuel; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2012-11-01

    Data regarding the patterns and the mechanisms of deregulation of the insulin growth factor (IGF) pathway in adult and paediatric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are limited. We investigated the expression profiling of the genes encoding the main components of the IGF signalling pathway in 131 GISTs (106 adults, 21 paediatric and four young adults) and 25 other soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) using an Affymetrix U133A platform. IGF2 was investigated for loss of imprinting (LOI) whereas IGF1R was analysed for copy number aberration and mutation. IGF2 was the most highly overexpressed gene of the IGF pathway in GIST. IGF2 expression was also significantly higher than in other STS. IGF2 expression was correlated to the age onset and mutational status of GIST. Indeed, IGF2 expression was significantly higher in the 'adult' group than in the 'paediatric' and 'young adult' groups. Among adult GIST, IGF2 expression was higher in tumours lacking Homo sapiens v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) or alpha-type platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFRA) mutations in comparison with mutated cases. A trend for a higher expression of IGF2 in resistant GIST in comparison to responsive GIST was also found. Overexpression of IGF2 was not related to LOI. Conversely, the expression of the IGF1R gene was significantly higher in the paediatric group than in the adult group. No copy number gains or mutations of IGF1R were observed. The IGF pathway is deregulated in GIST with distinct patterns according to age onset and mutational status. The IGF pathway may represent a therapeutic target in patients with primary or secondary resistance to imatinib. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Oncogenic signaling by Kit tyrosine kinase occurs selectively on the Golgi apparatus in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Obata, Y; Horikawa, K; Takahashi, T; Akieda, Y; Tsujimoto, M; Fletcher, J A; Esumi, H; Nishida, T; Abe, R

    2017-02-13

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are caused by gain-of-function mutations in the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase. Most primary GIST patients respond to the Kit inhibitor imatinib, but this drug often becomes ineffective because of secondary mutations in the Kit kinase domain. The characteristic intracellular accumulation of imatinib-sensitive and -resistant Kit protein is well documented, but its relationship to oncogenic signaling remains unknown. Here, we show that in cancer tissue from primary GIST patients as well as in cell lines, mutant Kit accumulates on the Golgi apparatus, whereas normal Kit localizes to the plasma membrane (PM). In imatinib-resistant GIST with a secondary Kit mutation, Kit localizes predominantly on the Golgi apparatus. Both imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant Kit (Kit(mut)) become fully auto-phosphorylated only on the Golgi and only if in a complex-glycosylated form. Kit(mut) accumulates on the Golgi during the early secretory pathway, but not after endocytosis. The aberrant kinase activity of Kit(mut) prevents its export from the Golgi to the PM. Furthermore, Kit(mut) on the Golgi signals and activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt (PI3K-Akt) pathway, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), and the Mek-Erk pathway. Blocking the biosynthetic transport of Kit(mut) to the Golgi from the endoplasmic reticulum inhibits oncogenic signaling. PM localization of Kit(mut) is not required for its signaling. Activation of Src-family tyrosine kinases on the Golgi is essential for oncogenic Kit signaling. These results suggest that the Golgi apparatus serves as a platform for oncogenic Kit signaling. Our study demonstrates that Kit(mut)'s pathogenicity is related to its mis-localization, and may offer a new strategy for treating imatinib-resistant GISTs.Oncogene advance online publication, 13 February 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.519.

  1. Oncogenic signaling by Kit tyrosine kinase occurs selectively on the Golgi apparatus in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Y; Horikawa, K; Takahashi, T; Akieda, Y; Tsujimoto, M; Fletcher, J A; Esumi, H; Nishida, T; Abe, R

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are caused by gain-of-function mutations in the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase. Most primary GIST patients respond to the Kit inhibitor imatinib, but this drug often becomes ineffective because of secondary mutations in the Kit kinase domain. The characteristic intracellular accumulation of imatinib-sensitive and -resistant Kit protein is well documented, but its relationship to oncogenic signaling remains unknown. Here, we show that in cancer tissue from primary GIST patients as well as in cell lines, mutant Kit accumulates on the Golgi apparatus, whereas normal Kit localizes to the plasma membrane (PM). In imatinib-resistant GIST with a secondary Kit mutation, Kit localizes predominantly on the Golgi apparatus. Both imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant Kit (Kit(mut)) become fully auto-phosphorylated only on the Golgi and only if in a complex-glycosylated form. Kit(mut) accumulates on the Golgi during the early secretory pathway, but not after endocytosis. The aberrant kinase activity of Kit(mut) prevents its export from the Golgi to the PM. Furthermore, Kit(mut) on the Golgi signals and activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Akt (PI3K–Akt) pathway, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), and the Mek–Erk pathway. Blocking the biosynthetic transport of Kit(mut) to the Golgi from the endoplasmic reticulum inhibits oncogenic signaling. PM localization of Kit(mut) is not required for its signaling. Activation of Src-family tyrosine kinases on the Golgi is essential for oncogenic Kit signaling. These results suggest that the Golgi apparatus serves as a platform for oncogenic Kit signaling. Our study demonstrates that Kit(mut)’s pathogenicity is related to its mis-localization, and may offer a new strategy for treating imatinib-resistant GISTs. PMID:28192400

  2. Analysis of c-KIT exon 11 mutations in canine gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Takanosu, M; Amano, S; Kagawa, Y

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of c-KIT exon 11 mutations in canine gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) and investigate the association between the c-KIT mutation status and KIT immunohistochemical staining pattern. Mutations in exon 11 of c-KIT were examined in 46 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded canine GISTs using PCR of genomic DNA and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of cDNA. Exon 11 c-KIT mutations were detected in 15/46 (32.6%) cases by conventional PCR and 34/46 (73.9%) cases by RT-PCR; the mutation detection rate was significantly higher for RT-PCR (P = 0.004, Fisher's exact test). Ten different mutations, including deletion, internal tandem duplication and point mutations, were identified by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed using an anti-KIT antibody; diffuse KIT staining was detected in the tumour cell cytoplasm in 32/46 (69.6%) cases and partial or stippled cytoplasmic staining of KIT was observed in 14/46 (30.4%) cases. Neither pattern was significantly associated with c-KIT exon 11 mutation status (P = 1.000, chi-square test). These data indicate that c-KIT exon 11 mutations occur frequently in canine GISTs, similar to human GISTs; however, there is no association between c-KIT mutations and the KIT expression pattern in canine GISTs. This study suggests that RT-PCR is more sensitive than conventional PCR for the detection of c-KIT mutations in canine GISTs.

  3. Concurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumor and digestive tract carcinoma: a single institution experience in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Deng, Rui; Xia, Zefeng; Shuai, Xiaoming; Chang, Weilong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin; Tao, Kaixiong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of patients with concurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and digestive tract carcinoma. Among 585 patients diagnosed with GIST from January 2005 to July 2014, 32 (5.5%) had synchronous digestive tract carcinoma, including 19 (59.4%) men and 13 (40.6%) women. The median age was 64 years (range, 43-84). GIST was located in the stomach (n=24), small intestine (n=6), duodenum (n=1) and retroperitoneum (n=1). GISTs were intra- or postoperatively discovered (n=28) or preoperatively identified (n=4). The tumor size was less than 10 mm (microGIST) in 23 (71.9%) GIST patients. The preoperatively identified GIST subgroup showed a significantly larger tumor size, more mitotic figures and a higher risk grade than the intra- or postoperatively identified GIST subgroup. Concurrent digestive tract carcinomas were most frequently located in the stomach (24 cases, 75%). The other involved sites were the esophagus (n=5), duodenum (n=2) and colon (n=1). With a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 9-80), 24 patients were alive without evidence of disease, 6 patients had died of carcinoma progression, 1 patient had died from an accident, and 1 patient experienced GIST metastasis to the liver. In summary, we discovered that 5.5% of GIST patients also developed a concurrent digestive tract carcinoma in a series of 585 GIST cases. The majority of GISTs are incidentally identified microGISTs. The concurrent carcinoma seems to have a greater unfavorable effect on prognosis than the GIST. However, for a GIST that is identified preoperatively with a high risk of progression, adjuvant therapy is warranted. PMID:26885079

  4. Histopathological Features of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors and the Contribution of DOG1 Expression to the Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Beril; Özyılmaz, Filiz; Tokuç, Burcu; Can, Nuray; Taştekin, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) have KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) mutations affecting receptor tyrosine kinase activity and do not benefit from classic treatment regimens. Aims: The aim of this study was to review the algorithm that may be followed for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis in GISTs by investigating the histomorphological parameters and expression characteristics of classical immunohistochemical antibodies used in routine tests in addition to DOG1 expression. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: We reevaluated the histological and immunohistochemical parameters of 37 GISTs. The standard immunohistochemical diagnosis and differential diagnosis panel antibodies (CD117, PDGFRα, CD34, vimentin, desmin, SMA, S-100, and Ki67) were studied on the tumor sections. We also used the popular marker DOG1 antibody with accepted sensitivity for GISTs in recent years and the PDGFRα immune marker for which the benefit in routine practice is discussed. Results: Classification according to progressive disease risk groups of the 37 cases revealed that 54% were in the high risk, 19% in the moderate risk, 16% in the low risk, 8% in the very low risk and 8% in the no risk group. Cytological atypia, necrosis, mucosal invasion and the Ki67 index were found to be related to the progressive disease risk groups of the tumors (p<0.05). Positive immunoreaction was observed with CD117 and PDGFRα in all GISTs in the study (100%). Positivity with the DOG1 antibody was found in 33 (89%) cases. CD34 was positive in 62% (23) of the cases. Conclusion: The CD117 antibody still plays a key role in GIST diagnosis. However, the use of DOG1 and PDGFRα antibodies combined with CD117 as sensitive markers can be beneficial. PMID:26740899

  5. Therapeutic consequences from molecular biology for gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Mussi, Chiara; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Gronchi, Alessandro; Wardelmann, Eva; Hohenberger, Peter

    2008-07-15

    Patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) have an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). NF-1-associated GISTs are usually wild type for c-KIT and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFR-alpha) mutations and harbor a different oncogenic molecular mechanism. The lack of data on imatinib activity raises the question whether to enroll these patients in clinical trials. We analyzed a large series of NF-1 related GISTs to discuss the therapeutic implications. Clinical, pathologic (IHC to CD34, S100, bcl-2, PDGFRA), and molecular features (exons 9, 11, 13, 14, 17 in c-kit and exons 12, 14, 18 in PDGFRA) of 28 patients were analyzed. The most common site of primary lesions was the small bowel (75%). Twelve patients (43%) had multiple tumors. Most tumors belonged to the high (30.5%) or intermediate risk group for malignant behavior (39%). Three patients developed peritoneal and liver metastases; another four had peritoneal spread only. All tumors were immunohistochemically strongly positive for CD117. Three primary KIT/PDGFRA activating mutations were found. Three metastatic patients treated with imatinib experienced progression, and only one had temporary stable disease. Median survival after starting treatment with imatinib was 21 months. This study is the largest series available and confirms that KIT/PDGFRA mutations in NF-1-associated GISTs are sporadic. Prognosis of metastatic tumors is poor, and imatinib response rate is low. Patients with NF-1-GIST of high or intermediate risk should not be eligible for adjuvant trials of imatinib. Imatinib should not be used in a neoadjuvant intent in these patients, and molecular analysis of activating mutations is strongly recommended.

  6. TERT promoter mutations are a rare event in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Keisuke; Toda-Ishii, Midori; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Mukaihara, Kenta; Kubota, Daisuke; Mitani, Keiko; Takagi, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Kazuo; Yao, Takashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the impact of telomere dysregulation on malignant progression has been reported in many cancers. A few studies have examined TERT promoter mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Irregular telomerase activation can be maintained by TERT hot spot alterations and alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) characterized by inactivation of either the alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) or death domain-associated protein (DAXX). To elucidate the clinicopathological impact of telomere dysregulation in GISTs, we examined 92 cases of GISTs for TERT promoter hot spot mutations along with immunohistochemical analysis of ATRX and DAXX expression, and compared these findings with the clinicopathological features. Univariate clinicopathological analysis revealed that tumor site, smaller tumor size, presence of necrosis, higher mitotic rate (>5/50 high-power fields) and risk classification were prognostic factors for either disease-free survival or overall survival. Two of 92 informative cases (2.2 %) were found to have heterozygous TERT promoter mutations (C228T), and these mutations occurred in a low-risk and a high-risk tumor, respectively. On immunohistochemical analysis for ATRX and DAXX, 16 (17.4 %) and 3 (3.3 %) of 92 cases showed loss of expression of ATRX and DAXX, respectively. Loss of expression of ATRX and DAXX were mutually exclusive except for one case. TERT promoter mutations were also mutually exclusive of the ALT phenotype. Telomere dysregulation was not associated with patient survival; however, telomere dysregulation was frequently observed in tumors of extra-gastric origin, which have an adverse outcome compared to those of gastric origin.

  7. Clinicopathological features and prognosis of coexistence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Shushang; Zheng, Gaozan; Yang, Jianjun; Hong, Liu; Sun, Li; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei; Feng, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The coexistence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and gastric cancer is relatively high, and its prognosis is controversial due to the complex and variant kinds of presentation. Thus, the present study aimed to explore the clinicopathological features and prognostic factors of gastric GIST with synchronous gastric cancer. From May 2010 to November 2015, a total of 241 gastric GIST patients were retrospectively enrolled in the present study. The patients with coexistence of gastric GIST and gastric cancer were recorded. The clinicopathological features and prognoses of patients were analyzed. Among 241 patients, 24 patients had synchronous gastric cancer (synchronous group) and 217 patients did not (no-synchronous group). The synchronous group presented a higher percentage of elders (66.7% vs 39.6%, P = 0.001) and males (87.5% vs 48.4%, P < 0.001) than the no-synchronous group. The tumor diameter, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health degree were also significantly different between the 2 groups (all P < 0.05). The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival rates of synchronous group were significantly lower than those of no-synchronous group (54.9% vs 93.5%, P < 0.001; 37.9% vs 89.9%, P < 0.001, respectively). However, the 5-year overall survival rates between synchronous and gastric cancer groups were comparable (37.9% vs 57.6%, P = 0.474). The coexistence of gastric GIST and gastric cancer was common in elder male patients. The synchronous GIST was common in low-risk category. The prognosis of gastric GIST with synchronous gastric cancer was worse than that of primary-single gastric GIST, but was comparable with primary-single gastric cancer. PMID:27828865

  8. Somatostatin receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: new prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wen-Yi; Zhuang, Chun; Xu, Jia; Wang, Ming; Zhang, Zi-Zhen; Tu, Lin; Wang, Chao-Jie; Ling, Tian-Long; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) already act as important roles in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) with high expression levels for prognosis predicting and octreotide LAR treatment purposes but less noticed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Our study aims to fully evaluate the expression levels and prognostic values of SSTRs in GIST patients. For SSTRs expression detection, qPCR were used in 25 fresh GIST specimens, and then, 453 GIST samples (405 GISTs with operation only and 48 with imatinib adjuvant therapy after surgery) were collected for tissue microarrays (TMAs) construction and confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Clinicopathological data were confirmed by pathological diagnosis and clinical recorders, recurrence-free survivals (RFS) were evaluated in 453 GIST patients. With IHC performed, SSTR1 and SSTR2 present high positive proportion (81.9% and 87.6%) in 453 GISTs in our study, and positive expression rates of SSTR3, SSTR4 and SSTR5 are 56.1%, 8.8% and 47.2%, respectively. SSTR2 and SSTR5 negative expression are associated with decreased RFS when compared to positive cases by Kaplan-Meier survival analyses with log-rank test and univariate analysis in GISTs, furthermore, SSTR2 was an independent prognostic indicator for GISTs by multivariate analysis. In our study, detection of SSRT2 and SSTR5 expression helps to predict different prognosis in GIST patients. SSTR2 is a novel independent prognostic biomarker for GISTs. With high expression performance of SSTRs in GISTs, new therapeutic strategies such as octreotide or pasireotide LAR could be taken into consideration in selected advanced GIST patients. PMID:25628793

  9. Somatostatin receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: new prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Yi; Zhuang, Chun; Xu, Jia; Wang, Ming; Zhang, Zi-Zhen; Tu, Lin; Wang, Chao-Jie; Ling, Tian-Long; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) already act as important roles in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) with high expression levels for prognosis predicting and octreotide LAR treatment purposes but less noticed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Our study aims to fully evaluate the expression levels and prognostic values of SSTRs in GIST patients. For SSTRs expression detection, qPCR were used in 25 fresh GIST specimens, and then, 453 GIST samples (405 GISTs with operation only and 48 with imatinib adjuvant therapy after surgery) were collected for tissue microarrays (TMAs) construction and confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Clinicopathological data were confirmed by pathological diagnosis and clinical recorders, recurrence-free survivals (RFS) were evaluated in 453 GIST patients. With IHC performed, SSTR1 and SSTR2 present high positive proportion (81.9% and 87.6%) in 453 GISTs in our study, and positive expression rates of SSTR3, SSTR4 and SSTR5 are 56.1%, 8.8% and 47.2%, respectively. SSTR2 and SSTR5 negative expression are associated with decreased RFS when compared to positive cases by Kaplan-Meier survival analyses with log-rank test and univariate analysis in GISTs, furthermore, SSTR2 was an independent prognostic indicator for GISTs by multivariate analysis. In our study, detection of SSRT2 and SSTR5 expression helps to predict different prognosis in GIST patients. SSTR2 is a novel independent prognostic biomarker for GISTs. With high expression performance of SSTRs in GISTs, new therapeutic strategies such as octreotide or pasireotide LAR could be taken into consideration in selected advanced GIST patients.

  10. Prediction of KIT mutation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors by the immunoprofile of the tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chu-Chung; Chou, Ming-Jen; Tzen, Chin-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Human KIT protooncogene is the cellular homolog of v-kit from the Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma virus, and encodes a 145-kDa type III tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor that is often mutated in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Standardized mutation analysis is not available in many countries; therefore, we aimed to determine if the presence of KIT mutation in GIST can be predicted by the immunoprofile of the tumor cells. One hundred and forty-nine GIST were subjected to mutation analysis for KIT and immunohistochemical analysis for the expression of CD117, CD34, alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and S100 protein. Mutation and immunohistochemistry data were correlated. KIT mutation rates were higher in certain immunoprofile subsets of GIST than in GIST in general. Compared with the overall mutation rate of KIT (70%), all GIST with CD117+ and S100+ had > 80% probability of harboring mutated KIT, and the subset with additional CD34+ and SMA- had a mutation rate of 88%. The overall KIT mutation rate in CD117- GIST was 31%. However, the probability of KIT mutation in CD117- GIST with CD34+SMA+S100-, CD34-SMA-S100+, and CD34+SMA-S100+ was 100%, 100%, and 67%, respectively. Compared with the overall mutation rate (8.7%) of exon 9, GISTs with CD34+SMA+ had > or = 20% probability of harboring an exon 9 mutation, and all GISTs in the small intestine had a probability of 19%. When mutation analysis is not available, immunoprofiles based on CD117, CD34, SMA, and S100 can be used to predict the presence of KIT mutation, but it is less useful for the prediction of exon 9 mutation in GISTs.

  11. A Screen for Epigenetically Silenced microRNA Genes in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Masanori; Kai, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Maruyama, Reo; Nobuoka, Takayuki; Nishida, Toshirou; Kanda, Tatsuo; Taguchi, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Tokino, Takashi; Hirata, Koichi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA) has been implicated in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) but the mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to explore the involvement of epigenetic alteration of miRNA genes in GISTs. Methods GIST-T1 cells were treated with 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), after which miRNA expression profiles were analyzed using TaqMan miRNA arrays. DNA methylation was then analyzed using bisulfite pyrosequencing. The functions of miRNAs were examined using MTT assays, wound-healing assays, Boyden chamber assays and Matrigel invasion assays. Gene expression microarrays were analyzed to assess effect of ectopic miRNA expression in GIST-T1 cells. Results Of the 754 miRNAs analyzed, 61 were significantly upregulated in GIST-T1 cells treated with 5-aza-dC plus PBA. Among those, 21 miRNA genes were associated with an upstream CpG island (CGI), and the CGIs of miR-34a and miR-335 were frequently methylated in GIST-T1 cells and primary GIST specimens. Transfection of miR-34a or miR-335 mimic molecules into GIST-T1 cells suppressed cell proliferation, and miR-34a also inhibited migration and invasion by GIST-T1 cells. Moreover, miR-34a downregulated a number of predicted target genes, including PDGFRA. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of PDGFRA in GIST-T1 cells suppressed cell proliferation, suggesting the tumor suppressive effect of miR-34a is mediated, at least in part, through targeting PDGFRA. Conclusions Our results suggest that miR-34a and miR-335 are candidate tumor suppressive miRNAs in GISTs, and that they are frequent targets of epigenetic silencing in GISTs. PMID:26214687

  12. Severe Imatinib-Associated Skin Rash in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Patients: Management and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sook Ryun; Ryu, Min-Hee; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Beck, Mo Youl; Lee, In Soon; Choi, Mi Jung; Lee, Mi Woo; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the incidence of imatinib-associated skin rash, the interventional outcomes of severe rash, and impact of severe rash on the outcomes of imatinib treatment in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patients. Materials and Methods A total of 620 patients were administered adjuvant or palliative imatinib for GIST at Asan Medical Center between January 2000 and July 2012. This analysis focused on a group of 42 patients who developed a severe rash requiring major interventions, defined as dose interruption or reduction of imatinib or systemic steroid use. Results Of the 620 patients treated with imatinib, 148 patients (23.9%) developed an imatinib-associated skin rash; 42 patients (6.8%) developed a severe rash requiring major intervention. Of these, 28 patients (66.8%) successfully continued imatinib with interventions. Serial blood eosinophil levels during imatinib treatment were associated with skin rash and severity. A significant association was observed between successful intervention and blood eosinophil level at the time of intervention initiation. In metastatic settings, patients with severe rash requiring major interventions tended to show poorer progression-free survival than patients who did not require major intervention and patients with no rash, although this finding was not statistically significant (p=0.326). Conclusion By aggressive treatment of severe rash through modification of imatinib dose or use of systemic steroid, the majority of patients can continue on imatinib. In particular, imatinib dose intensity can be maintained with use of systemic steroid. Measuring the blood eosinophil levels may be helpful in guiding the management plan for skin rash regarding the intensity and duration of interventions. PMID:26323636

  13. Transcriptomic reappraisal identifies MGLL overexpression as an unfavorable prognosticator in primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Chen, Ko-Chin; Chen, Yen-Yang; Fang, Fu-Min; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Chen, Tzu-Ju; Yu, Shih-Chen; Lan, Jui; Huang, Hsuan-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The role of deregulated cellular metabolism, particularly lipid metabolism, in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) remains unclear. Through data mining of published transcriptomes, we examined lipid metabolism-regulating drivers differentially upregulated in high-risk cases and identified monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) as the top-ranking candidate involved in GIST progression. MGLL expression status was examined in three GIST cell lines and two independent sets of primary localized GISTs. MGLL mRNA abundance and immunoexpression was determined in 70 cases through the QuantiGene assay and H-scoring on whole sections, respectively. H-scoring was extended to another cohort for evaluating MGLL immunoexpression on tissue microarrays, yielding 350 informative cases, with KIT/PDGFRA mutation genotypes noted in 213 of them. Both imatinib-sensitive (GIST882) and -resistant (GIST48 and GIST430) cell lines exhibited increased MGLL expression. MGLL mRNA levels significantly increased from adjacent normal tissue to the non-high-risk group (p = 0.030) and from the non-high-risk group to high-risk GISTs (p = 0.012), and were associated with immunoexpression levels (p < 0.001, r = 0.536). MGLL overexpression was associated with the nongastric location (p = 0.022) and increased size (p = 0.017), and was strongly related to mitosis and risk levels defined by NIH and NCCN criteria (all p ≤ 0.001). Univariately, MGLL overexpression was strongly predictive of poorer disease-free and overall survival (both p < 0.001), which remained prognostically independent for both endpoints, along with higher risk levels. Conclusively, MGLL is a lipid metabolic enzyme causatively implicated in GIST progression given its association with unfavorable clincopathological factors and independent negative prognostic effects. PMID:27366945

  14. Somatic mutational spectrum analysis in a prospective series of 104 gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Guenat, David; Deroo, Olivier; Magnin, Sandrine; Chaigneau, Loïc; Monnien, Franck; Borg, Christophe; Mougin, Christiane; Emile, Jean-François; Prétet, Jean-Luc

    2017-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are mesenchymal tumors distinguished by driver mutations in proto-oncogenes KIT or PDGFRA in 85-90% of cases. These mutations have been linked to the response to imatinib, a multikinase inhibitor, and have independent prognostic impact. Here, we describe the prospective study of the molecular characteristics of 104 GISTs from French adult patients analyzed routinely through the National Hospital Program of Molecular Cancer Diagnosis. All patients with GISTs diagnosed at the University Hospital of Besançon between August 2005 and October 2014 were prospectively included in the present study. KIT, PDGFRA and KRAS-codons 12 and 13 as well as BRAF codon 600 mutations were analyzed by Sanger sequencing or SNaPshot. KIT and PDGFRA mutations were detected in 71.2 and 19.2% of the cases, respectively. A total of 43 different mutations were detected of which 13 had never been described. As expected, KIT exon 9 and PDGFRA exon 18 mutations were associated with small bowel and gastric localizations respectively. No mutation was found in KRAS and BRAF. Molecular studies are critical to improve the management of GISTs. Our study enhances the current knowledge by describing 13 new mutations in KIT. A common molecular pattern in all KIT exon 11 substitutions is also described for the first time in this study but its significance remains unknown since genetic and environmental risk factors favoring the development of GISTs such as DNA repair defects and exposure to carcinogens are not currently known.

  15. Detection of Treatment-Induced Changes in Signaling Pathways in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors using Transcriptomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Michael F.; Rink, Lori; Tarn, Chi; Mburu, Sarah; Taguchi, Takahiro; Eisenberg, Burton; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Cell signaling plays a central role in the etiology of cancer. Numerous therapeutics in use or under development target signaling proteins, however off-target effects often limit assignment of positive clinical response to the intended target. As direct measurements of signaling protein activity are not generally feasible during treatment, there is a need for more powerful methods to determine if therapeutics inhibit their targets and when off-target effects occur. We have used the Bayesian Decomposition algorithm and data on transcriptional regulation to create a novel methodology, DESIDE (Differential Expression for SIgnaling DEtermination), for inferring signaling activity from microarray measurements. We applied DESIDE to deduce signaling activity in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cell lines treated with the targeted therapeutic imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). We detected the expected reduced activity in the KIT pathway, as well as unexpected changes in the P53 pathway. Pursuing these findings, we have determined that imatinib-induced DNA damage is responsible for the increased activity of P53, identifying a novel off-target activity for this drug. We then used DESIDE on data from resected, post-imatinib treatment tumor samples and identified a pattern in these tumors similar to that at late time points in the cell lines, and this pattern correlated with initial clinical response. The pattern showed increased activity of ELK1 and STAT3 transcription factors, which are associated with the growth of side population cells. DESIDE infers the global reprogramming of signaling networks during treatment, permitting treatment modification that leverages ongoing drug development efforts, which is crucial for personalized medicine. PMID:19903850

  16. Chronic therapy in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): the big gap between theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Maristella; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza; Nannini, Margherita; Biasco, Guido

    2012-12-01

    The advent of imatinib mesilate, an oral target therapy, has dramatically changed the natural history of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). This rare neoplasm has become the paradigm of targeted therapies in solid tumours, also introducing a home-based cure concept in oncology. However, it should be retained that oral drug administration entails new and relevant management problems. Multiple studies have demonstrated the efficacy of imatinib in GISTs associated with a good toxicity profile. However, the efficacy of imatinib, according to its mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics, is closely related to daily assumption. No interruption or "jerky" assumption is permitted in order to avoid efficacy loss. Thus, the issue of treatment adherence is crucial for a successful strategy and should not be overlooked. We think that dealing with the problem means assessing a wide spectrum of not only clinical and general but also psychological and individual aspects. Furthermore, both patient and family should play an active role in the "cure process" and physicians should reduce the distance separating them from their patients due to home-based target therapy, promoting communication and consolidation of a trust-based physician-patient relationship. Several advantages have been introduced by oral target therapies in oncology. However, chronic drug administration, even if generally well tolerated, when prolonged for an undetermined time could heavily impact on patients' quality of life. This could induce non-prescribed drug suspension, with negative impact on disease control. More studies would be necessary in order to detect real patients' adherence, to correlate drug assumption with clinical outcome and to optimize imatinib treatment strategy.

  17. Clinicopathological features and prognosis of coexistence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Shushang; Zheng, Gaozan; Yang, Jianjun; Hong, Liu; Sun, Li; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei; Feng, Fan

    2016-11-01

    The coexistence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and gastric cancer is relatively high, and its prognosis is controversial due to the complex and variant kinds of presentation. Thus, the present study aimed to explore the clinicopathological features and prognostic factors of gastric GIST with synchronous gastric cancer.From May 2010 to November 2015, a total of 241 gastric GIST patients were retrospectively enrolled in the present study. The patients with coexistence of gastric GIST and gastric cancer were recorded. The clinicopathological features and prognoses of patients were analyzed.Among 241 patients, 24 patients had synchronous gastric cancer (synchronous group) and 217 patients did not (no-synchronous group). The synchronous group presented a higher percentage of elders (66.7% vs 39.6%, P = 0.001) and males (87.5% vs 48.4%, P < 0.001) than the no-synchronous group. The tumor diameter, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health degree were also significantly different between the 2 groups (all P < 0.05). The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival rates of synchronous group were significantly lower than those of no-synchronous group (54.9% vs 93.5%, P < 0.001; 37.9% vs 89.9%, P < 0.001, respectively). However, the 5-year overall survival rates between synchronous and gastric cancer groups were comparable (37.9% vs 57.6%, P = 0.474).The coexistence of gastric GIST and gastric cancer was common in elder male patients. The synchronous GIST was common in low-risk category. The prognosis of gastric GIST with synchronous gastric cancer was worse than that of primary-single gastric GIST, but was comparable with primary-single gastric cancer.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor is a potential therapeutic target for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tarn, Chi; Rink, Lori; Merkel, Erin; Flieder, Douglas; Pathak, Harsh; Koumbi, Daphne; Testa, Joseph R.; Eisenberg, Burton; von Mehren, Margaret; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2008-01-01

    A subset of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) lack gain-of-function mutations in c-KIT and PDGFRα. These so-called wild-type (WT) GISTs tend to be less responsive to imatinib-based therapies and have a poor prognosis. We identified amplification of IGF1R in a SNP analysis of GIST and thus studied its potential as a therapeutic target in WT and mutant GIST. Expression of IGF1R and downstream effectors in clinical GIST samples was examined by using immunoblots and immunohistochemistry. The roles of IGF1R signaling in GIST and viability were analyzed by using NVP-AEW541, an inhibitor of IGF1R, alone and in combination with imatinib, or via siRNA silencing of IGF1R. IGF1R was strongly overexpressed, and IGF1R amplification was detected at a significantly higher frequency in WT GISTs, including a pediatric WT GIST, compared with mutant GISTs (P = 0.0173 and P = 0.0163, respectively). Inhibition of IGF1R activity in vitro with NVP-AEW541 or down-regulation of expression with siIGF1R led to cytotoxicity and induced apoptosis in GIST cell lines via AKT and MAPK signaling. Combination of NVP-AEW541 and imatinib in GIST cell lines induced a strong cytotoxicity response. Our results reveal that IGF1R is amplified and the protein is overexpressed in WT and pediatric GISTs. We also demonstrate that the aberrant expression of IGF1R may be associated with oncogenesis in WT GISTs and suggest an alternative and/or complementary therapeutic regimen in the clinical management of all GISTs, especially in a subset of tumors that respond less favorably to imatinib-based therapy. PMID:18550829

  19. Reversible sarcopenia in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor treated with imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Moryoussef, Frédérick; Dhooge, Marion; Volet, Julien; Barbe, Coralie; Brezault, Catherine; Hoeffel, Christine; Coriat, Romain; Bouché, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Background Imatinib is a long-term, oral, targeted therapy for high-risk resected and advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST). It is known that sarcopenia affects prognosis and treatment tolerance in patients with various solid cancers. We analysed lumbar skeletal muscle index changes in imatinib-treated GIST patients. Imatinib tolerance was also assessed to evaluate the influence of pre-treatment sarcopenia. Methods Thirty-one patients with advanced (n = 16) or high-risk resected (n = 15) GIST treated with imatinib (400 mg/day) were analysed retrospectively. Lumbar skeletal muscle indexes were evaluated on computed tomography images obtained before starting imatinib for all patients and at 6 months for those initially sarcopenic. Sarcopenia was defined using consensual cutoffs. Imatinib-induced toxicities were assessed after 3 months of administration. Results Twelve (38.7%) of the 31 patients were sarcopenic, including one unassessable at 6 months. Seven (63.6%) of the 11 assessable sarcopenic patients became non-sarcopenic after 6 months of imatinib. Pre-treatment sarcopenia was not associated with grades 3–4 toxicities, but the mean number of all-grade toxicities per sarcopenic patient was significantly higher for those non-sarcopenic (4.1 vs. 1.7, respectively, p < 0.01) after 3 months of treatment. Grades 1–2 anaemia and grades 1–2 fatigue were more frequent for sarcopenic than non-sarcopenic patients (83% vs. 26%, P < 0.01 and 42% vs. 5%, P = 0.02, respectively). Conclusions Sarcopenia is reversible in some GIST patients treated with imatinib. Pre-imatinib sarcopenia is predictive of non-severe toxicities, particularly anaemia and fatigue. PMID:26673372

  20. Is Autophagy Rather Than Apoptosis the Regression Driver in Imatinib-Treated Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?1

    PubMed Central

    Miselli, Francesca; Negri, Tiziana; Gronchi, Alessandro; Losa, Marco; Conca, Elena; Brich, Silvia; Fumagalli, Elena; Fiore, Marco; Casali, Paolo G; Pierotti, Marco A; Tamborini, Elena; Pilotti, Silvana

    2008-01-01

    Although apoptosis (programmed cell death type I) is more frequently reported in the literature in imatinib-treated gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) cell lines,morphological features consistent with autophagic changes aremore often encountered in surgical specimens of treated patients. Autophagy (programmed cell death type II) is highly regulated by a tumor-suppressor mechanism that mainly involves the genes beclin1, PI3KIII, and bcl2. Being our material not suitable for electron microscopy analysis (not paraformaldehyde-glutaraldehyde-fixed), we evaluated the morphological, biochemical, and immunophenotypical profiles expected to be related to autophagy and apoptosis in a series of surgically resected samples taken from 11 imatinib-treated patients with molecularly characterized GISTs. The samples were examined for imatinib-induced morphological changes, the presence/interactions of the autophagic-related proteins (beclin1, PI3KIII, bcl2, and LC3-II) and the presence of apoptosis-related proteins (caspase 3, caspase 7, and lamin A/C) by means ofWestern blot analysis and coimmunoprecipitation, complemented by immunohistochemistry. We also studied samples of two untreated GISTs used as controls. Sampling areas with different residual cellularity scores fromboth the imatinib-treated and untreated patients showed biochemical and immunohistochemical evidence of high levels of proautophagy beclin1/PI3KIII and low levels of antiautophagy beclin1/bcl2 complexes, together with the presence of LC3-II detected by Western blot analysis, thus supporting the presence of autophagy. There was no expression of cleaved/activated caspase 3 or 7 or cleaved lamin A/C. Our descriptive results support the idea that GISTs activate autophagy rather than apoptosis in response to imatinib treatment and that their molecular makeup includes fingerprints of autophagy. PMID:19043528

  1. Approval Summary: Imatinib Mesylate in the Adjuvant Treatment of Malignant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cortazar, Patricia; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2010-01-01

    On December 19, 2008, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved imatinib mesylate tablets for oral use (Gleevec®; Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ) for the adjuvant treatment of adult patients following complete gross resection of Kit+ (CD117+) gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study enrolling 713 patients was submitted. The primary objective of the clinical trial was to compare the recurrence-free survival (RFS) intervals of the two groups. Overall survival (OS) was a secondary endpoint. Eligible patients were ≥18 years of age with a histological diagnosis of GIST (Kit+), resected tumor size ≥3 cm, and a complete gross resection within 14–70 days prior to registration. Imatinib, 400 mg orally, was administered once daily for 1 year. The study was terminated after completion of the third protocol-specified interim analysis. At that time, 100 RFS events were confirmed by a blinded central independent review. With a median follow-up of 14 months, 30 RFS events were observed in the imatinib group and 70 were observed in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.398; 95% confidence interval, 0.259–0.610; two-sided p-value < .0001). OS results are immature. Most patients in both groups experienced at least one adverse reaction, and 31% of the imatinib group and 18% of the placebo group experienced grade ≥3 adverse reactions. The most frequently reported adverse reactions (≥20%) were diarrhea, fatigue, nausea, edema, decreased hemoglobin, rash, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Drug was discontinued for adverse reactions in 17% and 3% of the imatinib and placebo-treated patients, respectively. PMID:20200041

  2. Approval summary: imatinib mesylate in the adjuvant treatment of malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Martin H; Cortazar, Patricia; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2010-01-01

    On December 19, 2008, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved imatinib mesylate tablets for oral use (Gleevec(R); Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ) for the adjuvant treatment of adult patients following complete gross resection of Kit(+) (CD117(+)) gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study enrolling 713 patients was submitted. The primary objective of the clinical trial was to compare the recurrence-free survival (RFS) intervals of the two groups. Overall survival (OS) was a secondary endpoint. Eligible patients were > or =18 years of age with a histological diagnosis of GIST (Kit(+)), resected tumor size > or =3 cm, and a complete gross resection within 14-70 days prior to registration. Imatinib, 400 mg orally, was administered once daily for 1 year. The study was terminated after completion of the third protocol-specified interim analysis. At that time, 100 RFS events were confirmed by a blinded central independent review. With a median follow-up of 14 months, 30 RFS events were observed in the imatinib group and 70 were observed in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.398; 95% confidence interval, 0.259-0.610; two-sided p-value < .0001). OS results are immature. Most patients in both groups experienced at least one adverse reaction, and 31% of the imatinib group and 18% of the placebo group experienced grade > or =3 adverse reactions. The most frequently reported adverse reactions (> or =20%) were diarrhea, fatigue, nausea, edema, decreased hemoglobin, rash, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Drug was discontinued for adverse reactions in 17% and 3% of the imatinib and placebo-treated patients, respectively.

  3. Mucosal cutting biopsy technique for histological diagnosis of suspected gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Mikinori; Kawai, Takashi; Yagi, Kenji; Sugimoto, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Kei; Hayama, Yasutaka; Nonaka, Masaya; Aoki, Takaya; Fukuzawa, Masakatsu; Fukuzawa, Mari; Itoi, Takao; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2013-05-01

    The Japanese Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) therapeutic guidelines recommend endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy for histological diagnosis. However, before 2010, this technique was only carried out at a minority of medical institutions in Japan. In the present study, we investigated the usefulness of mucosal cutting biopsy. In 18 asymptomatic gastric submucosal tumors, mucosal cutting biopsies were carried out. We examined tumor size, tumor site (lower third: L; middle third: M; upper third: U), histopathological diagnostic yield and complications. In cases that proceeded to surgical resection with a diagnosis of GIST, we compared the pre- and postoperative histopathological diagnosis, and the histological degrees of malignancy. The tumors had a mean size of 20.3 mm and were located at the L site in five cases, M in four, and U in nine. Histological diagnosis of submucosal tumor was obtained in all the cases. (GIST, n = 13; heterotopic pancreas, n = 2; and leiomyoma, n = 3). No complications (e.g. bleeding, perforation or peritonitis) were seen after this procedure. In all 11 patients with GIST who underwent surgical resection, the histopathological findings from the mucosal cutting biopsy specimens were similar to those from the surgically resected specimens, with agreement between the immunostaining findings and the histological degree of malignancy (90.9%) in 10 patients. The mucosal cutting biopsy technique is a useful diagnostic modality for the diagnosis of gastric GIST and for selection of the appropriate treatment. © 2012 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2012 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  4. Overcoming Cost Implications of Mutational Analysis in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Pragmatic Approach.

    PubMed

    Schöffski, Patrick; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Schöffski, Oliver; van Eycken, Liesbet; Debiec-Rychter, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Genetic analysis of tissue derived from patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) is not uniformly applied on a national and international level, even though mutational data can provide clinically relevant prognostic and predictive information, especially in patients qualifying for treatment with expensive targeted agents. The current article describes the rationale for genetic testing of GIST tissue, looks at financial implications associated with such analysis and speculates on potential cost savings introduced by routine mutational testing and tailored use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors based on genotyping. This work is based on a hypothetical analysis of epidemiological data, drug costs, reimbursement criteria and market research figures. The cost burden for routine genotyping of important genes in GISTs, especially in patients at high risk for relapse after primary surgery and in advanced, inoperable metastatic disease, is relatively low. The early identification of GISTs with primary resistance mutations should be the basis for personalized GIST treatment and reimbursement of drugs. As illustrated by Belgian figures, the exclusive use of a drug such as imatinib in patients who are likely to benefit from the agent based on genetic information can lead to significant cost savings, which outweigh the costs for testing. Mutational analysis of GIST should be considered early in all patients at risk for relapse after curative surgery and in the case of advanced, inoperable, metastatic disease. The costs for the actual genotyping should not be used as an argument against profiling of the tumor. The adjuvant and palliative systemic treatment of GISTs should be personalized based on the genotype and other known prognostic and predictive factors. Reimbursement criteria for essential agents such as imatinib should be adapted accordingly. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  5. Defects in succinate dehydrogenase in gastrointestinal stromal tumors lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Janeway, Katherine A.; Kim, Su Young; Lodish, Maya; Nosé, Vânia; Rustin, Pierre; Gaal, José; Dahia, Patricia L. M.; Liegl, Bernadette; Ball, Evan R.; Raygada, Margarita; Lai, Angela H.; Kelly, Lorna; Hornick, Jason L.; O'Sullivan, Maureen; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Dinjens, Winand N. M.; Demetri, George D.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Helman, Lee; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2011-01-01

    Carney-Stratakis syndrome, an inherited condition predisposing affected individuals to gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and paraganglioma, is caused by germline mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits B, C, or D, leading to dysfunction of complex II of the electron transport chain. We evaluated the role of defective cellular respiration in sporadic GIST lacking mutations in KIT or PDGFRA (WT). Thirty-four patients with WT GIST without a personal or family history of paraganglioma were tested for SDH germline mutations. WT GISTs lacking demonstrable SDH genetic inactivation were evaluated for SDHB expression by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting and for complex II activity. For comparison, SDHB expression was also determined in KIT mutant and neurofibromatosis-1–associated GIST, and complex II activity was also measured in SDH-deficient paraganglioma and KIT mutant GIST; 4 of 34 patients (12%) with WT GIST without a personal or family history of paraganglioma had germline mutations in SDHB or SDHC. WT GISTs lacking somatic mutations or deletions in SDH subunits had either complete loss of or substantial reduction in SDHB protein expression, whereas most KIT mutant GISTs had strong SDHB expression. Complex II activity was substantially decreased in WT GISTs. WT GISTs, particularly those in younger patients, have defects in SDH mitochondrial complex II, and in a subset of these patients, GIST seems to arise from germline-inactivating SDH mutations. Testing for germline mutations in SDH is recommended in patients with WT GIST. These findings highlight a potential central role of SDH dysregulation in WT GIST oncogenesis. PMID:21173220

  6. Laparoscopic management of gastrointestinal stromal tumours: review at a Canadian centre

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Carl; Meneghetti, Adam T.; Lam, Jasmine; Panton, Ormond N.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic wedge resection has been widely accepted for small benign gastric tumours. Large gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), however, can be difficult to manipulate laparoscopically and are at risk for capsule disruption, which can then result in peritoneal seeding. Some authors have suggested that large GISTs (> 8 cm) are best approached using an open technique. However, there has been no consensus as to what the cut-off size should be. We conducted one of the largest Canadian series to date to assess outcomes and follow-up of the laparoscopic management of GISTs. Methods All patients with gastric GISTs presenting to Vancouver General Hospital and University of British Columbia Hospital between 2000 and 2008 were reviewed. Most lesions were resected using a wedge technique with closure of the stomach facilitated by an endoscopic linear stapling device. Results In all, 23 patients presented with GISTs; 19 patients underwent laparoscopic resection and, of these, 15 had a purely laparoscopic operation and 4 had a hand-assisted laparoscopic resection. Mean tumour size was 3.2 cm, with the largest tumour measuring 6.8 cm. There were no episodes of tumour rupture or spillage and no major intraoperative complications. All margins were negative. Mean follow-up was 13.3 (range 1–78) months. There was no evidence of recurrence or metastasis. Conclusion The laparoscopic management of gastric GISTs is safe and effective with short hospital stays and good results over a mean follow-up of 13.3 months. We believe that it should be the preferred technique offered to patients. PMID:22269221

  7. Dysregulated expression of Snail and E-cadherin correlates with gastrointestinal stromal tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Liao, Guoqing; Ding, Jie; Ye, Ke; Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Liang; Chen, Senlin

    2014-09-01

    Snail, a zinc finger structure transcription inhibitory factor, has been reported to play an important role in the metastatic progression of several types of cancer. The aim of the study was to identify potential biomarkers for metastasis in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) by examining the expression levels of Snail, E-cadherin, and Vimentin in GISTs and investigate their clinical significance. The protein expression of Snail, E-cadherin, and Vimentin in 74 GIST specimens was detected by immunohistochemical analysis, and the correlation between expression levels and clinicopathological data was analyzed. Snail, E-cadherin, and Vimentin were positively expressed in 51.4% (38/74), 32.4% (24/74), and 68.9% (51/74) of GIST tissue samples, respectively. Snail protein expression was significantly higher in GISTs with distant metastasis compared with GISTs without distant metastasis (P<0.05). E-cadherin expression level was significantly lower in cases of GIST with distant metastasis compared with those without distant metastasis (P<0.05), whereas the expression level of Vimentin did not significantly change according to clinical and pathological characteristics (all P>0.05). Snail expression was significantly negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression (r's=-0.276, P=0.017) but not with Vimentin expression (r's=0.041, P=0.728) in GISTs. High Snail expression and low E-cadherin expression were significantly correlated with metastasis in GISTs, and Snail, because of positive correlation, is potentially a biomarker of GIST with distant metastasis.

  8. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a very rare cause of jejunoileal intussusception in a 6-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Gunaydin, Mithat; Biçakci, Unal; Bozkurter, Asudan Tuğçe; Elli, Murat; Tander, Burak; Bariş, Sancar; Rizalar, Rıza; Aritürk, Ender; Bernay, Ferit

    2012-05-01

    A 6-year-old girl was admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain and bilious vomiting of 3 days in duration. Abdominal ultrasound examination showed an 8-cm-long intussuscepted intestinal segment with a target sign. There was a 26 × 28 × 23 mm nonperistaltic anechoic cystic mass suggestive of a duplication cyst. At laparotomy, the ileocecal region was normal with many enlarged lymph nodes from which biopsies were taken. There was a 20-cm-long intussuscepted segment at the proximal ileum close to the jejunum. After manual reduction, a 2-cm-long edematous segment resembling a duplication cyst served as the lead point. The segment was excised, and a primary bowel anastomosis was performed. She was discharged on the fifth postoperative day. The histopathologic examination revealed that the excised segment contained a gastrointestinal stromal tumor measuring 2.5 cm, with a mitotic rate of 2 to 3 mitoses per 50 high-power fields (low-risk group) showing an infiltrative growth pattern. On immunohistochemistry assay, some of the tumor cells were CD117 and CD34 positive, whereas all of them were smooth muscle actin and S-100 positive but CD10 negative. Staining index with Ki-67 was 5%. Surgical margins were free of tumor. The lymph nodes showed reactive hyperplasia. She was referred to the pediatric oncology department for further evaluation. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are common in adults and may lead to intussusception. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first childhood case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor causing jejunoileal intussusception in the literature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Life-threatening bleeding of a duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a teenager: a rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Valli, Piero V.; Valli, Carlo; Pfammatter, Thomas; Bauerfeind, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are per se infrequent and are exceptional in children or young adults. So far, only 2 cases of pediatric duodenal GISTs have been published. Here we report on the case of a 19-year-old female patient who was admitted in hemorrhagic shock due to arterial bleeding of a duodenal GIST located in immediate proximity to the major duodenal papilla. After several attempts of endoscopic hemostasis failed, the tumor bleeding was controlled with a second coil embolization of the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. PMID:27995183

  10. A case of multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors caused by a germline KIT gene mutation (p.Leu576Pro).

    PubMed

    Vale Rodrigues, Rita; Santos, Filipa; Pereira da Silva, João; Francisco, Inês; Claro, Isabel; Albuquerque, Cristina; Lemos, Maria Manuel; Limbert, Manuel; Dias Pereira, António

    2017-04-01

    Multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) caused by germline KIT gene mutations are an extremely rare autosomal dominant disorder. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with a 2-week history of asthenia, palpitations and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. After further clinical evaluation one gastric and two small bowel GISTs were diagnosed, which were surgically resected after neoadjuvant therapy with Imatinib. Diffuse hyperplasia of the interstitial cells of Cajal was also seen in the background gastric and small intestinal walls. Somatic mutational analysis of the KIT gene revealed a substitution at codon 576 in exon 11 (p.Leu576Pro) in all tumors and normal ileal mucosa. The germline nature of this mutation was confirmed by mutation analysis in peripheral blood leukocytes. However, she had no familial history of GISTs and her parents did not carry the respective germline mutation.

  11. Is laparoscopic resection the appropriate management of a jejunal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)? Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Pitiakoudis, Michail; Zezos, Petros; Courcoutsakis, Nikos; Papanas, Nikolaos; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Kouklakis, Georgios; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2010-10-01

    A 51-year-old female patient presented with iron deficiency anemia. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy were unremarkable. Computed tomography enteroclysis showed an ovoid 3×4-cm jejunal tumor with intraluminal protrusion and exophytic growth pattern, without lymphadenopathy or metastatic disease. Laparoscopic resection of the tumor was successfully carried out. Histologically, a mesenchymal tumor composed of spindle cells with an interlacing bundle pattern and high-mitotic activity greater than 10 mitoses/50 high-power fields were observed. The immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor was KIT (CD117)-, vimentin-, smooth muscle actin-, and S-100-positive, whereas it was CD34-negative. These findings were consistent with the features of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, and after 10 months of follow-up, she is well without any evidence of tumor recurrence.

  12. Metachronous Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung During Adjuvant Imatinib Mesylate Therapy for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of Stomach: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Meng-Jie; Weng, Shan-Shan; Cao, Ying; Li, Xiao-Fen; Wang, Liu-Hong; Xu, Jing-Hong; Yuan, Ying

    2015-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in gastrointestinal tracts; however, the synchronous or metachronous coexistence of GIST with additional primary malignancy is not common.Here, we present an unusual case of gastric GIST with metachronous primary lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed during his adjuvant treatment with oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (400 mg daily). After 6-month use of imatinib, the patient suffered from dry cough and dyspnea. Subsequent lung biopsy demonstrated adenocarcinoma with diffuse interstitial changes.Our research emphasizes the possibility of an additional primary tumor with GIST, and reminds the clinicians to strengthen the surveillance of the additional cancer during the follow-up of GIST patients.

  13. Generation of orthotopic patient-derived xenografts from gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common sarcoma and its treatment with imatinib has served as the paradigm for developing targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite this success, imatinib-resistance has emerged as a major problem and therefore, the clinical efficacy of other drugs has been investigated. Unfortunately, most clinical trials have failed to identify efficacious drugs despite promising in vitro data and pathological responses in subcutaneous xenografts. We hypothesized that it was feasible to develop orthotopic patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) from resected GIST that could recapitulate the genetic heterogeneity and biology of the human disease. Methods Fresh tumor tissue from three patients with pathologically confirmed GISTs was obtained immediately following tumor resection. Tumor fragments (4.2-mm3) were surgically xenografted into the liver, gastric wall, renal capsule, and pancreas of immunodeficient mice. Tumor growth was serially assessed with ultrasonography (US) every 3-4 weeks. Tumors were also evaluated with positron emission tomography (PET). Animals were sacrificed when they became moribund or their tumors reached a threshold size of 2500-mm3. Tumors were subsequently passaged, as well as immunohistochemically and histologically analyzed. Results Herein, we describe the first model for generating orthotopic GIST PDXs. We have successfully xenografted three unique KIT-mutated tumors into a total of 25 mice with an overall success rate of 84% (21/25). We serially followed tumor growth with US to describe the natural history of PDX growth. Successful PDXs resulted in 12 primary xenografts in NOD-scid gamma or NOD-scid mice while subsequent successful passages resulted in 9 tumors. At a median of 7.9 weeks (range 2.9-33.1 weeks), tumor size averaged 473±695-mm3 (median 199-mm3, range 12.6-2682.5-mm3) by US. Furthermore, tumor size on US within 14 days of death correlated with gross tumor size on necropsy. We also

  14. Inhibition of KIT RNAi mediated with adenovirus in gastrointestinal stromal tumor xenograft.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Bao; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Lin, Wei-Hao; Shi, Han-Ping; Dong, Wen-Guang

    2010-10-28

    To investigate a therapeutic method for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) based on KIT RNA interference (RNAi) with AdMax adenovirus. KIT short hairpin RNA (shRNA), whose lateral sides were decorated with restriction endonuclease sequences, was designed. T(4) DNA ligase catalyzed the joint of the KIT shRNA and the green fluorescent protein-containing PDC316-EGFP-U6 to form PDC316-EGFP-U6-KIT. Homologous recombination of AdEGFP-U6-KIT was performed with the AdMax system. Heterotopically transplanted GISTs were established in nude mice. AdEGFP-U6-KIT was intratumorally injected. The volume, inhibition ratio of tumor and CD117 expression of GIST graft tumor in nude mice were compared between test and control groups. The length of KIT shRNA was determined to be about 50bp by agarose electrophoresis. Gene sequencing detected the designed KIT RNAi sequence in PDC316-EGFP-U6-KIT. After transfection with AdEGFP-U6-KIT, 293 cells displayed green fluorescence. The physical and infective titers of AdEGFP-U6-KIT were 5 × 10(11) viral particles/mL and 5.67 × 10(7) plaque forming units/mL, respectively. The mean volume of the grafted tumor was significantly smaller in test mice than in control mice (75.3 ± 22.9 mm(3) vs 988.6 ± 30.5 mm(3), t = -18.132, P < 0.05). The inhibition ratio of the tumors was 59.6% in the test group. CD117 positive expression was evident in two cases (20%) in the test group and 10 cases (100%) in the control group (χ(2) = 10.2083, P < 0.005). AdEGFP-U6-KIT is successfully constructed, and KIT RNAi mediated with Admax vector system can effectively inhibit the expression of the KIT gene and the growth of GIST in nude mice.

  15. Prognostic value of KIT/PDGFRA mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The postulated relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and their prognostic value in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) has generated intense attention during the past decade, despite the fact that a great deal of studies have been conducted on this subject. To provide a strong quantitative estimate of this postulated relationship, we carried out a meta-analysis which combined, compared, and summarized the results of existing relevant studies. Methods Studies were identified by searching databases and reviewing citations in relevant articles. Of 48 potentially relevant studies, we combined individual patient data from 18 studies which involved 1,487 patients with GISTs, by which we made a comparison between the positive KIT mutation subgroup and the negative KIT mutation subgroup (PDGFRA mutation and wild type). We tabulated and analyzed the patient characteristics from each study, including general information such as age and gender, histopathological parameters, and clinical follow-up outcomes. Results KIT mutations, compared with PDGFRA mutations and wild type, showed a marked increased risk not only for tumor size (>5 cm) but also for higher mitotic activity (>5), suggesting that KIT mutations significantly correlated with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) high risk or National Institutes of Health (NIH) high risk (1.74 (95% CI, 1.20 to 2.53) and 2.00 (95% CI, 1.08 to 3.68), respectively). Moreover, higher recurrence and metastasis was observed in GISTs with KIT mutations, revealing its closer correlation with clinical malignant risk (P <0.001 for each, with odds ratio (OR) of 2.06 (95%, 1.37 to 3.11) and 2.77 (95%, 1.64 to 4.67), respectively). High risk or malignant GISTs with KIT mutations had a significantly poorer prognosis, as measured by 3-year overall survival, compared to those with PDGFRA mutations and wild type (0.47 (95% CI, 0.25 to 0.90)). Conclusions KIT mutations, compared with PDGFRA mutations and wild type

  16. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor as entry port for S. intermedius causing bacteremia and multiple liver abscesses. Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Benou, C; Walter, B M; Schlitter, M A; Wilhelm, D; Neu, B; Schmid, R M

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a previously healthy 52-year-old man who presented with fever and liver lesions suspicious for metastatic disease, which proved subsequently to be abscesses. Further workup revealed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the gastric corpus as entry port to Streptococcus intermedius-associated bacteremia and liver abscesses. After antibiotic treatment and surgical resection of the tumor, the patient recovered well. This unusual case indicates that gastrointestinal stromal tumors can remain undetected until they cause a life threatening infection. A review of recent literature pertaining to GIST and liver abscesses follows.

  17. The inside mystery of jejunal gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a rare case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dhull, A K; Kaushal, V; Dhankhar, R; Atri, R; Singh, H; Marwah, N

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are malignant and rare form of soft tissue sarcoma of the digestive tract. The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors is very low Kramer et al. 2005 Jejunal GISTs are extremely rare. Here we present a rare case of jejunal GIST with unusually large size at presentation. The patient presented with severe abdomen pain, exophytic growth, and dimorphic anemia. Surgical resection of the tumor was carried out, and operative findings revealed a 15 × 10 cm growth, arising from serosal surface of jejunum, at the antimesenteric surface. Diagnosis in this case was made by subjecting the resected specimen to immunohistochemical analysis. In view of large size of the resected tumor, and high-risk histopathological features, imatinib mesylate 400 mg once daily was given as adjuvant chemotherapy. Patient is asymptomatic without any evidence of tumor recurrence after six months of postoperative followup. Imatinib as such is recommended in metastatic, residual or recurrent cases of GISTs or which are surgically not removable; however, recent recommendations suggests the use of imatinib mesylate after radical surgery in high-risk cases, because it has shown a significant decrease in the recurrence rate, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has also approved the use of imatinib as adjuvant therapy after complete resection of localized, primary GIST.

  18. [Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors "GIST": status and news through our experience on 54 cases and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Taoufiq, Nezha; Naim, Asmaa; Bouchbika, Zineb; Benchekroune, Nadia; Jouhadi, Hassan; Sahraoui, Souha; Benider, Abdelatif

    2017-01-01

    Tumors Gastrointestinal Stromal "GIST" are a very rare form of digestive tract cancers belonging to the family of sarcomas. The aim of this study is to establish the epidemiological profile, the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of this malignancy supported in a developing country. A retrospective study spread over 8 years from January 2002 to March 2010, was conducted at the Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology of Casablanca (Morocco) have collated 54 cases of Gastrointestinal Stromal tumors. The average age of our patients was 55 years. The average time of evolution was 11 months (0-72 months). The biopsy confirmed the diagnosis in 14 cases and surgery in 40 cases. The main histological form was fusiform (92.6%). GIST in our series had an average tumor size of 12.5 cm with a positive C-Kit in 52 cases. The risk of progression was established in 47 cases of which 39 were high risk. Surgery was the main treatment of patients in our study. After a mean fellow of 31 months, half of evaluable patients in our series (n = 19) is maintained complete remission, one third (n= 13) died while a quarter (n= 8) has a local recurrence and / or metastatic. Although the recommendations are published for the treatment of these tumors, these still present many problems both diagnostic and therapeutic in our context.

  19. Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Killoran, Joseph H.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

  20. Tumor markers in colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and gastrointestinal stromal cancers: European group on tumor markers 2014 guidelines update.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M J; Lamerz, R; Haglund, C; Nicolini, A; Kalousová, M; Holubec, L; Sturgeon, C

    2014-06-01

    Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and management of patients with several different types of gastrointestinal cancer, especially colorectal, gastric, gastro-oesophageal junction (GOJ) adenocarcinomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of this article is to provide updated and evidence-based guidelines for the use of biomarkers in the different gastrointestinal malignancies. Recommended biomarkers for colorectal cancer include an immunochemical-based fecal occult blood test in screening asymptomatic subjects ≥50 years of age for neoplasia, serial CEA levels in postoperative surveillance of stage II and III patients who may be candidates for surgical resection or systemic therapy in the event of distant metastasis occurring, K-RAS mutation status for identifying patients with advanced disease likely to benefit from anti-EGFR therapeutic antibodies and microsatellite instability testing as a first-line screen for subjects with Lynch syndrome. In advanced gastric or GOJ cancers, measurement of HER2 is recommended in selecting patients for treatment with trastuzumab. For patients with suspected GIST, determination of KIT protein should be used as a diagnostic aid, while KIT mutational analysis may be used for treatment planning in patients with diagnosed GISTs.

  1. Pharmacogenetics of drug transporters in modulating imatinib disposition and treatment outcomes in chronic myeloid leukemia & gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sylvia; Sutiman, Natalia; Chowbay, Balram

    2016-11-02

    The use of imatinib in the treatment of BCR-ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia and gastrointestinal stromal tumors has significantly improved survival outcomes in patients afflicted by these malignancies. However, a substantial proportion of imatinib-treated patients still experience treatment failure. Suboptimal concentrations of imatinib have been postulated to contribute at least partially to the development of resistance against imatinib. Indeed, variations in the genes encoding drug transporters have been reported to markedly influence imatinib disposition and treatment outcomes in various populations. This review aims to consolidate and critically assess the studies conducted to date which have investigated the influence of pharmacogenetic variants in drug transporters on the disposition of imatinib and treatment outcomes in Asians and other populations.

  2. Splenosis in gastric fundus mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Huang, Ya; Chao, Baoting; Zhao, Qi; Hao, Jinghua; Qin, Chengyong; Xu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Splenosis refers to heterotopic autotransplantation and implantation of splenic tissue following splenic trauma or surgery. Splenosis in gastric fundus is rare and difficult to diagnose, since splenosis has similar manifestation with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) under routine endoscopy examination. In this report, we present two quite rare case of splenosis. Both of their pre-operative diagnose under endoscopic ultrasonography was considered as GIST. Finally, one in the abdominal cavity, adhering closely to the gastric fundus, measuring 20 mm × 15 mm, was resected by surgical operation, and one in the gastric fundus, measuring 20 mm × 20 mm, was resected by endoscopic surgery. The precise diagnosis of splenosis was distinct by post-operative histopathologic examination. In addition, we also made a mini review of previously published articles, in order to provide indication to solve future doubts in diagnosing and treating splenosis.

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor with a PDGFRA mutation masquerading as gastric plexiform fibromyxoma: A comparative clinicopathological study of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Jingjing; Jiang, Guozhong; Ma, Yihui; Qi, Jingwen; Li, Wencai; Zhang, Dandan

    2017-01-01

    Gastric plexiform fibromyxoma (PF) is a rare mesenchymal tumor with a histologically distinctive multinodular pattern, dissimilar to conventional gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The current study presents one case of gastric PF, and one case of GIST with a platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) mutation mimicking PF, and discusses their differential diagnoses. The two patients were a 51-year-old male with PF and a 47-year-old female with GIST, each of whom presented with an occupying lesion in the gastric antrum. Histologically, the two cases shared a rare and approximately unanimous morphological pattern of a prominent multinodular and plexiform figuration in the gastric wall, including mucoid matrix, short spindle cells and small caliber vascular elements, and areas of stromal tumor cells exhibited an epithelioid appearance. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the PF tumor cells were positive for smooth muscle actin (SMA), but negative for mast/stem cell growth factor receptor (KIT), GIST-1 (DOG1), cluster of differentiation (CD) 34, S-100, desmin and cytokeratin AE1/AE3. The case of GIST expressed KIT and DOG1, but was negative for SMA, CD34, S-100, desmin and AE1/AE3. In addition, the GIST case, which was observed to harbor a D842V mutation in exon 18 of PDGFRA, was demonstrated to be genetically distinct from PF. The cases presented in the current study were uncommon in that GIST exhibited a plexiform appearance that mimicked the histology of the rare PF tumor; therefore, GIST must be considered and discounted first when determining a differential diagnosis for a gastrointestinal mesenchymal neoplasm. PMID:28356974

  4. Initial presentation of a giant gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach with recurrent spontaneous intra-peritoneal haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Vinagreiro, Margarida; Valverde, Jorge N; Guerreiro, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours are a rare group of tumours of the digestive tract. In the majority of cases, at the time of the diagnosis, tumours are usually small and patients are asymptomatic or have non-specific symptoms. The occurrence of digestive haemorrhage is relatively common; however, the manifestation with a spontaneous hemoperitoneum is extremely rare, specially if chronic and non-emergent. We report an unusual case of a 65-year-old man with a history of alcohol abuse, presenting with abdominal distension due to ascites and a constitutional syndrome. He was found to have a gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) of the stomach associated with a chronic hemoperitoneum, due to recurrent spontaneous haemorrhage. In an elective setting, the lesion was resected completely without rupturing the tumour pseudo-capsule and the patient had an uneventful postoperative course. The tumour was classified as a moderate-risk lesion for aggressive biological behaviour, and imatinib mesylate was initiated as an adjuvant to treatment. No evidence of disease recurrence after one year was noted. GISTs are uncommon and rarely present with spontaneous intra-peritoneal haemorrhage, which may be life threatening. In our understanding, this is the first reported case of the reviewed literature presenting with a chronic hemoperitoneum, due to recurrent brisk episodes of tumour haemorrhage. Tumour rupture and large tumour size are two poor independent prognostic tumour factors for recurrence. Despite this, the patient remains free of disease after surgery and instituted adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinicopathologic study of 275 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: the experience at 3 large medical centers in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Vázquez, Gonzálo; Sierra Santiesteban, Francisca I; Hernández-Hernández, Dulce Ma; Pompa, Angel Zavala

    2007-02-01

    It is important to distinguish gastrointestinal (GI) stromal tumors (GISTs) from other GI mesenchymal tumors (GIMTs) because of the availability of molecular-targeted therapy for GISTs. The aim of the study was to reclassify GIMTs and to determine the clinicopathologic features of GISTs in Mexico. Cases of GIMT identified from the database of 3 large diagnostic centers in Mexico between 1995 and 2004 were reclassified according to current criteria. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections and clinical histories were reviewed, and immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-CD117, CD34, smooth muscle actin, and S-100 protein. A total of 275 GISTs were identified. The tumors were located in the stomach (40%), small intestine (35%), colorectum (12%), abdominal cavity (11%), and esophagus (2%). There were equal numbers of men and women with a mean age at diagnosis of 61 years. The tumors ranged in size from 3.5 to 34 cm (mean, 9.1 cm); 95 tumors (34%) were larger than 10 cm. Colorectal and omental tumors were the largest. The cell types included pure spindle (68%), pure epithelioid (16%), and mixed epithelioid/spindle (14%). Whereas 17.8% of tumors were regarded as low risk, 43% of tumors were in the high-risk category. CD117 positivity was detected in most of the tumors (96%). In addition to CD117, 255 cases (92%) were positive for CD34, 82 cases (32%) were positive for smooth muscle actin, and 13 cases (4.7%) were positive for desmin. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors in Mexico have the same clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features as those reported in other countries. It is not always easy to distinguish GISTs from other soft tissue lesions. The diagnosis can be difficult even for experienced pathologists.

  6. Orai1 mediates tumor-promoting store-operated Ca(2+) entry in human gastrointestinal stromal tumors via c-KIT and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hao, Jiaqi; Zhang, Yijian; Yang, Ziyi; Cao, Yang; Lu, Wei; Shu, Yijun; Jiang, Lin; Hu, Yunping; Lv, Wenjie; Liu, Yingbin; Dong, Ping

    2017-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors originate from interstitial cells of Cajal, the pacemaker cells of the gut. Ca(2+) regulates the pacemaker activity of interstitial cells of Cajal. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry mediates the majority of Ca(2+) entry in most cancer cells and may be a factor in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) in interstitial cells of Cajal and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Therefore, a blockade of this mechanism may affect the progression of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Orai1 is the pore subunit of store-operated Ca(2+) channels. Here, we reported that Orai1 was overexpressed in gastrointestinal stromal tumor tissues and was positively correlated with a high-risk grade in gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients. Furthermore, upon Orai1 silencing, the functional store-operated Ca(2+) entry in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells was decreased, indicating that the function of store-operated Ca(2+) entry was mediated by Orai1. Inhibition of Orai1-mediated store-operated Ca(2+) entry by Orai1 silencing or store-operated Ca(2+) entry blockers (SKF-96365 and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborate) induced obvious cell proliferation suppression, cell-cycle distribution, and apoptosis stimulation in GIST-T1 cells. Conversely, Orai1 overexpression increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry and cell proliferation in GIST882 cells. In addition, we found that activation of c-KIT and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway participated in the oncogenic functions of Orai1-mediated store-operated Ca(2+) entry in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells. These results revealed that Orai1-mediated store-operated Ca(2+) entry is critical for gastrointestinal stromal tumor cell proliferation via c-KIT and ERK signaling pathway activation. Orai1-mediated store-operated Ca(2+) entry plays an oncogenic role and may be a novel prognostic factor and therapeutic target for patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  7. Effect of surface chemistry on nanoparticle interaction with gastrointestinal mucus and distribution in the gastrointestinal tract following oral and rectal administration in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, Katharina; Ensign, Laura; Reddy, Mihika; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    It is believed that mucoadhesive surface properties on particles delivered to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract improve oral absorption or local targeting of various difficult-to-deliver drug classes. To test the effect of nanoparticle mucoadhesion on distribution of nanoparticles in the GI tract, we orally and rectally administered nano- and microparticles that we confirmed possessed surfaces that were either strongly mucoadhesive or non-mucoadhesive. We found that mucoadhesive particles (MAP) aggregated in mucus in the center of the GI lumen, far away from the absorptive epithelium, both in healthy mice and in a mouse model of ulcerative colitis (UC). In striking contrast, water absorption by the GI tract rapidly and uniformly transported non-mucoadhesive mucus-penetrating particles (MPP) to epithelial surfaces, including reaching the surfaces between villi in the small intestine. When using high gavage fluid volumes or injection into ligated intestinal loops, common methods for assessing oral drug and nanoparticle absorption, we found that both MAP and MPP became well-distributed throughout the intestine, indicating that the barrier properties of GI mucus were compromised. In the mouse colorectum, MPP penetrated into mucus in the deeply in-folded surfaces to evenly coat the entire epithelial surface. Moreover, in a mouse model of UC, MPP were transported preferentially into the disrupted, ulcerated tissue. Our results suggest that delivering drugs in non-mucoadhesive MPP is likely to provide enhanced particle distribution, and thus drug delivery, in the GI tract, including to ulcerated tissues. PMID:25449804

  8. Does imatinib turn recurrent and/or metastasized gastrointestinal stromal tumors into a chronic disease? - single center experience.

    PubMed

    Armbrust, Thomas; Sobotta, Michael; Gunawan, Bastian; Füzesi, Laszlo; Langer, Claus; Cameron, Silke; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2009-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract supposed to arise from the cells of Cajal because of gain-of-function mutations of the tyrosine receptor kinases c-kit or platelet-derived growth factor receptor A. Imatinib selectively inhibits the kinase activity of both receptors. Despite this breakthrough in the treatment of GIST, resistance against imatinib has been reported to be as high as 50% after the first 2 years of treatment. Outcome of 13 consecutive patients with relapsed or metastasized GIST who were treated with imatinib was analyzed. Mean duration of treatment was 53.5 months. Four patients developed progressive disease and died after a mean treatment time of 31 months in spite of increase of imatinib dosages to 800 mg daily. Two patients (23%) developed a progressive disease after 46 months or 52 months of treatment. Two patients had a stable disease and five had a partial response. The overall progression rate was 46%, the mean survival time since primary diagnosis was 85.8 months. From our experience, frequency of resistance development to imatinib may be below that given in the literature (50% after 2 years). Individual treatment in specialized centers may improve compliance.

  9. A Foregut Duplication Cyst of the Stomach in Association with a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor and a Leiomyoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Andréanne; Sazonova, Olga; Marceau, Simon; Périgny, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Duplication cysts are rare benign lesions usually arising in the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman with an incidental gastric mass found on computed tomography during a pregraft workup for a familial cardiomyopathy. Methods. The mass was completely excised by partial gastrectomy and gross examination revealed a cystic lesion containing two small solid nodules in its wall. Microscopic evaluation and immunohistochemistry study were performed to further characterize the cyst and the nodules. A comprehensive literature review of the NCBI database PubMed was also carried out. Results. While the cyst was diagnosed as a foregut duplication cyst, the solid nodules proved to be concomitant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and leiomyoma. Both morphologic features and immunohistochemistry stains, including CD117, smooth muscle actin, and CD34 supported the diagnosis. Clinical course was benign and the patient had no clinical evidence of relapse ten months following the surgical procedure. The literature search did not reveal any other published case of a foregut duplication cyst presenting in combination with a GIST and a leiomyoma. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a composite lesion comprising a foregut duplication cyst of the stomach along with a leiomyoma and a GIST. PMID:28097030

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor and other primary metachronous or synchronous neoplasms as a suspicion criterion for syndromic setting.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Luppi, Gabriele; Martorana, Davide; Rossi, Giulio; Losi, Lorena; Bertolini, Federica; Sartori, Giuliana; Pellacani, Giovanni; Seidenari, Stefania; Boni, Elisa; Neri, Tauro Maria; Silini, Enrico; Tamburini, Elisa; Maiorana, Antonio; Conte, Pier Franco

    2010-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) may be sporadic or inherited. Although KIT and PDGFRA activating mutations are the oncogenic mechanisms in most sporadic and inherited GISTs, a small subset of GISTs are negative for both. Besides the classical Familial GIST Syndrome, GIST can occur as part of multi-neoplastic disease. The present study was designed to analyze the synchronous and metachronous tumors developed among GIST patients assessed by our institution for GIST Syndrome setting recognition. Patients (n=141) with primary GIST (77 men and 64 women) were recruited between 1988 and 2007 and their clinical and pathological records were reviewed. Mutation analysis of KIT, PDGFRA, NF1 and MMR genes was performed on somatic and peripheral blood DNA. GISTs occurred associated with other primary malignancies in 46 of 141 (32.6%) patients. The most common neoplasms were gastrointestinal and genitourinary. A novel exon 6 germline large deletion of NF1 was identified in the NF1/GIST kindred. The development of GIST associated with other neoplasms is common and diagnosis of peculiar benign associated-neoplasms warrants the search for familial cancer susceptibility. In particular, syndromic or familial settings have to be suspected in the presence of neurofibroma or lung chordoma in C-KIT and PDGFRA negative GIST patients.

  11. [A case of metachronous gastrointestinal perforation of a patient with metastatic rectal cancer during treatment with bevacizumab-based chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Sadatomo, Ai; Koinuma, Koji; Miki, Atsushi; Horie, Hisanaga; Yasuda, Yoshikazu

    2013-07-01

    A 64-year-old man received mFOLFOX6+bevacizumab chemotherapy for metastatic lung cancer after rectal cancer resection( Stage IV). After 28 courses, he had an abdominal pain with fever, and computed tomography showed pelvic abscess with stercolith of appendix. He was diagnosed as acute appendicitis with intra-abdominal abscess, and emergency appendectomy with drainage was performed. Two days after the operation, he was suspected to have a sutural leakage as was suggested from the properties of his drainage, therefore re-operation was performed. A small hole of the ileum, about 2mm in diameter, was observed. The margin of the hole showed neither inflammatory nor neoplastic change, and a suturing closure of the hole was performed. The post-operative course was uneventful. Histopathological findings of the resected appendix suggested that the perforation was caused by necrosis of metastatic cancer cells penetrating the appendiceal wall. This is a case of a bevacizumab-related metachronous perforation that occurred in different gastrointestinal origins within a very short term.

  12. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the ampulla of Vater with osteoclastic giant cells, osteoid-like matrix deposition, and aneurysmal bone cyst-like features.

    PubMed

    Candanedo-Gonzalez, Fernando; Camacho-Rebollar, Leslie; Uscanga, Candelaria Cordova; Utrilla, Alejandra Romero; Bucio, Maria Eugenia Palmerin; Rodriguez, Sandra Sanchez; Hernandez, Luis Mora

    2013-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are a heterogeneous group with a wide spectrum of histologic features. We describe the first case of 61-year-old woman who presented gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the ampulla of Vater with osteoclast-like giant cells surrounding osteoid-like material and aneurismal bone cyst-like areas. The phenotype was supported by light microscopy and corroborated by immunohistochemistry analysis. Because of the presence of osteoid-like and aneurismal bone cyst-like components, it is first necessary to make differential diagnosis with other entities such as metastatic osteosarcoma. Our case shows another form of differentiation that has not previously been reported. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Can the colour of per-rectal bleeding estimate the risk of lower gastrointestinal bleeding caused by malignant lesion?

    PubMed

    Lai, Pui-Yan; Chan, Kin-Wai; Wong, Carlos King-Ho; Meng, William; Luk, Wan

    2016-02-01

    To estimate the risk of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) caused by malignant lesion in patients presenting with per-rectal bleeding (PRB), by using visual aid as an objective measurement of PRB colour. This was a prospective observational study on patients presented with PRB to Family Medicine Specialty Clinic, who undergo flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) or colonoscopy (CLN) from December 2012 to September 2013. Patients aged 40 years old or above, haemodynamically stable, with normal haemoglobin level were included. Patients with a history of previous colonic surgery, refused to have FS or CLN, with ophthalmologic diseases such as colour blindness were excluded. Parameters including subjective description of PRB colour, number of chosen red colour by patients, source and distance of bleeding from anal verge were recorded for analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to identify the optimal cutoff level of colour for diagnosing colonic lesion. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by area under the ROC curve (AUC). Accountability of this model was assessed by logistic regression. The dark PRB colour was associated with diagnosis of tumour (p < 0.001) and advanced neoplastic polyp (p < 0.001). The light PRB colour was associated with the diagnosis of piles (p < 0.001). The performance of our model to predict tumour or advanced neoplastic polyps by colour (AUC, 0.798) had a better discriminative power than that to predict colonic lesion alone (AUC, 0.610) by ROC curve analysis. Objective measurement of PRB colour accurately estimated the risk of LGIB caused by malignant lesion in patients presenting with PRB.

  14. High-risk gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) and synovial sarcoma display similar angiogenic profiles: a nude mice xenograft study

    PubMed Central

    Giner, Francisco; Machado, Isidro; Lopez-Guerrero, Jose Antonio; Mayordomo-Aranda, Empar; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common primary mesenchymal tumour of the gastrointestinal tract. Spindle cell monophasic synovial sarcoma (SS) can be morphologically similar. Angiogenesis is a major factor for tumour growth and metastasis. Our aim was to compare the angiogenic expression profiles of high-risk GIST and spindle cell monophasic SS by histological, immunohistochemical and molecular characterisation of the neovascularisation established between xenotransplanted tumours and the host during the initial phases of growth in nude mice. Methods The angiogenic profile of two xenotransplanted human soft-tissue tumours were evaluated in 15 passages in nude mice using tissue microarrays (TMA). Tumour pieces were also implanted subcutaneously on the backs of 14 athymic Balb-c nude mice. The animals were sacrificed at 24, 48, and 96 h; and 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after implantation to perform histological, immunohistochemical, and molecular studies (neovascularisation experiments). Results Morphological similarities were apparent in the early stages of neoplastic growth of these two soft-tissue tumours throughout the passages in nude mice and in the two neovascularisation experiments. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated overexpression of pro-angiogenic factors between 24 h and 96 h after xenotransplantation in both tumours. Additionally, neoplastic cells coexpressed chemokines (CXCL9, CXCL10, GRO, and CXCL12) and their receptors in both tumours. Molecular studies showed two expression profiles, revealing an early and a late phase in the angiogenic process. Conclusion This model could provide information on the early stages of the angiogenic process in monophasic spindle cell SS and high-risk GIST and offers an excellent way to study possible tumour response to antiangiogenic drugs. PMID:28386296

  15. Molecular alterations and expression of succinate dehydrogenase complex in wild-type KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Celestino, Ricardo; Lima, Jorge; Faustino, Alexandra; Vinagre, João; Máximo, Valdemar; Gouveia, António; Soares, Paula; Lopes, José Manuel

    2013-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, disclosing somatic KIT, PDGFRA and BRAF mutations. Loss of function of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex is an alternative molecular mechanism in GISTs, namely in carriers of germline mutations of the SDH complex that develop Carney-Stratakis dyad characterized by multifocal GISTs and multicentric paragangliomas (PGLs). We studied a series of 25 apparently sporadic primary wild-type (WT) KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs occurring in patients without personal or familial history of PGLs, re-evaluated clinicopathological features and analyzed molecular alterations and immunohistochemistry expression of SDH complex. As control, we used a series of well characterized 49 KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. SDHB expression was absent in 20% and SDHB germline mutations were detected in 12% of WT GISTs. Germline SDHB mutations were significantly associated to younger age at diagnosis. A significant reduction in SDHB expression in WT GISTs was found when compared with KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. No significant differences were found when comparing DOG-1 and c-KIT expression in WT, SDHB-mutated and KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. Our results confirm the occurrence of germline SDH genes mutations in isolated, apparently sporadic WT GISTs. WT KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs without SDHB or SDHA/SDHB expression may correspond to Carney-Stratakis dyad or Carney triad. Most importantly, the possibility of PGLs (Carney-Stratakis dyad) and/or pulmonary chondroma (Carney triad) should be addressed in these patients and their kindred.

  16. Molecular alterations and expression of succinate dehydrogenase complex in wild-type KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Celestino, Ricardo; Lima, Jorge; Faustino, Alexandra; Vinagre, João; Máximo, Valdemar; Gouveia, António; Soares, Paula; Manuel Lopes, José

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, disclosing somatic KIT, PDGFRA and BRAF mutations. Loss of function of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex is an alternative molecular mechanism in GISTs, namely in carriers of germline mutations of the SDH complex that develop Carney–Stratakis dyad characterized by multifocal GISTs and multicentric paragangliomas (PGLs). We studied a series of 25 apparently sporadic primary wild-type (WT) KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs occurring in patients without personal or familial history of PGLs, re-evaluated clinicopathological features and analyzed molecular alterations and immunohistochemistry expression of SDH complex. As control, we used a series of well characterized 49 KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. SDHB expression was absent in 20% and SDHB germline mutations were detected in 12% of WT GISTs. Germline SDHB mutations were significantly associated to younger age at diagnosis. A significant reduction in SDHB expression in WT GISTs was found when compared with KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. No significant differences were found when comparing DOG-1 and c-KIT expression in WT, SDHB-mutated and KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. Our results confirm the occurrence of germline SDH genes mutations in isolated, apparently sporadic WT GISTs. WT KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs without SDHB or SDHA/SDHB expression may correspond to Carney–Stratakis dyad or Carney triad. Most importantly, the possibility of PGLs (Carney–Stratakis dyad) and/or pulmonary chondroma (Carney triad) should be addressed in these patients and their kindred. PMID:22948025

  17. Hedgehog pathway dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of human gastrointestinal stromal tumors via GLI-mediated activation of KIT expression

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Adam M.; Leonard, Stephanie Y.; Gao, Fei; Chan, Jonathan C.; Shi, Eileen; Chmielecki, Juliann; Morosini, Deborah; Wang, Kai; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Kendrick, Michael L.; Bardsley, Michael R.; De Siena, Martina; Mao, Junhao; Harismendy, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) arise within the interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC) lineage due to activating KIT/PDGFRA mutations. Both ICC and GIST possess primary cilia (PC), which coordinate PDGFRA and Hedgehog signaling, regulators of gastrointestinal mesenchymal development. Therefore, we hypothesized that Hedgehog signaling may be altered in human GIST and controls KIT expression. Quantitative RT-PCR, microarrays, and next generation sequencing were used to describe Hedgehog/PC-related genes in purified human ICC and GIST. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches were employed to investigate the effects of GLI manipulation on KIT expression and GIST cell viability. We report that Hedgehog pathway and PC components are expressed in ICC and GIST and subject to dysregulation during GIST oncogenesis, irrespective of KIT/PDGFRA mutation status. Using genomic profiling, 10.2% of 186 GIST studied had potentially deleterious genomic alterations in 5 Hedgehog-related genes analyzed, including in the PTCH1 tumor suppressor (1.6%). Expression of the predominantly repressive GLI isoform, GLI3, was inversely correlated with KIT mRNA levels in GIST cells and non-KIT/non-PDGFRA mutant GIST. Overexpression of the 83-kDa repressive form of GLI3 or small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of the activating isoforms GLI1/2 reduced KIT mRNA. Treatment with GLI1/2 inhibitors, including arsenic trioxide, significantly increased GLI3 binding to the KIT promoter, decreased KIT expression, and reduced viability in imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant GIST cells. These data offer new evidence that genes necessary for Hedgehog signaling and PC function in ICC are dysregulated in GIST. Hedgehog signaling activates KIT expression irrespective of mutation status, offering a novel approach to treat imatinib-resistant GIST. PMID:27793025

  18. First Case Report of a Sporadic Adrenocortical Carcinoma With Gastric Metastasis and a Synchronous Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Kovecsi, Attila; Jung, Ioan; Bara, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Azamfirei, Leonard; Kovacs, Zsolt; Gurzu, Simona

    2015-09-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare tumor with high aggresivity that can associate systemic metastases. A 71-year-old man was hospitalized for gastric cancer. The abdominal computed tomography also revealed a tumor above the right kidney. Total gastrectomy and right adrenalectomy were performed. The encapsulated tumor of the adrenal gland weighed 560 grams and presented diffuse tumor architecture under microscope, with capsular, sinusoidal, and vascular invasion. The large tumor cells had a polygonal shape, with slight basophilic, eosinophilic, or vacuolated cytoplasm, pleomorphic nuclei, and a high mitotic rate. In the stomach, the protruded tumor was covered by normal mucosa; under microscope, the tumor cells were observed only in the submucosal layer. In primary adrenal tumor and gastric metastasis the tumor cells were marked by vimentin, inhibin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, and calretinin. Based on these criteria, the diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) with gastric metastasis and no lymph node metastases was established. A synchronous 10 × 10-mm-sized gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the stomach, without mitoses, was also identified. So far, as we know, this is the 15th case of ever reported synchronous/metachronous sporadic ACCs; the ACC-related gastric metastases either synchronous ACC and GIST, has not been reported in the literature previously.

  19. First Case Report of a Sporadic Adrenocortical Carcinoma With Gastric Metastasis and a Synchronous Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kovecsi, Attila; Jung, Ioan; Bara, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar jr.; Azamfirei, Leonard; Kovacs, Zsolt; Gurzu, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare tumor with high aggresivity that can associate systemic metastases. A 71-year-old man was hospitalized for gastric cancer. The abdominal computed tomography also revealed a tumor above the right kidney. Total gastrectomy and right adrenalectomy were performed. The encapsulated tumor of the adrenal gland weighed 560 grams and presented diffuse tumor architecture under microscope, with capsular, sinusoidal, and vascular invasion. The large tumor cells had a polygonal shape, with slight basophilic, eosinophilic, or vacuolated cytoplasm, pleomorphic nuclei, and a high mitotic rate. In the stomach, the protruded tumor was covered by normal mucosa; under microscope, the tumor cells were observed only in the submucosal layer. In primary adrenal tumor and gastric metastasis the tumor cells were marked by vimentin, inhibin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, and calretinin. Based on these criteria, the diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) with gastric metastasis and no lymph node metastases was established. A synchronous 10 × 10-mm-sized gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the stomach, without mitoses, was also identified. So far, as we know, this is the 15th case of ever reported synchronous/metachronous sporadic ACCs; the ACC-related gastric metastases either synchronous ACC and GIST, has not been reported in the literature previously. PMID:26376405

  20. [Autopsy case of von Recklinghausen's disease associated with lung cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach, and duodenal carcinoid tumor].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Miki; Wakabayashi, Osamu; Araya, Yoshikazu; Jinushi, Eisei; Yoshida, Fumiaki

    2009-09-01

    A 58-year-old man with von Recklinghausen's disease was admitted for further investigation of right chest pain. Chest X-ray revealed multiple emphysematous bullae in both lungs and a tumor shadow in the right upper lobe. Bronchofiberscopy was performed, but an adequate specimen was not obtained. The tumor was diagnosed as a non-small-cell lung cancer with direct invasion to the adjacent rib. Although chemotherapy and radiotherapy resulted in decrease in tumor size, the tumor subsequently increased in size and the patient died 14 months after the first admission. Autopsy revealed multiple emphysematous bullae, poorly differentiated adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung, gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach, and duodenal carcinoid tumor. This case suggests the possibility that von Recklinghausen's disease associated with emphysematous bullae is a risk factor for lung cancer. It has also been suggested that the genetic abnormality responsible for von Recklinghausen's disease increases the risk for various types of malignancy. Although von Recklinghausen's disease is reportedly associated with various malignant tumors, it is quite rare for von Recklinghausen's disease to be associated with triple non-neurogenic tumors. Careful observation is mandatory for patients with von Recklinghausen's disease.

  1. The diagnostic value of endoscopic ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanchao; Qian, Linxue; Li, Peng; Zhang, Shutian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and contrast-enhanced harmonic (CEH) EUS in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Patients and Methods: About 19 patients with suspected GISTs underwent EUS and CEH-EUS before tumor resection. The malignant potential was assessed according to the modified Fletcher classification system. Patients were divided into lower (Group I) and higher (Group II) malignant potential group. The clinical characteristics and EUS/CEH-EUS features were compared between two groups. Results: The tumor size in Group II was significantly larger than that in Group I (14.6 ± 5.8 mm vs. 32.1 ± 8.4 mm, P < 0.05). Heterogeneous echogenicity was observed in 4 (4/8) cases in Group II and none in Group I (P < 0.05). Irregular intratumoral vessels were detected in 6 cases in Group II and none in Group I (P < 0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of irregular vessel detection for discriminating higher from lower malignant potential GISTs were 75% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value of detection of irregular vessels to high malignant potential GISTs were 33% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Detection of irregular intratumoral vessels can predict higher malignant potential before tumor resection. The tumor size and echogenicity are assistant factors for malignant potential assessment. Endoscopic resection is an efficacious treatment with good security for appropriate patients. PMID:27080610

  2. Is surgery mandatory in locally advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors after imatinib? A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Congedo, Teresa; Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Di Noia, Vincenzo; Di Dio, Carmela; Quirino, Michela; Barone, Carlo; Cassano, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Oesophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare neoplasms (about 2% of all GISTs); radical surgery is the standard treatment of all GISTs but in case of locally advanced and unresectable disease no clear treatment guide lines are available. Studies including neoadjuvant imatinib mesylate (IM) are relatively recent, includes small sample size of heterogeneous patients and do not report a standardized duration of neoadjuvant treatment. The main question still remains whether surgery after neoadjuvant IM gives a survival benefit in locally advanced disease. A 46-year-old man with locally advanced unresectable oesophageal GIST harboring KIT exon 11 mutation was treated in our institution for 12 months with neoadjuvant IM; a reduction of 83% of tumor volume was obtained in 9-month of neoadjuvant IM, but in the last 3 months no further response was seen. After neoadjuvant therapy, patient underwent radical surgery and adjuvant IM, which is still ongoing. Since no definitive data are available about survival benefit of surgery after neoadjuvant IM in locally advanced GISTs, a careful balance between morbidity and mortality derived from surgery should be considered and more studies are needed to better define the utility and the optimal duration of neoadjuvant treatment. PMID:28280629

  3. Circulating levels of cell adhesion molecule L1 as a prognostic marker in gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background L1 cell adhesion molecule (CD171) is expressed in many malignant tumors and its expression correlates with unfavourable outcome. It thus represents a target for tumor diagnosis and therapy. An earlier study conducted by our group identified L1 expression levels in primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) as a prognostic marker. The aim of the current study was to compare L1 serum levels of GIST patients with those of healthy controls and to determine whether levels of soluble L1 in sera could serve as a prognostic marker. Methods Using a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), soluble L1 was measured in sera of 93 GIST patients und 151 healthy controls. Soluble L1 levels were then correlated with clinicopathological data. Results Median levels of soluble L1 were significantly higher (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U test) in sera of GIST patients compared to healthy individuals. Median soluble L1 levels were particularly elevated in patients with recurrence and relapse (p < 0.05; Mann Whitney U test). Conclusion These results suggest that high soluble L1 levels predict poor prognosis and may thus be a promising tumor marker that can contribute to individualise therapy. PMID:21600041

  4. Evaluation of the Relationships Between Computed Tomography Features, Pathological Findings, and Prognostic Risk Assessment in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Iannicelli, Elsa; Carbonetti, Francesco; Federici, Giulia Francesca; Martini, Isabella; Caterino, Salvatore; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Panzuto, Francesco; Briani, Chiara; David, Vincenzo

    The aim of this study was to correlate computed tomography (CT) findings with pathology in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). A retrospective evaluation of CT images of 44 patients with GISTs was performed. Computed tomography findings analyzed were location, size, margins, degree and pattern of contrast enhancement, angiogenesis, necrosis, signs of invasion, peritoneal effusion, peritoneal implants, surface ulceration, and calcifications.Associations between CT features and mitotic rate, Miettinen classes of risk, lesions size, and among CT features were investigated. χ Test and Fisher test were performed. Mitotic rate was associated with margins (P = 0.016) and with adjacent organ invasion (P = 0.043). Pattern of contrast enhancement (P = 0.002), angiogenesis (P = 0.006), necrosis (P = 0.006), invasion of adjacent organs (P = 0.011), and margins (P = 0.006) were associated with classes of risk. Several associations (P < 0.05) between lesion size and CT features and among all the investigated CT features were found. Computed tomography features could reflect GIST biology being associated with the mitotic rate and with classes of risk.

  5. Advances in preclinical therapeutics development using small animal imaging and molecular analyses: the gastrointestinal stromal tumors model.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, M A; Landuzzi, L; Nicoletti, G; Nanni, C; Boschi, S; Piazzi, G; Santini, D; Di Battista, M; Castellucci, P; Lodi, F; Fanti, S; Lollini, P-L; Biasco, G

    2009-09-01

    The large use of target therapies in the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) highlighted the urgency to integrate new molecular imaging technologies, to develop new criteria for tumor response evaluation and to reach a more comprehensive definition of the molecular target. These aspects, which come from clinical experiences, are not considered enough in preclinical research studies which aim to evaluate the efficacy of new drugs or new combination of drugs with molecular target. We developed a xenograft animal model GIST882 using nude mice. We evaluated both the molecular and functional characterization of the tumor mass. The mutational analysis of KIT receptor of the GIST882 cell lines and tumor mass showed a mutation on exon 13 that was still present after in vivo cell growth. The glucose metabolism and cell proliferation was evaluated with a small animal PET using both FDG and FLT. The experimental development of new therapies for GIST treatment requires sophisticated animal models in order to represent the tumor molecular heterogeneity already demonstrated in the clinical setting and in order to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment also considering the inhibition of tumor metabolism, and not only considering the change in size of tumors. This approach of cancer research on GISTs is crucial and essential for innovative perspectives that could cross over to other types of cancer.

  6. Detection of mutations in the BRAF gene in patients with KIT and PDGFRA wild-type gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Jasek, Karin; Buzalkova, Veronika; Minarik, Gabriel; Stanclova, Andrea; Szepe, Peter; Plank, Lukas; Lasabova, Zora

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by mutations in exons 9, 11, 13, and 17 of KIT or exons 12, 14, and 18 of PDGFRA gene. However, approximately 10 to 15 % of GISTs lack the mutations in KIT and PDGFRA, and these are referred to as wild-type GISTs which are less sensitive to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors. The aim of this study was to detect BRAF mutations in patients with wild-type GISTs. We applied a sensitive allele-specific PCR, which was optimized using the V600E mutation-harboring cell line RKO, followed by verification of the results by dideoxy sequencing. We selected 149 GIST patients without detectable mutations in KIT and PDGFRA genes from the Slovak national GIST register and analyzed biopsy specimens for the presence of BRAF mutations in exon 15. We identified nine patients with the V600E mutation. The BRAF-driven GISTs were primary gastric (n = 3), small intestinal (n = 3), colon (n = 1), and of uncertain origin (n = 1). We also included a liver metastasis of a patient with a simultaneous KIT exon 11-mutated intra-abdominal metastasis. We conclude that genome analysis of wild-type GISTs for mutations should include the BRAF gene, as its mutation status contributes to understanding of pathogenesis and might be important for decisions on therapy.

  7. Emerging Agents for the Treatment of Advanced, Imatinib-Resistant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Sebastian; Joensuu, Heikki

    2015-08-01

    Imatinib is strongly positioned as the recommended first-line agent for most patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) due to its good efficacy and tolerability. Imatinib-resistant advanced GIST continues to pose a therapeutic challenge, likely due to the frequent presence of multiple mutations that confer drug resistance. Sunitinib and regorafenib are approved as second- and third-line agents, respectively, for patients whose GIST does not respond to imatinib or who do not tolerate imatinib, and their use is supported by large randomized trials. ATP-mimetic tyrosine kinase inhibitors provide clinical benefit even in heavily pretreated GIST suggesting that oncogenic dependency on KIT frequently persists. Several potentially useful tyrosine kinase inhibitors with distinct inhibitory profiles against both KIT ATP-binding domain and activation loop mutations have not yet been fully evaluated. Agents that have been found promising in preclinical models and early clinical trials include small molecule KIT and PDGFRA mutation-specific inhibitors, heat shock protein inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, allosteric KIT inhibitors, KIT and PDGFRA signaling pathway inhibitors, and immunological approaches including antibody-drug conjugates. Concomitant or sequential administration of tyrosine kinase inhibitors with KIT signaling pathway inhibitors require further evaluation, as well as rotation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as a means to suppress drug-resistant cell clones.

  8. Clinicopathological significance of c-KIT mutation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lin; Zou, Lei; Zhao, Wenhua; Wang, Yansen; Liu, Bo; Yao, Hongliang; Yu, Haihua

    2015-01-01

    Many types of KIT mutations have been observed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), but their prognostic and predictive significance are still unclear. A meta-analysis and literature review were conducted to estimate the contribution of KIT mutations in prognostic parameters and clinic-pathological significance of GISTs. A total of 18 relevant articles from PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science databases were included in this study. The frequency of KIT mutation was significantly increased in the GIST patients with higher mitosis (≥5/50 high-power fields (HPFs) and larger size (≥5 cm) of tumors than in those with lower MI (≤5/50HPFs) and smaller size (≤5 cm) of GISTs respectively. The rate of KIT mutation was not significantly changed between GISTs in stomachs and in small intestines. KIT mutational status has prognostic significance for patients’ outcome. GIST patients with KIT exon 9 mutations have higher risk of progression than those with exon 11 mutations. 5 year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate was significantly higher in patients with KIT exon 11 deletion than in those with other type of KIT exon 11 mutations. The deletion involving KIT exon 11, particularly codons 557–558, is a valuable predictor of prognosis for patients with GISTs. PMID:26349547

  9. A nonrandom association of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and desmoid tumor (deep fibromatosis): case series of 28 patients

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, A. G.; Rink, L.; Godwin, A. K.; Miettinen, M.; Joensuu, H.; Strosberg, J. R.; Gronchi, A.; Corless, C. L.; Goldstein, D.; Rubin, B. P.; Maki, R. G.; Lazar, A. J.; Lev, D.; Trent, J. C.; von Mehren, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and desmoid tumors (DTs) are two rare mesenchymal tumor. Anecdotal reports of individuals with both diseases led us to make the hypothesis that the association is a nonrandom event as the probability would be extremely low to observe such cases if they were independent events. Patients and methods: We evaluated the existence of patients with GIST and DT in a large multicenter cohort at 10 institutions in the United States, Australia and Europe. Data on gender, age at diagnosis, KIT, PDGFRA, CTNNB1 mutation status and follow-up time after diagnosis were collected. Results: We identified 28 patients diagnosed with both tumors. DT was diagnosed after GIST in 75% of patients and concomitantly in 21%. In only one case (4%), GIST was diagnosed after DT. KIT or PDGFRA mutations were detected in 12 of 14 GIST, 9 in KIT exon 11, 2 in KIT exon 9 and 1 in PDGFRA. Conclusion: A statistical analysis of these 28 cases suggests a nonrandom association between GIST and DT. Further studies may be able to elucidate the underlying biology responsible for this association. PMID:21994214

  10. Sporadic diffuse segmental interstitial cell of Cajal hyperplasia harbouring two gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) mimicking hereditary GIST syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Mafalda Costa; Stamp, Gordon; Mudan, Satvinder

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are thought to derive from or differentiate towards the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) as most demonstrate a similar immunoprofile: CD117+, CD34+ and DOG1+. ICC hyperplasia refers to KIT-expressing microscopic spindle cell proliferations involving the myenteric plexus. Case report 74 year-old male presented with a 5-year history of heartburn and dysphagia. Imaging revealed a 4 cm GIST in the gastric fundus. Pathology of the resected specimen revealed diffuse segmental ICC hyperplasia harbouring two macroscopic GISTs and a ‘tumorlet’. A mutation in c-KIT exon 11 was detected in both the solid and the diffuse components. Discussion ICC hyperplasia can occur either as a sporadic focal lesion or in a syndromic setting, known to predispose to multiple GIST tumours at different sites. The majority of cases of sporadic ICC hyperplasia previously reported were of localised type. The hereditary form is mostly caused by germline mutations in c-KIT and PDGFRA or in patients with NF-1 andpresents as a diffuse hyperplasia, usually with a confluent, nodular or multifocal growth pattern. Conclusion We describe a diffuse form of sporadic ICC hyperplasia harbouring multifocal GISTs, mimicking diffuse ICC hyperplasia in hereditary GIST syndromes. Detection of somatic c-KIT exon 11 mutation ruled out a hereditary disorder. PMID:26521201

  11. Microfluidic Deletion/Insertion Analysis for Rapid Screening of KIT and PDGFRA Mutations in CD117-Positive Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zamò, Alberto; Bertolaso, Anna; Franceschetti, Ilaria; Weirich, Gregor; Capelli, Paola; Pecori, Sara; Chilosi, Marco; Hoefler, Heinz; Menestrina, Fabio; Scarpa, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) frequently harbor mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes, the presence and type of which correlate with the response to the kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate. Because most GIST mutations are deletions/insertions, we used a microfluidic apparatus to detect these size variations in polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA. This approach, termed microfluidic deletion/insertion analysis (MIDIA), identified mutations in 30 of 50 DNA samples from paraffin-embedded CD117-positive GISTs (60%), comprising 25 deletions and five insertions. Sequencing of 14 MIDIA-positive samples confirmed the deletions/insertions, including two 3-bp alterations. Sequencing of all 20 MIDIA-negative samples also showed highly consistent results with MIDIA because 10 cases were wild type and eight displayed a single base substitution in which detection by MIDIA was not expected. Sequencing also revealed a 3-bp deletion undetected by MIDIA, thus establishing the resolution limit of MIDIA at deletions/insertions ≥3 bp. Denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis confirmed all mutations detected by MIDIA and sequencing. We propose MIDIA as the first step in mutational screening of GIST because it allowed the detection of 75% of mutated cases (94% of deletions/insertions) in less than 30 minutes after polymerase chain reaction amplification and at a lower cost compared with denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography and sequencing, which might then be used only for MIDIA-negative cases. PMID:17384206

  12. Opposing roles of KIT and ABL1 in the therapeutic response of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) cells to imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Jessica L; Boichuk, Sergei; Ali, Areej A; Patil, Sneha S; Liu, Lijun; Lee, Donna M; Brown, Matthew F; Makielski, Kathleen R; Liu, Ying; Taguchi, Takahiro; Kuan, Shih-Fan; Duensing, Anette

    2017-01-17

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are caused by activating mutations of the KIT receptor tyrosine kinase. The small molecule inhibitor imatinib mesylate was initially developed to target the ABL1 kinase, which is constitutively activated through chromosomal translocation in BCR-ABL1-positive chronic myeloid leukemia. Because of cross-reactivity of imatinib against the KIT kinase, the drug is also successfully used for the treatment of GIST. Although inhibition of KIT clearly has a major role in the therapeutic response of GIST to imatinib, the contribution of concomitant inhibition of ABL in this context has never been explored. We show here that ABL1 is expressed in the majority of GISTs, including human GIST cell lines. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown, we demonstrate that depletion of KIT in conjunction with ABL1 - hence mimicking imatinib treatment - leads to reduced apoptosis induction and attenuated inhibition of cellular proliferation when compared to depletion of KIT alone. These results are explained by an increased activity of the AKT survival kinase, which is mediated by the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2, likely through direct phosphorylation. Our results highlight that distinct inhibitory properties of targeted agents can impede antitumor effects and hence provide insights for rational drug development. Novel KIT-targeted agents to treat GIST should therefore comprise an increased specificity for KIT while at the same time displaying a reduced ability to inhibit ABL1.

  13. What impact has the introduction of a synoptic report for rectal cancer had on reporting outcomes for specialist gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal pathologists?

    PubMed

    Messenger, David E; McLeod, Robin S; Kirsch, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Synoptic pathology reports increase the completeness of reporting for colorectal cancer. Despite the perceived superiority of specialist reporting, service demands dictate that general pathologists report colorectal cancer specimens in many centers. To determine differences in the completeness of rectal cancer reporting between specialist gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal pathologists in both the narrative and synoptic formats. Pathology reports from rectal cancer resections performed between 1997 and 2008 were reviewed. A standardized, synoptic report was formally introduced in 2001. Reports were assessed for completeness according to 10 mandatory elements from the College of American Pathologists checklist. Overall, synoptic reports (n  =  315) were more complete than narrative reports (n  =  183) for TNM stage, distance to the circumferential radial margin, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, extramural venous invasion, perineural invasion, and regional deposits (all P < .01). Compared with those by nonspecialist pathologists, narrative reports by gastrointestinal pathologists were more complete for lymphovascular invasion (59.3% versus 35.9%, P  =  .02) and extramural venous invasion (70.4% versus 35.9%, P  =  .001), but there was no difference in completeness once a synoptic report was adopted. Gastrointestinal pathologists tended to report the presence of extramural venous invasion more frequently in both the narrative (18.5% versus 5.1%, P  =  .01) and synoptic formats (25.5% versus 14.6%, P  =  .02). Completeness of reporting, irrespective of subspecialist interest, was dramatically increased by the use of a synoptic report. Improvements in completeness were most pronounced among nongastrointestinal pathologists, enabling them to attain a level of report completeness comparable to that of gastrointestinal pathologists. Further studies are required to determine whether there are actual discrepancies in the detection of

  14. Comparison of Esophageal, Rectal, and Gastrointestinal Temperatures During Passive Rest After Exercise in The Heat: The Influence of Hydration.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Yuri; Adams, William M; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-08-24

    It is unknown how valid esophageal, rectal, and gastrointestinal temperatures (TES, TRE, and TGI) compare after exercise-induced hyperthermia in various hydration states. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences between TES, TRE, and TGI during passive rest following exercise-induced hyperthermia under two different hydration states: euhydrated (EU) and hypohydrated (HY). Randomized-crossover design. Controlled laboratory setting. Nine recreationally active male participants (mean±SD; age, 24±4; height, 177.3±9.9cm; body mass, 76.7±11.6kg; body fat, 14.7±5.8%). Participants completed two trials (EU and HY) consisting of a bout of treadmill exercise (a 10 minute walk ranging 4.8-7.2km·hr(-1) at a 5% grade followed by a 20 minute jog ranging 8.0-12.1km·hr(-1) at a 1% grade) in a hot environment (ambient temperature, 39.3±1.0°C; relative humidity, 37.6±6.0%; wet bulb globe temperature, 31.3±1.5°C) followed by passive rest. Root mean squared difference (RMSD) was used to compare the variance of temperature readings at corresponding time points for TRE vs TGI, TRE vs TES, and TGI vs TES in EU and HY. RMSD values were compared using three-way repeated measures ANOVA. Post hoc analysis of significant main effects was done using Tukey's HSD with significance set at p<0.05. RMSD values (°C) for all device comparisons were significantly different in EU (TRE-TGI, 0.11±0.12; TRE-TES, 1.58±1.01; TGI-TES, 2.04±1.19) than HY (TRE-TGI, 0.22±0.28; TRE-TES, 1.27±0.61; TGI-TES, 1.16±0.76) (p<0.01). Across the 45-minute bout of passive rest, there were no differences in TRE, TGI and TES between EU and HY trials (p=0.468). During passive rest after exercise in the heat, TRE and TGI were in good agreement when tracking body temperature, with a better agreement appearing in those maintaining a state of euhydration versus those who became hypohydrated during exercise; however, this small difference does not appear to be of clinical significance.

  15. Frequence, Spectrum and Prognostic Impact of Additional Malignancies in Patients With Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors1234

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, K.; Wolf, S.; Mayer, B.; Schmidt, S.A.; Agaimy, A.; Henne-Bruns, D.; Knippschild, U.; Schwab, M.; Schmieder, M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available data on prognostic implication of additional neoplasms in GIST miss comprehensive information on patient outcome with regard to overall or disease specific and disease free survival. Registry data of GIST patients with and without additional neoplasm were compared in retrospective case series. We investigated a total of 836 patients from the multi-center Ulmer GIST registry. Additionally, a second cohort encompassing 143 consecutively recruited patients of a single oncology center were analyzed. The frequency of additional malignant neoplasms in GIST patients was 31.9% and 42.0% in both cohorts with a mean follow-up time of 54 and 65 months (median 48 and 60 months), respectively. The spectrum of additional neoplasms in both cohorts encompasses gastrointestinal tumors (43.5%), uro-genital and breast cancers (34.1%), hematological malignancies (7.3%), skin cancer (7.3%) and others. Additional neoplasms have had a significant impact on patient outcome. The five year overall survival in GIST with additional malignant neoplasms (n = 267) was 62.8% compared to 83.4% in patients without other tumors (n = 569) (P < .001, HR=0.397, 95% CI: 0.298-0.530). Five-year disease specific survival was not different between both groups (90.8% versus 90.9%). 34.2% of all deaths (n = 66 of n = 193) were GIST-related. The presented data suggest a close association between the duration of follow-up and the rate of additional malignancies in GIST patients. Moreover the data indicate a strong impact of additional malignant neoplasms in GIST on patient outcome. A comprehensive follow-up strategy of GIST patients appears to be warranted. PMID:25622906

  16. Comparison of Different Risk Classification Systems in 558 Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors after R0-Resection

    PubMed Central

    Schmieder, Michael; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Mayer, Benjamin; Knippschild, Uwe; Rolke, Claudia; Schwab, Matthias; Kramer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to adjuvant treatment concepts for patients with R0-resected gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), a reproducible and reliable risk classification system proved of utmost importance for optimal treatment of patients and prediction of prognosis. The aim of this study was to reevaluate the impact of five widely-applied and well-established GIST risk classification systems (i.e., scores by Fletcher, Miettinen, Huang, Joensuu, and TNM classification) on a series of 558 GIST patients with long-term follow-up after R0 resection. Methods: Tumor size, mitotic count and site were used in variable combination to predict high- and low risk patients by the use of the five risk classification models. For survival analyses disease-specific survival, disease-free survival and overall-survival were investigated. Patients with initial metastatic disease or incompletely resectable tumors were excluded. Results: All GIST classification models distinguished well between patients with high-risk and low-risk tumors and none of the five risk systems was superior to predict patient outcome. The models showed significant heterogeneity. There was no significant difference between the different risk-groups regarding overall-survival. Subdivision of GIST patients with very low- and low-risk appeared to be negligible. Conclusions: Currently applied GIST risk classification systems are comparable to predict high- or low-risk patients with initial non-metastatic and completely resected GIST. However, the heterogeneity of the high-risk group and the absence of differences in overall survival indicate the need for more precise tumor- and patient-related criteria for better stratification of GIST and identification of patients who would benefit best from adjuvant tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. PMID:28082898

  17. SDHA loss of function mutations in a subset of young adult wild-type gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine; Chen, Chun-Liang; Sung, Yun-Shao; Singer, Samuel; DeMatteo, Ronald P; LaQuaglia, Michael P; Besmer, Peter; Socci, Nicholas; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2012-09-14

    A subset of KIT/PDGFRA wild-type gastrointestinal stromal tumors (WT GIST) have been associated with alteration of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex II function. A recent report identified four non-syndromic, KIT/PDGFRA WT GIST harboring compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations in SDHA encoding the main subunit of the SDH complex II. Next generation sequencing was applied on five pediatric and one young adult WT GIST, by whole exome capture and SOLiD 3-plus system sequencing. The putative mutations were first confirmed by Sanger sequencing and then screened on a larger panel of 11 pediatric and young adult WT GIST, including 5 in the context of Carney triad. A germline p.Arg31X nonsense SDHA mutation was identified in one of the six cases tested by SOLiD platform. An additional p.D38V missense mutation in SDHA exon 2 was identified by Sanger sequencing in the extended KIT/PDGFRA WT GIST patients cohort. Western blotting showed loss of SDHA expression in the two cases harboring SDHA mutations, while expression being retained in the other WT GIST tumors. Results were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry for both SDHA and SDHB, which showed a concurrent loss of expression of both proteins in SDHA-mutant lesions, while the remaining WT tumors showed only loss of SDHB expression. Germline and/or somatic aberrations of SDHA occur in a small subset of KIT/PDGFRA WT GISTs, outside the Carney's triad and are associated with loss of both SDHA and SDHB protein expression. Mutations of the SDH complex II are more particularly associated with KIT/PDGFRA WT GIST occurring in young adults. Although pediatric GIST consistently display alterations of SDHB protein expression, further molecular studies are needed to identify the crucial genes involved in their tumorigenesis.

  18. Autophagy is involved in endogenous and NVP-AUY922-induced KIT degradation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yuan-Shuo; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Shih, Neng-Yao; Chiang, Nai-Jung; Li, Chien-Feng; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a prototype of mutant KIT oncogene-driven tumor. Prolonged tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment may result in a resistant phenotype through acquired secondary KIT mutation. Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90AA1) is a chaperone protein responsible for protein maturation and stability, and KIT is a known client protein of HSP90AA1. Inhibition of HSP90AA1 has been shown to destabilize KIT protein by enhancing its degradation via the proteasome-dependent pathway. In this study, we demonstrated that NVP-AUY922 (AUY922), a new class of HSP90AA1 inhibitor, is effective in inhibiting the growth of GIST cells expressing mutant KIT protein, the imatinib-sensitive GIST882 and imatinib-resistant GIST48 cells. The growth inhibition was accompanied with a sustained reduction of both total and phosphorylated KIT proteins and the induction of apoptosis in both cell lines. Surprisingly, AUY922-induced KIT reduction could be partially reversed by pharmacological inhibition of either autophagy or proteasome degradation pathway. The blockade of autophagy alone led to the accumulation of the KIT protein, highlighting the role of autophagy in endogenous KIT turnover. The involvement of autophagy in endogenous and AUY922-induced KIT protein turnover was further confirmed by the colocalization of KIT with MAP1LC3B-, acridine orange- or SQSTM1-labeled autophagosome, and by the accumulation of KIT in GIST cells by silencing either BECN1 or ATG5 to disrupt autophagosome activity. Therefore, the results not only highlight the potential application of AUY922 for the treatment of KIT-expressing GISTs, but also provide the first evidence for the involvement of autophagy in endogenous and HSP90AA1 inhibitor-induced KIT degradation. PMID:23196876

  19. Predicting malignant potential of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Role of p16 and E2F1 expression.

    PubMed

    Tetikkurt, Umit Seza; Ozaydin, Ipek Yildiz; Ceylan, Sule; Gurbuz, Yesim; Erdogan, Nusret; Oz, Feriha

    2010-07-01

    Altered expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins in GISTs (gastrointestinal stromal tumors) may be the mechanism for their diversity in clinical behavior. The use of these tumorigenetic and cell proliferative proteins may provide an alternative route for follow-up and treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic relevance of the E2F1 and p16 expression in GISTs. Tissues from 21 cases with GIST were collected retrospectively. Tumor grade was designated according to the consensus system. Immunohistochemistry was done with antibodies against Ki-67, p16, E2F1. For statistical analysis, Ki-67 proliferation index was evaluated in 2 categories: < or =10% and >10%, whereas p16 expression was scored as negative or positive. E2F1 expression cutoff values were tested for risk group variables as >5% and >10%. Correlation between the presence of necrosis, Ki-67 proliferation index, p16, E2F1 expression and the risk grade was determined by Spearman correlation test. Sensitivity and specificity were determined by Fisher exact test with P < or =0.05 considered as significant. High E2F1 expression (over 10%) and high Ki-67 proliferation index (over 10%) correlated significantly with increasing risk grade. There was also a significant correlation between the presence of necrosis and high-risk grade. No correlation was found between the risk grade and p16 expression. Our results suggest that in addition to high Ki-67 proliferation index, high E2F1 expression may also be a useful predictive marker for malignant potential of GISTs.

  20. Successful establishment of patient-derived tumor xenografts from gastrointestinal stromal tumor-a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Quan; Tong, Han-Xing; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Ying-Yong; Li, Jing-Lei; Wang, Jiong-Yuan; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Lu, Wei-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDTX) generally represent a kind of more reliable model of human disease, by which a potential drugs’ preclinical efficacy could be evaluated. To date, no stable gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) PDTX models have been reported. In this study, we aimed to establish stable GIST PDTX models and to evaluate whether these models accurately reflected the histological feature of the corresponding patient tumors and create a reliable GIST PDTX models for our future experiment. By engrafting fresh patient GIST tissues into immune-compromised mice (BALB/c athymic mice), 4 PDTX models were established. Histological features were assessed by a qualified pathologist based on H&E staining, CD117 and DOG-1. We also conduct whole exome sequencing(WES) for the 4 established GIST PDTX models to test if the model still harbored the same mutation detected in corresponding patient tumors and get a more intensive vision for the genetic profile of the models we have established, which will help a lot for our future experiment. To explore the tumorigenesis mechanism for GIST, we also have a statistical analysis for the genes detected as nonsynchronous-mutated simultaneously in 4 samples. All 4 GIST PDTX models retained the histological features of the corresponding human tumors, with original morphology type and positive stains for CD117 and DOG-1. Between the GIST PDTX models and their parental tumors, a same mutation site was detected, which confirmed the genetic consistency. The stability of molecular profiles observed within the GIST PDTX models provides confidence in the utility and translational significance of these models for in vivo testing of personalized therapies. To date, we conducted the first study to successfully establish a GIST PDTX model whose genetic profiles were revealed by whole exome sequencing. Our experience could be of great use. PMID:27186422

  1. The HSP90 Inhibitor, AT13387, Is Effective against Imatinib-Sensitive and -Resistant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Tomoko; Van Looy, Thomas; Curry, Jayne E.; Rodriguez-Lopez, Ana M.; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Zhu, Meijun; Donsky, Rachel; Morgan, Jennifer G.; Mayeda, Mark; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Schöffski, Patrick; Lyons, John; Thompson, Neil T.; Wallis, Nicola G.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are characterized by activating mutations of KIT, an HSP90 client protein. Further secondary resistance mutations within KIT limit clinical responses to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib. The dependence of KIT and its mutated forms on HSP90 suggests that HSP90 inhibition might be a valuable treatment option for GIST, which would be equally effective on imatinib-sensitive and -resistant clones. We investigated the activity of AT13387, a potent HSP90 inhibitor currently being evaluated in clinical trials, in both in vitro and in vivo GIST models. AT13387 inhibited the proliferation of imatinib-sensitive (GIST882, GIST-T1) and -resistant (GIST430, GIST48) cell lines, including those resistant to the geldanamycin analogue HSP90 inhibitor, 17-AAG. Treatment with AT13387 resulted in depletion of HSP90 client proteins, KIT and AKT, along with their phospho-forms in imatinib-sensitive and -resistant cell lines, irrespective of KIT mutation. KIT signaling was ablated, whereas HSP70, a marker of HSP90 inhibition, was induced. In vivo, antitumor activity of AT13387 was showed in both the imatinib-sensitive, GIST-PSW, xenograft model and a newly characterized imatinib-resistant, GIST430, xenograft model. Induction of HSP70, depletion of phospho-KIT and inhibition of KIT signaling were seen in tumors from both models after treatment with AT13387. A combination of imatinib and AT13387 treatment in the imatinib-resistant GIST430 model significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition over either of the monotherapies. Importantly, the combination of AT13387 and imatinib was well tolerated. These results suggest AT13387 is an excellent candidate for clinical testing in GIST in combination with imatinib. PMID:22714264

  2. [Influence of c-kit RNA interference mediated by AdMax adenovirus upon gastrointestinal stromal tumor in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-bao; Shi, Han-ping; Huang, Wen-sheng; Lin, Wei-hao; Dong, Wen-guang

    2011-03-01

    To investigate a novel therapeutic regiment for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) based on c-kit RNA interference (RNAi) under the mediation of AdMax adenovirus. c-kit shRNA, whose lateral sides were decorated with restriction endonuclease sequences, was designed. The joining of c-kit shRNA and PDC316-EGFP-U6 was catalyzed by T4 DNA ligase to construct PDC316-EGFP-U6-C-KIT. Homologous recombination of AdEGFP-U6-C-KIT was performed with AdMax system. Heterotopic transplantation of GIST in nude mice was established. AdEGFP-U6-C-KIT was intratumorally injected in experimental group while blank admax adenovirus AdEGFP-U6 in control group. The volume, inhibition ratio of tumor and CD117 expression of graft tumor were compared between test and control groups. The length of c-kit shRNA was around 50 bp in agarose electrophoresis. Gene sequencing revealed the designed c-kit RNAi sequence in PDC316-EGFP-U6-C-KIT. After transfection with AdEGFP-U6-C-KIT, 293 cells presented green fluorescence. The physical and infective titer of AdEGFP-U6-C-KIT was 5 × 10(11)vp/ml and 5.67 × 10(7) pfu/ml respectively. At the end of test, the mean volume of graft tumor was significantly smaller in test group than in control group [(75 ± 23) vs (989 ± 31) mm(3), P = 0.000]. The inhibition ratio of tumor was 59.6% in test group. Two cases (20%) in test group and 10 (100%) in control group had a positive expression of CD117 (P = 0.001). c-kit RNAi mediated by Admax vector system can inhibit effectively the expression of c-kit gene and the growth of GIST in nude mice.

  3. Fluid Retention Associated with Imatinib Treatment in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Quantitative Radiologic Assessment and Implications for Management

    PubMed Central

    Shinagare, Atul B.; Krajewski, Katherine M.; Pyo, Junhee; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to describe radiologic signs and time-course of imatinib-associated fluid retention (FR) in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and its implications for management. Materials and Methods In this Institutional Review Board-approved, retrospective study of 403 patients with GIST treated with imatinib, 15 patients with imaging findings of FR were identified by screening radiology reports, followed by manual confirmation. Subcutaneous edema, ascites, pleural effusion, and pericardial effusion were graded on a four-point scale on CT scans; total score was the sum of these four scores. Results The most common radiologic sign of FR was subcutaneous edema (15/15, 100%), followed by ascites (12/15, 80%), pleural effusion (11/15, 73%), and pericardial effusion (6/15, 40%) at the time of maximum FR. Two distinct types of FR were observed: 1) acute/progressive FR, characterized by acute aggravation of FR and rapid improvement after management, 2) intermittent/steady FR, characterized by occasional or persistent mild FR. Acute/progressive FR always occurred early after drug initiation/dose escalation (median 1.9 month, range 0.3-4.0 months), while intermittent/steady FR occurred at any time. Compared to intermittent/steady FR, acute/progressive FR was severe (median score, 5 vs. 2.5, p = 0.002), and often required drug-cessation/dose-reduction. Conclusion Two distinct types (acute/progressive and intermittent/steady FR) of imatinib-associated FR are observed and each type requires different management. PMID:25741192

  4. Impact of periodic endoscopy on incidentally diagnosed gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors: findings in surgically resected and confirmed lesions.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Hyuk; Kim, Eun Hye; Jung, Da Hyun; Chung, Hyunsoo; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Hoguen; Lee, Sang Kil

    2015-09-01

    Although gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are usually identified by endoscopic examinations, the diagnostic value of endoscopy has not been fully evaluated. We assessed the diagnostic performance of endoscopy for gastric GISTs according to lesion characteristics. Furthermore, the benefits of periodic endoscopy prior to diagnosis of gastric GISTs were evaluated. We reviewed patients who underwent surgery for gastric GISTs at Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea, between January 2008 and April 2014. In addition, we administered a questionnaire to determine the usage of periodic endoscopic inspection and the period from the penultimate endoscopy to the diagnosis. Of 174 included patients, 109 (62.4 %) showed intraluminally growing GISTs and 65 (37.4 %) showed extraluminally growing GISTs. The proportions of lesions that were initially diagnosed via endoscopy were 99.1 % for intraluminally growing GISTs and 49.2 % for extraluminally growing GISTs (P < 0.001). In patients with intraluminally growing GISTs, patients who had undergone endoscopy within 3 years prior to the diagnosis showed smaller tumor sizes (P = 0.015) and fewer tumors with ulceration (7.1 vs. 28.4 %, P = 0.021). The proportion of GISTs with a high mitotic index did not differ according to the usage of periodic endoscopy (P = 0.639). In contrast, lesion characteristics of the extraluminally growing GISTs did not differ according to whether an endoscopy was performed within 3 years prior to the diagnosis. Endoscopic examinations had a limited role in the diagnosis of extraluminally growing GISTs. However, periodic endoscopy was associated with relatively earlier detection of growth in intraluminal gastric GISTs.

  5. Post-Transcriptional Dysregulation by miRNAs Is Implicated in the Pathogenesis of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor [GIST

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Lorna; Bryan, Kenneth; Kim, Su Young; Janeway, Katherine A.; Killian, J. Keith; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Miettinen, Markku; Helman, Lee; Meltzer, Paul S.; van de Rijn, Matt; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; O’Sullivan, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to adult mutant gastrointestinal stromal tumors [GISTs], pediatric/wild-type GISTs remain poorly understood overall, given their lack of oncogenic activating tyrosine kinase mutations. These GISTs, with a predilection for gastric origin in female patients, show limited response to therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors and generally pursue a more indolent course, but still may prove fatal. Defective cellular respiration appears to underpin tumor development in these wild-type cases, which as a group lack expression of succinate dehydrogenase [SDH] B, a surrogate marker for respiratory chain metabolism. Yet, only a small subset of the wild-type tumors show mutations in the genes coding for the SDH subunits [SDHx]. To explore additional pathogenetic mechanisms in these wild-type GISTs, we elected to investigate post-transcriptional regulation of these tumors by conducting microRNA (miRNA) profiling of a mixed cohort of 73 cases including 18 gastric pediatric wild-type, 25 (20 gastric, 4 small bowel and 1 retroperitoneal) adult wild-type GISTs and 30 gastric adult mutant GISTs. By this approach we have identified distinct signatures for GIST subtypes which correlate tightly with clinico-pathological parameters. A cluster of miRNAs on 14q32 show strikingly different expression patterns amongst GISTs, a finding which appears to be explained at least in part by differential allelic methylation of this imprinted region. Small bowel and retroperitoneal wild-type GISTs segregate with adult mutant GISTs and express SDHB, while adult wild-type gastric GISTs are dispersed amongst adult mutant and pediatric wild-type cases, clustering in this situation on the basis of SDHB expression. Interestingly, global methylation analysis has recently similarly demonstrated that these wild-type, SDHB-immunonegative tumors show a distinct pattern compared with KIT and PDGFRA mutant tumors, which as a rule do express SDHB. All cases with Carney triad within our cohort cluster

  6. Rationale and design of a UK database for a rare cancer type: the GEM Registry for gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Bulusu, V R; Fullarton, J; Leahy, M; Morgan, C; Rasheed, A; Taniere, P; Toh, S; Verrill, M; White, J; Judson, I

    2013-09-17

    Despite advances in the management of and changes in clinical practice, little is known about the epidemiology, patterns of care and outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) patients in the UK. Patient registries are receiving increasing attention as they can provide important information on clinical practice and patient outcomes. The rationale and study design of the GIST Epidemiology and Management (GEM) Registry, which forms part of the routine clinical practice for GISTs in several UK centres, are described. The GEM Registry is a secure web-based registry system designed around a Microsoft Access core using SQL interface. Demographic, surgical, histopathological and clinical data will be captured including treatment outcomes and survival. The registry was piloted in six centres and following further fine tuning of the data sets, ethical committee submission and approval was completed. The GEM National Registry is the first of its kind to be implemented in rare cancers in UK. The registry is being rolled out initially in selected centres with the aim to expand to other centres. The first publication reporting analyses of the central data set is anticipated for the summer of 2013. GEM Registry will enable us to obtain a clear picture of incidence/prevalence of GISTS in UK. Clinicians will be able to review the prognostic and predictive value of variables in a large prospective data set. The data can be used for planning the delivery and improving the quality of care. This information is likely to inform clinical practice and, in years to come, guide the development and implementation of clinical trials for novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The results will not only benefit the GIST community, but also serve as a basis for the study of other rare tumour types.

  7. Novel V600E BRAF mutations in imatinib-naive and imatinib-resistant gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Agaram, Narasimhan P; Wong, Grace C; Guo, Tianhua; Maki, Robert G; Singer, Samuel; Dematteo, Ronald P; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2008-10-01

    BRAF and NRAS are commonly mutated in cancer and represent the most frequent genetic events in malignant melanoma. More recently, a subset of melanomas was shown to overexpress KIT and harbor KIT mutations. Although most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) exhibit activating mutations in either KIT or PDGFRA, about 10% of the cases lack mutations in these genes. It is our hypothesis following the melanoma model that mutations in BRAF or NRAS may play a role in wild-type GIST pathogenesis. Alterations in RAS/MEK/ERK pathway may also be involved in development of imatinib resistance in GIST, particularly in tumors lacking secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations. Imatinib-naive wild-type GISTs from 61 patients, including 15 children and 28 imatinib-resistant tumors without secondary KIT mutations were analyzed. Screening for hot spots mutations in BRAF (exons 11 and 15) and NRAS (exons 2 and 3) was performed. A BRAF exon 15 V600E was identified in 3 of 61 GIST patients, who shared similar clinical features, being 49- to 55-years-old females and having their tumors located in the small bowel. The tumors were strongly KIT immunoreactive and had a high risk of malignancy. An identical V600E BRAF mutation was also identified in one of 28 imatinib resistant GIST lacking a defined mechanism of drug resistance. In conclusion, we identified a primary BRAF V600E mutations in 7% of adult GIST patients, lacking KIT/PDGFRA mutations. The BRAF-mutated GISTs show predilection for small bowel location and high risk of malignancy. A secondary V600E BRAF mutation could represent an alternative mechanism of imatinib resistance. Kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF may be effective therapeutic options in this molecular GIST subset.

  8. Folate-related polymorphisms in gastrointestinal stromal tumours: susceptibility and correlation with tumour characteristics and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Sabrina; Ravegnini, Gloria; Nannini, Margherita; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Musti, Muriel; Pantaleo, Maria A; Fumagalli, Elena; Venturoli, Nicola; Palassini, Elena; Consolini, Nicola; Casali, Paolo G; Biasco, Guido; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The folate metabolism pathway has a crucial role in tumorigenesis as it supports numerous critical intracellular reactions, including DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. Despite its importance, little is known about the influence of the folate pathway on gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST), a rare tumour with an incidence ranging between 6 and 19.6 cases per million worldwide. The importance of folate metabolism led us to investigate the influence of polymorphisms in the genes coding folate-metabolising enzymes on GIST susceptibility, tumour characteristics and clinical outcome. We investigated a panel of 13 polymorphisms in 8 genes in 60 cases and 153 controls. The TS 6-bp deletion allele (formerly rs34489327, delTInsTTAAAG) was associated with reduced risk of GIST (OR=0.20, 95% CI 0.05–0.67, P=0.0032). Selected polymorphisms in patients stratified by age, gender, and other main molecular and clinical characteristics showed that few genotypes may show a likely correlation. We also observed a significant association between the RFC AA/AG genotype and time to progression (HR=0.107, 95% CI 0.014–0.82; P=0.032). Furthermore, we observed a tendency towards an association between the SHMT1 variant allele (TT, rs1979277) and early death (HR=4.53, 95% CI 0.77–26.58, P=0.087). Aware of the strengths and limitations of the study, these results suggest that polymorphisms may modify the risk of GIST and clinical outcome, pointing to the necessity for further investigations with information on folate plasma levels and a larger study population. PMID:25227144

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST): a rare entity, a tumor model for personalized therapy, and yet ten different molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Blay, Jean-Yves; Le Cesne, Axel; Cassier, Philippe A; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle L

    2012-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most frequent sarcoma and were recognized as distinct molecular entities in 1998. Following the identification of driving molecular alterations in KIT, imatinib was rapidly introduced for the treatment of GIST, and became the paradigm of molecularly targeted therapies for solid tumors. While surgery was the only known effective treatment in 1998, two drugs are approved by the FDA and EMA in 2012 for the treatment of localized and advanced forms of this disease. Imatinib has been shown to provide a high level of clinical efficacy in patients with advanced GIST, a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 2 years and median overall survival close to 5 years, with 20% patients progression-free after 10 years of treatment. Imatinib has also been proven to improve overall survival and reduce the risk of relapse in localized GIST at high risk for relapse after resection. Sunitinib is indicated in advanced GIST after failure of imatinib, and provided a median PFS close to 6 months after imatinib failure. However, there is an important variability in the molecular and genetic characteristics that drive the pathogenesis of GIST, allowing thus for the identification of distinct molecular subtypes of GIST with different prognosis and sensitivity to the targeted treatments. Different strategies are now recommended in these different molecular subtypes of GIST which must be recognized as different entities regarding sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and treatment decisions. This fragmentation of a yet recently recognized disease entity illustrates to strong trend of fragmentation in nosology of cancers, even in rare tumors such as GIST. For this aspect also, GIST is again a paradigmatic model for oncology, as many tumors with a higher prevalence will be fragmented in different molecular subsets and are going to become rare disease in the years to come.

  10. Antitumor effect of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib on gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and imatinib-resistant GIST cells.

    PubMed

    Sako, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Rieko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Wada, Norihito; Kawakubo, Hirohumi; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Ohmori, Tai; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Despite the benefits of imatinib for treating gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), the prognosis for high risk GIST and imatinib-resistant (IR) GIST remains poor. The mechanisms of imatinib resistance have not yet been fully clarified. The aim of the study was to establish imatinib-resistant cell lines and investigate nilotinib, a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), in preclinical models of GIST and imatinib-resistant GIST. For a model of imatinib-resistant GIST, we generated resistant cells from GK1C and GK3C cell lines by exposing them to imatinib for 6 months. The parent cell lines GK1C and GK3C showed imatinib sensitivity with IC50 of 4.59±0.97 µM and 11.15±1.48 µM, respectively. The imatinib-resistant cell lines GK1C-IR and GK3C-IR showed imatinib resistance with IC50 values of 11.74±0.17 µM (P<0.001) and 41.37±1.07 µM (P<0.001), respectively. The phosphorylation status of key cell signaling pathways, receptor tyrosine kinase KIT (CD117), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) and downstream signaling kinases: serine-threonine kinase Akt (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) or the non-receptor tyrosine kinase: proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (SRC), was analyzed in established cell lines and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was found to be increased compared to the parental cells. Nilotinib demonstrated significant antitumor efficacy against GIST xenograft lines and imatinib-resistant GIST cell lines. Thus, nilotinib may have clinical potential for patients with GIST or imatinib-resistant GIST.

  11. Analysis of the amount of tissue sample necessary for mitotic count and Ki-67 index in gastrointestinal stromal tumor sampling.

    PubMed

    Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Chiyo, Taiga; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Kato, Kiyohito; Kamada, Hideki; Fujita, Koji; Morishita, Asahiro; Oryu, Makoto; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Iwama, Hisakazu; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    There are no established opinions concerning whether the amount of tissue affects the accuracy of histological analyses in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of the present study was to investigate the appropriate amount of tissue sample needed for mitotic count based on the risk classification of GISTs and the Ki-67 index using the following three methods: endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA), a novel sampling method called tunneling bloc biopsy (TBB), and biopsy forceps followed by TBB (Bf). Forty-three samples (12 FNA, 17 TBB and 14 Bf) diagnosed as GISTs by immunohistological analysis were utilized. The major and minor axes and overlay area of one piece of specimen (OPS) from the three sampling methods were measured using digital imaging software and were analyzed comparatively regarding the acquisition of histological data. The mean major and minor axes (mm) and overlay areas (mm2) were in the order of TBB > Bf > FNA. The evaluable rates by mitotic count and Ki-67 were, respectively, 75% (9/12) and 83.3% (10/12) for FNA samples, 100% (17/17) and 100% (17/17) for TBB samples, and 100% (14/14) and 100% (14/14) for Bf samples (P>0.05). Three FNA samples were judged unevaluable due to too small specimens in overall diagnosis including mitotic count and Ki-67, calculating the cut-off value for the overlay area of OPS as 0.17 mm2. Comparing the concordance rates between the pre- and post-operative samples, TBB samples was significantly better than FNA (P<0.05). Conclusively, while the amounts of tissues obtained by TBB and Bf are unnecessary for the histological assessment of mitotic count and Ki-67 index, developments of the FNA method are needed to minimize sample error. Considering the technical aspects, as well as the size of the specimens, could help to guide therapeutic planning and improve diagnostic yield for GI subepithelial tumors.

  12. Epithelial and Stromal Cell Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor Expression Differentially Correlates with Survival in Rectal Cancer Stages B and C Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seong Beom; Chan, Charles; Dent, Owen F.; Mohamedali, Abidali; Kwun, Sun Young; Clarke, Candice; Fletcher, Julie; Chapuis, Pierre H.; Nice, Edouard C.; Baker, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been proposed as a potential prognostic factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival. However, CRC uPAR expression remains controversial, especially regarding cell types where uPAR is overexpressed (e.g., epithelium (uPARE) or stroma-associated cells (uPARS)) and associated prognostic relevance. In this study, two epitope-specific anti-uPAR monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) could discriminate expression of uPARE from uPARS and were used to examine this association with survival of stages B and C rectal cancer (RC) patients. Using immunohistochemistry, MAbs #3937 and R4 were used to discriminate uPARE from uPARS respectively in the central and invasive frontal regions of 170 stage B and 179 stage C RC specimens. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to determine association with survival. uPAR expression occurred in both epithelial and stromal compartments with differential expression observed in many cases, indicating uPARE and uPARS have different cellular roles. In the central and invasive frontal regions, uPARE was adversely associated with overall stage B survival (HR = 1.9; p = 0.014 and HR = 1.5; p = 0.031, respectively) reproducing results from previous studies. uPARS at the invasive front was associated with longer stage C survival (HR = 0.6; p = 0.007), reflecting studies demonstrating that macrophage peritumoural accumulation is associated with longer survival. This study demonstrates that different uPAR epitopes should be considered as being expressed on different cell types during tumour progression and at different stages in RC. Understanding how uPARE and uPARS expression affects survival is anticipated to be a useful clinical prognostic marker of stages B and C RC. PMID:25692297

  13. Absolute volume of the rectum and AUC from rectal DVH between 25Gy and 50Gy predict acute gastrointestinal toxicity with IG-IMRT in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mirjolet, Céline; Walker, Paul M; Gauthier, Mélanie; Dalban, Cécile; Naudy, Suzanne; Mazoyer, Frédéric; Martin, Etienne; Maingon, Philippe; Créhange, Gilles

    2016-11-04

    To determine whether dose/volume specific endpoints (DVSE) or Area under the rectal DVH curve (rAUC) better predict acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with IMRT in the era of daily image guidance (IG-IMRT). A set of DVSE was recorded from V25 to V75 (increments of 5Gy) (both in % and in cc) for 180 men. The rAUC was calculated for doses ranging between 25Gy and 50Gy (rAUC25-50). Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to determine the relationship between DVSE or rAUC25-50 and the appearance of any acute GI toxicity. The rates of acute grade 1 (G1), G2 and G3 GI toxicities were 53.3 %, 10.6 % and 1.1 %, respectively. No G4+ toxicity was observed. Rectal V25 to V75 expressed in % were not predictive of G ≥ 1 GI toxicity (p ≥ 0.12) whereas rectal V25 to V50 expressed in cc did correlate with GI toxicity G ≥ 1 (p ≤ 0.04). rAUC25-50 expressed in cc. Gy correlated significantly with the occurrence of any acute GI toxicity G ≥ 1 (p = 0.027). The absolute volume of the rectum between 25Gy and 50Gy and rAUC25-50 could significantly predict any acute rectal toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with daily IG-IMRT.

  14. The novel WHO 2010 classification for gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours correlates well with the metastatic potential of rectal neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Jernman, Juha; Välimäki, Matti J; Louhimo, Johanna; Haglund, Caj; Arola, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10-15% of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs, carcinoids) occur in the rectum, some of which are potentially able to metastasize. The new WHO 2010 classification of NETs applies to all gastroenteropancreatic NETs, but no reports have studied its correlation with the prognosis of rectal NETs. We retrospectively classified 73 rectal NETs according to the novel WHO 2010 and the previous WHO 2000 classifications. The aim was to assess the validity of the classifications in distinguishing indolent rectal NETs from metastasising tumours. Using the WHO 2010 criteria, we identified 61 G1 tumours, none of which had metastasised during follow-up. Of 11 G2 tumours, 9 had shown distant metastases. The only G3 neuroendocrine carcinoma that occurred had been disseminated at initial presentation. Our results show that rectal NETs classified as G1 according to the WHO 2010 classification have an indolent clinical course, whereas G2 NETs often metastasise. The WHO 2010 classification of NETs predicts the metastatic potential of rectal NETs better than the WHO 2000 classification. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Combination of PLR, MLR, MWR, and Tumor Size Could Significantly Increase the Prognostic Value for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Shushang; Zheng, Gaozan; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Systemic inflammation and immune response were associated with prognosis of tumors. However, data was limited due to the relatively low incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of preoperative peripheral blood cells in prognosis of GISTs. From September 2008 to July 2015, a total of 274 GIST patients in our department were enrolled in the present study. Clinicopathological features of GISTs were recorded. The association between preoperative peripheral blood cells and prognosis of GISTs were analyzed. Tumor location, tumor size, mitotic index, intratumoral necrosis, and National Institutes of Health (NIH) risk category were associated with prognosis of GISTs. High neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), monocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio (MLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), neutrophil-to-white blood cell ratio (NWR), monocyte-to-white blood cell ratio (MWR) and low lymphocyte-to-white blood cell ratio (LWR) was associated with poor prognosis of GISTs (76.2% vs 83.7%, P = 0.010. 70.5% vs 98.7%, P = 0.000. 65.7% vs 96.4%, P = 0.004. 78.5% vs 82.5%, P = 0.044. 73.5% vs 97.8%, P = 0.004. 76.6% vs 83.6%, P = 0.012, respectively). However, tumor size was the only independent risk factor for prognosis according to multivariate analysis (P = 0.006). Tumor location, tumor size, mitotic index, and NIH risk category were significantly correlated with the above-mentioned parameters (all P < 0.05). The prognosis of GISTs with tumor size >5 cm, high MLR, high PLR, and high MWR was significantly lower than the remnant patients (P = 0.010). The peripheral blood routine test is convenient, reproducible, and inexpensive. High NLR, MLR, PLR, NWR, MWR, and low LWR were associated with poor prognosis of GISTs. The association between the above parameters and prognosis of GISTs may be attributed to their correlation with tumor size, mitotic index, and NIH risk

  16. Masitinib in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) after failure of imatinib: A randomized controlled open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    Adenis, A.; Blay, J.-Y.; Bui-Nguyen, B.; Bouché, O.; Bertucci, F.; Isambert, N.; Bompas, E.; Chaigneau, L.; Domont, J.; Ray-Coquard, I.; Blésius, A.; Van Tine, B. A.; Bulusu, V. R.; Dubreuil, P.; Mansfield, C. D.; Acin, Y.; Moussy, A.; Hermine, O.; Le Cesne, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Masitinib is a highly selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against the main oncogenic drivers of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Masitinib was evaluated in patients with advanced GIST after imatinib failure or intolerance. Patients and methods Prospective, multicenter, randomized, open-label trial. Patients with inoperable, advanced imatinib-resistant GIST were randomized (1 : 1) to receive masitinib (12 mg/kg/day) or sunitinib (50 mg/day 4-weeks-on/2-weeks-off) until progression, intolerance, or refusal. Primary efficacy analysis was noncomparative, testing whether masitinib attained a median progression-free survival (PFS) (blind centrally reviewed RECIST) threshold of >3 months according to the lower bound of the 90% unilateral confidence interval (CI). Secondary analyses on overall survival (OS) and PFS were comparative with results presented according to a two-sided 95% CI. Results Forty-four patients were randomized to receive masitinib (n = 23) or sunitinib (n = 21). Median follow-up was 14 months. Patients receiving masitinib experienced less toxicity than those receiving sunitinib, with significantly lower occurrence of severe adverse events (52% versus 91%, respectively, P = 0.008). Median PFS (central RECIST) for the noncomparative primary analysis in the masitinib treatment arm was 3.71 months (90% CI 3.65). Secondary analyses showed that median OS was significantly longer for patients receiving masitinib followed by post-progression addition of sunitinib when compared against patients treated directly with sunitinib in second-line [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.27, 95% CI 0.09–0.85, P = 0.016]. This improvement was sustainable as evidenced by 26-month follow-up OS data (HR = 0.40, 95% CI 0.16–0.96, P = 0.033); an additional 12.4 months survival advantage being reported for the masitinib treatment arm. Risk of progression while under treatment with masitinib was in the same range as for sunitinib (HR = 1.1, 95% CI 0.6–2.2, P

  17. Masitinib in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) after failure of imatinib: a randomized controlled open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Adenis, A; Blay, J-Y; Bui-Nguyen, B; Bouché, O; Bertucci, F; Isambert, N; Bompas, E; Chaigneau, L; Domont, J; Ray-Coquard, I; Blésius, A; Van Tine, B A; Bulusu, V R; Dubreuil, P; Mansfield, C D; Acin, Y; Moussy, A; Hermine, O; Le Cesne, A

    2014-09-01

    Masitinib is a highly selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against the main oncogenic drivers of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Masitinib was evaluated in patients with advanced GIST after imatinib failure or intolerance. Prospective, multicenter, randomized, open-label trial. Patients with inoperable, advanced imatinib-resistant GIST were randomized (1 : 1) to receive masitinib (12 mg/kg/day) or sunitinib (50 mg/day 4-weeks-on/2-weeks-off) until progression, intolerance, or refusal. Primary efficacy analysis was noncomparative, testing whether masitinib attained a median progression-free survival (PFS) (blind centrally reviewed RECIST) threshold of >3 months according to the lower bound of the 90% unilateral confidence interval (CI). Secondary analyses on overall survival (OS) and PFS were comparative with results presented according to a two-sided 95% CI. Forty-four patients were randomized to receive masitinib (n = 23) or sunitinib (n = 21). Median follow-up was 14 months. Patients receiving masitinib experienced less toxicity than those receiving sunitinib, with significantly lower occurrence of severe adverse events (52% versus 91%, respectively, P = 0.008). Median PFS (central RECIST) for the noncomparative primary analysis in the masitinib treatment arm was 3.71 months (90% CI 3.65). Secondary analyses showed that median OS was significantly longer for patients receiving masitinib followed by post-progression addition of sunitinib when compared against patients treated directly with sunitinib in second-line [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.27, 95% CI 0.09-0.85, P = 0.016]. This improvement was sustainable as evidenced by 26-month follow-up OS data (HR = 0.40, 95% CI 0.16-0.96, P = 0.033); an additional 12.4 months survival advantage being reported for the masitinib treatment arm. Risk of progression while under treatment with masitinib was in the same range as for sunitinib (HR = 1.1, 95% CI 0.6-2.2, P = 0.833). Primary efficacy analysis ensured

  18. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  19. The outcome and predictive factors of sunitinib therapy in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) after imatinib failure - one institution study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) mutational status is recognized factor related to the results of tyrosine kinase inhibitors therapy such as imatinib (IM) or sunitinib (SU). Arterial hypertension (AH) is common adverse event related to SU, reported as predictive factor in renal cell carcinoma. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcomes and factors predicting results of SU therapy in inoperable/metastatic CD117(+) GIST patients after IM failure. Methods We identified 137 consecutive patients with advanced inoperable/metastatic GIST treated in one center with SU (2nd line treatment). Median follow-up time was 23 months. Additionally, in 39 patients there were analyzed selected constitutive single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of VEGFA and VEGFR2 genes. Results One year progression-free survival (PFS; calculated from the start of SU) rate was 42% and median PFS was 43 weeks. The estimated overall survival (OS, calculated both from start of SU or IM) was 74 weeks and 51 months, respectively. One-year PFS was 65% (median 74 weeks) in 55 patients with AH vs. 22% (median 17 weeks) in patients without AH. Patients with primary tumors carrying mutations in KIT exon 9 or wild-type had substantially better 1-year PFS (68% and 57%; median 65.5 and 50.5 weeks, respectively) than patients having tumors with KIT exon 11 or PDGFRA mutations (34% and 15%; median 36.8 and 9 weeks, respectively). We identified two independent factors with significant impact on PFS and OS in univariate and multivariate analysis: primary tumor genotype and presence of AH. The most common adverse events during therapy were: fatigue, AH, hypothyroidism, hand and foot syndrome, mucositis, skin reactions, dyspepsia, and diarrhea. Two deaths were assessed as related to tumor rupture caused by reaction to SU therapy. The presence of C-allele in rs833061 and the T-allele in rs3025039 polymorphism of VEGFA were associated with significantly higher risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 10.0 p = 0

  20. Surgical Management of Adolescents and Young Adults With Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A US Population-Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fero, Katherine E; Coe, Taylor M; Fanta, Paul T; Tang, Chih-Min; Murphy, James D; Sicklick, Jason K

    2017-05-01

    There is a dearth of population-based evidence regarding outcomes of the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). To describe a large cohort of AYA patients with GISTs and investigate the effect of surgery on GIST-specific survival (GSS) and overall survival (OS). This retrospective cohort study of 392 AYA patients and 5373 older adult (OA) patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database with GISTs histologically diagnosed from January 1, 2001, through December 31, 2013, with follow-up through December 31, 2015, compared the baseline characteristics of AYA (13-39 years old) and OA (≥40 years old) patients and among AYA patients stratified by operative management. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used for OS analyses. Cumulative incidence functions were used for GSS analysis. The effect of surgery on survival was evaluated with a multivariable Fine-Gray regression model. Tumor resection. GIST-specific survival and OS. This study included 392 AYA and 5373 OA patients diagnosed with GISTs (207 [52.8%] male AYA patients, 2767 [51.5%] male OA patients, 277 [70.7%] white AYA patients, and 3661 [68.1%] white OA patients). Compared with the OA patients, more AYA patients had small-intestine GISTs (139 [35.5%] vs 1465 [27.3%], P = .008) and were managed operatively (332 [84.7%] vs 4212 [78.4%], P = .003). Multivariable analysis of AYA patients found that nonoperative management was associated with a more than 2-fold increased risk of death from GISTs (subdistribution hazard ratio, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.21-2.25; P = .01). On subset analysis of 349 AYA patients with tumors of the stomach and small intestine, small-intestine location was associated with improved survival (OS: 91.1% vs 77.2%, P = .01; GSS: 91.8% vs 78.0%, P = .008). On subset analysis of 91 AYA patients with metastatic disease, operative management was associated with improved survival (OS: 69.5% vs 53.7%, P = .04; GSS

  1. Immunohistochemical loss of succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA) in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) signals SDHA germline mutation.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Markku; Killian, Jonathan Keith; Wang, Zeng-Feng; Lasota, Jerzy; Lau, Christopher; Jones, Laura; Walker, Robert; Pineda, Marbin; Zhu, Yuelin Jack; Kim, Su Y; Helman, Lee; Meltzer, Paul

    2013-02-01

    A subset (7% to 10%) of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) is notable for the immunohistochemical loss of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunit B (SDHB), which signals the loss of function of the SDH complex consisting of mitochondrial inner membrane proteins. These SDH-deficient GISTs are known to be KIT/PDGFRA wild type, and most patients affected by this subset of GISTs are young. Some of these patients have germline mutations of SDH subunit genes SDHB, SDHC, or SDHD, known as Carney-Stratakis syndrome when combined with paraganglioma. More recently, germline mutations in SDH subunit A gene (SDHA) have also been reported in few patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs. In this study we immunohistochemically examined 127 SDHB-negative and 556 SDHB-positive gastric GISTs and 261 SDHB-positive intestinal GISTs for SDHA expression using a mouse monoclonal antibody 2E3 (Abcam). Cases with available DNA were tested for SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD gene mutations using a hybridization-based custom capture next-generation sequencing assay. A total of 36 SDHA-negative GISTs (28%) were found among 127 SDHB-negative gastric GISTs. No SDHB-positive GIST was SDHA negative. Among 7 SDHA-negative tumors analyzed, there were 7 SDHA mutants, most germline. A second hit indicating biallelic inactivation of SDHA was present in 6 of those cases. These patients had no other SDH subunit gene mutations. Among the 25 SDHA-positive, SDHB-negative GISTs analyzed, we identified 3 SDHA mutations (1 germline), and 11 SDHB, SDHC, or SDHD mutations (mostly germline), and 11 patients with no SDH mutations. Compared with patients with SDHA-positive GISTs, those with SDHA-negative GISTs had an older median age (34 vs. 21 y), lower female to male ratio (1.8 vs. 3.1) but similar mitotic counts and median tumor sizes, with a slow course of disease in most cases, despite a slightly higher rate of liver metastases. SDHA-negative GISTs comprise approximately 30% of SDHB

  2. Technical success and short-term results of surgical treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: an experience of three centers.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, Mark Igorevich; Kashchenko, Victor Anatolevich; Karachun, Aleksei Mikhailovich; Orlova, Rashida Vakhidovna; Nakatis, Iakov Aleksandrovich; Pelipas, Iurii Vasilevich; Vasiukova, Evgenia Leonidovna; Rykov, Ivan Vladimirovich; Petrova, Veronika Vladimirovna; Nepomniashchaia, Svetlana Leonidovna; Klimov, Anton Sergeevich

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) comprise about 80% of gastrointestinal sarcomas. In patients with localized disease, surgery is considered as "Gold Standard" treatment. Organ-sparing radical en-block resection is widely accepted practice. Since lymph node dissection is not routinely indicated, minimally invasive approach is of particular interest. The aim of this study is to investigate the short-term outcomes of different surgical treatment of GISTs. We analyzed data of 116 patients who received surgical treatment for localized forms of GIST. Tumors were located in the stomach in 87 (75%) cases, in the small intestine in 26 (22.4%) cases, and extragastrointestinal GISTs were found in 3 (2.6%) patients. Four different approaches were used-open surgery (OpS, n=48), laparoscopic surgery (LS, n=40), endoscopic procedures (EP, n=22) and hybrid rendezvous (HR, n=6). Patient demographics, clinical presentation of tumors, characteristics of operation procedures (duration, intraoperative blood loss, frequency of R0-resection and fragmentation of tumor), postoperative complications and length of hospital stay were examined in all these groups. Radical treatment (R0-resection) was performed in all patients. There were no cases of tumor ruptures during surgical procedure. Mean size of GIST in OpS was 9.1±2.0 [2-35] cm; in LS: 4.9±0.8 (1.5-15) cm; in HR: 3.5±0.8 (2-4.5) cm and in EP: 2.3±0.3 (0.4-3.5) cm. Intraoperative blood loss in OpS was 369.7±209.5 [0-4,000] mL; LS: 63.9±16.0 [0-150] mL; in HR: 96.7±44.3 [50-200] mL; in EP: 33.3±11.0 [0-150] mL. Duration of operation in OpS was 160±20.4 [50-310] min; in LS: 104.7±12.7 [50-185]; in HR: 176.7±44.0 [110-260] min and in EP: 89.8±15.5 [25-190] min. Complication rate in OpS was 5 (10.4%); in LS: 3 (7.5%); in HR: 0% and in EP: 3 (13.6%). Length of hospital stay in OpS was 13.8±2.2 [7-52] days; in LS: 11, 4±2.2 [4-21] days; in HR: 11±3.2 [7-15] days and in EP: 11, 9±2.1 [5-22] days. There were no

  3. Is gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) originating from the rectovaginal septum GIST or extra-GIST (EGIST)? A case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y H; Chong, G O; Hong, D G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumors of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that arise from primitive mesenchymal cells. Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs) are extremely rare tumors that show the features of GISTs outside the GI tract. Their most common locations are the omentum, mesentery, and retroperitoneum. The authors report herein a case of a 54-year-old woman with GIST in rectovaginal septum. The patient underwent low anterior resection of the rectum, total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and partial resection of the posterior vagina. She received adjuvant therapy with an oral tyrosine-kinase inhibitor. She is presently healthy without any evidence of recurrence at 26 months after surgery. For GISTs arising in the rectovaginal septum, it is difficult to ascertain whether the tumor origin site is the rectum, rectovaginal septum, or vagina. In other words, it is difficult to classify these tumors as GISTs or EGISTs. More consideration for the exact origin should be given to the GIST in the rectovaginal septum for the precise diagnosis (GIST or EGIST) and risk classification in future.

  4. [Analysis of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors in Shandong Province: a midterm report of multicenter GISSG1201 study].

    PubMed

    Hou, Qingsheng; Luo, Wenqiang; Li, Leping; Dai, Yong; Jiang, Lixin; Wang, Ailiang; Chu, Xianqun; Li, Yuming; Yang, Daogui; Lu, Chunlei; Yao, Linguo; Cui, Gang; Lin, Huizhong; Chen, Gang; Cui, Qing; Zhang, Huanhu; Lun, Zengjun; Xia, Lijian; Su, Yingfeng; Han, Guoxin; Hui, Xizeng; Wei, Zhixin; Sun, Zuocheng; Guo, Hongliang; Zhou, Yanbing

    2017-09-25

    To summarize the treatment status of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in Shandong province,by analyzing the clinicopathological features and prognostic factors. Clinicopathological and follow-up data of 1 165 patients with gastric GIST between January 2000 and December 2013 from 23 tertiary referral hospitals in Shandong Province were collected to establish a database. The risk stratification of all cases was performed according to the National Institutes of Health(NIH) criteria proposed in 2008. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the survival rate. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used for univariate and multivariate prognostic analyses. Among 1 165 cases of gastric GIST, 557 were male and 608 were female. The median age of onset was 60 (range 15-89) years. Primary tumors were located in the gastric fundus and cardia in 623 cases(53.5%), gastric body in 346 cases(29.7%), gastric antrum in 196 cases(16.8%). All the cases underwent resection of tumors, including endoscopic resection (n=106), local resection (n=589), subtotal gastrectomy(n=399), and total gastrectomy(n=72). Based on the NIH risk stratification, there were 256 cases (22.0%) at very low risk, 435 (37.3%) at low risk, 251 cases (21.5%) at intermediate risk, and 223 cases (19.1%) at high risk. A total of 1 116 cases(95.8%) were followed up and the median follow-up period was 40 (range, 1-60) months. During the period, 337 patients relapsed and the median time to recurrence was 34 (range 1-60) months. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 98.6%, 86.1% and 73.4%, respectively. The 5-year survival rates of patients at very low, low, intermediate, and high risk were 93.1%, 85.8%, 63.0% and 42.3% respectively, with a statistically significant difference (P=0.000). Multivariate analysis showed that primary tumor site (RR=0.580, 95%CI:0.402-0.835), tumor size (RR=0.450, 95%CI:0.266-0.760), intraoperative tumor rupture(RR=0.557, 95%CI:0.336-0.924), risk classification (RR=0

  5. An innovative procedure of laparoscope combined with endoscopy for gastrointestinal stromal tumor resection and cholecystectomy: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    YAN, YE; LI, FENG; GAI, YONG-HAO; LIU, QING-WEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a novel approach to laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery for gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) resection and cholecystectomy, and conducts a review of the associated literature. The novel surgical procedure was performed on one patient who was diagnosed with a GIST and cholecystic polypus. The GIST was resected using an insulation-tipped diathermic electrosurgical knife under the guide of an endoscope. Subsequently, a cholecystectomy was performed by inserting two more 5-mm trocars and instruments transumbilically, guided using an endoscope. The tumor and the gallbladder were exteriorized using a peroral approach and the incision lining of the stomach was sutured laparoscopically. The procedure was successfully performed and the patient experienced no discomfort during the 5-year follow-up. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery is feasible and would be an ideal choice for invisible abdominal scar surgery, in particular for multi-visceral resection. PMID:27073455

  6. Successful treatment of bleeding large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour in a patient under dual antiplatelet therapy after recent drug-eluting coronary stent implantation

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Keita; Fujikawa, Takahisa; Kuramitsu, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 69-year-old man who started dual antiplatelet therapy (APT) with aspirin and clopidogrel after recent implantation of drug-eluting coronary stent and developed massive bleeding due to large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). Following endoscopic haemostasis and discontinuation of dual APT, neoadjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib was started under continuation of ‘single’ APT with aspirin. A good chemotherapeutic response was achieved without recurrence of bleeding, and subsequent less invasive surgical resection of the tumour was performed, while preoperative single APT was continued for prevention of stent thrombosis. The patient recovered well without any thromboembolic or bleeding events. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy and subsequent less invasive surgery under continuation of APT is one of the preferred approaches for patients with duodenal GIST with severe thromboembolic comorbidities, as in the current case. PMID:24777088

  7. Synchronous Occurrence of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma of the Duodenum and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Ileum in a Patient with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tohru; Maruyama, Yumiko; Saitoh, Mayuko; Itoh, Hideto; Yoshimoto, Mitsuru; Tsujisaki, Masayuki; Nakayama, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A 64 year-old woman with steroid-dependent immune thrombocytopenia developed anemia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed the presence of a tumor, which was diagnosed to be diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, in the second portion of the duodenum. 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography showed an increased uptake mass in the pelvic cavity as well as in the duodenum. Though the duodenal tumor disappeared after 4 cycles of chemotherapy, the pelvic mass did not shrink in size. As a result, laparoscopic resection of the pelvic tumor was performed and the tumor was histologically diagnosed to be a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Subsequently, the patient was treated with 2 more cycles of the chemotherapy. Eventually, thrombocytopenia completely resolved. PMID:27746431

  8. High-risk CD117-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the colon in a 12-year-old girl: adjuvant treatment with imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Okur, Arzu; Oguz, Aynur; Karadeniz, Ceyda; Pinarli, Faruk Guclu; Ozen, Onur; Ekinci, Ozgür

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are mesenchymal tumors of the alimentary tract rarely observed in children. The treatment of choice for GIST is surgical resection. Although the prognosis of GISTs with low malignant potential is excellent, high-malignant-potential GISTs have a high rate of recurrence. Prognostic factors such as tumor size, mitotic rate and presence of metastases may provide an indication for adjuvant imatinib mesylate (IM) treatment. Here we present a young patient with a large GIST with high-risk features who is in complete remission after surgical excision and adjuvant IM treatment. This patient is the only colon-located CD117-positive case where IM was administered. The exact indications as well as the optimal dose and duration of IM need to be clarified with the contribution of new cases and the growing experience of this rare disease.

  9. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST)--development in pathology, surgery and medical therapy. Developed during the 10th German GIST-meeting, Göttingen].

    PubMed

    Agaimy, A; Bauer, S; Beham, A; Bertolini, J; Haller, F; Koschny, R; Maier, J; Montemurro, M; Perez, D; Schaefer, I-M; Schildhaus, H-U; Wurst, C; Cameron, S

    2015-03-01

    The first description of ligand-independent activating mutations in the KIT gene, which encodes the tyrosine-kinase KIT, greatly improved our understanding of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) biology. The therapeutic success in GIST has made tyrosine kinase inhibitors a "paradigm of targeted therapy". Deciphering resistance mechanisms in GIST has had implications for many other kinase-driven cancers. To exchange current knowledge within the field of GIST, the German GIST Meeting has taken place for now 10 years, traditionally in Göttingen. Subjects discussed include clinical diagnostics, pathology, surgery, and medical therapy. The following presentation gives an overview of the last meeting held in December 2013, including distinctive features in GIST and current data on the different topics.

  10. Low Rectal Cancer Study (MERCURY II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Colorectal Neoplasms; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases; Rectal Diseases

  11. [Clinical and pathological features of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in a single institution: A descriptive study and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Flores-Funes, Diego; Lirón-Ruiz, Ramón José; Pérez-Guarinos, Carmen Victoria; Martín-Lorenzo, Juan Gervasio; Torralba-Martínez, José Antonio; Giménez-Bascuñana, Alberto; Chaves-Benito, María Asunción; Aguayo-Albasini, José Luis

    This study was aimed to assess the main clinical, pathological and therapeutic characteristics of a cohort of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Observational study including 66 patients diagnosed with GIST admitted to our hospital between 2002 and 2015. Parameters related to medical history, clinical manifestations, medical and surgical treatment, histopathology, and morbi-mortality were studied. A review of the literature was included to correlate with the results. The most frequent location of GIST in our patients was the stomach (65.2%), in which the gastric fondo was the predominant region. The most common clinical manifestation was gastrointestinal hemorrhage (45.5%), followed by incidental finding after imaging or invasive procedures (33.3%). 58 patients underwent surgery (90.6%), 15.5% were urgent. A total of 69% of the GISTs had a size between 2 and 10cm. The one-year mortality was 7.9%, all cases related to local or remote extension, or surgical complications. There is a large clinical variability among GIST cases. The first choice of treatment is surgery, which is feasible in most cases and should be as conservative as possible. The prognosis varies depending on the size and proliferation index, thus close follow-up should be performed. No tumor marker is clearly associated with a poor prognosis. New molecular biology studies are needed in order to find therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlation between mutational status and survival and second cancer risk assessment in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rubió-Casadevall, Jordi; Borràs, Joan Lluis; Carmona-García, Maria Carme; Ameijide, Alberto; Gonzalez-Vidal, Allan; Ortiz, Maria Rosa; Bosch, Ramon; Riu, Francesc; Parada, David; Martí, Esther; Miró, Josefina; Sirvent, Juan Jose; Galceran, Jaume; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael

    2015-02-13

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are sarcomas of the digestive tract characterized by mutations mainly located in the c-KIT or in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-alpha genes. Mutations in the BRAF gene have also been described. Our purpose is to define the distribution of c-KIT, PDGFR and BRAF mutations in a population-based cohort of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) patients and correlate them with anatomical site, risk classification and survival. In addition, as most of the GIST patients have a long survival, second cancers are frequently diagnosed in them. We performed a second primary cancer risk assessment. Our analysis was based on data from Tarragona and Girona Cancer Registries. We identified all GIST diagnosed from 1996 to 2006 and performed a mutational analysis of those in which paraffin-embedded tissue was obtained. Observed (OS) and relative survival (RS) were calculated according to risk classifications and mutational status. Multivariate analysis of variables for observed survival and was also done. A total of 132 GIST cases were found and we analyzed mutations in 108 cases. We obtained 53.7% of mutations in exon 11 and 7.4% in exon 9 of c-KIT gene; 12% in exon 18 and 1.9% in exon 12 of PDGFR gene and 25% of cases were wild type GIST. Patients with mutations in exon 11 of the c-KIT gene had a 5-year OS and RS of 59.6% and 66.3%, respectively. Patients with mutations in exon 18 of the PDGFR gene had a 5-year OS and RS of 84.6% and 89.7%. In multivariate analysis, only age and risk group achieved statistical significance for observed survival. GIST patients had an increased risk of second cancer with a hazard ratio of 2.47. This population-based study shows a spectrum of mutations in the c-KIT and PDGFR genes in GIST patients similar to that previously published. The OS and RS of GIST with the exon 18 PDGFR gene mutation could indicate that this subgroup of patients may be less aggressive and have a good prognosis, although

  13. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  14. Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors, lentigines, and café-au-lait macules associated with germline c-kit mutation treated with imatinib.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Divya; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Larizza, Lidia; Colombo, Elisa A; Fontana, Laura; Gervasini, Cristina; Thappa, Devinder M; Rajappa, Medha; Rajendiran, Kalai Selvi; Sreenath, Gubbi Shamanna; Kate, Vikram

    2017-02-01

    Familial lentiginosis syndromes are characterized by a wide array of manifestations resulting from activation of molecular pathways which control growth, proliferation, and differentiation of a broad range of tissues. Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are often accompanied by additional features like hyperpigmentation, mastocytosis, and dysphagia. They have been described with mutations in c-kit (most commonly), platelet-derived growth factor receptor A, neurofibromatosis-1, and succinate dehydrogenase genes. We report on molecular characterization and tumor histopathology of two siblings in whom lentigines and café-au-lait macules were present along with multifocal GIST. Immuhistochemical analysis of CD34 and CD117 was performed on GIST biopsy samples from both siblings, while c-kit mutational analysis was done by PCR and direct sequencing on DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of all family members and from paraffin-embedded gastric biopsy specimens of affected siblings. Histopathology revealed positive expression of CD117 and CD34. Mutational analysis showed the germline c.1676T>C mutation in c-kit exon 11, (p.(Val559Ala)), in the peripheral blood of both siblings and a second exon 11 mutation, c.1669T>A (p.(Trp557Arg)) in the tumor biopsy of one of them. Initiation of imatinib treatment resulted in striking resolution of their hyperpigmentation and a stable gastrointestinal disease in one of them. A c-kit mutational test in familial GISTs is indicated before initiation of imatinib therapy, as it can help predict tumor response to treatment. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. Genetic alteration and mutation profiling of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) for diagnosis and targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weixin; Zhang, Aiguo; Powell, Michael J

    2016-07-21

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have been recognized as a biologically distinctive type of tumor, different from smooth muscle and neural tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The identification of genetic aberrations in proto-oncogenes that drive the growth of GISTs is critical for improving the efficacy of cancer therapy by matching targeted drugs to specific mutations. Research into the oncogenic mechanisms of GISTs has found that these tumors frequently contain activating gene mutations in either platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) or a receptor tyrosine protein associated with a mast cell growth factor receptor encoded by the KIT gene. Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to disrupt durable patient responses to molecularly targeted therapy for GISTs, yet the prevalence and size of subpopulations remain largely unexplored. Detection of the cancer subpopulations that harbor low-frequency mutant alleles of target proto-oncogenes through the use of molecular genetic methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) target amplification technology, is hampered by the high abundance of wild-type alleles, which limit the sensitivity of detection of these minor mutant alleles. This is especially true in the case of mutant tumor DNA derived "driver" and "drug-resistant" alleles that are present in the circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) in the peripheral blood circulation of GIST patients. So-called "liquid biopsy" allows for the dynamic monitoring of the patients' tumor status during treatment using minimally invasive sampling. New methodologies, such as a technology that employs a xenonucleic acid (XNA) clamping probe to block the PCR amplification of wild-type templates, have allowed improved molecular detection of these low-frequency alleles both in tissue biopsy samples and in cfDNA. These new methodologies could be widely applied for minimally invasive molecular testing in the therapeutic management of GISTs.

  16. Gastrointestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 33 selections. Some of the titles are: The natural history of colorectal cancer; opportunities for intervention; Radiotherapy for early rectal cancer; Intraoperative irradiation for gastrointestinal cancers; Hepatocellular carcinoma; clinical presentation, etiology, and prevention; and Current issues in the treatment of patients with gastric cancer.

  17. Comparison of Gene Expression Profile Between Tumor Tissue and Adjacent Non-tumor Tissue in Patients with Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST).

    PubMed

    Kou, Youwei; Zhao, Ying; Bao, Chenhui; Wang, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are defined as spindle cell and/or epithelioid tumors originated from interstitial Cajal cells or precursors in the digestive tract. This study was conducted to identify genes differing in expression between the gastric tumors and the adjacent non-cancerous mucosas in patients with primary gastric GIST. The gene expression profile was determined by using oligonucleotide-based DNA microarrays and further validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis was performed to predict signaling pathways involved in gastric GIST. Our data showed that the expression levels of 957 genes (RAB39B, member RAS oncogene family; VCAN, versican; etc.) were higher and that of 526 genes (CXCL14, chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 14; MTUS1, microtubule-associated tumor suppressor 1; etc.) were lower in the gastric tumor tissues as compared with normal gastric tissues. Results from KEGG pathway analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were enriched into 16 signaling transduction pathways, including Hedeghog and Wnt signaling pathways. Our study may provide basis for identification of novel biomarkers associated with primary gastric GIST pathogenesis and for exploration of underlying mechanisms involved in this gastric sarcoma.

  18. Synchronous poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach: a case report with immunohistochemical and molecular genetic analyses of KIT and PDGFRA.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Sun, Ping; Cai, Xiao-Yan; Fei, Shao-Hua; Wu, Jian; Qi, Yu-Kai; Liu, Ze-Bin; Yuan, Lin; He, Yu-Jie; Song, Hui; Chen, Wei-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Although the stomach is the most common location for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) with co-primary tumors, the synchronous appearance of a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) and GIST in the stomach is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of gastric GIST coexisting with gastric NEC to be reported in the literature. The current study reports the case of a 71-year-old male with gastric poorly differentiated NEC and GIST discovered incidentally during surgical treatment of the NEC. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that the NEC tumor cells were positive for CK (cytokeratin), CD57, synaptophysin, chromogranin, CD117 (KIT protein), Dog-1 (discovered on GIST-1 protein) and CD34. The synchronous GIST immunophenotype showed positivity for CD117, Dog-1 and CD34 (100%), whereas staining for CK, SMA, desmin and S100 was negative. Ki-67 labeling of proliferating cells was 90% in NEC and 1% in GIST. An accurate diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemical findings. Furthermore, genetic analysis using PCR direct sequencing identified no mutations in the KIT (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17) and PDGFRA (exons 12 and 18) genes. The patient developed lymph node metastases and underwent cisplatin-based chemotherapy after the operation. This is the first documented case of synchronous gastric GIST and NEC with the examination of protein expression and gene mutations in KIT and PDGFRA, which will help to further understand the etiology and pathogenesis of NEC coexisting with GIST in a gastric location.

  19. Patterns of care, prognosis, and survival in patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) refractory to first-line imatinib and second-line sunitinib.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine; Cioffi, Angela; Coco, Paola; Maki, Robert G; Schöffski, Patrick; Rutkowski, Piotr; Le Cesne, Axel; Duffaud, Florence; Adenis, Antoine; Isambert, Nicolas; Bompas, Emmanuelle; Blay, Jean-Yves; Casali, Paolo; Keohan, Mary Louise; Toulmonde, Maud; Antonescu, Cristina R; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Bui, Binh

    2012-05-01

    Data regarding the management and outcome of patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) refractory to 1st-line imatinib and 2nd-line sunitinib are limited. Medical records of 223 imatinib-resistant and sunitinib-resistant GIST who were treated in 11 major referral centers were reviewed. The three most frequent drugs used in the 3rd-line setting were: nilotinib n = 67 (29.5%), sorafenib n = 55 (24.5%), and imatinib n = 40 (17.5%). There were 18 patients (8%) who received best supportive care (BSC) only. The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) on 3rd-line treatment were 3.6 months [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 3.1-4.1] and 9.2 months (95% CI, 7.5-10.9), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that, in the 3rd-line setting, albumin level and KIT/PDGFRA mutational status were significantly associated with PFS, whereas performance status and albumin level were associated with OS. After adjustment for prognostic factors, nilotinib and sorafenib provided the best PFS and OS. Rechallenge with imatinib was also associated with improved OS in comparison with BSC. In the 3rd-line setting, rechallenge with imatinib provided limited clinical benefit but was superior to BSC. Sorafenib and nilotinib have significant clinical activity in imatinib-resistant and sunitinib-resistant GIST and may represent an alternative for rechallenge with imatinib.

  20. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Gastric Resection for Primary Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors >5 cm: A Size-Matched and Location-Matched Comparison.

    PubMed

    de'Angelis, Nicola; Genova, Pietro; Amiot, Aurelien; Charpy, Cecile; Disabato, Mara; Belgaumkar, Ajay P; Chahrour, Ali; Legou, Francois; Azoulay, Daniel; Brunetti, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    This study compared robotic (RR) and laparoscopic resection (LR) for primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) of the stomach >5 cm. Twelve consecutive patients who underwent RR from 2012 to 2015 were matched for tumor size and location with 24 patients who underwent LR from 2000 to 2012. The median tumor size was 7.1 cm (range, 5.5 to 11.5). GISTs were resected by wedge resection (91.7%) or distal gastrectomy. The median RR operative time was longer than that of LR (162.5 vs. 130 min, respectively; P=0.004). Only 1 LR patient required conversion. The time to flatus and hospital stay were similar between groups. Overall, 3 patients developed minor postoperative complications that were medically treated. Mortality was nil. All resections were R0. No difference was observed in the incidence of recurrence. RR was significantly more expensive (+21.6%) than LR. RR appears to be safe and feasible for GISTs>5 cm, but is associated with longer operative times and greater costs.

  1. Effective Downsizing of a Large Oesophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour with Neoadjuvant Imatinib Enabling an Uncomplicated and without Tumour Rupture Laparoscopic-Assisted Ivor-Lewis Oesophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Neofytou, Kyriakos; Costa Neves, Mafalda; Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Benson, Charlotte; Mudan, Satvinder

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) is increasingly used nowadays. As oesophagectomy is associated with high morbidity and mortality, a preoperative downsizing of an oesophageal GIST to limit the extent of resection would be ideal. Because these tumours are rare and neoadjuvant treatment with imatinib is recent, there is limited literature available regarding neoadjuvant administration of imatinib in patients with oesophageal GISTs. A 50-year-old woman presented with total dysphagia. An upper endoscopy and biopsy revealed a large submucosal KIT-positive GIST obstructing the mid oesophagus. CT confirmed a lesion measuring 99 mm × 50 mm × 104 mm. Because the size and location of the tumour increased the risk of intraoperative rupture, it was decided to administer preoperative imatinib. The patient had an excellent clinical and radiological response. Her dysphagia gradually resolved and the follow-up CT scans of the first 10 months showed a gradually reducing tumour size to 54 mm × 33 mm × 42 mm. The patient underwent an uneventful laparoscopic-assisted Ivor-Lewis oesophagectomy. Postoperatively, the patient continued with adjuvant imatinib. At the last follow-up, 1 year from operation and 38 months from the diagnosis, the patient is disease free.

  2. Bortezomib enhances the therapeutic efficacy of dasatinib by promoting c-KIT internalization-induced apoptosis in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Liang, Chao; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Jianjuan; He, Xuexin; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Xianning; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-28

    Dasatinib-based therapy is often used as a second-line therapeutic strategy for imatinib-resistance gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs); however, acquired aberrant activation of dasatinib target proteins, such as c-KIT and PDGFRβ, attenuates the therapeutic efficiency of dasatinib. Combination therapy which inhibits the activation of dasatinib target proteins may enhance the cytotoxicity of dasatinib in GISTs. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, significantly inhibited cell viability and promoted apoptosis of dasatinib-treated GIST-T1 cells, whereas GIST-T1 cells showed little dasatinib cytotoxicity when treated with dasatinib alone, as the upregulation of c-KIT caused by dasatinib itself interfered with the inhibition of c-KIT and PDGFRβ phosphorylation by dasatinib. Bortezomib induced internalization and degradation of c-KIT by binding c-KIT to Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, and the subsequent release of Apaf-1, which was originally bound to the c-KIT-Hsp90β-Apaf-1 complex, induced primary apoptosis in GIST-T1 cells. Combined treatment with bortezomib plus dasatinib caused cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase through inactivation of PDGFRβ and promoted bortezomib-induced apoptosis in GIST-T1 cells. Our data suggest that combination therapy exerts better efficiency for eradicating GIST cells and may be a promising strategy for the future treatment of GISTs.

  3. Imatinib-induced hyperbilirubinemia with UGT1A1 (*28) promoter polymorphism: first case series in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Smith, Melissa Hennessey; Maloney, Antonia; Diasio, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib, an orally administered protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is indicated for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Severe hepatotoxicity associated with imatinib is rare, and relationship to polymorphism of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) expression and related frequency of hyperbilirubinemia or toxicity are not well known. We present a case series patients who developed hyperbilirubinemia while on oral administration imatinib for treatment of GIST. Genetic testing for polymorphism of UGT1A1 showed the first patient to be homozygous for the UGT1A1 TA7 (*28) polymorphism and the second patient heterozygous for the UGT1A1 TA1 (*28) polymorphism. The first patient had to stop imatinib due to severe and persistent hyperbilirubenemia peaking >3 despite reducing imatininb to only 100 mg every other day while the second patient improved at this dose. Our case series represent the first data associating UGT1A1 polymorphism and imatinib in patients being treated for GIST. Given the prevalence of Gilbert’s syndrome and the increasing use of imatinib, we encourage physicians to be aware of this possible toxicity as hepatotoxicity can be fatal if not managed in a timely fashion. This association is also timely due to recent FDA requirement for testing UGT1A1 polymorphism for nilotinib, another TKI. PMID:27708529

  4. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography can predict a higher malignant potential of gastrointestinal stromal tumors by visualizing large newly formed vessels.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasunobu; Kato, Jun; Ueda, Kazuki; Nakamura, Yasushi; Abe, Hiroko; Tamura, Takashi; Itonaga, Masahiro; Yoshida, Takeichi; Maeda, Hiroki; Moribata, Kosaku; Niwa, Toru; Maekita, Takao; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the histologic and clinical implications of detection of intratumoral vessels on contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography (CE-EUS) in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Thirteen patients with a GIST, all of whom were referred for surgery, underwent presurgical CE-EUS. The malignant potential, assessed according to the modified Fletcher risk classification system, and the histologic degree of angiogenesis were compared with the presence or absence of intratumoral vessels on CE-EUS. Of the six tumors with intratumoral vessels observed on CE-EUS, five were intermediate- or high-risk GISTs, and the remaining seven negative cases were categorized as very low risk or low risk. The presence of intratumoral vessels on CE-EUS was significantly correlated with a higher-risk classification (p = 0.005). On histologic examination, all GISTs having visualized vessels incorporated vessels of more than 500 μm in diameter. The large intratumoral vessels of the five intermediate- or high-risk GISTs lacked elastic fibers, suggesting that they were neovascular in nature. These higher-risk tumors were also found, by immunohistochemical analysis, to have high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Intratumoral vessels observed in GISTs on CE-EUS are correlated with a higher degree of angiogenesis, resulting in higher malignant potential. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Consensus report on the radiological management of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST): recommendations of the German GIST Imaging Working Group.

    PubMed

    Kalkmann, Janine; Zeile, Martin; Antoch, Gerald; Berger, Frank; Diederich, Stefan; Dinter, Dietmar; Fink, Christian; Janka, Rolf; Stattaus, Jörg

    2012-05-07

    The aim was to reach consensus in imaging for staging and follow-up as well as for therapy response assessment in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST). The German GIST Imaging Working Group was formed by 9 radiologists engaged in assessing patients with GIST treated with targeted therapy. The following topics were discussed: indication and optimal acquisition techniques of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT; tumour response assessment considering response criteria and measurement techniques on CT, MRI and PET/CT; result interpretation; staging interval and pitfalls. Contrast-enhanced CT is the standard method for GIST imaging. MRI is the method of choice in case of liver-specific questions or contraindications to CT. PET/CT should be used for early response assessment or inconclusive results on morphologic imaging. All imaging techniques should be standardized allowing a reliable response assessment. Response has to be assessed with respect to lesion size, lesion density and appearance of new lesions. A critical issue is pseudoprogression due to myxoid degeneration or intratumoural haemorrhage. The management of patients with GIST receiving a targeted therapy requires a standardized algorithm for imaging and an appropriate response assessment with respect to changes in lesion size and density.

  6. KIT over-expression by p55PIK-PI3K leads to Imatinib-resistance in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaonian; Luo, Xuelai; Wang, Guoping; Xia, Xianmin; Hu, Junbo; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib is the first-line drug for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), as mutated KIT is closely associated with the occurrence of GIST. However, Imatinib resistance (IMA-resistance) occurs inevitably in most GIST patients. Although the over-expression of KIT in GIST is one of the major factors contributing to IMA-resistance, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that p55PIK, an isoform of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), increases KIT expression, leading to IMA-resistance in GISTs by activating NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, down-regulation of p55PIK significantly decreases KIT expression and re-sensitizes IMA-resistance-GIST cells to Imatinib in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, the expression of both p55PIK and KIT proteins is significantly increased in tumor samples from IMA-resistance-GIST patients, suggesting that p55PIK up-regulation may be important for IMA-resistance in the clinical setting. Altogether, our data provide evidence that p55PIK-PI3K signaling can contribute to IMA-resistance in GIST by increasing KIT expression. Moreover, p55PIK may be a novel potential drug target for treating tumors that develop IMA-resistance. PMID:26587973

  7. Kit K641E oncogene up-regulates Sprouty homolog 4 and Trophoblast glycoprotein in interstitial cells of Cajal in a murine model of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Gromova, Petra; Ralea, Sebastian; Lefort, Anne; Libert, Frédérick; Rubin, Brian P; Erneux, Christophe; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are thought to derive from the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) or an ICC precursor. Oncogenic mutations of the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT are present in most GIST. KIT K642E was originally identified in sporadic GIST and later found in the germ line of a familial GIST cohort. A mouse model harbouring a germline Kit K641E mutant was created to model familial GIST. The expression profile was investigated in the gastric antrum of the KitK641E murine GIST model by microarray, quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. Gja1/Cx43, Gpc6, Gpr133, Pacrg, Pde3a, Prkar2b, Prkcq/Pkce, Rasd2, Spry4 and Tpbg/5T4 were found to be up-regulated. The proteins encoded by Gja1/Cx43, Pde3a, Prkcq/Pkce were localized in Kit-ir ICC in wild-type and KitK641E animals while Spry4 and Tpbg/5T4 were detected in Kit-ir cells only in KitK641E, but not in KitWT/WT animals. Most up-regulated genes in this mouse model belong to the gene expression profile of human GIST but also to the profile of normal Kit+ ICC in the mouse small intestine. Spry4 and Tpbg/5T4 may represent candidates for targeted therapeutic approaches in GIST with oncogenic KIT mutations. PMID:19453770

  8. [A case report of two-term surgery for focal progression of a huge liver metastasis and peritoneal dissemination from gastrointestinal stromal tumor during imatinib mesylate treatment].

    PubMed

    Toyokawa, Takahiro; Teraoka, Hitoshi; Kitayama, Kisyu; Nomura, Shinya; Kanehara, Isao; Nishino, Hiroji

    2014-03-01

    We report a patient who underwent 2-term surgery to treat focal progression of a huge liver metastasis and peritoneal dissemination from a gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor(GIST)during imatinib mesylate treatment. A 59-year-old man underwent an emergency surgery for perforative peritonitis caused by gastric GIST in June 2006 and a partial resection of the stomach in September 2006. Four years later, abdominal computed tomography(CT)detected a huge liver tumor that occupied the entire right lobe. We initiated imatinib mesylate treatment(400mg/day), and the patient maintained stable disease for several months. However, focal progression of the huge liver tumor and a peritoneal tumor at the splenic hilum were revealed by CT; therefore, an extended right hepatic resection was performed in August 2011 and a distal pancreatectomy, splenectomy, and partial resection of the stomach were performed in February 2012. The patient died of the primary disease at 16 months after the hepatic resection for focal progression.

  9. Rare triad of periampullary carcinoid, duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumor and plexiform neurofibroma at hepatic hilum in neurofibromatosis type 1: a case report.

    PubMed

    Abdessayed, Nihed; Gupta, Rahul; Mestiri, Sarra; Bdioui, Ahlem; Trimech, Mounir; Mokni, Moncef

    2017-08-29

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a relatively common inherited disorder. Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 are at high risk of developing neurogenic, neuroendocrine and mesenchymal intra-abdominal tumors. Although coexistence of multiple tumors of different types is frequent in neurofibromatosis type 1, simultaneous occurrence of abdominal tumors of three types in very rare. A 66-year-old lady with neurofibromatosis type 1 presented with painless progressive jaundice for six months. Laboratory investigations revealed iron deficiency anemia and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Tumor markers were normal. Abdominal computed tomography showed a 3 × 2 cm heterogenous mass in the periampullary region with mild dilation of the common bile duct and another 2 × 1.7 cm mass in the fourth portion of the duodenum. Endoscopic biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of periampullary carcinoid. At surgery, multiple small nodules were detected at the hepatic hilum. Frozen section suggested them to be neurofibromas. Patient underwent pancreatoduodenectomy and had uneventful recovery with no recurrence at two months. Microscopic examination of the resected specimen confirmed presence of three tumors: periampullary well differentiated neuroendocrine tumor, gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the fourth part of duodenum and plexiform neurofibroma at the hepatic hilum. Patients of neurofibromatosis type 1 with abdominal symptoms should be treated with high index of clinical suspicion and thoroughly evaluated to rule out multiple tumors.

  10. Effective Downsizing of a Large Oesophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour with Neoadjuvant Imatinib Enabling an Uncomplicated and without Tumour Rupture Laparoscopic-Assisted Ivor-Lewis Oesophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Costa Neves, Mafalda; Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Benson, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) is increasingly used nowadays. As oesophagectomy is associated with high morbidity and mortality, a preoperative downsizing of an oesophageal GIST to limit the extent of resection would be ideal. Because these tumours are rare and neoadjuvant treatment with imatinib is recent, there is limited literature available regarding neoadjuvant administration of imatinib in patients with oesophageal GISTs. A 50-year-old woman presented with total dysphagia. An upper endoscopy and biopsy revealed a large submucosal KIT-positive GIST obstructing the mid oesophagus. CT confirmed a lesion measuring 99 mm × 50 mm × 104 mm. Because the size and location of the tumour increased the risk of intraoperative rupture, it was decided to administer preoperative imatinib. The patient had an excellent clinical and radiological response. Her dysphagia gradually resolved and the follow-up CT scans of the first 10 months showed a gradually reducing tumour size to 54 mm × 33 mm × 42 mm. The patient underwent an uneventful laparoscopic-assisted Ivor-Lewis oesophagectomy. Postoperatively, the patient continued with adjuvant imatinib. At the last follow-up, 1 year from operation and 38 months from the diagnosis, the patient is disease free. PMID:26075122

  11. Lack of any relationship between ABO and Rh blood groups and clinicopathological features in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Turkish Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Ürün, Yüksel; Utkan, Güngör; Yalcin, Şuayib; Coşkun, Hasan Şenol; Koçer, Murat; Özdemir, Nuriye Yildirim; Kaplan, Mehmet Ali; Arslan, Ülkü Yalçintaş; Özdemir, Feyyaz; Öztuna, Derya; Akbulut, Hakan; İçli, Fikri

    2012-01-01

    An association between the ABO blood group and the risk of certain malignancies, including pancreatic and gastric cancer, has been reported previously. However, it is unclear whether this association is valid for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). In this study, ABO blood groups and the Rh factor were investigated in a series of GIST cases. In 162 patients with GIST, blood group and Rh factor were examined and compared with a control group of 3,022,883 healthy volunteer blood donors of the Turkish Red Crescent between 2004 and 2011. The relationship of blood groups with tumor size, mitotic activity, and age were also evaluated. Overall, the ABO blood group and Rh factor distributions of the 162 patients with GIST were similar to those of the general population. There were no significant differences between both ABO blood types and Rh factor in terms of tumor size, mitotic activity, and age. This is the first study reported on this issue. In our study, we didn't find any relationship between GIST and ABO blood group and Rh factor. However further studies with larger number of patients are needed to establish the role of blood groups in this population.

  12. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) from risk stratification systems to the new TNM proposal: more questions than answers? A review emphasizing the need for a standardized GIST reporting

    PubMed Central

    Agaimy, Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Following the successful introduction of the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) as the mainstay for the treatment of advanced and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), GIST has received a special attention in the recent literature. This resulted in major achievements on the surgical pathology diagnosis and improved our understanding of the molecular biology of the disease. Availability of the effective TKI therapy has emphasized the need for a more reliable and reproducible system for assessment of the malignant potential in GIST to allow for an optimal individualized patient treatment. All of the risk stratification systems proposed so far have emphasized the value of tumor size, mitotic count and anatomic site for risk estimation, at the same time appreciating the difficulty of classifying individual tumors as either benign or malignant. The newly proposed UICC TNM classification for GISTs represents the most recent hallmark on this topic; yet its usefulness remains to be tested in future clinical studies. This review briefly summarizes and discusses the most pertinent risk systems proposed for assessment of the malignant potential of GIST stressing their advantages and limitations and including some critical remarks on the newly proposed UICC TNM system for classifying GIST. Most importantly, an emphasis is made on the urgent need for a standardized approach for histopathological evaluation and reporting of GIST specimens to allow for a reproducible tumor size, mitotic count and tumor growth pattern, and hence for a better risk classification. PMID:20606727

  13. Chemical modifications in the seed region of miRNAs 221/222 increase the silencing performances in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Durso, Montano; Gaglione, Maria; Piras, Linda; Mercurio, Maria Emilia; Terreri, Sara; Olivieri, Michele; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Grieco, Paolo; Orsini, Gaetano; Tonon, Giancarlo; Messere, Anna; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-03-23

    Most GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT gene overexpression, which in turn is regulated by levels of microRNA 221 and microRNA 222. GISTs can also be distinguished by their miRNAs expression profile in which miRNAs 221/222 result reduced in comparison with GI normal tissues. In this paper, to restore normal miRNAs levels and to improve the silencing performances of miRNAs 221/222, new miRNA mimics in which guide strands are modified by Phosphorothioate (PS) and/or 2'-O-methyl RNA (2'-OMe) inside and outside the seed region, were synthesized and tested in GIST48 cells. We evaluated the positional effect of the chemical modifications on the miRNAs silencing activity, compared to natural and several commercial miRNA mimics. Our results show that chemically modified miRNAs 221/222 with alternating 2'-OMe-PS and natural nucleotides in the seed region are effective inhibitors of KIT gene expression and exhibit increased stability in rat plasma. Besides, their transfection in GIST 48 cells showed significant effects on different cellular processes in which KIT plays a functional role for tumor development (such as migration, cell proliferation, and apoptosis). Therefore, modified miRNAs 221/222 may provide an alternative therapeutic option for GIST treatment also aimed to overcome drug resistance concerns.

  14. Treatment of non-resectable and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors: experience with the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in a third level hospital in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel Renteria, Alberto; Pluma Jiménez, Miguel; Pérez Martínez, Mario; Martínez Martínez, Gloria; Rivera Rivera, Samuel; Grajales Álvarez, Rocío; Bautista Aragón, Yolanda; Quintana Quintana, Miguel; Alejandro Silva, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Stromal tumors of the digestive tract are uncommon malignant diseases, are subclassified as leiomyosarcomas and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) depending on the molecular expression of tyrosine kinase receptor KIT (CD117). GISTs represent 1% of malignant tumors affecting this anatomical site. Localized tumours diseases are reasonably well controlled by surgical resection and several criteria define the need for adjuvant therapy. In the case of metastatic disease a poor prognosis has been reported with systemic treatment based on chemotherapy. Recently, significant advances have been shown since tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were introduced, with median overall survival close to 5 years. Unfortunately in Mexico, even though the therapy has been long used there are no published data of the experience in the treatment of these tumors. Methods We used an electronic data base to obtain clinical, radiological and histological data of patients diagnosed with GIST and treated in the oncological center of the Mexican Institute of Social Security, patients were subclassified by stage, symptoms at diagnosis as well as the initial and subsequent systemic treatment. Finally we made an analysis for progression free survival and overall survival identifying prognostic factors. Results We obtained information of 71 patients with metastatic, non-resectable or recurrent GIST, treated with a TKI, we observed a predominant relation for women (60.4%) with median age of 58 years. Stage at diagnosis was predominantly metastatic (46.5%), most frequently affected sites were lung, liver and retroperitoneum. Median progression free survival was 30.6 months and overall survival was 81.3 months. All patients were initially treated with imatinib at a dose of 400 mg per day. Treatment was well-tolerated in most cases. Conclusions Metastatic GIST evaluated in our center shows a different affection in gender and age, and our population shows a different response to TKIs

  15. Functional role of the Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel DOG1/TMEM16A in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, Erik; Akcakaya, Pinar; Berglund, David; Karlsson, Fredrik; Vukojević, Vladana; Lee, Linkiat; Bogdanović, Darko; Lui, Weng-Onn; Larsson, Catharina; Zedenius, Jan; Fröbom, Robin; Bränström, Robert

    2014-08-15

    DOG1, a Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel (CaCC), was identified in 2004 to be robustly expressed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). It was rapidly included as a tumor marker in routine diagnostics, but the functional role remained unknown. CaCCs are important regulators of normal physiological functions, but also implicated in tumorigenesis, cancer progression, metastasis, cell migration, apoptosis, proliferation and viability in several malignancies. We therefore investigated whether DOG1 plays a role in the three latter in GIST by utilizing in vitro cell model systems. Confocal microscopy identified different subcellular localizations of DOG1 in imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant cells. Electrophysiological studies confirmed that DOG1-specific pharmacological agents possess potent activating and inhibiting properties. Proliferation assays showed small effects up to 72 h, and flow cytometric analysis of adherent cells with 7-AAD/Annexin V detected no pharmacological effects on viable GIST cells. However, inhibition of DOG1 conveyed pro-apoptotic effects among early apoptotic imatinib-resistant cells. In conclusion, DOG1 generates Cl{sup −} currents in GIST that can be regulated pharmacologically, with small effects on cell viability and proliferation in vitro. Inhibition of DOG1 might act pro-apoptotic on some early apoptotic GIST cell populations. Further studies are warranted to fully illuminate the function of DOG1 and its potential as therapeutic target. - Highlights: • Subcellular DOG1 localization varies between GIST cells. • DOG1 in GIST is voltage- and Ca{sup 2+}-activated. • Known TMEM16A modulators, like A01 and Eact, modulate DOG1. • DOG1 has small effects on cell viability and proliferation in vitro. • DOG1 impact early apoptotic GIST cells to undergo late apoptosis.

  16. A pharmaco-economic analysis of second-line treatment with imatinib or sunitinib in patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Hernández, I; Mould-Quevedo, J F; Silva, A; Salinas-Escudero, G; Villasís-Keever, M A; Granados-García, V; Dávila-Loaiza, G; Petersen, J A; Garduño-Espinosa, J

    2008-01-01

    Second-line treatments recommended by the National Cancer Center Network to manage advanced-stage gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) were evaluated to determine the cost and cost-effectiveness of each intervention in the Mexican insurance system, the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). Treatments examined over a 5-year temporal horizon to estimate long-term costs included 800 mg day−1 of imatinib mesylate, 50 mg day−1 of sunitinib malate (administered in a 4 week on/2 week rest schedule), and palliative care. The mean cost (MC), cost-effectiveness, and benefit of each intervention were compared to determine the best GIST treatment from the institutional perspective of the IMSS. As sunitinib was not reimbursed at the time of the study, a Markov model and sensitivity analysis were conducted to predict the MC and likelihood of reimbursement. Patients taking 800 mg day−1 of imatinib had the highest MC (±s.d.) of treatment at $35 225.61 USD (±1253.65 USD); while sunitinib incurred a median MC of $17 805.87 USD (±694.83 USD); and palliative care had the least MC over treatment duration as the cost was $2071.86 USD (±472.88 USD). In comparison to palliative care, sunitinib is cost-effective for 38.9% of patients; however, sunitinib delivered the greatest survival benefit as 5.64 progression-free months (PFM) and 1.4 life-years gained (LYG) were obtained in the economic model. Conversely, patients on imatinib and palliative care saw a lower PFM of 5.28 months and 2.58 months and also fewer LYG (only 1.31 and 1.08 years, respectively). Therefore, economic modeling predicts that reimbursing sunitinib over high dose imatinib in the second-line GIST indication would deliver cost savings to the IMSS and greater survival benefits to patients. PMID:18506179

  17. Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and frequent mutational inactivation of SDHA in wild-type SDHB-negative gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Belinsky, Martin G; Rink, Lori; Flieder, Douglas B; Jahromi, Mona S; Schiffman, Joshua D; Godwin, Andrew K; Mehren, Margaret von

    2013-02-01

    Approximately 15% of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in adults and 85% in children lack mutations in KIT and PDGFRA and are known as wild-type GISTs. Wild-type GISTs from adults and children express high levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) and exhibit stable genomes compared to mutant GISTs. Pediatric wild-type GISTs, GISTs from the multitumor Carney-Stratakis syndrome, and the Carney triad share other clinicopathological properties (e.g., early-onset, multifocal GISTs with epitheliod cell morphology), suggesting a common etiology. Carney-Stratakis is an inherited association of GIST and paragangliomas caused by germline mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) genes. The connection between defective cellular respiration and GIST pathology has been strengthened by the utilization of SDHB immunohistochemistry to identify SDH deficiency in pediatric GISTs, syndromic GISTs, and some adult wild-type GISTs. SDHB and IGF1R expression was examined in 12 wild-type and 12 mutant GIST cases. Wild-type GISTs were screened for coding-region alterations in SDH genes and for chromosomal aberrations using genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism and MIP arrays. SDHB-deficiency, identified in 11/12 wild-type GIST cases, was tightly associated with overexpression of IGF1R protein and transcript. Biallelic inactivation of the SDHA gene was a surprisingly frequent event, identified in 5 of 11 SDHB-negative cases, generally due to germline point mutations accompanied by somatic SDHA allelic losses. As a novel finding, inactivation of the SDHC gene from a combination of a heterozygous coding-region mutation and hypermethylation of the wild-type allele was found in one SDHB-negative case. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A pharmaco-economic analysis of second-line treatment with imatinib or sunitinib in patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Hernández, I; Mould-Quevedo, J F; Silva, A; Salinas-Escudero, G; Villasís-Keever, M A; Granados-García, V; Dávila-Loaiza, G; Petersen, J A; Garduño-Espinosa, J

    2008-06-03

    Second-line treatments recommended by the National Cancer Center Network to manage advanced-stage gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) were evaluated to determine the cost and cost-effectiveness of each intervention in the Mexican insurance system, the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). Treatments examined over a 5-year temporal horizon to estimate long-term costs included 800 mg day(-1) of imatinib mesylate, 50 mg day(-1) of sunitinib malate (administered in a 4 week on/2 week rest schedule), and palliative care. The mean cost (MC), cost-effectiveness, and benefit of each intervention were compared to determine the best GIST treatment from the institutional perspective of the IMSS. As sunitinib was not reimbursed at the time of the study, a Markov model and sensitivity analysis were conducted to predict the MC and likelihood of reimbursement. Patients taking 800 mg day(-1) of imatinib had the highest MC (+/-s.d.) of treatment at $35,225.61 USD (+/-1253.65 USD); while sunitinib incurred a median MC of $17,805.87 USD (+/-694.83 USD); and palliative care had the least MC over treatment duration as the cost was $2071.86 USD (+/-472.88 USD). In comparison to palliative care, sunitinib is cost-effective for 38.9% of patients; however, sunitinib delivered the greatest survival benefit as 5.64 progression-free months (PFM) and 1.4 life-years gained (LYG) were obtained in the economic model. Conversely, patients on imatinib and palliative care saw a lower PFM of 5.28 months and 2.58 months and also fewer LYG (only 1.31 and 1.08 years, respectively). Therefore, economic modeling predicts that reimbursing sunitinib over high dose imatinib in the second-line GIST indication would deliver cost savings to the IMSS and greater survival benefits to patients.

  19. Performance of F-18 FDG PET/CT for Predicting Malignant Potential of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Jang; Lee, Sang-Woo

    2017-10-10

    We aimed to explore the role of the diagnostic accuracy of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (F-18 FDG PET) or positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for prediction of malignant potential of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) through a systematic review and meta-analysis. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library database, from the earliest available date of indexing through May 31, 2017, were searched for studies evaluating the diagnostic performance of F-18 FDG PET or PET/CT for prediction of malignant potential of GIST. We determined the sensitivities and specificities across studies, calculated positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-), and constructed summary receiver operating characteristic curves. Across 7 studies (188 patients), the pooled sensitivity for F-18 FDG PET or PET/CT was 0.88 (95% CI; 0.80-0.94) without heterogeneity (χ(2) =6.15, p=0.72) and a pooled specificity of 0.88 (95% CI; 0.75-0.94) with heterogeneity (χ(2) =23.2, p= 0.01). Likelihood ratio (LR) syntheses gave an overall positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of 7.2 (95% CI; 3.3-15.3) and negative likelihood ratio (LR-) of 0.13 (95% CI; 0.07-0.24). The pooled DOR was 54 (95% CI; 16-181). F-18 FDG PET or PET/CT demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity for the prediction of malignant potential of GIST. At present, the literature regarding the use of F-18 FDG PET or PET/CT for the prediction of malignant potential of GIST remains still limited; thus, further large multicenter studies would be necessary to substantiate the diagnostic accuracy of F-18 FDG PET or PET/CT prediction of malignant potential of GIST. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic dual-energy computed tomography: optimization of kiloelectron volt settings in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Martin, Simon S; Pfeifer, Sophia; Wichmann, Julian L; Albrecht, Moritz H; Leithner, Doris; Lenga, Lukas; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Vogl, Thomas J; Bodelle, Boris

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic imaging (VMI+) reconstruction technique on quantitative and qualitative image analysis in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) at dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) of the abdomen. Forty-five DECT datasets of 21 patients (14 men; 63.7 ± 9.2 years) with GISTs were reconstructed with the standard linearly blended (M_0.6) and VMI+ and traditional virtual monoenergetic (VMI) algorithm in 10-keV increments from 40 to 100 keV. Attenuation measurements were performed in GIST lesions and abdominal metastases to calculate objective signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR). Five-point scales were used to evaluate overall image quality, lesion delineation, image sharpness, and image noise. Quantitative image parameters peaked at 40-keV VMI+ series (SNR 27.8 ± 13.0; CNR 26.3 ± 12.7), significantly superior to linearly blended (SNR 16.8 ± 7.3; CNR 13.6 ± 6.9) and all VMI series (all P < 0.001). Qualitative image parameters were highest for 60-keV VMI+ reconstructions regarding overall image quality and image sharpness (median 5, respectively; P ≤ 0.023). Qualitative assessment of lesion delineation peaked in 40 and 50-keV VMI+ series (median 5, respectively). Image noise was superior in 90 and 100-keV VMI and VMI+ reconstructions (all medians 5). Low-keV VMI+ reconstructions significantly increase SNR and CNR of GISTs and improve quantitative and qualitative image quality of abdominal DECT datasets compared to traditional VMI and standard linearly blended image series.

  1. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours in children and young adults: a clinicopathologic series with long-term follow-up from the database of the Cooperative Weichteilsarkom Studiengruppe (CWS).

    PubMed

    Benesch, Martin; Leuschner, Ivo; Wardelmann, Eva; Thielen, Mareike; Schmid, Irene; Kontny, Udo; Ebetsberger, Georg; Frey, Eva; Graf, Norbert; Schneider, Dominik T; Kremens, Bernhard; Amann, Gabriele; Urban, Christian; Schlemmer, Marcus; Quehenberger, Franz; Klingebiel, Thomas; Dantonello, Tobias; Koscielniak, Ewa

    2011-07-01

    Studies on gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) in the paediatric population are limited to case reports or small case series. We conducted a retrospective study to describe the long-term outcome of children and adolescents with GIST registered in the database of the Cooperative Weichteilsarkom Studiengruppe (CWS). Sixteen patients (female, n = 11) were identified. Median age at diagnosis was 13.5 years. In four female patients presence of thoracic masses in addition to GIST led to the diagnosis of complete or incomplete Carney triad. Three female patients had metastatic disease at diagnosis, the remaining thirteen GIST were localised. The stomach was the most common primary site of the tumour, followed by the small bowel and colon/abdomen. All patients underwent tumour resection. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKI) were administered in five patients. With a median follow-up of 96 months all patients are alive, nine of them in first CR. Four female patients developed local or distant recurrence; three of them achieved second CR and one a PR. Two individuals have extensive progressive (n = 1) or stable (n = 1) disease. Estimated progression-free survival at 5 years is 0.63 (95%CI: 0.50-0.86). Although long-term overall survival is favourable, approximately 30 percent of patients develop disease progression. International cooperation in registration, tissue collection and molecular studies are required to obtain reliable data on the clinical course of these rare tumours in the paediatric population. Biological studies are a prerequisite for initiation of studies with RTKI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Role for Adjuvant RFA in Managing Hepatic Metastases from Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) After Treatment with Targeted Systemic Therapy Using Kinase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hakimé, Antoine Cesne, Axel Le Deschamps, Frederic Farouil, Geoffroy Boudabous, Sana Aupérin, Anne Domont, Julien Debaere, Thierry

    2013-04-16

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the multimodality management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in patients undergoing targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy (TKI) for liver metastases.MethodsOutcomes of 17 patients who underwent liver RFA for 27 metastatic GIST after TKI therapy, from January 2004 to March 2012, were retrospectively analyzed. Mean maximum tumor diameter was 2.5 ± 1 cm (range 0.9–4.5 cm). In seven patients (group A), RFA of all residual tumors was performed, with curative intent, and TKI therapy was discontinued. In five patients (group B), RFA of all residual tumors was performed upon achieving the best morphological response with TKI therapy, which was maintained after RFA. In another five patients (group C), RFA was performed on individual liver metastases which were progressive under TKI therapy.ResultsAll 27 targeted tumors were completely ablated, without local recurrence during the mean follow-up period of 49 months. No major complications occurred. Two minor complications were reported (11 %). Only two patients (both in group C) died at 20 and 48 months. Two-year progression-free survival (PFS) after RFA was 29 % in group A, 75 % in group B, and 20 % in group C.ConclusionsRFA in patients, previously treated with TKI, is feasible and safe. Our data suggest that RFA is a useful therapeutic option in patients with metastatic GIST and should be performed at the time of best clinical response with patient maintained under TKI after the procedure.

  3. Genome-wide functional screening identifies CDC37 as a crucial HSP90-cofactor for KIT oncogenic expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Mariño-Enríquez, A; Ou, W-B; Cowley, G; Luo, B; Jonker, A H; Mayeda, M; Okamoto, M; Eilers, G; Czaplinski, J T; Sicinska, E; Wang, Y; Taguchi, T; Demetri, G D; Root, D E; Fletcher, J A

    2014-04-03

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) contain KIT or PDGFRA kinase gain-of-function mutations, and therefore respond clinically to imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapies. However, clinical progression subsequently results from selection of TKI-resistant clones, typically containing secondary mutations in the KIT kinase domain, which can be heterogeneous between and within GIST metastases in a given patient. TKI-resistant KIT oncoproteins require HSP90 chaperoning and are potently inactivated by HSP90 inhibitors, but clinical applications in GIST patients are constrained by the toxicity resulting from concomitant inactivation of various other HSP90 client proteins, beyond KIT and PDGFRA. To identify novel targets responsible for KIT oncoprotein function, we performed parallel genome-scale short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated gene knockdowns in KIT-mutant GIST-T1 and GIST882. GIST cells were infected with a lentiviral shRNA pooled library targeting 11 194 human genes, and allowed to proliferate for 5-7 weeks, at which point assessment of relative hairpin abundance identified the HSP90 cofactor, CDC37, as one of the top six GIST-specific essential genes. Validations in treatment-naive (GIST-T1, GIST882) vs imatinib-resistant GISTs (GIST48, GIST430) demonstrated that: (1) CDC37 interacts with oncogenic KIT; (2) CDC37 regulates expression and activation of KIT and downstream signaling intermediates in GIST; and (3) unlike direct HSP90 inhibition, CDC37 knockdown accomplishes prolonged KIT inhibition (>20 days) in GIST. These studies highlight CDC37 as a key biologic vulnerability in both imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant GIST. CDC37 targeting is expected to be selective for KIT/PDGFRA and a subset of other HSP90 clients, and thereby represents a promising strategy for inactivating the myriad KIT/PDGFRA oncoproteins in TKI-resistant GIST patients.

  4. Expression of immune checkpoint molecules of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin protein 3/galectin-9 for NK cell suppression in human gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Komita, Hideo; Koido, Shigeo; Hayashi, Kazumi; Kan, Shin; Ito, Masaki; Kamata, Yuko; Suzuki, Masafumi; Homma, Sadamu

    2015-10-01

    Monoclonal antibody therapy for immune checkpoint blockade has achieved promising results for several types of malignant tumors. For the future treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) by immune checkpoint blockade, expression of immune checkpoint-related molecules that suppress antitumor immunity in GISTs was examined. Infiltration of immune cell types into 19 GIST tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, and expression of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin protein 3 (Tim-3) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) in the infiltrated immune cells was examined by immunofluorescence microscopy. The expression status of galectin-9 in the GIST tumor cells was also determined by immunohistochemistry. All the GIST tissues showed CD8+ T cell infiltration and 8 showed CD56+ natural killer (NK) cell infiltration, and the numbers of infiltrated CD8+ T and NK cells were strongly correlated. However, these CD8+ T and NK cells were CD69-negative inactivated cells. Tim-3 was expressed in the infiltrated NK cells in 6/8 (75%) of the GIST tissues. Expression of galectin-9, a ligand of Tim-3, was observed in 13/19 (68.4%) GIST tissues and all of the GIST tissues with Tim-3+ NK cell infiltration showed positive galectin-9 expression. No PD-1 expression in the infiltrated NK cells and neither Tim-3 nor PD-1 expression was observed in the infiltrated CD8+ T cells. Interaction between Tim-3 in infiltrated NK cells and galectin-9 in tumor cells may be involved in an immune checkpoint mechanism for suppression of antitumor immunity in GISTs. Blockade of the Tim-3/galectin-9 pathway may become a new strategy for GIST treatment.

  5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors with KIT exon 9 mutations: Update on genotype-phenotype correlation and validation of a high-resolution melting assay for mutational testing.

    PubMed

    Künstlinger, Helen; Huss, Sebastian; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Binot, Elke; Kleine, Michaela Angelika; Loeser, Heike; Mittler, Jens; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Hohenberger, Peter; Reichardt, Peter; Büttner, Reinhard; Wardelmann, Eva; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-11-01

    KIT exon 9 mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are highly relevant and have direct therapeutic implications. In this context, we established and validated a fast and sensitive high-resolution melting assay. Analyzing 126 primary and 18 metastatic KIT exon 9-mutated cases from our registry, we demonstrate that the mutational spectrum of exon 9 is broader than previously thought and describe 3 novel mutations. Including these cases and the common p.A502_Y503dup mutation, we provide a comprehensive list of all known KIT exon 9 mutations according to the Human Genome Variation Society nomenclature. Two of the newly described mutations were associated with an aggressive phenotype and tumor progression while being treated with 400 mg imatinib, indicating that also GIST with rare exon 9 mutations could be treated with increased imatinib dosage. On the basis of >1500 GISTs from our registry, we have determined the frequency of KIT exon 9 mutations to be 9.2% among all GISTs and 22.5% among small-bowel cases. We describe for the first time that nearly 20% of exon 9-mutated GIST occur in the stomach or rectum. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that exon 9-mutated GISTs metastasize significantly more often to the peritoneum than to the liver. Performing extensive statistical analyses on data from our registry and from the literature, we demonstrate that KIT exon 9 mutations are neither associated with intermediate-risk/high-risk status nor overrepresented among metastatic lesions. Thus, we conclude that exon 9 mutations per se do not have prognostic relevance.

  6. A potent combination of the novel PI3K inhibitor, GDC-0941, with imatinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumor xenografts: long-lasting responses after treatment withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Floris, Giuseppe; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Sciot, Raf; Li, Haifu; Friedman, Lori; Van Looy, Thomas; Wellens, Jasmien; Vermaelen, Peter; Deroose, Christophe M.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Schöffski, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oncogenic signaling in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) is sustained via PI3K/AKT pathway. We used a panel of six GIST xenograft models to assess efficacy of GDC-0941 as single agent or in combination with imatinib (IMA). Experimental design Nude mice (n=136) were grafted bilaterally with human GIST carrying divers KIT mutations. Mice were orally dosed over four weeks, grouped as follows: A) control; B) GDC-0941; C) IMA and D) GDC+IMA treatments. Xenografts re-growth after treatment discontinuation was assessed in group C and D for additional four weeks. Tumor response was assessed by volume measurements, micro-PET imaging, histopathology and immunoblotting. Moreover genomic alterations in PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway were evaluated. Results In all models, GDC-0941 caused tumor growth stabilization, inhibiting tumor cells proliferation but did not induce apoptosis. Under GDC+IMA, profound tumor regression, superior to either treatment alone, was observed. This effect was associated with the best histologic response, a nearly complete proliferation arrest and increased apoptosis. Tumor re-growth assays confirmed superior activity of GDC+IMA over IMA; in three out of six models tumor volume remained reduced and stable even after treatment discontinuation. A positive correlation between response to GDC+IMA and PTEN loss, both on gene and protein levels, was found. Conclusion GDC+IMA has significant antitumor efficacy in GIST xenografts, inducing more substantial tumor regression, apoptosis and durable effects than IMA. Notably, after treatment withdrawal, tumor regression was sustained in tumors exposed to GDC+IMA, which was not observed under IMA. Assessment of PTEN status may represent a useful predictive biomarker for patient selection. PMID:23231951

  7. Safety, efficacy and prognostic analyses of sunitinib in the post-marketing surveillance study of Japanese patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Yoshito; Ohki, Emiko; Ueno, Naomi; Yoshida, Ai; Toyoshima, Yasuharu; Ueda, Eiji; Houzawa, Hiroyuki; Togo, Kanae; Nishida, Toshirou

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to expand the sunitinib safety database in Japanese imatinib-resistant/-intolerant gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients. Retrospective analyses investigated common adverse events as potential prognostic markers. Methods Four hundred and seventy patients who received sunitinib between June 2008 and November 2009 were analyzed for safety, progression-free survival and overall survival; 386 for objective response rate; 88% received sunitinib on Schedule 4/2 starting at 50 mg/day. Results No unexpected safety issues occurred. Grade ≥ 3 adverse events occurred in 70%, most commonly thrombocytopenia (33%), neutropenia (22%) and leukopenia (15%). Objective response rate was 20% (95% confidence interval 16–24). Median progression-free survival was 22.4 weeks (95% confidence interval, 21.7–24.0). The overall survival rate at 24 weeks was 91% (95% confidence interval, 88–94). Higher relative dose intensity (≥70 vs. <70%) during the first 6 weeks and better Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0 vs. ≥1) were associated with longer progression-free survival (24.0 vs. 20.1 weeks; P = 0.011; and 24.1 vs. 16.9 weeks; P < 0.001) and higher 24-week overall survival rate (94 vs. 83%; P < 0.001; and 96 vs. 83%; P < 0.001). Increased progression-free survival and overall survival rates were associated with specific adverse events. Cox proportional hazard modeling adjusted for relative dose intensity and performance status established hand–foot syndrome (hazard ratio = 0.636; 95% confidence interval, 0.456–0.888) and leukopenia (hazard ratio = 0.683; 95% confidence interval, 0.492–0.948) occurring within 12 weeks were significantly correlated with increased progression-free survival. Conclusion Sunitinib showed good efficacy and tolerable safety. Factors associated with greater efficacy were relative dose intensity, performance status and specific early adverse events. PMID:26373318

  8. Correlation of imatinib resistance with the mutational status of KIT and PDGFRA genes in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Han; Kim, Younghye; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Young-Sik

    2013-12-01

    Imatinib resistance is the most important clinical issue in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). However, the association of imatinib resistance with the genetic characteristics of GIST has not been clearly defined. Our meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between imatinib resistance and KIT and PDGFRA mutations in GIST. METHODS. We identified all relevant studies in PubMed and Embase. The effect sizes were calculated as prevalence or odds ratio (OR) with a random-effects model. RESULTS. We identified 10 eligible studies that included 1083 GIST cases. Total imatinib resistance was found in 35.5 % of PDGFRA-mutant tumors (OR = 2.9, P = 0.038), 33.7% of wild-type tumors (KIT and PDGFRA non-mutant tumors; OR = 2.8, P = 0.002), and 27.4% of KIT-mutant tumors (OR = 0.3, P = 0.001). Primary imatinib resistance was found in 50.0% of PDGFRA-mutant tumors (OR = 10.9, P = 0.031), 33.4% of wild-type tumors (OR = 5.9, P = 0.060), and 8.9% of KIT-mutant tumors (OR = 0.2, P = 0.025). KIT exon 9-mutant tumors showed primary resistance more frequently than exon 11-mutant and other tumors (OR = 7.6, P < 0.001). Regarding secondary resistance associated with KIT second-site mutations, the exon 17 mutation (54.5%) was most frequent, followed by exon 13 (38.3%) and 14 (13.4%) mutations. CONCLUSION. Our meta-analysis indicates that imatinib resistance is closely associated with KIT and PDGFRA genotypes in GIST. Thus, the mutational status of KIT and PDGFRA might predict response to imatinib in GIST patients.

  9. The Therapeutic Response of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors to Imatinib Treatment Assessed by Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Histopathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunfang; Wang, He; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Weizhen; Hong, Nan; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To exploit the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI when evaluating the therapeutic response of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) to Imatinib in a mouse model. Materials and Methods Mice with xenografts bearing cells from the GIST-T1 cell line were randomly divided into a treated group receiving Imatinib and a control group. DWMRI scans with 14 b-values (0–1500 s/mm2) were performed before and after treatment (days 1, 3 and 7). IVIM related parameters perfusion fractions (fp) and perfusion-related diffusion coefficients (D*) and the conventional apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were calculated by fitting the DWMRI signal decay. The mean changes from baseline to each post-treatment time point for each measurement (ΔADC, Δfp and ΔD*) were calculated. The differences of mean changes between the two groups were tested for statistical significance. Histopathological analyses including Ki-67, CD31, TUNEL and H&E were conducted in conjunction with the MRI scans. Results Increases in ADC of the treated group were higher than those of the control group after treatment, whereas statistical significances were not observed. Compared to the control group, D* in the treated group decreased significantly (ΔD*treated = -41%, -49%, and -49% with P = 0.0001, 0.0001 and 0.0001), and fp increased significantly (Δfptreated = 79%, 82% and 110%, with P = 0.001, 0.0001 and P = 0.0007) on days 1, 3 and 7 after treatment. Histopathological analyses demonstrated different tumor tissue characteristics between the treated and control groups. Conclusion IVIM measurements may serve as more sensitive imaging biomarkers than ADC when assessing GIST response to Imatinib as early as one day after treatment. PMID:27911930

  10. miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 induce apoptosis via the KIT/AKT signalling pathway in gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Ihle, Michaela Angelika; Trautmann, Marcel; Kuenstlinger, Helen; Huss, Sebastian; Heydt, Carina; Fassunke, Jana; Wardelmann, Eva; Bauer, Sebastian; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Buettner, Reinhard; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine

    2015-08-01

    Aberrantly expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in many diseases including cancer. In gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) expression of miR-221 and miR-222 is reduced compared to control tissue and other sarcomas but the functional effects of this downregulation are not fully understood. This study aimed at evaluating the miR-221 and miR-222 expression profiles in different GIST subtypes and the functional role of these miRNAs. Expression of miR-221 and miR-222 was analysed in six KIT exon 9 and three KIT exon 11 mutated and nine wildtype GISTs by qPCR. Viability and apoptosis were examined in three different, KIT positive GIST cell lines (GIST882, GIST-T1 and GIST48) after overexpression of these miRNAs. The modulation of KIT and the PI3K/AKT pathways was determined by Western blot. Wildtype and KIT mutated GISTs revealed reduced miRNA expression compared to adequate control tissue. miRNA expression was lower for wildtype compared to mutated GISTs. Transient transfection of miR-221 and miR-222 reduced viability and induced apoptosis by inhibition of KIT expression and its phosphorylation and activation of caspases 3 and 7 in all three GIST cell lines. p-AKT, AKT and BCL2 expression was reduced after miRNA transfection whereas only slight influence on p-MTOR, MTOR and BCL2L11 (BIM) was detected. Our results demonstrate that miR-221 and miR-222 which are downregulated in wildtype and mutated GISTs, induce apoptosis in vitro by a signalling cascade involving KIT, AKT and BCL2. Therefore, overexpression of these miRNAs seems to functionally counteract oncogenic signalling pathways in GIST.

  11. Safety, efficacy and prognostic analyses of sunitinib in the post-marketing surveillance study of Japanese patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Yoshito; Ohki, Emiko; Ueno, Naomi; Yoshida, Ai; Toyoshima, Yasuharu; Ueda, Eiji; Houzawa, Hiroyuki; Togo, Kanae; Nishida, Toshirou

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to expand the sunitinib safety database in Japanese imatinib-resistant/-intolerant gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients. Retrospective analyses investigated common adverse events as potential prognostic markers. Four hundred and seventy patients who received sunitinib between June 2008 and November 2009 were analyzed for safety, progression-free survival and overall survival; 386 for objective response rate; 88% received sunitinib on Schedule 4/2 starting at 50 mg/day. No unexpected safety issues occurred. Grade ≥ 3 adverse events occurred in 70%, most commonly thrombocytopenia (33%), neutropenia (22%) and leukopenia (15%). Objective response rate was 20% (95% confidence interval 16-24). Median progression-free survival was 22.4 weeks (95% confidence interval, 21.7-24.0). The overall survival rate at 24 weeks was 91% (95% confidence interval, 88-94). Higher relative dose intensity (≥70 vs. <70%) during the first 6 weeks and better Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0 vs. ≥1) were associated with longer progression-free survival (24.0 vs. 20.1 weeks; P = 0.011; and 24.1 vs. 16.9 weeks; P < 0.001) and higher 24-week overall survival rate (94 vs. 83%; P < 0.001; and 96 vs. 83%; P < 0.001). Increased progression-free survival and overall survival rates were associated with specific adverse events. Cox proportional hazard modeling adjusted for relative dose intensity and performance status established hand-foot syndrome (hazard ratio = 0.636; 95% confidence interval, 0.456-0.888) and leukopenia (hazard ratio = 0.683; 95% confidence interval, 0.492-0.948) occurring within 12 weeks were significantly correlated with increased progression-free survival. Sunitinib showed good efficacy and tolerable safety. Factors associated with greater efficacy were relative dose intensity, performance status and specific early adverse events. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Recombinant erythropoietin for the anaemia of patients with advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (GIST) receiving imatinib: an active agent only in non progressive patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recombinant erythropoietin for the anaemia of patients with advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (GIST) receiving imatinib : an active agent only in non progressive patients. Background Imatinib is a standard treatment for advanced/metastatic GIST and in adjuvant setting. Anaemia is frequently observed in patients with advanced GIST, and is one of the most frequent side effects of imatinib with grade 3–4 anaemia in 10% of patients. Whether EPO treatment is useful in the management of GIST patients receiving imatinib treatment is unknown. Methods A retrospective study of EPO treatment in GIST patients receiving imatinib was undertaken in 4 centres. Thirty four patients received EPO treatment among the 319 GIST patients treated with imatinib in clinical trials or with compassionate use between 2001 and 2003. The efficacy of EPO on the anaemia of patients with GIST treated with imatinib was analyzed. Results There were 18 males and 16 females with a median age of 59 years. Median WHO-PS was 1. Primary tumour sites were mainly gastric (32%) and small bowel (29%). Sites of metastases were mainly liver (82%) and peritoneum (79%). The median delay between the initiation of imatinib treatment and EPO was 58 days (range 0–553). Median haemoglobin (Hb) level prior to EPO was 9 g/dL (range 6,9-11,8) and 11,7 g/dL (range 6,8-14,4) after 2 months. An increase of more than 2 g/dL was observed in 18 (53%) of patients. None of the 7 patients who progressed (PD) under imatinib treatment (400 mg/day) experienced HB response, as compared to 66% (18/27) of the remaining patients (PR + SD) (p = 0,002). Primary tumour site, liver metastases, peritoneal metastases, age, gender did not correlate with HB response to EPO. Response to EPO was observed in 2/11 patients receiving high-dose imatinib (800 mg/day) vs 16/23 of others. Using logistic regression, only PD before EPO treatment was retained as a predictive factor for EPO response. Conclusion EPO enables to

  13. Characterization of various types of mast cells derived from model mice of familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors with KIT-Asp818Tyr mutation.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Noriko; Nakai, Norihiro; Ohkouchi, Mizuka; Hashikura, Yuka; Liu-Kimura, Ning-Ning; Isozaki, Koji; Hirota, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic mast cell neoplasms and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) often have various types of somatic gain-of-function mutations of the c-kit gene which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, KIT. Several types of germline gain-of-function mutations of the c-kit gene have been detected in families with multiple GISTs. All three types of model mice for the familial GISTs with germline c-kit gene mutations at exon 11, 13 or 17 show development of GIST, while they are different from each other in skin mast cell number. Skin mast cell number in the model mice with exon 17 mutation was unchanged compared to the corresponding wild-type mice. In the present study, we characterized various types of mast cells derived from the model mice with exon 17 mutation (KIT-Asp818Tyr) corresponding to human familial GIST case with human KIT-Asp820Tyr to clarify the role of the c-kit gene mutation in mast cells. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs) derived from wild-type mice, heterozygotes and homozygotes were used for the experiments. Immortalized BMMCs, designated as IMC-G4 cells, derived from BMMCs of a homozygote during long-term culture were also used. Ultrastructure, histamine contents, proliferation profiles and phosphorylation of various signaling molecules in those cells were examined. In IMC-G4 cells, presence of additional mutation(s) of the c-kit gene and effect of KIT inhibitors on both KIT autophosphorylation and cell proliferation were also analyzed. We demonstrated that KIT-Asp818Tyr did not affect ultrastructure and proliferation profiles but did histamine contents in BMMCs. IMC-G4 cells had an additional novel c-kit gene mutation of KIT-Tyr421Cys which is considered to induce neoplastic transformation of mouse mast cells and the mutation appeared to be resistant to a KIT inhibitor of imatinib but sensitive to another KIT inhibitor of nilotinib. IMC-G4 cells might be a useful mast cell line to investigate mast cell biology.

  14. Short- and Long-Term Outcomes of Laparoscopic Versus Open Resection for Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Propensity Score-Matching Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-Feng; Huang, Chang-Ming; Lin, Mi; Lin, Jian-Xian; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Wang, Jia-Bin; Chen, Qi-Yue; Cao, Long-Long; Tu, Ru-Hong

    2016-04-01

    Published reports on laparoscopic resection of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) were limited to small experiences and selection bias. Two hundred fourteen patients who underwent primary gastric GIST resection at our institution (January 2006-December 2012) were identified from a prospectively collected database. Laparoscopic resections (LAP) were performed in 133 patients, and open resections (OPEN) were performed in 81 patients. The short- and long-term outcomes were analyzed using propensity-score matching (PSM) by comparing the clinicopathological factors between these groups. The tumor resection method and tumor size were significantly different between the LAP and OPEN groups. After PSM, there were no differences (P > 0.05) in these clinicopathological factors. The LAP group had less blood loss and shorter operation time, time to first flatus, time to first fluid diet, time to gastric tube removal, and postoperative stay before PSM. In addition, there were no differences regarding the time of drainage tube removal or hospitalization expense. Other than the time of gastric tube removal, which was similar in these 2 groups, the short-term outcomes were similar before and after PSM. The rates of postoperative complications in the LAP and OPEN groups were 6.8% and 22.8%, respectively, before PSM (P = 0.001) and 5.6% and 22.5%, respectively, after PSM (P = 0.004). The multivariate analyses for complications showed that tumors were located in the middle of the stomach, and the operation method and proximal gastrectomy were independent risk factors before and after PSM. The 5-year cumulative survival rates in the LAP and OPEN groups were 95.4% and 85.9%, respectively, (P = 0.07) before PSM and 93.1% and 91.9%, respectively, (P = 0.69) after PSM (not significantly different). Laparoscopic resection for gastric GISTs had better short-term outcomes and similar long-term outcomes compared with open surgery. Localized gastric GISTs can be

  15. Characterization of various types of mast cells derived from model mice of familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors with KIT-Asp818Tyr mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Noriko; Nakai, Norihiro; Ohkouchi, Mizuka; Hashikura, Yuka; Liu-Kimura, Ning-Ning; Isozaki, Koji; Hirota, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic mast cell neoplasms and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) often have various types of somatic gain-of-function mutations of the c-kit gene which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, KIT. Several types of germline gain-of-function mutations of the c-kit gene have been detected in families with multiple GISTs. All three types of model mice for the familial GISTs with germline c-kit gene mutations at exon 11, 13 or 17 show development of GIST, while they are different from each other in skin mast cell number. Skin mast cell number in the model mice with exon 17 mutation was unchanged compared to the corresponding wild-type mice. In the present study, we characterized various types of mast cells derived from the model mice with exon 17 mutation (KIT-Asp818Tyr) corresponding to human familial GIST case with human KIT-Asp820Tyr to clarify the role of the c-kit gene mutation in mast cells. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs) derived from wild-type mice, heterozygotes and homozygotes were used for the experiments. Immortalized BMMCs, designated as IMC-G4 cells, derived from BMMCs of a homozygote during long-term culture were also used. Ultrastructure, histamine contents, proliferation profiles and phosphorylation of various signaling molecules in those cells were examined. In IMC-G4 cells, presence of additional mutation(s) of the c-kit gene and effect of KIT inhibitors on both KIT autophosphorylation and cell proliferation were also analyzed. We demonstrated that KIT-Asp818Tyr did not affect ultrastructure and proliferation profiles but did histamine contents in BMMCs. IMC-G4 cells had an additional novel c-kit gene mutation of KIT-Tyr421Cys which is considered to induce neoplastic transformation of mouse mast cells and the mutation appeared to be resistant to a KIT inhibitor of imatinib but sensitive to another KIT inhibitor of nilotinib. IMC-G4 cells might be a useful mast cell line to investigate mast cell biology. PMID:26722383

  16. Efficacy and safety of regorafenib for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours after failure of imatinib and sunitinib: an international, multicentre, prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial (GRID)

    PubMed Central

    Demetri, George D; Reichardt, Peter; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Blay, Jean-Yves; Rutkowski, Piotr; Gelderblom, Hans; Hohenberger, Peter; Leahy, Michael; von Mehren, Margaret; Joensuu, Heikki; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Blackstein, Martin; Cesne, Axel Le; Schöffski, Patrick; Maki, Robert G; Bauer, Sebastian; Nguyen, Binh Bui; Xu, Jianming; Nishida, Toshirou; Chung, John; Kappeler, Christian; Kuss, Iris; Laurent, Dirk; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background To date, only two agents, imatinib and sunitinib, have shown clinical benefit in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), but almost all metastatic GISTs eventually develop resistance to these agents, resulting in fatal disease progression. This phase 3 trial assessed efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with metastatic and/or unresectable GIST progressing after failure of at least imatinib and sunitinib. Methods Patients were randomised 2:1 to receive either regorafenib 160 mg orally daily or placebo, plus best supportive care in both arms, for the first 3 weeks of each 4-week cycle. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Upon disease progression, patients on placebo could cross over to regorafenib. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), objective response rate, disease control rate (DCR: rate of durable stable disease lasting for ≥12 weeks plus complete or partial responses), and safety. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01271712). Results From January to August 2011, 240 patients were screened at 57 centres in 17 countries, and 199 patients were randomised to receive regorafenib (n=133) or matching placebo (n=66). Median PFS per independent blinded central review was 4·8 months and 0·9 months, respectively (hazard ratio [HR] 0·27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0·19–0·39; p<0·0001). Following progression, 56/66 patients (84·8%) on placebo crossed over to regorafenib, resulting in no significant difference in OS between study arms (HR 0·77, 95% CI 0·42–1·41; p=0·199). A best response of partial response or stable disease was observed in 101/133 patients (75·9%) on regorafenib and 23/66 patients (34·8%) on placebo. DCR was 52·6% (70/133 patients) and 9·1% (6/66 patients), respectively. Drug-related adverse events were reported in 130 (98·5%) of 132 regorafenib patients and 45 (68·2%) of 66 placebo patients. The most common grade ≥3 regorafenib

  17. Surgical Management of Wild-Type Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Report From the National Institutes of Health Pediatric and Wildtype GIST Clinic.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Christopher B; Madenci, Arin L; Boikos, Sosipatros A; Janeway, Katherine A; George, Suzanne; von Mehren, Margaret; Pappo, Alberto S; Schiffman, Joshua D; Wright, Jennifer; Trent, Jonathan C; Pacak, Karel; Stratakis, Constantine A; Helman, Lee J; La Quaglia, Michael P

    2016-12-28

    Purpose Wild-type gastrointestinal stromal tumors (WT-GISTs) that lack KIT or PDGFRA mutations represent a unique subtype of GIST that predominantly affects children. We sought to determine the effect on event-free survival (EFS) of staging variables, extent of resection, and repeat resection of tumors. Methods In 2008, a WT-GIST clinic was established at the National Cancer Institute, allowing the development of a large clinical database. We included participants who underwent resection of WT-GIST. Associations with EFS (ie, freedom from disease progression or recurrence) were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results Among 76 participants with WT-GISTs, the median follow-up was 4.1 years. Overall EFS (± SE) was 72.6 ± 5.4% at 1 year, 57.6 ± 6.2% at 2 years, 23.7 ± 6.0% at 5 years, and 16.3 ± 5.5% at 10 years postoperatively. Hazard of disease progression or recurrence was significantly increased for patients with metastatic disease (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 2.3; 95% CI, 1.0 to 5.1; P = .04) and > 5 mitoses per 50 high-power fields (AHR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 6.0; P = .03), whereas there was no significant effect of negative microscopic resection margins (AHR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.4 to 2.2; P = 0.86). There was no association between type of gastric resection (ie, anatomic v partial/wedge) and EFS ( P = .67). Repeated resection after the initial resection was significantly associated with decreasing postoperative EFS ( P < .01). Five patients (6%) died after initial enrollment in 2008. Conclusion WT-GIST is an indolent disease, and most patients survive with disease progression. We found no improvement in EFS with more extensive or serial resections. Disease progression or recurrence may be more closely related to tumor biology than surgical management. These data suggest that resections for WT-GISTs be restricted to the initial procedure and that subsequent resections be performed only to address symptoms such as

  18. Correlation of KIT and PDGFRA mutational status with clinical benefit in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor treated with sunitinib in a worldwide treatment-use trial.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Peter; Demetri, George D; Gelderblom, Hans; Rutkowski, Piotr; Im, Seock-Ah; Gupta, Sudeep; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Schöffski, Patrick; Schuette, Jochen; Soulières, Denis; Blay, Jean-Yves; Goldstein, David; Fly, Kolette; Huang, Xin; Corsaro, Massimo; Lechuga, Maria Jose; Martini, Jean-Francois; Heinrich, Michael C

    2016-01-15

    Several small studies indicated that the genotype of KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRA) contributes in part to the level of clinical effectiveness of sunitinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patients. This study aimed to correlate KIT and PDGFRA mutational status with clinical outcome metrics (progression-free survival [PFS], overall survival [OS], objective response rate [ORR]) in a larger international patient population. This is a non-interventional, retrospective analysis in patients with imatinib-resistant or intolerant GIST who were treated in a worldwide, open-label treatment-use study (Study 1036; NCT00094029) in which sunitinib was administered at a starting dose of 50 mg/day on a 4-week-on, 2-week-off schedule. Molecular status was obtained in local laboratories with tumor samples obtained either pre-imatinib, post-imatinib/pre-sunitinib, or post-sunitinib treatment, and all available data were used in the analyses regardless of collection time. The primary analysis compared PFS in patients with primary KIT exon 11 versus exon 9 mutations (using a 2-sided log-rank test) and secondary analyses compared OS (using the same test) and ORR (using a 2-sided Pearson χ(2) test) in the same molecular subgroups. Of the 1124 sunitinib-treated patients in the treatment-use study, 230 (20%) were included in this analysis, and baseline characteristics were similar between the two study populations. Median PFS was 7.1 months. A significantly better PFS was observed in patients with a primary mutation in KIT exon 9 (n = 42) compared to those with a primary mutation in exon 11 (n = 143; hazard ratio = 0.59; 95 % confidence interval, 0.39-0.89; P = 0.011), with median PFS times of 12.3 and 7.0 months, respectively. Similarly, longer OS and higher ORR were observed in patients with a primary KIT mutation in exon 9 versus exon 11. The data available were limited to investigate the effects of additional KIT or PDGFRA mutations on the efficacy

  19. Nilotinib vs imatinib as first-line therapy for patients with unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumours: randomised phase 3 trial results and subgroup analysis of molecular subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Blay, Jean-Yves; Shen, Lin; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Rutkowski, Piotr; Qin, Shukui; Nosov, Dmitry; Wan, Desen; Trent, Jonathan; Srimuninnimit, Vichien; Pápai, Zsuzsanna; Le Cesne, Axel; Novick, Steven; Taningco, Lilia; Mo, Shuyuan; Green, Steven; Reichardt, Peter; Demetri, George D

    2015-01-01

    Background Nilotinib inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of ABL1/BCR-ABL1, as well as KIT, platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs), and the discoidin domain receptor. Gain-of-function mutations in KIT or PDGFRα are key drivers in most gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). This trial was designed to test the efficacy and safety of nilotinib vs imatinib as first-line therapy for patients with advanced GISTs. Methods This randomised, open-label, multicentre phase 3 trial included 647 adult patients with previously untreated, histologically confirmed, metastatic and/or unresectable GISTs. Patients were stratified by prior adjuvant therapy and randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive oral imatinib 400 mg once daily or oral nilotinib 400 mg twice daily. Centrally reviewed progression-free survival (PFS) was the primary endpoint. Response rates, toxicity, and overall survival were also analysed for the overall population and for mutation-defined subsets. Efficacy endpoints used the intention to treat principle. Here, the final results are reported. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00785785. Findings Because the futility boundary was crossed at a preplanned interim analysis, trial accrual terminated in April 2011. At final analysis of the core study (data cutoff, October 2012), PFS was higher with imatinib overall (hazard ratio [HR] 1.47) and in the KIT exon 9 subgroup (HR 32.46) but roughly similar between arms in the KIT exon 11 subgroup (HR 1.12). Sensitivity analyses suggested that informative censoring may have contributed, because of the high proportion of premature nilotinib progressions declared by local investigators and the design changes implemented following the interim analysis, potentially biasing PFS data in favour of the nilotinib arm. The most common adverse events were nausea, diarrhoea, and peripheral oedema in the imatinib arm and rash, nausea, and abdominal pain in the nilotinib arm. The most common serious

  20. What Are Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the GI tract, called the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs). ICCs are cells of the autonomic nervous system, the part of the nervous system that regulates body processes such as digesting food. ICCs are sometimes ...

  1. Diazepam Rectal

    MedlinePlus

    Diazepam rectal gel is used in emergency situations to stop cluster seizures (episodes of increased seizure activity) in people who are ... Diazepam comes as a gel to instill rectally using a prefilled syringe with a special plastic tip. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, ...

  2. Rectal Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters Are Associated With Long-Term Patient-Reported Gastrointestinal Quality of Life After Conventional and High-Dose Radiation for Prostate Cancer: A Subgroup Analysis of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Paul L.; Chen, Ronald C.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Trofimov, Alexei; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Coen, John J.; Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Talcott, James A.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: We examined whether rectal dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters were associated with long-term patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) quality of life (QOL) after conventional (70.2 GyE) or high-dose (79.2 GyE) radiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Of 64 men with localized prostate cancer alive with a minimum 7-year follow-up after treatment as part of a randomized trial with either 70.2 GyE or 79.2 GyE of external beam radiation at Massachusetts General Hospital, 56 men (88%) returned a QOL questionnaire, and 50 of those men had DVH information. The DVH parameters of the anterior rectal wall were correlated with patient-reported long-term GI QOL using Pearson correlation and t tests. Results: There was a trend toward an association between increased long-term GI dysfunction and higher V60 (p = 0.07), V65 (p = 0.06), V70 (p = 0.09), and V75 (p = 0.09). When dichotomized by their medians, a V60 > 54% (p = 0.04), V70 > 44% (p = 0.06), and V75 > 39% (p = 0.06) were associated with increased long-term GI dysfunction. There was no difference in long-term GI dysfunction between men on the conventional vs. high-dose arms (p = 0.49). Conclusions: Dose-volume histogram parameters of the anterior rectal wall were associated with long-term patient-reported GI QOL after prostate radiation, whereas the dose prescribed to the prostate was not, suggesting that DVH constraints, rather than total prescribed dose, may have the greatest impact on long-term bowel dysfunction, and therefore that continued dose escalation may be feasible if appropriate dose-volume constraints are met.

  3. Rectal neuroendocrine neoplasms: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) are very rare, among which second most common type is the rectal NENs in China. Patients with rectal NENs may experience non-specific symptoms such as pain, perianal bulge, anemia, and bloody stools, and surgery is considered as the first treatment for rectal NENs. We report a case of rectal NENs in a 68-year-old male patient with bloody stools, who received surgery and postoperative pathology revealed an elevated well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:28138616

  4. A rare cause of chronic rectal bleeding in children; solitary rectal ulcer: case report.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Abdulkerim; Tander, Burak; Temiz, Muhyittin; Barış, Sancar; Arıtürk, Ender

    2011-03-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer causing lower gastrointestinal bleeding is extremely rare in children. Rare presentation, non-specific symptoms, insufficient experience, and characteristics mimicking other rectal diseases may cause misdiagnosis or delay of diagnosis in some pediatric patients. Here, we report a 10-year-old boy with solitary rectal ulcer diagnosed two years after onset of the symptoms who responded well to the conservative therapy, including high-fiber diet, laxatives, defecation training, and sucralfate enema.

  5. Effects of gastrointestinal parasites on parasite burden, rectal temperature, and antibody titer responses to vaccination and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Schutz, J S; Carroll, J A; Gasbarre, L C; Shelton, T A; Nordstrom, S T; Hutcheson, J P; Van Campen, H; Engle, T E

    2012-06-01

    Thirty-three colostrum-deprived Holstein bull calves (initial BW of 131 ± 4 kg) were used to determine the effect of timing of anthelmintic administration relative to vaccination on antibody titer response to vaccine component antigens. When calves were at least 3 mo of age, they were sorted randomly into individual pens and assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups, treatments consisted of 1) dewormed 2 wk before vaccination (DPV), 2) dewormed at the time of vaccination (DV), or 3) control, vaccinated but not dewormed (CONT). All calves were inoculated with infective larvae of brown stomach worms (Ostertagia ostertagi) and intestinal worms (Cooperia spp.) on d 1, 7, 10, 14, and 18 for a total dose of 235,710 infective larvae per calf. Calves (DPV and DV) were dewormed on d 21 or 35 with a 10% fenbendazole suspension at 5 mg/kg of BW. On d 35, all calves were vaccinated with a modified-live virus respiratory vaccine containing IBRV (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus), BVDV-1 (bovine viral diarrhea virus genotype 1), BVDV-2 (BVDV genotype 2), PI-3 (parainfluenza-3), and BRSV (bovine respiratory syncytial virus). During the 103-d experiment, weekly fecal egg counts, blood, and rectal temperatures were collected and health status was recorded daily. Blood samples were obtained weekly to determine serum neutralizing (SN) antibody titers to IBRV, BVDV-1, BVDV-2, and PI-3 and cytokine levels for IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α), and IFN-γ (interferon-gamma). There was a tendency (P < 0.09) for CONT calves to have greater IL-4 concentrations. By design, control calves had greater (P < 0.01) fecal egg counts during the experiment. All calves developed antibody titers to IBRV, BVDV-1, BVDV-2, and PI-3 by d 15 postvaccination. On d 88, all calves were challenged with IBRV and blood samples were obtained on d 88, 89, 90, 93, 95, 98, 99, and 103. All calves had increased rectal temperatures during the final 7 d of the IBRV challenge. However, the CONT group had

  6. Expression of neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (CD171) in neuroectodermal and other tumors. An immunohistochemical study of 5155 tumors and critical evaluation of CD171 prognostic value in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Inaguma, Shingo; Wang, Zengfeng; Lasota, Jerzy P.; Miettinen, Markku M.

    2016-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (CD171) is a multidomain type 1 membrane glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily important in the nervous system development, kidney morphogenesis, and maintenance of the immune system. Recent studies reported CD171 expression being associated with adverse clinical outcome in different types of cancer and there has been a growing interest in targeting this cell membrane molecule on neoplastic cells by chimeric antigen receptor redirected T lymphocytes or specific antibodies. Nevertheless, conflicting results regarding the prognostic value of CD171 expression in renal cell carcinomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors were published. In this study, CD171 expression was immunohistochemically analyzed in 5155 epithelial, mesenchymal, melanocytic, and lymphohematopoietic tumors to assess its utility in diagnostic pathology and to pinpoint potential targets for CD171-targeting therapy. A newly developed anti-CD171 rabbit monoclonal antibody, clone 014, was selected from the panel of commercially available CD171 antibodies. Immunohistochemistry was performed using Leica Bond Max automation and multitumor blocks containing up to 60 tumor samples. CD171 was constitutively and strongly expressed in neuroectodermal tumors such as schwannoma, neuroblastoma, and paraganglioma, whereas other mesenchymal tumors including schwannoma mimics showed only rarely CD171 positivity. Frequent CD171-expression was also detected in ovarian serous carcinoma, malignant mesothelioma, and testicular embryonal carcinoma. CD171 immunohistochemistry may have some role in immunophenotypic differential diagnosis of neurogenic tumors and pinpointing potential candidates for anti-CD171 therapy. Though, because of its rare expression and lack of predictive value, CD171 is neither a diagnostic nor prognostic marker for gastrointestinal stromal tumors. PMID:27419370

  7. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-13

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  8. Budgetary impact of treatment with adjuvant imatinib for 1 year following surgical resection of Kit-positive localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Jaime L; Taylor, Douglas C A; Sanon, Myrlene; Coombs, John H; Bollu, Vamsi K

    2010-09-01

    Imatinib mesylate, an orally administered kinase inhibitor that targets the Kit (CD117) protein, currently has 10 approved indications including treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Treatment with adjuvant imatinib following surgical resection of localized Kit-positive GIST, the most recent FDA-approved indication (December 2008), has been shown to significantly improve recurrence-free survival (RFS) compared with surgical resection alone. Although adjuvant imatinib has proven effective in clinical trials, it is important to consider the economic impact to health plans of introducing imatinib in accordance with its new labeled indication. To evaluate the budgetary impact over a 3-year time horizon of treating patients with localized Kit-positive GIST with 1 year of adjuvant imatinib following surgical resection. A Markov model was developed to predict patients' transitions across health states defined by initial treatment (surgical resection followed by adjuvant imatinib 400 milligrams [mg] daily versus surgical resection alone), recurrence, and progression. Treatments for a first recurrence were (a) imatinib 400 mg daily for recurrences following resection only or after completion of 1 year of treatment with imatinib 400 mg daily and (b) imatinib 800 mg daily for recurrence during active treatment with imatinib 400 mg daily. Treatments for further progression were imatinib 800 mg daily, sunitinib, or best supportive care (BSC) following imatinib 400 mg per day, and sunitinib or BSC following imatinib 800 mg daily. Recurrence rates were derived from the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) Z9001 clinical trial, which compared 1 year of adjuvant imatinib following surgical resection with surgical resection only. The total number of patients with localized and surgically resected GIST (incidence rate of 0.36 per 100,000) was estimated from epidemiologic studies of GIST. Uptake of treatment

  9. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing unveils a lack of driver-gene mutations linking non-hereditary gastrointestinal stromal tumors and highly prevalent second primary malignancies: random or nonrandom, that is the question

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yung-Chia; Hsu, Hung-Chih; Chen, Jen-Shi; Chen, Tse-Ching; Wu, Ren-Chin; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2016-01-01

    The association of non-hereditary (sporadic) gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and second primary malignancies is known to be nonrandom, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, 136 of 749 (18.1%) patients with sporadic GISTs were found to have additional associated cancers, with gastrointestinal and genitourinary/gynecologic/breast cancers being the most prevalent. Gene mutations in GISTs and their associated colorectal cancers (CRCs) (n=9) were analyzed using a panel of 409 cancer-related genes, while a separate group of 40 sporadic CRCs not associated with GISTs served as controls. All 9 of the GISTs had either KIT (8 of 9) or PDGFRA (1 of 9) mutations that were not present in their associated CRCs. Conversely, all but one of the 9 GIST-associated CRCs exhibited an APC mutation, a TP53 mutation or both, while none of their corresponding GISTs harbored either APC or TP53 mutations. The genetic profile of CRCs with and without associated GISTs did not differ. Although population-based studies and case series worldwide, including ours, have unanimously indicated that the GIST-CRC association is nonrandom, our targeted ultra-deep sequencing unveiled a lack of driver-gene mutations linking sporadic GISTs to highly prevalent second primaries. Further studies are needed to elucidate other genetic alterations that may be responsible for this puzzling contradiction. PMID:27806309

  10. qPCR in gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Evaluation of reference genes and expression analysis of KIT and the alternative receptor tyrosine kinases FLT3, CSF1-R, PDGFRB, MET and AXL

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) represent the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. About 85% carry an activating mutation in the KIT or PDGFRA gene. Approximately 10% of GIST are so-called wild type GIST (wt-GIST) without mutations in the hot spots. In the present study we evaluated appropriate reference genes for the expression analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and fresh frozen samples from gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We evaluated the gene expression of KIT as well as of the alternative receptor tyrosine kinase genes FLT3, CSF1-R, PDGFRB, AXL and MET by qPCR. wt-GIST were compared to samples with mutations in KIT exon 9 and 11 and PDGFRA exon 18 in order to evaluate whether overexpression of these alternative RTK might contribute to the pathogenesis of wt-GIST. Results Gene expression variability of the pooled cDNA samples is much lower than the single reverse transcription cDNA synthesis. By combining the lowest variability values of fixed and fresh tissue, the genes POLR2A, PPIA, RPLPO and TFRC were chosen for further analysis of the GIST samples. Overexpression of KIT compared to the corresponding normal tissue was detected in each GIST subgroup except in GIST with PDGFRA exon 18 mutation. Comparing our sample groups, no significant differences in the gene expression levels of FLT3, CSF1R and AXL were determined. An exception was the sample group with KIT exon 9 mutation. A significantly reduced expression of CSF1R, FLT3 and PDGFRB compared to the normal tissue was detected. GIST with mutations in KIT exon 9 and 11 and in PDGFRA exon 18 showed a significant PDGFRB downregulation. Conclusions As the variability of expression levels for the reference genes is very high comparing fresh frozen and formalin-fixed tissue there is a strong need for validation in each tissue type. None of the alternative receptor tyrosine kinases analyzed is associated with the pathogenesis of wild-type or mutated GIST. It

  11. Ovarian mucinous epithelial neoplasm showing immunohistochemical pattern of lower gastrointestinal origin with stromal minor sex-cord elements: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Taeko; Nakagawa, Hitomi; Hachisuga, Toru

    2014-12-01

    •We report a case of an ovarian mucinous cystadenoma that exhibited extensive sex-cord differentiation.•The ovarian tumor coincided with a uterine endometrial carcinoma.•The immunohistochemical pattern of mucinous epithelium of the ovarian tumor was suggestive of lower gastrointestinal origin.

  12. Dose-escalation study of a second-generation non-ansamycin HSP90 inhibitor, onalespib (AT13387), in combination with imatinib in patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andrew J; Agulnik, Mark; Heinrich, Michael C; Mahadevan, Daruka; Riedel, Richard F; von Mehren, Margaret; Trent, Jonathan; Demetri, George D; Corless, Christopher L; Yule, Murray; Lyons, John F; Oganesian, Aram; Keer, Harold

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib can become resistant when additional mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinases KIT or PDGFRA block imatinib activity. Mutated KIT requires the molecular chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) to maintain stability and activity. Onalespib (AT13387) is a potent non-ansamycin HSP90 inhibitor. We hypothesised that the combination of onalespib and imatinib may be safe and effective in managing TKI-resistant GIST. In this dose-escalation study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of combination once-weekly intravenous onalespib for 3 weeks and daily oral imatinib in 28-d cycles. Twenty-six patients with TKI-resistant GIST were enrolled into four sequential dose cohorts of onalespib (dose range, 150-220 mg/m(2)) and imatinib 400 mg. The relationship between tumour mutational status (KIT/PDGFRA) and efficacy of treatment was explored. Common onalespib-related adverse events were diarrhoea (58%), nausea (50%), injection site events (46%), vomiting (39%), fatigue (27%), and muscle spasms (23%). Overall, 81% of patients reported more than one onalespib-related gastrointestinal disorder. Nine patients (35%) had a best response of stable disease, including two patients who had KIT mutations known to be associated with resistance to imatinib and sunitinib. Disease control at 4 months was achieved in five patients (19%), and median progression-free survival was 112 d (95% confidence interval 43-165). One patient with PDGFRA-mutant GIST had a partial response for more than 376 d. The combination of onalespib plus imatinib was well tolerated but exhibited limited antitumour activity as dosed in this TKI-resistant GIST patient population. Trial registration ID: clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01294202. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Microfluidic deletion/insertion analysis for rapid screening of KIT and PDGFRA mutations in CD117-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumors: diagnostic applications and report of a new KIT mutation.

    PubMed

    Zamò, Alberto; Bertolaso, Anna; Franceschetti, Ilaria; Weirich, Gregor; Capelli, Paola; Pecori, Sara; Chilosi, Marco; Hoefler, Heinz; Menestrina, Fabio; Scarpa, Aldo

    2007-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) frequently harbor mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes, the presence and type of which correlate with the response to the kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate. Because most GIST mutations are deletions/insertions, we used a microfluidic apparatus to detect these size variations in polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA. This approach, termed microfluidic deletion/insertion analysis (MIDIA), identified mutations in 30 of 50 DNA samples from paraffin-embedded CD117-positive GISTs (60%), comprising 25 deletions and five insertions. Sequencing of 14 MIDIA-positive samples confirmed the deletions/insertions, including two 3-bp alterations. Sequencing of all 20 MIDIA-negative samples also showed highly consistent results with MIDIA because 10 cases were wild type and eight displayed a single base substitution in which detection by MIDIA was not expected. Sequencing also revealed a 3-bp deletion undetected by MIDIA, thus establishing the resolution limit of MIDIA at deletions/insertions >or=3 bp. Denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis confirmed all mutations detected by MIDIA and sequencing. We pro-pose MIDIA as the first step in mutational screening of GIST because it allowed the detection of 75% of mutated cases (94% of deletions/insertions) in less than 30 minutes after polymerase chain reaction amplification and at a lower cost compared with denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography and sequencing, which might then be used only for MIDIA-negative cases.

  14. A new case of Carney triad: gastrointestinal stromal tumours and leiomyoma of the oesophagus do not show activating mutations of KIT and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Knop, S; Schupp, M; Wardelmann, E; Stueker, D; Horger, M S; Kanz, L; Einsele, H; Kroeber, S M

    2006-10-01

    The Carney triad is a rare syndrome of unknown aetiology, with synchronous or metachronous appearance of rare neoplasms: gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), pulmonary chondromas and extra-adrenal paragangliomas. In most cases, the Carney triad is incomplete. The combination encountered typically, GISTs and pulmonary chondromas, was also seen in our patient, a 22-year-old woman. She was diagnosed with the triad after Billroth II gastrectomy for histologically proved gastric GISTs. The diagnosis of pulmonary chondromas was confirmed by transthoracic, computed tomography-guided needle biopsy. An oesophageal leiomyoma was resected 2 years after the initial diagnosis, on suspicion of paraganglioma. The clinical course of the patient has been uneventful since. The last follow-up was carried out 6 years after the initial diagnosis. On histological examination, the cells of gastric GIST were partly positive for CD34, whereas CD117 was expressed in all areas in variable intensity and S-100 protein was negative. The oesophageal tumour was classified as leiomyoma due to strong immunopositivity for smooth muscle actin and desmin, being negative for CD34 and CD117. Two different gastric GIST lesions as well as the oesophageal leiomyoma and normal tissue were analysed for activating mutations in common hot spots of KIT (exon 9 and 11) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (exon 18), but in all probes wild-type sequences were found. These results are in accordance with the first published analyses of GIST lesions from Carney patients.

  15. A new case of Carney triad: gastrointestinal stromal tumours and leiomyoma of the oesophagus do not show activating mutations of KIT and platelet‐derived growth factor receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Knop, S; Schupp, M; Wardelmann, E; Stueker, D; Horger, M S; Kanz, L; Einsele, H; Kroeber, S M

    2006-01-01

    The Carney triad is a rare syndrome of unknown aetiology, with synchronous or metachronous appearance of rare neoplasms: gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), pulmonary chondromas and extra‐adrenal paragangliomas. In most cases, the Carney triad is incomplete. The combination encountered typically, GISTs and pulmonary chondromas, was also seen in our patient, a 22‐year‐old woman. She was diagnosed with the triad after Billroth II gastrectomy for histologically proved gastric GISTs. The diagnosis of pulmonary chondromas was confirmed by transthoracic, computed tomography‐guided needle biopsy. An oesophageal leiomyoma was resected 2 years after the initial diagnosis, on suspicion of paraganglioma. The clinical course of the patient has been uneventful since. The last follow‐up was carried out 6 years after the initial diagnosis. On histological examination, the cells of gastric GIST were partly positive for CD34, whereas CD117 was expressed in all areas in variable intensity and S‐100 protein was negative. The oesophageal tumour was classified as leiomyoma due to strong immunopositivity for smooth muscle actin and desmin, being negative for CD34 and CD117. Two different gastric GIST lesions as well as the oesophageal leiomyoma and normal tissue were analysed for activating mutations in common hot spots of KIT (exon 9 and 11) and platelet‐derived growth factor receptor α (exon 18), but in all probes wild‐type sequences were found. These results are in accordance with the first published analyses of GIST lesions from Carney patients. PMID:17021135

  16. Molecular, Pathologic and MRI Investigation of the Prognostic and Redictive Importance of Extramural Venous Invasion in Rectal Cancer (MARVEL) Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Diseases; Colorectal Neoplasms; Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous; Carcinoma; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous; Intestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Digestive System Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Digestive System Diseases; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Intestinal Diseases

  17. Guidelines for time-to-event end point definitions in sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) trials: results of the DATECAN initiative (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials)†.

    PubMed

    Bellera, C A; Penel, N; Ouali, M; Bonvalot, S; Casali, P G; Nielsen, O S; Delannes, M; Litière, S; Bonnetain, F; Dabakuyo, T S; Benjamin, R S; Blay, J-Y; Bui, B N; Collin, F; Delaney, T F; Duffaud, F; Filleron, T; Fiore, M; Gelderblom, H; George, S; Grimer, R; Grosclaude, P; Gronchi, A; Haas, R; Hohenberger, P; Issels, R; Italiano, A; Jooste, V; Krarup-Hansen, A; Le Péchoux, C; Mussi, C; Oberlin, O; Patel, S; Piperno-Neumann, S; Raut, C; Ray-Coquard, I; Rutkowski, P; Schuetze, S; Sleijfer, S; Stoeckle, E; Van Glabbeke, M; Woll, P; Gourgou-Bourgade, S; Mathoulin-Pélissier, S

    2015-05-01

    The use of potential surrogate end points for overall survival, such as disease-free survival (DFS) or time-to-treatment failure (TTF) is increasingly common in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in cancer. However, the definition of time-to-event (TTE) end points is rarely precise and lacks uniformity across trials. End point definition can impact trial results by affecting estimation of treatment effect and statistical power. The DATECAN initiative (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event End points in CANcer trials) aims to provide recommendations for definitions of TTE end points. We report guidelines for RCT in sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). We first carried out a literature review to identify TTE end points (primary or secondary) reported in publications of RCT. An international multidisciplinary panel of experts proposed recommendations for the definitions of these end points. Recommendations were developed through a validated consensus method formalizing the degree of agreement among experts. Recommended guidelines for the definition of TTE end points commonly used in RCT for sarcomas and GIST are provided for adjuvant and metastatic settings, including DFS, TTF, time to progression and others. Use of standardized definitions should facilitate comparison of trials' results, and improve the quality of trial design and reporting. These guidelines could be of particular interest to research scientists involved in the design, conduct, reporting or assessment of RCT such as investigators, statisticians, reviewers, editors or regulatory authorities. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors - quantitative detection of the Ki-67, TPX2, TOP2A, and hTERT telomerase subunit mRNA levels to determine proliferation activity and a potential for aggressive biological behavior.

    PubMed

    Kalfusova, A; Hilska, I; Krskova, L; Kalinova, M; Linke, Z; Kodet, R

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have an unpredictable biological potential ranging from benign to malignant. Molecular markers involved in the mechanisms of proliferation and cellular senescence may provide additional information about biological behavior of the tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate Ki-67, TPX2, TOP2A and hTERT mRNA expression levels in specimens from patients with GISTs to define relationships between proliferation activity and biological potential and progression of the disease. We measured Ki-67, TPX2, TOP2A and hTERT mRNA levels using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (RQ RT PCR). The highest Ki-67, TPX2, TOP2A and hTERT mRNA expression levels were found in the highly proliferative BLs (18 specimens), in comparison with GISTs (137 specimens) and LMSs (9 specimens). Patients with GISTs and adequate information about mitotic activity, tumor size and anatomical site (84 specimens) were divided into two groups - GISTs with benign (29 patients) and with malignant (55 patients) potential. We observed association between higher Ki-67, TPX2 and hTERT mRNA levels and the GISTs with malignant potential. Univariate analysis (57 patients with available follow-up information) of survival (Kaplan Meier curves method) revealed a correlation between higher levels of TPX2, Ki-67 and hTERT markers and shorter event-free survival (EFS) or poorer overall survival (OS). The results demonstrate the importance of quantitative assessment of the proliferation activity in GISTs. Proliferation markers of Ki-67, TPX2, TOP2A and hTERT are suitable markers for detection the proliferation activity and telomerase activity of these tumors. Furthermore, the assessment of TPX2, Ki-67 and hTERT expression levels is appropriate for determination of malignant potential of GISTs.

  19. Clinicopathological and molecular features of a large cohort of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and review of the literature: BRAF mutations in KIT/PDGFRA wild-type GISTs are rare events.

    PubMed

    Huss, Sebastian; Pasternack, Helen; Ihle, Michaela Angelika; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Heitkötter, Birthe; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Trautmann, Marcel; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Büttner, Reinhard; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Wardelmann, Eva

    2017-04-01

    In KIT/PDGFRA wild-type gastrointestinal stromal tumors (wt-GISTs), BRAF mutations are regarded as alternative pathogenic events driving tumorigenesis. In our study, we aimed at analyzing a large cohort (n=444) of GISTs for BRAF mutations using molecular and immunohistochemical methods. More than 3000 GIST samples from caucasian patients were available in our GIST and Sarcoma Registry NRW. Of these, we selected 172 wt-GISTs to evaluate the frequency of BRAF mutations. Furthermore, 272 GISTs with a representative KIT and PDGFRA mutational status were selected. BRAF mutational status was evaluated by high-resolution melting analysis, Sanger sequencing, and VE1 immunohistochemistry. A BRAF mutation (p.V600E) was found in 7 cases (3.9%) of the wt-GIST cohort. In 2 cases, multiple synchronous tumors harbored the same somatic BRAF mutation. VE1 immunohistochemical staining had a sensitivity of 81.8% and a specificity of 97.5% to detect BRAF p.V600E mutations. Analyzing our cases and the cases reported in the literature (n=37), the percentage of intermediate and high-risk BRAF-mutated wt-GISTs (17/31; 54.8%) was comparable to that recorded for large GIST cohorts irrespective of the mutational status. BRAF mutations are rare events in wt-GISTs, and VE1 immunohistochemistry appears to be a valuable pre-screening tool for the detection of BRAF p.V600E mutations. BRAF mutations in GISTs do not seem to have a prognostic value per se. However, as BRAF inhibition represents a therapeutic option to control disease, we suggest the assessment of the BRAF mutational status, especially in the setting of advanced GIST disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inflammatory fibroid polyps of the gastrointestinal tract: evidence for a dendritic cell origin.

    PubMed

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Antonioli, Donald A; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Shahsafaei, Ali; Odze, Robert D

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyps (IFPs) are rare mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract that consist of spindle-shaped stromal cells and an inflammatory infiltrate rich in eosinophils. Their etiology and histogenesis remain unknown. Based on previous reports of their immunoreactivity for CD34 and c-kit biomarkers, IFPs have been thought to be related to gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). After reviewing the current literature and examining IFPs at the light microscopic level, we evaluated a series of IFPs using an extensive panel of immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization markers in an effort to gain insight into their etiology and histogenesis and to determine their true relationship to GISTs. Sixteen routinely processed IFP specimens (14 gastric, 1 ileal, and 1 rectal) were immunohistochemically stained for antibodies to CD34, HMB-45, desmin, smooth muscle actin, calponin, h-caldesmon, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, S-100 protein, epithelial membrane antigen, c-kit (CD117), stem cell factor (SCF/N19 or kit ligand), p53, bcl-2, cyclin D1, and human herpesvirus-8 (HHV8). In situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA (EBER) was also performed. Ten cases were further evaluated for the dendritic cell markers fascin, CD21, CD23, and CD35. Stromal cells were diffusely positive for CD34 and fascin in all (100%) cases, and these stromal cells were, in addition, immunoreactive for calponin and smooth muscle actin in 88% and 25% of cases, respectively. CD35 was also found to be focally reactive in the stromal cells. Cyclin-D1 was overexpressed in all (100%) IFPs. All other immunohistochemical markers and EBER were negative in the stromal cells. These findings suggest that the proliferating stromal cells in IFPs are of dendritic cell origin, with some cases also exhibiting myofibroblastic features. Absence of c-kit, SCF, and h-caldesmon immunoreactivity fails to support a relationship to GISTs. We also conclude that Epstein Barr virus and HHV8 are

  1. Gastrointestinal complications of von Recklinghausen's disease: two case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, I; Dukhno, O; Ovnat, A; Levy, I

    2003-12-01

    There are few reports of the association between neurofibromatosis (von Recklinghausen's disease) and large, solid stromal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract. The prevalence of gastrointestinal involvement in von Recklinghausen's disease has been estimated at 11%-25%. Some associated gastrointestinal stromal tumours present clinically as bowel obstruction, perforation or gastrointestinal bleeding. We recently treated two patients with this condition who presented with gastrointestinal bleeding and were diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumours. We report the unique aspects of these cases and discuss the diagnostic and management problems that are posed by this unusual association.

  2. Transanal Endoscopic Operation for Benign Rectal Lesions and T1 Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Emi; Dedrye, Lieven; Vindevoghel, Koen; Nuytens, Frederiek; Pottel, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Transanal endoscopic operation (TEO) is a minimally invasive technique used for local excision of benign and selected malignant rectal lesions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility, safety, and oncological outcomes of the procedure and to report the experience in 3 centers. Methods: Retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was performed of all patients with benign lesions or ≤cT1N0 rectal cancer who underwent TEO with curative intent at 3 Belgian centers (2012 through 2014). Results: Eighty-three patients underwent 84 TEOs for 89 rectal lesions (37 adenomas, 43 adenocarcinomas, 1 gastrointestinal stromal tumor, 1 lipoma, 2 neuroendocrine tumors, and 5 scar tissues). Operative time was associated with lesion size (P < .001). Postoperative complications occurred in 13 patients: 7 hemorrhages, 1 urinary tract infection, 1 urinary retention, 2 abscesses, 1 anastomotic stenosis, and 1 entrance into the peritoneal cavity. Median hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1–8). During a median follow-up of 13 months (range, 2–27), there was 1 recurrence. Conclusion: Although longer follow-up is still necessary, TEO appears to be an effective method of excising benign tumors and low-risk T1 carcinomas of the rectum. However, TEO should be considered as part of the diagnostic work-up. Furthermore, the resected specimen of a TEO procedure allows adequate local staging in contrast to an endoscopic piecemeal excision. Nevertheless, definitive histology must be appreciated, and in case of unfavorable histology, radical salvage resection still has to be performed. PMID:28144126

  3. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  4. Irinotecan, Fluorouracil, and Leucovorin in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Liver Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  5. How Are Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... The cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes. M categories for GIST M0: The cancer has not ... lungs). Stage grouping Once the T, N, and M categories have been determined, this information is combined, ...

  6. How Are Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... targeted therapy. Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is ... 2014 Last Revised: February 8, 2016 American Cancer Society medical information is copyrighted material. For reprint requests, ...

  7. Rectal ulcer with an elusive diagnosis: all that ulcers is not Crohn disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A single rectal ulcer is an uncommon finding in children with gastrointestinal disease. Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is foremost among the differential diagnoses, a primary immunological defect should not be forgotten. Because of the paucity of literature on the association of rectal ul...

  8. Current concepts in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleshman, James W; Smallwood, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    The history of rectal cancer management informs current therapy and points us in the direction of future improvements. Multidisciplinary team management of rectal cancer will move us to personalized treatment for individuals with rectal cancer in all stages.

  9. Gastric stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Ovali, Gülgün Yilmaz; Tarhan, Serdar; Serter, Selim; Pabuşçu, Yüksel

    2005-06-01

    Gastric stromal tumors are rare neoplasms of the stomach. In this report we present a gastric stromal tumor with an exophytic growth pattern, and describe magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography findings.

  10. Pazopanib plus best supportive care versus best supportive care alone in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours resistant to imatinib and sunitinib (PAZOGIST): a randomised, multicentre, open-label phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Mir, Olivier; Cropet, Claire; Toulmonde, Maud; Cesne, Axel Le; Molimard, Mathieu; Bompas, Emmanuelle; Cassier, Philippe; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Rios, Maria; Adenis, Antoine; Italiano, Antoine; Bouché, Olivier; Chauzit, Emmanuelle; Duffaud, Florence; Bertucci, François; Isambert, Nicolas; Gautier, Julien; Blay, Jean-Yves; Pérol, David

    2016-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Imatinib followed by sunitinib and regorafenib is the standard sequence of treatment for advanced disease. Pazopanib is effective in soft tissue sarcomas but has never been assessed in advanced GIST in a randomised trial. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of pazopanib in patients with previously treated advanced GIST. In this randomised, open-label phase 2 study, we enrolled adults (aged ≥18 years) with advanced GIST resistant to imatinib and sunitinib from 12 comprehensive cancer centres or university hospitals in France and randomly assigned them 1:1 using an interactive web-based centralised platform to 800 mg oral pazopanib once daily in 4-week cycles plus best supportive care or best supportive care alone. Randomisation was stratified by the number of previous treatment regimens (2 vs ≥3); no-one was masked to treatment group allocation. Upon disease progression, patients in the best supportive care group were allowed to switch to pazopanib as compassionate treatment. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed progression-free survival, analysed by intention-to-treat. All randomised participants who received at least one dose of pazopanib were included in the safety analysis. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01323400. Between April 12, 2011, and Dec 9, 2013, 81 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to pazopanib plus best supportive care (n=40) or best supportive care alone (n=41). The median follow-up was 26·4 months (IQR 22·0-37·8) in the pazopanib plus best supportive care group and 28·9 months (22·0-35·2) in the best supportive care group. 4-month investigator-assessed progression-free survival was 45·2% (95% CI 29·1-60·0) in the pazopanib plus best supportive care group versus 17·6% (7·8-30·8) in the best supportive care group (hazard ratio [HR] 0·59, 95% CI 0·37-0·96; p=0·029

  11. Rectal Blue Nevus: Distinguishing Features of a Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Neena; McCue, Peter; Quirk, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A 26-year-old African American man with a history of depression and tuberculosis presented to the gastroenterology department after several months of rectal pain with bowel movements. Colonoscopy revealed hyperpigmentation in the distal rectum and internal hemorrhoids, which resulted in a diagnosis of blue nevi. This is only the third known description of a blue nevus involving the gastrointestinal mucosa. PMID:28008401

  12. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  13. Rectal tuberculosis in an HIV-infected patient: case report

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Marcos dos Santos Vieira; Christiano, Celso Guilherme; Lovisolo, Silvana Maria; Rosa, Vladimir Mulele Pinto Santa

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract has been increasingly affected by tuberculosis, especially in immunocompromised patients. Although strict rectal involvement is rare, the GI site mostly affected is the ileocecal region. Thus, tuberculosis should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of perianal and rectal lesions, and more so in patients infected by the HIV virus. The authors report the case of a 32-year-old man presenting a long-term history of fever, night sweats, weight loss, bloody diarrhea, fecal incontinence, tenesmus, and rectal pain. HIV serology was positive. The patient underwent anoscopy and biopsy, which disclosed the diagnosis of rectal tuberculosis. Thus the patient was referred to an outpatient clinic to follow the standard treatment. PMID:28573121

  14. Bladder urothelial carcinoma extending to rectal mucosa and presenting with rectal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Aneese, Andrew M; Manuballa, Vinayata; Amin, Mitual; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2017-01-01

    An 87-year-old-man with prostate-cancer-stage-T1c-Gleason-6 treated with radiotherapy in 1996, recurrent prostate cancer treated with leuprolide hormonal therapy in 2009, and bladder-urothelial-carcinoma in situ treated with Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin and adriamycin in 2010, presented in 2015 with painless, bright red blood per rectum coating stools daily for 5 mo. Rectal examination revealed bright red blood per rectum; and a hard, fixed, 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm mass at the normal prostate location. The hemoglobin was 7.6 g/dL (iron saturation = 8.4%, indicating iron-deficiency-anemia). Abdominopelvic-CT-angiography revealed focal wall thickening at the bladder neck; a mass containing an air cavity replacing the normal prostate; and adjacent rectal invasion. Colonoscopy demonstrated an ulcerated, oozing, multinodular, friable, 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm mass in anterior rectal wall, at the usual prostate location. Histologic and immunohistochemical analysis of colonoscopic biopsies of the mass revealed poorly-differentiated-carcinoma of urothelial origin. At visceral angiography, the right-superior-rectal-artery was embolized to achieve hemostasis. The patient subsequently developed multiple new metastases and expired 13 mo post-embolization. Comprehensive literature review revealed 16 previously reported cases of rectal involvement from bladder urothelial carcinoma, including 11 cases from direct extension and 5 cases from metastases. Patient age averaged 63.7 ± 9.6 years (all patients male). Rectal involvement was diagnosed on average 13.5 ± 11.8 mo after initial diagnosis of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Symptoms included constipation/gastrointestinal obstruction-6, weight loss-5, diarrhea-3, anorexia-3, pencil thin stools-3, tenesmus-2, anorectal pain-2, and other-5. Rectal examination in 9 patients revealed annular rectal constriction-6, and rectal mass-3. The current patient had the novel presentation of daily bright red blood per rectum coating the stools simulating

  15. GASTROINTESTINAL EOSINOPHILIA

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Li; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2007-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Gastrointestinal eosinophilia, as a broad term for abnormal eosinophil accumulation in the GI tract, involves many different disease identities. These diseases include primary eosinophil associated gastrointestinal diseases, gastrointestinal eosinophilia in HES and all gastrointestinal eosinophilic states associated with known causes. Each of these diseases has its unique features but there is no absolute boundary between them. All three groups of GI eosinophila are described in this chapter although the focus is on primary gastrointestinal eosinophilia, i.e. EGID. PMID:17868858

  16. A rectal neuroendocrine neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Varas Lorenzo, Modesto J; Muñoz Agel, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    The incidence of gastric and rectal carcinoids is increasing. This is probably due to endoscopic screening. The prognosis is primarily dependent upon tumor size, aggressiveness (pathology, Ki-67), metastatic disease and stage. However, neuroendocrine carcinoma usually behaves as an adenocarcinoma.

  17. Rectal imaging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vining, D J

    1998-09-01

    Rectal imaging has evolved substantially during the past 25 years and now offers surgeons exquisite anatomic detail and physiologic information. Dynamic cystoproctography, helical computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging, and immunoscintigraphy have become standards for the diagnosis of rectal disease, staging of neoplasia, and survey of therapeutic results. The indications, limitations, and relative costs of current imaging methods are reviewed, and advances in imaging technology that promise future benefits to colorectal surgeons are introduced.

  18. Therapeutic targeting of inflammation and tryptophan metabolism in colon and gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Srikanth; Alvarado, David M.; Ciorba, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Cytotoxic therapies cause significant side effects for most patients and do not offer cure in many advanced cases of CRC. Immunotherapies are a promising new approach to harness the body’s own immune system and inflammatory response to attack and clear the cancer. Tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway is a particularly promising target for immunotherapy. Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is the most well studied of the enzymes that initiate this pathway and it is commonly overexpressed in CRC. Herein, we provide an in-depth review of how tryptophan metabolism and kynurenine pathway metabolites shape factors important to CRC pathogenesis including the host mucosal immune system, pivotal transcriptional pathways of neoplastic growth and luminal microbiota. This pathway’s role in other gastrointestinal malignancies such as gastric, pancreatic, esophageal and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) is also discussed. Finally, we highlight how currently available small molecule inhibitors and emerging methods for therapeutic targeting of IDO1 might be applied to colon, rectal and colitis associated cancer. PMID:26297050

  19. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Zheng, L. Q.; Jiang, X. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  20. [Extragastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGIST)--a case review].

    PubMed

    Kolarík, J; Drápela, J

    2012-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. Due to the presence of thyrosine kinase receptors within the tumor tissue, GIST is thought to originate from gastrointestinal pacemaker cells, the intersticial cells of Cajal. Tumors with the same morphological and imunohistochemical characteristics detected outside the gastrointestinal tract, are called extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGIST). Biological characteristics of these tumors is uncertain and the malignancy rates are difficult to predict. Surgical R0 resection in resecable tumors is the only option with the potential for complete cure. Nevertheless, the recurrence rates are high. Adjuvant biological treatment with imatinib, a thyrosine kinase inhibitor, reduces the risk of relapses. Imatinib administration is also the principal treatment method in metastatic GIST disorders. The article offers a short and complex overview of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) problematics and presents a case report of a patient suffering from EGIST of mesocolon transversum treated by R0 resection which was performed under multidisciplinary cooperation, with a specialist follow up.

  1. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  2. Rectal contrast increases rectal dose during vaginal cuff brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Sebastia; Andres, Ignacio; Jimenez-Jimenez, Esther; Berenguer, Roberto; Sevillano, Marimar; Lopez-Honrubia, Veronica; Rovirosa, Angeles; Sanchez-Prieto, Ricardo; Arenas, Meritxell

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of rectal dose on rectal contrast use during vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB). A retrospective review of gynecology patients who received some brachytherapy fractions with and without rectal contrast was carried out. Rectal contrast was instilled at the clinician's discretion to increase rectal visibility. Thirty-six pairs of CT scans in preparation for brachytherapy were analyzed. Pairs of CTs were segmented and planned using the same parameters. The rectum was always defined from 1 cm above the cylinder tip up to 1.5 cm below the last activated dwell source position. An individual plan was computed at every VCB fraction. A set of values (Dmax, D(0.1cc), D(1cc), and D(2cc)) derived from dose-volume histograms were extracted and compared according to the rectal status. Rectal volume was 26.7% larger in the fractions with rectal contrast. Such an increase in volume represented a significant increase from 7.7% to 10.4% in all parameters analyzed except Dmax dose-volume histogram. Avoiding rectal contrast is a simple way of decreasing the rectal dose parameters of VCB, which would mean a better therapeutic ratio. Results also suggest that action directed at maintaining the rectum empty might have the same effect. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rectal culture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The test is performed to isolate and identify organisms in the rectum that can cause gastrointestinal symptoms and/or disease.

  4. Phase I Study of Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil for Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  5. A Pilot Study of the Effect of Daikenchuto on Rectal Sensation in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael; Linker-Nord, Sara; Busciglio, Irene; Iturrino, Johanna; Szarka, Lawrence A; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2016-01-31

    Daikenchuto (TU 100), a botanical agent that modulates gastrointestinal nerves, is used in the treatment of motility and functional disorders. Our aim was to study the effects of TU-100 on rectal compliance and sensation in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In 20 patients per treatment arm, we conducted a single-center, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose pharmacodynamics study evaluating the effects of TU-100, 15 g (5 g t.i.d. [means 3 times a day]), for 14-16 consecutive days on rectal compliance and rectal sensation (thresholds and sensation ratings), all measured at baseline and on the last day of medication treatment. The primary endpoint was rectal sensation thresholds and sensation ratings in response to balloon distension at 32 mmHg. Secondary endpoints were rectal compliance, sensation thresholds, ratings and tone (fasting and postprandial), bowel pattern, abdominal pain (average and worst severity) and bloating scores, IBS quality of life and safety profile. Rectal sensation ratings post-treatment were significantly associated with baseline (pre-treatment) ratings and with level of anxiety or stress recorded at the time of the sensation testing. There were no effects of TU-100 treatment on rectal sensation ratings, sensation thresholds, rectal fasting or postprandial tone, rectal compliance, bowel function, abdominal pain or bloating scores, or IBS quality of life. TU-100 did not significantly affect rectal compliance and sensation in patients with IBS in this study.

  6. A Pilot Study of the Effect of Daikenchuto on Rectal Sensation in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael; Linker-Nord, Sara; Busciglio, Irene; Iturrino, Johanna; Szarka, Lawrence A; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Daikenchuto (TU 100), a botanical agent that modulates gastrointestinal nerves, is used in the treatment of motility and functional disorders. Our aim was to study the effects of TU-100 on rectal compliance and sensation in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods In 20 patients per treatment arm, we conducted a single-center, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose pharmacodynamics study evaluating the effects of TU-100, 15 g (5 g t.i.d. [means 3 times a day]), for 14–16 consecutive days on rectal compliance and rectal sensation (thresholds and sensation ratings), all measured at baseline and on the last day of medication treatment. The primary endpoint was rectal sensation thresholds and sensation ratings in response to balloon distension at 32 mmHg. Secondary endpoints were rectal compliance, sensation thresholds, ratings and tone (fasting and postprandial), bowel pattern, abdominal pain (average and worst severity) and bloating scores, IBS quality of life and safety profile. Results Rectal sensation ratings post-treatment were significantly associated with baseline (pre-treatment) ratings and with level of anxiety or stress recorded at the time of the sensation testing. There were no effects of TU-100 treatment on rectal sensation ratings, sensation thresholds, rectal fasting or postprandial tone, rectal compliance, bowel function, abdominal pain or bloating scores, or IBS quality of life. Conclusions TU-100 did not significantly affect rectal compliance and sensation in patients with IBS in this study. PMID:26486374

  7. Rectal balloon use limits vaginal displacement, rectal dose, and rectal toxicity in patients receiving IMRT for postoperative gynecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Chia; Wuu, Yen-Ruh; Yanagihara, Theodore; Jani, Ashish; Xanthopoulos, Eric P; Tiwari, Akhil; Wright, Jason D; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel

    2017-09-01

    /inferior 2.22 ± 2.04 mm, laterally 3.41 ± 3.62 mm, and anterior/posterior 3.86 ± 3.45 mm. The avg vector magnitude was 6.60 ± 4.14 mm. For acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities, 50% experienced grade 1 toxicities and 18% grade 2 GI toxicities. For acute genitourinary (GU) toxicities, 21% had grade 1 and 18% had grade 2 toxicities. For late GU toxicities, 7% had grade 1 and 4% had grade 2 toxicities. RB for gynecological patients receiving IMRT in the postoperative setting can limit V40 rectal dose and vaginal displacement. Although V30 constraints were not met, patients had limited acute and late toxicities. Further studies are needed to validate these findings. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Marek, T A

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most important emergencies in gastroenterology. Despite this, only about 100 abstracts concerning gastrointestinal bleeding (excluding bleeding complicating endoscopic procedures) were presented at this year's Digestive Disease Week (DDW; 7-10 May 2011; Chicago, Illinois, USA), accounting for less than 2% of all presented lectures and posters. It seems that the number of such abstracts has been decreasing over recent years. This may be due in part to the high level of medical care already achieved, especially in the areas of pharmacotherapy and endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review of gastrointestinal bleeding, priority has been given to large epidemiological studies reflecting "real life," and abstracts dealing more or less directly with endoscopic management. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Gastrointestinal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Tanowitz, H B; Simon, D; Weiss, L M; Noyer, C; Coyle, C; Wittner, M

    1996-11-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is a common problem in the setting of HIV-1 infection. As patients live longer and other opportunistic pathogens are suppressed, these problems are becoming even more important in the quality of life.

  10. Gastrointestinal tattoos.

    PubMed

    Snider, T E; Goodell, W M; Pulitzer, D R

    1994-06-01

    Tattooing of the gastrointestinal tract is used to facilitate the relocation of biopsy sites or other sites of interest at the time of subsequent biopsy or surgery. Submucosal injection of sterile india ink produces a zone of blue-black coloration that is grossly visible from both the mucosal and serosal surfaces. The pathology of gastrointestinal tattoos has only been briefly mentioned previously in the medical literature. We report two cases of gastrointestinal tattooing: one that was done to mark the margin of resection in a patient with gastric lymphoma, and the second that occurred unintentionally following the administration of activated charcoal for drug overdosage in a patient with undiagnosed active inflammatory bowel disease. Unintentional tattooing of the gastrointestinal tract has, therefore, not been reported.

  11. Hereditary gastrointestinal cancer syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Lynch, Jane F; Shaw, Trudy G

    2011-07-01

    The rapid growth of molecular genetics and its attendant germline mutation discoveries has enabled identification of persons who are at an inordinately high cancer risk and, therefore, ideal candidates for prevention. However, one must fully appreciate the extensive genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity that exists in hereditary cancer. Once the causative germline mutation has been identified in a patient, high-risk members of the family can be similarly tested and identified and provided highly targeted surveillance and management opportunities. DNA testing can change the individual's presumed risk status and affect decision making by patients and their physicians regarding surveillance and management. Our purpose is to describe familial/hereditary cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, including familial Barrett's esophagus, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, familial adenomatous polyposis and desmoid tumors, Lynch syndrome, small bowel cancer, and familial pancreatic cancer. We use our discussion of Lynch syndrome as a model for diagnostic and clinical translation strategies for all hereditary gastrointestinal tract cancers, which clearly can then be extended to cancer of all anatomic sites. Highly pertinent questions from the patient's perspective include the following: What kind of counseling will be provided to a patient with a Lynch syndrome mutation, and should that counseling be mandatory? Does the proband have the responsibility to inform relatives about the familial mutation, even if the relatives do not want to know whether they carry it? Is the patient is responsible for notifying family members that a parent or sibling has Lynch syndrome? Can notification be forced and, if so, under what circumstances? These questions point out the need for criteria regarding which family members to inform and how to inform them.

  12. Therapeutic targeting of inflammation and tryptophan metabolism in colon and gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Srikanth; Alvarado, David M; Ciorba, Matthew A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Cytotoxic therapies cause significant adverse effects for most patients and do not offer cure in many advanced cases of CRC. Immunotherapy is a promising new approach to harness the body's own immune system and inflammatory response to attack and clear the cancer. Tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway (KP) is a particularly promising target for immunotherapy. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is the most well studied of the enzymes that initiate this pathway and it is commonly overexpressed in CRC. Herein, we provide an in-depth review of how tryptophan metabolism and KP metabolites shape factors important to CRC pathogenesis including the host mucosal immune system, pivotal transcriptional pathways of neoplastic growth, and luminal microbiota. This pathway's role in other gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies such as gastric, pancreatic, esophageal, and GI stromal tumors is also discussed. Finally, we highlight how currently available small molecule inhibitors and emerging methods for therapeutic targeting of IDO1 might be applied to colon, rectal, and colitis-associated cancer.

  13. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumour of The Abdominal Wall - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Sathish Selva; Padmini, R; Veena, G; Murugesan, N

    2013-01-01

    Stromal tumours occurring in areas other than the GastroIntestinal Tract (GIT) are known as Extra GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumours (EGISTs). They usually arise in the mesentery, omentum or retroperitoneum, while EGISTs which occur in the abdominal wall are very rare. Both gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) and EGISTs are histologically and immunophenotypically similar. We are reporting a case of EGIST, which occurred in the anterior abdominal wall in a twenty five-year-old female patient. The tumour was present in the right loin and imaging studies suggested that it was a desmoid tumour. It was surgically excised by doing an abdominal wall mesh repair. The histological examinations revealed a tumour with spindle cell morphology, with <2 mitoses per 50 High Power Field (HPF) and no necrosis, with tumour free margins. Immunohistochemistry was strongly positive for CD117 and Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA), while it was negative for β-catenin and S100. The patient is well post operatively and is on close follow up. EGISTs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenchymal tumours which occur in the abdominal wall, inspite of their rarity, as the high risk patients may need Imatinib chemotherapy. PMID:24551695

  15. A rare presentation of breast cancer: near obstructing rectal mass and gastric outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rachel; Mathews, Winn; Scarcliff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasizes to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are exceedingly rare. The low incidence and vague presentation of GI metastasizes often cause delay in diagnosis and treatment. Here, we present a case of metastatic breast cancer causing gastric outlet obstruction and rectal obstruction. PMID:27672104

  16. Mucoadhesion and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Varum, Felipe J O; McConnell, Emma L; Sousa, Joao J S; Veiga, Francisco; Basit, Abdul W

    2008-01-01

    The concept of mucoadhesion is one that has the potential to improve the highly variable residence times experienced by drugs and dosage forms at various sites in the gastrointestinal tract, and consequently, to reduce variability and improve efficacy. Intimate contact with the mucosa should enhance absorption or improve topical therapy. A variety of approaches have been investigated for mucoadhesion in the gastrointestinal tract, particularly for the stomach and small intestine. Despite interesting results in these sites, mucoadhesive approaches have not yet shown success in humans. The potential of the lower gut for these applications has been largely neglected, although the large intestine in particular may benefit, and the colon has several factors that suggest mucoadhesion could be successful there, including lower motility and the possibility of a lower mucus turnover and thicker mucus layer. In vitro studies on colonic mucoadhesion show promise, and rectal administration has shown some positive results in vivo. This review considers the background to mucoadhesion with respect to the physiological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract as well as the principles that underlie this concept. Mucoadhesive approaches to gastrointestinal drug delivery will be examined, with particular attention given to the lower gut.

  17. Rectal shaving for deep endometriosis infiltrating the rectum: a 5-year continuous retrospective series.

    PubMed

    Roman, Horace; Moatassim-Drissa, Salwa; Marty, Noemie; Milles, Mathilde; Vallée, Aurélie; Desnyder, Eulalie; Stochino Loi, Emanuela; Abo, Carole

    2016-11-01

    To report postoperative outcomes after rectal shaving for deep endometriosis infiltrating the rectum. Retrospective study using data prospectively recorded in the CIRENDO database. University tertiary referral center. One hundred and twenty-two consecutive patients whose follow-up observation ranged from 1 to 6 years. Rectal shaving performed using ultrasound scalpel or scissors and plasma energy in 68 and 54 women, respectively. Postoperative digestive function assessed using standardized gastrointestinal questionnaires: the Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI) and the Knowles-Eccersley-Scott-Symptom Questionnaire (KESS). Nodules were between 1 and 3 cm, <1 cm, and >3 cm in diameter, in 73.7%, 11.5%, and 14.8% of cases, respectively. They were located on the middle (49.2%) and upper rectum (50.8%). Clavien-Dindo 3a, 3b, 4a, and 4b complications occurred in 0.8%, 5.7%, 1.6%, and 0.8% of cases, respectively. Excepting two rectal fistulas (1.6%), the majority of complications were not related to rectal shaving itself. Gastrointestinal scores revealed statistically significant improvement in digestive function and pelvic pain at 1 and 3 years after rectal shaving, but not constipation. Rectal recurrences occurred in 4% of patients, 2.4% of whom had segmental resection, 0.8% shaving, and 0.8% disc excision. Three years postoperatively, the pregnancy rate was 65.4% among patients with pregnancy intention, 59% of whom conceived spontaneously. Our data suggest that rectal shaving is a valuable treatment for deep endometriosis infiltrating the rectum, providing a low rate of postoperative complications, good improvement in digestive function, and satisfactory fertility outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence and consultation behavior of self-reported rectal bleeding by face-to-face interview in an Asian community.

    PubMed

    Basaranoglu, Metin; Celebi, Selman; Ataseven, Huseyin; Rahman, Suheyla; Deveci, S Erhan; Acik, Yasemin

    2008-01-01

    Although rectal bleeding is a common gastrointestinal symptom, there are very few community-based studies, and all of these studies were conducted in the West. So far the epidemiologic characteristics of rectal bleeding have not been defined in an Asian country. We aimed to characterize self-reported rectal bleeding and its association with functional bowel disorders in Turkey. Factors affecting healthcare-seeking behavior were reviewed as well. In this study, 760 subjects were chosen randomly. Questionnaires were completed by nurses during face-to-face interviews with each participant. Of the 707 (93%) subjects included in this study, 9.5% had functional dyspepsia, 8.6% had irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 24.5% had functional constipation, and 13.8% had functional abdominal bloating. The prevalence of rectal bleeding in the previous year was 14.7%. The recent onset of rectal bleeding was 2.7%. Rectal bleeding was more common among subjects younger than 45 years. Subjects who had functional constipation or constipation-dominant IBS reported rectal bleeding more frequently than others. The rate of consultation was only 41.3% among the subjects with rectal bleeding. Subjects aged > or =45 years and who had marked bleeding or bleeding more than twice a day or fear of cancer sought healthcare more frequently than others. Rectal bleeding is as common a symptom in Turkey as in Western countries. Advanced age and fear of cancer were independent predictors of consultation behavior in this group. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. A rare association of celiac disease and rectal neuroendocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Deniz; Tanrıverdi, Özgür; Solak Özşeker, Havva; Özşeker, Burak

    2017-07-28

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated enteropathy which is triggered by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Increased risk of all gastrointestinal cancers was found during the first year after diagnosis of CD. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are a heterogeneous tumor group originating from the diffuse neuroendocrine system. Today, the incidences of both GEP-NETs and CD have increased due to the increased availability of diagnostic tools and awareness. Association of GEP-NETs with CD is rarely seen. Here we aimed to present a case in which we diagnosed CD with concurrent rectal NET. Association of CD and rectal NET has not been reported in the literature, and we believe that our case report can contribute to the epidemiological data.

  20. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Is an Independent Risk Factor for Poor Prognosis in GIST Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Li, Yuji; Dong, Ming; Kong, Fanmin

    2017-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of prognosis of GIST was used to assess the prognostic effects of hemorrhage of digestive tract induced by mucosal invasion of primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors and related mechanisms. The conclusion is that GISTs with gastrointestinal hemorrhage are more likely to recur, which indicates poor prognosis. Therefore, gastrointestinal hemorrhage may be used as a significant indicator to assess the prognosis of patients. PMID:28589146

  1. An Unusual Case of Rectal and Ileal Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abdulsamad, Molham; Abbas, Naeem; Balar, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is the most common neuroendocrine tumor affecting the gastrointestinal tract. The coexistence of multifocal carcinoid lesions is a well-established phenomenon. Although intubation of the terminal ileum is not routinely attempted during colonoscopy, it can occasionally reveal the presence of some incidental findings. We present a patient with known rectal carcinoid, who was found to have another carcinoid lesion in the terminal ileum during surveillance colonoscopy. The patient underwent right hemicolectomy, and no chemotherapy was required as the patient was found to have stage 1 carcinoid tumor. PMID:28203126

  2. Multicompartmental Pharmacokinetic Model of Tenofovir Delivery to the Rectal Mucosa by an Enema

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yajing; Katz, David F.

    2017-01-01

    Rectal enemas that contain prophylactic levels of anti-HIV microbicides such as tenofovir have emerged as a promising dosage form to prevent sexually transmitted HIV infections. The enema vehicle is promising due to its likely ability to deliver a large amount of drug along the length of the rectal canal. Computational models of microbicide drug delivery by enemas can help their design process by determining key factors governing drug transport and, more specifically, the time history and degree of protection. They can also inform interpretations of experimental pharmacokinetic measures such as drug concentrations in biopsies. The present work begins rectal microbicide PK modeling, for enema vehicles. Results here show that a paramount factor in drug transport is the time of enema retention; direct connectivity between enema fluid and the fluid within rectal crypts is also important. Computations of the percentage of stromal volume protected by a single enema dose indicate that even with only a minute of enema retention, protection of 100% can be achieved after around 14 minutes post dose. Concentrations in biopsies are dependent on biopsy thickness; and control and/or knowledge of thickness could improve accuracy and decrease variability in biopsy measurements. Results here provide evidence that enemas are a promising dosage form for rectal microbicide delivery, and offer insights into their rational design. PMID:28114388

  3. Pathological complete response in advanced gastric stromal tumor after imatinib mesylate therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are a rare neoplasm exhibiting, in most cases, mutations of c-kit. Imatinib mesylate is the standard treatment for patients who have advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Although the response rate in patients treated with imatinib mesylate in prospective clinical studies is above 50%, a complete response is very rare. We report the case of a patient with a gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor who had a pathological complete response after neoadjuvant treatment with imatinib mesylate. Case presentation We report the case of a 54-year-old Arab woman with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor who had a pathological complete response after neoadjuvant treatment with imatinib mesylate. Conclusion The pathological examination of our patient documented a complete pathological response after imatinib therapy. Recently, it has been confirmed that the kinase genotype of KIT and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α can accurately predict a good response to imatinib mesylate therapy. We propose that this patient had a mutation conferring high sensitivity to imatinib mesylate. PMID:21600007

  4. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental.

  5. [Gastrointestinal bezoars].

    PubMed

    Espinoza González, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal bezoars are a concretion of indigested material that can be found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and some animals. This material forms an intraluminal mass, more commonly located in the stomach. During a large period of history animal bezoars were considered antidotes to poisons and diseases. We report a historical overview since bezoars stones were thought to have medicinal properties. This magic conception was introduced in South America by Spanish conquerors. In Chile, bezoars are commonly found in a camelid named guanaco (Lama guanicoe). People at Central Chile and the Patagonia believed that bezoar stones had magical properties and they were traded at very high prices. In Santiago, during the eighteenth century the Jesuit apothecary sold preparations of bezoar stones. The human bezoars may be formed by non-digestible material like cellulose (phytobezoar), hair (trichobezoar), conglomerations of medications or his vehicles (pharmacobezoar or medication bezoar), milk and mucus component (lactobezoar) or other varieties of substances. This condition may be asymptomatic or can produce abdominal pain, ulceration, gastrointestinal bleeding, gastric outlet obstruction, perforation and mechanical intestinal obstruction. We report their classification, diagnostic modalities and treatment.

  6. Age and cellular context influence rectal prolapse formation in mice with caecal wall colorectal cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Tommelein, Joke; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; De Vlieghere, Elly; Wagemans, Glenn; Gespach, Christian; Boterberg, Tom; Demetter, Pieter; Ceelen, Wim; Bracke, Marc; De Wever, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In patients with rectal prolapse is the prevalence of colorectal cancer increased, suggesting that a colorectal tumor may induce rectal prolapse. Establishment of tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice after orthotopic inoculations of human colorectal cancer cells into the caecal wall is a widely used approach for the study of human colorectal cancer progression and preclinical evaluation of therapeutics. Remarkably, 70% of young mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor showed symptoms of intussusception of the large bowel associated with intestinal lumen obstruction and rectal prolapse. The quantity of the COLO320DM bioluminescent signal of the first three weeks post-inoculation predicts prolapse in young mice. Rectal prolapse was not observed in adult mice carrying a COLO320DM caecal tumor or young mice carrying a HT29 caecal tumor. In contrast to HT29 tumors, which showed local invasion and metastasis, COLO320DM tumors demonstrated a non-invasive tumor with pushing borders without presence of metastasis. In conclusion, rectal prolapse can be linked to a non-invasive, space-occupying COLO320DM tumor in the gastrointestinal tract of young immunodeficient mice. These data reveal a model that can clarify the association of patients showing rectal prolapse with colorectal cancer. PMID:27689329

  7. Accomplishments in 2008 in the Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Renouf, Daniel; Blay, Jean-Yves; Blanke, Charles

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Overview of the Disease ProcessIncidencePrognosisPredictive MarkersCurrent General Therapy Standards in North America and EuropeLocalized or Potentially Resectable DiseaseUnresectable or Metastatic DiseaseAccomplishments During the YearTherapySurgical Issues and Perioperative TherapyImatinibSunitinibNew DrugsBiomarkersBasic and Other Translational ScienceWhat Needs to Be DoneFuture DirectionsComments on ResearchObstacles to Progress PMID:20011569

  8. Rare cases reports of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    AMENDOLARA, M.; RAMUSCELLO, S.; BROGGIATO, A.; ANDREOTTI, A.; STEVANATO, G.; BONFIGLIO, M.; BERNARDI, M.; PARINI, D.; GALEOTTI, F.; RIZZO, M.

    2014-01-01

    The GISTs are rare tumours but even rarer is the localization in some districts. We reported two GISTs of the duodenum, two of the omentum and peritoneum, one of the rectum and one of a Meckel’s diverticulum. These exceptional locations are confirmed by the relative difficult diagnosis, obtained in some cases only by the surgical treatment despite the CT and MR. The endoscopy is useful in hemorrhagic and duodenum forms, only for the diagnosis and for the control of blood loss. Surgical treatment in all cases was decisive without the need to make use of adjuvant therapy, with positive long-term results, which excluded the disappearance of relapses or secondary lesions. PMID:24979104

  9. What Are the Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... often, this syndrome is caused by an abnormal c-kit gene passed from parent to child. The c-kit gene is the same gene that is mutated ( ... with neurofibromatosis (discussed below). Before tests for the c-kit and PDGFRA genes became available, some of these ...

  10. What Happens After Treatment for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as exercising, eating a certain type of diet, or taking nutritional supplements. Unfortunately, it’s not yet clear if there are things you can do that will help. Adopting healthy behaviors such as not smoking, eating well, getting regular ...

  11. [Medical treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in Japan].

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Hamada, Kazuyuki; Imataka, Hiromi

    2012-05-01

    To facilitate an optimal diagnosis and treatment of GIST in Japan, the Japanese Clinical Practice Guideline for GIST was proposed by the GIST Guideline Subcommittee. Multidisciplinary treatment planning is needed(involving pathologists, radiologists, surgeons and medical oncologists)for patients with GIST. Medical treatment is usually selected for unresectable GIST, metastatic GIST at the initial examination, and recurrent GIST. Imatinib is strongly recommended for patients with KIT-positive GIST; the standard dose of imatinib mesylate(Glivec)is 400 mg/day. For patients with imatinib-resistant GIST, Sunitinib (Sutent)is now approved in Japan and is covered by medical insurance. However, high-dose imatinib(>400mg/day)has not yet been approved in Japan.

  12. Do We Know What Causes Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene is found in all cells of the body. It directs the cell to make a protein called KIT, which causes the cell to grow and divide. Usually the c-kit gene in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) is inactive. It is only active if ...

  13. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Resources ASCRS Textbook, 3rd Edition CARSEP® CREST® Case Study Listserv International Colon and Rectal Societies and Organizations ... Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery CARSEP® Members Case Study Listserv CREST® Young Surgeons Listserv Quality Assessment and ...

  14. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. Warren; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Pog